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Pikes Peak 8.7.13

Teller County, Colorado • Volume 52, Issue 32

August 7, 2013

75 cents

A Colorado Community Media Publication

ourtellercountynews.com

Goats to the

rescue

By Pat Hill

phill@ourcoloradonews.com

I

nstead of killing weeds and polluting the air with pesticides, Darlene Kobobel, founder of the Colorado Wolf and Wildlife Center in Divide, called in the goats. In a fire-mitigation project that bypasses human labor for weed-smacking goats, Kobobel goes back to the future with a project that was once considered old news, goats in a field. “The goats take away the noxious and tall weeds,” Kobobel said. Unlike human mitigators, goats are nimble, undaunted by clumps of brush and trees. “Goats can get through every nook-and-cranny,” she said. “We’re into keeping everything as close to natural as we can, not using sprays and pesticides that get into the groundwater from the creek.” In a tiptoe-into-the-experience, 50 cashmere goats from Silver Fleece Farm in Hartsel had to be convinced that eating weeds as a do-good operation was going to be fun, worth their time. The first emerged slowly from the truck, then another, followed by the other 48, all sparking the herding instinct in Casey, the center’s rescue border-collie. In a parade to the field of weeds, with Casey keeping the goats in line, the party began. “They eat shrub oak, prefer it over grass; they’ll eat the leaves off the aspen as well as some of the branches,” said Dean Wierth, who owns the farm. “They’ll eat a half-inch a day.” The goats are multi-taskers that double as weed-killers and fertilizers. At the end of the first week in August, the goats will have chewed their way through five acres of the 70-acre center. “We’re trying to use these goats as a business,” said Wierth, who can be reached at 719-837-2836.

These cashmere goats from the Silver Fleece Farm in Hartsel are available for hire to eat noxious weeds and scrub brush.

For this cashmere goat, paradise is all about eating weeds. Little does this goat know that he is part of a fire-mitigation project to halt catastrophic fire in its tracks at the Colorado Wolf and Wildlife Center.

You want me to do what? Said the first goat of 50 to take a peek from the Silver Fleece Farm truck. The goats were charged with chewing through six acres of weeds at the Colorado Wolf and Wildlife Center. Photos by Pat Hill

Udall comes to Florissant By Pat Hill

phill@ourcoloradonews.com The Post to Parks program at Florissant Fossil Beds National Monument drew the attention of Colorado Senator Mark Udall July 27. Udall, chairman of the U.S. Senate National Parks Subcommittee, spoke to the kids about conservation as well as his work with students in Outward Bound, a program that connects youth to the outdoors. “Our military has given a lot,” Udall said. “What is sometimes forgotten is what we

ask of their families. I am proud to live in a state that provides programs like Post to Parks that not only connects Coloradans with our stunning public lands but also promotes healthier lifestyles.” The Monument has the distinction of being the first national park to create the Post to Parks program, which was inspired by rangers Troy Fuhrman and Jeff Wolin. The program gives military members and their families the opportunity to become stewards of the national parks and other public lands Sen. Udall encourages youth to get outdoors with his Kids to Parks initiative.

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Colorado Senator Mark Udall spoke to military youth July 27 at the Florissant Fossil Beds National Monument. The youth are part of the Monument’s Post to Parks program. Courtesy photo


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August 7, 2013

Ken Matthews it is for WP council By Pat Hill

phill@ourcoloradonews.com Ken Matthews can’t stay away. After four years of a political sabbatical from his position on the Woodland Park City Council, Matthews signed on to fill the vacancy left by Terry Harrison. Matthews won the appointment last week from Mayor Dave Turley and the council, one of five possible candidates that included Darwin Naccarato, John Posusta, Geoff Watson and Stephen Yoxheimer. With several hot issues coming up, including the annexation request by Teller County Waste as well as one from the Woodland Aquatic Project, Matthews is ready. “In the decision-making process you have to balance the needs of the people who live here, the people who want to live here and the business community,” he said. “You can’t just be focused on one or the other.” For the new councilor, emotion has no place in the decision process. “Take yourself out of it and make the decision based on what’s right for the community not what you personally think,” he said. In a heads-up for the council as well as the residents, Matthews can be ponderous. “I like to gather all the information first, think about it, analyze it and then make a decision,” he said. “I’ve never been one for snap decisions.” Former member of the city’s utilities advisory committee, Matthews expects water to be among the big issues for the council as well as the role of the Downtown Development Authority. “The city has always been hamstrung by not being able to offer incentives so I think the DDA is a great thing for that district because they can do incentives,” he said. “The more we can get businesses in, doing their own advertising to get people here, that helps everybody.” When it comes to zoning issues Matthews won’t be a pushover, whether it’s ruling on affordable-housing permits or the

Ken Matthews was appointed to the Woodland Park City Council Aug. 1. Matthews fills the position vacated by Terry Harrison, who was term-limited. Matthews faces an election in April if he chooses to run. Photo by Pat HIll proposed storage units just east of town. For instance, what if a resident requests a permit to turn a garage, with an upstairs area, into a mother-in-law residence, or turn a basement into apartments? “Legally, you can’t do that,” Matthews said. “Well they’re talking about trying to figure out a way to do that, to have more affordable places in town.” If granted, the change in zoning would

be multi-family rather than residential, a change that could affect the future - when the residence has a new owner, for example, he said. “The people in the neighborhood bought their residences knowing the zoning code, residential, around them,” he said. “To change the zoning after they are there is not fair. That’s my hot button.” If all the neighbors agree to the zoning change, that’s one thing, Matthews said. “Then I would reconsider,” he said. In yet another instance, several years ago a developer wanted to build a chain motel on land facing U.S. 24 just east of town. “That land was zoned commercial and the people who bought their homes knew that,” Matthews said. “But there was such an uproar from the neighbors, the motel just didn’t work back then.”

As well, a proposal to build storage units (behind the Paradox brewery) has met with stiff resistance from the neighbors. “Well, when those people bought their homes, that land was zoned commercial,” he said. “They knew that.” Matthews, a resident of Woodland Park for more than 28 years, founded the awardwinning Building Alternatives, which he sold a few years ago. Before serving on the city council, he was a city planning commissioner for 10 years and was a member of the utilities advisory committee. He and his wife Julie own The Insurance Center. Serving is part of his life philosophy. “It’s the way I’ve always been taught; if you live and work in a city, get involved,” he said. Matthews’ appointment to the council ends with the April election. He can choose to run for the position in that election.

inside the Courier VieW this WeeK Flower power in Pikes Peak area tradition. Page 10

Heritage Days in Florissant affected by rain. Page 9

Body builder turns heads. Page 18


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Pikes Peak Courier View 3

August 7, 2013

Health exchanges, here they come By Pat Hill

phill@ourcoloradonews.com

No matter what happens with the Affordable Care Act, healthcare exchanges are set to launch Oct. 1. For Teller County residents, there are no worries about how to sign up, not with the Community Partnership Family Resource Center ready to help. The center recently scored a $100,000 reimbursement grant to hire a full-time certified exchange coordinator, Chandra Breitenfeld, and a part-time assistant. “We think we can help from 600 to 1,000 people for 18 months, beginning Oct. 1,” said Karen CaseySvetich, executive director of the resource center. From the sign-up time to eligibility is three months, she added. Connect for Health Colorado, a nonprofit organization, oversees the online applications for medical insurance from companies that sign on to the program. “This opens the door for us to help people with different options for health coverage,” CaseySvetich said. In what could be a maze of online applications and decisions, Breitenfeld will be trained and certified in the exchange field for individuals as well as small businesses with two to 50 employees. units with Well, mes, said.

It’s time to consider the ins and outs of the soon-to-be launched Colorado’s health-care exchange program. Community Partnership Family Resource Center has been awarded a $100,000 grant to help Teller County residents maneuver the online application process. Pictured, the partnership’s executive director, Karen Casey-Svetich, left, and Chandra Breitenfeld, who has been hired as the center’s exchange supervisor/ coordinator. Photo by Pat Hill “If the need arises in our community, we will help small businesses figure out a way to get health coverage through this system,” Casey-Svetich said. As a nonprofit in a rural moun-

tain community, the partnership belongs to one of five Colorado information hubs, the Mountain Resource Center in Conifer which serves centers in Teller, Park, Lake and Chaffee counties.

“The people we serve in mountain rural communities, by and large, have different barriers, different challenges,” Casey-Svetich said. “The hub will provide discus-

sions and opportunities as we go along. They’re making that commitment to get their arms around everything and be a resource for us.” For the past four years, CaseySvetich and her staff have helped people sign on to receive benefits through Medicaid and the Child Health Plan Plus; the exchanges present options that include tax credits and limited subsidies. “Some subsidies, on a sliding scale, are available for families that earn up to 400 percent of the federal poverty level, which is around $60,000 for a family of two,” CaseySvetich said. As health-care costs escalate and free-market solutions remain elusive, the exchanges are expected to increase the number of people who are insured. “Are people more comfortable responding to a crisis and going to the emergency room or having insurance they could actually manage?” Casey-Svetich said. The grant enables the resource center to include an educational component to keep the exchanges in the spotlight. “Do we all need insurance and health care? Yes, everybody needs it, expensive as it is,” Breitenfeld said. “Is it the right thing? I don’t know but it’s a start at least and we’ll go from there.” For more information, call Breitenfeld at 686-0705, x 1.

It is sink or swim for Woodland Aquatic Project

Park ward-By Pat Hill h hephill@ourcoloradonews.com n the com- They’re used to it, their feelings not hurt ber ofat all. “People ask us what we’re doing,” said d hisGerry Simon, president of the board of the Woodland Aquatic Project. . “It’s Granted, after three years, the project u liveis still not off the ground. “We’ve been very d. busy,” Simon said. uncil In addition to raising $8,000 to conduct oosethe professional survey of Woodland Park residents, the WAP committee has been granted nonprofit status as a 501 ©(3) organization. However, while a majority of residents want a swimming pool the question of funding is still up in the air. In a chronology of events leading up to rubber-meets-the road, Simon goes through the good, the bad and the ugly. “We developed our own amateur business plan, which wasn’t well-received,” he said. Undaunted, the board asked for help from the city of Woodland Park. “We were rebuffed,” he said. “So we raised money, $10,000, for a professional business plan, thanks to the Holiday Home Tour (WAP was a beneficiary of the tour in December) and the Cripple Creek & Victor Gold Mining Co.” 8 Armed with funds, the board hired

DETAILS After looking at facilities around the state, the board considers a swimming pool a vital aspect of community, as it relates to:

• Health and wellness: “Swimming is one of the big-three ways of getting aerobic exercise, can be done by people who can’t run or bike, so it really serves a whole segment of people,” said Gerry Simon, president of the Woodland Aquatic Project board of directors. As well, Simon said, swimming expands exercise options during the winter months. • Economic vitality: “Having a place to swim is a consideration for young families deciding to move to Woodland Park,” he said. “We see this as a great way to turn around this trend we’ve had with declining youth in the community. Schools are hurting right now with dropping enrollment.” As an economic engine, swim meets bring in hundreds of people to the city, with the auxiliary benefit of shopping.

• Civic responsibility: “A pool is a long-time community desire and a positive venue for after-school activities, which Ballard*King and Associates of Pueblo to design the business plan. “The design team looked at our community, the size and relative affluence and was surprised that we don’t have any kind of recreational facility yet,” Simon said. In the past three years, the board has changed, with members resigning for one reason or another. Today, Simon leads the

we need because we have far too many parties on Rampart Range,” he said. As well, swimming is a required skills for the military, many of whom live in Woodland Park. “So a pool would be one of those things where we’re not just serving our community but our country as well,” Simon said.

• Public safety: “Drowning is the second leading cause of death for children under 14,” he said. • Timing: “We still have these historically-low interest rates, although they are starting to creep up,” he said. “And construction costs will probably creep up.” In another dwindling opportunity, the two-year option on land north of town, offered by Reamx owner Dana Duncan ceases in the spring. But the board has sets it site on another location. “We see this project as a great way to dovetail in to the Memorial Park facelift and also the Downtown Development Authority’s Colorado Main Street Program to build a vibrant downtown,” Simon said. current board that includes Bob Carlson (city councilor), Jackson Peters (retired Teller County judge), Nancy Sells and Steve Jeroslow as well as Daniel Carr, student advisor. “We are still very driven, still see this as a great need in terms of health and wellness, economic vitality, civic responsibility and public safety,” Simon said. “We’ve been talking to various community groups and clubs.”

But now it’s time for the final push. “We’ve gone as far as we can go without city support,” Simon said. Next month, the board expects to present a resolution asking the city to authorize a Woodland aquatic center to be approved by a vote of the people in April. “We think the money is in the budget right now,” Simon said. “If you look at the sales-revenue increase for the last year - and I’m projecting right now - it’s enough to fund what it would take to service the debt and cover the difference between operating revenue and use fees.” For Simon and the board, seeking a tax increase in April is worse-case scenario. “If the city can’t find a nickel in the city budget to fund the project, the additional revenue required would cost our citizens six cents a day per person,” he added. The resolution, if passed, would ask the city to work with the WAP to finalize a location, select a design-build team, commission a concept design, identify the right funding mix and develop ballot wording, if it comes to, Simon said. As far as location is concerned, the board is focusing on the north side of Memorial Park, at the intersection of Lake and Park streets. “We’re at a turning point here; we either proceed with city support or we may shut down for awhile,” he said.

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August 7, 2013

PIKES PEAK NEWS IN A HURRY Salute to Veterans scheduled for Aug. 16-18

ing Company (CC&V) for an update on how construction projects are proceeding. In 2012, CC&V completed the important and necessary pubic permitting process to extend gold mining operations in the Cripple Creek Mining District. Mine extension projects include: A new valley leach facility and recovery plant located in Squaw Gulch; relocation of Highway 67; new mill facility; new mining operations; and historic mining structure relocations. The presentation will overview the progress of these projects and include a discussion regarding any questions the community has about the work CC&V is doing in the “World’s Greatest Gold Camp.” This presentation, which is free and open to the public, will be at CC&V’s Visitors Center, 371 East Bennett Ave, Cripple Creek, 10:00 a.m., on Saturday, August 10, 2013, and given by Community Affairs Manger, Jane Mannon. Seating is limited, so please RSVP to 719-689-2341. For additional information, please contact: Jane Mannon, Community Affairs Manger Cripple Creek & Victor Gold Mining Company 719-686-4044 Jane@CCVMine.com P. O. Box 191 Victor, Colorado 80860

The City of Cripple Creek welcomes the Salute to American Veterans Rally August 16 - 18, 2013, for a patriotic display that recognizes those who served in our nation’s military. Saturday, the event offers an impressive parade and the 26th Annual POW/MIA Recognition Ride - Colorado’s largest procession of motorcycles. Other attractions include: POW/MIA Remembrance Ceremony POW/MIA Recognition Ride Veteran’s Parade VIP Guest Speakers Veteran’s Poker Run Aircraft Flyovers Wild West Gun Fighters Street Vendors

Donations in Hunter’s name

The family of the late Ed Hunter, who died July 7, asks that donations be made in his name to the Lowell Thomas Museum at 298 Victor Ave. Victor, CO 80860; or the Western Museum of Mining at 225 Northridge Ave., Colorado Springs, CO 80921. Hunter played a large role in both museums.

Gold mining company to present update on mine extension project Please join Cripple Creek & Victor Gold Min-

HAVE A STORY IDEA? Email your ideas to Pikes Peak Community Editor Pat Hill at phill@ourcoloradonews.com or call her at 719-686-6458.

Karen Earley, coordinator of the Senior Circle program at Pikes Peak Regional Hospital, talks about the various upcoming programs with Donna Clark, who serves as a greeter for the club that features health-related presentations and social occasions. The club has 250 members, so far. Photo by Pat HIll

Senior Circle is the place to be By Pat Hill

phill@ourcoloradonews.com In a groundswell of support, a movement in acceleration mode, the Senior Circle at Pikes Peak Regional Hospital is up to 250 members and climbing. Last month, the hospital hosted a barbecue dinner to celebrate the first anniversary of the circle that unites people who may not otherwise know one another. For Donna Clark, who at the age of 79 continues her worldwide travels, the circle events are a chance to catch up with friends while absorbing health-care information. “I love the seniors,” Clark said. “And, you know, we all need that companionship.” In a chat session with the circle’s coordinator Karen Earley and the hospital’s marketing director Eric Riggle, Clark talks about issues that concern the senior population, topics that could be discussed at future circle meetings. “A lot of seniors cannot afford nursing homes. I worry about going to a nursing home,” Clark said. “I don’t want to go. I worry about who they hire because they don’t pay them enough.” Earley agreed. “Certified nurses’ assistants don’t get paid what they’re worth,” she said. As well, seniors worry about falling or being diagnosed with Alzheimer’s Disease, Earley added. “Seniors ask a lot of questions and the doctors here are very good.”

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As far as future topics, the three tossed around several health-related ideas such as diabetes, pain management and maintaining balance. “As we age our health needs are greater in a variety of ways,” Riggle said. “So a program like Senior Circle gives them a vehicle to identify their health needs and help them work through those.” Joining the circle includes several benefits such as 20-percent discounts in the hospital’s cafeteria with chef Paddy Egan, free health screenings, support groups, medication checks and ascendance into the Very Important Patient Program, VIP, when a member is hospitalized. In a time when senior citizens have a tendency to withdraw, Clark acknowledges the reluctance they may feel about reaching out. “Oh, yes, it takes guts to go to the circle, or the senior center, because older people, especially the ones who not real outgoing, worry about not knowing anybody, wonder who they are going to sit with,” Clark said. “Once you go, you get attached to the people.” Riggle added, “Relationships are born out of that fear.” As PPRH continues to add services and treatments, the senior circle is a vital aspect of the hospital’s planning for the 21st century. According to the just-released Teller County Strategic Plan, over the next 20 years the county’s population of people aged 65 or older is expected to increase 157 percent. For information about the Senior Circle, call Earley at 686-5802.

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Pikes Peak Courier View 5

August 7, 2013

The Butte Theater: Our Local Broadway ByJenette DaPolito special to Courier

The Butte Theater in Cripple Creek is a dynamic theater overflowing with history, hard work, and jaw-dropping talent. Located on Bennett Avenue, the building itself was built in the 1890’s and has been refurbished for modern use. Several years ago it was unknown that there was ever a theater above the city’s fire station. How did they discover it? Mel Moser, the director of the theater explained “It was the city, they were renovating this whole building for the fire department and while they were tearing the walls down they came across some old playbills from the old opera house, back at the turn of the century, and they decided to renovate the upstairs space and clear some floor and make it into a theater.” It wasn’t just anyone inexperienced in the theater that took it over. Mel continued by saying, “The Mackin family who were the ones that started that classic melodrama up at the Imperial in the 40’s

which through the 90’s. But they sold the Imperial Hotel to the gaming folks, and once they did that they shut down the melodrama. So the city . . . they asked the Mackin’s to bring their melodrama troop back down to the Butte Theater once they had it renovated. So they started their long running melodrama here at the Butte, and that was in the year 2000.” Clearly the Butte is filled with rich history and theatrical heritage. Several productions are organized each year. A lot of hard work goes into such a full schedule for the theater. When asked about some challenges of putting a show together Mickey Burdick, a producer, said “It starts so early, people think you kind of show up and start rehearsals but it’s one of those things that starts in January every year and takes 4-5 months just of build-up like, marketing, building sets, and casting.” Dwelling on the challenge of casting, the actors are from all over the country. Representatives from the theater travel to several large auditions where they see

about 1,000 actors in just four days, and over 100 theaters are also represented. Has all that hard work casting paid off? It seems the answer is a resounding yes. Mel, quoted earlier, says “Last year when we did ‘My Fair Lady’ it had just come through Colorado Springs about 4 months earlier, and patrons from Colorado Springs would come up and say ‘We weren’t sure we wanted to come to this little theater to see this huge musical.’ But they love it because it’s so intimate and they’re sitting right on top of the actors and they get to see all the expressions of the actors. Some of the special effects of bigger theaters we don’t have but we do have great talent and we put on really solid shows. I think the audiences really appreciate seeing a big musical like that by a small group of actors, and on that level of talent.” Of course the actors themselves work hard on another level, they basically have three weeks of constant rehearsal before the show opens. Performing too, is physically demand-

e Rain has few friends in Ute Pass corridor

veral ment s are35,000 cars a day m likeWoodland Park ealth

through

By Sherri Albertson

h asSpecial to the Courier chef medi- Rain, rain go away! This is an odd statement to t Pa-hear from people living in Colorado, a state plagued

by drought and water restrictions, but with the with-amount of rain we’ve seen in Teller County this seafeelson and the resulting road flooding and commuter ircle,interruptions – more people are leaning in that diy therection. any- According to David Buttery, Woodland Park City said.Manager, approximately 35,000 cars traverse U.S.

24 through the city each day during the height of ar.” summer. This year’s temporary road closures in the , theUte Pass corridor have done little to impact that g fornumber, but many Teller County residents are keepoun-ing a close eye on the sky each afternoon as storm opu-clouds build and planning ahead before making a e 157trip down the Pass. Two things never thought to be

an issue before. ey at The road challenges started last year after the Waldo Canyon wildfire changed the landscape around U.S. 24 and the residents here have been dealing with the issue ever since. The Colorado Department of Transportation has been working over a year now on culvert repairs andreconfiguration and rock mitigation from Ute Pass Elementary to the west on U.S. 24 and east to RainbowFalls in Manitou to ensure that flood waters flow properly into Fountain Creek and not onto the highway and nearby property. This $2 million

dollar project is expected to be finished by the end ofsummer. “We are very happy with the quick response from CDOT during the latest flooding occurrences and the work they have done so far to correct the road issues,” said Buttery. “Bill Alspach, the City’s Director of Public Works, has been in close contact with the Region’s Supervisor of Maintenance during each incident to stay informed on corrective steps being taken.” During the recent highway closures, the City’s Facebook page “City of Woodland Park” listed several alternate routes and driving times to both reach Woodland Park and to get down to Colorado Springs. Traffic warnings signs have also been installed along Highway 24 near Crystola, Cascade and Manitou Springs to warn commuters of possible hazards during heavy rains. Teller County residents looking for traffic alerts such as road closures and flood notifications can sign up with Nixle to receive these alerts by text or email. Signing up is easy – just visit www.Nixle.com and enter your email and phone number. This service is FREE and alerts come directly from our local authorities. To help further prepare for your travels, CDOT offers several tools. For current road and weather conditions you can call 511 or visit www.cotrip. org. You can also sign up for free e-mail and text message alerts. Once you create an account, you can subscribe to the corridors and topics that apply to you and your travels. You can also join CDOT on Facebook at www.facebook.com/coloradodot or follow on Twitter @ColoradoDOT.

HAVE A NEWS TIP Our team of professional reporters, photographers and editors are out in the community to bring you the news each week, but we can't do it alone. Send your news tips, your own photographs, event information, letters, commentaries ... Please share by contacting us at news@ourcoloradonews.com and we will take it from there.

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ing “Most folks are winded just coming up the stairs to get up here [on stage], but to see these actors doing all these dances at 10,000 feet in elevation.” said Mickey Burdick. Accompanying the strenuous dancing is their seemingly effortless, yet beautiful singing. The Friday night performance of ‘Singin’ in the Rain’ received a standing ovation. Considering the wonderful acting, singing, dancing, and real rain . . . a standing ovation was the only appropriate level of praise for the production. Right now three shows are being performed on an alternating schedule including, ‘Singin’ in the Rain’, ‘Girl of the Golden West’ and ‘Star Spangled Girl’. It is impossible to overestimate the fun and enjoyment you’ll experience attending just one Thin Air Theatre Company production be it with your family, a friend, or even by yourself. Surely, an evening enjoying fine entertainment at the Butte Theater can be placed as a top priority for us all.

Sheriff tracks arsonist, crime down in TC By Pat Hill

phill@ourcoloradonews.com After more than a year of no good news on the multiple arsons last summer in Teller County, Sheriff Mike Ensminger has a solid report. “We feel confident that we have presented a good case to the District Attorney’s office,” he said. “They’re evaluating the case right now to see if we can move forward with prosecution.” While no arrests have been made, Ensminger remains hopeful with this latest break in the case. The arson case is unrelated to the small fires that broke out around the county this summer, fires that the sheriff’s office attributed to carelessness. In other good news from the sheriff’s office, the deputies have done 3,400 after-hours checks on businesses. “Our checks have cut down on burglaries,” he said. On another note, by the end of July the deputies had done 1,200 patrols on houses whose owners requested vacation checks. “We have really picked up our subdivision patrols and business checks,” Ensminger said. “These checks are having an impact on our crime rate here.” Three months ago, a robbery of a Wells Fargo branch in Colorado Springs led to a house in Teller County. “We were able to obtain a search warrant and retained a lot of stolen property from burglaries that happened in Teller County in 2012,” he said. While several of the alleged burglars are in jail in Teller County, the

case remains open, he said. In line with a national trend, DUI arrests are down by about 10 percent this year, Ensminger said. “The state patrol has beefed up their patrol and I think people are starting to get the message,” he added. On the other hand, domestic violence cases are up by about 10 percent. “But we haven’t had any domestic-violence that involves guns,” he said. As El Paso County has experienced a rash of home invasions, Teller County has not. “We’re keeping our fingers crossed,” Ensminger said knocking on his wood desk. But one case remains elusive, the murder of John Hogan in 2011 in the Holiday Hills area. “We have had a perjury conviction on the case but we’re still working on the homicide case,” he said. The sheriff credits the relationship with entities in the 4th Judicial District for cracking cases that involve multiple agencies. “We’re constantly calling them or they’re calling us, which has a tremendous impact on us being able to resolve crime in Teller County,” he said. As well, the sheriff relies on observations from the public that have helped solve crimes or keep people safe. “The advantage that we have in Teller County is the cooperative effort between the community and us, particularly with the fires and the quick response,” said Ensminger, referring to several fires that broke out accidentally around the county this summer. “They see something that looks like smoke and they call us; if it doesn’t turn out to be anything we don’t care.”


6-Opinion

6 Pikes Peak Courier View

August 7, 2013

opinions / yours and ours

Empty seat in photo forces reckoning of sorts This story first appeared in the Denver Post when I served on their Voices panel in 2004. I stared at the photo of my buddies at the football game for the longest time without realizing what was wrong. Something was missing. Then, after tossing the photo on the scanner, the image software forced me to put a name to the puzzle. “Where’s Leavell?.jpg” the label now reads. In the photograph there is an empty seat in the front row on the right-hand side. A brain tumor killed our friend Lynn Leavell more than six years prior, but that didn’t stop him from leading us home. Lynn was our quarterback for the Dolores Bears in 1978 and ‘79. He later coached, taught and served as principal in Akron, Colo. In November, Dolores and Akron met leading up to the Colorado Single A football quarter finals. If played in Akron, the game would have been played on Lynn Leavell Field. But in Dolores that fall, Lynn reined in absentia over an important homecoming. When I showed up at the game in November, it was out of respect for Lynn’s

memory and the circular coincidence surrounding a Dolores/Akron playoff game. Others, I think, showed too, for similar reasons. His cousin Scott Weinmaster, picked me up in Colorado Springs in a rental car after a flight to Denver from his home in Florida. We spent a lot of time talking about Lynn, on the way down to Dolores, and then with others when we arrived. To us he was not really a hero figure but just an above average cat. In examining the hole he left in our lives, we struggled for a better grip on understanding our own existence. In the words of our coach, Carl Rice, “Lynn’s talent was that he was cool under

The trip over the Pass When General Palmer was starting to build the Denver and Rio Grande, he built south from Denver toward Mexico. He hired a number of surveyors to look at various routes. He had traveled the area only a few years before and was well familiar with it. As his surveyors traveled, camps in the mountains were starting to attract attention. The Denver and Rio Grande filed a formal plan of intent to build, in their original charter. It featured a number of possible extensions into the mountains during 1871 preliminary rough surveys were done on these, and a few other lines. One of the proposed routes given a preliminary look was west from Canon City through the “big canyon” on the Arkansas west of Pueblo. It would be quite valuable in the future. Getting into the mountains was a challenge. There were few places south of Denver that looked to be a good path for a railroad. In Colorado City, the Indians had a path that followed a high valley into the mountains. It was one of a few ways to get west from the plains. The Indian trail was too steep for a railroad, but it met Fountain Creek after only a few miles, and from there it was easy and gentle. To improve travel in the area, General Palmer hired a grading team to look at widening the path of Fountain Creek. A better road was scouted through the narrow gorge of the creek west of Colorado City. A road started taking shape, blasted from the granite walls along the creek. In

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places the precarious ledge was barely wide enough for one wagon. The trail was finally finished, but the decision to build a railroad in the canyon was shelved. The route eliminated the climbing the long hill, and cut about a mile from the trip. The road would allow freight wagons, even though it was still steep and winding. When Dr. William A. Bell, Palmer’s close friend scouted the area above the pass he found quite a timber resource, quite the thing needed to build a town. As gold was discovered at the headwaters of the Arkansas River, this new road from Colorado City became the best path from the prairie to Leadville. It wound over the Hayden Divide, across South Park and split into a variety of trails to the Arkansas River. In a few years the railroad was finally finished to Leadville, but it followed the Arkansas River from Pueblo. Another railroad started in Colorado City building up Ute Pass ten years later, called the Colorado Midland, which got the towns in Ute Pass started.

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Columnists and guest commentaries The Pikes Peak Courier View features a limited number of regular columnists, found on these pages and elsewhere in the paper, depending on the typical subject the columnist covers. Their opinions are not necessarily those of the Pikes Peak Courier View. Want your own chance to bring an issue to our readers’ attention, to highlight something great in our community, or just to make people laugh? Why not write a letter of 300 words or fewer. Include your full name, address and the best number to reach you by telephone.

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pressure and the most stoic youngster I have ever met.” He was a planner who usually had a laser beam focus. He set his goals early and often. As a result, he generally had a pretty good success ratio, and a facade of at least appearing calm. His public persona was of one of a man way beyond his years. It was as if he knew his ticket was punched for the matinee only. Lynn was also an assistant coach in Akron under Rice. Carl Rice now lives, coaches and serves as principal in Yuma, Colorado. “He was like a son. I was and am proud of him. His flaws, like all of ours, are better left to the wind,” says Rice. “We each have a responsibility to teach honor within the confines of our own life.” “He was his own worst enemy because he acted like he needed nothing but he needed support so much he felt guilty. You guys think he was different than you. I don’t see him that way. He just didn’t ask as much.” But as usual, in that November, we were asking a lot from Lynn and his memory. Dolores football and seeing old friends was

one thing. But personally, I hoped for connection. The kind of connection to a group where you can finish each other’s stories — even if you haven’t seen other members of the group in more than 20 years. As we settled into old familiar roles, I found some of that connection. At one point, in an argument with Weinmaster and James Biard about what to make of Lynn’s death, I asked for peace. I think they both misunderstood me. I wanted peace, not in the sense that he was gone, and I needed to accept it. But peace in what his absence represented. With Lynn’s absence—without him being in the picture anymore— two lessons were driven home with the force and violence of helmet-on-helmet, head-on tackling drills. First, that life is short and you need to make the most of it. And related to that, we would never again be 17-years-old, with plans to live forever. We would never again be connected by the same passion and change. I, for one, find no peace in that. The empty seat in photo still brings me great saddness.

The ticking you hear could be your biological clock In a quiet moment, with no one else around, have you noticed a ticking? It just might be your biological clock. I’m not talking about the biological clock that sends 39-year-old women scurrying to have a baby or the clock that’s ticking for all of us that tells us “time’s up.” I’m talking about the biological clock that drives our circadian rhythms, the roughly 24-hour cycle of physical, mental and behavioral changes that influence sleep patterns, hormone release, body temperature, hunger and much more. According to the National Institute of General Medical Sciences, circadian rhythms respond primarily to the light and darkness in an organism’s environment and are found in most living things, including animals, plants, insects and many tiny microbes. The study of these cycles is known as chronobiology. The biological clocks that control these rhythms are groupings of interacting molecules in cells throughout the body. A “master clock,” consisting of 20,000 nerve cells, resides in the brain and coordinates synchronizing the various body clocks. When our circadian rhythms aren’t in sync, there’s trouble. Abnormal rhythms have been associated with insomnia, obesity, diabetes, depression, bipolar disorder and seasonal affective disorder (SAD). WebMD lists shift work, pregnancy, time zone changes, medications, seasonal changes and changes in one’s routine as the main factors responsible for circadian rhythm disorders. The good news is that researchers funded by the National Institute of Health are in the process of identifying the genes and proteins that run biological clocks and are starting to figure out how they keep the body’s daily cycles synchronized. Scientists have long suspected that diabetes, obesity and other metabolic disorders were linked to problems with biological clocks and new scientific findings are supporting this theory. Researchers at the University of California, San Diego have isolated a protein that helps keep the liver’s production of

Letters PoLicy The editor welcomes signed letters on most any subject. Please limit letters to 300 words. We reserve the right to edit for legality, clarity, civility and the paper’s capacity. Only submissions with name, address and telephone number will run.

glucose in sync with our fasting at night, while we sleep, and our eating during the day. The hope is that a drug can be developed that would control that protein providing a new approach for treating diabetes. By studying the genetic sleep codes of fruit flies, a well-established organism for studying genetics that actually have a sleep pattern similar to humans, researchers at Rockefeller University hope to better understand how our genes control sleep. Better sleep would be great news for the estimated 70 million Americans with sleep-related disorders, especially given insomnia’s link to hypertension, diabetes, depression and cancer. For those frequent flyers that suffer jet lag, scientists at the University of Massachusetts Medical School and the University of Washington are studying hamsters exposed to conditions that advance or delay their biological clock in hopes of developing more effective jet lag remedies. And it’s not just humans who have garnered the attention of chronobiologists. Many organisms use their biological clocks to measure changes in the seasons. This process is especially important for plants, including the ones we harvest. Researchers anticipate that one day they may be able to manipulate the growing of crops. Do you hear the ticking now? Cord Prettyman is a certified Master Personal Trainer and the owner of Absolute Workout Fitness and Post-Rehab Studio in Woodland Park. He can be reached at 687-7437 or by email at cordprettyman@msn.com.

MaiL, e-MaiL or fax to:

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Pikes Peak Courier View 7

August 7, 2013

Insurance companies and wildfire risk Companies are quick to say conditions are unacceptable By Melena Slavins Dozens of homeowners received letters from their insurance stating the company is concerned with the wildfire risk in the area and are not renewing their insurance policy. Each company expects thousands of brush inspections to roll in over the short Colorado summer, many of them with unacceptable conditions. Companies are quick to say conditions are unacceptable. Yet as one homeowner, Don Jones said, “They are very vague when it comes to what is acceptable.” And he is exactly right. Speaking in comfortable anonymity, an underwriter said, “We can’t tell you what is acceptable, we can only advise you on what is not.” Why are they doing this? Insurers are attempting to get a handle on how much risk they are exposed to. Colorado’s recent and frequent hail storms and catastrophic fires have done a number on

the insurance industry’s profitability. Because everybody’s money is pooled into a lump sum and not making as much in investments or interest as once did, insurance companies are watching every dime — more so than usual. One terrible catastrophe can wipe out insurance profits for the last 10 years. The inspections are designed to measure the risk each property poses; it is up to the homeowner to reduce the risk to an acceptable level or to shop around for a company willing to accept the risk as it is. Typically, agents recommend calling the local fire department or forestry service for mitigation tips or hiring a local fire mitigation tree service. Insurance agents are good at helping families understand the risks they have and protecting them from the bad effects of those risks, not cutting down trees or fighting wildfires. Colorado author, wife of an insurance agent, and wildfire survivor, Linda Masterson wrote Surviving Wildfire to fill the gaps between what your agent knows and tells you and what happens when you actually use your insurance. A Firewise property is one that fire fighters are willing to spend resources to save it-

getting a free mitigation evaluation today could save your property in the future. The evaluation should look at how closely trees are spaced, assess fuel sources around the home and consider the geography and environment around your property. If you pay someone to do the work, ask for an invoice and signed letter that addresses each concern your insurance company gave you. Have the company representative list any credentials they may have. Plan ahead if you do it yourself, have a place to take slash off site. The Divide Slash site charges $6 per pickup truck load of clean slash, they are open Friday through Sunday from 9-3 until November 10th. Check them out at www.divideslashsite. com. Rocky Mountain Insurance Information Association, www.rmiia.com is a great place to find tips on how much defensible space you need. RMIIA has a free download called Are you Wildfire Ready? Carole Walker, spokeswoman for RMIIA, said she’d like to see communities get involved from the ground up, starting with homeowners and neighborhoods. Roxborough Park, a Douglas county

community, became a Firewise community in 2007. Ms. Walker and others in the insurance business have hinted at state and county level efforts to require mitigation through building codes and ordinances. Fire mitigation is a community concern just as wildfire is a community risk. Fires do not respect property lines. Yet, maintaining a private property boundary is important and many homeowners with a healthy fear of being shot for trespassing are reluctant to cross over onto neighboring lots and understandably balk at the expense of cleaning up property that isn’t their responsibility. With as many as 25% of homes in the area insured as vacation or 2nd homes, some homeowners face absentee neighbors and have little recourse in sharing costs and work if they want to keep their coverage. Current regulations hinder homeowner’s ability to properly mitigate around their property which borders forest lands; however, congressional efforts are underway to find a solution for mitigating public lands. We’d appreciate your thoughts and suggestions on possible solutions to address our community’s risk for wildfire and how to handle community mitigation efforts.

Coloradans are key in fixing immigration It’s not often we witness Colorado’s high-tech innovators, third-generation farmers, prominent business executives, traditional faith leaders, aspiring young immigrants and leading law enforcement officials uniting behind a common cause. It is even less likely in Washington, D.C., for Republicans and Democrats from across the nation to come together to tackle a complex national crisis and write a landmark bill with bipartisan support. The long and tireless work of these unlikely allies culminated in the immigration bill the United States Senate passed with a broad, bipartisan vote earlier this summer. The bill will strengthen our economy and secure our borders. It will establish a sensible and rational system for the flow of future immigrants, put in place a process to reunite families and provide a tough but fair path to citizenship for millions of people who came to this country for a better life but are living in the shadows of our society. The long road to Senate passage began for our office roughly two years ago with the Colorado Compact. We brought together people from throughout the state of different backgrounds, industries and perspectives to talk about the challenges of the current immigration system. Every member of this diverse coalition shared their frustration with our current immigration system and said that it was fundamentally broken. Traveling around Colorado you’ll see these frustrations exemplified. Farmers on the Western Slopes and Eastern Plains watch their crops wither on the vines because they can’t hire the workers they need to harvest them.

Ski resorts and our tourism industry struggle with an unworkable system for their seasonal workers. Start-up and high-tech business owners watch as we educate the world’s best and brightest in our schools of higher ed and graduate programs only to send them back to their own countries, where we then spend the next 20 years competing against them for the ideas and intellectual property our schools help instill in them. The Senate immigration bill streamlines the visa system and aligns it with the needs of our businesses, while still protecting American workers and jobs. Our flawed system has also left 11 million people in the shadows with few options and no opportunity. That’s bad for our economy as Americans try to compete with undocumented workers who are often paid under the table, driving salaries down. It’s also bad for families, when parents live in fear of being deported and separated from their American-born kids. The tough but fair path to citizenship in the Senate bill provides a sensible solution. Undocumented immigrants must pay taxes, pay a fine, learn English and stay out of trouble with the law to access this

LETTER TO THE EDITOR Barber thanks the community for tree project

Dear Editor, On behalf of Welcome Home Warrior, my husband Bob and I would like to express our sincere thanks to everyone who supported our “Warrior Tree Project.” So many people got involved it would be impossible to mention everyone by name so we ask you to accept our thanks through this letter to the Courier View. Some of the people and organizations who demonstrated their community spirit or showed their support for our needy soldiers are: everyone who worked so diligently to make and tie the ribbons; Peoples Bank, our host which provided refreshments for these ribbon-tying seminars; the high-school wrestlers who zip-tied the ribbon bunches on the 50-foot cords; Curt from Excel Service Plus, who provided and went skyward on the cherry picker to attach the ribbons to the tree; and Pat at the Courier for her co-opera-

tion. The spirit was shown in other ways by people who deserve recognition; the child who donated 25 cents from his meager funds, the unemployed veteran who sent two dollar bills in the mail, and the nameless person who left a nice note and a donation on the windshield of my car in the grocery store parking lot. Everyone who donated their time, energy and funds deserves a special thanks. Doesn’t it feel good to know that you are providing a helping hand to a soldier, a veteran or one of their children to return to a normal life after the sacrifices they have made on our behalf? Remember you can always make a donation to Welcome Home Warrior at PO Box 7217, Woodland Park, CO 80863 On behalf of our Military and Veterans, thank you, Sincerely, Doloretta and Bob Barber

path, which can’t be completed until the bill’s border security measures are in place. The border security measures were crafted under the leadership of Senators John McCain and Jeff Flake, Republicans from Arizona. If anyone knows a thing or two about what it’s like to live next to a border, and what border security our nation needs, it’s these two. The border security measures include unprecedented steps to make our borders stronger than ever: doubling the number of border agents, completing 700 miles of fencing and adding new technology to

provide 100 percent surveillance. As a member of the group of eight lawmakers who drafted this bill, I am grateful for the input and feedback Coloradans gave us during the process. We came together to fix a broken system and address one of our nation’s major challenges. Now, we’re on the doorstep of success; Colorado needs the House of Representatives to take action and pass a bill so we can solve these problems for our economy and our communities. Michael Bennet is a Democrat who has represented Colorado in the U.S. Senate since 2009.

OBITUARIES SHRUM

Michele Irene Shrum

December 15, 1967 – July 26, 2013

Michele married Scott Shrum on May 22, 1999 in Moline, Illinois. She was a devoted wife, loving mother and Pediatric Home Health Nurse who was dedicated to caring for the most ill, homebound children. She will be deeply missed by her loving husband, Scott Shrum; son, Michael; daughter, Emily; step-son, Jonathon of Iowa; father, Gary (Vicki) Ketchum of Indiana; mother Doris Ketchum of Indiana; grandmother, Mildred Headlee of Indiana; sisters, Melissa (Steve) Mason of Indiana, Melanie Barnes of Colorado, and Marsha (John) Jones of Michigan, as well as nine nieces and nephews. Visitation was July 31, 2013 at The Springs Funeral Services, 3115 East Platte Avenue, Colorado Springs, Colorado, 80909 Funeral Services were held August 1, 2013 at Impact Christian Church 27400 North Highway 67, Woodland Park, Colorado 80866. Arrangements by: The Springs Funeral Services, www.tsfs.co

RenteR

Arvilla J. (Kitty) Renter

Arvilla J. (Kitty) Renter passed away Monday, July 29, 2013. She is survived by her husband, Vern, his daughter Christie, his sons Brian and Donnie, and her son Joe. She will be laid to rest at Divide cemetery. There will be a memorial service in her honor at Our Lady of the Woods Church in Woodland Park, Saturday August 10th, at 10:00 AM. Arrangements Mountian Memorial Funeral Home Divide CO.

Local Focus. More News. 23 newspapers & websites. Connecting YOU to your LOCAL community.

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Private Party Viola Ortega 303-566-4089 obituaries@ourcoloradonews.com

Funeral Homes www.memoriams.com


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8 Pikes Peak Courier View

August 7, 2013

Western literature festival brings authors to Cripple Creek August 10 Special to Courier View Historical romance writer Mona Hodgson, author of the “Sinclair Sisters of Cripple Creek” series, will be celebrating the launch of a new series at the Cripple Creek District Museum’s Western Literature Festival from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday, Aug. 10 at the museum. Hodgson, who lives in Cottonwood, Arizona, will join several local Colorado authors whose books also will be featured at the festival. Most of the writers will be present to autograph copies of their works, which include a range of fiction and nonfiction books set in the historic Cripple Creek dis-

trict and drawing on its rough-and-tumble Gold Rush history. The four books in the Sinclair Sisters series, Two Brides Too Many, Too Rich for a Bride, The Bride Wore Blue and Twice a Bride, each include a true historical female character in addition to the romantic adventures that the fictional sisters have in the 1890s mining town. Hodgson’s new book, Prairie Song, set for release Aug. 6, is the first of her new series, “The Quilted Heart.” Colorado authors of mystery and suspense will also be featured. Historian Bert Entwistle’s The Drift weaves timelines from the present and past into a thriller that races through the mines below the Cripple

Creek district’s surface. John Sharpe, president of the nonprofit museum’s board of directors, has crafted a witty, action-packed mystery, No More Bull, around the character of a western veterinarian who is having a hard time giving a damn until a series of tough circumstances force him to take action to save his reputation and his life. For those who prefer their history factual, the festival also features new and classic nonfiction. Books by the late historian Leland Feitz, including Cripple Creek: A Quick History, will be available. Sylece Andromeda of Cripple Creek offers an impressive set of true tales collected from the region’s miners in her 2012 book, Hardrock

Man: Whispers from the Cripple Creek District Underground. And Hereford Vernon “Bud” Peiffer of Victor, Colo., recounts the story of three generations of Peiffers in the district in his memoir, A Short History of a Long Life. District resident Herb Boyce is featured with his fiction, Kill the Boomers, and also a true story, Land of the Morning Calm, under the pen name Harry Bryce. The Western Literature Festival is part of a special day of events for the museum, located at 5th Street and Bennett Avenue. At 7 p.m., the play “Mr. & Mrs. Wyatt Earp: The Sunset Years” will be performed at the Imperial Hotel’s Gold Bar Room Theater as a fundraiser for the museum.

Kitchen show comes to Woodland Park Mr. & Mrs. Wyatt Earp bring historic By Cynthia Sipes

Special to the Courier Woodland Park is abuzz and excitement is in the air. On Friday, August 2, 2013, the Fox Television Network announced that “Kitchen Nightmares” with Gordon Ramsay is taping an episode locally for its sixth season. August 6 – 9, Ramsay and his team will be in Woodland Park, taping his show at Mangia Mangia. Ramsay is known for many shows including Kitchen Nightmares, Hell’s Kitchen and Master Chef.

A Scottish chef, who owns many restaurants, he has been awarded 15 Michelin stars (currently holds 14). Mangia Mangia is a local Italian restaurant boasting “Handmade Italian Cuisine in a family friendly environment.” It is located at 407 E. Grace Avenue in Woodland Park. They take reservations, have a call ahead take out and pick up drive-thru window, cater, and provide pasta, seafood and sandwiches. Hours are 11 am – 9 pm Fox is requesting that the local community book a reservation for while the show is filming by e-mailing woodlandrest@gmail. com.

drama to Gold Bar Theater August 10 Special to the Courier The Players and the Play: In a benefit performance for the Cripple Creek District Museum, Wyatt and Terry Earp of Phoenix will be presenting their two-person play, “Mr. & Mrs. Wyatt Earp: The Sunset Years” at 7 p.m. Saturday, Aug. 10, in Cripple Creek. The Old West gambler and lawman, Wyatt Earp, and his third wife—born Josephine Sarah “Sadie” Marcus—are portrayed near the end of their lives, each recounting independently the blessings and curses of their 47 years together, living on the risky edge of the American frontier in Kansas, Colorado, Arizona, California and Alaska. Playwright Terry Earp, a native of Pueblo, Colo., and her husband, Wyatt, the greatgrandnephew of the Tombstone, Ariz., deputy town marshal, have created and performed similar historical dramas since 1996, presenting hundreds of performances in the United States and Europe. Terry’s scripts have won ariZoni awards for theater excellence, and reviewers frequently note the striking resemblance between Wyatt, a retired insurance agent, and his famous namesake. Severely injured when struck by a car while bicycling in 2006, Terry Earp now uses a wheelchair onstage. The Gold Bar Room Theater: The intimate sharing between the characters and

the audience finds an appropriate setting in the revitalized Gold Bar Room Theater at the Imperial Hotel, 123 N. Third St. in Cripple Creek. Once the site of Wayne and Dorothy Mackin’s 1948 revival of theater in the goldmining district through the return of oldtime melodrama, the Gold Bar now hosts a busy lineup of acts, with full details posted at its website, GoldBarTheater.com. The 150-seat theater offers an open bar for the show, which runs about 90 minutes and includes one intermission and a time to meet and greet the players afterward. Purchase Tickets from the Museum: Order tickets in advance for $15 each by phoning the Cripple Creek District Museum at (719) 689-9540 and paying with your credit or debit card. Or mail your check and ticket order to the museum at CCDM – Ticket Order, PO Box 1210, Cripple Creek, CO 80813. Proceeds benefit the nonprofit museum. The Cripple Creek District Museum, founded in 1953, preserves and presents the district’s Gold Rush history in a complex that includes the 1895 Midland Terminal Railway Depot, the Colorado Trading & Transfer Co. store, an authentic Assay Office and numerous indoor and outdoor displays. The museum is open every day through mid-October.

‘Benefit for the Black Forest’ announces entertainment lineup Doug Kershaw, Grass It Up and Wendy Woo to headline Special to the Courier The Black Rose Acoustic Society, announces that world-renowned fiddle legend Doug Kershaw has agreed to entertain at the Benefit for Black Forest concert Saturday, Aug. 24 at the Wonderland Ranch at 8798 Hodgen Road. Eleven bands will entertain on two stages plus there will be food, beverages, and outdoor activities for all ages from 11 a.m. to 7 p.m. “One-hundred percent of the proceeds will go to Tri-Lakes Cares to be distributed directly to Black Forest residents impacted by the fire,” said Black Rose President Jeff Smith. The event has been dubbed as, “Music in the Forest, for the Forest.” Gates open at 10 and the music starts at 11 a.m. Admission is $20 in advance, or $25 the day of the show. Children under 12, Black Forest residents who lost their homes, and firefighters will be admitted free. Tickets are available on the Black Rose Acoustic Society website at www.blackroseacoustic.org. “We are truly honored to have a legend like Doug Kershaw agree to play for this benefit,” said Smith. “Not many musicians

can say they’ve had one of their hit songs broadcast back to earth by Apollo astronauts on a moon mission, but Doug Kershaw is one who can.” In addition to Kershaw, other acts slated to perform are Wendy Woo, Moors & McCumber, Mango fan Django, Charlie Hall and Friends, The Wielands of Mass Destruction, Skean Dubh The Blue Fenders, The County Line Ramblers, and local bluegrass sensations, Grass It Up. Smith said the fundraiser will have a festive, outdoor picnic atmosphere. “There will be non-stop music alternating on two stages, plus children’s activities, a petting zoo, food and beverages, volleyball, horseshoes, Bluegrass music, Cajun music, Celtic music, folk music, country music, Americana, and lots of family fun, so bring your lawn chair and blankets and spend the afternoon.” Smith encourages people to purchase advance tickets to streamline the entry process at the gate. Proceeds from the Benefit for Black Forrest will be handled by Tri-Lakes Cares. TriLakes Cares will be accepting donations of can goods, clothing, personal hygiene items, household items, other non-perishable items, and monetary donations. For more information about how to donate, go to: www.tri-lakescares.org or call Carrie Pendergast at 719-481-4864 x110.

Have an event? To submit a calendar listing, send information to calendar@ourcoloradonews.com or by fax to 303-566-4098.


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Pikes Peak Courier View 9 WE WOULD LIKE TO ANNOUNCE

August 7, 2013

0

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Accepting new patients and getting acquainted with existing ones

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Families enjoy wagon rides at the Florissant Heritage Day Saturday, July 27th. The wagon rides were provided by M lazy C ranch free of charge to festival goers.

Florissant Heritage Day rained out Success despite soggy conditions By N. W. Oliver

Special to Courier On Saturday, July, 27, the town of Florissant invited visitors to celebrate with them the rich history of the area. The first event, a pancake breakfast offered, began at the Florissant Fire House at 7 a.m. and ran until 11 a.m. Florissant Fire Corps Coordinator, Brooke Alstatt reported increased turnout, more businesses contributing, and an impressive volunteer force. The fire department had 62 businesses from Woodland Park, Cripple Creek, Divide, Florissant and Lake George donate 117 items for a silent auction to raise money. “The pancake breakfast prep starts approx two months in advance,” says Alstatt; “and on average, a lot of our volunteers spend over 100 hours on it.” The massive task of cooking pancakes, eggs, sausage, biscuits and gravy for over 600 people was accomplished by fewer than 25 volunteers but “we always need more volunteers,” Alstatt says. According to Alstatt, Costello’s Coffee House donates the coffee every year and most of the food is donated by a distributor in Colorado Springs. The proceeds of the breakfast go to the Florissant Fire Protection District for equipment and operation costs. Festivities at the Florissant Grange No. 420 began at 9 a.m.where burgers, brats and hot dogs were served all day. According to Event Coordinator, Renee Caldwell, 800-900 people came to the Grange on Heritage Day; nearly 200 more than last year. “We did well, not fantastic, but well…other than the weather, there were no problems. A severe thunderstorm accompanied by very strong winds threatened to pick up several of the vendor tents between 1:45 and 2 p.m. and essentially ended the event. The Florissant Grange hoped to raise money for a new roof said

Richard Cashow (top left), Nancy Cashow (top right), David Spannaus (bottom left), and Tanya Spannaus (bottom right) show up to the Florissant Grange #420 in their pioneer costumes at Florissant Heritage Day. Photos by N. W. Oliver Caldwell. Despite the event being cut short, she was optimistic that the guests that left because of the storm would return to the Grange and to next year’s Heritage Day. “Everyone had a lot of fun, the play was great and the volunteers were fantastic, I’m sure they will be back,” she said. The main stage included musical acts by the Elbert Sisters and Rich Currier. Mel March did not have time to play due to the rain. Cowboy poet Susie Knight had her audience in stitches and the historic play produced by the 20 Years on the Trail performers delighted the audience on the stage set up within the Grange hall.

Free Presentation 10 AM, Saturday, August 10

Magician Dwayne Faux was also cut from the lineup due to the rain. Vendors and crafters sold handmade crafts, precious rocks and raffle tickets. Despite the day being cut short, sales were good according to the vendors who stayed long enough to see the festival goers’ “mass exodus” to the parking lot. The others packed up their tents and trucks during the storm. At the Hornbek Homestead, in the Florissant Fossil Beds National Monument, volunteers dressed in period clothing to demonstrate period crafts, lead pioneer games, churn butter, and bake bread using a wood-burning stove.

Presentation Topic: Mine Extension Project Community Update Location: CC&V Visitor Center 371 East Bennett Ave Cripple Creek, CO Space is limited: RSVP to 719-689-2341 Connect & Comment at:

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Pikes Peaklife 10-Life-Color

10 Pikes Peak Courier View August 7, 2013

Wildflowers

in your hair

Watchers and preservationists have long, local history By Rob Carrigan

rcarrigan@ourcoloradonews.com

T

hough it may be a surprise to no one, wildflower watchers and preservationists have a long history in the Pikes Peak Region. The earliest recorded non-native activity in the area was the Army’s Major Stephen Long Expedition of 1820, which discovered the Colorado State Flower, the white and lavender Columbine, somewhere between Monument and Palmer Lake. “The white and lavender Columbine, Aquilegia caerulea, was adopted as the official state flower on April 4, 1899 by an act of the General Assembly. In 1925, the General Assembly made it the duty of all citizens to protect this rare species from needless destruction or waste. To further protect this fragile flower, the law prohibits digging or uprooting the flower on public lands and limits the gathering of buds, blossoms and stems to 25 in one day. It is unlawful to pick the Columbine on private land without consent of the land owner,” according to the the Colorado Department of Personnel and Administration. In June of 1820, Major Steven Long and 22 men left what is now Nebraska to explore the source of the Platte River. After more than three weeks of crossing the tall grass prairies of eastern Colorado, the expedition finally reaches the base of Pikes Peak. Major Long was anxious to continue, but was persuaded by Dr. Edwin James, a naturalist with the expedition, to wait a couple days. James wanted the delay so he could climb Pike’s Grand Peak. Long reluctantly agreed and provided Dr. James three days to climb the peak, make his observa-

Lupine near Green Mountian Falls.

To paraphrase Alice Walker, it makes God mad if you walk by the color purple in a field somewhere if you don’t notice it. tions and return to camp. Dr. James and two men reach the summit on the afternoon of the second day and spend only an hour on the summit before it is time to start the trip back down. James returns to Long’s encampment in time to make the prescribed deadline, having managed to scale the mountain. In addition, he made extensive notes in his journal and documented examples of previously unknown plants and flowers, including Colorado’s state flower, the blue Columbine. Long was so impressed, he named the mountain for him, declaring it James Peak, but, of course, it didn’t stick. In the 1890s, Edlowe, near Woodland Park, was one destination of the Wildflower Excursion run by the Colorado Midland. The Wildflower Excursion carried passengers from Colorado City to Edlowe who were interested in picking the ubiquitous blue columbines in the area. One favorite destination, the meadow west of Edlowe, was used on almost all of the excursions according to Mel McFarland, in writings from 1980. The Wildflower was one of the Colorado Midland’s popular excursions, according to Celinda Kaelin in her book “Pikes Peak Back Country.” Dr. H.A. Burton, whose father was a Colorado Midland engineer related the following: “The Midland’s famous Wildflower Excursions proved to be a source of summertime spending money for the children of Florissant. We boys looked forward eagerly to the summertime tourist season and the daily and the daily operation of the flower train.” According to advertisements running in Colorado Springs papers, a one-day trip left Colorado Springs at 8:45 a.m and turned around at west end of Eleven Mile Canyon, returning to the Springs by 5 p.m.

Tied-dyed color on a mat of green, near Green Mountain Falls. Early in the rail road’s history, wild flower excursion trains ran up Ute Pass conducted by the Colorado Midland. Photos by Rob Carrigan

Indian Paintbrush in the hills near the Air Force Academy.


11-Color

Pikes Peak Courier View 11

August 7, 2013

Volunteers fill gaps in sheriff’s office By Pat Hill

phill@ourcoloradonews.com Burglars, thieves, speeders and other scofflaws are in the sights of the sheriff’s posse, volunteers who keep an eye on things that seem off-kilter. For some unfortunate burglars in Divide a few years back, the posse spelled doom for the ringleaders. “We decided to do a saturation patrol; the only way we could do that was with the help of our volunteers, our posse and reserves,” said Teller County Sheriff Mike Ensminger. As a result, the burglaries in that area stopped. Armed with a sense of responsibility while displaying the old team spirit, the posse perpetuates the myth of the Old West while filling in the blanks of modern-day lean budgets. “In the first six months of the year, we put in 1,780 hours,” said George Long, retired Colonel in the U.S. Air Force. “Most of us are in excess of 70 years old.” In addition to zeroing in on burglars, paving the way for arrests by sheriff’s deputies, the posse is everywhere, whether it’s a routine traffic patrol or casing neighborhoods on the lookout for people up to no good. The sheriff’s posse is highly visible. “We are at every public event

In a place with dozens of community events, the sheriff’s posse is at every one, whether it’s Teller County, Woodland Park, Cripple Creek, Florissant or Victor. As well, the posse keeps vigilance over areas where something appears suspicious. Pictured with Teller County Sheriff Mike Ensminger are from left, Maurice Loehner, George Long, Ensminger, and Charlie Vervalin. Photo by Pat Hill in the county, including the Touch a Truck for kids, Donkey Derby and Gold Rush days, the Bike Rodeo and the Biker Rally, for instance,” Long said. The posse is diverse, a mixedbag, Long said. “We have two Ph.D.’s, several retired police of-

ficers and firefighters,” he said. “We have a lot of talent and experience, people of varied interests who like to volunteer.” Posse volunteers receive 200 hours of training. Currently, there are 20 members, 15 of whom are active. “We support the boss in

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whatever he wants us to do,” Long said Ed Zupancic of Florissant, retired officer from the Detroit Police Department, founded the posse and continues to attend the regular meetings. Under his direction, the posse today includes the

Honor Guard, which appears at every military funeral in Divide. “I’m proud of that,” Long said. For Ensminger and the deputies, the volunteers cover spots in emergencies such as dispatch and fire calls as well as the Pikes Peak Hill Climb. “We don’t charge for our services,” Ensminger said. “But the cities are generous with their contributions which help buy uniforms for the posse.” The posse members are not armed but have the use of radios to call in suspicious incidents. “It’s a tremendous blessing to have these guys,” Ensminger said. “They’re just so happy to be doing this and nobody ever comes to work as a posse member who doesn’t want to be here.” In addition to the posse, the sheriff’s reserve officers are volunteers. Unlike the posse members, the officers are Post-certified (Peace Officer Standards and Training) and are allowed to carry guns. The officers are trained on-site at the academy at the sheriff’s office in Divide. To date, the sheriff’s office has 10 reserve officers, some whom are retired military, who are part of two-man patrol units. “A lot of time the reserves will use the position as a stepping stone for a full-time position,” Ensminger said.


12-Color

12 Pikes Peak Courier View

August 7, 2013

Proceeds from the festival are donated to Rock Ledge Ranch Historic Site. The event is put on by Club Nine, a non-profit consisting of local civic-minded chefs. They donate the proceeds from Fiddles, Vittles and Vino to further agricultural programs at Rock Ledge Ranch.

Fiddles, Vittles and Vino

Fiddles, Vittles and Vino is an annual event at Rock Ledge Ranch Historic Site on the west side of Colorado Springs. This year’s classic took place July 28.Photos by Bob Macdonald

Fiddles, Vittles and Vino is an annual event at Rock Ledge Ranch Historic Site on the west side of Colorado Springs. This year’s classic took place July 28. Venders come from around the Pikes Peak area and allow guests to sample their foods and wines. The event was also marked by bluegrass music and other happenings unique to the ranch that was built in the 1870s.

Venders come from around the Pikes Peak area and allow guests to sample their foods and wines. The event was also marked by bluegrass music and other happenings unique to the ranch that was built in the 1870s.


13-Color

Pikes Peak Courier View 13

August 7, 2013

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14

14 Pikes Peak Courier View

August 7, 2013

Tires aren’t always tires By Pat Hill

phill@ourcoloradonews.com

Recycled tires get a makeover this month when the tires become mulch as a base for the playground in Cripple Creek. The tires were once used on the heavy equipment at the Cripple Creek & Victor Mining Co. which donated the tires as well as the processing by Western Tire Recyclers. Courtesy photos

A+ Rated

In the new-age world of recycling, where almost everything can be transformed into something else, a playground in Cripple Creek is soon to be filled with a form of old tires. From tires to mulch for the playground on Bennett Avenue, the idea was proposed by Gary Horton, environmental coordinator with the Cripple Creek & Victor Mining Co. As a result the mine donated the tires, the mulch and the process to the city’s parks and recreation department, a donation valued at $28,000. “The mulch is ADA-accessible, safer, cleaner, wears better and doesn’t attract insects,” said Connie Dodrill, the department’s executive director. Dodrill looks up toward heaven when talking about the donation, which included the process by Western Tire Recyclers in Tremonton, Utah. “We are so ever-grateful to the mine,” she said. “This gift is huge.” The gift is indeed huge, as it includes 77,000 pounds of mulch, or 30 tons delivered in one-ton bags.

For an entertainment venue that attracts children all day, from 6 a.m. to 8 p.m., the mulch is environmentally-friendly as well as a playground enhancer that replaces sand. “Sand tends to blow away, or get hard,” Dodrill said. Yet the sand is also being recycled. “We’re putting the sand in front of the greenhouse and the basketball court and skate park,” she said. In what Dodrill hopes will be a mulchspreading community event, she is calling for volunteers to show up at the park with shovels, rakes and gloves at 7:30 a.m. Aug. 27 to work alongside the staff from Rockledge Landscaping and Maintenance in Colorado Springs. “The mulch just brings the playground up to a higher standard,” Dodrill said. “It makes the playground more attractive, safer and requires less maintenance.” Last year, Horton launched the playground tire\connection in Wallace Park in Victor. According to information provided by the parks department, nearly 300 million tires are dumped every year all over the United States. Those tires will still be here 100,000 years from now, unless they are recycled into mulch or water tanks for livestock.

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See Us For:

Kids who come to the playground on Bennett Avenue in Cripple Creek have a magnificent view of the city. This month, the playground gets a sprucing up with recycled tires forming the base of the playground, thanks to a donation by the Cripple Creek & Victor Mining Co.

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Woodland Park Hwy 24 & Chester . . 687-6682 open: M-F 7:30 aM – 5:30 PM • SaT 7:30 aM - 4:00 PM

aUSTIn BlUFFS Austin Bluffs & Barnes . . 599-4555 FIllMorE Fillmore & Prospect . . . . . . . . 520-0722 FoUnTaIn / WIdEFIEld N. of Walmart on Camden . . . . . . . . . . 392-4203

MonUMEnT Safeway Center . . . . . . . . 488-2299 PoWErS CEnTEr Powers & Palmer Park . . 550-1840 SoUTH nEVada 2 Blocks South of I-25 . . 473-7089 WoodMEn road Woodmen & Rangewood . . 268-9988

T h e T e a m yo u T r u s T

The Business Buzz features news about the economic scene, promotions, acquisitions and expansions. Contact Pat Hill at phill@ourcoloradonews.com or 687-3006. Carol and Eddie Sturman, founders of Sturman Industries, recently hosed a natural-gas retreat in Woodland Park. Participants hailed form major natural-gas supplies, whose combined net income in 2012 exceeded $39 billion. At the retreat, the participants discussed opportunities for growing natural-gas engine use through the implementation of engine controls. Andersen Consruction donated a portion of the construction costs of the rebuild of the two buildings purchased by the nonprofit organization, the Community Cupboard, whose executive director is Janey Child. Teller County Waste donated the dumpsters for the project while the RE-2 School District donated food for the volunteers. The organizatin recently opened in the new location on north Colo. Highway 67. According to the Roshek Report, 66 homes sold in Teller County and Ute Pass in June. Of 38 homes sold in Woodland Park, the highest-priced, at 1050 Park St., was $475,000, the lowest, at 380 Paradise Cr.#C-4, was $60,000. In Divide, of 13 homes sold, the highest-priced, at 1080 Casntiberry Rd., was $660,000, the lowest, at 753 Will Stutley Dr., was $79,600. In Florissant, of 14 homes sold, the highest-priced, at 1048 Comanche Tr., was $460,000, the lowest, at 236 Obsidian Dr., was $73,500. In Ute Pass, one home sold, at 9010 Mountain Rd., for $469,500. Cripple Creek & Victor Gold Mining Co. holds a public presentation on the mine-

Zach Pope is the new manager at Papa Murphy’s in Woodland Park. A five-year employee of the restaurant, Pope now works for Papa Murphy’s International whose regional manager is Damir Vojvodic.

The city of Victor is distinguished by its mining history as well as its Victorian architecture. extension projects; a new valley leach facility and recovery plan in Squaw Gulch; the relocation of Colo. 67; the new mill facility and the relocation of the historic-mining structure. The presentation is at 10 a.m. Aug. 10 at the CC& V’s Visitor Center at 371 E. Bennet Avenue in Cripple Creek. Jane Mannon, Community Affairs Manager, will give the presentation. For reservations, call 689-2341.


15

Pikes Peak Courier View 15

August 7, 2013

Tiny old town is nucleus of faith The dim alcove sits to the side of the altar, kept cool by its old adobe walls. A young woman stoops through the low doorway, followed by her three children and her mother. She bends and scoops some of the soft, fine dirt from the small hole in the center of the floor with her fingers. She rubs her hands together, then caresses her mother’s hair with the dusty mist and kisses her forehead. “So you get better,” she says. They step into a narrow anteroom, flanked on one side by a wall quilted with photographs of men, women and children who have come searching for healing and on the other by countless canes and walkers left behind by those who believe they found it. In the bright sunlight just outside the church, Yvonne Roberto, 39, stands with her children, her mother, Rosa María Hernandez, 69, and her father, Joe Hernandez, 75. It has been 22 years since Yvonne last visited the Holy Dirt Room at El Santuario de Chimayó — the Sanctuary of Chimayó — in this small New Mexico town. Her mother’s illness — and her belief — have brought her back. “I’m not really looking for a miracle,” she says. “I’m just hoping it helps my mother better deal with her illness. I’d like her to be happy, instead of sad all the time. She knows she’s sick.” Yvonne pauses, glances at her mother. “She cries all the time.” Rosa María has Alzheimer’s. She believes the dirt can heal. And so, fueled by faith, the family drove six hours from El Paso, Texas. “I am a very religious person,” Rosa María says, nodding, the eyes beneath her sun hat solemn. “I pray.” As the family strolls away, Yvonne reaches for her mother’s hand.

••• The two-lane road that leads to the simple adobe and wooden church runs north, about 30 minutes from Santa Fe, through a vast, desolate horizon in the foothills of the Sangre de Cristo mountains. Pinyon pines and Russian olive trees splotch the dry, austere landscape with dark green and silver gray. The tiny, historic community of Chimayó, founded in the 17th century by

Spanish settlers, is known for its Hispanic and Tewa Indian arts, weaving, red chile and sheep-raising, among other longtime traditions. About 200 years ago, it also became known for the miraculous physical and spiritual healings said to have occurred at the site where a wooden crucifix was discovered in the ground. Some 300,000 people from throughout the world and representing myriad religions visit each year, seeking to sate curiosity or petition for the blessings of la tierra bendita, the sacred earth, that encased the cross. Because in this place — where history, culture and spirituality entwine so thickly they cloak you like a blanket — many believe in miracles. A sign just beyond the church points up a bumpy, rock-pocked road. Fifth-generation woodcarver, it says. That’s Patricio Chavez, 39, a woodcarver of santos — saints. He is a direct descendant of local friar Bernardo Abeyta, who discovered the cross that led to the building of the Catholic santuario in 1816 on land considered hallowed by Native Americans. He shares an art studio with his wife, also an artist, who traces her roots in this village back eight generations. They live in the modest house next door, which has been handed down by Chavez’s family through the ages. He’s not sure if the dirt has healing powers. “I think it’s what you bring to the church, not what you take,” he says. But Patricio, an affable father of three with an easy smile, believes in faith and, therefore, in the possibility of miracles. There was the gentleman about to have his hand amputated because of illness, he says, who after rubbing dirt on it, still had his hand a year later. Some, the santuario’s website says, believe the dirt will alleviate arthritis, paralysis, sadness and other physical and emotional afflictions. Some

Things To do

Aug. 8 AARP dRiveR safety program for the 50-plus driver is from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Aug. 8 at the Woodland Park Public Library. Hone your safe driving skills, and maybe save money on your car insurance. Must register by calling 719-687-9281, ext. 114. Cost is $12 for AARP members and $14 for non-members. Aug. 8 inteResting women. Learn about Doc Susie and other Early

Colorado Women Doctors at 6:30 p.m. Aug. 8 at the Woodland Park Public Library. Doris McGraw, a historian who specializes in Colorado history, will present this interesting program that illuminates the life of one of Colorado’s most interesting women. Call 719-687-9281 ext. 132.

Aug. 9

ant, CAndye KAne concert. Candye Kane performs at 8 p.m. Friday, hose Aug. 9, at the Crystola Roadhouse, 20918 HWY 24, Woodland Park. Tickets are $18 advance general admission and $38 VIP (includes reserved seat and choice of prime rib or catfish dinner). Tickets may be purchased on line at www.amusiccompanyinc. com or at the Crystola Roadhouse. For more information contact A Music Company Inc. at 719-576-5945 or Crystola Roadhouse at 719-687-7879.

Aug. 9, Aug. 23 meet AuthoRs. Meet two authors: First is Mona Hodgson, who lives in Arizona and has written a series set in Colorado titled “Sinclair Sisters of Cripple Creek.” She has also written children’s books. Mona will be at the Lake George Library at 10 a.m. Aug. 9 to kick off Colorado month. The second author will be Linda Womack, who lives in Colorado and has written a new book on Colorado hotels. Yes, she is related to the famous Womack of Cripple Creek. Linda will be at the library at 9:30 a.m. Aug. 23. Both authors will talk about writing and characters and gathering information. Brunch items will be provided by the Friends of the Lake George Library for both dates, along with coffee, tea and juice. Aug. 10 FRee touRs. The Ute Pass Historical Society offers free public tours of History Park the second Saturday of the month from June through September. The next tour is Aug. 10, and it starts at 10 a.m. Come explore the museum buildings, and learn some of

the history of Ute Pass. The historic walking tour of downtown Woodland Park meets at 10:30. Both tours begin at the Museum Center, 231 E. Henrietta Ave., next to the Woodland Park Public Library. The gift shop in the Museum Center building will also be open from 10 to 3. Contact UPHS at 719-686-7512 or e mail uphs@peakinter.net for information.

Aug. 10 woodlAnd musiC Series. Shades of Blue featuring Dotsero, Gentle Rain Band, Tribe with Susan Rissman and A stick, A Pick and A Chick Plus One is from 9:30 a.m. to 3 p.m. Aug. 10 on the green at Ute Pass Cultural Center, 210 E. Midland Ave., Woodland Park. Visit www.woodlandmusicseries.com. Aug. 10 Quilt show. The seventh annual show of Woodland Park’s Quilter’s Above the Clouds Quilt Guild, “Quilts in the Aspens,” is from 9 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Saturday, Aug. 10, at the Woodland Park Middle School, 600 E. Kelly Road. More than 100 quilts will be displayed including traditional bed-sized quilts, lap quilts, wall hangings, art quilts and Pinwheel Mystery quilts. Admission to the show is $2; children under 12 years are free.  Area individuals or quilting groups are invited to enter a quilt into the show.  Entry fee is $5 per quilt (limit 2 quilts).  Entry forms are available at local quilt shops or at www.quiltersabovetheclouds.org.  Quilt check-in will take place at Nuts and Bolts, 200 Chestnut Street in Woodland Park on Thursday, August 8 from 1-6 PM.  Quilters Above the Clouds is a 501-3c non-profit organization dedicated to promote quilting and sewing arts through educational programs, quilting challenges, sharing of ideas and projects and construction of quilts for donation.  The guild meets monthly to learn new quilting techniques and includes quilters of all skill levels from novice to master. For quilt show information, contact Betty at 719-687-0104 or getkings0104@msn.com. thRough Aug. 14 volunteeR oPPoRtunites. The start of the 2014 school year is just around the corner and Junior Achievement will be back in action in the Teller County schools. If you are interested in volunteering in the classroom to help teach students about financial literacy and entrepreneurship, contact Sherri L. Albertson, Teller County area coordinator, Junior Achievement of Southern Colorado Inc., at 719-650-4089 or via email to sherri.albertson@ ja.org.

say it will cure cancer. “I hear the stories,” Patricio says. “There’s something going on.” But a less extraordinary miracle, perhaps, can be found in the way faith inspires perseverance in those who, as Patricio says, carry heavy burdens: The mother on a quest to visit all the chapels and churches in New Mexico to help her son in prison. The father, who has walked the 88 miles from Albuquerque to the santuario every year since his son died in the Vietnam War. In 2004, Patricio was one of six artists who renovated the historic wooden altar screens, or reredos, in the santuario. Pushed into the cracks and crevices, they discovered letters, locks of hair, notes, necklaces, dollar bills — the offerings left behind in supplication. You may not believe in miracles. But, Patricio says, “You have to believe in faith — it’ll ultimately save you.”

••• The church is quiet and cool. Behind the altar is a tall wooden screen, painted in greens, reds and blacks and gilded with gold, that surrounds the crucifix Abeyta is said to have found. More reredos with images of saints adorn the walls. Light filters through a stained glass window, and several women and an elderly priest sit in the wooden pews reciting the rosary. The Holy Dirt Room — also known as the Pocito, the little well room — can be reached through a door off the altar. Although some believe the well replenishes itself, it is commonly known that the dirt is brought in from nearby hills and blessed by a priest. Still, an intense reverence fills this

space. A frail, elderly woman, helped by her daughter, bends slowly, with difficulty, her hand trembling slightly and reaching for the silken dirt in the hole. She clutches a small fistful and wrings the dirt through her hands. “Gracias a Dios,” she whispers. Thanks be to God. They slowly walk out, the daughter gently supporting her mother. Ross Milliken, 58, and his girlfriend, Julie Rom, 53, enter and glance quietly around the room. At the poem on the wall: “If you are a stranger, if you are weary from the struggles in life, whether you have a handicap, whether you have a broken heart, follow the long mountain road, find a home in Chimayó ….” At the hole in the floor: As they leave, Ross bends and lets his fingers briefly brush the dirt. The couple has stopped here on their way home to Fort Collins from a wedding in Santa Fe. They are Christians, they say, not Catholic, but they like the spirituality of Catholic tradition. As for the dirt, “I think that people have faith, and it’s faith that heals,” Julie says. “Whether it’s the dirt or not, it’s the faith that heals them.” Ross agrees. But he acknowledges he felt moved to touch the blessed dirt. “There might,” he says, “be something to it.” There just might. Ann Macari Healey’s column about people, places and issues of everyday life appears every other week. She can be reached at ahealey@ourcoloradonews.com or 303-5664110.


$445,000.00

16 Pikes Peak Courier View

Outstanding Principal Balance:

16 $ 1 4 7 , 1 7 4 . 5 1

Pursuant to C.R.S. §38-38-101 (4) (i), you are hereby notified that the covenants of the deed of trust have been violated as follows:

Pursuant to C.R.S. §38-38-101 (4) (i), you are hereby notified that the covenants of the deed of trust have been violated as follows:

Failure to obtain a Certificate of Occupancy and complete construction as required by the Deed of Trust and other violations of the terms thereof.

Failure to pay principal and interest when due together will all other payments provided for in the Evidence of Debt secured by the Deed of Trust and other violations of the terms thereof.

THE LIEN FORECLOSED MAY NOT BE A FIRST LIEN.

THE LIEN FORECLOSED MAY NOT BE A FIRST LIEN.

THE PROPERTY DESCRIBED HEREIN IS ALL OF THE PROPERTY ENCUMBERED BY THE LIEN OF THE DEED OF TRUST.

THE PROPERTY DESCRIBED HEREIN IS ALL OF THE PROPERTY ENCUMBERED BY THE LIEN OF THE DEED OF TRUST.

LOT 7, SUNNY GLEN RETREAT SUBDIVISION, COUNTY OF TELLER, STATE OF COLORADO

Public Trustees Public Notice NOTICE OF SALE (CRS §38-38-103) Foreclosure Sale No. 2013-0034 To Whom It May Concern: This Notice is given with regard to the following described Deed of Trust: On May 10, 2013, the undersigned Public Trustee caused the Notice of Election and Demand relating to the Deed of Trust described below to be recorded in the County of Teller records. Original Grantor: ELSIE ROBERTA FURNISS Original Beneficiary: BANK OF AMERICA, N.A. Current Holder of Evidence of Debt: GREEN TREE SERVICING LLC Date of Deed of Trust: 6/17/2009 Recording Date of Deed of Trust: 6/24/2009 Recorded in Teller County: Reception No. 627610 Original Principal Amount: $234,300.00 Outstanding Principal Balance: $218,033.62 Pursuant to C.R.S. §38-38-101 (4) (i), you are hereby notified that the covenants of the deed of trust have been violated as follows: Failure to pay principal and interest when due together will all other payments provided for in the Evidence of Debt secured by the Deed of Trust and other violations of the terms thereof. THE LIEN FORECLOSED MAY NOT BE A FIRST LIEN. THE PROPERTY DESCRIBED HEREIN IS ALL OF THE PROPERTY ENCUMBERED BY THE LIEN OF THE DEED OF TRUST. LOT 28, BLOCK 3, HIGHLAND LAKES SUBDIVISION FILING NO. 1, COUNTY OF TELLER, STATE OF COLORADO which has the address of: 488 Maroon Lake Cir Divide, CO 80814-9703 NOTICE OF SALE The current holder of the Evidence of Debt secured by the Deed of Trust described herein, has filed Notice of Election and Demand for sale as provided by law and in said Deed of Trust. THEREFORE, Notice Is Hereby Given that I will, at 10:00 a.m. in the forenoon of September 11, 2013, at the Teller County Public Trustee’s Office, 101 W. Bennett Ave., Cripple Creek, Colorado, sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder for cash, the said real property and all interest of said Grantor(s), Grantor(s)’ heirs and assigns therein, for the purpose of paying the indebtedness provided in said Evidence of Debt secured by the Deed of Trust, plus attorneys’ fees, the expenses of sale and other items allowed by law, and will issue to the purchaser a Certificate of Purchase, all as provided by law. First Publication: 7/17/2013 Last Publication: 8/14/2013 Published in: Pikes Peak Courier View Dated: 5/14/2013 ROBERT W. CAMPBELL Teller COUNTY PUBLIC TRUSTEE By: Pamela A. Cronce Deputy Public Trustee Attorney: JOAN OLSON Attorney Registration #28078 ARONOWITZ & MECKLENBURG, LLP 1199 BANNOCK STREET, DENVER, COLORADO 80204 Phone: (303) 813-1177 Fax: Attorney file #: 1159.00415 The Attorney above is acting as a debt collector and is attempting to collect a debt. Any information provided may be used for that purpose. Legal Notice No. 2013-0034 First Publication: 7/17/2013 Last Publication: 8/14/2013 Published in: Pikes Peak Courier View Public Notice NOTICE OF SALE (CRS §38-38-103) Foreclosure Sale No. 2013-0032 To Whom It May Concern: This Notice is given with regard to the following described Deed of Trust: On May 6, 2013, the undersigned Public Trustee caused the Notice of Election and Demand relating to the Deed of Trust described below to be recorded in the County of Teller records. Original Grantor: JOYCE MARTINEZ Original Beneficiary: PINETREE FINANCIAL PARTNERS FF, LTD. Current Holder of Evidence of Debt: PINETREE FINANCIAL PARTNERS FF, LTD. Date of Deed of Trust: 2/26/2013 Recording Date of Deed of Trust : 2/27/2013 Recorded in Teller County: Reception No. 660604 Original Principal Amount: $445,000.00 Outstanding Principal Balance: $445,000.00 Pursuant to C.R.S. §38-38-101 (4) (i), you are hereby notified that the covenants of the deed of trust have been violated as follows: Failure to obtain a Certificate of Occupancy and complete construction as required by the Deed of Trust and other violations of the terms thereof. THE LIEN FORECLOSED MAY NOT BE A FIRST LIEN. THE PROPERTY DESCRIBED HEREIN IS ALL OF THE PROPERTY ENCUMBERED BY THE LIEN OF THE DEED OF TRUST. LOT 7, SUNNY GLEN RETREAT SUBDIVISION, COUNTY OF TELLER, STATE OF COLORADO which has the address of: 2771 Mountain Glen Court Woodland Park, CO 80863 NOTICE OF SALE The current holder of the Evidence of Debt secured by the Deed of Trust described herein, has filed Notice of Election and Demand for sale as provided by law and

which has the address of: 2771 Mountain Glen Court Woodland Park, CO 80863

Public Trustees

NOTICE OF SALE

The current holder of the Evidence of Debt secured by the Deed of Trust described herein, has filed Notice of Election and Demand for sale as provided by law and in said Deed of Trust. THEREFORE, Notice Is Hereby Given that I will, at 10:00 a.m. in the forenoon of September 4, 2013, at the Teller County Public Trustee’s Office, 101 W. Bennett Ave., Cripple Creek, Colorado, sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder for cash, the said real property and all interest of said Grantor(s), Grantor(s)’ heirs and assigns therein, for the purpose of paying the indebtedness provided in said Evidence of Debt secured by the Deed of Trust, plus attorneys’ fees, the expenses of sale and other items allowed by law, and will issue to the purchaser a Certificate of Purchase, all as provided by law. First Publication: 7/10/2013 Last Publication: 8/7/2013 Published in: Pikes Peak Courier View Dated: 5/9/2013 ROBERT W. CAMPBELL Teller COUNTY PUBLIC TRUSTEE By: Pamela A. Cronce Deputy Public Trustee Attorney: ROBERT GRAHAM Attorney Registration #26809 FOSTER GRAHAM MILSTEIN & CALISHER, LLP 360 SOUTH GARFIELD STREET 6TH FLOOR, DENVER, COLORADO 80209 Phone: (303) 333-9810 Fax: (303) 333-9786 Attorney file #: 3118.0161 The Attorney above is acting as a debt collector and is attempting to collect a debt. Any information provided may be used for that purpose. Legal Notice No.: 2013-0032 First Publication: 7/10/2013 Last Publication: 8/7/2013 Published in: Pikes Peak Courier View Public Notice NOTICE OF SALE (CRS §38-38-103) Foreclosure Sale No. 2013-0033 To Whom It May Concern: This Notice is given with regard to the following described Deed of Trust: On May 10, 2013, the undersigned Public Trustee caused the Notice of Election and Demand relating to the Deed of Trust described below to be recorded in the County of Teller records. Original Grantor: RENEE M WEST Original Beneficiary: MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., ACTING SOLELY AS NOMINEE FOR PREMIER HOME MORTGAGE, INC. Current Holder of Evidence of Debt: JPMORGAN CHASE BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION Date of Deed of Trust: 9/21/2012 Recording Date of Deed of Trust: 9/25/2012 Recorded in Teller County: Reception No. 656700 Original Principal Amount: $83,673.00 Outstanding Principal Balance: $83,420.56 Pursuant to C.R.S. §38-38-101 (4) (i), you are hereby notified that the covenants of the deed of trust have been violated as follows: Failure to pay principal and interest when due together will all other payments provided for in the Evidence of Debt secured by the Deed of Trust and other violations of the terms thereof. THE LIEN FORECLOSED MAY NOT BE A FIRST LIEN. THE PROPERTY DESCRIBED HEREIN IS ALL OF THE PROPERTY ENCUMBERED BY THE LIEN OF THE DEED OF TRUST. LOT 13A (FKA LOTS 13, 14 AND 15), BLOCK 3, WHISPERING PINES SUBDIVISION NO. 1, ACCORDING TO THE ORIGINAL PLAT AND TO THAT VACATION RECORDED JUNE 19, 2000 AT RECEPTION NO. 506174, COUNTY OF TELLER, STATE OF COLORADO. which has the address of: 747 Trout Haven Road Divide, CO 80814 NOTICE OF SALE The current holder of the Evidence of Debt secured by the Deed of Trust described herein, has filed Notice of Election and Demand for sale as provided by law and in said Deed of Trust. THEREFORE, Notice Is Hereby Given that I will, at 10:00 a.m. in the forenoon of September 11, 2013, at the Teller County Public Trustee’s Office, 101 W. Bennett Ave., Cripple Creek, Colorado, sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder for cash, the said real property and all interest of said Grantor(s), Grantor(s)’ heirs and assigns therein, for the purpose of paying the indebtedness provided in said Evidence of Debt secured by the Deed of Trust, plus attorneys’ fees, the expenses of sale and other items allowed by law, and will issue to the purchaser a Certificate of Purchase, all as provided by law.

ATTACHED HERETO AS EXHIBIT 'A' AND INCORPORATED HEREIN AS THOUGH FULLY SET FORTH.

Public Trustees Public Notice NOTICE OF SALE (CRS §38-38-103) Foreclosure Sale No. 2013-0035 To Whom It May Concern: This Notice is given with regard to the following described Deed of Trust: On May 10, 2013, the undersigned Public Trustee caused the Notice of Election and Demand relating to the Deed of Trust described below to be recorded in the County of Teller records. Original Grantor: JENNIFER L. FOSTER AND PHIL B. FOSTER Original Beneficiary: SECURITY SERVICE FEDERAL CREDIT UNION Current Holder of Evidence of Debt: SECURITY SERVICE FEDERAL CREDIT UNION Date of Deed of Trust: 8/31/2004 Recording Date of Deed of Trust: 9/3/2004 Recorded in Teller County: Reception No. 570813 Original Principal Amount: $18,900.00 Outstanding Principal Balance: $7,975.68 Pursuant to C.R.S. §38-38-101 (4) (i), you are hereby notified that the covenants of the deed of trust have been violated as follows: Failure to pay principal and interest when due together will all other payments provided for in the Evidence of Debt secured by the Deed of Trust and other violations of the terms thereof. THE LIEN FORECLOSED MAY NOT BE A FIRST LIEN. THE PROPERTY DESCRIBED HEREIN IS ALL OF THE PROPERTY ENCUMBERED BY THE LIEN OF THE DEED OF TRUST. LOT 13, CRIPPLE CREEK MOUNTAIN ESTATES FILING NO. 10, COUNTY OF TELLER, STATE OF COLORADO which has the address of: 142 Gold Crown Circle Cripple Creek, CO 80813 NOTICE OF SALE The current holder of the Evidence of Debt secured by the Deed of Trust described herein, has filed Notice of Election and Demand for sale as provided by law and in said Deed of Trust. THEREFORE, Notice Is Hereby Given that I will, at 10:00 a.m. in the forenoon of September 11, 2013, at the Teller County Public Trustee’s Office, 101 W. Bennett Ave., Cripple Creek, Colorado, sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder for cash, the said real property and all interest of said Grantor(s), Grantor(s)’ heirs and assigns therein, for the purpose of paying the indebtedness provided in said Evidence of Debt secured by the Deed of Trust, plus attorneys’ fees, the expenses of sale and other items allowed by law, and will issue to the purchaser a Certificate of Purchase, all as provided by law. First Publication: 7/17/2013 Last Publication: 8/14/2013 Published in: Pikes Peak Courier View Dated: 5/14/2013 ROBERT W. CAMPBELL Teller COUNTY PUBLIC TRUSTEE By: Pamela A. Cronce Deputy Public Trustee Attorney: EMILY JENSIK Attorney Registration #31294 ARONOWITZ & MECKLENBURG, LLP 1199 BANNOCK STREET, DENVER, COLORADO 80204 Phone: (303) 813-1177 Fax: Attorney file #: 3850.00623 The Attorney above is acting as a debt collector and is attempting to collect a debt. Any information provided may be used for that purpose. Legal Notice No.: 2013-0035 First Publication: 7/17/2013 Last Publication: 8/14/2013 Published in: Pikes Peak Courier View Public Notice NOTICE OF SALE (CRS §38-38-103) Foreclosure Sale No. 2013-0037 To Whom It May Concern: This Notice is given with regard to the following described Deed of Trust: On May 13, 2013, the undersigned Public Trustee caused the Notice of Election and Demand relating to the Deed of Trust described below to be recorded in the County of Teller records. Original Grantor: FAWN L. HARTZELL Original Beneficiary: OPTION ONE MORTGAGE CORPORATION Current Holder of Evidence of Debt: JPMC SPECIALTY MORTGAGE LLC F/K/A WM SPECIALTY MORTGAGE LLC Date of Deed of Trust: 12/2/1999 Recording Date of Deed of Trust : 12/9/1999 Recorded in Teller County: Reception No. 499814 Original Principal Amount: $176,000.00 Outstanding Principal Balance: $147,174.51

First Publication: 7/17/2013 Last Publication: 8/14/2013 Published in: Pikes Peak Courier View

Pursuant to C.R.S. §38-38-101 (4) (i), you are hereby notified that the covenants of the deed of trust have been violated as follows:

Dated: 5/14/2013 ROBERT W. CAMPBELL Teller COUNTY PUBLIC TRUSTEE By: Pamela A. Cronce Deputy Public Trustee

Failure to pay principal and interest when due together will all other payments provided for in the Evidence of Debt secured by the Deed of Trust and other violations of the terms thereof.

Attorney: EMILY JENSIK Attorney Registration #31294 ARONOWITZ & MECKLENBURG, LLP 1199 BANNOCK STREET , DENVER, COLORADO 80204 Phone: (303) 813-1177 Fax: Attorney file #: 1068.06186

THE LIEN FORECLOSED MAY NOT BE A FIRST LIEN.

The Attorney above is acting as a debt collector and is attempting to collect a debt. Any information provided may be used for that purpose. Legal Notice No.: 2013-0033 First Publication: 7/17/2013 Last Publication: 8/14/2013 Published in: Pikes Peak Courier View

THE PROPERTY DESCRIBED HEREIN IS ALL OF THE PROPERTY ENCUMBERED BY THE LIEN OF THE DEED OF TRUST. ATTACHED HERETO AS EXHIBIT 'A' AND INCORPORATED HEREIN AS THOUGH FULLY SET FORTH.

which has the address of: 108 Quartz Road Florissant, CO 80816

Public Trustees

NOTICE OF SALE The current holder of the Evidence of Debt secured by the Deed of Trust described herein, has filed Notice of Election and Demand for sale as provided by law and in said Deed of Trust. THEREFORE, Notice Is Hereby Given that I will, at 10:00 a.m. in the forenoon of September 11, 2013, at the Teller County Public Trustee’s Office, 101 W. Bennett Ave., Cripple Creek, Colorado, sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder for cash, the said real property and all interest of said Grantor(s), Grantor(s)’ heirs and assigns therein, for the purpose of paying the indebtedness provided in said Evidence of Debt secured by the Deed of Trust, plus attorneys’ fees, the expenses of sale and other items allowed by law, and will issue to the purchaser a Certificate of Purchase, all as provided by law. First Publication: 7/17/2013 Last Publication: 8/14/2013 Published in: Pikes Peak Courier View Dated: 5/14/2013 ROBERT W. CAMPBELL Teller COUNTY PUBLIC TRUSTEE By: Pamela A. Cronce Deputy Public Trustee Attorney: EMILY JENSIK Attorney Registration #31294 ARONOWITZ & MECKLENBURG, LLP 1199 BANNOCK STREET , DENVER, COLORADO 80204 Phone: (303) 813-1177 Fax: Attorney file #: 1068.06142 The Attorney above is acting as a debt collector and is attempting to collect a debt. Any information provided may be used for that purpose. ATTACHED LEGAL DESCRIPTION Lot 43, Twin Rock Subdivision, Teller County, Colorado. The security instrument secures an obligation for a manufactured home which is already or to be permanently affixed to the subject real estate: Make: Bench Mark Model Number: 820-4S Model Name: Serial Number: Width: 60 Length: 28 Year Built: 1995 Legal Notice No.: 2013-0037 First Publication: 7/17/2013 Last Publication: 8/14/2013 Published in: Pikes Peak Courier View Public Notice NOTICE OF SALE (CRS §38-38-103) Foreclosure Sale No. 2013-0038 To Whom It May Concern: This Notice is given with regard to the following described Deed of Trust: On May 16, 2013, the undersigned Public Trustee caused the Notice of Election and Demand relating to the Deed of Trust described below to be recorded in the County of Teller records. Original Grantor: JENNY O. MARIETTA AND PAUL D. MARIETTA Original Beneficiary: MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC. ACTING SOLELY AS NOMINEE FOR UNITED CAPITAL MORTGAGE CORPORATION Current Holder of Evidence of Debt: U.S. BANK NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, AS TRUSTEE FOR CREDIT SUISSE FIRST BOSTON MORTGAGE SECURITIES CORP. CSFB MORTGAGE PASSTHROUGH CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2003-AR26 Date of Deed of Trust: 4/16/2003 Recording Date of Deed of Trust: 4/24/2003 Recorded in Teller County: Reception No. 547960 Original Principal Amount: $200,000.00 Outstanding Principal Balance: $174,700.26 Pursuant to C.R.S. §38-38-101 (4) (i), you are hereby notified that the covenants of the deed of trust have been violated as follows: Failure to pay principal and interest when due together will all other payments provided for in the Evidence of Debt secured by the Deed of Trust and other violations of the terms thereof. THE LIEN FORECLOSED MAY NOT BE A FIRST LIEN. THE PROPERTY DESCRIBED HEREIN IS ALL OF THE PROPERTY ENCUMBERED BY THE LIEN OF THE DEED OF TRUST. LOTS 1, 2 AND 3, BLOCK 6, GREEN'S ADDITION, TO THE TOWN OF WOODLAND PARK, TELLER COUNTY, COLORADO. which has the address of: 550 Highland Street Woodland Park, CO 80863 NOTICE OF SALE The current holder of the Evidence of Debt secured by the Deed of Trust described herein, has filed Notice of Election and Demand for sale as provided by law and in said Deed of Trust. THEREFORE, Notice Is Hereby Given that I will, at 10:00 a.m. in the forenoon of September 18, 2013, at the Teller County Public Trustee’s Office, 101 W. Bennett Ave., Cripple Creek, Colorado, sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder for cash, the said real property and all interest of said Grantor(s), Grantor(s)’ heirs and assigns therein, for the purpose of paying the indebtedness provided in said Evidence of Debt secured by the Deed of Trust, plus attorneys’ fees, the expenses of sale and other items allowed by law, and will issue to the purchaser a Certificate of Purchase, all as provided by law. First Publication: 7/24/2013 Last Publication: 8/21/2013 Published in: Pikes Peak Courier View

which has the address of: 108 Quartz Road Florissant, CO 80816

Dated: 5/31/2013 ROBERT W. CAMPBELL Teller COUNTY PUBLIC TRUSTEE By: Pamela A. Cronce Deputy Public Trustee

NOTICE OF SALE The current holder of the Evidence of Debt secured by the Deed of Trust described herein, has filed Notice of Election and

Attorney: LISA CANCANON Attorney Registration #42043 ARONOWITZ & MECKLENBURG, LLP 1199 BANNOCK STREET,

herein, has filed Notice of Election and Demand for sale as provided by law and in said Deed of Trust. THEREFORE, Notice Is Hereby Given that I will, at 10:00 a.m. in the forenoon of September 18, 2013, at the Teller County Public Trustee’s Office, 101 W. Bennett Ave., Cripple Creek, Colorado, sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder for cash, the said real property and all interest of said Grantor(s), Grantor(s)’ heirs and assigns therein, for the purpose of paying the indebtedness provided in said Evidence of Debt secured by the Deed of Trust, plus attorneys’ fees, the expenses of sale and other items allowed by law, and will issue to the purchaser a Certificate of Purchase, all as provided by law. First Publication: 7/24/2013 Last Publication: 8/21/2013 Published in: Pikes Peak Courier View Dated: 5/31/2013 ROBERT W. CAMPBELL Teller COUNTY PUBLIC TRUSTEE By: Pamela A. Cronce Deputy Public Trustee

Public Trustees

Attorney: LISA CANCANON Attorney Registration #42043 ARONOWITZ & MECKLENBURG, LLP 1199 BANNOCK STREET, DENVER, COLORADO 80204 Phone: (303) 813-1177 Fax: Attorney file #: 9106.02502 The Attorney above is acting as a debt collector and is attempting to collect a debt. Any information provided may be used for that purpose. Legal Notice No.: 2013-0038 First Publication: 7/24/2013 Last Publication: 8/21/2013 Published in: Pikes Peak Courier View Public Notice NOTICE OF SALE (CRS §38-38-103) Foreclosure Sale No. 2013-0039 To Whom It May Concern: This Notice is given with regard to the following described Deed of Trust: On May 16, 2013, the undersigned Public Trustee caused the Notice of Election and Demand relating to the Deed of Trust described below to be recorded in the County of Teller records. Original Grantor: WILLIAM R NETTLES AND IWANA K NETTLES Original Beneficiary: MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., AS NOMINEE FOR COUNTRYWIDE BANK, N.A. Current Holder of Evidence of Debt: DEUTSCHE BANK NATIONAL TRUST COMPANY, AS TRUSTEE FOR HARBORVIEW MORTGAGE LOAN TRUST MORTGAGE LOAN PASS-THROUGH CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2006-9 Date of Deed of Trust: 8/31/2006 Recording Date of Deed of Trust: 9/11/2006 Recorded in Teller County: Reception No. 597790 Original Principal Amount: $377,120.00 Outstanding Principal Balance: $417,597.03 Pursuant to C.R.S. §38-38-101 (4) (i), you are hereby notified that the covenants of the deed of trust have been violated as follows:

August 7, 2013 To Whom It May Concern: This Notice is given with regard to the following described Deed of Trust: On May 16, 2013, the undersigned Public Trustee caused the Notice of Election and Demand relating to the Deed of Trust described below to be recorded in the County of Teller records. Original Grantor: ROBERT L HUTCHISON INVESTMENTS, LLLP Original Beneficiary: PARK STATE BANK & TRUST Current Holder of Evidence of Debt: PARK STATE BANK & TRUST Date of Deed of Trust: 3/4/2010 Recording Date of Deed of Trust: 3/5/2010 Recorded in Teller County: Reception No. 633809 Original Principal Amount: $637,000.00 Outstanding Principal Balance: $639,744.74

Public Trustees

Pursuant to C.R.S. §38-38-101 (4) (i), you are hereby notified that the covenants of the deed of trust have been violated as follows: The failure to make timely payments required under said Deed of Trust and the Evidence of Debt secured thereby. THE LIEN FORECLOSED MAY NOT BE A FIRST LIEN. THE PROPERTY DESCRIBED HEREIN IS A PORTION OF THE PROPERTY ENCUMBERED BY THE LIEN OF THE DEED OF TRUST. ATTACHED HERETO AS EXHIBIT 'A' AND INCORPORATED HEREIN AS THOUGH FULLY SET FORTH. which has the address of: 1920 County Road 31 Florissant, CO 80816 NOTICE OF SALE The current holder of the Evidence of Debt secured by the Deed of Trust described herein, has filed Notice of Election and Demand for sale as provided by law and in said Deed of Trust. THEREFORE, Notice Is Hereby Given that I will, at 10:00 a.m. in the forenoon of September 18, 2013, at the Teller County Public Trustee’s Office, 101 W. Bennett Ave., Cripple Creek, Colorado, sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder for cash, the said real property and all interest of said Grantor(s), Grantor(s)’ heirs and assigns therein, for the purpose of paying the indebtedness provided in said Evidence of Debt secured by the Deed of Trust, plus attorneys’ fees, the expenses of sale and other items allowed by law, and will issue to the purchaser a Certificate of Purchase, all as provided by law. First Publication: 7/24/2013 Last Publication: 8/21/2013 Published in: Pikes Peak Courier View Dated: 5/31/2013 ROBERT W. CAMPBELL Teller COUNTY PUBLIC TRUSTEE By: Pamela A. Cronce Deputy Public Trustee

THE LIEN FORECLOSED MAY NOT BE A FIRST LIEN.

Attorney: TIMOTHY F BREWER Attorney Registration #32946 TIMOTHY F. BREWER, P.C. 10 BOULDER CRESCENT, SUITE 200, COLORADO SPRINGS, COLORADO 80903 Phone: (719) 477-0225 Fax: (719) 634-1106 Attorney file #: N/A

THE PROPERTY DESCRIBED HEREIN IS ALL OF THE PROPERTY ENCUMBERED BY THE LIEN OF THE DEED OF TRUST.

The Attorney above is acting as a debt collector and is attempting to collect a debt. Any information provided may be used for that purpose.

LOT 2 R IN SUNNY GLEN FILING NO. 2, ACCORDING TO A REPLAT OF LOTS 2 AND 3, SUNNY GLEN FILING NO. 2, RECORDED FEBRUARY 17, 1994 IN PLAT BOOK N AT PAGE 26, TELLER COUNTY, COLORADO

EXHIBIT FOR LEGAL DESCRIPTION Trustee’s Sale No. 2013-0040 LOT 2, VACATION REPLAT OF A TRACT NUMBER 4, CRYSTAL PEAK RANCHES FILING NUMBER THREE, EXCEPT THE PORTION DESCRIBED IN WARRANTY DEED RECORDED MARCH 13, 1989 IN BOOK 476, PAGE 260 AND EXCEPT THE PORTION DESCRIBED IN WARRANTY DEED RECORDED JULY 27, 1994 UNDER RECEPTION NO. 423230, COUNTY OF TELLER, STATE OF COLORADO

Failure to pay principal and interest when due together will all other payments provided for in the Evidence of Debt secured by the Deed of Trust and other violations thereof.

which has the address of: 194 Glen Dale Drive Woodland Park, CO 80863 NOTICE OF SALE The current holder of the Evidence of Debt secured by the Deed of Trust described herein, has filed Notice of Election and Demand for sale as provided by law and in said Deed of Trust. THEREFORE, Notice Is Hereby Given that I will, at 10:00 a.m. in the forenoon of September 18, 2013, at the Teller County Public Trustee’s Office, 101 W. Bennett Ave., Cripple Creek, Colorado, sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder for cash, the said real property and all interest of said Grantor(s), Grantor(s)’ heirs and assigns therein, for the purpose of paying the indebtedness provided in said Evidence of Debt secured by the Deed of Trust, plus attorneys’ fees, the expenses of sale and other items allowed by law, and will issue to the purchaser a Certificate of Purchase, all as provided by law. First Publication: 7/24/2013 Last Publication: 8/21/2013 Published in: Pikes Peak Courier View Dated: 5/31/2013 ROBERT W. CAMPBELL Teller COUNTY PUBLIC TRUSTEE By: Pamela A. Cronce Deputy Public Trustee Attorney: CYNTHIA LOWERY-GRABER Attorney Registration #34145 THE CASTLE LAW GROUP, LLC 999 18TH STREET, SUITE 2201, DENVER, COLORADO 80202 Phone: 1 (303) 865-1400 Fax: 1 (303) 865-1410 Attorney file #: 11-13526R The Attorney above is acting as a debt collector and is attempting to collect a debt. Any information provided may be used for that purpose. Legal Notice No.: 2013-0039 First Publication: 7/24/2013 Last Publication: 8/21/2013 Published in: Pikes Peak Courier View Public Notice NOTICE OF SALE (CRS §38-38-103) Foreclosure Sale No. 2013-0040 To Whom It May Concern: This Notice is given with regard to the following described Deed of Trust: On May 16, 2013, the undersigned Public Trustee caused the Notice of Election and Demand relating to the Deed of Trust described below to be recorded in the County of Teller records. Original Grantor: ROBERT L HUTCHISON INVESTMENTS, LLLP Original Beneficiary: PARK STATE BANK & TRUST Current Holder of Evidence of Debt: PARK STATE BANK & TRUST Date of Deed of Trust: 3/4/2010 Recording Date of Deed of Trust: 3/5/2010 Recorded in Teller County: Reception No. 633809 Original Principal Amount: $637,000.00 Outstanding Principal Balance: $639,744.74 Pursuant to C.R.S. §38-38-101 (4) (i), you are hereby notified that the covenants of the deed of trust have been violated as

Legal Notice No.: 2013-0040 First Publication: 7/24/2013 Last Publication: 8/21/2013 Published in: Pikes Peak Courier View Public Notice NOTICE OF SALE (CRS §38-38-103) Foreclosure Sale No. 2013-0041 To Whom It May Concern: This Notice is given with regard to the following described Deed of Trust: On May 31, 2013, the undersigned Public Trustee caused the Notice of Election and Demand relating to the Deed of Trust described below to be recorded in the County of Teller records. Original Grantor: ANETA J BARCOME Original Beneficiary: NATIONAL CITY MORTGAGE CO. Current Holder of Evidence of Debt: PNC BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION Date of Deed of Trust: 3/22/2000 Recording Date of Deed of Trust: 3/28/2000 Recorded in Teller County: Reception No. 503220 Original Principal Amount: $44,200.00 Outstanding Principal Balance: $37,204.19 Pursuant to C.R.S. §38-38-101 (4) (i), you are hereby notified that the covenants of the deed of trust have been violated as follows: Failure to pay principal and interest when due together will all other payments provided for in the Evidence of Debt secured by the Deed of Trust and other violations of the terms thereof. THE LIEN FORECLOSED MAY NOT BE A FIRST LIEN. THE PROPERTY DESCRIBED HEREIN IS ALL OF THE PROPERTY ENCUMBERED BY THE LIEN OF THE DEED OF TRUST. LOT 6, BLOCK 2, SPRING VALLEY 7TH FILING, COUNTY OF TELLER, STATE OF COLORADO. which has the address of: 69 Valley Cir Divide, CO 80814 NOTICE OF SALE The current holder of the Evidence of Debt secured by the Deed of Trust described herein, has filed Notice of Election and Demand for sale as provided by law and in said Deed of Trust. THEREFORE, Notice Is Hereby Given that I will, at 10:00 a.m. in the forenoon of October 2, 2013, at the Teller County Public Trustee’s Office, 101 W. Bennett Ave., Cripple Creek, Colorado, sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder for cash, the said real property and all interest of said Grantor(s), Grantor(s)’ heirs and assigns therein, for the purpose of paying the indebtedness provided in said Evidence of Debt secured by the Deed of Trust, plus attorneys’ fees, the expenses of sale and other items allowed by law, and will issue to the purchaser a Certificate of Purchase, all as provided by law.


THEREFORE, Notice Is Hereby Given that I will, at 10:00 a.m. in the forenoon of October 2, 2013, at the Teller County Public Trustee’s Office, 101 W. Bennett Ave., Cripple Creek, Colorado, sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder for cash, the said real property and all interest of said Grantor(s), Grantor(s)’ heirs and assigns therein, for the purpose of paying the indebtedness provided in said Evidence of Debt secured by the Deed of Trust, plus attorneys’ fees, the expenses of sale and other items allowed by law, and will issue to the purchaser a Certificate of Purchase, all as provided by law.

August 7, 2013

Public Trustees

First Publication: 8/7/2013 Last Publication: 9/4/2013 Published in: Pikes Peak Courier View Dated: 6/3/2013 ROBERT W. CAMPBELL Teller COUNTY PUBLIC TRUSTEE By: Pamela A. Cronce Deputy Public Trustee Attorney: JENNIFER H TRACHTE Attorney Registration #40391 ARONOWITZ & MECKLENBURG, LLP 1199 BANNOCK STREET , DENVER, COLORADO 80204 Phone: (303) 813-1177 Fax: Attorney file #: 7575.00361 The Attorney above is acting as a debt collector and is attempting to collect a debt. Any information provided may be used for that purpose. Legal Notice No.: 2013-0041 First Publication: 8/7/2013 Last Publication: 9/4/2013 Published in: Pikes Peak Courier View Public Notice NOTICE OF SALE (CRS §38-38-103) Foreclosure Sale No. 2013-0031 To Whom It May Concern: This Notice is given with regard to the following described Deed of Trust: On May 6, 2013, the undersigned Public Trustee caused the Notice of Election and Demand relating to the Deed of Trust described below to be recorded in the County of Teller records. Original Grantor: DALE R EISEMAN AND KATHRYN A EISEMAN Original Beneficiary: PARK STATE BANK & TRUST Current Holder of Evidence of Debt: ROBERT E. WILLIAMS Date of Deed of Trust: 4/26/2007 Recording Date of Deed of Trust: 5/1/2007 Recorded in Teller County: Reception No. 606062 Original Principal Amount: $36,608.89 Outstanding Principal Balance: $33,647.61 Pursuant to C.R.S. §38-38-101 (4) (i), you are hereby notified that the covenants of the deed of trust have been violated as follows: The failure to make timely payments required under said Deed of Trust and the Evidence of Debt secured thereby. THE LIEN FORECLOSED MAY NOT BE A FIRST LIEN. THE PROPERTY DESCRIBED HEREIN IS ALL OF THE PROPERTY ENCUMBERED BY THE LIEN OF THE DEED OF TRUST. LOT 120 IN WILSON LAKE ESTATES, COUNTY OF TELLER, STATE OF COLORADO which has the address of: 9 Freeman Drive Florissant, CO 80816 NOTICE OF SALE The current holder of the Evidence of Debt secured by the Deed of Trust described herein, has filed Notice of Election and Demand for sale as provided by law and in said Deed of Trust. THEREFORE, Notice Is Hereby Given that I will, at 10:00 a.m. in the forenoon of September 4, 2013, at the Teller County Public Trustee’s Office, 101 W. Bennett Ave., Cripple Creek, Colorado, sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder for cash, the said real property and all interest of said Grantor(s), Grantor(s)’ heirs and assigns therein, for the purpose of paying the indebtedness provided in said Evidence of Debt secured by the Deed of Trust, plus attorneys’ fees, the expenses of sale and other items allowed by law, and will issue to the purchaser a Certificate of Purchase, all as provided by law.

17 PUBLIC NOTICE

Notice To Creditors

Public Notice Misc. Private Legals Notice of Sale

[must reside within the Gateway Elementary Boundaries] (Four Year Term) District E [must reside within the Summit Elementary Boundaries] – (Four Year Term)

All persons having claims against the above-named estate are required to present them to the Personal Representative or to the District Court of Teller County, Colorado on or before November 25, 2013 or the claims may be forever barred.

Contents unknown and miscellaneous boxes of personal items belonging to Derrick Irwin whose last known address is: P.O. Box 739 Cripple Creek, CO and stored in Unit #18, STORAGE ONE/ Cripple Creek (410 Xenia Street), Cripple Creek, CO 80813 will be sold at auction or otherwise disposed of at this location after August 22, 2013.

To be qualified, a candidate must have been a registered elector and a resident of the school district for at least twelve consecutive months before the election and must reside in the boundaries specified above. A person is ineligible to run for school director if he/she has been convicted of committing a sexual offense against a child.

Legal Notice No.: 933765 First Publication: August 7, 2013 Last Publication: August 7, 2013 Publisher: Pikes Peak Courier View

Legal Notice No.: 933764 First Publication: August 7, 2013 Last Publication: August 14, 2013 Publisher: Pikes Peak Courier View

Any person who desires to be a candidate for the office of school director shall file a written notice of such intention to be a candidate and a nomination petition in accordance with law. A nominating petition must be signed by at least fifty (50) eligible electors throughout the school district.

Century Casinos request the vacation of a portion of the Alley located in Block 20, Fremont Addition, between Lots 1-4 and 38-40.

NOTICE TO CREDITORS Estate of Terry Lynette Lightfoot, aka Terry L. Lightfoot, aka Terry Lightfoot, Deceased Case Number: 2013 PR 30007

Bobby Lightfoot Personal Representative 331 Ranch Resorts Drive Florissant, Colorado 80816 Legal Notice No: 933730 First Publication: July 24, 2013 Last Publication: August 7, 2013 Publisher: Pikes Peak Courier View

Misc. Private Legals Public Notice DISTRICT COURT, TELLER COUNTY, COLORADO Court address: 101 W. Bennett Ave. P.O. Box 997 Cripple Creek, CO 80813 Phone number: 719-689-2574 Plaintiffs: JACK D. ENGLAND DOPC PSP,and JACK D. ENGLAND DOPC v. Defendants: TOM N. WILLIAMS, DIANA M. WILLIAMS, MARK A. WORTKOETTER, NANCY P. WORTKOETTER, IVO STAHULJAK, ANNETTE STAHULJAK, ANTHONY W. NELSON, STEPHANIE NELSON and ALL UNKNOWN PERSONS OR ENTITIES WHO CLAIM ANY INTEREST IN THE SUBJECT MATTER OF THIS ACTION. Linda McMillan, #20347 Buxman Kwitek & Ohlsen, P.C. Attorneys for Plaintiff 601 N. Main, Suite 200 Pueblo, Colorado 81003 Telephone: (719) 544-5081 Case No. 2013 CV 30004 Div.: 11 SUMMONS BY PUBLICATION THE PEOPLE OF THE STATE OF COLORADO TO THE ABOVE NAMED DEFENDANTS: You are hereby summoned and required to appear and defend against the claims of the Complaint filed with the Court in this action by filing with the Clerk of this Court an Answer or other response. You are required to file your Answer or other response within 35 days after the service of this Summons upon you. Service of this Summons shall be complete on the day of the last publication. A copy of the Complaint may be obtained from the Clerk of the Court. If you fail to file your Answer or other response to the Complaint in writing within 35 days after the date of the last publication, judgment by default may be rendered against you by the Court for the relief demanded in the Complaint without further notice. This is an action to quiet title to real properties in the State of Colorado, legally described as follows: L295 TURKEY ROCK RANCH 2 Also know as: 55 Hedges Circle L8 B3 TROUT HAVEN 2 Also known as: 141 Elbert Dr. L531A MELODY ACRES L4 B2 VALLEY HI MTN EST Also known as: 171 Crestridge Rd. DATED: BUXMAN KWITEK & OHLSEN, P.C. By: Linda McMillan, #20437 Attorney for Plaintiff THIS SUMMONS IS ISSUED PURSUANT TO RULE 4(h), CRCP Legal Notice No.: 933710 First Publication: July 10, 2013 Last Publication: August 7, 2013 Publisher: Pikes Peak Courier View Public Notice District Court Teller County, Colorado 101 W. Bennett Avenue, Cripple Creek CO 80813

First Publication: 7/10/2013 Last Publication: 8/7/2013 Published in: Pikes Peak Courier View

In the Matter of the Petition of: Leslie C. Grenfell Jr. and Carolyn J. Grenfell

Dated: 5/9/2013 ROBERT W. CAMPBELL Teller COUNTY PUBLIC TRUSTEE By: Pamela A. Cronce Deputy Public Trustee

For the Adoption of a Child Case Number: 13JA9

Attorney: TIMOTHY F BREWER Attorney Registration #32946 TIMOTHY F. BREWER, P.C. 10 BOULDER CRESCENT, SUITE 200, COLORADO SPRINGS, COLORADO 80903 Phone: (719) 477-0225 Fax: (719) 634-1106 Attorney file #: N/A The Attorney above is acting as a debt collector and is attempting to collect a debt. Any information provided may be used for that purpose. Legal Notice No.: 2013-0031 First Publication: 7/10/2013 Last Publication: 8/7/2013 Published in: Pikes Peak Courier View

Notice To Creditors PUBLIC NOTICE NOTICE TO CREDITORS Estate of Terry Lynette Lightfoot, aka Terry L. Lightfoot, aka Terry Lightfoot, Deceased Case Number: 2013 PR 30007

The City of Woodland City Council will consider this amendment to the Woodland Park Municipal Code during a public hearing on September 19, 2013. This meeting will also be held at 7:00 PM in the Council Chambers located at 220 W. South Avenue, Woodland Park, Colorado

Division: II NOTICE OF HEARING To: Emily Anne Martin and John Doe: Pursuant to §19-5-208, C.R.S., you are hereby notified that the above-named Petitioner(s) have filed in this Court a verified Petition seeking to adopt a child. An Affidavit of Abandonment has been filed alleging that you have abandoned the child for a period of one year or more and/or have failed without cause to provide reasonable support for the child for one year or more. You are notified that an adoption hearing is set on October 31, 2013 at 1:00pm located in the court location identified above. You are further notified that if you fail to appear for said hearing, the Court may terminate your parental rights and grant the adoption as sought by the Petitioner(s). Legal Notice No.: 933762 First Publication: August 7, 2013 Last Publication: September 4, 2013 Publisher: Pikes Peak Courier View Public Notice Notice of Sale

Government Legals Public Notice INVITATION FOR BIDS Sealed bids for “Teller County 2013 Annual Centerline Striping Services” consisting of approximately 67.1 miles of centerline striping with CDOT specification paint and beads for Teller County Public Works will be received by Teller County Public Works at its Administrative Office located at 308-A Weaverville Road, P.O. Box 805, Divide, CO 80814 up until 2:00 p.m. local time, Thursday August 22, 2013, at which time they will be publicly opened and read aloud. Please visit www.co.teller.co.us to obtain the bid package electronically. Once bid package is obtained electronically, please call Teller County Public Works and inform us so that we can list you on the official plan holders list. Any questions regarding this bid should be directed to Bryan Kincaid, Right-ofWay Supervisor at 719-687-8812. All interested firms are invited to submit a bid in accordance with the terms and conditions stated in the RFB. BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS TELLER COUNTY, CO Legal Notice No.: 933748 First Publication: July 31, 2013 Last Publication: August 14, 2013 Publisher: Pikes Peak Courier View Public Notice NOTICE OF PURCHASE OF REAL ESTATE TAX LIEN SALE AND OF APPLICATION FOR TREASURER’S DEED TAX SALE CERTIFICATE OF PURCHASE NO. 20080097 The said premises were for the year A.D. 2007, assessed and taxed in the name of CLAUDE R BLUE REVOC TRUST and the properties are currently assessed and taxed in the name of CLAUDE R BLUE REVOC TRUST. To whom it may concern and to every person in actual possession or occupancy of the hereinafter described land, lots or premises, and to the person in whose name the same was taxed, and to all persons having an interest or title of record in or to the same, and particularly to: CLAUDE R BLUE REVOC TRUST EARNEST R BLUE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that at a tax lien sale lawfully held on the 14th day of November A.D. 2008, the then County Treasurer of Teller County, State of Colorado, duly offered for delinquent taxes for the year 2007, the following described property, situated in County of Teller and State of Colorado, to-wit: L11 B1 CRYSTAL PEAK EST 2 That, at said sale, said property was stricken off to and a tax lien sale certificate of purchase was duly issued therefore to L Z ESTATES LP, the present holder and legal owner thereof, who hath made request upon the Treasurer of Teller County for a deed, and that unless the same be redeemed on or before December 4, 2013, the said County Treasurer will issue a Treasurer’s deed therefore to said certificate holder. Dated at Cripple Creek, Teller County, Colorado, this 17th day of July, A.D. 2013. ROBERT W CAMPBELL, TREASURER TELLER COUNTY, COLORADO Public Notice No.: 933734 First date of Publication: July 24, 2013 Second date of Publication: July 31, 2013 Third and last date of Publication: August 7, 2013 Publisher: Pikes Peak Courier View PUBLIC NOTICE CALL FOR NOMINATIONS FOR SCHOOL BOARD DIRECTORS REGULAR BIENNIAL SCHOOL ELECTION WOODLAND PARK SCHOOL DISTRICT RE-2 TELLER COUNTY, COLORADO The Board of Education of Woodland Park School District Re-2 in the County of Teller, State of Colorado, calls for nomination of candidates for school directors to be placed on the ballot for the regular biennial school election to be held on Tuesday, November 5, 2013. At this election three directors will be elected representing the following director districts: District B [must reside within Woodland Park District Re-2 Boundaries] (Four Year Term) District D [must reside within the Gateway Elementary Boundaries] (Four Year Term) District E [must reside within the Summit Elementary Boundaries] – (Four Year Term)

Government Legals

Nomination petitions will be available on August 7, 2013 through the Superintendent’s Office located at 155 Panther Way between the hours of 7:30 a.m. and 3:30 p.m. Completed petitions should be submitted to Kelley Havin, the School District’s Designated Election Official NO LATER THAN 3:30 p.m. on August 30, 2013. IN WITNESS WHEREOF, the Board of Education of Woodland Park School District Re-2, in the County of Teller and State of Colorado, has caused this call for nominations to be given this 7th day of August 2013. Legal Notice No.: 933745 First Publication: August 7, 2013 Last Publication: August 7, 2013 Publisher: Pikes Peak Courier View

Government Legals

Please contact the Woodland Park Planning Department at 687-5283 with any questions.

Public Notice CITY OF CRIPPLE CREEK VACATION OF RIGHT OF WAY

City Council Hearing Date: August 21, 2013, at 5:30 PM All hearings to be held at City Hall, 337 East Bennett Avenue, Cripple Creek, Colorado. Any comments in support or in opposition should be sent in writing to the City of Cripple Creek, PO Box 430, Cripple Creek, CO 80813, or comments can be stated in person at the hearing. Additional information can be obtained at City Hall, 337 East Bennett Avenue, Cripple Creek, CO, or call 719-689-3905. Legal Notice No.: 933766 First Publication: August 7, 2013 Last Publication: August 7, 2013 Publisher: Pikes Peak Courier View PUBLIC NOTICE CITY OF CRIPPLE CREEK CONDITIONAL USE PERMIT

PUBLIC NOTICE The Cripple Creek City Clerk now has nomination petitions available for One (1) Council Seat in Ward 4, and One (1) Council Seat in Ward 5, which will be voted upon in the Coordinated Election to be held November 5, 2013. Candidates for elective office must be United States citizens and registered electors of the City who are 18 years of age or older on August 26, the last day for filing a nomination petition. No person shall hold any elective office of the City unless he or she has been a resident of the City in your ward for at least one (1) year immediately prior to the last day for filing original petitions for such office or prior to the time of appointment to fill a vacancy. No person shall hold any elective office unless he or she is a qualified and registered elector of the City on such last day for filing (August 26, 2013) and throughout tenure of office. Each candidate for elective office shall file with his or her petition an affidavit that the candidate possesses the qualifications for such office. Failure to file such affidavit shall invalidate the petition. Nomination petitions will be available for circulation on August 6, 2013 and the last day to file the petition with the City Clerk is August 26, 2013. Please contact Debra Blevins, City Clerk at 719-689-2502 with any questions you may have. Legal Notice No.: 933760 First Publication: August 7, 2013 Last Publication: August 7, 2013 Publisher: Pikes Peak Courier View PUBLIC NOTICE City of Woodland Park A public hearing for the case below will be heard by the Woodland Park Planning Commission on Thursday, August 22, 2013 at 7:00PM in the City Hall Council Chambers at 220 W. South Avenue, Woodland Park, Colorado. CUP13-004 for the Steen Single Family Residence: Request for Conditional Use Permit approval to change existing commercial use to single family residence on the property at 404 N. State Highway 67, legally described as Lot 4, Block 2, Woodland Hills Filing #1. The applicant’s name is Norm Steen. The City of Woodland Park City Council will hear the case on Thursday, September 5, 2013 for initial posting of the ordinance and to set the public hearing for September 19, 2013. The City Council meetings will be held at 7:00PM in the City Hall Council Chambers. If you have any questions, please contact the City of Woodland Park Planning Department at 687-5209. Legal Notice No.: 933763 First Publication: August 7, 2013 Last Publication: August 7, 2013 Publisher: Pikes Peak Courier View PUBLIC NOTICE City of Woodland Park The City of Woodland Planning Commission will consider an amendment to the Woodland Park Municipal Code as described below on August 22, 2013. The meeting will be held at 7:00 PM in the Council Chambers located at 220 W. South Avenue, Woodland Park, Colorado: An Ordinance amending the Municipal Code Sections 18.09.090 S.8., 18.39.030 and 18.33.180. H. related to the zoning of Farm, Ranch, Lawn and Garden Supply retail sales facilities. The City of Woodland City Council will consider this amendment to the Woodland Park Municipal Code during a public hearing on September 19, 2013. This meeting will also be held at 7:00 PM in the Council Chambers located at 220 W. South Avenue, Woodland Park, Colorado Please contact the Woodland Park Planning Department at 687-5283 with any questions.

Elizabeth Denson, Applicant, (dba The Kid’s Corral) requests a Conditional Use in the BB Zone to allow a Day Care Center at 124 W. Bennett Avenue (L 5&6, B8, CR CK FREEMAN PLACER ADD). Planning Commission Hearing on August 21, 2013, at 5:30PM City Council Hearing on August 21, 2013, at 5:30PM Hearings will be at City Hall, 337 E. Bennett Ave., Cripple Creek, CO. Comments in support or opposition to the request should be sent to City of Cripple Creek, PO Box 430, Cripple Creek, CO, 80813, or comments can be made at the hearings. Call or come to City Hall for more information, 719-689-3905. Legal Notice No.: 933767 First Publication: August 7, 2013 Last Publication: August 7, 2013 Publisher: Pikes Peak Courier View Public Notice City of Cripple Creek AGENDA – AUGUST 07, 2013 WORK SESSION - 5:00 PM – STEDC & LCC DISCUSSION REGARDING TRANSPORTATION; JOHN POSUSTA Regular Meeting - 5:30 PM Location: Cripple Creek City Council Chambers 337 Bennett Avenue, Cripple Creek, Colorado 80813 CALL TO ORDER INVOCATION PLEDGE OF ALLEGIANCE ROLL CALL APPROVAL OF MINUTES FROM PRIOR MEETING PUBLIC COMMENT ADMINISTRATOR REPORT FINANCE DIRECTOR REPORT 1. PRESENTATION – PERFORMANCE EVALUATION SESSION; COLORADO NATURAL GAS 2. REQUEST - APPROVAL OF IGA WITH TELLER COUNTY FOR THE NOVEMBER 5, 2013 COORDINATED ELECTION; DEBRA BLEVINS 3. LEASE OF CABLE TELEVISION SYSTEM BETWEEN THE CITY OF CRIPPLE CREEK AND TELLER NETCAST, LLC; PAUL HARRIS 4. PLANNING COMMISSION BUSINESS – REQUEST FOR A VARIANCE TO THE SIGN ORDINANCE IN THE BB ZONE AT THE NW CORNER OF E. GOLDEN AND S . H W Y 6 7 A T 1 1 9 C A R V O N A TE STREET (L12 AMERICAN GAMING SUBDIVISION, HAYDEN PLACER ADD) TO ALLOW A FREESTANDING SIGN THAT IS TWENTY-SEVEN (27) SQUARE FEET WHERE SIXTEEN (16) SQUARE FEET IS ALLOWED AND TO ALLOW OFFPREMISE SIGNAGE WHERE NONE IS ALLOWED, CARL POCH, APPLICANT; KATHY STOCKTON 5. CITY COUNCIL BUSINESS – RECOMMENDATION FROM PLANNING COMMISSION FOR A REQUEST FOR A VARIANCE TO THE SIGN ORDINANCE IN THE BB ZONE AT THE NW CORNER OF E. GOLDEN AND S. HWY 67 AT 119 CARVONATE STREET (L12 AMERICAN GAMING SUBDIVISION, HAYDEN PLACER ADD) TO ALLOW A FREESTANDING SIGN THAT IS TWENTY-SEVEN (27) SQUARE FEET WHERE SIXTEEN (16) SQUARE FEET IS ALLOWED AND TO ALLOW OFF-PREMISE SIGNAGE WHERE NONE IS ALLOWED, CARL POCH, APPLICANT; KATHY STOCKTON Legal Notice No.: 933772 First Publication: August 7, 2013 Last Publication: August 7, 2013 Publisher: Pikes Peak Courier View Public Notice INVITATION FOR BIDS Lowell Thomas Museum STIP SR 25079.032 CDOT Project No. 18210 FHWA: STE C430-016 Victor, CO 80860 NOTICE TO BIDDERS Teller County will receive sealed bids up to the hour of 11:00 a.m. on the 30th day of August, 2013 and will open said bids at 11:15 a.m. that same day at the office of the Teller County Public Works, P.O. Box 805, 308-A Weaverville Road, Divide, CO 80814 for the following:

Pikes Peak Courier View 17 Teller County will receive sealed bids up to the hour of 11:00 a.m. on the 30th day of August, 2013 and will open said bids at 11:15 a.m. that same day at the office of the Teller County Public Works, P.O. Box 805, 308-A Weaverville Road, Divide, CO 80814 for the following:

Government Legals

Roof and Flashing Repair The project consists generally of roof and associated work of the existing Lowell Thomas Museum located at 300 South 3rd Street in Victor, Colorado. All work performed shall comply with the Secretary of the Interior’s Standards for the Treatment of Historic Properties, 1995 edition. Bids must be enclosed in one envelope and shall be labeled “Roofing and Flashing Repair Project”. Bids not received at the specific date, regardless of method of delivery, will be returned to the bidder unopened. Teller County will not be responsible for premature opening of bids not properly labeled or sealed. All costs related to the preparation of the Bid are the sole responsibility of the prospective Bidder. The project is funded in part by the Colorado Department of Transportation Enhancement Funds. It is subject to Federal and State contracting requirements, including Davis-Bacon wages, EEO requirements, etc. The UDBE Goal for this project is 0%. The CDOT Form 347, Certification of EEO Compliance, is no longer required to be submitted in the bid package. This form certified that the contractor/proposed subcontractors were in compliance with the Joint Reporting Committee EEO-1 form requirements. The EEO-1 Report must still be submitted to the Joint Reporting Committee if the contractors and subcontractors meet the eligibility requirements (29CFR 1602.7); we will, however, no longer require certification. For additional information regarding these federal requirements, please refer to: http://www.eeoc.gov/stats/jobpat/e1instruct.html . Since this project is not located on a CDOT right of way, CDOT contractor prequalification is not required for this project. Pursuant to Executive Orders 11246, as amended, and 11375 on Equal Employment Opportunity, Part 60-4, Construction Contractor Affirmative Action Requirements, and Section 3 of the Housing and Urban Development Act of 1968, as amended, a prime contractor and subcontractor who signs a contract on a Federally assisted construction project are required to take affirmative action toward equal employment opportunity and are required to implement the Colorado Statewide Plan. Prior to the bid, General Contractors are required to attend a mandatory pre-bid walk-through, Thursday, August 22nd, 2013 at 1:30 p.m. at the Lowell Thomas Museum site in Victor, CO 80860. The last day for questions regarding this Project is to be received at the Architect office by Noon, Wednesday, August 28th, 2013. Only those bidders who attend the meeting will be allowed to bid the project. Plans and Project Manual may be obtained electronically from the offices of the Architect, Source Architechnology Systems PC, Colorado Springs, Colorado by either calling 719-338-5314 or emailing a request to the following address: robert@sourcearch.com. The Project documents will be delivered via email or a CD delivered by the US Postal Service. The Bidder shall be responsible for the reproduction and associated costs of any printed plans or manuals required during the Bid period. Each bid must be accompanied by a certified check, cashier's check, postal money order or bid bond in the amount of five (5) percent of the grand total bid, payable to the Teller County, as a guarantee that if the bid is accepted, the bidder will execute and file the proposed contract and bond within fifteen (15) days from the date of the award of the contract. Only proposals or bids which are made out upon the regular proposal bid forms will be considered. Any correction on the bid or proposal forms must be initialed by the person signing the bid or proposal. BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS TELLER COUNTY, CO Legal Notice No.: 933771 First Publication: August 7, 2013 Last Publication: August 21, 2013 Publisher: Pikes Peak Courier View Public Notice CITY OF WOODLAND PARK ORDINANCE NO. 1192, SERIES 2013 SUMMARY: AN ORDINANCE GRANTING A CONDITIONAL USE PERMIT FOR THE PURPOSE OF OPERATING AN OFF-HIGHWAY VEHICLE (OHV) AND MOTORCYCLE SHOWROOM, SALES OFFICE AND REPAIR CENTER IN THE CENTRAL BUSINESS DISTRICT LOCATED AT 310 E. HIGHWAY 24 WITH A LEGAL DESCRIPTION OF LOT 2, VISTA SUBDIVISION, WOODLAND PARK, TELLER COUNTY, COLORADO, AS REQUESTED BY PAUL SCHEXNAYDER. Summary: This ordinance grants a conditional use permit for a OHV, Motorcycle showroom, sales office and repair center located at 310 East Highway 24. PENALTY: None. This Ordinance was passed on second and final reading on August 1, 2013 after notice and public hearing and is hereby published by title only as required by Charter Section 7.6 to be effective seven days after this publication. Suzanne Leclercq, Deputy City Clerk City of Woodland Park Legal Notice No.: 933773 First Publication: August 7, 2013 Last Publication: August 7, 2013 Publisher: Pikes Peak Courier View

Public Knowledge = Notices Community

All persons having claims against the above-named estate are required to present them to the Personal Representative or to the District Court of Teller County, Colorado on or before November 25, 2013 or the claims may be forever barred. Bobby Lightfoot Personal Representative 331 Ranch Resorts Drive Florissant, Colorado 80816

Legal Notice No: 933730 First Publication: July 24, 2013 Last Publication: August 7, 2013 Publisher: Pikes Peak Courier View

Contents unknown and miscellaneous boxes of personal items belonging to Derrick Irwin whose last known address is: P.O. Box 739 Cripple Creek, CO and stored in Unit #18, STORAGE ONE/ Cripple Creek (410 Xenia Street), Cripple Creek, CO 80813 will be sold at auction or otherwise disposed of at this location after August 22, 2013.

To be qualified, a candidate must have been a registered elector and a resident of the school district for at least twelve consecutive months before the election and must reside in the boundaries specified above. A person is ineligible to run for school director if he/she has been convicted of committing a sexual offense against a child.

Legal Notice No.: 933764 First Publication: August 7, 2013 Last Publication: August 14, 2013 Publisher: Pikes Peak Courier View

Any person who desires to be a candidate for the office of school director shall file a written notice of such intention to be a candidate and a nomination petition in accordance with law. A nominating petition must be signed by at least fifty (50) eligible electors throughout the school district.

Read the Notices!

Nomination petitions will be available on August 7, 2013 through the Superintendent’s Office located at 155 Panther Way between the hours of 7:30 a.m. and 3:30 p.m. Completed petitions should be submitted to Kelley Havin, the School District’s Designated Election Official NO LATER THAN 3:30 p.m. on August 30, 2013.

IN WITNESS WHEREOF, the Board of Education of Woodland Park School District Re-2, in the County of Teller and State of Colorado, has caused this call for nominations to be given this 7th day of

Legal Notice No.: 933765 First Publication: August 7, 2013 Last Publication: August 7, 2013 Publisher: Pikes Peak Courier View

Roof and Flashing Repair The project consists generally of roof and associated work of the existing Lowell Thomas Museum located at 300 South 3rd Street in Victor, Colorado. All work performed shall comply with the Secretary of the Interior’s Standards for the Treatment of Historic Properties, 1995 edition.

About Your

Bids must be enclosed in one envelope and shall be labeled “Roofing and Flashing Repair Project”. Bids not received at the specific date, regardless of method of delivery, will be returned to the bidder unopened. Teller County will not be responsible for premature opening of bids not properly labeled or sealed. All costs related to the preparation of the Bid are the sole responsibility of the prospective Bidder.

Be Informed! The project is funded in part by the Colorado Department of Transportation Enhancement Funds. It is subject to Federal and State contracting requirements, including Davis-Bacon wages, EEO requirements, etc. The UDBE Goal for this project is 0%. The CDOT Form 347, Certification of EEO Compliance, is no longer required to be


Pike PeakSportSFs 18-Color-Sports

18 Pikes Peak Courier View August 7, 2013

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Ann Bunge, 45, of Woodland Park recently earned her pro card as a body builder. She began body building 10 years ago. She is set to compete in her first pro event Oct. 12 in Houston. She also works as a personal trainer. Photos by Danny Summers

Woodland Park woman turning heads as a body builder Ann Bunge earned her pro card in July By Danny Summers

Dsummers@ourcoloradonews.com Ann Bunge is not offended if you tell her that has the kind of physique that Arnold Schwarzenegger would be impressed with. In fact, she’d take it as a compliment. Bunge, you see, is a female body builder. She hopes to one day strut her stuff in front of Schwarzenegger, himself. That’s why she spends numerous hours in the gymnasium working on exercises and techniques that will shape mold and form her physique into a picturesque figure that would cause anybody to pause. “I like the athletic appeal to body building,” Bunge said. “I like feeling strong and healthy.” Bunge, 45, moved to Woodland Park five years ago with her husband and two boys. A certified personal trainer and certified nutritionist, Bunge spends much of her time at the Woodland Fitness Center. “I truly believe that if you don’t become obsessed with it, exercise right, eat right, not taking any types of supplements that are bad for you, I think it’s the secret to staying young” she said. Bunge earned her pro card July 19 at the Physique Committee (NPC) Teen, Collegiate and Masters National Championships in Pittsburgh, Pa. She took first place in the 45-plus “C” class and third place in the 35-plus “C” class. Her first professional competition is Oct. 12 in Houston. The top prize is around $6,000. “I’m trying to bring my shoulders up a little bit, put a little thickness in my back and tighten up my legs and butt a little bit; that’s always a problem for women,” said Bunge, whose competition swim suits cost up to $2,000. Bunge began bodybuilding in 2003.

Ann Bunge began body building 10 years ago. She recently earned her pro card at a show in Pittsburgh. An avid sportswoman and athlete, she entered about one competition per year for several years. In 2007, as a way to celebrate her 40th birthday, she competed in the Ms. Fitness America Competition in Los Angeles and placed second in the Masters Division. “I thought “Wow, I can to this,’” Bunge said. But by the next year, however, Bunge was feeling that perhaps she made the

wrong choice to take up the sport after a poor showing at the NPC Carla Sanchez Fitness Fiesta in Denver. “There were only three people in my class and I finished third,” Bunge said. “I got discouraged. I still competed, but my heart wasn’t really into it. I wasn’t really excited about it. “I was too small, I guess. At that point (the judges) were looking for girls with bigger muscles. That was too much for

me. I didn’t want to go there.” Bunge decided to all but walk away from the sport in 2011 when she finished 16th in her division at the Arnold (Schwarzenegger) Classic in Columbus, Ohio. “When I got back from that I had a really hard time,” Bunge said. “I was done. Builder continues on Page 19


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Pikes Peak Courier View 19

August 7, 2013

Former panthers football standouts suiting up this fall for RMac schools Head coaches Frank Serratore of Air Force Academy and Scott Owens of Colorado College will be center stage as usual during the annual Sports Corp College Hockey Face-Off Luncheon on Wednesday, October 2, at the Colorado Springs Marriott. The festive event begins at noon. Air Force finished 17-13-7 last year, losing at home to league champion Canisius in the Atlantic Hockey Association Quarterfinals. Colorado College went 18-19-5, but finished strong, defeating Denver in the WCHA playoffs, then stunning North Dakota and Minnesota in the WCHA Championships, before dropping a 3-2 heartbreaker to Wisconsin that would have put the Tigers into the NCAA Tournament.

Builder Continued from Page 18

I was sick of it. I stopped for a few years.” Last October, Bunge was encouraged by friends to compete again. So she set a goal of competing in the NPC Northern Colorado Figure Championships in Golden in April of this year. She took first place in two classes, including overall (all ages), and regained her confidence. “It really felt good,” said Bunge, who has a 25-inch waist and wears a 00 dress size. “I thought `Maybe I should try and go a little bit further and see if I can get a pro card. I got it on my first try, and honestly that’s very rare. A lot of my friends have tried several times and they still haven’t gotten it. “It’s not an easy thing to do, but I think I put enough time in to where I knew what I needed to do between my workouts, what I eat, cardio and posing.” Bunge (5-foot, 120 pounds) more than holds her own at the gym, where she often out lifts the men. Her workouts include lifting two 40-pound dumbbells over her head 10 to 12 times, leg pressing 600 pounds eight to 10 times, curling 67 ½ pounds 10 times, as well as four sets of 10 pull ups each. She also does squats, a lot of stretching and aggressive cardio workouts. Bunge takes great pride in her career as a personal trainer. “A lot of people up here in Woodland Park are very athletic,” Bunge said. “They just want something that’s go-

Ann Bunge prepares for body building shows by working on specific parts of her body’s muscle groups. She works out at Woodland Fitness Center in Woodland Park. She is set to compete in her first pro event Oct. 12 in Houston. Photo by Danny Summers ing to help them get in condition with their skiing, their hiking, etc. I try to create a program that will benefit them in those areas.” Bunge can be reached at abunge@bajabb.com or at www.training4-results.com. Also try her on Facebook.

RecReation RepoRt Woodland Park Parks & Recreation offers the following programs and sports. Sign up at least a week prior to session starting. Classes may be cancelled due to lack of participants. Call 719-687-5225, stop by our office at 204 W. South Ave or visit www.city-woodlandpark.org. aug. 10 Start Smart soccer. This program is for young children between the ages of 3-5. The Start Smart Development Program is a proven instructional program that prepares young children for the world of organized sports without the threat of competition or the fear of getting hurt. Parents work together with their children in a supportive environment to learn all of the basic skills. Benefits include building confidence and selfesteem, fun and positive experience, prepares for future sports, quality time together for parent and child, helps parents learn how to support and teach their child. Classes are from 6-7 p.m. Tuesdays and from 9-10 a.m. Saturdays, July 23, 27, 30, Aug. 3, 6, 10. To receive the kit for this program in time, register by Monday, July 1. Cost is $54 per child; includes $36 kit. aug. 10, 17, 24, 31 Family dog training. Led by Alice Roszczewski, family dog training is from 9-10 a.m. Saturdays, July 27, Aug. 3, 10, 17, 24, 31, at the CSCS-WP branch gym. Learn commands such as loose leash walking, focus, wait, come stay, sit, down, leave it and more. Cost $150 per session (6 classes).

aug. 10, Sept. 21

or $9 for drop-in, or fitness punch card.

garden club. Join the “Gardeners with Altitude” garden club, part of the largest gardening organization in the world. Learn about different aspects of gardening participate in tours of green houses and gardens and be part of a civic project to enhance our community. This club is lead by Trudie Layton and is on Saturdays from 10-11 a.m. in the Parks and Recreation Classroom. Class is held once a month; June 15, July 13, Aug. 10 and Sept. 21. Cost is $20.

yoga For stress relief. Nancy Stannard leads yoga for stress relief from 5:30-6:30 p.m. Wednesdays in the Parks and Recreation Classroom. Cost is $28 per session (4 classes), $9 for drop-in, or fitness punch card.

ongoing lean to swim. Connie Knowles leads American Red Cross swimming lessons for ages 6 months to 18 years. Classes are Mondays starting April 1. Guppies (3-5 yrs): 4:30-5 p.m.; Level 1-2: 5-5:30 p.m.; Level 3: 5:30-6 p.m. and Level 4/5/6: 6-6:30 p.m. at Golden Bell Camp in Divide. Call to be placed on an interest list for Parent and Tot class (6 months-2 yrs). Cost is $40 for first child and additional family member is discounted to $36 per session. Call or visit our website for level descriptions. body SculPt. Jane Enger leads the body sculpt class from 11:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays in the Parks and Recreation Classroom. All fitness levels welcome. Cost is $60 per session, $8 for drop-in, or a fitness punch card. namaSte yoga. Jody Ajimura-Kessler leads namaste yoga from 5:30-6:30 p.m. Mondays in the Parks & Recreation Classroom. Cost is $21 per session (3 classes)

lunch-time Zumba. Alison Grimm leads lunchtime Zumba class from noon to 1 p.m. Tuesdays and Thursdays at the Parks and Recreation Classroom. Cost is $8 drop in, or fitness punch card. Zumba. Sharron Johnson leads Zumba class from 5:30-6:30 p.m. Mondays. This class is at the Ute Pass Cultural Center in the main room, 210 E. Midland Ave. Cost is $8 per class, or fitness punch card. Zumba gold. Zumba Gold is specifically designed to take the exciting Latin and international dance rhythms of the original Zumba program and bring them to older or less active adults. Sharron Johnson leads Zumba Gold Fitness from 9-10 a.m. Tuesdays. Next session starts April 2. This class is held at the Parks and Recreation Classroom. Cost is $8 per class, or fitness punch card. tae kWon do, kids and adults. Leeann Loss leads tae kwon do classes for ages 5 years and older on Tuesdays and Thursday in the Parks and Recreation Classroom. Times are 4:15-5 p.m. for Little Lions (5-6 yrs); 5-6 p.m. for intermediate; 6-7 p.m. for beginners; and 7-8 p.m. for adults. Cost is $70 per session and $40 for additional family members per session. A uniform fee of $30 is paid to the instructor.

Let us ceLebrate with you Have a wedding, anniversary, engagement, birth and special occasion coming up? Share it! Colorado Community Media invites you to place an announcement to share your news. Go to ourcoloradonews.com/celebrations for package and pricing information. Deadline is 10 a.m. Tuesdays the week preceding the announcement.

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Five Woodland Park High School graduates are playing football for Rocky Mountain Athletic Conference schools this fall. Louie Neil (class of 2012) is a redshirt freshman at Colorado State UniversityPueblo, while Alex Fenlon (2011) is also playing for the school. Neil is vying for a starting spot as a punter and/or wide receiver. Fenlon is a reserve running back. Two players from last spring’s graduating class, and another from the class of 2012, are at Fort Lewis; Joe Callahan is hoping to crack the starting squad wide receiver and/ or punter), while Jacob Censner is vying for playing time at quarterback. Tyler Casey (2012) is a redshirt freshman and is playing

ern Michigan. The conference begins its inaugural season on Oct. 18 with a doubleheader featuring North Dakota at Miami and Colorado College hosting Minnesota Duluth. The games will be nationally televised on the CBS Sports Network. The Tigers also play the USA Under-18 team at the World Arena on Oct. 12. Air Force and Colorado College resume their heated intra-city rivalry with a single game on Nov. 19 at the World Arena. Tickets for the Hockey Face-Off Luncheon are $25 for Sports Corp Members and AFA or CC Booster Club Members with ID, and $35 for all others. Tables (10 Seats) are $250 for Sports Corp Members or AFA/ CC Boosters and $350 for all others. For reservations, contact Cara Jorgensen at the Sports Corp (719) 634-7333, ext. 1007, or by e-mail: cara@thesportscorp.org.

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college hockey Face-oFF luncheon

Dsummers@ourcoloradonews.com

Air Force (http://www.goairforcefalcons.com/) opens its season with an exhibition game against the University of New Brunswick on Oct. 7 at the Cadet Ice Arena. The Falcons then head to Alaska for pair of games on Oct. 11-12 against Alaska and Alaska-Anchorage. Penn State comes to Colorado Springs to play the Falcons on Oct. 18-19. Colorado College (http://cctigers.com/) opens its season on Oct. 5 with an exhibition against the University of New Brunswick at the Colorado Springs World Arena. The Tigers kick off their first season in the new National Collegiate Hockey Conference. (www.NCHCHockey.com) The NCHC includes member institutions Colorado College, Denver, Miami, Minnesota Duluth, Nebraska Omaha, North Dakota, St. Cloud State, and West-

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tight end for the Sky Hawks.

By Danny Summers

OurColoradoNews.com


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20 Pikes Peak Courier View

August 7, 2013

Grand Marshals of the Bronc Day parade, John and Modenia Kramer, get a grand kick out of being the celebrities of the 75thannual Bronc Day Parade.

BroncD ay PHOTOS BY PAT HILL

A glorious day in Green Mountain Falls for the people lined along te Pass Avenue to watch the 75th annual Bronc Day parade the morning of Aug. 3. With the requisite horses and gunslingers, the parade held on to tradition while marching up to the present with the Sister Nation Color Guard from Fort Carson. Along with the Grand Marshals, John and Modenia Kramer, a car full of two present mayors and three former mayors added a touch of community to the parade. Despite the threat of rains, thunderstorms and floods that day, the spectators came anyway to cheer on the people who marched as well as the colorful floats that reflected decorating ingenuity. Following the parade, the crowd gathered in the park, along the Green Box festival grounds and Lake Avenue to see all the vendors and hear the music and drum beats o Native Americans from the Colorado Indian Center. And the rain held off until later afternoon.

Green Mountain Falls Mayor Lorrie Worthey entertained a mayor and former mayors in the Bronc Day parade Aug. 3: With Worthey on the top are from left, Woodland Park Mayor Dave Turley, Worthey, Tyler Stevens and Jennifer Forbes. Dick Lackmond is on the left on the passenger side and the driver is Marshall Worthey, former town trustee. What’s a parade without a clown? This one entertains the crowd waiting for the Bronc Day parade in Green Mountain Falls. This clown, however, is special as he has been fighting wildland fires for the Green Mountain Falls/ Chipita Park fire department for decades and his name is Rich Bowman.

Dancers from Mountain Eire Dance School in Woodland Park added an Irish note to the Bronc Day parade which featured gunslingers, Native American women, the Boy Scouts, Church in the Wildwood and Joyland.

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Adult Sunday School Sunday Adult9:00 Sunday School AM School 9:009:30 AMAM (Both Adults & Children) Worship Worship 10:00 AM Worship 10:00 AM AM Sunday Children’s10:30 Sunday School Children’s Sunday School 7:00pM Tuesday During Worship During Worship Children’s Nursery Care (During Sunday Nursery School Care Worship) Provided Provided Nursery Care provided L M AY A

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Woodland Park Church of Christ Worship Service

Morning { Sunday Bible Class 10 am { Service { Worship { 11am Wednesday Bible { Class 7pm { 816 Browning Ave. & Burdette Call: 687-2323 or 687-6311

Rev. David Shaw, Pastor Rev. David Shaw, Pastor

Worship Services Wednesday 7:00 p.m. Sundays 8 a.m. & 10:30 a.m. Sunday School 9:15 a.m. Adult Bible Study 9:15 a.m.

Sunday WorShip 10:30am and 6pm WedneSday 7:00 PM 2001 CR 31 • Florissant, CO Next to the Grange Hall

719-748 3272

Highway 24, just east of Lake George

Worship: Saturday 5:30 PM (free meal) Sunday 10:30 AM

684-9427

684-9427 www.church-in-the-wildwood.org www.church-in-the-wildwood.org

10585 Ute Pass Ave. 10585 Ute Pass Ave. Green Mountain Falls Green Mountain Falls SUNDAY WORSHIP SERVICES 9:30am OR 11am

Building Relationships One Heart at a Time. Christ Centered, Spirit Filled, Bible Based

Sunday Service 10:30 a.m. The Clothes Closet Free Clothes for Struggling Families

27400 North Hwy 67 • Woodland Park (2.6 miles from Hwy 24 across from Shining Mountain Golf Course)

719.687.3755

www.impactchristian.net

New Home

108 N. Park St. • Woodland Park 719-687-2388 pastortrish@q.com www.livingstreamschurch.net

A place of worship and prayer where people can come to escape their daily routine and enter into the presence of God. Mon. - Thurs. 10 a.m. - 10 p.m. Fri. 10 a.m. 4 p.m. Free Wi-Fi 107 West Henrietta Ave. Woodland Park, CO 80863 (719) 687-7626 www.prayermountainco.com Experience His Presence Encounter His Power Expand His Kingdom

www.faithteller.org

Saint David of the Hills Episcopal Church

Sunday Worship - 9:30 a.m 36 Edlowe Road • Woodland Park 719-687-9195

Highland Bible Church



Meeting at Tamarac Center 331-4903 Sunday School – 8:50 am Worship – 10:00 am

Mountain View United Methodist Church 1101 Rampart Range Road Woodland Park (719) 687-3868

Sunday Worship 10:30 am www.mt-viewumc.org

To advertise your place of worship in this section, call 303-566-4091 or email kearhart@ourcoloradonews.com


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