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Pikes Peak 7.10.13

Teller County, Colorado • Volume 52, Issue 28

July 10, 2013

75 cents

A Colorado Community Media Publication

ourtellercountynews.com

Arrests for shoplifting increase By Pat Hill

phill@ourcoloradonews.com

Woodland Park is among several cities to be honored with the “Remembering Our Fallen-Colorado.” In a ceremony June 29 hosted by the city of Woodland Park, the American Legion 1980, VFW Post 5061 in Woodland Park and VFW Post 14111 in Lake George, Gold Star Families and other Teller County residents paid tribute to the 96 military personnel who have died in America’s wars on terror. Photos by Photo by Pat Hill

Ceremony pays tribute to Colorado’s fallen By Pat Hill

phill@ourcoloradonews.com In a time when most people are celebrating summer, Teller County residents paid tribute to the 96 members of Colorado’s military who have died in the wars on terror. In a ceremony June 30 that highlighted the cost of war and those who pay the ultimate price, the traveling memorial, “Remember Our Fallen — Colorado,” reflected the theme. “We want to recognize the Gold Star Families,” said Woodland Park Mayor Dave Turley, referring to survivors of those who gave their lives in military service. To date, 6,693 members of the American military have died as a result of the wars in Afghanistan and Iraq, most of them having signed on after Sept. 11, 2001, said Brig. Gen. Dana Capozzelli, commander of the Colorado National Guard and a Woodland Park resident. “We are still at war, in Afghanistan and other parts of the world, so let’s take a moment of silence to pray for them and their families.” Less than 1 percent of American citizens serve in the military, Capozzella said. “It is up to us to ensure that our heroes, our loved ones, are remembered, that their stories are shared so that our country will never forget their sacrifice in ensuring that the other 99 percent are safe and free.” This war on terror is different from past wars, said Norm Steen, retired brigadier general and Teller County commissioner. “We have sent our young men and women into battlefields to preserve not just our country but our very lives,” Steen said. “There are people out there who want to destroy our way of life. I’m glad there are still patriots alive who carry on the fight.” Chuck Gardner, commander of the American Legion Post #1980, read a passage from a celebration that took place at the Vietnam Memorial. “Because of your service and your sacrifice we remain at lib-

The city of Woodland Park and the American Legion Post #1980 brought “Remembering our Fallen” memorial to the Ute Pass Cultural Center June 30. The welcome ceremony was from 12 to 12:30 p.m. June 30 at the cultural center. The memorial will be in Woodland Park for one week. Courtesy photo

‘There are people out there who want to destroy our way of life. I’m glad there are still patriots alive who carry on the fight.’ Norm Steen, retired brigadier general and Teller County commissioner erty to enjoy our precious freedom and our American way of life.” Among Woodland Park’s fallen is Master Sgt. Richard Ferguson, who was killed in action in March 2004 during his fourth tour of duty with the Special Forces in Iraq. A Cub

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Scout leader, Ferguson considered service to his community a high calling, said city manager David Buttery. As the day was set aside to memorialize the fallen, Turley recalled the death of the Boy Scouts Nick Naples, Alex Ragan and Paul Kekich, along with their leader Richy Kleiner, who were killed in a car accident June 30, 2012. Contributing to the patriotic and somber occasion was vocalist Mia Troxell, 13, who sang “The Star Spangled Banner” and “Amazing Grace.” Her father, Brian Troxell, pastor of Church of the Nazarene, gave the invocation. In addition to the city of Woodland Park and the American Legion, VFW posts 5061 and 11411 in Woodland Park and Lake George took part in the ceremony.

In today’s world of organized retail crime, the cops in Woodland Park are arresting a multitude of Walmart shoplifters. “We’re not dealing with `little Johnny’ stealing a candy bar anymore,” said Detective Sgt. Tom Kinney. As the largest store in town with plenty of inventory Walmart is the prime target of organized shoplifters, with 26 reported cases in 2012 and 60 so far through June. But the police are gaining on the criminals, figuring out all the tricks. “You see a lot of other crimes; they’re using stolen vehicles while they execute the thefts,” Kinney said. Police Chief Bob Larson added, “A lot of the stolen vehicles are not high-value cars.” Some steal license plates and do a switch while some arrive with a shopping list and rely on their accomplices to keep an eagle eye out for receipts dropped by paying customers. “They’ll steal the exact items from the shelves, bring the receipt they found to customer service and ask for cash back,” Kinney said. Sometimes thieves will take the goods to a “fence” in a kind of auction. “They’ll take bids on items such as laptops, or iPads to see how much they can get,” Larson said. “There’s quite a bit of that sort of thing where groups of people are independent but have cooperative working relationships with other criminals.” While the getaway car is still used during theft executions, today’s crooks use cell phones. “They’ll alert the driver of the car which door they’re coming out and the person will be right there,” Kinney said. “They’re usually in groups, with one acting as a distractor because they know people are watching.” Apparently some criminals haven’t gotten the word yet about what’s going on in Woodland Park. “We’re arresting suspects from Denver, Pueblo and Fairplay, for instance,” Kinney said. To share information with other lawenforcement agencies as well as the retail segment, the department meets monthly with the Colorado Retail Crime Alliance to discuss shoplifting cases. But the police credit Walmart manager William White and his staff for the increase in theft reports. “We have a good working relationship with Walmart and if it weren’t for that bond we probably wouldn’t have 60 arrests,” said Deputy Chief John Gomes. “A lot of these arrests are done off warrants because we can get positive ID’s with the advances in technology that we didn’t have 10 years ago.” Along with the change in technology, Walmart is adapting to the times. “They are more sophisticated in their loss prevention and have doubled their staff,” Larson said. As well, the officers are encouraged by the recent change in state laws. Today, criminals who steal at least $2,000 worth of items in multiple thefts within six months can be charged with a felony. At the same time, law enforcement takes a dim view of thieves. “Now we’re looking at whether the person is a member of our community, has a criminal history and a record of multiple thefts,” Kinney said. “If so, we’re more than likely going to take that person to the Teller County jail.” As shoplifting becomes a multi-billion business in the United States, stealing by children is no longer the order of the day. “In the past 20 years the drug culture has evolved,” Gomes said. “We have more people dependent upon illegal substances and they have to fund their addiction somehow.” Arrests continues on Page 3


2-Color

2 Pikes Peak Courier View

July 10, 2013

Westbound Highway 24 closed for about 90 minutes on July 1 Flash-flooding in the Manitou Springs area intensified by Waldo Canyon burn scar More than a half inch of rain fell in 20 minutes on July 1 near Manitou Springs, causing the closure of the west bound lane of Highway 24 near Manitou Springs, as well as the destruction of other property in the area. Mud flowed into 20 homes, and 11 vehi-

cles were damaged in Manitou Springs and the west side. More than 160 people were also briefly evacuated from a low-lying trailer park in the area. Manitou Springs police Chief Joe Ribeiro said at least three homes were total losses. The flash flood was intensified by black mud and debris that found its way down the mountain near the burn scar left by the massive 2012 Waldo Canyon Fire. Within 25 minutes of the rain fall, Manitou Springs issued a Reverse 911 call notify-

ing folks in the area of flooding near Highway 24 and Manitou Ave. National Weather Service meteorologist John Kalina said the damage could have been much worse if the storm had settled over the area. Westbound Highway 24 was closed from 31st St. in Colorado Springs to Fountain Avenue in Cascade for about 90 minutes. It reopened at 7:15 p.m. after Colorado Department of Transportation workers used snow plows to remove the mud and debris

as rush hour traffic backed up in both directions. In June, the U.S. Agriculture Department said it was sending nearly $20 million to repair watersheds and mitigate flood potential in both the Waldo Canyon and High Park Fire burn areas. Work includes mulching, re-seeding and shoring up water channels. Kalina warned that more flash-flooding could occur in the area as we approach the monsoon season in July and August.

SWAT demonstrations and training July 20-21 Teller County Sheriff’s Office and the Honorary Deputy Sheriff’s Association host the 3rd annual SWAT tactical demonstration and public-training event from 8:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. July 20-21. The two-day event is a fundraiser for the Teller County Emergency Response Team to buy equipment and attend training classes. “Due to the nature of extremely vi-

olent criminals who carry assault-type weapons today it’s necessary that ERTs have the skills to protect citizens and enforce laws,” said Commander Les Lewis, in a press release. Participants are asked to bring a handgun and 150 rounds each day. For a one-day session, the cost is $175 and $300 for two days. The Honorary Deputy Sheriff’s As-

sociation was started in January 2011 and consists of business people who want to make a difference in the community by supporting those who serve through the Sheriff’s Office with augmentation, public education and fundraising responsibilities. To register, call 719-304-5706. For more information, go to www.tchdsa. org.

so much inside the courier view this week Staying green. Greenhouses alive despite drought. Page 4

Memorial Park. Two meetings invited the public to plan new park. Page 8

After serving nine years on the Woodland Park City Council, Terry Harrison bids farewell at the meeting June 27. Presenting Harrison with a farewell gift are Mayor Dave Turley, left, and City Manager Dave Buttery. Courtesy photo

Harrison bids farewell

Independence Day. Woodland Park celebrates Fourth of July. Page 16

Terry Harrison, aka The Glass Broker, attended his last meeting of the Woodland Park City Council as a nine-year council member.

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3-Color

Pikes Peak Courier View 3

July 10, 2013

1 Fires’ link to beetles not cut-and-dried

irec-

mentConventional wisdom comes on to under scrutiny poHigh By Kevin Vaughan and Burt Hubbard ulchI-News at Rocky Mountain PBS han-

Colorado’s 4.3 million acres of beetleding decimated forests represent a catastrophe h the in the making during another devastating wildfire season. Or do they? That is the conventional wisdom as another summer unfolds with destructive blazes that have left skies along the Front Range choked with smoke, but the reality is not so simple. “The issue is not will beetle-kill forests burn — they certainly will,” said Monica Turner, a University of Wisconsin professor who has done extensive research of wildfires in the West. “The question is, are they burning worse — more severely — than if the forest was green?” And the answer to that question is a matter of ongoing scientific debate, wrapped in factors that include the amount of time that has passed since the beetles did their damage, the number of trees that survived the infestation, other species of plants in the area and weather patterns. “This is a field of study that we just don’t have all the answers for,” said Matt Jolly, a researcher at the Missoula Fire Sciences Laboratory in Montana whose work has looked extensively at the way plants burn in wildfires.

Millions of acres affected

Anyone who has spent any time in the Colorado high country has seen the damage done by mountain pine beetles — vast swaths of formerly green forested hills painted red, or gray, by dying and dead trees. The most recent count by the Colorado State Forest Service showed 3.35 million acres affected by the mountain pine beetle and 924,000 acres attacked by a different bug, the spruce beetle. An I-News examination of state maps found that hundreds of thousands of those acres are in the so-called “red zones” — the

high-fire danger areas primarily along Colorado’s Front Range and up the Interstate 70 corridor. State officials use a number of factors to determine what constitutes a red zone, including development (primarily homes), the type of vegetation in the area and the slope of the land. So as the West Fork Complex fires continue to burn in the beetle-damaged forests of southwest Colorado, and as the state reels from blazes like the ones that destroyed 511 homes in the Black Forest, it’s tempting to look at all the dying, dead and decaying trees attacked by beetles and conclude that massive wildfires pose a real threat to all affected areas sooner or later. Not so fast, according to some of those who have dedicated years to studying the ways that trees and other vegetation burn in wildfires.

Man has changed forests

Today’s forests are vastly different than those of previous centuries. A century of aggressive firefighting efforts have left many areas overgrown and choked with downed and dead trees. Added to that, development has left many forested areas peppered with homes, and parts of the West are experiencing prolonged, even historic drought. So the propensity for big, destructive fires is a near constant. Those conditions fuel blazes known as “crown fires,” which burn through the tops of the trees as if they were torches, spreading rapidly and generating tremendous heat. Those massive, fast-moving fires — like the Black Forest blaze last month north of Colorado Springs, where some beetle-kill trees were present — make for mesmerizing television and are the subject of extensive research. Turner and researcher Jesse Logan, a former U.S. Forest Service scientist and college professor, are among those who believe that beetle-kill forests go through a predictable cycle — one in which they are at times much less volatile than green forests. It starts with a beetle infestation, and it will take three or four years for the bugs to inflict all the damage they will on a section of forest. The trees in that stage turn red — and there’s little dispute those needles are

Sheriff hosts open house Special to the Courier Sheriff Mike Ensminger and the Teller County Sheriff’s Office host the 2nd an-

Arrests continued from Page 1

While the thieves vary in gender, age and ethnicity, one commonality is drugs, Larson added. “Sometimes we’ll find a small amount of meth or heroin,” he said. In addition to the buy-in of Walmart,

highly combustible. But over the next couple years, the needles fall to the ground and begin to decompose. “The overall trend would be that immediately after trees are killed and they still have all those fine fuels, needles in particular, on the tree, then it’s highly flammable, probably more flammable than a green forest,” Logan said. “But after those needles fall and that can be, like in lodgepole, a couple years after the tree is killed, then the standing forest is actually less likely to lead to a crown fire than a green forest.” The reason? Green needles contain oils that are highly flammable. But that strange juxtaposition — that green, seemingly healthy forests might burn with more fury than dead ones — is difficult for many people to comprehend. “I think that one of the reasons that this seems counter-intuitive to people in terms of its effect on fire is that when we burn a fire in our fireplace, we put dead logs in there — we don’t put green branches,” Turner said. “But in a forest fire it’s those green needles that are extremely flammable, and that’s what gives you the amounts of fuel up in the canopy in the forest and its conductivity.” One of the difficulties in getting answers is that it has been difficult to build realistic fire models to examine the effect of beetlekill trees. At the same time, studies that have looked at actual fires in beetle-kill areas are still in the review process, and the results have not been made public.

their needles. His research has shown that dead, red needles burn faster and hotter than green ones — but that’s only part of the reason for being circumspect. “It’s just not that simple,” he said. “A standing gray tree, particularly one like a spruce … will have a lot of really, really fine dead branches. It may not have needles, but it will have those fine branches that will also burn and support a crown fire.” In addition, even areas with heavy beetle-kill have some trees that survive, and many have other kinds of trees mixed in among those that die. And then there’s another huge factor: the combination of weather and climate. Logan pointed to the massive Yellowstone fires of 1988, which took down every kind of forest — beetle-kill and green alike. “It all burned, just because conditions were so volatile,” he said. “In any situation, what’s driving it is fuel — you’ve got to have fuel. And the fuel can be green, red, gray, or gray on the ground, and if the weather conditions are right, and you get a lightning strike or some idiot with a match, it’s going to go. And if the weather conditions are like they’ve been in Colorado these past few years, or like they were in ‘88, it’s going to go big, regardless of what anybody can do. “As humans, we have this idea that we can control nature, and we often can — we turn on the air conditioner and things like that. But these are forces of nature you’re not going to control.”

Researcher raises questions

I-News is the public service journalism arm of Rocky Mountain PBS. For more information: inewsnetwork.org. Contact Kevin Vaughan at 303-446-4936 or kvaughan@ inewsnetwork.org.

Still, Jolly, the Montana researcher, cautioned against assuming that a forest will be less burnable six years after being hit by beetles because the trees no longer have

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nual open house from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. July 13 at the sheriff’s office grounds in Divide. The event is free and open to the public.

Gomes credits the size of the department as well as the cooperation among the retailers for the increase in shoplifting arrests. “It doesn’t mean that crimes aren’t occurring in El Paso County or other counties but they have higher crimes to prioritize while we still can focus on shoplifting,” Gomes said.

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HAVE A STORY IDEA? Email your ideas to Pikes Peak Community Editor Pat Hill at phill@ourcoloradonews. com or call her at 719-686-6458.

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4-Color

4 Pikes Peak Courier View

July 10, 2013

Greenhouse thrives on brain power By Pat Hill

phill@ourcoloradonews.com In the gardener’s constant battle to outwit Mother Nature in Teller County, or at least come to terms with what Lee Willoughby calls “climate chaos,” the winner is one who adapts rather than surrenders. “It’s not just the drought but the uneven temperatures,” said Lee Willoughby, project coordinator for The Harvest Center greenhouse at Aspen Valley Ranch. With warm temperatures in April and weekly blizzards in May, gardening these days seems like a quest for power. Willoughby, however, comes armed with tricks such as soaker hoses, drip irrigation and mulch. Recently, Willoughby raised the ante on working in conjunction with the drought, which, to lesser gardeners, threatens the entire season. However, by studying the ins and outs of plants, he’s generating a thriving garden. “Plants are sort of like people; they’re mostly made out of water,” Willoughby said, adding that plants receive moisture through the roots. “When that process is interrupted it makes the plant more vulnerable to insect damage, disease and, in the extreme, of dying.” As the drought impedes the growth cycle of plants and flowers, things go haywire in other areas. “You don’t see as many bees if there aren’t as many flowers,” Willoughby said. While Teller County is not in dire straits yet, Willoughby offers advice, courtesy of the Harvest Center. “This year we are encouraging people to pay attention to the watering process,” he said. For openers, Willoughby advises watering plants and flowers by hand, letting the water soak into the ground. “The worst thing you can do is have a hose and spray all the plants; it’s not good for water conservation and getting the plants wet like that tends to encourage disease,” he said. In a drought, fertilizing is a no-no. “When you don’t depend on Mother Nature for most of the water, the last thing you want to do is encourage growth,” he said. “Just leave it alone as far as fertilizer goes.” In a drought, weeds are the bad guys. “Weeds compete for water,” Willoughby said. In somewhat wishful thinking, Willoughby recalls weather patterns of days gone by. “There’s something magic about rainfall,” he said. “When it rains a nice slow gentle rain, things seem to pop up.” As the drought takes a stranglehold, Colorado State University extension office assumes a prominent role, particularly as an alert system for the next three months. “We’ve got a double whammy hitting us, high temperatures and low precipitation,” said Mark Platten, CSU Extension’s local director. “That combination is just a killer for

Lee Willoughby, project coordinator for the Harvest Center, a nonprofit organization that promotes sustainability, highlights several methods that allow gardeners to grow during a drought, including the soaker hose and mulch. Photos by Pat Hill us.” Platten is not encouraged by the colorcoded drought map of the west where brown, which denotes severe conditions, is gaining on Teller County. “With the high temperatures we’re getting we may be in the brown in the next few weeks,” he said. “The southern half of Teller is in extreme drought.” As conditions worsen, the extension office hosts Master Gardener workshops for area homeowners. With the lack of rainfall, the city of Woodland Park has initiated water restrictions, which, in turn, generate grumblings. But the Harvest Center looks on the bright side. “Restrictions force us to do things we’ve put off; in our case, drip irrigation,” Willoughby said. “As you get to understand what’s behind the policy, we’re primarily talking about convincing people not to use the overhead spray or sprinkle at the wrong times because some of it isn’t even hitting the ground, it’s going up in the air.” In the eyes of an optimist, restrictions increase brain power. “It’s made us be a little more inventive,” Willoughby said. A nonprofit organization, The Harvest Center donates the produce to the Community Cupboard.

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At the Harvest Center greenhouse at Aspen Valley Ranch, gardeners use a soaker hose, one with small openings, to slowly water the plants.

Yellow ribbons tied now By Pat Hill

phill@ourcoloradonews.com After a campaign to raise money for Welcome Home, Warrior, Doloretta Barber helped the organization raise more than $3,000. Barber led the yellow-ribbon campaign, which sought $1 per ribbon. In a ribbon-tying ceremony hosted by the city of Woodland Park June 30, Barber and a team of volunteers tied a string of ribbons, 8,465 of them, on the large tree in Lions Park. To help Barber achieve her goal of $8,465, donors may send checks to Welcome Home, Warrioer, PO Box 7217, Woodland Park, CO 80863.

Caitlin Barber, 5, ties the last ribbon, of 8,465, on the tree in Lions Park June 30 The number of ribbons signifies the altitude of Woodland Park while the dedication ceremony concluded the fundraising campaign for Welcome Home, Warrior. Courtesy photo


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July 10, 2013

Pikes Peak Courier View 5


6-Opinion

6 Pikes Peak Courier View

July 10, 2013

opinions / yours and ours

Ghosts of populations past in Teller County Among the first things a modern-day visitor notices when they first drop down into the bowl that is Cripple Creek, is the ghost, or “presence” of populations past. It is a similar feeling in nearby Victor. At one time, about 1900, Cripple Creek was the fourth largest city in Colorado, and boasted a population of 25,000 people, along with a fair amount of dogs, and donkeys. Today’s population figures put it closer to 1,200. The mining district at the time, of course, also counted the camps of Cameron, Altman, Independence, Elkton, Anaconda, Midway and Gillett. Most estimates put the district at a population of nearly 50,000 at the height of the boom.

Victor had a population of nearly 12,000 residents itself in 1900 according to the census. Today roughly 400 people live in Victor. Goldfield, at the time, claimed 3,500 residents, and Altman and Midway com-

bined added another 1,500. Independence counted 1,500 for its own. Anaconda, weighed in with 1,000, Gillett and Cameron each put forth 1,000. Even Beaver Park, (or Love, as it was also known), contributed 75 to the count in 1900. Elkton, which included Arequa and Eclipse tossed in another 2,500. Of course, there was also the lumber town and health resort of Woodland Park. When it was incorporated on Jan. 26, 1891, 38 votes were cast in favor of incorporation and 14 voted against. The “City Above the Clouds,” Woodland Park has grown some, tipping the scales recently at 7,200 residents. Between Divide and Woodland Park, the

settlement of Edlow had its own rail depot, school, and 10-room hotel. Estimates by the Ute Pass Historical Society a few years ago had nearly 2,000 residents living between Green Mountain Falls and Divide at the 1900-year-mark. Divide, itself was a stage stop, and a tent city for rail workers, as branch lines from the gold district joined the mainline of the Colorado Midland there. Florissant, had nearly 300 residents in in 1890s, but boomed as well by the turn of the century as it became a pathway into the camps. Today, Teller County’s population is estimated at about 24,000 residents. Just a little shy of Cripple Creek by itself, at the height of the boom around 1900.

Thirdhand smoke damages DNA It’s a no-brainer that smoking cigarettes is a killer and hardly news that secondhand smoke is bad for you. But here’s a new shocker – thirdhand smoke damages the DNA of human cells and exposure to it, especially for children, may be more injurious than smoking. According to the American Academy of Pediatrics, thirdhand smoke is the smoke left behind where people have previously smoked. It can be found in vehicles, furniture, carpets, curtains, walls, elevators and the hair and clothing of smokers or that of those who have been around a smoker. Long after the smoker and secondhand smoke have disappeared, this toxic brew of gases and particles clings to the surroundings. A New York Times article lists the chemicals found in thirdhand smoke as hydrogen cyanide, which is used in chemical weapons; butane; toluene, which is in paint thinners; lead; carbon monoxide; and polonium-210, a highly radioactive carcinogen. Nice. It turns out that the burning of tobacco releases nicotine in the form of a vapor that absorbs onto indoor surfaces that can linger for days, weeks and in some cases months. Scientists have known for years that tobacco smoke sticks to surfaces, where it can react with other chemicals. However, a new study published June 13th in the journal Mutagenesis and reported in LiveScience shows that the residual nicotine found in smoke reacts with molecules in the air forming a compound called tobacco-specific nitrosamine or TSNA. The researchers contend that this residue significantly damages DNA in human cells. In the study, scientists put paper strips in smoking chambers where some of the samples were left for only 20 minutes, after which the tobacco residue was measured. The researchers called this “acute exposure.” Other paper strips were left in the chamber for 200 days, which was ventilated so it would be exposed to chemicals

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normally found in the air. Researchers labeled this “chronic exposure.” Human cells were then exposed to the extracted chemicals from both samples with surprising results. The chronic samples had a higher concentration of thirdhand smoke residue than the acute samples and also caused higher levels of DNA damage. “The cumulative effect of thirdhand smoke is quite significant,” said researcher Lara Gundel, of Lawrence Berkley National Laboratory in California. “The findings suggest the materials could be getting more toxic with time.” One important characteristic of thirdhand smoke is that its residue can interact with other compounds in the air, such as ozone, and produce new toxins, the researchers said. And, it is difficult to say when it is safe to enter a place where a smoker has formerly lived as the emission seems to continue for a long time. Cleaning a car or a home or even painting the walls doesn’t solve the problem. “We can take up markers from former smoking months and sometimes even years after the smoker has left, said researchers. Next time you walk into a room or sit in a car that smells like smoke, your nose isn’t lying. It’s telling you the odor is toxic. Cord Prettyman is a certified Master Personal Trainer and the owner of Absolute Workout Fitness and Post-Re-hab Studio in Woodland Park. He can be reached at 687-7437 or by email at cordprettyman@ msn.com.

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Columnists and guest commentaries The Pikes Peak Courier View features a limited number of regular columnists, found on these pages and elsewhere in the paper, depending on the typical subject the columnist covers. Their opinions are not necessarily those of the Pikes Peak Courier View. Want your own chance to bring an issue to our readers’ attention, to highlight something great in our community, or just to make people laugh? Why not write a letter of 300 words or fewer. Include your full name, address and the best number to reach you by telephone.

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Ezequiel Ramirez of Highlands Ranch speaks in support of immigration reform in front of Denver’s Republican Party headquarters on July 2. Photo by Vic Vela

Rally calls for immigration reform Activists lean on GOP to back bill that passed Senate By Vic Vela

vvela@ourcoloradonews.com A group of immigration activists rallied in Denver on July 2 to call on Colorado’s Republican U.S. representatives to support an immigration-reform bill that recently passed the Senate. “We are calling on our Republican congressional delegation leaders to step up, to exercise leadership, to show bipartisan willingness, to follow the will of the people of Colorado,” said Julien Ross of the Colorado Immigrant Rights Coalition, during a rally that was held outside of Denver’s Republican Party headquarters. The group waved Americans flags and held signs that signaled its desire for immigration reform at the federal level. Immigration reform is high on President Obama’s second-term priority list, but it’s an effort that faces an unknown future in the Republican-controlled House. The bill — which passed the Democratic-controlled Senate by a 68-32 vote on June 27 — overhauls immigration laws by allowing a pathway to citizenship for about 11 million undocumented workers. It also puts provisions in place that strengthen border

security. Many House Republicans have expressed concern over security issues in the bill, and some party members are opposed to a bill that they believe grants amnesty for those living here illegally. House Speaker John Boehner, R-Ohio, has said through national media outlets that he will not bring the bill up for a vote if the majority Republicans in his caucus do not support it. The purpose of the Denver rally, which was organized by Coloradans for Citizenship Now, was to put pressure on Colorado’s four House Republicans — Reps. Mike Coffman, Doug Lamborn, Cory Gardner and Scott Tipton — to support the Senate bill. Through a statement issued after the rally, Democratic Rep. Ed Perlmutter joined rally organizers in calling on House Republicans to pass immigration reform, saying that by allowing undocumented persons a pathway to citizenship it would “lead to increased job growth and a stronger economy.” “I hope House Republican leadership will work with Democrats in a bipartisan way to protect our borders and ensure those who are working hard, paying taxes, getting an education, learning English and not committing crimes are able to achievecoun their American Dream as a citizen of our C Rally continues on Page 7cern enou Coffm when tion enfo prom Woodland Park district forester, Bonnie “I Sumner and Scott Lord, who are responthat sible for having their subdivisions declared to no “Firewise Communities.” that With the catastrophic fire season underthe s way in the Pikes Peak Region, agency repC resentatives as well as the Firewise volunnot w teers shared information about resources, the s including Coalition for the Upper South Platte.

Tranquil Acres residents in the know A dedicated group of Tranquil Acres residents attended a seminar to learn more about protecting their homes in the case of catastrophic fire. Tranquil Acres is a thickly wooded neighborhood bordering national forest land and has limited options for escape. Among the presenters were Tyler Lambert, chief of Northeast Teller County Fire Protection District, Andy Schlosberg,

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July 10, 2013

Love planted here sprouts in Africa On an unseasonably cold April day three years ago, snow broke from the sky and chilled business for a Castle Rock garage sale. But high school student Hanna Tenerowicz and her friends in the French Honor Society slapped high fives in jubilation. They had raised $150, enough to pay for two Congolese girls to stay in school another year and lessen their risk of being married at 13 or 14 in exchange for money to feed their families. “They were just so excited that we raised enough to sponsor a girl,” said Anne Damanti, Hanna’s French teacher at Castle View High School. But Hanna, 19, a wisp of a young woman who just completed her freshman year at Wellesley College near Boston, wants to do more. Two weeks ago she left for the Democratic Republic of Congo to document the lives of schoolgirls, bring back their hopes and ideas for community transformation, and establish connections to help those dreams come true. “Gender equality makes a difference,” Hanna, whose soft voice conveys conviction with quiet, deep passion, said before leaving. “It’s a domino effect on all kinds of things.” The story of how this came to be — that a girl so shy Anne often couldn’t hear her speak in class has grown into a young woman daring to change lives — converges on a shared connection to the French language and a motivation to help. It is a story of compassion, determination and, quite simply, courage. Because it takes bravery to stretch beyond the familiar, to push cultural boundaries, to try to make a difference in a world so big and complicated we sometimes wonder whether what we do matters. Finally, perhaps most importantly, it is a story of empowerment. And it begins with Sandra Bea, who emigrated to Colorado in 2001 from the French-speaking D.R. Congo to continue her studies in education. A French teacher, she graduated from Metropolitan State

University of Denver and today is dean of students at Global Village Academy, a language immersion school in Denver. The daughter of an engineer of a local mining company in Mbuji-Mayi, the country’s third largest city, Sandra grew up without worries: “I was eating three times a day; I went to school with a car. I grew up really easily. It was not hard like the other girls are facing right now. We never had any conversation about `You are going to get married in two days because we don’t have the money.’” It wasn’t until she was 22 and student teaching in her former high school that she understood the reality. Every two weeks, it seemed, another student would leave. They were, she learned, getting married. “Why?” she asked. “Because, Madam, we are not like you,” they told her. “You can afford it. We cannot afford it.” “That,” Sandra said, “broke my heart.” So, four years ago, she founded the nonprofit Muanjadi Organization, a women’s empowerment project that helps girls complete their high school education and avoid early arranged marriages. “For many parents in the Congo, marrying off their daughters constitutes a source of revenue in a country where people live with less than $1 a day with a GDP per capita of $300,” Sandra writes on the organization’s website. Through fundraising and donations, the organization — whose name means Brave Woman — provides tuition and supplies for girls in seventh through 12th grades at the same school Sandra attended.

Cost for one girl for one year of high school: $75. Cost for one year of college: $350. Anne, originally from Belgium, met Sandra and learned about Muanjadi at a state world language conference three years ago. She brought the idea back to her French Honor Society, which was looking for a community service project. Students learned how most girls eat just one meal a day and how the school has no water or electricity. They compared the cost of one year of high school to what teens here might spend on fancy jeans or a Starbucks coffee habit. “That’s not a lot to have the freedom to actually go to school and try to be something,” Anne said. That, Hanna said, coupled with the specter of forced marriage, “was a pretty powerful thing to learn about.” Last school year, Muanjadi sponsored 100 girls, 11 of them thanks to Castle View. The honor society, which has corresponded with the girls through letters, phone and Skype, also is sponsoring a student in college — one of the girls it began sponsoring in high school three years ago. Other organization sponsors include Kent Denver Academy, Metro State, Colorado State University, a lawyers’ organization and many individuals and families. But Hanna hopes to take the program one step further. Her new project is Portrait of a Brave Woman. Accompanied by Sandra, she has spent the past two weeks interviewing — in French — and filming girls at the school about their lives, but also about their ideas to implement change in their communities. She plans to share the mini-documentaries with artists who will be encouraged to create paintings about a particular girl whose story connects with them. Proceeds from the sale of those paintings will go toward the girls’ personal and community goals, such as becoming a nurse or training midwives to decrease the high infant mortality rate. The objectives are several: to empower

Congolese girls, improve their communities and create meaningful cross-cultural connections with Western artists and buyers. “I hope community improvement brought about by women’s ideas will help to create more positive and respectful attitudes towards women in Mbuji-Mayi,” Hanna, also an artist, said. And “I hope the project empowers the girls themselves by helping them to personally make a difference.” Her dream is unquestionably big. But, Anne said, “There is nothing, anymore, that she can’t do.” Hanna’s visit, Sandra said, is the concrete realization of what dreams and hard work can accomplish. And having someone their age talk to them and share ideas with them is inspirational: “You don’t know me, but you came to give me a chance to become someone.” Which is exactly what Hanna wanted to do after reading “Half the Sky,” a book about the oppression of women and girls in the developing world. “It really changed my outlook on the world,” she said. “I was really interested in doing whatever I could to make a difference.” Hanna returns this week with her videos and interviews and dream. “I’m definitely prepared for this to change my life,” she said before leaving. Without a doubt, it will. But, in a school half a world away, girls are surely changed, too, because a stranger from a different life cared enough to learn about theirs. That’s empowerment. The kind that makes a difference. To learn more about Hanna Tenerowicz and Portrait of a Brave Woman, go to www. muanjadi.blogspot.com. For information about the Muanjadi Organization, go to www.muanjadi.org. Ann Macari Healey’s column about people, places and issues of everyday life appears every other week. She can be reached at ahealey@ourcolorado news.com or 303-566-4110.

LACKMAN

Melton

Elizabeth Anne Lackman

June 29, 1923 - November 19, 2012

Immigration activists rally outside Denver’s Republican Party headquarters on July 2 in support of an immigration reform bill that is making its way through Congress. Photo by Vic Vela

Rally Continued from Page 6

country,” Perlmutter said. Colorado House Republicans are concerned that the Senate bill doesn’t go far enough in strengthening border security. Coffman said in a statement that in 1986, when Congress passed a major immigration reform bill, the promises made “on enforcement and border security were not promises kept.” “I will look for solutions in the House that will provide for the reforms necessary to not only secure our borders but to verify that they remain secure,” Coffman said in the statement. Coffman spokesman Dustin Zvonek did not wish to comment beyond what was in the statement.

Rally speakers brought up Coffman’s upcoming re-election race, a contest that surely will receive national attention. “Latinos came out in record numbers in the last election,” said Olivia Mendoza of the Colorado Latino Forum. “This is just the beginning.” Ezequiel Ramirez, 19, of Highlands Ranch, voted for the first time last year, and is one of Coffman’s constituents. Though he was born in the U.S., his parents were not. “The message we want to get across is that this is potentially going to help out a lot of people,” Ramirez said. “It’s going to help us become a better country. There’s a lot of people counting on (Coffman) and it’s really important for him to put his vote into this. Asked by reporters how he’d characterize Coffman’s re-election chances if he does not support the bill, Ramirez said, “Best of luck.”

Elizabeth Anne Lackman passed away peacefully on November 19, 2012, surrounded by her daughters, son-in-law, and friends. She was 89 years old. Elizabeth was born in Fort Worth, Texas, on June 29, 1923. She graduated from high school in Marshall, Texas, and attended business school there. She moved to Houston, Texas, where she became an executive secretary. She married Hugo Lackman in Houston on August 1, 1943, shortly before he deployed with the US Army to the Philippine Islands as a member of the 749th Transportation Battalion. Hugo and Elizabeth lived for many years in Longview, Texas, where they raised their family. In 1988, following Hugo’s retirement from the Union Pacific Railway, they moved to their summer home in Cripple Creek. They lived there while building their retirement home in Woodland Park, where they moved in 1990. Elizabeth was a gregarious, curious person who loved to learn. She was drawn particularly to science, history, and art. While in Longview, she volunteered for many years at Good Shepherd Hospital in the emergency department. She also was very active in St. Michael and All Angels’ Episcopal Church, also located in Longview. While in Cripple Creek, she served as a volunteer at the Cripple Creek District Museum and at the nursing home that once existed in a historic hospital building there. In Woodland Park, she belonged to and volunteered for Ute Pass Historical Society, Mountain Artists, and Ute Pass Symphony Guild. She loved to read aloud and for several years volunteered at Summit Elementary School in Divide to read stories to the children and help them with their reading. She also volunteered for many

years at the Woodland Park Senior Citizens Club. With her husband, Elizabeth was active in the Pueblo Locomotive and Rail Historical Society, which became the Pueblo Railway Foundation. Elizabeth was a member of both St. Andrew’s Episcopal Church in Cripple Creek and St. David of the Hills Episcopal Church in Woodland Park. She was very active at St. Andrew’s, where she held various positions on the vestry, and in the Episcopal Church Women organization, as part of which she served at the diocesan level. Elizabeth’s family and friends knew that she loved to cook. Her menus and delicious meals became part of her persona. She collected hundreds of cookbooks, showcasing cuisines from all parts of the world. Elizabeth is survived by two daughters, both of Woodland Park: Mary Gillaspy and Sherri (Tom) Cheatham; a daughterin-law, Barbara Lackman, of Montrose; three grandchildren, Janet (David) Colson of Garden City, Kansas, Daniel Gillaspy of Lawrence, Kansas, and Erik Lackman of Montrose; three great-grandchildren, Cameo and Rosemary Colson and Annabel Gillaspy. Preceding her in death were her beloved husband of 66 years, Hugo Lackman (2009); her son, William Watson Lackman (2011); and her son-in-law, Jefferson Gillaspy (1992). A memorial service and celebration of Elizabeth’s life will be held at St. Andrew’s on Saturday, August 3, 2013. Her remains will be inurned with her husband’s in the columbarium on the church’s grounds. The family requests no flowers. Instead, memorials in Elizabeth’s memory can be made to St. Joseph’s Indian School, P.O. Box 100, Chamberlain, South Dakota, or to either of the churches of which she was a member.

Lucy Eva Melton

October 2, 1920 – July 4, 2013

Lucy Eva (Harkins) Melton, 92, slipped the bonds of this life on Independence Day, to forever be with her Lord and Savior, Jesus Christ. Lucy was born October 2, 1920 in Tavna Beg, near Straid, County Mayo, Ireland, to James and Mary Harkins. She was raised in London, England, surviving the Battle of Britain during World War II. Emigrating to the United States, she eventually settled in Colorado where she met her husband, Glenn. She was a resident of Monument, Colorado for more than forty-four years. Lucy is survived by two sons, Stephen (Susan) and Kevin; two grandchildren, Jessica and Joshua; one great-grandchild, Max, and numerous nieces and nephews. She was preceded in death by her parents, eight siblings, her daughter Rebecca, and her husband. Visitation was, July 9, 2013 at Northland Community Church, 245 2nd Street Monument, CO 80132, with the funeral immediately after. Interment at Monument Cemetery. Arrangements by: The Springs Funeral Services, 719-328-1793

Private Party Viola Ortega | 303-566-4089 obituaries@ourcoloradonews.com

Funeral Homes www.memoriams.com


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July 10, 2013

Public invited to envision Memorial Park By Pat Hill

phill@ourcoloradonews.com Two public meetings this month launch the visioning exercise for the redevelopment of Memorial Park. With its view of Pikes Peak, the signature pond and urban location, the park is a vital piece of the city’s landscape. In April, the city awarded a $24,320 contract to Land Patterns, Inc. to design the plan. “We envisioned the project in a community-driven process,” said David Morrison who, with Bryan Kniep and David Mijares, leads the public process July 17 and 24. “We want stakeholder involvement to make sure the community feels engaged and invested in the outcome of the master plan.” The project springs from the city’s comprehensive plan which identified the redevelopment as the number priority for the parks and recreation department directed by Cindy Keating. “We want to have ideas flowing about how people use as well as perceive the park and how it all meshes together,” Morrison said. A visioning exercise is a chance for the citizens to put voice to their dreams of how the park could enhance the community. “Our design will be based on their input,” Morrison said. “Everybody’s going to have a different dream or idea and we cherish that, look forward to all the input we can get.” While most cities have memorial parks, the visioning is designed to identify unique characteristics of the one in Woodland Park. As well, the exercise is expected to identify the park user and to spotlight the amenities. “Are the amenities sacred, should always stay there?” Morrison said. “Or are there amenities that don’t belong, don’t function well?” Among the issues that may come up are parking, the desire for festivals and a place reserved for open space, Kniep said. “While we’re going through this, we’re also doing sight analysis, looking at viewsheds, doing an inventory of the trees and identifying the park’s features.” After two public sessions, the landscape architecture and planning firm retreats to the drawing board. “We’ll take all the de-

Land Patterns, Inc. has been selected to design a master plan for the redevelopment of Memorial Park. To begin the public process, the company, along with the city, hosts two public meetings this month, July 17 and July 24. The final plan depends upon the public’s input. Pictured, with Cindy Keating, director of the city’s Parks and Recreation Department, are company designers Bryan Kniep, left, and Dave Morrison. Not pictured is designer David Mijares. Photo by Pat Hill

sign ideas back to the office, filter through the information and see a theme start to evolve,” Morrison said. The public is once again invited back in August to refine the preliminary plan, an

exercise followed by approval by the city’s parks and recreation advisory board. Ultimately, the Woodland Park City Council will approve the final plan. “If we need to, we will do the redevelopment in phases,” Ke-

ating said. “Grants are getting tougher and tougher to get.” The public sessions are from 8:30 to 10:30 a.m. July 17 and from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. July 24 at the Ute Pass Cultural Center.

Programs offered at Mueller State Park The following programs are offered at Mueller State Park. All offered programs are free, but you must have a $7 daily parks pass or a $70 annual pass on your vehicle to enter the park. For weather updates or for more information, call Mueller State Park at 719-6872366. Mueller State Park is located 4 miles south of Divide on Highway 67.

Thursday, July 11

• Hike: Osborn Homestead. Meet at Black Bear TrailheadVisit the Osborn

Homestead to take in some views and travel back in time. Hear about what it was like to live in the mountains before modern conveniences from Interpretive Naturalist Penny Edyvean on this 3-mile moderate hike. Bring sturdy shoes, rain and sun protection, layered clothing, water, and snacks. 9:30 a.m.

uralist Penny Edyvean to play games and gain a greater understanding of the lives of the Ute people. 9:30 a.m. • Wild Turkeys. At the Amphitheater. Volunteer naturalist Mike Storey has a long history of outdoors experience with Colorado turkeys. Hear the life and times of this stately, large bird. Dress warmly. 8:30 p.m.

Friday, July 12

Saturday, July 13

• Life as a Ute. At the Visitor Center. Kids of all ages come and explore how Colorado’s early inhabitants lived, including their traditions and customs. Join Interpretive Nat-

Multi estate AUCTION Wednesday JULY 10th * 11 AM 6314 E Platte, C/S 80909 Model”T” Replica Food Cart, Player Piano, Pine Wash Stands, Dining Table, 6 Chairs & Hutch, Sofas, Bar Stools, Desks, Beds, Art, Oil Lamps, Noritake Dishes, Bentwood Chairs, Craft Supplies, Watches, Toys, Sony, Compac, HP, Magnavox Electronics & Much More, Still Unpacking!!

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• Hike: Family Fun Hike. Meet at the Visitor Center. Adults and children are welcome to join volunteer naturalist Carole Larkey for this 1-mile long hike which stops at

educational stations. This hike will include information of interest for all ages. 10 a.m. • Songs and Games to Keep Your Campfire Burning. At the Amphitheater. Hang out at the campfire tonight with volunteer naturalist Anne Cowles. We’ll be singing songs, and playing games that you’ll want to try later with your friends and family. Don’t forget the kids, water and camp chairs. Dress warmly. 7 p.m. Colorado Parks and Wildlife manages 42 state parks, more than 300 state wildlife areas, all of Colorado’s wildlife, and a variety of outdoor recreation. For more information go to cpw.state.co.us

Economic impact of new cadets on local economy $2 million Special to The Tribune The arrival of the Class of 2017 on June 27, along with the arrival of cadet-candidates at the academy’s Prep School, July 17, will add more than $2 million to the local economy.

When all the figures are added up, the estimated 4,170 visiting family members, relatives and friends of cadets and cadet-candidates will generate approximately $1,251,000 in direct revenue in the Pikes Peak Region, and an additional $925,740 in city, county, state and Pikes Peak Rural Transpor-

tation Authority sales taxes. Together, the total impact of inprocessing for both the academy and prep school will be $2,176,740. In fiscal year 2012, the total economic impact of the academy on the surrounding communities was $898,823,166.

business buzz The Business Buzz features news about the economic scene, promotions, acquisitions and expansions. Contact Pat Hill at phill@ourcoloradonews.com or 687-3006. The Clothes Closet and Living Streams Church opened this month at a new address at 108 North Park St. in Woodland Park. The Clothes Closet, under the direction of Pastor Trish Sin-

clair. The Clothes Closet is a nonprofit organization that provides clothing to assist struggling families. The clothes have been washed, sewed and drycleaned. The hours of operation are from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Monday, Friday and Saturday and from 2 to 6 p.m. Wednesday. For information, call 6872388. The Pikes Peak Workforce Cen-

ter was awarded the American Legion’s Annual National Employment Service Award. The award was given in recognition of the Center’s efforts during 2012 to ensure the economic well-being of the veterans of Colorado. In 2012, the Center provided services to 12,728 veterans, transitioning service members and eligible spouses.


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July 10, 2013

kImpostors posing as county employees Special to The Tribune

The El Paso County Assessor’s Office is warning residents that it has received a number of reports that residents in the Black Forest

fire area have been contacted by impostors who claim to represent the El Paso County Assessor’s Office. Residents should not provide information to these individuals.

“My appraisers were out there the last two weeks doing property inspections. We finished up last Friday and won’t be out there again soon except to respond to a request from a property owner,”

Mark Lowderman, El Paso County Assesssor, said. Employees of the County Assessor’s Office have county identification and business cards and drive official vehicles marked with

the words Assessor’s Department on the doors. The El Paso County Attorney’s Office warns that impersonating a public official to gather information for personal benefit is a felony.

Family looks for justice Fossil beds receives America’s Best Idea grant for Dylan Redwine Sheriff ’s office has not named any suspects, active investigation By Lisa Collacott

lcollacottourcoloradonews.com

The bracelets read “Hope for Dylan Redwine” and for seven months his family and friends held on to hope that he would come home. On June 27 the family was notified that the teen had been found but it wasn’t the ending they were hoping for. After investigators conducted a search of Middle Mountain Road near Vallecito Lake the La Plata County Sheriff’s Office received news back from the Colorado Bureau of Investigation that human remains found during that search were that of Dylan. Now instead of searching for him investigators are now focusing on what happened to him. “We have no new breaks in the case. We have not labeled anyone as a suspect,” Dan Bender, public information officer for the La Plata County Sheriff’s Office, said. Dylan Redwine went missing Nov. 19, the day after arriving in Vallecito to spend Thanksgiving with his father during a court ordered visit. Dylan was 13-years-old at the time and was an eighth grader at LewisPalmer Middle School. Dylan and his mom had moved to the Monument area from andBayfield a few months before. Dylan’s father, Mark Redwine, said he left his home 0 toto run errands that morning and when he p.m.returned Dylan was gone. During an interview with The Tribune in February Elaine Redwine, Dylan’s mom, said she had “hope that Dylan will come home safe.” Her thoughts were consumed with bringing Dylan home safe and wondering what happened to him. Elaine Redwine had to eventual return to her job but made the six hour drive to Durango every weekend to search for her son. The search of Middle Mountain Road

JULY 11

was not based on any recent tips or new information. “The search of Middle Mountain Road was one of a series of searches since the snow melted. It’s an area we have searched in the past and we always intended to go back there,” Bender said. The La Plata County Sheriff’s Office along with several other agencies had been searching the area around Vallecito Lake since Dylan disappeared and had to wait for the snow to melt to go back into some areas. According to the Durango Herald Mark Redwine met with investigators and was taken up to Middle Mountain Road where Dylan’s remains were found. “It was horrific. It was unimaginable. No parent should go up there in a situation like this,” Mark Redwine told the reporter. In that February interview with The Tribune Elaine Redwine said she believed that her ex-husband knew more than he was telling. The two appeared together on the Dr. Phil show in February and accused each other of having something to do with Dylan’s disappearance. Since it is an ongoing investigation the La Plata County Sheriff’s Office won’t release any more details in the case. Now that the search is over the family will now concentrate on bringing whoever is responsible to justice. In a separate interview with the Durango Herald, Dylan’s older brother Cory Redwine said, “It’s sad to hear he’s no longer with us, but it’s better than not knowing, wondering every single second of every single day. It’s nice to have closure. We found Dylan. That doesn’t really mean all that much if we can’t find justice and bring peace for him.” The Tribune attempted to contact Elaine Redwine for this story but did not hear back by the time of deadline. A candlelight vigil took place on July 27 in Bayfield. Hundreds turned out for the memorial. No word on whether or not there will be one held in Monument.

THINGS TO DO

KRITTER KARAVAN is at 10:15 a.m. July 11 at the Woodland Park Public Library. Ever touched a hedgehog, or felt the silky fur of a chinchilla? Or had a tarantula tickle your hand (or maybe not!)? Come to this special storytime program. Call 719687-9281 ext. 137 for questions. JULY 11 FOSSILS WITH Jeff Wolin from the Florissant Fossil Beds and storytime at the Florissant Public Library are at 10:30 a.m. July 11. Call 719-748-3939 for information.  JULY 11 KRITTER KARAVAN. Learn about hedgehogs and chinchillas at 10:15 a.m. July 11 at the Woodland Park Public Library. Have you ever seen a chinchilla? Do hedgehogs really roll into little balls? Come see for yourself. If she is in the mood, you might even get to see a tarantula in all her furry glory. Call 719-6879281 ext. 137. JULY 11-13 SEMINARS. FLORISSANT Fossil Beds offers seminars on

Petroglyph Making, Flora of the Rockies, and the Bugs of Florissant in July. Ecosystems and Flora of the Central Rockies is presented July 11-12. Join instructor Doug Coleman for a concentrated class representing an overview of trees, shrubs, wildflowers and grasses of the Central Rockies region. On July 13, learn about Florissant Bugs: Past Mysteries and Present Challenges.

JULY 12 CELEBRATE 40 years. The Woodland Park Senior Citizens Club celebrates 40 years on July 12. Join us for burgers and brats, and bring a side dish or dessert to share. We’ll supply the beverages. If you have photos or historical tidbits, bring them along to

share. Call 719-687-3877 for information.

JULY 12, JULY 19, JULY 26 MUSIC SERIES. The Ass in the Grass music series presents George Whitesell, variety oldies, on July 5; Tim Brown, fingerstyle guitar, on July 12; Skip Moore, adult contemporary, on July 19; Bill LaReau, nostalgic Americana, on July 26; Rich Owen, country fusion, on Aug. 2; Vicki Logan, cinematic, electronic, on Aug. 9; Muriel Shickman, folk & flute music, on Aug. 16; Six Minutes Apart, folk bluegrass, on Aug. 23 and Aug. 30; Gordy & Grace, Gypsy jass, on Sept. 6; George Whitesell, variety oldies, on Sept. 13; Vicki Logan, cinematic/electronic, on Sept. 20; Six Minutes Apart, folk bluegrass, on Sept. 27. Concerts are frolm 10 a.m. to noon Fridays on the corner of Henrietta Street and Park Avenue in Woodland Park. JULY 12 CONCERT. TIME Machine will play at 8 p.m. July 12 at the Crystola Roadhouse. JULY 13, JULY 20 FREE WILDFLOWER walks, provided by Teller County Master Gardeners, are from 9-11 a.m. July 13 and July 20. Walks are easy to moderate and all will start at the parking lot across from the US Forest Service’s Colorado Campground, which is located 6.5 miles north on highway 67, just before Manitou Lake. Contact Mike at 719-687-2325. JULY 13 FREE STUFF. Courtenay Sobral from Fox 21’s Foxy Moms Show will be at the Woodland Park Public Library at 11 a.m. July 13. Bring the kids, we’ll have activities for them. Find and share high-quality free deals so that you can save and use that money for necessities, investing, donating and just taking a vacation. Call 719-687-9281 ext. 132. 

Calendar continues on Page 11

Florissant Fossil Beds National Monument is one of 34 national parks selected to receive a 2013 America’s Best Idea grant from the National Park Foundation, the official charity of America’s national parks. Inspired by the critically-acclaimed Ken Burns’ documentary “The National Parks: America’s Best Idea” the program funds parks’ activities designed to connect diverse, underserved and under-engaged populations throughout the United States with their national parks in innovative and meaningful ways. “One of the great things about our national parks is that every American can relate to these treasured places if given the

chance to experience them,” said Jonathan Jarvis, director of the National Park Service, in a press release. “It’s our mission to engage visitors from all backgrounds in the diverse stories that we tell in our national parks.” Florissant Fossil Beds will use the grant money to fund its Post to Parks, an awardwinning outreach program designed to help connect the military community with the national parks. The park in Florissant will conduct three programs this summer: a military teen youth mentoring program, a military teen photojournalism camp and a camping trip for military families.

Butte features Singin’ in the Rain Thin Air Theatre Company presents “Singin’ in the Rain,” at the Butte Theatre in Cripple Creek. The play offers a lighthearted depiction of Hollywood, with the stars portraying performers caught up in the transition from silent films to “talkies.”

The show stars Mel Moser, Rebecca Myers and Kevin Pierce. “Singin’ in the Rain,” runs from July 5 through Aug. 31 and rotates with “Girl of the Golden West.” For reservations and times, visit ThinAirThreatre.com

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10 Pikes Peak Courier View

July 10, 2013

Thomas subject of forthcoming biography Former Ark building may become hockey sports camp By Pat Hill

phill@ourcoloradonews.com From an empty building with a sad story to a future as a hockey sports camp for youth, the site of the former Children’s Ark, and later Axios, is expected to rise from the ashes courtesy of Tim Thomas. Professional hockey player and former goalie for the Boston Bruins, Thomas recently purchased the building in unincorporated El Paso County, across U.S. 24 from Green Mountain Falls. Founder of hockey camps for children across the nation, Thomas and his family recently moved to the area and his presence is generating buzz about the camps. Another new resident of the area with his wife Sandi, Guy Scholz, is writing a biography of Thomas whom he met in July 2011. As their relationship developed, Scholz agreed to tell Thomas’s story, giving up his position as the manager of a curling club in Michigan to be close to his subject. “It’s a little bit of a risk but his story is the kind of stuff I’m looking for,” Scholz said. “I’ve kind of fallen in love with the story. Goalies are often quirky people and I’ve always been intrigued by that. They’re also very smart.” Scholz himself is part of the buzz around Green Mountain Falls. Ordained minister and writer who specializes in the psychology of athletes, Scholz wrote the Canadian best seller, “Gold on Ice: The Story of the Sandra Schmirler Curling Team,” which tells the story of the first Canadian team to

Tim Thomas, former goalie for the Boston Bruins, has purchased the building that formerly housed the Children’s Ark and, for the past couple of years, Axios. Thomas is expected to open another outlet in the building for a hockey camp for children. Photos by Pat Hill win the Gold Medal in the 1998 Olympics. “They were the first women’s team that competed against men and won more

Swipe

games than they lost,” said Scholz, who is a native of Saskatchewan, Canada. “It’s the number one curling book of all time, which is kind of cool.” His second book, “Between the Sheets: Creating Curling Champions,” Scholz coauthored with Cheryl Bernard. Energized by his latest subject, Scholz zeroes in on Thomas’s distinctions. “He plays an unorthodox style of goalie,” he said. “He’s older, 39, articulate and one-liner funny,” Scholz said. “He takes the game seriously but in interviews he came across as being grateful to even be there.” As far as the hockey camp is concerned, Scholz says it’s a work in progress. However, he divulged another tidbit about Thomas. “Tim started missionary\humanitarian work in Kenya, opening a school, hospital and a church,” Scholz said. “He didn’t try to North Americanize people but went in there to benefit the people of Kenya.”

CHILDREN’S ARK The Children’s Ark, founded in 1994, was a treatment center for troubled and neglected children. About four years ago, the founders sold the facility to Axios, which ran into trouble when one of their employees was convicted of sexual assault on a child. As a result, Axios never recovered and was later shut down by El Paso County. The closing leaves a gap in the treatment of troubled children.

As both their lives evolve, Scholz is writing the story as it happens. “I think Tim would consider missionary work I don’t think that was on his radar until about four or five years ago,”Scholz said. “He’s ready for the next chapter of his life.” In the meantime, Scholz expects to send the book, tentatively titled, “No Regrets: the Tim Thomas Story,” to the publisher sometime next year.

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Guy Scholz is writing a book about Tim Thomas, the professional hockey player. Scholz and his wife, Sandi, have moved to Green Mountain Falls to be closer to the subject. Sandi works at The Pantry and Guy does some of his computer work there.

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Our team of professional reporters, photographers and editors are out in the community to bring you the news each week, but we can't do it alone. Send your news tips, your own photographs, event information, letters, commentaries ... Please share by contacting us at news@ ourcoloradonews.com and we will take it from there.


11-Color

Pikes Peak Courier View 11

July 10, 2013

Explore the past, present and future of the mining museum Presentation will be given July 18 at Palmer Lake town hall By Lisa Collacott

lcollacott@ourcoloradonews.com Everything has a history and a future including the Western Museum of Mining and Industry. On July 18 the public is invited to learn all about it when the Palmer Lake Historical Society will present “The Western Museum of Mining and Industry: Past, Present and Future.” Rick Sauers, executive director of WMMI, will present a slide show and walk through the history of the museum until now and talk about plans for the future. The museum is located on a 27 acre parcel and Sauers said they are about to embark on major fundraising to add on to the museum. They also have plans to renovate the old farm house and will need to stabilize the foundation before it is open to the public. “Eventually we would like to make it into a community center,” Sauers said. Many people don’t know that the museum owns another 20 acres east of their current location at Interstate 25 and Northgate Boulevard. The 20 acres is located off Voyager Parkway and housed the original museum. It is used now for archives and other equipment. Sauers said during the Black Forest Fire everything in the original building had to be

moved out when that area had to be evacuated. They received help from the Pioneer Museum and the University of Colorado at Colorado Springs. Sauer said he will talk about that during his presentation. The long-term plan is to add a library on to the main museum to hold the archives. “By the time I retire it will be one of the best museums in the country,” Sauers added. Sauers said over the next few years they will eventually downsize the items in the warehouse and bring some back to the museum and give some items to other museums. The 20 acres will be sold. The presentation will be at 7:00 p.m. July 18 at town hall in Palmer Lake which is located at 28 Valley Crescent. It is free to the public and refreshments will be served.

Museum Presentation- Rick Sauers, executive director of the Western Museum of Mining and Industry, stands in front of a piece of machinery on the museum grounds. Sauers will give a presentation at Palmer Lake town hall on July 18 on the past, present and future of the museum. Courtesy photo

things to do Calendar continued from Page 9

July 13 QuEst for Mastery online class. Learn these tools that can help you manifest your highest potential, or can help you to overcome issues in your life. For more information email Jimena at Jimena.yantorno@gmail.com or call 719-306-0772. July 18 Author visit. Meet author, songwriter and treasure hunter WC Jameson at 6:30 p.m. July 18 at the Woodland Park Public Library. His new book is “Butch Cassidy, Beyond the Grave.” But a visit from WC would not be complete without a few songs. He’s been a local favorite for many years, but now we have to share him with Texas, so don’t miss his visit! Call 719-687-9281 ext. 132. July 20 support group. The Woodland Park Parkinson Support Group will meet from10-11:30 a.m. Saturday, July 20, in the third floor board room of the Woodland Park Library.  Our guest speaker will be Cindy Kuykendall from Medtronics Inc. who will speak to us about the new findings and theories of Deep Brain Stimulation. If you have questions, email wpparkinson@ gmail.com. July 21 gymkhAnA. WoodlAnd Park Saddle Club 2013 Gymkhana events are Sundays, June 9, June 23, July 7, July 21, Aug. 4, Aug. 18, Sept. 1, Sept. 15. Events last from 10 a.m. until finished at the WPSC Arena and are open to the public. Entry fee is $20 and jackpot is $200. Visit www.wpsaddleclub.com. July 27 ClAss rEunion. Woodland Park High School will have its all-class reunion from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. July 27 at Memorial Park, followed by a dance at the Cultural Center from 7 p.m. to midnight. A new band will be featured. Public is welcome. Cost is $15 donation. Call 719-687-9807. Aug. 3-4 Arts fEstivAl. Plan to attend the 28th annual Mountain Arts Festival from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Aug. 3-4 at the Ute Pass Cultural Center, Woodland Park.  The festival features 80 booths with many returning artists as well as new artists covering all venues including food booths.  The artists come from Colorado and several other states.  Admission is free. Visit www.themountainartists.com or contact Carolyn, 719-686-7436.  through August Art Exhibit. Some of the works of late local artist Nadine

Kent Drummond were on exhibit in Woodland Park last summer. Now an expanded exhibit is on display through August in the Western Art History floor at the Denver Public Library, 10 W. 14th Ave. Parkway.

sEpt. 21-22

CEmEtEry WAlk. Gold Camp Victorian Society presents Mt.

Pisgah Speaks, Historical Cemetery Walk, Sept. 21-22. Come to Cripple Creek to see and hear the stories of those who lived in the time of “The Biggest Gold Rush in the history of our country.”  Doc Suzie, Pearle DeVere and many who have not been presented before will be on hand to chill or thrill you with their tales. Tours will begin from The Cripple Creek District Museum parking lot (at the East end of Bennett Ave) aboard Cripple Creek’s Historic Trolley, starting about 10 a.m. and continuing with one every half hour up to and including the last trolley at 2 p.m. Tickets are $10 each.  Each tour will take approximately one and one-half hours. All donations help the Gold Camp Victorian Society’s Historic Preservation efforts. The cemetery walk may be difficult for those with health issues.  Comfortable walking shoes, hats, and sunscreen are recommended.  Please stay with your tour group throughout the walk.  The trolley will return you to the museum after your tour.  Refreshments will be served at the end of the tour at the cemetery. For additional information call Richard Coshow at 719-748-5523 or Howard Melching at 719-689-0907.

ongoing mothEr bEAr Self-Defense is offering Krav Maga classes

from 7-8:30 p.m. Thurday and 9-10:30 a.m. Saturday on the second floor of the Corner Dance Studio in Woodland Park. Classes are offered weekly, but days may change. Contact Wendy at 719-323-7949 for information.

July 27 ChristmAs in July, hosted by the Community Christmas Planning Committee and the Aspen Mine Center, is from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday, July 27, in the Aspen Mine Center, 166 E. Bennett Ave., Cripple Creek. All types of venders, Christmas cookies, baked sales. Call July’s chairman Shawn Kuhns at 719629-8063 to reserve a vender space for $10, or CCPC coordinator Kathi Pilcher at 719-659-3599. July 20 to Aug. 24 gEology of Teller County. Teller County enjoys some of the most amazing geology on the planet. Several features are found nowhere else. Community Partnership Family Resource Center, a Colorado nonprofit devoted to education, is offering a 6-Saturday course, from 9 a.m. to noon July 20 to Aug. 24 in Divide. Learn about our gold & silver, gems, fossils, faults, volcanoes, glaciers, and more, with computer imagery, specimens, and a field trip. Great for teachers, rock hounds or students. Fee is $80. Call 719-686-0705 for information and registration. July 14 Author visit. Meet author, songwriter and treasure hunter WC Jameson at 2 p.m. July 14 at the Florissant Public Library. His new book is “Butch Cassidy, Beyond the Grave.” But a visit from WC would not be complete without a few songs. He’s been a local favorite for many years, but now we have to share him with Texas, so don’t miss his visit! Call 687-9281 ext. 132. Calendar continues on Page 12

Extra! Extra! Have a news or business story idea? We'd love to read all about it. To send us your news and business press releases please visit ourcoloradonews.com, click on the Press Releases tab and follow easy instructions to make submissions.


12-Color

12 Pikes Peak Courier View

July 10, 2013

Stacy Mackin sets up a display of her father’s jewelry at the Once Upon a Time in the West art show at the Cripple Creek Heritage Center. Stacy and her mother, Bonnie Mackin, provided a sentimental moment in the show that feature the jewelry of the late Steve Mackin who died last year. The show is distinguished by the environment accoutrements such as a rock garden and a waterfall.

Art goes West PHOTOS BY PAT HILL

With its emphasis on the landscapes of the West, forest, trees and rocks, the annual art show “Once Upon a Time in the West,” features artistry that includes paintings, jewelry, pottery and the “Little People” by Rod “Little Bear” Sutton. The show, at the Cripple Creek Heritage Center, runs through July 7.

Jeweler Beth Red Hawk is among the creative artists at the annual Once Upon a Time in the West art show that runs from June 28 through July 7 at the Cripple Creek Heritage Center. With a Native-American theme, the show begins with a blessing by founding artist Rod “Little Bear” Sutton and Jon Zimmer, each dressed in a Native American regalia.

THINGS TO DO Calendar continued from Page 9

JULY 27 HERITAGE DAY. Don’t miss the biggest

event of the year for Florissant. Start the day with a pancake breakfast from 7-11 a.m. at Station 1, 2606 Highway 24 in Florissant. Breakfast is open to the community and donations are appreciated. Then make your way to the Pikes Peak Historical Society Museum, Costello Street Coffee House, Florissant Cemetery, and most importantly, The

Old School House. At the School house (The Florissant Grange) you will have live music on the Bandstand all day featuring The Elbert Sisters, Mel March, Rich Currier and more. Food is served starting at 10 a.m.; we will serve burgers, brats and dogs. A meal that includes chips, a drink and a cookie is a suggested donation of $5. Vendors will sell everything from handmade crafts to Miche purses and emergency food. Cowboy poets and magicians, you don’t want to miss these shows featuring Susie Knight and Dwyane Faux; Historic Readings and reenactments by local well known ladies

and gentlemen of the Florissant Area. Buckboard Rides are offered by MLazyC Ranch from 10 a.m. to noon. Gold Camp Victorian Society will create great ambiance with their beautiful historic attire. 20 years on the trail productions: Gun shoot outs and a historic play. Children’s play and activities, horseshoes and an ice cream social. The sheriff ’s posse will help us out with traffic and more.

ONGOING  FREE COMPUTER classes are offered starting in February at the Florissant Library. You can take Computer Basics,

Word I, Word II, Excel, and PowerPoint. To register for a class, or for information and a schedule, call 719-748-3939.

JAM NIGHT. The Grange Hall is open from 6-9 p.m. every Thursday for the Jammers music and potluck. This is a great night and the place to be on Thursdays. The music is always different depending on who and how many musicians show up. We always have fun, good food and dancing. All musicians are welcome to join in the jam session. If you are not a musician, come for a social evening out to meet other community members. Call 719-748-0358.

“experience you can count on”

Shawn Keehn

Bernie Vayle

Gunter Ott

Jason Roshek

David Martinek

YOGA CLASSES are offered at 5:30 p.m. Mondays and 9 a.m. Tuesdays and Thursdays, with a senior yoga class offered at 10:30 a.m. Tuesdays, at the Florissant Grange, 2009 County Road 31. Call Debbie at 719-748-3678 for information. 

MUSIC LESSONS. Guitar, drums and general music lessons are now offered on Friday mornings at the Florissant Grange, 2009 County Road 31. Call 719-748-0358. JULY 23 SECOND AMENDMENT. A public

discussion on the second amendment, guns, surveillance, freedom and federal and state responses to violence will take place from 7-9 p.m. July 23 at the downtown Penrose Library Carnegie Room, 20 N. Cascade, Colorado Springs. The discussion will feature Prof. Emeritus Bill Hochman, Ph.D., World War II veteran.

EDITOR’S NOTE: Calendar submissions must be received by noon Wednesday for publication the following week. Send information to calendar@ourcoloradonews. com, attn: Courier View. No attachments please. Listings are free and run on a space-available basis.

CLUBS IN YOUR COMMUNITY EDITOR’S NOTE: To add or update your club listing, e-mail calendar@ourcoloradonews. com, attn: Courier View. POLITICAL TELLER COUNTY’S Democrats In 2013, Teller County’s Democratic Party is hosting education programs and community activities. Members and interested citizens are invited to participate. For more information about the TellerDems’ 2013 schedule, contact Ellen Haase, 719-687.1813.

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COMPUTER CLASSES. The Woodland Park Public Library offers computer basics, Internet basics, Microsoft Word, Excel, PowerPoint, and Digital Photo Management classes. Some classes have prerequisites, and registration is required for all. Call 719687-9281, ext. 106 to register. KARDS NETWORKING Group meets from 8-9:30 a.m. Wednesdays at Hungry Bear, 111 E. Midland Ave., Woodland Park. Help build your business by building community. Accepting new members. Call Kim Francis at 719-232-0142 for information. TELLER BUSINESS Builders meets at 7 a.m. Mondays at the Hungry Bear, 111 E. Midland Ave., in Woodland Park. The group helps local businesses through cooperative marketing, professional education and trusted relationships. Call Gail Wingerd at 719-686-1076 or send e-mail to gail@woodlandparkprinter.com or Mike Hazelwood at 719-473-5008 THE TELLER Networking Team meet from 7:45-8:45 a.m. Thursdays at Denny’s Restaurant in Woodland Park. TNT is a local businesses owners networking group working to pass leads and help each others’ businesses grow. Join us to learn more or call Vickie at 719-748-1274.

Steve Roshek

call 719-687-0900 • 18401 E. Hwy 24 • Woodland Park, CO

TRANSPORTATION’S LOCAL Coordinating Council of Teller County meets at 9 a.m. on the third Monday of each month at the Aspen Mine Center in Cripple Creek. This meeting is open to the public and all are welcome to attend. DIVIDE CHAMBER of Commerce. Contact president Lisa Lee at 719-686-7587 for meeting dates and times.

Karen Johnston

Don Butzlaff

TELLER COUNTY Republicans meets at 7 p.m. the second Tuesday of each month at the Pikes Peak Community Center in Divide next to the Conoco. Come and help set the course for conservative thinking and direction in Teller County, Colorado, and the nation. Additional information at http://www.teller-gop.org.

Candy Kohler

Clubs continues on Page 22


13-Color

Pikes Peak Courier View 13

July 10, 2013

Child-health law proves toothless Proposal was intended to spur more physical activity By Kevin Vaughan I-News Network

A 2011 state law requiring 30 minutes of physical activity a day for elementary students was supposed to mark a new tool in the fight against childhood obesity — but in reality it did little more than reinforce the status quo, an I-News examination found. The reason: The measure was so gutted during the legislative process that it has meant virtually no meaningful changes in the way elementary schools are operated. The standard imposed by the law — which allows recess to count as physical activity time — was already being met by districts across the state. Two years later, the school day looks exactly the same for students across the state as it did before the law was passed. “We didn’t change anything because we were already meeting it to begin with,” said Dave Eichman, director of athletics and physical education for Colorado Springs School District 11. That sentiment was echoed over and over again by officials in the 10 largest Colorado districts — which account for more than half of the state’s 863,561 public school students — the I-News inquiry revealed. Checks with smaller districts by I-News showed the same thing. Still, supporters believe the law marked an important change in Colorado by instituting a standard where none previously existed. “We felt like it was a step in the right direction,” said Reilly Pharo, of the Colorado Children’s Campaign, a nonprofit advocacy group that backed the measure. “We know that obesity policy is complex, and it’s bigger than what happens at the state Capitol.”

Weight issues increasing

A far more encompassing measure was originally envisioned in an effort to fight the burgeoning child obesity problem — a growing concern among health professionals and policy makers who have seen a dramatic rise in the percentage of young people who are heavy. That reality concerns health officials — an obese child is at greater risk of such things as heart disease, Type 2 diabetes and sleep apnea, and is more likely to grow up to be an obese adult. In addition, obese children can suffer social discrimination. “For kids, it has not only health consequences, but it

has emotional consequences, too,” said Janet Fulton, a lead epidemiologist and expert in physical activity at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. “It is that double-edged sword.” In 1980, about 7 percent of U.S. children ages 6 to 11 were obese, according to the Centers for Disease Control. By 2010, that number had jumped to 18 percent. Among adolescents ages 12 to 19, the jump was similar — from 5 percent in 1980 to 18 percent in 2010. Colorado has not been immune to the problem, although the data here is less clear-cut. For example, the Colorado Childhood Survey, conducted by the state health department, found that about 16 percent of children ages 1 to 14 were obese in 2011. But a different survey of high-school teenagers showed that about 7 percent of those students were obese that same year. At the same time, other data paints a bleaker picture among children in a state ranked as the “fittest” by virtue of the fact that its adult obesity rate is the lowest in the country. When it comes to childhood obesity, Colorado ranks 23rd of the 50 states, according to the CDC’s latest data. That data, which dates to 2007, showed that a little more than 14 percent of the state’s children were obese.

Trends are troubling

Other trends portend trouble on the horizon. Latino children, who have overweight rates 60 percent higher than white children, according to the federal Office of Minority Health, are the fastest growing segment of the elementary school population. And the percentage of poor children, also more likely to be overweight, entering the state’s elementary schools is also climbing. Determining what constitutes “overweight” and “obese” requires determining what is known as body mass index — a formula that takes into account an individual’s height and weight. In adults, it’s a simple calculation: Anyone with a BMI between 25 and 29.9 is considered overweight; anyone with a BMI of 30 or greater is considered obese. In children, the calculation is more complicated. Although the determination is still based on BMI, it includes a comparison to other children the same age and gender. A child is considered overweight with a BMI between the 85th percentile and 94th percentile as compared to children of the same age and gender. A child who is obese has a body mass index in the 95th percentile or higher when compared to children of the

Grade-schoolers play during recess at Hutchinson Elementary School in Lakewood, Colo., near the close of the 2012-2013 school year. A 2011 state law written to incorporate physical activity into the daily schedule of elementary schools to help fight against childhood obesity has had little effect, according to an I-News examination. Photo by The I-News Network at Rocky Mountain PBS same age and gender. Against that backdrop, legislators drafted a measure that would have required each school district to formally report how it was incorporating physical activity into the daily routine for elementary students. It also proposed minimum standards for what had to be reported — including the physical education curriculum used by schools, the number of minutes each week that students spent on things like exercise programs, recess and fitness breaks, and the qualifications of those who supervised students in physical activity. And it would have required the Colorado Department of Education to report the collected information and correlate it with the academic performance information for each elementary school. But opponents, including the Colorado Association of School Boards and several school districts, chafed at the potential cost and at the intrusion of the state into an issue that many believe is one of local control. The proposal also banged into the philosophical question of who is responsible for making sure kids lead healthy lives — parents or schools?

Schools fought measure

Among the opponents were the Jefferson County, Adams 12 and Boulder Valley school districts. “It was creating a mandate,” said Briggs Gamblin, spokesman for Boulder Valley Schools. “That was the height of the cuts, and we felt that we couldn’t support even well-intentioned pro-

grams at that time that were mandating new programs on school districts, many of them much more cashstrapped than us.” The bill was amended to simply require that each school board institute a policy stating that all elementary students would have “opportunities” for the equivalent of 30 minutes of physical activity a day. Those opportunities could include gym class, recess, stretch breaks, and field trips that involve walking. “It was a great bill in concept, but it got watered down,” said state Sen. Irene Aguilar, one of the measure’s sponsors, who is also a primary care physician. Because there are no reporting requirements, there is no way to know with certainty exactly how schools are complying. Aguilar said she hopes the legislature can come back at some point and push for more substantive changes. Research has shown that physical activity is critical to maintaining a healthy body weight in adults — and, conversely, that it is almost impossible to do it with diet alone. The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services’ Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans call for children to get 60 minutes of moderate to vigorous physical movement a day. That means moving with enough intensity to get winded. A variety of activities that promote aerobic development and muscle and bone strengthening is recommended. And research has shown benefits far beyond healthy

body weight — things like attention, behavior and academic performance all improve when kids are active, according to multiple studies.

Trouble meeting goal

Kim Gorman, director of the weight management program at the University of Colorado’s Anschutz Health and Wellness Center, pointed out that even in the best possible scenario — every student getting 30 minutes of moderate to vigorous movement every day — it would account for only half that is called for. And it would account for only about 46 percent of the year. But even the best case has problems. In some schools, recess is an extension of lunch — meaning students who spend more time eating can end up with less time to move around. And recess doesn’t require a student to do anything — drive by an elementary when the kids are outside, and it’s not unusual to see groups of them standing around, or even sitting on the blacktop, talking. Still, Gorman and others argued that it’s critical to get

youngsters moving, and it doesn’t have to be running laps. Gorman’s idea is simple: She’d have 30 minutes of open playground time before and after school each day. And then she’d let the kids do whatever they wanted so long as they were moving — everything from jumping rope to playing basketball to dancing. “It can be dancing — it absolutely can be dancing,” Gorman said. “It doesn’t have to be a punitive thing that kids don’t like.” Data analysis and additional reporting by Burt Hubbard. I-News is the public service journalism arm of Rocky Mountain PBS. For more information: inewsnetwork.org. Contact Kevin Vaughan at kvaughan@inewsnetwork.org or 303-4464936. This article was conceived and produced as a project for the Dennis A. Hunt Fund for Health Journalism, which is administered by The California Endowment Health Journalism Fellowships, a program of USC’s Annenberg School for Communication & Journalism

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14-Color

14 Pikes Peak Courier View

July 10, 2013

Friends and neighbors of Mary Ann Davis and Claudia Eley, who hosted a signing party for their new book “Green Mountain Falls: Stories of the Early Years” gather in the new Fellowship Hall at Church in the Wildwood June 29.

Authors aid history group

Mary Ann Conn Davis, left, and Claudia Eley , co-authors and long-time residents of Green Mountain Falls, signed copies of their book about the town in a reception and fundraiser for the Ute Pass Historical Society. At $18 a copy, the two women helped raise $12,000 for the society.

PHOTOS BY PAT HILL Mary Ann Conn Davis and Claudia Eley hosted a fundraiser for the Ute Pass Historical Society June 29 in the new Fellowship Hall at Church in the Wildwood. The two have just released their book “Green Mountain Falls: Stories of the Early Years,” and donated the profits earned that day at the book-signing. According to Donna Finicle, executive director of the society, the book sales scooped in $12,000 that day.

Mountain View

Highland Bible Church United Methodist Church



1101 Rampart Range Road

Meeting at Woodland TamaracPark Center (719) 687-3868 331-4903 SundayWorship School –10:30 8:50 am Sunday am Worship – 10:00 am www.mt-viewumc.org

Building Relationships One Heart at a Time.

Highway 24, just east of Lake George

Christ Centered, Spirit Filled, Bible Based

Sunday Service 10:30 a.m.

Worship: Saturday 5:30 PM (free meal)

SUNDAY WORSHIP SERVICES 9:30am OR 11am

The Clothes Closet Free Clothes for Struggling Families

Sunday 10:30 AM

New Home

108 N. Park St. • Woodland Park 719-687-2388 pastortrish@q.com

27400 North Hwy 67 • Woodland Park

www.livingstreamschurch.net

(2.6 miles from Hwy 24 across from Shining Mountain Golf Course)

719.687.3755

Church in the Church in the Wildwood Wildwood

A place of worship and prayer where people can come to escape their daily routine and enter into the presence of God. Mon. - Thurs. 10 a.m. - 10 p.m. Fri. 10 a.m. 4 p.m. Free Wi-Fi 107 West Henrietta Ave. Woodland Park, CO 80863 (719) 687-7626 www.prayermountainco.com Experience His Presence Encounter His Power Expand His Kingdom

www.impactchristian.net

United Church of Christ United Church of Christ

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Woodland Park Church of Christ Worship Service

{ { Worship Service { 11am { Bible { Wednesday { Class 7pm Sunday Morning Bible Class 10 am

Saint David of the Hills Worship Services Wednesday 7:00 p.m. Sundays 8 a.m. & 10:30 a.m. Sunday School 9:15 a.m. Adult Bible Study 9:15 a.m.

Sunday WorShip 10:30am and 6pm WedneSday 7:00 PM 2001 CR 31 • Florissant, CO

Episcopal Church

Sunday Worship - 9:30 a.m 36 Edlowe Road • Woodland Park 719-687-9195

Next to the Grange Hall

816 Browning Ave. & Burdette Call: 687-2323 or 687-6311

719-748 3272

www.church-in-the-wildwood.org

10585 Ute Pass Ave. 10585 Ute Pass Ave. Green Mountain Falls Green Mountain Falls

www.faithteller.org

To advertise your place of worship in this section, call 303-566-4091 or email kearhart@ourcoloradonews.com


15-Color

Pikes Peak Courier View 15

July 10, 2013

Professional Pack Burro Racing Donkeys are brought in each year to run the Donkey Derby Race. They are all owned by Bill Lee of the Laughing Valley Ranch in Idaho Springs. Several of the donkeys used in this year’s races are World Champion Pack Burro Racers. Photos by Melissa Trenary

Donkey Derby provides asinine entertainment in district For the past 82 years, race has drawn a herd of visitors The Donkey Derby Race is a three-quarter-mile race down Bennett Ave from the Jail Museum to the Cripple Creek District Museum. Along the way, teams must

stop at different stations, or check points, and perform a task. At the finish line, racers must show their “Race Card” with all the stations marked off. The various stations are: • “Git Yer Gold” - teams must dig through a pile of bags of “gold” to find the two with their team number on them, then load the bags onto the donkey.

• “Git Yer Suit” - one team member must dig through a pile of suit coats to find the one with their team number on it, and then put it on and wear it all the way to the finish line. • “Do-SeeDo Yer Donkey” - teams must weave with their donkey through 4 poles set up in a line. • “Git An Apple” - they have to bob for an apple and make

sure it gets to the finish line. • “Kiss The Purty Girl” - Teams get a read “lip” stamp on their race card. At the finish line teams must unload all their gear and show the judge their completed race card. The first team to successfully do this, wins. • The Businessmen’s Race -

Teams are made up of two to five humans and one of our local donkeys. It is open to local business people only. They start in the parking lot of the Cripple Creek District Museum and the finish line is at 2nd Street and Bennett Avenue. All team members and the Donkey have to cross the finish line together.

Racers and their donkeys ready to go in Saturday’s big Donkey Derby Race.

All Types Of ROOfing Although Donkey Derby Race entrants Chris Brown and Brian Emerson didn’t place, they were very happy to have finished.

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Pikes Peaklife 16-Life-Color

16 Pikes Peak Courier View July 10, 2013

Star-spangled fashions from head-to-toe were in Vogue Thursday in Woodland Park. Photos by Angela Dingwell

Community celebrates Old Fashioned 4th of July The Woodland Park Old Fashioned 4th of July Celebration at Memorial Park went off without a hitch to the delight of thousands. The celebration lasted from 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. with about 50 local non-profit organizations and businesses offering family activities. “There was a steady stream of people,” said Cindy Keating, director of Parks and Recreation for the City of Woodland Park. “I know our sales and merchandise was up from the previous cou-

ple of years.” A pancake breakfast kicked off the event. Other activities included a fishing contest, fire truck rides, games, prizes, entertainment, food, arts and crafts, and more. Parks and Rec offered free volleyball and horseshoes. A spectacular fireworks show was originally scheduled to take place at Woodland Park High School, but it was cancelled to a fire ban in Teller County.

A popsicle cold front was enough to put smiles on several Independence Day faces.

Even the refreshments were Red, White and Blue.


Pikes PeakSPORTS 17

Pikes Peak Courier View 17 July 10, 2013

Loeb sets Hill Climb record French driver reaches peak in 8 minutes, 13 seconds By Danny Summers

dsummers@ourcoloradonews.com The buzz surrounding Sebastien Loeb only seemed to grow for the two weeks leading up to the 91st running of the Pikes Peak International Hill Climb. Fellow drivers knew the Frenchman was capable of something special, but nobody anticipated the impossible. Loeb, driving a 2013 Peugeot 208 T16 Pikes Peak, raced up the mountain on June 30 in blazing fashion that still has many folks wondering “How did he do it?” His time of 8 minutes, 13.878 seconds was more than a minute and a half faster than the previous record time. “I felt really good in the car, and I pushed it hard from the start to the finish,” said an elated Loeb, after reaching the top of the 14,110-foot summit. “I made no mistakes, and I felt the race was really good. To drive a car like this and race up here (to the top) is what makes this special. It’s amazing. “I’m really happy with the time I achieved. We’ll see in the future if we come back.” Loeb maneuvered the mountain in relative ease, taking each of the 156 turns along the 12.42 mile course and making the pavement his own personal playground. He reached top speeds of over 150 mph, while averaging a mindboggling 87 mph. “So many tears to break the 10-minute mark, and Sebastien just blows through this in less than nine minutes like it was nothing,” said longtime Hill Climb racer Layne Schranz, who finished second in the

Pikes Peak Open division behind his father, Randy. “What a machine. What a driver. “I know all of Europe was watching Sebastien blow that record, so congratulations to all everybody.” Loeb’s incredible run was one of those moments that will forever be etched in Hill Climb lore. It was just two years ago that the elusive 10-minute barrier was finally cracked by Nobuhiro “Monster” Tajima — arguably the most popular and greatest racer in the Hill Climb history. Tajima’s time of 9:51 was mind-blowing because it occurred when the final 2½ miles of road was still gravel. Competitors and fans alike understand the full significance of what Tajima accomplished on one of the most dangerous race courses in the world. With the road fully paved for the first time last year, two more drivers — also from foreign lands — joined the 9-minute club; Romain Dumas of France (9:46.181) and Rhys Millen of Australia (9:46.164). Dumas and Millin went head-to-head with Loeb this year, but with mixed results. Dumas’s engine blew up shortly after he left the start line. Millin ran an impressive time of 9:02.192. Dumas gave Loeb an assist by loaning him his face video from last year’s Hill Climb. “He didn’t need it,” Dumas said with a smile. “He’s good enough.” In any other year, Millin’s fast run would have left fans in awe. But his run came after Dumas not only the conquered the mountain, but brought it to its knees. “When you saw what he was doing in practice you knew he might be get into the low 8s,” said Woodland Park’s Clint Vahsholtz, who won the Open Wheel division with a time of 11:07. Loeb, 39, came to Pikes Peak with already impres-

This is the car of Nobuhiru “Monster” Tajima – a 2013 E-Runner Pikes Peak Special.

France’s Sebastien Loeb celebrates after shattering the all-time Hill Climb record. He drove to the top of the summit in 8 minutes, 13.878 seconds on June 30 during the 91st running of the famed event. Photo courtesy Pikes Peak International Hill Climb Photos by Danny Summers sive credentials. In 2012, he won his ninth consecutive World Rally Championship. He finished second at the famed 24 Hours of Le Mans in 2006. Peugeot was looking to make a statement at Pikes Peak. That’s why they dumped — by some reports — as much as $6 million into this race alone. They famous French car company said this was probably just a one-time venture, but many are wondering if they will make a return to “America’s Mountain” in 2014. June 30 marked the first time Peugeot had competed at Pikes Peak since back-toback titles in 1988 and 1989 by Ari Vatanen and Robby Unser. Twitter went crazy on the

afternoon of June 30 after Loeb’s record run. French men and women (the Hill Climb is more popular in Europe and Japan than in America) tweeted their praises to their beloved countryman. The conditions were nearly perfect for Loeb, who took off up the mountain around 11:30 a.m. Temperatures were in the mid-60s and the moisture (rain and snow) was not to come for at least an hour. As expected, numerous records fell at the historic race — the second oldest auto race in America behind the Indianapolis 500. Tajima, 63, a nine-time Unlimited division champion, switched from his traditional gasoline-powered past to the Electric Auto Division last year. His first attempt failed when he had to shut down because of an onboard fire. But not so on June 30. Tajima piloted his electric 2013 E-Runner Pikes Peak Special to victory with a new Electric record clocking of 9:46.530. Veteran driver Paul Dallenbach of Basalt won the Time Attack division with a time of 9:46.001, driving the Hyundai Genesis Coupe that Rhys Millen drove last year. Carlin Dunne of Santa Barbara, Calif. — who owns the race’s overall record for the motorcycles at 9:52.819 — again was the fastest motorcycle, clocking a time of 10:00.694 on his 2013 Lightning Electric SuperBike in the Exhibition Powersports class. France’s Bruno Langlois set a record on his 2013 Ducati Multi-

Nobuhiro “Monster” Tajima talks with a reporter prior to making his run in the Electric Car division. Tajima won the his race in a time of 9:46. strada in winning the Pikes Peak 1205 class with time of 10:21.323, while Jeffrey Tigert’s 10:32.964 mark on his 2013 Honda CRF450 established a new Pikes Peak 450 class record. Michael Coburn’s 11:05.874 time on his 2013 Walsh 450R was a Quad Modified class record, and Woodland Park’s Codie Vahsholtz set a Pikes Peak 250 record with a time of 11:24.792 on his 1996 Kawasaki KX 250.

The race was delayed twice in the morning wave after a pair of motorcycle riders were injured after crashing off the course. Michael Applehns of Denver, racing in the Pikes Peak Superbike 750 class, went off the course in his 2006 Suzuki GSXR, and Alex Moreno of Dublin, Ohio, also crashed his 2008 Honda CBR1000RR off the course. Both riders were airlifted to Colorado Springs-area hospitals for treatment.

Law Office of Kirk Garner General Civil • Contract Disputes • Adjoining Landowners • Personal Injury

Family Law • Dissolution of Marriage • Child Custody • Parental Responsibilities Office Located in the Pikes Peak Credit Union

719-687-6869

720 W. Midland, Suite 201

www.kirkgarner.com

Woodland Park


18

18 Pikes Peak Courier View

July 10, 2013

This is the car Layne Schranz used to compete in the June 30 Hill Climb. He finished second to his father in this 1999 Chevrolet Monte Carlo. Photos by Danny Summers

Schranz family continues success on Pikes Peak Good day for locals at 2013 Hill Climb By Danny Summers

dsummers@ourcoloradonews.com Randy Schranz’s 39th run up Pikes Peak was one of his most memorable. The 65-year-old longtime Colorado Springs resident won the Open division during the 91st running of the Pikes Peak International Hill Climb on June 30. He also clipped a spectator and destroyed an iPad with his 2013 Shelby Cobra. He later crossed the finish line

in first place (11 minutes, 21.410 seconds) — eight seconds ahead of his son, Layne. “I didn’t know I had done damage to my car until I got to the top (of the summit),” Randy said. “I clipped a woman with my front-side fender and it tore the whole thing off.” Randy later found out that the woman was taken to a local hospital. He was told she did not have lifethreatening injuries. The incident happened in the first half-mile of the race. Randy thinks he was going about 80 mph at the time.

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“She never moved,” he said. “She was standing in the dirt part of the road taking pictures. “I had rain tires on the car, so I was taking it easy. I could have been going 10 mph faster.” Randy and Layne were hoping that they would finish first and second. But they both agreed it would probably be Layne coming out on top. “All week long Layne was running about 30 seconds faster than me,” Randy said. But the day of the race he had problems with his engine again.” Layne spent his final day of practice on June 29 running his car around New Life Church, leaving burnt rubber on the road. But three times during race day his car — a 1999 Chevrolet Monte Carlo — either sputtered or stopped on the way up the mountain. “I thought we had gotten things worked out, but we had a few problems today,” said Layne, who suffered a leg injury in mid-June, but was able to operate his car without any issues. “My car shut off at Double Cup, but I was able to get it restarted and finish the race.” Layne switched to the Open division this year because there were not enough competitors in Stock Car. Clint competed in Open Wheel and won the class. “This is the happiest I’ve ever been with second place,” Layne said with a smile. “I’ve had seven years

Randy Schranz, 65, of Colorado Springs has started and finished a record 39 Pikes Peak International Hill Climbs. He won the Pikes Peak Open division at the June 30 event. He is seen here relaxing in the morning in the pit area with his crew. of coming in second (in Stock Car), but this wasn’t so bad. “My dad and I talked about it and we decided to run against each other. He ran really well all week and I am just so happy for him.” Layne, a graduate of the now defunct Hilltop Baptist in Colorado Springs, has raced up Pikes Peak 20 times. Coupled with his father’s mark, the two own the record for the most starts by a father and son in Hill Climb history. “We can sleep well tonight and have a good party with the team,” said Layne, who makes his home in Birmingham, Alabama. “All in all it was a pretty good day.” Layne and Randy were

set up next to each other in the Pike National Forest, about 50 yards from the start line. Randy said he would like to make at least one more run up Pikes Peak in 2014. “That would make 40 and that sounds like a good round number to end on,” Randy said “That would be a good time to quit.” Randy surpassed the famed Louis Unser a few years ago with the most runs up the mountain. Randy met Unser in 1972 after he had just retired. Layne believes his father might run his last race in 2016—- the 100-year anniversary of the Hill Climb. The oldest competitor in the latest edition of the

Hill Climb was 72-year-old Ralph Murdock of Colorado Springs in the Pikes Peak Vintage division. Murdock did not finish the race in his 1970 Chevy Camaro. David Donner of Colorado Springs won the Time Attack Division in a blistering 9:53.581. Dan Berendes of Monument finished third in the 450cc motorcycle division, while Jeff Grace of Colorado Springs won the Heavyweight Supermoto. Dan Elders of Monument finished fourth in Superbike 750cc, while Christopher Lennon of Monument finished second in Pikes Peak Vintage. Tom Specht of Woodland Park finished 14th in the 450cc.


19-Sports

Pikes Peak Courier View 19

July 10, 2013

Vahsholtz family makes history with multiple wins on Pikes Peak Clint, Codie win divisions at Hill Climb By Danny Summers

dsummers@ourcoloradonews.com Pikes Peak might always be known as “Unser Mountain” to auto racing fans around the world. But the Vahsholtz family now owns it. Woodland Park’s own Clint and Codie, also known as father and son, each won their divisions at the 91st running of the famed Pikes Peak International Hill Climb on June 30. Coupled with Leonard’s 18 wins (Clint’s dad/Codie’s grandfather) the Vahsholtz family now has 39 victories — one more than the famed Unsers. “I always dreamed of getting our family to that next level,” said Codie, 22, a 2009 Woodland Park High School graduate. “I feel ecstatic now that it’s happened.” Clint won in his first attempt in the Open Wheel Division — a 2013 Ford Open. His time of 11 minutes, 5.05 seconds was impressive considering the murky conditions he had to race in as clouds, rain and snow became an issue as the day wore on. Codie competed in the 250cc motorcycle division, setting an all-time record in the class of with a time 11:24.494 — 28 seconds faster than second-place finisher Jason Archuleta of Colorado Springs. Archuleta held the previous record of 11:41, set in 2012. “I’m really thankful to the Lord that he could give me the opportunity to do this,” said Codie, who also raced Pikes Peak in 2011 and 2012. “I felt focused all week. I felt really confident that I could make a good, clean run up the mountain and that we could walk away with a victory.” Clint and Codie drove/rode in completely different conditions. When Codie took off about 9:30 a.m., temperatures were in the mid-60s at the start line with perfect visibility. By the time Clint made his run at about 3:20 p.m., he had to deal with clouds, fog and slick roads caused by rain and snow. It was not a “Race to the Clouds” for Clint, but rather a “Race through the Clouds.” “I went through a dense fog patch below Mile Marker 16,” Clint said. “I thought it was raining. I could hardly see through my face mask.” Clint cleaned the muck off his helmet by using paper towels as wiper blades that had been taped to his arms. By the time Clint was ready for his run, the mountain was under a flash flood warning. The slick conditions caused the usually aggressive Clint to take things a little slower. “A time or two the car chopped sideways,” Clint said. “I gave it the best run I

Codie Vahsholtz, leaning on motorcycle, won the 250cc motorcycle class and set a record in the process. He joins his father, Clint, and grandfather, Leonard, as members of the family who have won Hill Climb titles. Photos by Danny Summers could, given the conditions. “You take it as you can get it. I’ll take it as a win and we’ll move forward.” The Vahsholtzes have been competing on Pikes Peak as a family for nearly 40 years. Leonard, the owner of Clint’s car, began his career in the 1970s, winning his last title in 2007. He also won an exhibition truck title in 2008, but the family does not officially count that as a victory. The Vahsholtz’s arrived at the mountain early Sunday morning — about 3 a.m. — to get set up and ready for the long day ahead. Clint visited with Codie prior to his run up the 12.42-mile course and gave him some final instructions. (Clint was a three-time winner in motorcycles back in the early 1990s and knows a thing or two about making a good run) While Clint ate a breakfast burrito, Codie got his game face on and waited in line for his run with members of his crew, as well as the bike’s owner, Gary Steinberger of Colorado Springs. Clint had no way to immediately congratulate Codie since telephone reception is non-existent on most of the mountain. So he had to wait about six hours until he reached the top. “I was so excited for Codie to get that first win,” Clint said. “He had that eye all

Woodland Park’s lin Vahsholtz enjoys a breakfast burrito early Sunday morning on June 30 as he prepares to make another run up Pikes Peak. Clint won the Open Wheel Class, giving him 20 victories. week. I hardly had to say anything to him. “Gary Steinberger put a motorcycle un-

der him that he could win in. And he went out there and did it.”

recreation report

He Woodland Park Parks & Recreation offers the h his following programs and sports. Sign up at least

a week prior to session starting. Classes may be cancelled due to lack of participants. Call 719-6875225, stop by our office at 204 W. South Ave or visit www.city-woodlandpark.org.

July 12 Wildlife PhotograPhy. This seminar will

include a combination of interactive discussion of techniques, equipment demonstrations, and viewing and critique of projected digital photos. Topics covered include specialized equipment used for wildlife photography, quality of light, compositional tips, and approaching wildlife without disturbing them. Other topics will include the best times and places to photograph wildlife in Colorado, and classic wildlife hotspots elsewhere. Seminar notes on CD will be provided. This seminar is oriented toward both beginner and advanced photographers. Presented by our wildlife expert and associate instructor Adam Lechnir. This class will be from 5:308 p.m. Friday, July 12, in the Parks and Recreation Classroom. Cost is $50 per person.

youth soccer league: kindergarten. Our youth

sports leagues strive to provide a healthy environment in which young people can learn about sports,

develop skills, coordination and teamwork, and most importantly, have fun. Attendance at practices and games is important, this is a team sport and your teammates depend on you. Format of divisions may change depending on registrations. Register by grade in the fall 2013. Players receive a T-shirt, socks and participation award. Required equipment: shin guards. Registration deadline: July 12; season runs from Aug. 24 to Oct. 12. Cost is $43 per child with a $4 discount for additional family members.

youth soccer league: 1-6 grade. Our youth sports leagues strive to provide a healthy environment in which young people can learn about sports, develop skills, coordination and teamwork, and most importantly, have fun. Attendance at practices and games is important, this is a team sport and your teammates depend on you. Format of divisions may change depending on registrations. Register by grade in the fall 2013. Players receive a T-shirt, socks and participation award. Required equipment: shin guards. Skills assessments: Thursday, July 25. Divisions: Grades 1-2 play 4v4; grades 3-4 play 6v6; grades 5-6 play 8v8. Registration deadline is Friday, July 12. Season runs from Aug. 17 to Oct. 26. Cost is $45 per child with a $4 discount for additional family members.

youth soccer: 7-12 grade. Each team will have 8 practices and play 8 games, plus will have four training sessions and three game observations per team with professional coaches from Rocky Mountain Soccer Camps. The topics for these sessions will be based on input from the Parks and Recreation team coaches, the needs of the players, and actual game observations. Players will receive individual soccer skill development and instruction in team tactical concepts. For information, visit wpparksandrecreation.org. Attendance at practices and games is very important, this is a team sport and your teammates depend on you. Format of divisions may change depending on registrations. Players receive a T-shirt, socks, participation award. Required equipment: shin guards. Skills assessments: Thursday, July 25. Divisions: D, grades 7-8, 11v11; and E, grades 9-12, 11v11. Registration deadline: Friday, July 12; season runs from Aug. 17 to Oct. 26. Registration fee: $88 per child with a $4 discount for additional family members. July 13, aug. 10, sePt. 21

garden club. Join the “Gardeners with Altitude” garden club, part of the largest gardening organization in the world. Learn about different aspects of gardening participate in tours of green houses and

gardens and be part of a civic project to enhance our community. This club is lead by Trudie Layton and is on Saturdays from 10-11 a.m. in the Parks and Recreation Classroom. Class is held once a month; June 15, July 13, Aug. 10 and Sept. 21. Cost is $20.

July 15-19 british soccer camp. Challenger has developed a unique camp program that offers players a much broader soccer skills experience. Camp coaches are selected and trained in the UK. They are professional, outgoing, have a cool “British” accent and a genuine interest in helping each participant develop their skills and provide them with a very memorable and positive experience. Boys and girls ages 3-16 years old. Register online at www.challengersports. com. Camp dates: July 15-19. July 19 business of photography. Have you ever wanted

to sell your pictures? This seminar is all about how to start selling your photos. Topics covered include where to sell you’re your photos, how to build a portfolio, image editing, basic business practices, useful marketing techniques and “how to tell the story” for your clients. We will also cover useful

Rec continues on Page 22

cripple creek rec report for hours for Cripple Creek Parks and Recreation, call 719-689-3514.

ongoing kido 4 Kids is every Monday and

Wednesday from 5-6 p.m. Kido is a selfdefense focused martial arts system for kids ages 7-13. Cost is $25 a month for unlimited classes.

aikido is every Monday and Wednesday from 6-7:30 p.m. Aikido is a Japanese Martial Art. We teach mature adults technically pure martial arts. Cost is $30 a month for unlimited classes. oPen ZuMba meets Monday through Thursday from 5-6:30 p.m. Lose those extra pounds with an energetic dance. Free to all fitness member types.


cured by the Deed of Trust and other violations of the terms thereof.

20 Pikes Peak Courier View

THE LIEN FORECLOSED MAY NOT BE A FIRST LIEN. THE PROPERTY DESCRIBED HEREIN IS ALL OF THE PROPERTY ENCUMBERED BY THE LIEN OF THE DEED OF TRUST. LOT 1328, COLORADO MOUNTAIN ESTATES NO. 10, COUNTY OF TELLER, STATE OF COLORADO. which has the address of: 2080 N. Mountain Estates Rd. Florissant, CO 80816 NOTICE OF SALE The current holder of the Evidence of Debt secured by the Deed of Trust described herein, has filed Notice of Election and Demand for sale as provided by law and in said Deed of Trust.

Public Trustees Public Notice NOTICE OF SALE (CRS §38-38-103) Foreclosure Sale No. 2013-0022 To Whom It May Concern: This Notice is given with regard to the following described Deed of Trust: On April 15, 2013, the undersigned Public Trustee caused the Notice of Election and Demand relating to the Deed of Trust described below to be recorded in the County of Teller records. Original Grantor: JESSE L. MORARIE AND PATRICIA C. MORARIE Original Beneficiary: MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., ACTING SOLELY AS NOMINEE FOR IRWIN MORTGAGE CORPORATION Current Holder of Evidence of Debt: CITIMORTGAGE, INC Date of Deed of Trust: 11/11/2002 Recording Date of Deed of Trust: 11/18/2002 Recorded in Teller County: Reception No. 541477 Original Principal Amount: $65,000.00 Outstanding Principal Balance: $54,751.15 Pursuant to C.R.S. §38-38-101 (4) (i), you are hereby notified that the covenants of the deed of trust have been violated as follows: Failure to pay principal and interest when due together will all other payments provided for in the Evidence of Debt secured by the Deed of Trust and other violations of the terms thereof. THE LIEN FORECLOSED MAY NOT BE A FIRST LIEN. THE PROPERTY DESCRIBED HEREIN IS ALL OF THE PROPERTY ENCUMBERED BY THE LIEN OF THE DEED OF TRUST. LOT 1328, COLORADO MOUNTAIN ESTATES NO. 10, COUNTY OF TELLER, STATE OF COLORADO.

Public Trustees

THEREFORE, Notice Is Hereby Given that I will, at 10:00 a.m. in the forenoon of August 14, 2013, at the Teller County Public Trustee’s Office, 101 W. Bennett Ave., Cripple Creek, Colorado, sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder for cash, the said real property and all interest of said Grantor(s), Grantor(s)’ heirs and assigns therein, for the purpose of paying the indebtedness provided in said Evidence of Debt secured by the Deed of Trust, plus attorneys’ fees, the expenses of sale and other items allowed by law, and will issue to the purchaser a Certificate of Purchase, all as provided by law.

20 THE LIEN FORECLOSED MAY NOT BE A FIRST LIEN.

To Whom It May Concern: This Notice is given with regard to the following described Deed of Trust: On April 15, 2013, the undersigned Public Trustee caused the Notice of Election and Demand relating to the Deed of Trust described below to be recorded in the County of Teller records. Original Grantor: TIMOTHY C BOULTER AND BROOK C EDDY-BOULTER Original Beneficiary: MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., AS NOMINEE FOR BNC MORTGAGE, INC., A DELAWARE CORPORATION Current Holder of Evidence of Debt: WELLS FARGO BANK, N.A., SUCCESSOR BY MERGER TO WELLS FARGO BANK MINNESOTA, N.A., AS TRUSTEE F/K/A NORWEST BANK MINNESOTA, N.A., AS TRUSTEE FOR THE BENEFIT OF THE REGISTERED HOLDERS OF THE STRUCTURED ASSET SECURITIES CORPORATION AMORTIZING, RESIDENTIAL COLLATERAL TRUST, MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2002-BC6 Date of Deed of Trust: 6/7/2002 Recording Date of Deed of Trust : 6/17/2002 Recorded in Teller County: Reception No. 535136 Original Principal Amount: $110,500.00 Outstanding Principal Balance: $108,634.15

Public Trustees

First Publication: 6/19/2013 Last Publication: 7/17/2013 Published in: Pikes Peak Courier View

Pursuant to C.R.S. §38-38-101 (4) (i), you are hereby notified that the covenants of the deed of trust have been violated as follows:

Dated: 4/19/2013 ROBERT W. CAMPBELL Teller COUNTY PUBLIC TRUSTEE By: Pamela A. Cronce Deputy Public Trustee

Failure to pay principal and interest when due together with all other payments provided for in the Evidence of Debt secured by the Deed of Trust and other violations of the terms thereof.

Attorney: LISA CANCANON Attorney Registration #42043 ARONOWITZ & MECKLENBURG, LLP 1199 BANNOCK STREET, DENVER, COLORADO 80204 Phone: (303) 813-1177 Fax: Attorney file #: 1175.14938

THE LIEN FORECLOSED MAY NOT BE A FIRST LIEN. THE PROPERTY DESCRIBED HEREIN IS ALL OF THE PROPERTY ENCUMBERED BY THE LIEN OF THE DEED OF TRUST.

The Attorney above is acting as a debt collector and is attempting to collect a debt. Any information provided may be used for that purpose. Legal Notice No.: 2013-0022 First Publication: 6/19/2013 Last Publication: 7/17/2013 Published in: Pikes Peak Courier View Public Notice NOTICE OF SALE (CRS §38-38-103) Foreclosure Sale No. 2013-0023 To Whom It May Concern: This Notice is given with regard to the following described Deed of Trust: On April 15, 2013, the undersigned Public Trustee caused the Notice of Election and Demand relating to the Deed of Trust described below to be recorded in the County of Teller records.

Original Grantor: TIMOTHY C BOULTER AND BROOK C EDDY-BOULTER Original Beneficiary: MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., AS NOMINEE FOR BNC MORTNOTICE OF SALE GAGE, INC., A DELAWARE CORPORATION The current holder of the Evidence of Debt Current Holder of Evidence of Debt: secured by the Deed of Trust described WELLS FARGO BANK, N.A., SUCherein, has filed Notice of Election and CESSOR BY MERGER TO WELLS Demand for sale as provided by law and FARGO BANK MINNESOTA, N.A., AS in said Deed of Trust. TRUSTEE F/K/A NORWEST BANK MINNESOTA, N.A., AS TRUSTEE FOR THE THEREFORE, Notice Is Hereby Given BENEFIT OF THE REGISTERED HOLDthat I will, at 10:00 a.m. in the forenoon of ERS OF THE STRUCTURED ASSET SEAugust 14, 2013, at the Teller County CURITIES CORPORATION AMORTIZPublic Trustee’s Office, 101 W. Bennett I N G , R E S I D ENTIAL COLLATERAL Ave., Cripple Creek, Colorado, sell at pubTRUST, MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH lic auction to the highest and best bidder CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2002-BC6 for cash, the said real property andPublic all in- Notice Date of Deed of Trust:of: 6/7/2002 terest of said Grantor(s)’ heirs which has the address NOTICE OF Grantor(s), SALE Recording Date of Deed of Trust: and assigns therein, for the purpose of 44 Mt. Elbert Road 6/17/2002 paying the indebtedness provided in said (CRS §38-38-103) Foreclosure Sale No. Divide, CO 80814 Recorded in Teller County: Reception No. Evidence of Debt secured by the Deed of 2013-0029 535136 OF SALE Trust, plus attorneys’ fees, the expenses NOTICE Original Principal Amount: $110,500.00 ofTosale andIt other items allowed by law, Whom May Concern: This Notice Outstanding Principal Balance: and will issue to the purchaser a CertificThe current holder of the Evidence is given with regard to the following $108,634.15 ate of Purchase, all as provided by law. of Debt secured by the Deed of Trust described Deed of Trust: described has§38-38-101 filed Notice(4) of (i), you Pursuant herein, to C.R.S. First Publication: 6/19/2013 and notified Demandthat for sale as providedof On April 26, 2013, the undersigned Public Election are hereby the covenants Last Publication: by law and in said Deed of Trust. Trustee caused 7/17/2013 the Notice of Election the deed of trust have been violated as Published in: Pikes Peak View and Demand relating to Courier the Deed of Trust follows: THEREFORE, Notice Is Hereby Given described below to be recorded in the Dated: 4/19/2013 that I will,toatpay 10:00 a.m. inand the interest forenoonwhen County of Teller records. Failure principal ROBERT W. CAMPBELL ofdue August 28, 2013, Tellerpayments County together with at allthe other Teller COUNTY PUBLIC TRUSTEE Public Trustee’s Office, 101 W. Original Grantor: JANICE E BANKS AND provided for in the Evidence Bennett of Debt seBy: PamelaJA. Cronce ROBERT DURYEE Ave., Cripple Creek, Colorado, sell at violcured by the Deed of Trust and other Deputy Public TrusteeNEW CENTURY public to the thereof. highest and best Original Beneficiary: ationsauction of the terms MORTGAGE CORPORATION bidder for cash, the said real property and Attorney: LISA CANCANON Attorney Reall interest said Grantor(s),MAY Grantor(s)’ Current Holder THE LIENofFORECLOSED NOT BE gistration #42043of Evidence of Debt: THE BANK OF NEW YORK MELLON TRUST heirs and assigns A FIRST LIEN. therein, for the purpose ARONOWITZ & MECKLENBURG, LLP ofTHE paying the indebtedness provided in COMPANY, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION PROPERTY DESCRIBED HEREIN 1199 BANNOCK STREET, FKA THECOLORADO BANK OF NEW YORK TRUST said the I S Evidence A L L O F ofTDebt H E secured P R O P Eby RT Y ENDENVER, 80204 Deed of Trust, plus fees,OF theTHE COMPANY, AS SUCCESSOR TO CUMBERED BY attorneys’ THE LIEN Phone: (303) N.A. 813-1177 Fax: expenses of sale and other items allowed JPMORGAN BANK N.A., AS DEED OF TRUST. Attorney file #: CHASE 1175.14938 by law, and will issue to the purchaser a TRUSTEE FOR RAMP 2003-RS10 Certificate Purchase, all as41, provided Date of Deed above of Trust: LOTS 13 of AND 14, BLOCK THE HAYThe Attorney is 9/30/2003 acting as a debt by law.PLACER COMPANY'S SUBDIVIRecording Date Deed of Trust: DEN collector and is of attempting to collect a 10/1/2003 SION OF THE HAYDEN PLACER, debt. Any information provided may be First Publication: 7/3/2013STATE OF COLRecorded in Teller County: Reception COUNTY OF TELLER, used for that purpose. ORADO Last Publication: 7/31/2013 No. 556462 Published in: Pikes Peak Courier View Original Principal Amount: $159,900.00 Legal Notice No.: 2013-0022 which has the address of: Outstanding Principal Balance: First Publication: 6/19/2013 324 E Golden Ave $142,076.71 Dated: 5/9/2013 Last Publication: 7/17/2013 Cripple Creek, CO 80813 ROBERT W. CAMPBELL Published in: Pikes Peak Courier View Pursuant to C.R.S. §38-38-101 (4) (i), you Teller COUNTY PUBLIC TRUSTEE NOTICE OF By: Pamela A.SALE Cronce are hereby notified that the covenants Deputy Public Trustee of the deed of trust have been violated The current holder of the Evidence of Debt as follows: secured CYNTHIA by the Deed of Trust described Attorney: LOWERY-GRABER herein, Registration has filed Notice of Election and Attorney #34145 Failure to pay principal and interest when Demand for sale provided by law and THE CASTLE LAWas GROUP, LLC due together will all other payments in said Deed of Trust. provided for in the Evidence of Debt 999 18TH STREET, SUITE 2201, secured by the Deed of Trust and other THEREFORE, Notice80202 Is Hereby Given DENVER, COLORADO violations thereof. that I will, at 10:00 a.m. in the forenoon of August1 14, 2013, at the Teller County Phone: (303) 865-1400 THE LIEN FORECLOSED MAY NOT BE Public Trustee’s Office, 101 W. Bennett Fax: 1 (303) 865-1410 A FIRST LIEN. Ave., Cripple Colorado, sell at pubAttorney file #: Creek, 13-02526 lic auction to the highest and best bidder THE PROPERTY DESCRIBED HEREIN for cash, theabove said real property The Attorney is acting as aand debtall inIS ALL OF THE PROPERTY ENCUMterest ofand saidisGrantor(s), collector attempting Grantor(s)’ to collect a heirs BERED BY THE LIEN OF THE DEED and assigns therein, for the purpose debt. Any information provided may be of OF TRUST. paying the indebtedness provided in said used for that purpose. Evidence of Debt secured by the Deed of ATTACHED HERETO AS EXHIBIT ‘A’ Trust, plus attorneys’ fees, the expenses Legal Notice 2013-0029 AND INCORPORATED HEREIN AS of sale and No.: other items allowed by law, First THOUGH FULLY SET FORTH. and Publication: will issue to7/3/2013 the purchaser a CertificLast Publication: 7/31/2013 ate of Purchase, all as provided by law. Published in: Pikes Peak Courier View ExhibitFirst A Publication: 6/19/2013 Last Publication: 7/17/2013 Published in: Pikes Peak Courier View which has the address of: 2080 N. Mountain Estates Rd. Florissant, CO 80816

Dated: 4/19/2013 ROBERT W. CAMPBELL Teller COUNTY PUBLIC TRUSTEE By: Pamela A. Cronce Deputy Public Trustee Attorney: DAVID A SHORE Attorney Registration #19973 HELLERSTEIN AND SHORE, PC 5347 S VALENTIA WAY, SUITE 100 , GREENWOOD VILLAGE, COLORADO 80111 Phone: (303) 573-1080 Fax: (303) 571-1271 Attorney file #: 12-00257SH The Attorney above is acting as a debt collector and is attempting to collect a debt. Any information provided may be used for that purpose. Legal Notice No.: 2013-0023 First Publication: 6/19/2013 Last Publication: 7/17/2013 Published in: Pikes Peak Courier View

LOTS 13 AND 14, BLOCK 41, THE HAYDEN PLACER COMPANY'S SUBDIVIS I O N O F T H E H A Y D E N P L A C E R, COUNTY OF TELLER, STATE OF COLORADO which has the address of: 324 E Golden Ave Cripple Creek, CO 80813 NOTICE OF SALE The current holder of the Evidence of Debt secured by the Deed of Trust described herein, has filed Notice of Election and Demand for sale as provided by law and in said Deed of Trust. THEREFORE, Notice Is Hereby Given that I will, at 10:00 a.m. in the forenoon of August 14, 2013, at the Teller County Public Trustee’s Office, 101 W. Bennett Ave., Cripple Creek, Colorado, sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder for cash, the said real property and all interest of said Grantor(s), Grantor(s)’ heirs and assigns therein, for the purpose of paying the indebtedness provided in said Evidence of Debt secured by the Deed of Trust, plus attorneys’ fees, the expenses of sale and other items allowed by law, and will issue to the purchaser a Certificate of Purchase, all as provided by law. First Publication: 6/19/2013 Last Publication: 7/17/2013 Published in: Pikes Peak Courier View Dated: 4/19/2013 ROBERT W. CAMPBELL Teller COUNTY PUBLIC TRUSTEE By: Pamela A. Cronce Deputy Public Trustee Attorney: DAVID A SHORE Attorney Registration #19973 HELLERSTEIN AND SHORE, PC 5347 S VALENTIA WAY, SUITE 100 , GREENWOOD VILLAGE, COLORADO 80111 Phone: (303) 573-1080 Fax: (303) 571-1271 Attorney file #: 12-00257SH The Attorney above is acting as a debt collector and is attempting to collect a debt. Any information provided may be used for that purpose. Legal Notice No.: 2013-0023 First Publication: 6/19/2013 Last Publication: 7/17/2013 Published in: Pikes Peak Courier View Public Notice NOTICE OF SALE (CRS §38-38-103) Foreclosure Sale No. 2013-0025 To Whom It May Concern: This Notice is given with regard to the following described Deed of Trust: On April 15, 2013, the undersigned Public Trustee caused the Notice of Election and Demand relating to the Deed of Trust described below to be recorded in the County of Teller records. Original Grantor: RONALD T LANE AND CINDY L LANE Original Beneficiary: MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., AS NOMINEE FOR TAYLOR, BEAN & WHITAKER MORTGAGE CORP. Current Holder of Evidence of Debt: BANK OF AMERICA, N.A. Date of Deed of Trust: 4/17/2008 Recording Date of Deed of Trust : 4/23/2008 Recorded in Teller County: Reception No. 616809 Original Principal Amount: $144,637.00 Outstanding Principal Balance: $141,457.20 Pursuant to C.R.S. §38-38-101 (4) (i), you are hereby notified that the covenants of the deed of trust have been violated as follows: Failure to pay principal and interest when due together will all other payments provided for in the Evidence of Debt secured by the Deed of Trust and other violations thereof. THE LIEN FORECLOSED MAY NOT BE A FIRST LIEN. THE PROPERTY DESCRIBED HEREIN IS ALL OF THE PROPERTY ENCUMBERED BY THE LIEN OF THE DEED OF TRUST. LOT 38, FLORISSANT HEIGHTS FILING NO. 2, COUNTY OF TELLER, STATE OF COLORADO which has the address of: 612 Columbine Road Florissant, CO 80816 NOTICE OF SALE The current holder of the Evidence of Debt secured by the Deed of Trust described herein, has filed Notice of Election and Demand for sale as provided by law and in said Deed of Trust. THEREFORE, Notice Is Hereby Given that I will, at 10:00 a.m. in the forenoon of August 14, 2013, at the Teller County Public Trustee’s Office, 101 W. Bennett Ave., Cripple Creek, Colorado, sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder for cash, the said real property and all interest of said Grantor(s), Grantor(s)’ heirs and assigns therein, for the purpose of

July 10, 2013

THE PROPERTY DESCRIBED HEREIN IS ALL OF THE PROPERTY ENCUMBERED BY THE LIEN OF THE DEED OF TRUST. LOT 38, FLORISSANT HEIGHTS FILING NO. 2, COUNTY OF TELLER, STATE OF COLORADO which has the address of: 612 Columbine Road Florissant, CO 80816 NOTICE OF SALE The current holder of the Evidence of Debt secured by the Deed of Trust described herein, has filed Notice of Election and Demand for sale as provided by law and in said Deed of Trust. THEREFORE, Notice Is Hereby Given that I will, at 10:00 a.m. in the forenoon of August 14, 2013, at the Teller County Public Trustee’s Office, 101 W. Bennett Ave., Cripple Creek, Colorado, sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder for cash, the said real property and all interest of said Grantor(s), Grantor(s)’ heirs and assigns therein, for the purpose of paying the indebtedness provided in said Evidence of Debt secured by the Deed of Trust, plus attorneys’ fees, the expenses of sale and other items allowed by law, and will issue to the purchaser a Certificate of Purchase, all as provided by law.

Public Trustees

First Publication: 6/19/2013 Last Publication: 7/17/2013 Published in: Pikes Peak Courier View Dated: 4/19/2013 ROBERT W. CAMPBELL Teller COUNTY PUBLIC TRUSTEE By: Pamela A. Cronce Deputy Public Trustee

Public Notice NOTICE OF SALE (CRS §38-38-103) Foreclosure Sale No. 2013-0026

Pursuant to C.R.S. §38-38-101 (4) (i), you are hereby notified that the covenants of the deed of trust have been violated as follows:

To Whom It May Concern: This Notice is given with regard to the following described Deed of Trust:

The failure to make timely payments required under said Deed of Trust and the Evidence of Debt secured thereby.

On April 26, 2013, the undersigned Public Trustee caused the Notice of Election and Demand relating to the Deed of Trust described below to be recorded in the County of Teller records.

THE LIEN FORECLOSED MAY NOT BE A FIRST LIEN.

Public Trustees

Original Grantor: JONATHAN J THORNE AND SHARI K. THORNE Original Beneficiary: MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC. ACTING SOLELY AS NOMINEE FOR MONCOR, INC. Current Holder of Evidence of Debt: WELLS FARGO BANK, NA Date of Deed of Trust: 10/9/2009 Recording Date of Deed of Trust: 10/20/2009 Recorded in Teller County: Reception No. 630713 Original Principal Amount: $217,395.00 Outstanding Principal Balance: $207,834.87 Pursuant to C.R.S. §38-38-101 (4) (i), you are hereby notified that the covenants of the deed of trust have been violated as follows:

Attorney: CYNTHIA LOWERY-GRABER Attorney Registration #34145 THE CASTLE LAW GROUP, LLC 999 18TH STREET, SUITE 2201, DENVER, COLORADO 80202 Phone: 1 (303) 865-1400 Fax: 1 (303) 865-1410 Attorney file #: 10-17753RR

Failure to pay principal and interest when due together will all other payments provided for in the Evidence of Debt secured by the Deed of Trust and other violations of the terms thereof.

The Attorney above is acting as a debt collector and is attempting to collect a debt. Any information provided may be used for that purpose.

THE PROPERTY DESCRIBED HEREIN IS ALL OF THE PROPERTY ENCUMBERED BY THE LIEN OF THE DEED OF TRUST.

Legal Notice No.: 2013-0025 First Publication: 6/19/2013 Last Publication: 7/17/2013 Published in: Pikes Peak Courier View

ATTACHED HERETO AS EXHIBIT 'A' AND INCORPORATED HEREIN AS THOUGH FULLY SET FORTH. which has the address of: 1053 Spring Creek Drive Divide, CO 80814

Public Notice NOTICE OF SALE (CRS §38-38-103) Foreclosure Sale No. 2013-0032 To Whom It May Concern: This Notice is given with regard to the following described Deed of Trust: On May 6, 2013, the undersigned Public Trustee caused the Notice of Election and Demand relating to the Deed of Trust described below to be recorded in the County of Teller records. Original Grantor: JOYCE MARTINEZ Original Beneficiary: PINETREE FINANCIAL PARTNERS FF, LTD. Current Holder of Evidence of Debt: PINETREE FINANCIAL PARTNERS FF, LTD. Date of Deed of Trust: 2/26/2013 Recording Date of Deed of Trust : 2/27/2013 Recorded in Teller County: Reception No. 660604 Original Principal Amount: $445,000.00 Outstanding Principal Balance: $445,000.00 Pursuant to C.R.S. §38-38-101 (4) (i), you are hereby notified that the covenants of the deed of trust have been violated as follows: Failure to obtain a Certificate of Occupancy and complete construction as required by the Deed of Trust and other violations of the terms thereof. THE LIEN FORECLOSED MAY NOT BE A FIRST LIEN. THE PROPERTY DESCRIBED HEREIN IS ALL OF THE PROPERTY ENCUMBERED BY THE LIEN OF THE DEED OF TRUST. LOT 7, SUNNY GLEN RETREAT SUBDIVISION, COUNTY OF TELLER, STATE OF COLORADO which has the address of: 2771 Mountain Glen Court Woodland Park, CO 80863 NOTICE OF SALE The current holder of the Evidence of Debt secured by the Deed of Trust described herein, has filed Notice of Election and Demand for sale as provided by law and in said Deed of Trust. THEREFORE, Notice Is Hereby Given that I will, at 10:00 a.m. in the forenoon of September 4, 2013, at the Teller County Public Trustee’s Office, 101 W. Bennett Ave., Cripple Creek, Colorado, sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder for cash, the said real property and all interest of said Grantor(s), Grantor(s)’ heirs and assigns therein, for the purpose of paying the indebtedness provided in said Evidence of Debt secured by the Deed of Trust, plus attorneys’ fees, the expenses of sale and other items allowed by law, and will issue to the purchaser a Certificate of Purchase, all as provided by law. First Publication: 7/10/2013 Last Publication: 8/7/2013 Published in: Pikes Peak Courier View Dated: 5/9/2013 ROBERT W. CAMPBELL Teller COUNTY PUBLIC TRUSTEE By: Pamela A. Cronce Deputy Public Trustee Attorney: ROBERT GRAHAM Attorney Registration #26809 FOSTER GRAHAM MILSTEIN & CALISHER, LLP 360 SOUTH GARFIELD STREET 6TH FLOOR, DENVER, COLORADO 80209 Phone: (303) 333-9810 Fax: (303) 333-9786 Attorney file #: 3118.0161 The Attorney above is acting as a debt collector and is attempting to collect a debt. Any information provided may be used for that purpose. Legal Notice No.: 2013-0032 First Publication: 7/10/2013 Last Publication: 8/7/2013 Published in: Pikes Peak Courier View Public Notice

THE LIEN FORECLOSED MAY NOT BE A FIRST LIEN.

NOTICE OF SALE The current holder of the Evidence of Debt secured by the Deed of Trust described herein, has filed Notice of Election and Demand for sale as provided by law and in said Deed of Trust. THEREFORE, Notice Is Hereby Given that I will, at 10:00 a.m. in the forenoon of August 28, 2013, at the Teller County Public Trustee’s Office, 101 W. Bennett Ave., Cripple Creek, Colorado, sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder for cash, the said real property and all interest of said Grantor(s), Grantor(s)’ heirs and assigns therein, for the purpose of paying the indebtedness provided in said Evidence of Debt secured by the Deed of Trust, plus attorneys’ fees, the expenses of sale and other items allowed by law, and will issue to the purchaser a Certificate of Purchase, all as provided by law. First Publication: 7/3/2013 Last Publication: 7/31/2013 Published in: Pikes Peak Courier View Dated: 5/9/2013 ROBERT W. CAMPBELL Teller COUNTY PUBLIC TRUSTEE By: Pamela A. Cronce Deputy Public Trustee Attorney: LISA CANCANON Attorney Registration #42043 ARONOWITZ & MECKLENBURG, LLP 1199 BANNOCK STREET, DENVER, COLORADO 80204 Phone: (303) 813-1177 Fax: Attorney file #: 9105.05529 The Attorney above is acting as a debt collector and is attempting to collect a debt. Any information provided may be used for that purpose. LEGAL DESCRIPTION A portion of Lot 19, Indian Creek No. 10, Teller County, Colorado described as follows: Beginning at the most Northwest corner of Lot 19 as platted in said Indian Creek No. 10; thence S 66 degrees 17'59" E along the Northeasterly line of said Lot 19, 551.09 feet to the Northeast corner thereof; thence along the Southeasterly line of said Lot 19 for the following three (3) courses; (1) thence S 67 degrees 15'12" W, 247.94 feet; (2) thence on a curve to the right which curve has a central angle of 11 degrees 18'13", a radius of 273.14 feet, and an arc length of 53.89 feet; (3) thence S 78 degrees 33'25" W, 5.00 feet to a point on the Southeasterly line of said Lot 19; thence N 55 degrees 49'15" W, 345.14 feet to a point on the Northwesterly line of said Lot 19; thence N 25 degrees 09'33" E along the Northwesterly line of said Lot 19, 155.00 feet to the point of beginning, County of Teller, State of Colorado Legal Notice No.: 2013-0026 First Publication: 7/3/2013 Last Publication: 7/31/2013 Published in: Pikes Peak Courier View Public Notice NOTICE OF SALE (CRS §38-38-103) Foreclosure Sale No. 2013-0031 To Whom It May Concern: This Notice is given with regard to the following described Deed of Trust: On May 6, 2013, the undersigned Public Trustee caused the Notice of Election and Demand relating to the Deed of Trust described below to be recorded in the County of Teller records. Original Grantor: DALE R EISEMAN AND KATHRYN A EISEMAN Original Beneficiary: PARK STATE BANK & TRUST Current Holder of Evidence of Debt: ROBERT E. WILLIAMS Date of Deed of Trust: 4/26/2007 Recording Date of Deed of Trust: 5/1/2007 Recorded in Teller County: Reception No. 606062 Original Principal Amount: $36,608.89 Outstanding Principal Balance: $33,647.61

NOTICE OF SALE (CRS §38-38-103) Foreclosure Sale No. 2013-0026

Pursuant to C.R.S. §38-38-101 (4) (i), you are hereby notified that the covenants of the deed of trust have been violated as follows:

To Whom It May Concern: This Notice is given with regard to the following described Deed of Trust:

The failure to make timely payments required under said Deed of Trust and the Evidence of Debt secured thereby.

On April 26, 2013, the undersigned Public Trustee caused the Notice of Election and Demand relating to the Deed of Trust described below to be recorded in the County of Teller records.

THE LIEN FORECLOSED MAY NOT BE A FIRST LIEN.

Original Grantor: JONATHAN J THORNE AND SHARI K. THORNE Original Beneficiary: MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC. ACTING SOLELY AS NOMINEE

Original Grantor: DALE R EISEMAN AND KATHRYN A EISEMAN Original Beneficiary: PARK STATE BANK & TRUST Current Holder of Evidence of Debt: ROBERT E. WILLIAMS Date of Deed of Trust: 4/26/2007 Recording Date of Deed of Trust: 5/1/2007 Recorded in Teller County: Reception No. 606062 Original Principal Amount: $36,608.89 Outstanding Principal Balance: $33,647.61

THE PROPERTY DESCRIBED HEREIN IS ALL OF THE PROPERTY ENCUMBERED BY THE LIEN OF THE DEED OF TRUST. LOT 120 IN WILSON LAKE ESTATES, COUNTY OF TELLER, STATE OF COLORADO

THE PROPERTY DESCRIBED HEREIN IS ALL OF THE PROPERTY ENCUMBERED BY THE LIEN OF THE DEED OF TRUST.

Public Trustees

LOT 120 IN WILSON LAKE ESTATES, COUNTY OF TELLER, STATE OF COLORADO which has the address of: 9 Freeman Drive Florissant, CO 80816 NOTICE OF SALE The current holder of the Evidence of Debt secured by the Deed of Trust described herein, has filed Notice of Election and Demand for sale as provided by law and in said Deed of Trust. THEREFORE, Notice Is Hereby Given that I will, at 10:00 a.m. in the forenoon of September 4, 2013, at the Teller County Public Trustee’s Office, 101 W. Bennett Ave., Cripple Creek, Colorado, sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder for cash, the said real property and all interest of said Grantor(s), Grantor(s)’ heirs and assigns therein, for the purpose of paying the indebtedness provided in said Evidence of Debt secured by the Deed of Trust, plus attorneys’ fees, the expenses of sale and other items allowed by law, and will issue to the purchaser a Certificate of Purchase, all as provided by law. First Publication: 7/10/2013 Last Publication: 8/7/2013 Published in: Pikes Peak Courier View Dated: 5/9/2013 ROBERT W. CAMPBELL Teller COUNTY PUBLIC TRUSTEE By: Pamela A. Cronce Deputy Public Trustee Attorney: TIMOTHY F BREWER Attorney Registration #32946 TIMOTHY F. BREWER, P.C. 10 BOULDER CRESCENT, SUITE 200, COLORADO SPRINGS, COLORADO 80903 Phone: (719) 477-0225 Fax: (719) 634-1106 Attorney file #: N/A The Attorney above is acting as a debt collector and is attempting to collect a debt. Any information provided may be used for that purpose. Legal Notice No.: 2013-0031 First Publication: 7/10/2013 Last Publication: 8/7/2013 Published in: Pikes Peak Courier View Public Notice NOTICE OF SALE (CRS §38-38-103) Foreclosure Sale No. 2013-0024 To Whom It May Concern: This Notice is given with regard to the following described Deed of Trust: On April 15, 2013, the undersigned Public Trustee caused the Notice of Election and Demand relating to the Deed of Trust described below to be recorded in the County of Teller records. Original Grantor: MELINDA ZURA Original Beneficiary: MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., AS NOMINEE FOR UNIVERAL LENDING CORPORATION Current Holder of Evidence of Debt: JPMORGAN CHASE BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION Date of Deed of Trust: 8/27/2009 Recording Date of Deed of Trust : 8/28/2009 Recorded in Teller County: Reception No. 629526 Original Principal Amount: $127,551.00 Outstanding Principal Balance: $121,748.44 Pursuant to C.R.S. §38-38-101 (4) (i), you are hereby notified that the covenants of the deed of trust have been violated as follows: Failure to pay principal and interest when due together will all other payments provided for in the Evidence of Debt secured by the Deed of Trust and other violations thereof. THE LIEN FORECLOSED MAY NOT BE A FIRST LIEN. THE PROPERTY DESCRIBED HEREIN IS ALL OF THE PROPERTY ENCUMBERED BY THE LIEN OF THE DEED OF TRUST. LOTS 163 AND 164 NOW DESIGNATED AS LOT 164A, BLOCK 59, SHERWOOD FOREST ESTATES - UNIT SIX, COUNTY OF TELLER, STATE OF COLORADO which has the address of: 55 Doublet Lane Divide, CO 80814 NOTICE OF SALE The current holder of the Evidence of Debt secured by the Deed of Trust described herein, has filed Notice of Election and Demand for sale as provided by law and in said Deed of Trust. THEREFORE, Notice Is Hereby Given that I will, at 10:00 a.m. in the forenoon of August 14, 2013, at the Teller County Public Trustee’s Office, 101 W. Bennett Ave., Cripple Creek, Colorado, sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder for cash, the said real property and all interest of said Grantor(s), Grantor(s)’ heirs and assigns therein, for the purpose of paying the indebtedness provided in said Evidence of Debt secured by the Deed of Trust, plus attorneys’ fees, the expenses of sale and other items allowed by law, and will issue to the purchaser a Certificate of Purchase, all as provided by law. First Publication: 6/19/2013 Last Publication: 7/17/2013 Published in: Pikes Peak Courier View Dated: 4/19/2013 ROBERT W. CAMPBELL Teller COUNTY PUBLIC TRUSTEE By: Pamela A. Cronce Deputy Public Trustee Attorney: KIMBERLY L MARTINEZ Attorney Registration #40351 THE CASTLE LAW GROUP, LLC 999 18TH STREET, SUITE 2201, DENVER, COLORADO 80202 Phone: 1 (303) 865-1400 Fax: 1 (303) 865-1410 Attorney file #: 13-02365 The Attorney above is acting as a debt collector and is attempting to collect a debt. Any information provided may be used for that purpose.


Deputy Public Trustee

JECT MATTER OF THIS ACTION.

Attorney: KIMBERLY L MARTINEZ Attorney Registration #40351 THE CASTLE LAW GROUP, LLC 999 18TH STREET, SUITE 2201, DENVER, COLORADO 80202 Phone: 1 (303) 865-1400 Fax: 1 (303) 865-1410 Attorney file #: 13-02365

Linda McMillan, #20347 Buxman Kwitek & Ohlsen, P.C. Attorneys for Plaintiff 601 N. Main, Suite 200 Pueblo, Colorado 81003 Telephone: (719) 544-5081

July 10, 2013

Public Trustees

The Attorney above is acting as a debt collector and is attempting to collect a debt. Any information provided may be used for that purpose. Public Notice No.: 2013-0024 First Publication: 6/19/2013 Last Publication: 7/17/2013 Published in: Pikes Peak Courier View

Misc. Private Legals Public Notice DISTRICT COURT, TELLER COUNTY, COLORADO 101 W. Bennett Avenue P.O. Box 997 Cripple Creek, CO 80813 DAVID MICHAEL FROHARDT and MARK STEPHEN FROHARDT, Plaintiffs, vs. HEIRS OF DOROTHY MIEROW; AND ALL UNKNOWN PERSONS WHO CLAIM ANY INTEREST IN THE SUBJECT MATTER OF THIS ACTION , Defendants, David C. Conley, P.C. (#12758) David C. Conley Attorney for Plaintiffs 24 S. Weber, Suite 300 Colorado Springs, CO 80903 Telephone: (719) 633-3334 Fax: (719) 471-1663 Email: conleypc@pcisys.net Case No. 2013 CV 30002 SUMMONS BY PUBLICATION THE PEOPLE OF THE STATE OF COLORADO TO THE ABOVE-NAMED DEFENDANTS: You are hereby summoned and required to appear and defend against the claims of the Complaint filed with the Court in this action, by filing with the clerk of this Court an answer or other response. You are required to file your answer or other response within thirty (30) days after service this Summons upon you. Service of this Summons will be complete on the day of the last publication. A copy of the Complaint may be obtained from the clerk of the Court. If you fail to file your answer or other response to the Complaint in writing within thirty (30) days after the date of the last publication, judgment by default may be rendered against you by the Court for the relief demanded in the Complaint, without any further notice. This is an action to quiet the title of the Plaintiff in and to the real property situated in Teller County, Colorado, more particularly described below. An Undivided 1/8th interest in and to the following described property: That portion of the Northwest Quarter of Section 5, the Northeast Quarter of Section 6 and the Southeast Quarter of Section 6, in Township 13 South, Range 68 West of the Sixth Principal Meridian, described as follows: BEGINNING at the Quarter Corner on the East line of Section 6, Township 13 South, Range 68 West of the Sixth Principal Meridian and running thence East 493.55 feet to a point on the West line of the Ute Pass County Road, thence North 24 degrees 31 minutes West 105 feet along said West line of road to a point; Thence North 8 degrees 05 minutes West 766.71 feet along said West line of road to a point; Thence West 993.98 feet to a point; Thence South 76 degrees 45 minutes West 725.08 feet to a point; Thence South 43 degrees 45 minutes West 1854.52 feet to a point; Thence South 818.93 feet to a point; Thence North 43 degrees 45 minutes East 2035.17 to a point; Thence East 1232.65 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING; TOGETHER with a perpetual right of way over the land of The Crystola Cooperative Association, its successors and assigns, between the above described premises and the Crystola Station on the Colorado Midland Railway; EXCEPT that portion of the above described premises taken by the State Department of Highways, Division of Highways, State of Colorado by Rule and Order recorded September 30, 1977 in Book 2966 at Page 332, Counties of El Paso and Teller, State of Colorado. Respectfully submitted this 19th day of June, 2013. DAVID C. CONLEY, P.C. /s/ Duly signed original on file at David C. Conley, P.C. By: David C. Conley, #12758 THIS SUMMONS IS ISSUED PURSUANT TO RULE 4(g), COLORADO RULES OF CIVIL PROCEDURE. THIS FORM SHOULD NOT BE USED WHERE PERSONAL SERVICE IS DESIRED Legal Notice No.: 933688 First Publication: July 3, 2013 Last Publication: July 31, 2013 Published in the Peak Courier View Public Notice

Public Notice To: Ricky Dean Aton: You are notified that you have 10 days after publication for this notice of levy to file your claim of exemption with the County Court of TELLER County, PO Box 997/101 W. Bennett Ave., Cripple Creek, CO 80813 in Case 12CV 199 entitled: Yellow Book, Inc., f/d/b/a Yellow Book Sales and Distribution Company, Inc. vs. Ricky Dean Aton, a/k/a Rick Aton, a/k/a Rick Dean Aton, a/k/a Ricky D. Aton, a/k/a Ricky Aton, a/k/a Rick D. Aton, d/b/a Excellent Plumbing and Heating, d/b/a Excellent Heating & Plumbing, d/b/a Excellent Plumbing & Heating $492.35 garnished at Vectra Bank, Denver, CO 80222.

Misc. Private Legals

Legal Notice No.: 933671 First Publication: June 19, 2013 Last Publication: July 17, 2013 Publisher: Pikes Peak Courier View PUBLIC NOTICE Pursuant to notices sent via certified mail to Don P. Roehres last known address, June 26, 2013, all contents in the below listed storage unit, located at Tregos Storage, 42 Buffalo Ct. Divide, CO 80814 will be sold or otherwise disposed of by removal to the Divide Colorado Dump Transfer Station on July 24, 2013 at 10:00 A.M. at the Tregos Venture Storage Facility Unit # K 55 located at 42 Buffalo Ct., Divide, CO 80814. The sale will be by Auction at the Site Unit K 55 and will be sold in one lot. Sealed bids will be accepted and opened first. Any proceeds will be applied to unpaid rents. Tenant: Don P. Roehres Storage Unit: K 55 Last Known Address Of: P.O. Box 3191 Carefree, AZ 85377 Contents consisting of, but not limited to: Miscellaneous Construction Supplies Legal Notice No.: 933705 First Publication: July 10, 2013 Last Publication: July 17, 2013 Publisher: Pikes Peak Courier View Public Notice

Misc. Private Legals

Case No. 2013 CV 30004 Div.: 11

SUMMONS BY PUBLICATION THE PEOPLE OF THE STATE OF COLORADO TO THE ABOVE NAMED DEFENDANTS: You are hereby summoned and required to appear and defend against the claims of the Complaint filed with the Court in this action by filing with the Clerk of this Court an Answer or other response. You are required to file your Answer or other response within 35 days after the service of this Summons upon you. Service of this Summons shall be complete on the day of the last publication. A copy of the Complaint may be obtained from the Clerk of the Court. If you fail to file your Answer or other response to the Complaint in writing within 35 days after the date of the last publication, judgment by default may be rendered against you by the Court for the relief demanded in the Complaint without further notice. This is an action to quiet title to real properties in the State of Colorado, legally described as follows: L295 TURKEY ROCK RANCH 2 Also know as: 55 Hedges Circle L8 B3 TROUT HAVEN 2 Also known as: 141 Elbert Dr. L531A MELODY ACRES L4 B2 VALLEY HI MTN EST Also known as: 171 Crestridge Rd. DATED: BUXMAN KWITEK & OHLSEN, P.C. By: Linda McMillan, #20437 Attorney for Plaintiff THIS SUMMONS IS ISSUED PURSUANT TO RULE 4(h), CRCP Legal Notice No.: 933710 First Publication: July 11, 2013 Last Publication: August 7, 2013 Publisher: Pikes Peak Courier View

District Court, Teller County, State of Colorado 101 W. Bennett Avenue Cripple Creek, CO 80813 Phone: (719) 689-2543

Government Legals

THE PEOPLE OF THE STATE OF COLORADO IN THE INTEREST OF: JAXON UBALLE DOB: 03/07/13 Child,

SEEKING CANDIDATES FOR CITY COUNCIL VACANCY

TELLER COUNTY DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL SERVICES Petitioner, And Concerning: VANESSA UBALLE UNKNOWN FATHER Respondents. Attorney or Party without Attorney Steven C. Zentz, #20045 Special County Attorney 287 E. Fountain Blvd., Suite 300 Colorado Springs, CO 80903 Phone: (719) 328-0389 FAX: (719) 227-9811 AMENDED SUMMONS Case Number: 13 JV 22 Division 11 To: Unknown Father, GREETINGS: You are hereby notified that a verified Petition has been filed in the above-named Court in which it is represented to the Court that the above-named child is or appears to be a DEPENDENT OR NEGLECTED CHILD as defined in C.R.S. 193-102 for the reasons set forth in said petition, a copy of which is attached hereto and incorporated herein. You are further notified that the Court has set said Petition for hearing on the 18th day of July 2013, at 11:00 a.m. You are hereby notified to be and appear before this Court at said time. Witness my hand and seal of said Court this 20th day of June, 2013. Clerk of the District Court BY: /s/ Laura Lee Rippe DEPUTY (original signature in file) Legal Notice No.: 933708 First Publication: July 10, 2013 Last Publication: July 10, 2013 Publisher: Pikes Peak Courier View Public Notice DISTRICT COURT, TELLER COUNTY, COLORADO Court address: 101 W. Bennett Ave. P.O. Box 997 Cripple Creek, CO 80813 Phone number: 719-689-2574 Plaintiffs: JACK D. ENGLAND DOPC PSP,and JACK D. ENGLAND DOPC v. Defendants: TOM N. WILLIAMS, DIANA M. WILLIAMS, MARK A. WORTKOETTER, NANCY P. WORTKOETTER, IVO STAHULJAK, ANNETTE STAHULJAK, ANTHONY W. NELSON, STEPHANIE NELSON and ALL UNKNOWN PERSONS OR ENTITIES WHO CLAIM ANY INTEREST IN THE SUBJECT MATTER OF THIS ACTION. Linda McMillan, #20347 Buxman Kwitek & Ohlsen, P.C. Attorneys for Plaintiff 601 N. Main, Suite 200 Pueblo, Colorado 81003 Telephone: (719) 544-5081

To: Ricky Dean Aton: You are notified that you have 10 days after publication Case No. 2013 CV 30004 for this notice of levy to file your claim Div.: 11 of exemption with the County Court of TELLER County, PO Box 997/101 W. SUMMONS BY PUBLICATION Bennett Ave., Cripple Creek, CO 80813 in Case 12CV 199 entitled: Yellow Book, THE PEOPLE OF THE STATE Inc., f/d/b/a Yellow Book Sales and DistriPublic Notice OF COLORADO TO THE ABOVE bution Company, Inc. vs. Ricky Dean City of Victor Payments for May 2013 NAMED DEFENDANTS: Aton, a/k/a Rick Aton, a/k/a Rick Dean Aton, a/k/a Ricky D. Aton, a/k/a Ricky You are hereby summoned required Konica Minolta Premier Finance and188.57 Vendor.Name Check.Amt Aton, a/k/a Rick D. Aton, d/b/a Excellent to appear claims Larry Beaty and defend against the 600.00 Plumbing and Heating, d/b/a Excellent of the Complaint filed with the Court in this Cloud Services 99.00 Macdougall & Woldridge PC 222.06 Heating Plumbing, d/b/a Excellent action Wallace by filing with the Clerk of 400.00 this Court Redeposit&Fee 7.50 Michael Plumbing Heating $492.35 garnished anPots Answer are reRedeposit&Fee 7.50at Mr. Inc or other response. You 210.00 Vectra Bank,Pymt Denver, quired Tarla to file your Answer or 400.00 other reSemi Annual WW CO Plant80222. 26,995.25 Perdew, sponse within 35 days after the 400.00 service of Personnel Law Posters 22.93 Petri, Veldean this Summons uponIncyou. Service of this Legal Notice No.: 933671 Personnel Law Posters 22.92 PR Diamond Products 198.00 Summons shall be complete on2,920.29 the day of First FlagsPublication: June 19, 2013 119.60 Sanducci Electric the last publication. A copy of the ComLast Publication: July 17, 2013 Flags 119.61 SGS North America Inc. 116.50 plaint be obtained from the Clerk of Publisher: Pikes Peak-Oximeters Courier View103.96 2013 FD Eqpt Project So East may Col Water Activity Ent 1,890.00 the Court. Payroll 9,401.76 Teller County Public Works 285.48 US Postal Service 157.12 The Gazette 383.32 If youJody fail to file your Answer or other Noel Wallace 285.00 Turner, 64.79 response to the Complaint in16.30 writing Payroll 9,370.36 Utility Notification within 35 days after the date2,000.00 of the last Orchard Trust Company 69.24 Victor Lowell Thomas Museum publication, Black Hills Energy 4,048.92 Zirkle Studios judgment by default 637.50may be rendered against you by the Court Carquest 131.68 Payroll 9,405.45 for the relief demanded in the ComCaselle 343.00 Aflac plaint without further notice.33.00 CBeyond 1,962.10 Colorado Department Of Revenue 1,284.00 Century Link 50.85 Delta of Colorado 364.61 This Dental is an action to quiet title to real Cirsa 67.00 Orchard TrustinCompany, Uc of Colorado, 69.24legproperties the State City of Cripple Creek 11,735.96 United Healthcare 8,356.75 ally described as follows: Claim Jumper 114.33 Gold BakeryROCK RANCH 2 30.00 L295Camp TURKEY Colorado Community Media 337.60 Headframe Also knowTavern as: 55 Hedges Circle 475.99 Debra Dawns 160.76 Hillers, 1,500.00 L8 B3 Ryan TROUT HAVEN 2 Diana Bowman 400.00 United States Treasury Also known as: 141 Elbert Dr. 3,114.44 El Paso Cty Public Health Lab 64.00 United States Treasury 3,108.62 L531A MELODY ACRES Ferrellgas 1,032.97 L4 B2 VALLEY HI MTN EST 108,487.00 Gold Camp Bakery 53.00 Legal Notice as: No.:171 933709 Also known Crestridge Rd. Hakes, Byron L 600.00 First Publication: July 10, 2013 Hayes Phillips Hoffman & Ca 1,779.28 Last Publication: July 10, 2013 DATED: Konica Minolta Business 148.89 BUXMAN Pikes KWITEK & OHLSEN, P.C. Publisher: Peak Courier View By: Linda McMillan, #20437 Attorney for Plaintiff THIS SUMMONS IS ISSUED PURSU-

commercial building situated in the SW¼

of Section 30, Township 12 North, Range 21-Color 68 West of the 6th P.M., City of Wood-

PUBLIC NOTICE

Pursuant to Section 3.5 of the City of Woodland Park Home Rule Charter, public notice is hereby given that letters of interest with qualifications are being requested by the City Council of Woodland Park from City residents interested in filling a vacated Council seat for the remainder of a term ending April 2014 at which time the seat will be filled at the City's Regular Municipal Election. Qualifications to serve as a City Councilmember are; applicant must be a citizen of the United States for not less than seven years; must be at least twenty-one years of age, and shall have been a resident of the City of Woodland Park not less than one year immediately preceding election or appointment. A person who has been convicted of a felony shall not be eligible to become a candidate for City office. Letters of interest citing qualifications and specific motivations for wanting to serve must be submitted to Woodland Park City Council, PO Box 9007, Woodland Park, CO 80866-9007, by email to the City Clerk cmorse@city-woodlandpark.org or hand delivered to City Hall at 220 West South Avenue by noon on Friday July 26, 2013. Applicants will be asked to interview with the City Council on Thursday August 1, 2013 at 6:00 P.M. Questions may be addressed to the City’s Clerk’s Office at 6875201. Cindy Morse, City Clerk Legal Notice No.: 933707 First Publication: July 10, 2013 Last Publication: July 24, 2013 Publisher: Pikes Peak Courier View Public Notice INVITATION FOR BIDS Sealed bids for “2013 Improvements” for Teller County Public Works will be received by Teller County Public Works located at 308-A Weaverville Road, P.O. Box 805, Divide, Colorado, 80814 up until 11:00 a.m. local time, Thursday August 01, 2013, at which time they will be publicly opened and read aloud. The work will consist of: replacing damaged guardrail sections and posts, rehabilitating culverts by slip lining HDPE culverts into existing culverts and grouting ends closed, replacing culverts, adding guardrail toe kick onto the top of existing toe kick for drainage purposes, replacing existing FES and curbing on guardrail drainage beaver slides, perform ditching and backsloping operations, prepare driveway aprons to receive HMA, installing a two (2) inch quantity leveling course of HMA on roadway and installing a two (2) inch compacted top mat of HMA on roadway, shouldering and striping. Please visit www.teller.co.us to obtain the bid package electronically. Once bid package is obtained electronically, please call Teller County Public Works and inform us so that we can list you on the official plan holders list. Any questions regarding this bid should be directed to Bryan Kincaid, Right-of-way Supervisor at 719-687-8812. All interested firms are invited to submit a bid in accordance with the terms and conditions stated in the RFB. BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS TELLER COUNTY, CO Legal Notice No.: 933706 First Publication: July 10, 2013 Last Publication: July 24, 2013 Publisher: Pikes Peak Courier View PUBLIC NOTICE City of Woodland Park A public hearing for the case below will be heard by the Woodland Park Planning Commission on Thursday, July 25, 2013 at 7:00PM in the City Hall Council Chambers at 220 W. South Avenue, Woodland Park, Colorado. ZON13-002 Starbucks Coffee Company: Request for a Planned Unit Development /Planned Business Development (PUD/PBD) amendment with a site plan review to Lot 2, Wal-Mart Center PUD/PBD to construct a 1,920 square foot commercial building situated in the SW¼ of Section 30, Township 12 North, Range 68 West of the 6th P.M., City of Woodland Park, Teller County, Colorado with an address of 19590 E. US Hwy. 24, Woodland Park, Colorado. The applicant is Chad Williams of Net Lease Alliance in Nashville, Tennessee. If you have any questions, please contact the City of Woodland Park Planning Department at 687-5209.

land Park, Teller County, Colorado with an address of 19590 E. US Hwy. 24, Woodland Park, Colorado. The applicant is Chad Williams of Net Lease Alliance in Nashville, Tennessee.

Government Legals

If you have any questions, please contact the City of Woodland Park Planning Department at 687-5209. Legal Notice No.: 933714 First Publication: July 10, 2013 Last Publication: July 10, 2013 Publisher: Pikes Peak Courier View Public Notice CITY OF WOODLAND PARK NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING Public Hearing on Ordinance No. 1187, Series 2013, shall be held in the Council Chambers of City Hall, 220 W. South Avenue, on the 18th day of July 2013 at 7:00 PM. The aforesaid Ordinance was posted in City Hall 24 hours prior to the June 6th, 2013 City Council meeting, passed on first reading, and ordered published, as required by Section 7.6 of the Charter of the City of Woodland Park. Subsequent to that publication in full the ordinance has been amended and is being published in full on July 17, 2013 as a courtesy. CITY OF WOODLAND PARK, COLORADO ORDINANCE NO. 1187, SERIES 2013 AN ORDINANCE ANNEXING A TRACT OF LAND KNOWN AS SOUTHWEST VALLEY ANNEXATION PLAT 1, PARCELS 1 AND 3 CONTAINING 0.88 ACRES SITUATED IN THE NW1/4 OF THE NW ¼ OF SECTION 25, TOWNSHIP 12 SOUTH, RANGE 69 WEST OF THE 6TH PRINCIPAL MERIDIAN IN TELLER COUNTY, COLORADO WITH ADDRESS OF 1000 COUNTY ROAD 231 (S. WEST STREET) AS REQUESTED BY THE PETITIONERS DONALD R. AND BETH J. McCARL. WHEREAS, a petition has been submitted and filed with the City Clerk of the City of Woodland Park, Colorado, by Donald R. and Beth J. McCarl, owners of one hundred (100%) of the area for annexation hereinafter described in Exhibit A; and, WHEREAS, the City Council has considered such petition and finds the same substantially complies with the provisions of the Colorado Municipal Annexation Act of 1965, C.R.S. 31-12-101 et seq. and specifically, the provisions of C.R.S. 3112-107; and WHEREAS, this petition is signed by the sole owners, or his duly authorized representative, of all of the property proposed to be annexed; and WHEREAS, after duly noticed public hearing held June 6, 2013, the City Council adopted Resolution No. 757 and Resolution No. 758; and WHEREAS, at said public hearings the City Council found that the requisite contiguity does exist between the City of Woodland Park and the area petitioned to be annexed; and WHEREAS, the City Council found that a community of interest exists between the City of Woodland Park and the area petitioned to be annexed; and WHEREAS, the City Council found that the area petitioned to be annexed will be urbanized in the future; and WHEREAS, the City Council found that the area petitioned to be annexed is capable of being integrated with the City of Woodland Park; and WHEREAS, by Resolutions Nos. 757 and 758 the City Council determined that the applicable provisions of Section 30 of article II of the state constitution and sections 31-12-104 and 31-12-105, C.R.S. have been met and that no election is required under Section 30(1)(a) of article II of the state constitution and section 31-12107(2), C.R.S.; and WHEREAS, the City Council finds that notice to Teller County via certified letter was effective as evidenced by the letter from Teller County dated May 6, 2013, that such method of notice substantially complies with state statues, any deviation from state statues was immaterial, and no prejudice resulted; and WHEREAS, the City Council finds that the legal description contained in the notice published on April 24, 2013, May 1, 2013, May 8, 2013 and May 15, 2013, substantially complies with state statutes, any error in the legal description was immaterial, City Council had before it at all proceedings pertaining to the Petition for Annexation the correct legal description, and no prejudice resulted from the legal description contained in the notice; and WHEREAS, the City Council finds that the hearings held on Resolution No. 757 and Resolution No. 758 substantially comply with state statutes, that June 6, 2013 was the earliest a hearing before City Council could be scheduled in compliance with the state statute post-publication timing requirements due to the fact that the City Council holds regular meetings on the first and third Thursdays and May contained five Thursdays; that any deviation from state statutes was, under the circumstances, immaterial, that the three days additional time inured to the benefit of all persons participating in the proceedings, and no prejudice resulted; and WHEREAS, City Council finds that the requirements of applicable statutes have been met. NOW, THEREFORE, THIS ORDINANCE: THE CITY OF WOODLAND PARK, COLORADO, ORDAINS: That an Ordinance entitled “AN ORDINANCE ANNEXING A TRACT OF LAND KNOWN AS SOUTHWEST VALLEY ANNEXATION PLAT 1, PARCELS 1 AND 3 CONTAINING 0.88 ACRES SITUATED IN THE NW1/4 OF THE NW ¼ OF SECTION25, TOWNSHIP 12 SOUTH, RANGE 69 WEST OF THE 6TH PRINCIPAL MERIDIAN IN TELLER COUNTY, COLORADO WITH ADDRESS OF 1000 COUNTY ROAD 231 (S. WEST STREET) AS REQUESTED BY THE PETITIONERS DONALD R. AND BETH J. McCARL”, be and the same is hereby enacted to read as follows: Section 1. Findings. The findings contained in the above recitals are reaffirmed and incorporated into this Ordinance. Section 2. Legal Description. There is hereby annexed into the City of Woodland Park a tract of land, the legal description of said tract of land being a portion in the NW1/4 of the NW1/4 of Section 25, Township 12 South, Range 69 West of the 6th P.M. in Teller County Colorado, located at 1000 CR 231 (S. West Street), Woodland Park, Colorado as described by Exhibit A. Section 3. Enforceability.Should any provision of this Ordinance be deemed by a Court of competent jurisdiction to be ineffective, inoperable, unconstitutional or in any way not binding upon the parties hereto, such provision shall be stricken from the Ordinance with the remaining provisions continuing in full force and effect. Section 4. Effective Date. This Ordinance shall be in full force and effect from and after its publication as required by law. PASSED BY CITY COUNCIL ON SECOND AND FINAL READING FOLLOWING PUBLIC HEARING THIS __ DAY OF __, 2013. David J. Turley, Mayor ATTEST: Cindy Morse, City Clerk APPROVED AS TO FORM:

Section 4. Effective Date. This Ordinance shall be in full force and effect from and after its publication as required by law. PASSED BY CITY COUNCIL ON SECOND AND FINAL READING FOLLOWING PUBLIC HEARING THIS __ DAY OF __, 2013.

Government Legals

David J. Turley, Mayor

ATTEST: Cindy Morse, City Clerk APPROVED AS TO FORM: Erin Smith, City Attorney Exhibit A LEGAL DESCRIPTION – SOUTHWEST VALLEY ANNEXATION PLAT 1: PARCELS 1 AND 3 OF THAT DEED RECORDED FEBRUARY 09, 1996 UNDER RECEPTION NO. 443568 OF THE RECORDS OF THE TELLER COUNTY CLERK AND RECORDER, SITUATED IN THE NORTHWEST ONE-QUARTER OF THE NORTHWEST ONE-QUARTER (NW1/4 NW1/4) OF SECTION 25, TOWNSHIP 12 SOUTH, RANGE 69 WEST OF THE 6TH P.M., TELLER COUNTY, COLORADO, AND BEING MORE PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: BEGINNING AT THE MOST WESTERLY CORNER OF SAID PARCEL 3, SAID POINT ALSO BEING AN ANGLE POINT ON THE SOUTHEASTERLY RIGHT-OFWAY LINE OF U.S. HIGHWAY NO. 24, FROM WHICH THE MOST SOUTHERLY CORNER OF SAID PARCEL 3 BEARS S40°07'50"E, A DISTANCE OF 246.55 FEET AND IS THE BASIS OF BEARINGS USED HEREIN; THENCE N26°44'00"E ALONG THE NORTHWESTERLY LINE OF SAID PARCEL 3 AND SAID PARCEL 1, SAID LINE ALSO BEING THE SOUTHEASTERLY RIGHT-OF-LINE OF SAID U.S. HIGHWAY NO. 24, A DISTANCE OF 147.74 FEET TO THE NORTHWESTERL Y CORNER OF SAID PARCEL 1; THENCE N89°24'16"E ALONG THE NORTH LINE OF SAID PARCEL 1, A DISTANCE OF 103.17 FEET TO THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF SAID PARCEL 1, SAID POINT ALSO BEING THE NORTHWEST CORNER OF PARCEL 2, AS RECORDED UNDER SAID RECEPTION NO. 443568; THENCE S03°56'39"E ALONG THE COMMON LINE OF SAID PARCELS 1 AND 2, A DISTANCE OF 294.49 FEET TO THE SOUTHERLY CORNER COMMON TO SAID PARCELS 1, 2, AND 3, SAID POINT ALSO BEING A POINT ON THE NORTHWESTERLY RIGHT-OFWAY LINE OF WEST STREET (COUNTY ROAD NO. 231); THENCE S48°08'45"W ALONG THE SOUTHEASTERLY LINE OF SAID PARCEL 3 AND ALONG SAID NORTHWESTERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY LINE, A DISTANCE OF 41.57 FEET TO THE MOST SOUTHERLY CORNER OF SAID PARCEL 3; THENCE N40°07'50"W ALONG THE SOUTHWESTERLY LINE OF SAID PARCEL 3, A DISTANCE OF 246.55 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. SAID TRACT CONTAINS 38,157 SQUARE FEET (0.88 ACRES) OF LAND, MORE OR LESS. Legal Notice No.: 933715 First Publication: July 10, 2013 Last Publication: July 10, 2013 Publisher: Pikes Peak Courier View Public Notice CITY OF WOODLAND PARK NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING Public Hearing on Ordinance No. 1188, Series 2013, shall be held in the Council Chambers of City Hall, 220 W. South Avenue, on the 18th day of July 2013 at 7:00 PM. The aforesaid Ordinance was posted in City Hall 24 hours prior to the June 6th, 2013 City Council meeting, passed on first reading, and ordered published, as required by Section 7.6 of the Charter of the City of Woodland Park. Subsequent to that publication in full the ordinance has been amended and is being published in full on July 17, 2013 as a courtesy. CITY OF WOODLAND PARK, COLORADO ORDINANCE NO. 1188, SERIES 2013 AN ORDINANCE ANNEXING TRACTS OF LAND KNOWN AS SOUTHWEST VALLEY ANNEXATION PLAT 2, PARCELS A AND B CONTAINING 0.58 ACRES AND A PORTION OF PARCEL 2 CONTAINING 0.38 ACRES SITUATED IN THE NW¼ OF THE NW¼ OF SECTION 25, TOWNSHIP 12 SOUTH, RANGE 69 WEST OF THE 6TH PRINCIPAL MERIDIAN IN TELLER COUNTY, COLORADO WITH ADDRESSES OF 1050 AND 1000 COUNTY ROAD 231 (S. WEST STREET) AS REQUESTED BY THE PETITIONERS KARL HIRSHBECK (PARCELS A AND B), AND DONALD R. AND BETH J. McCARL (PORTION OF PARCEL 2). WHEREAS, a petition has been submitted and filed with the City Clerk of the City of Woodland Park, Colorado, by Karl Hirshbeck, and Donald R. and Beth J. McCarl, owners of one hundred (100%) of the area for annexation hereinafter described in Exhibit A; and, WHEREAS, the City Council has considered such petition and finds the same substantially complies with the provisions of the Colorado Municipal Annexation Act of 1965, C.R.S. 31-12-101 et. seq. and specifically, the provisions of C.R.S. 3112-107; and WHEREAS, this petition is signed by the sole owners, or his duly authorized representative, of all of the property proposed to be annexed; and WHEREAS, after a duly noticed public hearing held June 6, 2013, the City Council adopted Resolution No. 757 and Resolution No. 758; and WHEREAS, at said public hearings the City Council found that the requisite contiguity does exist between the City of Woodland Park and the area petitioned to be annexed; and WHEREAS, the City Council found that a community of interest exists between the City of Woodland Park and the area petitioned to be annexed; and WHEREAS, the City Council found that the area petitioned to be annexed will be urbanized in the future; and WHEREAS, the City Council found that the area petitioned to be annexed is capable of being integrated with the City of Woodland Park; and WHEREAS, Resolutions Nos. 757 and 758 the City Council determined that the applicable provisions of Section 30 of article II of the state constitution and sections 31-12-104 and 31-12-105, C.R.S. have been met and that no election is required under Section 30(1)(a) of article II of the state constitution and section 31-12107(2), C.R.S.; and WHEREAS, the City Council finds that notice to Teller County via certified letter was effective as evidenced by the letter from Teller County dated May 6, 2013, that such method of notice substantially complies with state statues, any deviation from state statues was immaterial, and no prejudice resulted; and WHEREAS, the City Council finds that the legal description contained in the notice published on April 24, 2013, May 1, 2013, May 8, 2013 and May 15, 2013, substantially complies with state statutes, any error in the legal description was immaterial, City Council had before it at all proceedings pertaining to the Petition for Annexation the correct legal description, and no prejudice resulted from the legal description contained in the notice; and

such method of notice substantially complies with state statues, any deviation from state statues was immaterial, and no prejudice resulted; and WHEREAS, the City Council finds that the legal description contained in the notice published on April 24, 2013, May 1, 2013, May 8, 2013 and May 15, 2013, substantially complies with state statutes, any error in the legal description was immaterial, City Council had before it at all proceedings pertaining to the Petition for Annexation the correct legal description, and no prejudice resulted from the legal description contained in the notice; and WHEREAS, the City Council finds that the hearings held on Resolution No. 757 and Resolution No. 758 substantially comply with state statutes, that June 6, 2013 was the earliest a hearing before City Council could be scheduled in compliance with the state statute post-publication timing requirements due to the fact that the City Council holds regular meetings on the first and third Thursdays and May contained five Thursdays; that any deviation from state statutes was, under the circumstances, immaterial, that the three days additional time inured to the benefit of all persons participating in the proceedings, and no prejudice resulted; and WHEREAS, City Council finds that the requirements of applicable statutes have been met.

Pikes Peak Courier View 21

Government Legals

NOW, THEREFORE, THIS ORDINANCE: THE CITY OF WOODLAND PARK, COLORADO, ORDAINS: That an Ordinance entitled “AN ORDINANCE ANNEXING TRACTS OF LAND KNOWN AS SOUTHWEST VALLEY ANNEXATION PLAT 2, PARCELS A AND B CONTAINING 0.58 ACRES AND A PORTION OF PARCEL 2 CONTAINING 0.38 ACRES SITUATED IN THE NW¼ OF THE NW¼ OF SECTION 25, TOWNSHIP 12 SOUTH, RANGE 69 WEST OF THE 6TH PRINCIPAL MERIDIAN IN TELLER COUNTY, COLORADO WITH ADDRESSES OF 1050 AND 1000 COUNTY ROAD 231 (S. WEST STREET) AS REQUESTED BY THE PETITIONERS KARL HIRSHBECK (PARCELS A AND B), AND DONALD R. AND BETH J. McCARL (PORTION OF PARCEL 2)”, be and the same is hereby enacted to read as follows: Section 1. Findings. The findings contained in the above recitals are reaffirmed and incorporated into this Ordinance. Section 2. Legal Description. There is hereby annexed into the City of Woodland Park a tract of land, the legal description of said tract of land being a portion in the NW1/4 of the NW1/4 of Section 25, Township 12 South, Range 69 West of the 6th P.M. in Teller County Colorado, located at 1050 and 1000 CR 231 (S. West Street), Woodland Park, Colorado as described by Exhibit A. Section 3. Enforceability.Should any provision of this Ordinance be deemed by a Court of competent jurisdiction to be ineffective, inoperable, unconstitutional or in any way not binding upon the parties hereto, such provision shall be stricken from the Ordinance with the remaining provisions continuing in full force and effect. Section 4. Effective Date. This Ordinance shall be in full force and effect from and after its publication as required by law. PASSED BY CITY COUNCIL ON SECOND AND FINAL READING FOLLOWING PUBLIC HEARING THIS __ DAY OF ____, 2013. David J. Turley, Mayor ATTEST: Cindy Morse, City Clerk APPROVED AS TO FORM: Erin Smith, City Attorney Exhibit A LEGAL DESCRIPTION – SOUTHWEST VALLEY ANNEXATION PLAT 2: PARCELS A AND B, AS RECORDED IN BOOK 623 AT PAGE 183-184 OF THE RECORDS OF TELLER COUNTY CLERK AND RECORDER, SITUATED IN THE NORTHWEST ONE-QUARTER OF THE NORTHWEST ONE-QUARTER (NW1/4 NW1/4) OF SECTION 25, TOWNSHIP 12 SOUTH, RANGE 69 WEST OF THE 6TH P.M., TELLER COUNTY, COLORADO AND BEING MORE PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: BEGINNING AT THE MOST SOUTHERLY CORNER OF PARCEL 3 AS RECORDED UNDER RECEPTION NO. 443568 OF SAID COUNTY RECORDS, SAID POINT ALSO BEING THE MOST EASTERLY CORNER OF SAID PARCEL A AND A POINT ON THE NORTHWESTERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY LINE OF WEST STREET, FROM WHICH THE MOST WESTERLY CORNER OF SAID PARCEL 3, SAID POINT ALSO BEING AN ANGLE POINT ON THE SOUTHEASTERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY LINE OF U.S. HIGHWAY NO. 24 BEARS N40°07'50"W, A DISTANCE OF 246.55 FEET AND IS THE BASIS OF BEARINGS USED HEREIN; THENCE ALONG SAID NORTHWESTERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY LINE THE FOLLOWING TWO (2) COURSES; 1) THENCE S48°08'45"W, A DISTANCE OF 83.85 FEET; 2) THENCE ALONG THE ARC OF A 1337.03 FOOT RADIUS CURVE TO THE RIGHT, THROUGH A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 01°17'09", AN ARC LENGTH OF 30.00 FEET, (THE LONG CHORD OF WHICH BEARS S48°56'31"W, A LONG CHORD DISTANCE OF 30.00 FEET); THENCE N41°42'01"W, A DISTANCE OF 205.05 FEET TO A POINT ON SAID SOUTHEASTERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY LINE; THENCE N37°26'44"E ALONG SAID SOUTHEASTERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY LINE, A DISTANCE OF 122.29 FEET TO A POINT ON THE COMMON LINE OF SAID PARCEL A AND SAID PARCEL 3; THENCE S40°07'50"E ALONG SAID COMMON LINE, A DISTANCE OF 228.27 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. SAID TRACT CONTAINS 25,322 SQUARE FEET (0.58 ACRES) OF LAND, MORE OR LESS. TOGETHER WITH A PORTION OF THAT TRACT OF LAND DESCRIBED AS PARCEL 2, AS RECORDED UNDER RECEPTION NO. 443568 OF SAID COUNTY RECORDS, SITUATED IN THE NORTHWEST ONE-QUARTER OF THE NORTHWEST ONE-QUARTER (NW1/4 NW1/4) OF SECTION 25, TOWNSHIP 12 SOUTH, RANGE 69 WEST OF THE 6TH P.M., TELLER COUNTY, COLORADO AND BEING MORE PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: COMMENCING AT THE MOST SOUTHERLY CORNER OF PARCEL 3 AS RECORDED UNDER RECEPTION NO. 443568 OF SAID COUNTY RECORDS, SAID POINT ALSO BEING THE MOST EASTERLY CORNER OF SAID PARCEL A AND A POINT ON THE NORTHWESTERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY LINE OF WEST STREET, FROM WHICH THE MOST WESTERLY CORNER OF SAID PARCEL 3, SAID POINT ALSO BEING AN ANGLE POINT ON THE SOUTHEASTERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY LINE OF U.S. HIGHWAY NO. 24 BEARS N40°07'50"W, A DISTANCE OF 246.55 FEET AND IS THE BASIS OF BEARINGS USED HEREIN; THENCE N48°08'45"E ALONG SAID NORTHWESTERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY LINE, A DISTANCE OF 41.57 FEET TO THE MOST SOUTHERLY CORNER OF SAID PARCEL 2 AND THE POINT OF BEGINNING OF THE TRACT OF LAND HEREIN DESCRIBED;


hereby annexed into the City of Woodland Park a tract of land, the legal description of said tract of land being a portion in the NW1/4 of the NW1/4 of Section 25, Township 12 South, Range 69 West of the 6th P.M. in Teller County Colorado, located at 1050 and 1000 CR 231 (S. West Street), Woodland Park, Colorado as described by Exhibit A.

22-Color

22 Pikes Peak Courier View

CLUBS IN YOUR COMMUNITY

Section 3. Enforceability.Should any provision of this Ordinance be deemed by a Court of competent jurisdiction to be ineffective, inoperable, unconstitutional or in Clubs Page 12 any waycontinued not binding from upon the parties hereto, such provision shall be stricken from the Ordinance with the remaining provisions continuing in full force and efRECREATION fect.

Section 4. Effective Date. This for Ordinance offered free through Community EXERCISE CLASSES shall be in full force and effect from and after its publication as required by law. Partnership Family Resource Center’s Healthy Living Programs. Locations are P A S S E DofBclasses Y CIT Y throughout C O U N C I LTeller O N County.  Visit www. SECOND AND FINAL READING FOLcpteller.org under “Get Healthy Challenge” LOWING PUBLIC HEARING THIS __ or email Kathy at DAY OF ____, 2013. Kathy@cpteller.org for more information. David J. Turley, Mayor

EVERY THURSDAY all year the Florissant Grange Hall (The

ATTEST: Old School House) is open from 6-9 pm for the Jammers Music Cindy Morse, City Clerk

and Pot Luck. This is a happening place to be on Thursday APPROVED AS TO FORM: evenings. we have more musicians than people Erin Smith,Sometimes City Attorney and sometimes we have more people than the hall can hold, Exhibit A LEGAL DESCRIPTION – SOUTHWEST but no matter what, we have fun and great music and fabulous VALLEY ANNEXATION PLAT 2: food. All musicians are welcome to join in the jam session and PARCELS A AND B, AS RECORDED IN ifBOOK you are notATa musician, come forOFtheTHE social evening out. Call 623 PAGE 183-184 RECORDS OF TELLER COUNTY CLERK 719-748-0358. AND RECORDER, SITUATED IN THE

NORTHWEST ONE-QUARTER OF THE NORTHWEST ONE-QUARTER (NW1/4 fitness membership. GET IN shape with a parks and recreation NW1/4) OF SECTION 25, TOWNSHIP 12 The centerRANGE offers Paramount andTHE Nautilus SOUTH, 69 WEST OF 6TH equipment and free P.M., TELLER COUNTY, COLORADO weights. Schedule a personalized fitness orientation and have AND BEING MORE PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED AS workout FOLLOWS: an individual program designed for your fitness needs. BEGINNING AT THE MOST SOUTHIndividuals ages 16 older are3 welcome ERLY CORNER OFand PARCEL AS RE- to become fitness CORDED UNDER RECEPTION NO. members. Minors require signed parental 443568 OF SAID COUNTY RECORDS, permission. Corporate SAID POINT ALSO BEINGCall THE MOST memberships are available. 719-689-3514. EASTERLY CORNER OF SAID PARCEL A AND A POINT ON THE NORTHWESTFRONT RANGE FencingLINE Club.OF Learn to fence class for children ERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY WEST STREET, FROM WHICH THE MOST and adults. Meets at Discovery Canyon Campus. Visit http:// WESTERLY CORNER OF SAID PARCEL 3, SAID POINT ALSO BEING AN competitive lessons frontrangefencing.tripod.com/ Advanced ANGLE POINT ON THE SOUTHEASTavailable too. ERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY LINE OF U.S. HIGHWAY NO. 24 BEARS N40°07'50"W, A DISTANCE OF 246.55 FEET AND IS THE BASIS OF BEARINGS USED HEREIN;

HEALTHIER LIVING Colorado, Chronic Disease Self-Management Classes Are you tired of being sick and tired? Teller County Public Health and Community Partnership Family Resource Center offer six-week classes to help you with the challenges of living with an ongoing health condition. Participants learn skills to cope with fatigue, frustration, pain and stress of chronic disease, as well as effective action plans and problem solving. Call Teller County Public Health at 719-687-6416 or visit www. cpteller.org or www.tellercountypublichealth.org for information and a list of classes in your neighborhood. Suggested donation: $35.

KARATE PLUS meets at 6 p.m. Mondays and Wednesdays at Woodland Park Community Church and at 6:30 p.m. Tuesdays at Lake George Bible Church. The class includes Japanese karate and jujitsu, Okinawan weapons, padded sparring and Judo throws. Self-defense is also taught. The program is Bible-based. Black belt instruction. KP has been in the Ute Pass area for more than 16 years. Low rates. Ages 5 through adult. Two free lessons. For more information call Ken at 719-687-1436. KP is nonprofit and non-denominational. THE LAKE George Gem and Mineral Club Youth Program for

Earth Science Education, Peblepups, meets from 6-6:45 p.m. the third Tuesday of each month at the Lake George Community Center on Hwy 24 on the east side of Lake George. The program is free to students age 8-18. Each session discusses a separate aspect of Earth science or mineral collecting. Warm weather will allow field trips on weekends. Further information from Steve Veatch 719-748-5010 or John Rakowski 719-748-3861 or at LGGMClub.org.

THE LAKE George Gem and Mineral Club meets the second

THENCE ALONG SAID NORTHWESTERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY LINE THE FOLLOWING TWO (2) COURSES; 1) THENCE S48°08'45"W, A DISTANCE OF 83.85 FEET; 2) To THENCE ALONG THE ARC OF A send information to calensubmit a calendar listing, 1337.03 FOOT RADIUS CURVE TO THE dar@ourcoloradonews.com RIGHT, THROUGH A CENTRAL ANGLE or by fax to 303-566-4098. OF 01°17'09", AN ARC LENGTH OF 30.00 FEET, (THE LONG CHORD OF WHICH BEARS S48°56'31"W, A LONG CHORD DISTANCE “Established 1934”OF 30.00 FEET); THENCE N41°42'01"W, A DISTANCE OF 205.05 FEET TO A POINT ON SAID SOUTHEASTERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY LINE;

HAVE AN EVENT?

THENCE N37°26'44"E ALONG SAID SOUTHEASTERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY Call Noma Nel before you buy LINE, A DISTANCE OF 122.29 FEET TO A POINT ON THE COMMON LINE OF SAID PARCEL A AND SAID PARCEL 3; THENCE S40°07'50"E ALONG SAID COMMON LINE, A DISTANCE OF 228.27 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING.

or sell!

TOGETHER WITH A PORTION OF THAT TRACT OF LAND DESCRIBED AS PARCEL 2, AS RECORDED UNDER RECEPTION NO. 443568 OF SAID COUNTY RECORDS, SITUATED IN THE NORTHWEST ONE-QUARTER OF THE NORTHWEST ONE-QUARTER (NW1/4 NW1/4) OF SECTION 25, TOWNSHIP 12 SOUTH, RANGE 69 WEST OF THE 6TH P.M., TELLER COUNTY, COLORADO AND BEING MORE PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: COMMENCING AT THE MOST SOUTHERLY CORNER OF PARCEL 3 AS RECORDED UNDER RECEPTION NO. 443568 OF SAID COUNTY RECORDS, SAID POINT ALSO BEING THE MOST EASTERLY CORNER OF SAID PARCEL A AND A POINT ON THE NORTHWESTERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY LINE OF WEST STREET, FROM WHICH THE MOST WESTERLY CORNER OF SAID PARCEL 3, SAID POINT ALSO BEING AN ANGLE POINT ON THE SOUTHEASTERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY LINE OF U.S. HIGHWAY NO. 24 BEARS N40°07'50"W, A DISTANCE OF 246.55 FEET AND IS THE BASIS OF BEARINGS USED HEREIN;

Do you want to live in the tall pines? Where you can hike, fish and enjoy the clear night skys? This homE is iT! Just west of Florissant, bordering National Forest, private fishing lake to HOA members. 3/2/2 car garage plus additional carport for all the toys. Wilson Lake Estates

$219,900

719.661.9434

email: callnomanel@gmail.com

Government Legals

THENCE N48°08'45"E ALONG SAID NORTHWESTERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY LINE, A DISTANCE OF 41.57 FEET TO THE MOST SOUTHERLY CORNER OF SAID PARCEL 2 AND THE POINT OF BEGINNING OF THE TRACT OF LAND HEREIN DESCRIBED; THENCE N03°56'39"W ALONG THE WESTERLY LINE OF SAID PARCEL 2, A DISTANCE OF 294.49 FEET TO THE NORTHWEST CORNER THEREOF; THENCE N89°24'16"E ALONG THE NORTH LINE OF SAID PARCEL 2, A DISTANCE OF 65.17 FEET TO A POINT ON THE WESTERLY LINE OF LOT 7, BLOCK 1, SUNNY SLOPE ACRES INCORPORATED FILING NO. 1, AS RECORDED UNDER RECEPTION NO. 167288 OF SAID COUNTY RECORDS; THENCE S02°05'01"E ALONG SAID WESTERLY LINE, A DISTANCE OF 246.37 FEET TO A POINT ON THE SOUTHERLY LINE OF SAID PARCEL 2, SAID POINT ALSO BEING A POINT ON SAID NORTHWESTERLY RIGHT-OFWAY LINE; THENCE S48°08'45"W ALONG SAID SOUTHERLY LINE AND SAID NORTHWESTERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY LINE, A DISTANCE OF 72.33 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. SAID TRACT CONTAINS 16,428 SQUARE FEET (0.38 ACRES) OF LAND, MORE OR LESS. Legal Notice No.: 933716 First Publication: July 10, 2013 Last Publication: July 10, 2013 Publisher: Pikes Peak Courier View Public Notice CITY OF WOODLAND PARK NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING Public Hearing on Ordinance No. 1189, Series 2013, shall be held in the Council Chambers of City Hall, 220 W. South Avenue, on the 18th day of July 2013 at 7:00 PM. The aforesaid Ordinance was posted in City Hall 24 hours prior to the June 6th, 2013 City Council meeting, passed on first reading, and ordered published, as required by Section 7.6 of the Charter of the City of Woodland Park. CITY OF WOODLAND PARK ORDINANCE NO. 1189, SERIES 2013 AN ORDINANCE REZONING FROM TELLER COUNTY ZONE DISTRICT OF AGRICULTURAL (A-1) FOR PARCELS 1, 2 AND 3, AND INDUSTRIAL (M-1) PARCELS A AND B TO COMMUNITY COMMERCIAL (CC) LOCATED IN THE NW1/4 OF THE NW1/4 OF SECTION 25, TOWNSHIP 12 SOUTH, RANGE 69 WEST OF THE 6TH P.M. IN TELLER COUNTY WITH ADDRESSES OF 1000

LEARN GUITAR from a guitar player, singer and entertainer,

Cari Dell. Call 719-748-0358.

THE MOUNTAIN Top Cycling club holds monthly meetings for bicyclist of all types and skill levels. The club meets at different locations on the first Tuesday of the month. Membership fee is $25 for individual and $40 for family. We have guest speakers, presentations and door prizes. The meeting is from 7-8 p.m. Social time at 6:30 p.m. Visit www.mountaintopcyclingclub. com or write us Mountain Top Cycling Club P.O.Box 843 Woodland Park CO 80866. For more information, call Debbie at 719-687-2489. TAI CHI is offered for free at 9 a.m. Mondays at the Florissant Public Library. Call Pam Powers, 719-748-3378 or Judy Ross, 719-686-9122. TAI CHI is offered every Wednesday at Florissant/Four Mile Fire Department. Call Meridel Gatterman, 719-689-5861. TAI CHI is offered from 9:30-10:30 a.m. Thursdays at the Woodland Park Senior Center. Call Rip Blaisdel, 719-686-1408. TAI CHI is offered from 5:30-6:30 p.m. Thursdays at the Wood-

land Park Library, in the downstairs resource room. Call Cheryl Koc, 719-687-2633 or Judy Ross at 719-686-9122.

TAI CHI is offered from 9-10 a.m. Fridays at the Woodland Park Library, in the downstairs community room. Call Penny Brandt, 719-687-1848 or Judy Ross at 719-686-9122.

TAI CHI, Sun Style 73 Forms, is offered from 10-11 a.m. Fridays at the Woodland Park Library, in the downstairs community room. Call Cheryl Koc, 719-687-2633.

THE TELLER County 4-H Shooting Sports Club meets the first Sunday of each month at the Pikes Peak Community Club (PPCC) in Divide at 4 p.m. 4-H projects/disciplines covered by the club: .22 and Air Rifle, Archery, Shotgun, and Air Pistol. For more information about the club meetings or project/discipline practices, please call 719-235-7473. THURSDAY NIGHT Beginners Book Study meets from 7-8 p.m. Thursdays at Woodland Park Community Church. Email gclark25@live.com for information. THE UTE Pass Historical Society offers free tours (donations gratefully accepted) of History Park every second Saturday of the month from June through September. History Park is open from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Come tour our old buildings, and learn some of the history of Ute Pass. We also offer a walking tour of Woodland Park which meets at the Museum Center at 10:30. The Museum Center at History Park is located at 231 E. Henrietta Avenue in Woodland Park, next to the library. For information, contact UPHS at 719-686-7512 or check out our website: www.utepasshistoricalsociety.org. Also, like us on PARCELS 1 AND 3 AND A PORTION OF Facebook. PARCEL 2 OF THAT DEED RECORDED

UNDER RECEPTION NO. 443568 OF

THE R E CShop O R DisSopen O F from T H E10Ta.m. E L Lto ER UTE PASS Historical Society Gift COUNTY CLERK AND RECORDER, TO-

GETHER WITH in PARCELS A AND B, AS 3 p.m. Wednesdays through Saturdays the Museum Center RECORDED IN BOOK 623 AT PAGE building at History Park,183-184 231 E. Henrietta, to theRECORDS, Woodland OF SAID next COUNTY SITUATED IN THE NORTHWEST ONEPark Library. Call 719-686-7512 forOF information or to schedule QUARTER THE NORTHWEST ONEQUARTER (NW1/4 NW1/4) OF SECa group tour. TION 25, TOWNSHIP 12 SOUTH, RANGE 69 WEST OF THE Clubs continues on 6TH PageP.M., 24 TELLER COUNTY, COLORADO, AND BEING MORE PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS:

RECREATION REPORT Rec continued from Page 19

equipment, lighting, travel tips, photography in the

family dog training is from 9-10 a.m. Saturdays, July 27, Aug. 3, 10, 17, 24, 31, at the CSCS-WP branch gym. Learn commands such as loose leash walking, focus, wait, come stay, sit, down, leave it and more. Cost $150 per session (6 classes).

BEGINNING AT THE MOST WESTERLY CORNER OF SAID PARCEL 3, SAID POINT ALSO BEING AN ANGLE POINT ON THE SOUTHEASTERLY RIGHT-OFWAY LINE OF U.S. HIGHWAY NO. 24, FROM WHICH THE MOST SOUTHERLY CORNER OF SAID PARCEL 3 BEARS S40°07'50"E, A DISTANCE OF 246.55 FEET AND IS THE BASIS OF BEARINGS USED HEREIN;

for stress relief from 5:30-6:30 p.m. Wednesdays in the THENCE N26°44'00"E ALONG THE Parks and Recreation Classroom. CostLINE is $28 session NORTHWESTERLY OFper SAID PARCEL 3 ANDorSAID PARCEL 1, SAID LINE (4 classes), $9 for drop-in, fitness punch card. ALSO BEING THE SOUTHEASTERLY

field, printing and storage of digital photos. Seminar RIGHT-OF-LINE OF SAID U.S. HIGHnotes on CD will be provided. This seminar is oriented LUNCH-TIMEWAY ZUMBA. AlisonA Grimm leadsOF lunchNO. 24, DISTANCE 147.74 FEET TO THE NORTHWESTERLY towards advanced photographers. Presented by profestime Zumba class from noonOFto 1SAID p.m. Tuesdays and1; CORNER PARCEL sional photographer Kenneth Wyatt. This class will be Thursdays at the Parks and Recreation Classroom. Cost is THENCE N89°22'18"E ALONG THE from 5:30-8:30 p.m. July 19 in the Parks and Recreation $8 drop in, or fiNORTH tness punch LINEcard. OF SAID PARCEL 1 AND A PORTION OF SAID PARCEL 2, A DISClassroom. Cost is $90 per person. LEANentitled TO swim. Knowles leads American Red TANCE OF 168.34 A POINT That an Ordinance "ANConnie ORDINZUMBA. SHARRON Johnson leadsFEET ZumbaTOclass from ON THE WESTERLY LINE OF LOT 7, A N C E R E Z OCross N I N Gswimming FROM T ELLER lessons for ages 6 months to 18 years. JULY 23, 27, 30; AUG. 3, 6, 10 SUNNY ACRES COUNTY ZONE DISTRICT OF AGRI5:30-6:30 p.m. BLOCK Mondays.1,This class isSLOPE at the Ute Pass INClasses arePARCELS Mondays starting April 1. Guppies (3-5 yrs): CORPORATED FILING NO. 1, AS RECULTURAL (A-1) FOR 1, 2 Cultural Center CORDED in the main UNDER room, 210RECEPTION E. Midland Ave.NO. AND 3, AND INDUSTRIAL START SMART soccer. This program is for young 4:30-5 5-5:30 p.m.; Level 3: 5:30-6 p.m. 167288 OF SAID COUNTY RECORDS; (M-1) PARCELS A p.m.; AND Level B TO1-2: COMCost is $8 per class, or fi tness punch card. PARCELS 1 AND 3 AND A PORTION OF MUNITY COMMERCIAL (CC) LOCATED children between the ages of 3-5. The Start Smart and Level 4/5/6: 6-6:30 p.m. atPARCEL Golden Bell Camp in THENCE S02°05'24"E ALONG SAID 2 OF THAT DEED RECORDED IN THE NW1/4 OF THE NW1/4 OF SECDevelopment Program is a proven instructionalT Iprogram DISTANCE RECEPTION O N 2 5 , T ODivide. W N S HCall I P to1 2 OUTH ZUMBAOFGOLD.WESTERLY Zumba Gold LINE, is specifiAcally designed OF to be Splaced on, an UNDER interest list for Parent NO. 443568 246.54 FEET TO A POINT ON THE THE RECORDS OF THE TELLER RANGE 69 WEST OF THE 6TH P.M. IN that prepares young children for the world of organized take theTOexcitingSOUTHERLY Latin and international dancePARCEL rhythms2, and Tot classADDRESSES (6 months-2 yrs).COUNTY Cost is $40CLERK for firstAND childRECORDER, LINE OF SAID TELLER COUNTY WITH SAID POINT ALSO BEING A POINT ON GETHER WITH PARCELS A AND B, AS 1000 COUNTY ROAD 231 sports without the threat of competition or theOF fear of AND 1050 original Zumba program and bring them to older and additional family memberRECORDED is discounted to per 623 of THE NORTHWESTERLY RIGHT-OFIN $36 BOOK ATthe PAGE (S. WEST STREET), WOODLAND PARK, WAY Sharron LINE OF WEST leads ROAD (COUNTY SAID COUNTY RECORDS, AND CONTAINING 1.83 getting hurt. Parents work together with theirCOLORADO children or less active adults. Johnson Zumba Gold session. Call or visit our website183-184 for levelOF descriptions. ROAD NO. 231); SITUATED IN THE NORTHWEST ONEbe and the same is hereby adTOWNSHIP 12 SOUTH, RANGE 69 in a supportive environment all of theACRES.” basic as follows: Fitness from 9-10 a.m. Tuesdays. Next session starts QUARTER OF THE NORTHWEST ONEopted WEST OF THE 6TH P.M. to IN learn TELLER BODY SCULPT. Jane Enger leads the body(NW1/4 sculpt class THENCE S48°10'59"W ALONG A PORQUARTER NW1/4) OF SECCOUNTY WITH ADDRESSES OF 1000 skills. Benefi ts include building confi dence andSection self- 1. Property 2.TThis is held the Parks and2,Recreation TION OF at SAID PARCEL THE SOUTHT I O N 2 5Wednesdays , T O W N S H I P 1 2April SOU H , class Description. The sub-p.m. Mondays, AND 1050 COUNTY ROAD 231 (S. from 11:30 a.m. to 12:30 LINE SAID PARCEL RANGE 69 WEST OF THE Classroom. 6TH P.M., CostEASTERLY tracts are generally located in the WEST WOODLAND PARK, esteem,STREET), fun and positive experience, preparesject for future is $8 ALONG per class, or fiOF tness punch card. 3 AND SAID NORTHWESTERLY TELLER COUNTY, COLORADO, AND NW1/4 of the NW1/4 of Section 25, TownCOLORADO AND CONTAINING 1.83 and Fridays in the Parks and Recreation Classroom. All sports, quality time together for parent and child, RIGHT-OF-WAY LINE, A DISTANCE OF BEING MORE PARTICULARLY DEship helps 12 South, Range 69 West of the 6th ACRES. TAE KWON do,113.88 kids and adults. Loss leads tae fitness levelsCounty, welcome. Cost is $60 per session, for FEET TOLeeann THE MOST SOUTHSCRIBED AS $8 FOLLOWS: Principal Meridian in Teller Colorparents learnthe howCity to support and teach their child. ERLY CORNER OF SAID PARCEL 3, ado and more specifically described by WHEREAS, of Woodland Park kwon do classes for ages 5 years and older on Tuesdays drop-in, or a fi tness punch card. SAID POINT ALSO BEING THE MOST BEGINNING AT THE MOST WESTERLY the legal description attached hereto as has received an application requesting Classes are from 6-7 p.m. Tuesdays and from 9-10 a.m. CORNER OF Classroom. SAID PARCEL CORNER OF SAID PARCELand 3, Thursday SAID inEASTERLY Exhibit A. rezoning approval of parcels located in the the Parks and Recreation Saturdays, JulyNW1/4 23, 27,of30, Aug. 25, 3, 6,Town10. To receive the A; POINT ALSO BEING AN ANGLE POINT NW1/4 of the Section NAMASTE YOGA. Jody Ajimura-Kessler leads namaste ON THE SOUTHEASTERLY RIGHT-OFSection 2. Zoning. The properties deship 12 South, Range 69 West of the 6th Times are 4:15-5 p.m. for Little Lions (5-6 yrs); 5-6 p.m. kit for thisMeridian programininTeller time,County, registerColorby Monday, July 1.above yoga from 5:30-6:30 p.m. Mondays the Parks & HIGHWAY NO. 24, THENCE S48°08'45"W ALONG THE WAY in LINE OF U.S. scribed are hereby zoned ComPrincipal for intermediate; 6-7 p.m. for beginners; and 7-8 p.m. SOUTHEASTERLY LINE OF SAID PARFROM WHICH THE MOST SOUTHERLY munity Commercial (CC) and the City Offiado, more specifically, 1000 and 1050 Cost is $54 per child; includes $36 kit. Classroom.toCost per session classes) CEL AND ALONG CORNER OF (3 SAID PARCELfor 3 BEARS cial Zoning MapRecreation is hereby amended re- is $21 County Road 231 (S. West Street), Woodadults. Cost ERLY is $70A per session andSAID $40NORTHWESTfor additional RIGHT-OF-WAY LINE, A DISS40°07'50"E, A DISTANCE OF 246.55 flect such determination. land Park, Colorado as requested by the or $9 for drop-in, or fitness punch card. JULY 27, AUG. 3, 10, 17, 24, 31 OF 83.85 FEET TO FEET AND IS THE BASIS OF BEARapplicant, Jay Baker. family membersTANCE per session. A uniform fee THE of $30SOUTHis EASTERLY CORNER COMMON TO INGS USED HEREIN; Section 3. Effective Date. This Ordinance WHEREAS, public notice has been pubYOGAand FOReffect stressfrom relief. Nancy Stannard leads yoga paid to the instructor. SAID PARCELS A AND B; shall be in full force and lished, been posted, and pubFAMILYsigns DOGhave training. Led by Alice Roszczewski,

ONGOING

435 PhYLLis DR.

SAID TRACT CONTAINS 25,322 SQUARE FEET (0.58 ACRES) OF LAND, MORE OR LESS.

Saturday of every month at the Community Center, Lake George. Meetings begin at 10 a.m. until May, when it changes to 9 a.m. to accommodate a field trip in conjunction with the regular meeting. There is always a program or field trip.

July 10, 2013

Public Notice CITY OF WOODLAND PARK NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING

Government Legals

Public Hearing on Ordinance No. 1189, Series 2013, shall be held in the Council Chambers of City Hall, 220 W. South Avenue, on the 18th day of July 2013 at 7:00 PM. The aforesaid Ordinance was posted in City Hall 24 hours prior to the June 6th, 2013 City Council meeting, passed on first reading, and ordered published, as required by Section 7.6 of the Charter of the City of Woodland Park. CITY OF WOODLAND PARK ORDINANCE NO. 1189, SERIES 2013 AN ORDINANCE REZONING FROM TELLER COUNTY ZONE DISTRICT OF AGRICULTURAL (A-1) FOR PARCELS 1, 2 AND 3, AND INDUSTRIAL (M-1) PARCELS A AND B TO COMMUNITY COMMERCIAL (CC) LOCATED IN THE NW1/4 OF THE NW1/4 OF SECTION 25, TOWNSHIP 12 SOUTH, RANGE 69 WEST OF THE 6TH P.M. IN TELLER COUNTY WITH ADDRESSES OF 1000 AND 1050 COUNTY ROAD 231 (S. WEST STREET), WOODLAND PARK, COLORADO AND CONTAINING 1.83 ACRES. WHEREAS, the City of Woodland Park has received an application requesting rezoning approval of parcels located in the NW1/4 of the NW1/4 of Section 25, Township 12 South, Range 69 West of the 6th Principal Meridian in Teller County, Colorado, more specifically, 1000 and 1050 County Road 231 (S. West Street), Woodland Park, Colorado as requested by the applicant, Jay Baker. WHEREAS, public notice has been published, signs have been posted, and public hearings have been held by the City Planning Commission on May 23, 2013 and City Council on June 27, 2013; and WHEREAS, after public hearing, the City Council deems it to be in the City’s best interest to zone said parcels from Industrial (M-1) and Agricultural (A-1) to Community Commercial (CC). NOW, THEREFORE, THIS ORDINANCE: THE CITY OF WOODLAND PARK ORDAINS: That an Ordinance entitled "AN ORDINANCE REZONING FROM TELLER COUNTY ZONE DISTRICT OF AGRICULTURAL (A-1) FOR PARCELS 1, 2 AND 3, AND INDUSTRIAL (M-1) PARCELS A AND B TO COMMUNITY COMMERCIAL (CC) LOCATED IN THE NW1/4 OF THE NW1/4 OF SECTION 25, TOWNSHIP 12 SOUTH, RANGE 69 WEST OF THE 6TH P.M. IN TELLER COUNTY WITH ADDRESSES OF 1000 AND 1050 COUNTY ROAD 231 (S. WEST STREET), WOODLAND PARK, COLORADO AND CONTAINING 1.83 ACRES.” be and the same is hereby adopted as follows:

lic hearings have been held by the City Planning Commission on May 23, 2013 and City Council on June 27, 2013; and WHEREAS, after public hearing, the City Council deems it to be in the City’s best interest to zone said parcels from Industrial (M-1) and Agricultural (A-1) to Community Commercial (CC).

Government Legals

NOW, THEREFORE, THIS ORDINANCE: THE CITY OF WOODLAND PARK ORDAINS: That an Ordinance entitled "AN ORDINANCE REZONING FROM TELLER COUNTY ZONE DISTRICT OF AGRICULTURAL (A-1) FOR PARCELS 1, 2 AND 3, AND INDUSTRIAL (M-1) PARCELS A AND B TO COMMUNITY COMMERCIAL (CC) LOCATED IN THE NW1/4 OF THE NW1/4 OF SECTION 25, TOWNSHIP 12 SOUTH, RANGE 69 WEST OF THE 6TH P.M. IN TELLER COUNTY WITH ADDRESSES OF 1000 AND 1050 COUNTY ROAD 231 (S. WEST STREET), WOODLAND PARK, COLORADO AND CONTAINING 1.83 ACRES.” be and the same is hereby adopted as follows: Section 1. Property Description. The subject tracts are generally located in the NW1/4 of the NW1/4 of Section 25, Township 12 South, Range 69 West of the 6th Principal Meridian in Teller County, Colorado and more specifically described by the legal description attached hereto as Exhibit A. Section 2. Zoning. The properties described above are hereby zoned Community Commercial (CC) and the City Official Zoning Map is hereby amended to reflect such determination. Section 3. Effective Date. This Ordinance shall be in full force and effect from and after its publication as required. PASSED BY THE CITY COUNCIL ON SECOND AND FINAL READING, FOLLOWING PUBLIC HEARING THIS DAY OF __, 2013. David J. Turley, Mayor ATTEST: Cindy Morse, City Clerk

after its publication as required.

PASSED BY THE CITY COUNCIL ON SECOND AND FINAL READING, FOLLOWING PUBLIC HEARING THIS DAY OF __, 2013.

Government Legals

David J. Turley, Mayor ATTEST: Cindy Morse, City Clerk APPROVED AS TO FORM Erin Smith, City Attorney EXHIBIT A LEGAL DESCRIPTION – OVERALL BOUNDARY: PARCELS 1 AND 3 AND A PORTION OF PARCEL 2 OF THAT DEED RECORDED UNDER RECEPTION NO. 443568 OF THE RECORDS OF THE TELLER COUNTY CLERK AND RECORDER, TOGETHER WITH PARCELS A AND B, AS RECORDED IN BOOK 623 AT PAGE 183-184 OF SAID COUNTY RECORDS, SITUATED IN THE NORTHWEST ONEQUARTER OF THE NORTHWEST ONEQUARTER (NW1/4 NW1/4) OF SECTION 25, TOWNSHIP 12 SOUTH, RANGE 69 WEST OF THE 6TH P.M., TELLER COUNTY, COLORADO, AND BEING MORE PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: BEGINNING AT THE MOST WESTERLY CORNER OF SAID PARCEL 3, SAID POINT ALSO BEING AN ANGLE POINT ON THE SOUTHEASTERLY RIGHT-OFWAY LINE OF U.S. HIGHWAY NO. 24, FROM WHICH THE MOST SOUTHERLY CORNER OF SAID PARCEL 3 BEARS S40°07'50"E, A DISTANCE OF 246.55 FEET AND IS THE BASIS OF BEARINGS USED HEREIN; THENCE N26°44'00"E ALONG THE NORTHWESTERLY LINE OF SAID PARCEL 3 AND SAID PARCEL 1, SAID LINE ALSO BEING THE SOUTHEASTERLY RIGHT-OF-LINE OF SAID U.S. HIGHWAY NO. 24, A DISTANCE OF 147.74 FEET TO THE NORTHWESTERL Y CORNER OF SAID PARCEL 1; THENCE N89°22'18"E ALONG THE NORTH LINE OF SAID PARCEL 1 AND A PORTION OF SAID PARCEL 2, A DISTANCE OF 168.34 FEET TO A POINT ON THE WESTERLY LINE OF LOT 7, BLOCK 1, SUNNY SLOPE ACRES INCORPORATED FILING NO. 1, AS RECORDED UNDER RECEPTION NO. 167288 OF SAID COUNTY RECORDS;

THENCE N26°44'00"E ALONG THE NORTHWESTERLY LINE OF SAID PARCEL 3 AND SAID PARCEL 1, SAID LINE ALSO BEING THE SOUTHEASTERLY RIGHT-OF-LINE OF SAID U.S. HIGHWAY NO. 24, A DISTANCE OF 147.74 FEET TO THE NORTHWESTERLY CORNER OF SAID PARCEL 1;

Government Legals

THENCE N89°22'18"E ALONG THE NORTH LINE OF SAID PARCEL 1 AND A PORTION OF SAID PARCEL 2, A DISTANCE OF 168.34 FEET TO A POINT ON THE WESTERLY LINE OF LOT 7, BLOCK 1, SUNNY SLOPE ACRES INCORPORATED FILING NO. 1, AS RECORDED UNDER RECEPTION NO. 167288 OF SAID COUNTY RECORDS; THENCE S02°05'24"E ALONG SAID WESTERLY LINE, A DISTANCE OF 246.54 FEET TO A POINT ON THE SOUTHERLY LINE OF SAID PARCEL 2, SAID POINT ALSO BEING A POINT ON THE NORTHWESTERLY RIGHT-OFWAY LINE OF WEST ROAD (COUNTY ROAD NO. 231); THENCE S48°10'59"W ALONG A PORTION OF SAID PARCEL 2, THE SOUTHEASTERLY LINE OF SAID PARCEL 3 AND ALONG SAID NORTHWESTERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY LINE, A DISTANCE OF 113.88 FEET TO THE MOST SOUTHERLY CORNER OF SAID PARCEL 3, SAID POINT ALSO BEING THE MOST EASTERLY CORNER OF SAID PARCEL A; THENCE S48°08'45"W ALONG THE SOUTHEASTERLY LINE OF SAID PARCEL A AND ALONG SAID NORTHWESTERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY LINE, A DISTANCE OF 83.85 FEET TO THE SOUTHEASTERLY CORNER COMMON TO SAID PARCELS A AND B; THENCE ALONG THE ARC OF A 1337.03 FOOT RADIUS CURVE TO THE RIGHT, THROUGH A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 01°17'09", AN ARC LENGTH OF 30.00 FEET, (THE LONG CHORD OF WHICH BEARS S48°56'31"W, A LONG CHORD DISTANCE OF 30.00 FEET) TO THE MOST SOUTHERLY CORNER OF SAID PARCEL B;

THENCE ALONG THE ARC OF A 1337.03 FOOT RADIUS CURVE TO THE RIGHT, THROUGH A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 01°17'09", AN ARC LENGTH OF 30.00 FEET, (THE LONG CHORD OF WHICH BEARS S48°56'31"W, A LONG CHORD DISTANCE OF 30.00 FEET) TO THE MOST SOUTHERLY CORNER OF SAID PARCEL B;

Government Legals

THENCE N41°42'01"W ALONG THE SOUTHWESTERLY LINE OF SAID PARCEL B, A DISTANCE OF 205.05 FEET TO THE MOST WESTERLY CORNER OF SAID PARCEL B, SAID POINT ALSO BEING A POINT ON SAID SOUTHEASTERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY LINE OF U.S. HIGHWAY NO. 24; THENCE N37°26'44"E ALONG THE NORTHWESTERLY LINE OF SAID PARCELS B AND A AND ALONG SAID SOUTHEASTERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY LINE, A DISTANCE OF 122.29 FEET TO THE MOST NORTHERLY CORNER OF SAID PARCEL A, SAID POINT ALSO BEING A POINT ON THE SOUTHWESTERLY LINE OF SAID PARCEL 3; THENCE N40°07'50"W ALONG SAID SOUTHWESTERLY LINE, A DISTANCE OF 18.28 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. SAID TRACT CONTAINS 1.83 ACRES (79,924 SQUARE FEET) OF LAND, MORE OR LESS. PREPARED BY: KEVIN F. LLOYD, COLORADO P.L.S. NO. 26965 FOR AND ON BEHALF OF RAMPART SURVEYS, INC. P.O. BOX 5101 WOODLAND PARK, COLORADO 80866 719-687-0920 Legal Notice No.: 933717 First Publication: July 10, 2013 Last Publication: July 10, 2013 Publisher: Pikes Peak Courier View

When government takes action, it uses local newspapers to notify you. Reading your public notices is the best way to find out what is happening in your community and how it affects you. If you don’t read public notices, you never know what you might miss. APPROVED AS TO FORM Erin Smith, City Attorney

EXHIBIT A LEGAL DESCRIPTION – OVERALL BOUNDARY: PARCELS 1 AND 3 AND A PORTION OF PARCEL 2 OF THAT DEED RECORDED UNDER RECEPTION NO. 443568 OF THE RECORDS OF THE TELLER COUNTY CLERK AND RECORDER, TOGETHER WITH PARCELS A AND B, AS RECORDED IN BOOK 623 AT PAGE 183-184 OF SAID COUNTY RECORDS, SITUATED IN THE NORTHWEST ONEQUARTER OF THE NORTHWEST ONEQUARTER (NW1/4 NW1/4) OF SEC-

THENCE S02°05'24"E ALONG SAID WESTERLY LINE, A DISTANCE OF 246.54 FEET TO A POINT ON THE SOUTHERLY LINE OF SAID PARCEL 2, SAID POINT ALSO BEING A POINT ON THE NORTHWESTERLY RIGHT-OFWAY LINE OF WEST ROAD (COUNTY ROAD NO. 231); THENCE S48°10'59"W ALONG A POR-

THENCE N41°42'01"W ALONG THE SOUTHWESTERLY LINE OF SAID PARCEL B, A DISTANCE OF 205.05 FEET TO THE MOST WESTERLY CORNER OF SAID PARCEL B, SAID POINT ALSO BEING A POINT ON SAID SOUTHEASTERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY LINE OF U.S. HIGHWAY NO. 24;

THENCE N37°26'44"E ALONG THE NORTHWESTERLY LINE OF SAID PARCELS B AND A AND ALONG SAID SOUTHEASTERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY LINE, A DISTANCE OF 122.29 FEET TO THE MOST NORTHERLY CORNER OF SAID PARCEL A, SAID POINT ALSO BEING A POINT ON THE SOUTHWESTERLY LINE OF SAID PARCEL 3;


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Pikes Peak Courier View 23

July 10, 2013 Instruction

Help Wanted

Help Wanted

PIANO LESSONS from a fun, experienced teacher! Summer is the perfect time to start lessons. Call (719) 687-1906 TODAY!

Help Wanted IT Tech—Double Eagle Casino Double Eagle Hotel and Casino is accepting applications for the immediate hire of an Information Technology Technician. Qualified Applicant should have 2+ years experience in maintaining computer hardware, software, and network systems in a help desk & desk side support environments. If you are interested in applying you may download an application at www.decasino.com. Applications & Resumes may be submitted to susan.sloan@decasino.com or faxed to 719-689-5057. Details will be discussed at time of interview.

Part time 20 hours a week,

8 am-noon in Woodland Park. General office accounts payable/ receivable, QuickBooks, answer phones in manufacturing environment. Must have great computer/people skills, be organized, self-motivated, an flexible. Pay depending on experience. Please email resume

to: Celebrations@ourcoloradonews.com

Part-Time Substitute Shuttle Driver-

Starting Pay $10.74/hour, DOE. No benefits. Cripple Creek Transportation Department Colorado CDL, Class B with P2 endorsement preferred, but not required. Nights and weekends required. Application & full ad at www.cripplecreekgov.com Closing date: Open until filled. EOE.

Healthcare Openings Medical Assistant (Cripple Creek/Victor School-Based Health Center): Graduate of an MA program or equivalent military training required Receptionist (Divide Health Center): Front office healthcare experience preferred Apply online: www.peakvista.org/employment Teller County is seeking an HR Financial Specialist in Cripple Creek. Starting Salary: $2,856$3,173/month plus a full benefits package. DOQ. Applications available at the Teller County Centennial Building, 112 North “A” Street, P.O. Box 959, Cripple Creek, CO 80813, or at www.co.teller.co.us. A completed application, resume and cover letter are due by 12:00 noon, Monday July 15, 2013 at the above address. EOE The Cripple Creek-Victor School District is soliciting letters of intent for a vacated position on the Board of Education. This is a voluntary position representing Director District "B" and will be filled by appointment by the President of the Board. Proof of eligibility is required. A description of the district and an information packet may be obtained from the Franklin Ferguson Memorial Library in Cripple Creek during normal business hours. Regular meetings are held monthly on the fourth Monday of the month beginning with a 4:00 pm work session, however special meetings can occur as needed. Interested individuals are asked to submit a letter of intent by August 10, 2013 to the Office of the Superintendent of Schools, 410 North B Street/P.O. Box 897, Cripple Creek, Colorado. Interviews will be scheduled at the discretion of the Board of Education.

Garage Sales

Teller County seeks a Public Health Nurse. Starting Salary: $3,538 - $3,931 per month, DOQ. Job description and application available at the Teller County Human Resources Office, 112 North A Street, Cripple Creek, CO or at www.co.teller.co.us. Completed application plus resume must be received at the above address. Open until filled. EOE

Farm Products & Produce

Homes For Rent

Friday & Saturday July 12th & 13th 8am-3pm 1450 Eagle Trace Court, Woodland Park Everything left last year went to Goodwill All new stuff this year including Furniture, Small Appliances, Home Decor, Clothing, Shoes, Books, plus much more July 13th, Saturday, 8-12 electronics, furniture, air mattress, tools, and lots of misc. 2990 Sunnywood Ave WP

PORK !!!

USDA INSPECTED, LOCALLY CORN FED PORK FOR SALE. JUST IN AND FREEZERS ARE FULL PROCESSED AT SCANGA MEAT IN SALIDA, CO BUY 1 POUND OR 100 POUNDSWE HAVE IT !!! PLEASE CALL 719-684-6543

Large Moving Sale

Friday and Saturday 7:30am-1pm Furniture, Small Appliances, Baby Items, Exercise Equipment, Teacher Supplies 432 Rhyolite Lane, Florissant - 1 mile south of Highway 24 just off Crystal Peak Road.

Grain Finished Buffalo

Saturday July 13th 8-2 only furniture, floor lamps, clothes, housewares, books, cook books, and misc 490 Little Topsey Dr, Cripple Creek Mtn Estates just north of Cripple Creek off Teller 1

quartered, halves and whole

719-775-8742

Wanted Looking for a bosses job! Superintendent, Supervisor assistant. I have performance and brain power. No degree, mentally bordering on genius. Fooling around wont be tolerated. Time is money. Counselor, dealt with people for 7 years. I know how they should be treated. I pay attention to detail. Are you looking for performance or something worthless on paper? I'm also a biologist, writer and designer. Please respond to PO BOX 7063, Woodland Park, CO 80863

Garage Sales MULTI-FAMILY GARAGE SALE Sat. July 13, 9am-4pm 2220 Lee Circle Dr, Woodland Park. Hockey equip, sporting goods, furniture, antiques, household items, etc. No early birds.

Yard Sale At Joyland Church Sat July 13th 7am-3pm Ute Pass/ all community acivity Reserve space in Joyland Prk lot $10 8ftx17 10605 Green Mountain Falls Rd Call 719-684-9418

Estate Sales

WOODLAND PARK 2 LEVEL APARTMENT:

1BD/2BA with loft, garage, w/d hookups, freshly renovated $775/mo (719) 684-2596 Woodland Park 3 bedroom, 2 bath, attached garage, fenced yard, RV parking, 1 yr. lease $1200 mo, Avail 8/1/13 313-3348 evenings

Woodland Park

near hospital, efficiency $450+ deposit. All utilities paid 687-9897

Office Rent/Lease 200 sq ft office space for rent in Woodland Park (Midland and Boundary). $250 per month (with a one year lease). Please call 719217-9316.

Wanted Land Wanted min 5 max 30 acres small local company seeks vacant land within 15 minute drive from Divide, at least one acre must be level meadow/pasture, and accesable by road. no utilities nec. can purchase or lease. email admin@chambertest.com

RV’s and Campers

Huge Estate Sale

to benefit the Chipita Park Association July 12th & 13th 8am-2pm at Marcroft Hall - 9105 Chipita Park Road in Chipita Park Artwork, Collectibles, Houseware Items, Linens, Antiques, Furnirute

Firewood

Miscellaneous

America’s Drive•In

SM

GENERAL MANAGER

Opportunity available at Sonic Drive In Woodland Park, Colorado.

Sonic is looking for people with great management skills, a positive attitude, work well with others, and driven toward absolute customer satisfaction. Enjoy an incredible work environment, based entirely around the team work principals. Ideal candidates will be ATL094004B O COMMUNITY MEDIA able to demonstrate a proven track record of operational excellence in a restaurant including managing & recruiting staff, managing food safety and executing excellent customer service. Candidates must successfully pass a drug screening and criminal background check prior to beginning employment.

In addition to being a great place to work, Sonic Drive-In offers a: GREAT BENEFITS PACKAGE! 1 7/10/2013 IMPROVE YOUR LIFE… JOIN THEESMOOKLER SONIC TEAM!

Please fax a SingleRetail Page resume to SIAD Inc. at 719-633-4672 or email to: tom.cage@sonicpartnernet.com An Equal Opportunity Employer

Husqvarna Self-Propelled Lawn Mower, Model HU700F, Exc Cond, $200 OBO Dual Wheel Wheelbarrow, 8-10 Cu Ft, $75 OBO Call: 687-1793 Tow Bar For Jeep with chains & wiring $150 Coleman portable 3 in 1 grill w/2 propane bottles and carrying case $75 (719)748-5262

Dogs Golden Retriever Puppies

AKC Registered, 1st shots, dewormed, ready July 15th. $750 Daniel 719-351-7134

WLMART-002

Horse & Tack

Use cattle to improve your horsemanship skills

on the 87,000 acre Chico Basin Ranch. Cam Schryver, life long educator and horseman, supported by Chico Basin Ranch staff, will help you sharpen your skills in a ranch setting, working cattle as a medium for learning natural horsemanship principles. www.chicobasinranch.com 719.719.683.7960 or info@chicobasinranch.com

Businesses for Sale/ Franchise For Sale Mountain Shadows Restaurant, Lake George (719)748-8660

Condo/Townhomes

Your spark makes us Walmart. Whether you’re interested in full-time or part-time, cashier or management, you’ll discover more than a job at Walmart. You’ll find a place where you can make a difference in the lives of our customers, have plenty of advancement opportunities and enjoy the perks of working for the world’s largest retailer.

Your Local Woodland Park, CO Walmart Supercenter is Hiring! Opportunities include: FRONT END Cashiers OVERNIGHT Stockers

SALES Lawn & Garden, Electronics, Toys, Housewares, Shoes, Stationary Assembler, Wireless, Dry Grocery

For more information on how you can become a part of the great Walmart team, please visit our store and stop by the hiring kiosk. Walmart Store #3805 19600 E US Highway 24 • Woodland Park, CO 80863 • (719) 687-1065 Or apply online at www.walmart.com/apply and specify interest in store in Store #3805.

Walmart will not tolerate discrimination of employment on the basis of race, color, age, sex, sexual orientation, religion, disability, ethnicity, national origin, marital status, veteran status or any other legally protected status.

Woodland Park 2bd 2 ba 1 car, 900 sq ft condo, fireplace. All appliances including washer/dryer. Great location and views. $800. 719-351-1019

Manufactured/Mobile Homes For Sale By Owner Mobile home on 5.3 acres Skycrest Sub Division 5 miles north of Divide (720)338-8785

Homes For Rent LAKE GEORGE - PEACEFUL PROPERTY FOR RENT:

Handyman

HOME REPAIR

Small repairs to complete remodeling. Tim Thomas, Woodland Park

687-6941

As Always Free Estimates References

Hauling Service

WE HAUL

Need A Dumpster? Free Labor Slash Removal Fire Mitigation Demolition

Home Property & Business Clean UP Save money on roof tearoffs. We recycle shingles.

Call Bob 719-748-8381

Painting

Class A, 33', sleeps 6, AC, 5KW Gen, Self Contained, 62K, Excellent Condition, Reduced!! $13,900 obo (719)226-2948

Carpet Cleaning

TYLER‛S

C A R P ET C Dry Split Pine LER ‛ S AR TY delivered $125 a cord Call Mike at 689-0869

FIREWOOD Log Loads $109/cord (5 cord min.), Rounds $129/cord, Split $179/cord Fuel Surcharge David - Colorado Timber Products 719-287-1234

• Wood • Gas • Pellet • Wood/Coal Ph. (719) 748-3831

97 Georgie Boy Motor Home

CARPET CARE

E

IMPROVE YOUR LIFE… JOIN THE SONIC TEAM!

General

ServiceS offered: • Carpet Cleaning starting at $55 • 24-Hr Water Restoration • Renovation Service • Home Restoration • Tile and Grout Cleaning • Commercial or Residential Family Owned/Operated with excellent references

www.tylercarpetcare.intuitwebsites.com tylercarpetcare@live.com

719.247.9934 Concrete/Paving

Pet Care & Services Pet Nanny

Take time off while I stay in your home and care for your pets. Mature and responsible. References available.

Sandy 719-306-3854

Sit, Stay, Pet Sitting Call Beth 719-466-7478 Plumbing

CONCRETE

C.W’s Plumbing Repair, Remodel Residential, Commercial

PREP - PLACE - FINISH

winterize • FrOzen PiPeS

Driveways, Patios, Walkways

719-687-4122

Also Demo and Removal

Call Paul 719-200-6754 Excavating/Trenching

Skidloader With

Operator

• Driveways • Backfill • • Grading • Concrete • • Horse Pens • Landscaping •

$50/Hour Call Paul 719-200-6754

SKID MAN SKID WORK SERVICES

Driveways. Culverts. Grade Work. Backfill Lot Clearing. Plus Much More

CALL 748-3246 719-464-6666

Licensed & Insured! Free estimates!

Printing Paul's Painting

Interior/Exterior Painting - Deck & Fence Staining - One job at a time Local References, Free Estimates Insured, 33 yrs. Exp., Reasonable Serving Teller & Park County

(719)287-9824

Roofing/Gutters

Locally owned and operated in Teller County

Licensed and Insured All Work Guaranteed | Free Estimates

719-210-9235

SEAMLESS GUTTERS Licensed and Insured www.sheltersystemsllc.com Call 719-246-4544

Woodland Roofing Company CompleteRoofingService

687-9645

www.woodlandroofing.com Serving Teller County for over 47 years.

1 BD/1BA on 40 acres, woodstove, large deck, w/d, $625/mo. (719) 684-2596

General

Storage

Land Resource Associates

HIGH COUNTRY MAINTENANCE

WOODLAND PARK U-STORE-IT 5 locations within city limits Huge Move-in Special & Free Circular Lock Carter Realty Property Mgmt. 719-687-9274 • 303 E. Hwy. 24

We have tenants looking for rentals. If you are interested in renting your property, please call Donna Jones at Land Resource Associates

719-684-8414

Yard Mainenance & Hauling Painting & Staining Power Washing Gutter & Window Cleaning

719-687-4088

Call John today for a free estimate!


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24 Pikes Peak Courier View

July 10, 2013

Cycling Hill Climb coming to Pikes Peak July 21 Riders will be on the same course as the famous auto race By Danny Summers

More than 1,500 cyclists will attempt to climb Pikes Peak in the 2013 Bicycle Hill Climb. The event is scheduled to take place July 21. Photo courtesy of Pikes Peak Cycling Hill Climb

The 2013 Pikes Peak Bicycle Hill Climb is set for July 21. Presented by The Broadmoor, the Pikes Peak Bicycle Hill Climb is a challenge cycling event for all comers. It includes a USA Cycling sanctioned bicycle race and an open “Fun Ride” that ascends to the summit of “America’s Mountain.” The course is 12.4 miles - the same distance the automobiles use for the world renowned Pikes Peak International Hill Climb. The race and ride is a fully supported cycling event that provides a limited number of cyclists (maximum of 1,500) the chance to tackle one of the most challenging climbs in the world. Riders negotiate over 150 turns and climb over 4,700 feet on their way to the summit of Pikes Peak. The race is now part of the Rocky Mountain State Games, which is held over the last two weekends of July. This Bicycle Hill Climb takes place the day after the Mount Evans Hill Climb. Evans and Pikes Peak are the two highest paved roads in the United States, and for those cyclists that attempt to climb both of these 14,000 feet mountains on the same weekend it will take courage, heart and a great amount of endurance. Pactimo, the Official Clothing Supplier of both Bicycle Hill Climbs, will be creating a special cap awarded to those that brave and accomplish the summit of these two great Colorado peaks. This is the third year of the Pikes Peak event. The record is owned by LeRoy

Popowski of Colorado Springs, who ascended the mountain in one hour, eight minutes, 36.818 seconds. The women’s record is held by Katie Compton of Colorado Springs (1:30:46.157). The first 500 Fun Ride registrants will receive a commemorative event T-Shirt. The Fun Ride will begin at 6 a.m. (one hour prior to the racers) and utilize the same course. All Fun Ride participants who finish by 9:30 a.m. will receive a summiteer medal. Fun Ride will be hand timed. Preregistration is $70 for the Hill Climb and $50 for the Fun Ride before July 15. For more information, go to http://www. coscycling.com/home.html.

clubs in your community Clubs continued from Page 22

Walking Tours. The Cripple Creek District Museum offers free walking tours at 2 p.m. each Sunday. Tours last approximately 45 minutes. Meet in front of the Colorado Trading & Transfer Company building at the museum, 500 E. Bennett Ave., for an extensive look at the history of downtown Cripple Creek. No reservations are required. Comfortable shoes, bottled water and jackets are advised. Tours may be postponed or canceled due to inclement weather. Call 719-689-2634, visit www. cripple-creek.org or email CCDMuseum@aol.com. Woodland Park Saddle Club, providing community camaraderie among humans and horses since 1947, sponsors gymkhanas, jackpots, dances, barbecues, parades, trail rides and more. Join us. For information, contact info@wpsaddleclub. com. Visit www.wpsaddleclub.com. Yoga classes are offered at 9 a.m. Tuesdays and Thursdays, with a senior class offered at 10:30 a.m. Tuesdays, at the Florissant Grange No. 420 (the old schoolhouse), 2009 County Road 31. Call Debbie at 719-748-3678 for information. Yoga classes are offered in Woodland Park. All levels are

welcome. Contact Michelle Truscelli at 719-505-5011 or check out www.shakti3yoga.com for information.

XingYi is offered from 7-9 p.m. Wednesdays at the Woodland Park Recreation Center. Must be 18 or older. Contact Jeff at 816260-8595 for information. social a course in Miracles classes meets at 6:30 p.m. Tuesdays in Woodland Park. Call 719-286-8421 or e-mail lynnzina@aol.com for information. above The Clouds Cruisers meet the first Friday of the month at 6:30 p.m. at 1120 West Bowman Ave., Woodland Park. For information contact Marsh at 719-687-1058. american legion Post 1980 Woodland Park meets at 7 p.m. the fourth Tuesday of each month at Grange Hall on Hwy 67, about three miles north of the US-24/Hwy-67 junction in Woodland Park. Visit http://post1980.org.

bill harPer, as seen on the Grand Ole Opry, performs 4-7 p.m. every Saturday at Oney’s Restaurant in Florissant. Enjoy old country classic music in a family friendly atmosphere. The book Club at Woodland Park Public Library meets at 6:30 p.m. on the first Tuesday of each month in the quiet reading room at the Woodland Park Public Library. Call 719-687-9281, ext. 103.

colorado mounTed Rangers Troop “B” is looking for civic minded people who wish to volunteer and contribute to their community. We primarily serve Teller and Park counties, and assist other troops throughout the state. Troop B meets at 6 p.m. the first Thursday of each month at the Highland Bible Church, 800 Research Drive, Woodland Park. We are an all-volunteer organization that is recognized as an auxiliary law enforcement agency by the state of Colorado. We assist law enforcement agencies, forest service, and search and rescue organizations. Experience is not necessary, just a willingness to contribute to your community. To volunteer, or for more information, contact us through www.coloradoranger.org. colorado mounTed Rangers Troop “I” is looking for responsible and dedicated volunteers who want to make a difference serving their community. You are invited to our monthly meeting the first Friday of the month at 7 p.m. at the Pikes Peak National Bank, in the upstairs conference room, 2401 W. Colorado Ave, on the corner of Colorado Ave and 24th Street. Free parking is available for the meeting in the bank employee parking lot on the south side of the bank’s drive-up facility. Visit http://itroop.coloradoranger.org or e-mail Info@ coloradoranger.org. criPPle creek Friendship Club meets from 1-3 p.m. at the Henry C. “June” Hack Arena in City Park. The club is free and offers an opportunity to meet with acquaintances and make new friends. divide PlaYgrouP meets from 9-10: 30 a.m. Mondays and Wednesdays at Community Partnership in Divide. Ffdd program. Call 686-0705 more more info. Drop-ins welcome.

american legion Post 171 meets at 7 p.m. at the Post Building, 400 East Carr Ave. in Cripple Creek.

doll lovers of Teller County are invited to meetings at 10:30 a.m. the first Thursday of every month at the Village at Skyline. It’s free. A variety of programs include the study of antiques, and vintage and modern dolls. Everyone older than age 12 is welcome. Call Nancy at 719-390-8098.

aPPlY sPiriTual laws as taught by the Ascended Masters for the achievement of personal and global freedom, love, peace and abundance. Free study group meets every Saturday in Woodland Park. For information, contact Barbara Royal at 719-687-6823 or miraclesofwellness@gmail.com.

FlorissanT grange No. 420 meets at 7 p.m. the second Monday of each month. The grange continues to offer the Florissant Jammers every Thursday for a potluck dinner at 6 p.m. followed by the music of the great Jammers until 9 p.m. All are welcome to come to the Grange. Call 719-748-0358. 

arT recePTion Today is planned for the second Friday of the month and will feature a different artist at Park State Bank in Woodland Park.

The FlorissanT Library Book Club welcomes all book readers to its group. It meets at 10:30 a.m. the third Wednesday of the month. Call 719-748-3939.


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