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STEM SCHOOL SHOOTING

DISPUTE OVER SRO CONTRACT

Learn why STEM School Highlands Ranch switched to a private security firm P2

COMMISSIONERS EYE FUNDING On Mother’s Day, friends of Kendrick Castillo add to a makeshift shrine in his parent’s dining room. Castillo was killed in a shooting at STEM School Highlands Ranch on May 7. ALEX DEWIND

‘He was the perfect son’ Kendrick Castillo’s parents share photos of his last prom at STEM School Highlands Ranch. Castillo, who people describe as a mentor and friend to all, loved robotics and engineering. COURTESY PHOTO

Board may approve $10 million for school safety P3

Kendrick Castillo’s parents want the world to remember their son as someone special BY ALEX DEWIND ADEWIND@COLORADOCOMMUNITYMEDIA.COM

On her first Mother’s Day without her only child, Maria Castillo mustered the strength to get out of bed and into the shower, where she wept. In the kitchen, eight teenage boys and girls, friends of her son, cooked

her breakfast. They added items to a bench, a makeshift shrine, with a few of her son’s favorite things: Dr. Seuss’ “Oh, the Places You’ll Go” and Shel Silverstein’s “The Giving Tree.” A pair of lab safety glasses. A pocket-sized,

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VOICES: PAGE 14 | CALENDAR: PAGE 24 | LIFE: PAGE 26 | SPORTS: PAGE 27

ParkerChronicle.net

VOLUME 17 | ISSUE 26


2 Parker Chronicle

May 17, 2019M

Documents reveal dispute over resource officer contract, duties STEM’s deal for an SRO was not renewed after 2017-18 school year BY ALEX DEWIND ADEWIND@COLORADOCOMMUNITYMEDIA.COM

Documents show disagreement, and some underlying tension, led to the discontinuation of a contract that provided a school resource officer at STEM School Highlands Ranch. The school’s security was put in the spotlight following a May 7 shooting that left one student dead and eight others wounded. The school contracts with the private security company BOSS High Level Protection, an arrangement that followed the end of STEM’s contract with the Douglas County Sheriff ’s Office following the 2017-18 school year. A security guard was on site at the time of the shooting and reportedly helped detain one of the suspects. In a May 10 news release, Sheriff Tony Spurlock said STEM had not been making the best use of its school resource officer’s time and provided 20 pages of documents detailing the relationship between DCSO and the school. A Denver media outlet had made a public records

of the cost. The request for the two charters split documents. the other half. Within an hour, At the end of STEM responded the year, when with a news rethe officer lease of its own. became ill and “The unfortucouldn’t fulfill nate fact is that his contract, schools with and STEM’s executive without SROs director, Penny have experienced Eucker, requested violence,” reads a credit for the a statement from months not STEM’s public relations firm. STEM public relations firm, served, according to emails “With regard to in a news release responding released by the the tragedy on May 7, 2019, we to a release from the Douglas sheriff ’s office. according credit both the County Sheriff’s Office toBut a report from actions of our Lt. Lori Bronner, private security who oversees guard, the team Douglas County of DCSO law School District’s resource officers, enforcement officials who were on the sheriff ’s office continued to proscene within two minutes, and the vide services to the school through heroic students and staff members at STEM for minimizing the number its SRO and Youth Education and Safety in Schools (Y.E.S.S.) departof fatalities and casualties.” ments while the assigned SRO was STEM partnered with the sheron leave. iff ’s office for a school resource ofEucker also expressed dissatisfacficer from 2013 through early 2018. tion with the SRO’s service, citing In the 2017-18 school year, STEM his disengagement with students shared an SRO with another Highand lack of presence at the school. lands Ranch charter school, Sky“We also request placement of View Academy, which is just less a new SRO for the 2018-19 school than 7 miles away. The officer split year and participation in his or her his time between the two schools. selection process,” Eucker wrote in The sheriff ’s officer covered half

‘The unfortunate fact is that schools with and without SROs have experienced violence.’

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an email to the sheriff ’s office and Bronner on May 18, 2018. Spurlock agreed to forgo billing STEM for the last four months of the contract but elected not to renew the contract for the following school year. STEM didn’t provide an office space for the SRO — a stipulation of the contract — and mainly used the SRO to mitigate traffic, according to a letter from Spurlock to Eucker on June 20, 2018. “I am sorry that STEM School is dissatisfied with the services we have provided,” Spurlock says in the letter. “It appears we do not share a common understanding of the role our school resource officers play in educating our community’s youth and protecting our schools.” STEM paid $26,925 for an SRO for the 2017-18 school year, the same amount as SkyView Academy, according to a copy of the contract. The sheriff ’s office covered the remaining $53,850. Spurlock agreed to refund STEM $6,731.50 for the four months the assigned SRO was absent. After several meetings between officials from STEM and the sheriff ’s office, Eucker opted to contract with a private security company for the 2018-19 school year and requested a deputy from the sheriff ’s office for up to three hours a day to assist with traffic.

Private security guard detained suspect, company’s owner says BY ALEX DEWIND ADEWIND@COLORADOCOMMUNITYMEDIA.COM

One security guard from BOSS High Level Protection was at STEM School Highlands Ranch at the time of the shooting that killed one student and injured eight others, the company’s owner, Grant Whitus, told Colorado Community Media on May 8. The guard found and took into custody one of the two suspects, Whitus said. “My feelings are, if it wasn’t for his response and the quick Douglas County Sheriff ’s response, this could’ve been one of the worst school shootings ever with two shooters and the number of people in that school,” said Whitus, a former Jefferson County SWAT team leader who responded to the Columbine High School attack in 1999. STEM, a K-12 charter school, has been contracting with the company for about a year, according to Whitus. He would not say if the guards are armed. Penny Eucker, STEM’s executive director, said the school employs one guard for eight hours a day. The school also has a standing order with the sheriff ’s office in which, if

requested, an off-duty deputy’s vehicle will assist for up to three hours a day, Eucker said. Previously, the school shared a school resource officer with a nearby charter, SkyView Academy, according to Eucker. In the current situation, Eucker said, a familiar security guard walks the entire campus and, when needed, an off-duty deputy assists with traffic. Whitus’ company, comprising men and women with military backgrounds, provides security for “a lot of private schools,” Whitus said. The guard who took down one of the STEM shooters is a Marine Corps combat veteran who previously worked at the Jefferson County Sheriff ’s Office, according to Whitus. He declined to provide the name of the guard. At a media briefing the morning of May 8, Douglas County Sheriff Tony Spurlock said he believed one of the suspects was detained by a privately contracted security guard when officers first encountered them in the school. BOSS, based in Greenwood Village, specializes in security for “schools, religious buildings and businesses of all kinds,” according to its website.


Parker Chronicle 3

May 17, 2019

Commissioners eye $10 million to enhance school safety Law enforcement wants more school resource officers; public offers ideas for safety, support BY JESSICA GIBBS JGIBBS@COLORADOCOMMUNITYMEDIA.COM

Jennifer Thompson Consolo and her family had no idea her daughter was being bullied and had begun selfharming during her sophomore year at Douglas County High School. They also didn’t know she was forming a plan to take her life. But a friend grew brave enough to “break her trust” and tell a school counselor that her daughter was not OK, Thompson Consolo said. The counselor pulled the girl out of class, told her parents what was happening and together they got Abigail help. The 18-year-old, who has since transferred schools and moved out of state, is about to graduate high school and is thriving, her mother said. Still, schools are in desperate need of curriculum that incorporates mental health and teaches students how to support one another. Thompson Consolo believes that’s one way to prevent more violence against schools.

d

Her perspective was one of many pieces of public testimony during a special work session held by Douglas County commissioners May 13 as they discussed allocating $10 million to heighten school safety in Douglas County. The meeting was in response to the May 7 shooting at STEM School Highlands Ranch that left one student dead and eight students injured. Commissioners unanimously approved directing staff to prepare a supplemental budget item for their May 28 meeting that allocates the onetime $10 million toward school safety. That is when the decision to dedicate $10 million toward public safety will be formally considered. Their work session motion named “physical entryway security technology and mental health services for children,” as well as “a community response team for kids in schools, with the option to consider safety onsite specialists” and to “specifically train school resource officers dedicated solely to school security.” These work sessions are public but rarely attended by residents and typically held in a small conference room on an upper level of the county building. For the May 13 meeting, commissioners met in their larger hearing room and opened overflow seating in anticipation of large public turnout. As expected, dozens filled seats from the front to the back of the room. Fol-

lowing their meeting, commissioners opened the floor to public comment. Thankful, but more support needed Students, parents and concerned citizens urged more mental health support in schools, heightened security measures such as metal detectors, more school resource officers throughout the system and additional funding for ongoing expenses related to preventing school shootings. Many thanked commissioners for the $10 million but said it was not enough, calling it a Band-Aid. Some parents and students said with current security measures in Douglas County schools, they fear anyone could get in the building or smuggle in weapons. And they were tired, numerous said, of hearing the same conversations held time and time again in the 20 years since the Columbine High School tragedy. Ultimately, residents called for action now. Commissioners had encouraged the public to share their thoughts and bring “out-of-the-box” ideas forward for addressing school safety. A group advocating more sales tax dollars be put toward public safety discussed their proposal. A man suggested incorporating a watchdog program that periodically inspects safety protocols at schools. Noah Buckley, who attends school online, suggested a club that brings

students together to discuss their mental health in a safe space. Going to a counselor can be uncomfortable, he said, but talking to peers could break the ice. Anna Keesen, 18, a senior at Douglas County High School, said she didn’t know the answer, but she believed students needed more education about mental health and managing stress. “What to do when everything seems to fall apart,” she said. Castle View High School junior Mattysen Short, 17, skipped class to speak at the meeting and ensure student voices were heard, she said. She supports adding more school resource officers in the system and more mental health education. Right now, she said, she is scared to go to school. “It’s hard to focus on your school work,” she said. Not enough school resource officers It’s unclear how the $10 million will be spent if re-appropriated, but the money would remain under the board’s management. It comes from county reserves — funds not used in 2018 — and will be replenished by property tax revenue. Because they are public funds, the money must go toward public schools. SEE SAFETY, P25

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4 Parker Chronicle

May 17, 2019M

STEM denies allegations made by anonymous parent School filed lawsuit for ‘defamatory statements’ BY ALEX DEWIND ADEWIND@COLORADOCOMMUNITYMEDIA.COM

The executive director of STEM School Highlands Ranch adamantly denies allegations made by an anonymous school parent that STEM’s climate and culture are out of control. “I can’t even fathom why someone would fabricate these sort of statements,” Penny Eucker said when reached by phone on May 9. The allegations were the focus of an article published by CNN.com on May 9, two days after a shooting at the school that killed one student, Kendrick Castillo, and injured eight others. Among the allegations that were made in December 2018 were rampant drug use, bullying, concerns about violence and misuse of school funds. In an emailed statement through a public relations company on May 9, STEM said school officials investigated the allegations months earlier and found them to be false. “At STEM School Highlands Ranch, our priority is the safety and wellbeing of our students, staff and the STEM community,” the statement says. “We investigate every complaint and concern, regardless of the source. This includes threats, bullying, allegations of criminal behavior and/or

mental health concerns.” STEM, a K-12 charter school of about 1,800 students, had been asked to do an investigation by a Douglas County School District official after the accusations came to light. Like other charter schools in the district, STEM has its own governing body and operates autonomously — though the school receives public funding and must have its charter renewed by the school district’s board of education. Candice Craig, a parent of three STEM students, said she was disappointed to see the allegations surface in the media. The school has a strong community, she said, adding that her kids thrive in the “hands-on” learning environment. “We need to heal right now,” Craig said. “We don’t need to be part of the collective voice.” On Dec. 19, Daniel Winsor, director of choice programing at Douglas County School District, sent an email to Eucker outlining allegations made by the anonymous parent to school board member Wendy Vogel via phone. Vogel reported certain information to the Department of Human Services and the Douglas County Sheriff ’s Office, and the district requested the charter school investigate the allegations to determine their legitimacy, according to the email. Vogel did not respond to a request for comment for this article. One of the concerns the anonymous

The evolution of STEM School Highlands Ranch

ence to the sites of fatal shootings in 1999 and 2013, respectively, at schools less than 10 miles from STEM.

parent shared with Vogel was that of “student violence due to a high-pressure environment.” “The individual expressed concerns about a repeat of Columbine or Arapahoe,” the Dec. 19 letter states, in refer-

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Parker Chronicle 5

May 17, 2019

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6 Parker Chronicle

May 17, 2019M

‘Our school districts are strong. Our communities are strong’ Community rallies support; mental health resources abound BY ALEX DEWIND ADEWIND@COLORADOCOMMUNITYMEDIA.COM

In the aftermath of tragedy, mental health experts point to resources and encourage the community to stay resilient. “We are strong. Colorado is strong,” said Dr. Sarah Davidon, research director at Mental Health Colorado, a nonprofit organization that advocates for the treatment and prevention of mental health and substance-use disorders. “Our school districts are strong. Our communities are strong.” Colorado knows the sequence of events all too well. The May 7 shoot-

ing at STEM School Highlands Ranch that left one student dead and eight others injured adds to a list of mass shootings the state has experienced. Anxiety and tension following such a tragedy are common feelings in adults and children, Davidon said. It’s important for young people to know they are safe, their schools are safe and their feelings are validated. “Kids sense a lot of anxiety and tension in the adults around them,” Davidon said. “Certainly we want to let children know that when something like this happens, it’s OK to feel these things.” Individuals process trauma differently. Some may react within weeks of a tragedy. For others it may take weeks or months, according to mental health organizations. Symptoms to look for in children are a hyper-focus on death, problems with eating and sleeping, changes

in behavior and school avoidance, according to Child Mind Institute, a nonprofit organization that advocates for family mental health. In adults, responses to trauma may include flashbacks or nightmares, fear, edginess, social isolation and changes in mood. Mental Health Colorado is one of several public health organizations that offer a robust network of online resources. For help in a number of areas — grief, how to find mental health services near you, suicide prevention and more — visit www.mentalhealthcolorado.org/help. Coming together Since the May 7 shooting, hundreds of people, from near and far, have used social media to connect with others and brainstorm ways to support those hurting. Starting May 10, Fastsigns, a cus-

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tom sign and graphic company based in Englewood, is giving away “STEM Strong” yard signs in honor of Kendrick Castillo, the STEM student who was killed in the shooting. The company requests a $10 donation in cash or check, which will go to Castillo’s memorial fund at Wells Fargo. Larissa Croll, owner of Fastsigns, 5124 S. Broadway, thought of the idea when a Douglas County teacher requested the sign, she said in a news release. “Our community is rallying around the students, teachers and families affected by this tragedy and around the first responders who were there to help,” Croll said in the release. In Highlands Ranch, Shaylynn Hall, a STEM parent, organized a May 10 supply drive to thank and honor law SEE COMMUNITY, P22


Parker Chronicle 7

May 17, 2019

‘We need to grieve’ BY NICK PUCKETT NPUCKETT@COLORADOCOMMUNITYMEDIA.COM

Mountainview Christian Church in Highlands Ranch held a prayer service and candlelight vigil May 8 memorializing the victims of the STEM School shooting the day before. Senior pastor Ken Hensley led the service, which featured song and prayer from leaders of the church. At the end of the service, the congregation sang “Amazing Grace” while holding candles to remember the victims, students and families of the school — which is just down the road from the church — especially Kendrick Castillo, who died to protect others during the shooting. Hensley described his experience at the Northridge Recreation Center, where parents were taken to reunite with their children. He talked about the different emotions he saw — from worry and confusion to relief and love. He spoke about how he saw families coming together, evident by one family of four, with one high school-aged and one middle schoolaged student, holding hands walking down Broadway. “We need to grieve,” he said. “We need to express our doubt, we need to express our anger, but in the end, if you are a person of faith, and you

A girl holds a candle during the prayer service at Mountainview Church in Highlands Ranch May 8, memorializing the victims of the STEM School shooting the day before.

The Mountainview Church in Highlands Ranch held a prayer service and candlelight vigil May 8 to memorialize and grieve the victims of the STEM School shooting May 7, which occurred just down the road. PHOTOS BY NICK PUCKETT are a person of hope, a person that believes, I would encourage you to be

a person who holds onto the God who holds onto you.”

A man leads the congregation in song during a prayer service at the Mountainview Church in Highlands Ranch.

Community comes together after tragedy Vigils and services are held in days after shooting at STEM BY ALEX DEWIND ADEWIND@COLORADOCOMMUNITYMEDIA.COM

Doug Cunningham, wearing a neon yellow vest and holding a large umbrella, stood at the entrance of Cherry Hills Community Church in Highlands Ranch. Under a gray sky, as heavy rain poured down, he walked adults, teens and children from their cars to the building. The church volunteer didn’t know Kendrick Castillo, the 18-year-old who was killed in the May 7 shooting at STEM School Highlands Ranch, or any of the other eight other students who were injured. “I just got a heart for kids,” Cunningham said. Cherry Hills was one of several churches and schools across the community that held vigils and services the evening of May 8 to provide a space for people to grieve, to honor those injured and affected by the tragedy. Nearby, St. Andrew United Methodist Church hosted a service for STEM families. In the lobby, students embraced one another. In the sanctuary hundreds of people prayed, shared feelings of grief and lit candles. Security personnel from Douglas County School District, along with Superin-

A mother-son pair pray at a service hosted by Cherry Hills Community Church on May 8. The service was one of several churches and schools to offer support for the community following a deadly shooting at STEM School Highlands Ranch. tendent Thomas Tucker, watched the crowd from the outskirts. “We know that we are strongest as a community,” the Rev. Annie Arnoldy said. Cherry Hills Community Church provided a buffet dinner for families, followed by a service with song and prayer. Childcare was available for children in third grade and under. Hundreds of community members filled the sanctuary. Many people stood with their hands in the air, belting words of hope and love. Among the guests were the three Douglas County commissioners. Shane Farmer, senior pastor, was candid with the audience. He honored Kendrick, who witnesses say lunged at

Doug Cunningham, a volunteer, walks guests from their cars to the entrance of Cherry Hills Community Church for a service on May 8, a day after the deadly shooting at STEM School Highlands Ranch. PHOTOS BY ALEX DEWIND the shooter to save other students. “We are so sick of being the epicenter of the violence on our kids. We are so sick of it,” Farmer said. “This is a day when we need help, we need hope, we need healing.” After hearing news of the shooting, Serene Erickson, a student at Heritage High School in Littleton, texted her grandma and asked if she could join her at church. The 15-year-old said she felt stressed, scared. “Tonight really helped,” Erickson said after the Cherry Hills service. “It was refreshing to hear positive words and to see everyone come together.”

A group of people join together in prayer at a service hosted by Cherry Hills Community Church.


8 Parker Chronicle

May 17, 2019M

‘He was an angel among us’ Kendrick Castillo was killed while saving others, classmates say BY ALEX DEWIND ADEWIND@COLORADOCOMMUNITYMEDIA.COM

Kendrick Castillo was kind, talented, a hero. Castillo was killed in the May 7 shooting at STEM School Highlands Ranch. He was less than two weeks away from graduation. His senior quote: “The most difficult roads lead us to the most beautiful places.” Penny Eucker, executive director of STEM, called Castillo the “glue of the senior class.” He was always positive, she said. Everyone who met him felt safe with him. “He did have a transcendent smile and he was an angel among us,” Eucker said, holding back tears. “When people say be kind, he was the definition of that.” Castillo, 18, charged a shooter who had entered his classroom in an effort to save others, classmates said. Castillo was a member of FIRST Robotics Competition Team 4418, according to a Facebook post from FIRST. He was also among the first students to intern at Panther Industries, an automated labeling equipment manufacturer in Highlands Ranch, just down the road from STEM. Then just

Kendrick Castillo, 18, was killed in the shooting at STEM School Highlands Ranch on May 7. Here, he is shown at age 16 working on a label-printing product at Panther Industries. FILE PHOTO 16 years old, Castillo was determined to learn all facets of a professional manufacturing job. “Our hearts go out to Kendrick’s family and friends, and to all affected by the shooting,” FIRST, a nonprofit robotics organization based in New Hampshire, wrote on Facebook. Brendan Kerr, a sophomore at STEM, looked up to Castillo, he said. They were in a physical education class together. “He was a good friend,” Kerr said.

“I’ll remember him as a hero.” STEM student Nui Giasolli told NBC’s “Today’’ show that she was in her British literature class when one of the two suspects came in and pulled out a gun. Castillo lunged at the gunman, who shot the teen. Castillo’s swift action gave the rest of the class time to get underneath their desks and then run across the room to escape, Giasolli said. Castillo, friend and classmate Bren-

CASTILLO FROM PAGE 1

dark-green Jeep — the same color and model as the one parked in the driveway. “He was the perfect son,” said Maria, a small woman with a gentle smile. “He told me everything. He was my baby.” Four days earlier, Maria and her husband John had lost their 18-yearold son, Kendrick Castillo, the sole fatality in the May 7 school shooting at STEM School Highlands Ranch. Eight other students were injured in the attack. The two suspects are in custody. Classmates say Kendrick charged one of the shooters to protect other students. That didn’t surprise the people closest to him. “He was one of the most genuine and compassionate people I have ever met,” said Mike Shallenberger, an engineering teacher at STEM who taught Kendrick all four years of high school, as he sat on the Castillos’ back porch. “You don’t meet people like that but once in a lifetime.” The afternoon of Mother’s Day, Maria stood near the front door of her southwest Denver home, tucked in a quiet neighborhood lined with modest single-family houses and spacious backyards. She softly greeted teenagers and parents and directed them to the living room, where John was telling stories of Kendrick to the intimate

Kendrick Castillo was the only child of John and Maria Castillo. His parents described their son as a loving and respectful person who helped others even in competitive situations. They want him to be remembered as an extraordinary individual. COURTESY PHOTO gathering. Comfort food — trays of chocolate chip cookies, Kendrick’s favorite — and assortments of colorful flowers filled the kitchen and dining room. They hugged. They cried. They honored Kendrick, a hero. ‘A lot of hopes and dreams’ Born March 14, 2001, Kendrick was an easy baby and boy with a loving temperament, his dad said. He was honest, not defiant. He respected his

elders and always said “thank you,” “good morning” and “goodbye.” His faith never wavered. Even at the fast-food Taco Bell restaurant, he would make sure to pray before eating. “He respected and loved his mother so much,” said John, sitting on a chair on the back porch, tears welling in his eyes. “Any man in the world whose daughter ended up with Kendrick would, quite honestly, hit the man lottery.” Kendrick’s love for robotics and

dan Bialy said, felt an obligation to protect his fellow students. Bialy said Castillo rushed the shooter and was like a “bowling ball” coming toward him. Bialy said he and another classmate, who was injured and did not want to be identified, helped Castillo bring the suspect down. Bialy, who was not injured, said Castillo was interested in cars and the two met in an internal combustion class at STEM. Bialy said the two of them would cruise around and just talk or watch funny videos together. “Kendrick Castillo died a legend,” Bialy said. “He died a trooper... I love that kid.” Rachel Short said Castillo was a funny and empathetic person who loved others and was a part-time employee at her manufacturing company, Baccara USA, based in Englewood. “To find he went down as a hero, I’m not surprised,” Short said. “That’s exactly who Kendrick was.” Cecilia Bedard, 19, knew Castillo since elementary school and said he was always friendly, modest and excited to help people. He made a point of always joining his father at Knights of Columbus fundraisers and bingo nights. “He was amazing,’’ Bedard said. “He was honestly the sweetest kid I ever met. Never said a mean joke.’’ — Colorado Community Media reporter Nick Puckett and The Associated Press contributed to this report. engineering started early. As a young child he would dismantle his toys, inspecting every inner working, and put them back together in new formations. Whenever he’d get a new gadget, he’d invite his friends over to share in his excitement. The father-son duo enjoyed weekend hunting trips, fishing trips and campouts. They never had much luck but that didn’t matter, as long as they were together. They spent many nights in the backyard, working on old cars. Kendrick loved cars. Kendrick’s parents, who both work in the hotel industry — Maria is a chef and John a chief engineer — prioritized spending time with their son. Eating meals together was important. The three of them would sit on the couch in the evening and eat bowls of ice cream. “I don’t know if I will ever be able to eat another bowl of ice cream again,” his father said. Kendrick attended Notre Dame Catholic School in Denver for middle and elementary school. When it came to choosing a high school, he wasn’t thrilled with any of the local, neighborhood options, which had a large focus on traditional sports. His passion was engineering and electronics. On his first tour of STEM, Kendrick was like a kid in a candy store, John said. He was especially enthralled with the expansive engineering room. The Castillo family applied for the SEE CASTILLO, P9


Parker Chronicle 9

May 17, 2019

‘There was no hesitation, there was no looking around’ BY NICK PUCKETT NPUCKETT@COLORADOCOMMUNITYMEDIA.COM

Brendan Bialy, center, says what he saw emerge during the May 7 shooting at STEM School Highlands Ranch was “the absolute best of people.” At left is his family’s lawyer, Mark Bryant, and at right is Bialy’s mother, Dena Bialy. NICK PUCKETT

Brendan Bialy said the decision to act was made quickly. Actually, it wasn’t a decision at all. It was instinct. “It was immediate, non-hesitation,” Bialy, an aspiring Marine, said. “There was no questioning, there was no hesitation, there was no looking around.” Bialy said he, Kendrick Castillo and another student subdued one of the suspects who had entered their classroom in the May 7 shooting at STEM School Highlands Ranch that left eight students injured and one dead. Castillo was killed and the other student was wounded and did not want to be identified, said Bialy, who was not injured. Bialy said he and a teacher put compression on the chest of Castillo after he had been shot. “What I saw yesterday was the absolute best of people,” Bialy said at a May 8 press conference. “I got to see two heroes, two regular high school kids, two awesome people,

CASTILLO

‘We have to be better people. If you are going to have kids in this world, you need to be all in.’

FROM PAGE 8

charter school, which uses a lottery system for enrollment, and won. “His face lit up ear-to-ear,” John said. Kendrick was on two robotics teams and part of the school’s Technology Student Association. Even in highpressure competitions, he would stop what he was doing to help other students, said Jordon Monk, one of his best friends, who was visiting Kendrick’s parents on Mother’s Day. Kendrick was a mentor, a friend to all. After high school he planned to attend Arapahoe Community College for two years and then Colorado State University or the University of Colorado at Boulder. He wanted to be an electrical or mechanical engineer. “He had a lot of hopes and dreams,” John said. “Most of his hopes and dreams always included the people he loved.” When Monk wasn’t at his own house in Highlands Ranch, he was at Kendrick’s. The two would play video games, go for drives in Kendrick’s beloved Jeep and take a golf cart parked in the backyard for a spin. At school they’d often get the classroom off topic with their amiable banter. “The only thing he loved more than his Jeep was the people inside,” Monk said. “Everyone went to him for help.” ‘We have to be better people’ John was eating lunch at a Chickfil-A near his work at the Denver Tech Center on May 7 when a colleague texted: “Doesn’t Kendrick go to STEM? There is an active shooter.” He called his wife and raced to Northridge Recreation Center, where

jump into action without any hesitation. I was more than lucky to join them in doing that action. Somebody entered the building with incredibly malicious intent, using their cowardice, surprise and superior weapons, and they lost. They completely and utterly lost to good people.” Bialy, of Castle Rock, said the incident will give him the confidence to act when called upon when he begins service. He is currently a poolee in the Marine Corps Delayed Entry Program, a program people enlist in before being shipped to basic training. A poolee is a person who has already signed up to become a Marine but has not left for the 13 weeks of recruit training. The U.S. Marine Corps released a statement in response to Bialy’s efforts. “Brendan’s courage and commitment to swiftly ending this tragic incident at the risk of his own safety is admirable and inspiring,” the statement reads. “His decisive actions resulted in the safety and protection of his teachers and fellow classmates.”

John Castillo, Kendrick’s father

Kendrick Castillo helps a classmate at STEM High School in Highlands Ranch. Castillo “had a lot of hopes and dreams,” his father said. COURTESY PHOTO parents were being reunified with their children. He parked in a nearby neighborhood, jumped a fence and scanned the crowd — his anxiety skyrocketing. Cop cars were everywhere. People were hysterical. He texted Kendrick and called over and over. No response. John, who coached a robotics team at the school, used an app to try to get in touch with the group of kids. Names began popping up. They were safe, they wrote. “Kendrick’s name never came up,” John said. He and Maria caught word that Kendrick might be at a local hospital. A police officer raced them to Littleton Adventist, where they were pulled

aside into a small room. A nurse asked them to provide any identifying factors of their son. He wore Ray-Ban reading glasses, John told the nurse. She said she was so sorry. The Castillos went home that evening and collapsed on the couch in the spot where Kendrick used to lay. “I felt like it wasn’t real,” John said. “We kept hoping we would hear his Jeep exhaust in the driveway.” Part of him wishes his son would have run or hid, John said. But that wasn’t Kendrick. He was selfless, valiant. In the aftermath of tragedy, he would have wanted his parents to think about the teacher in that classroom, the students in that school, his dad said. Kendrick wouldn’t want

them to think about his death. As the STEM community tries to make sense of it all, John doesn’t want to see people blaming guns or the school building’s safety. The solutions are simpler than that, he said. “We have to be better people,” he said. “If you are going to have kids in this world, you need to be all in.” Shallenberger, Kendrick’s engineering teacher, echoed that sentiment. Now, more than ever, people need to put down their phones and be present. “We just need to love each other,” Shallenberger said. “We need to reengage with one another.” The grief is overwhelming for the Castillos, who say they feel like they’ve lost their purpose. What’s helping them heal is the strong support from the community. They want to hear stories of their son. They want those who knew Kendrick to reach out to talk. They want their son to be remembered as the “extraordinary” young man he was. “I’d like the world to know that he’s just not your normal person,” John said. “He is special.”


10 Parker Chronicle

May 17, 2019M

Memorial Day Douglas County offices will be closed Monday, May 27 for Memorial Day. Many county services are available online at www.douglas.co.us

Household Chemical Roundup May 18 in Parker Drop off hazardous household chemicals between 9 a.m. - 3 p.m. May 18 at the Parker Joint Services Center, 17801 E. Plaza Drive. Participants must provide proof of county residency and $25 to help offset costs of hazardous waste disposal. For more information, including a map and a list of acceptable items, visit www.tchd. org/250/Household-Chemical-Roundups

Register now for Seniors’ Council Vintage & Vibrant event Join us for the Seniors’ Council Vintage & Vibrant, a day-long educational event, on Wed. May 22, 8 a.m. 3:30 p.m. at the PACE Center in Parker. For information and to register visit www.douglas. co.us and search for Vintage & Vibrant.

Public Comment encouraged on the Draft 2040 CMP Public comments on the Draft 2040 Comprehensive Master Plan may be submitted through Friday, May 24. The Draft 2040 CMP documents and instructions on submitting comments are available by visiting www. douglas.co.us and seaching for 2040 CMP Referral.

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How to help STEM shooting victims STAFF REPORT

An official fundraising page has been set up for STEM School Highlands Ranch via The Foundation for Douglas County Schools. It can be found at www.coloradogives.org/ STEMstrong “All donations received through this campaign will be used for the benefit of our impacted students. Thank you for your support during this time,” the website states. In addition, a fund started last year to help victims of mass tragedy has been activated in the aftermath of the STEM shooting that left one student dead and eight wounded. The Colorado Healing Fund is chaired by former Colorado Attorney General Cynthia H. Coffman and the nonprofit organization’s board of trustees, according to a news release. “The Colorado Healing Fund exists to serve as the trusted, statewide organization for the collection of public donations in the aftermath of a mass tragedy,” Coffman said in the release. “Donations from caring Colora-

dans can be channeled to organizations working directly with victims of this terrible tragedy. If you want to help, we encourage you to give through the Colorado Healing Fund and know your generosity will help victims, survivors, families and the STEM School Highlands Ranch community in the weeks and months ahead.” Donations can be made by visiting ColoradoHealingFund.org and donating through Colorado Gives. Checks and in-person donations will be accepted at Colorado-based FirstBank locations. Donors should make checks out to “Colorado Healing Fund” and designate their donation for “victims accounts” to bank tellers. Donations will be distributed to victims by the fund’s community partners, including the Colorado Organization of Victim Assistance, the release states. Local victim assistance organizations and Douglas County officials are partnering with CHF to determine how best to support individuals and families after the STEM shooting, according to the release.

STEM shooting: what is known so far STAFF REPORT

Nine students were shot shortly before 2 p.m. May 7 at STEM School Highlands Ranch. Here are key details known to Colorado Community Media as of May 13: • STEM senior Kendrick Castillo was killed. Castillo was shot while trying to save others from one of the armed suspects, classmates have said. • Eight students were wounded. All students have been treated and released from area hospitals. • Two suspects, both STEM students, were arrested. One is Devon Erickson, 18. He was booked on 29 counts of attempted first-degree murder and one count of firstdegree murder, according to court records. The other suspect is a juvenile. The sheriff ’s office is identifying the suspect as a female, but the suspect’s lawyer says his client uses male pronouns, such as “he.” That suspect will not be identified

by Colorado Community Media unless charged as an adult by the 18th Judicial District Attorney’s Office. It was not immediately known what charges this suspect will face. • Authorities say two handguns were found at the scene during the early stages of their investigation. No motive for the shooting has been given by authorities. • Both suspects made their first court appearance on May 8. A second court appearance scheduled for May 10 was postponed until Wednesday, May 15, at the Douglas County Justice Center in Castle Rock. • STEM School Highlands Ranch is a K-12 charter school of about 1,800 students at 8773 S. Ridgeline Blvd., west of Broadway and south of C-470. STEM does not have a school resource officer, but employs a private security firm. A security guard was at the school the day of the shooting, and the owner of the security company says the guard helped detain one of the suspects. SEPTEMBER 21, 2018

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Parker Chronicle 11

May 17, 2019

STEM shooting suspects Step-up being held without bond your savings:

Teens make first court appearances in Castle Rock BY JESSICA GIBBS JGIBBS@COLORADOCOMMUNITYMEDIA.COM

The two teenagers arrested on suspicion of shooting nine students at STEM School Highlands Ranch, killing 18-year-old Kendrick Castillo, appeared in court for the first time on May 8 at hearings attended by students who survived the shooting and Castillo’s family. One of the suspects is Devon Erickson, a STEM student who is being held at the Douglas County jail without bond. Erickson, 18, was booked on one count of first-degree murder and 29 counts of attempted first-degree murder, according to court records. The second suspect is a juvenile student at STEM, also being held without bond, and it was not immediately known what charges were pending. Colorado Community Media will not identify the juvenile suspect, who is 16, unless that suspect is charged as an adult. Both suspects were expected to be formally charged on May 15 after a May 10 hearing was postponed. The morning of May 8, Douglas County Sheriff Tony Spurlock said authorities mistakenly identified the juvenile suspect as a male the day of the shooting only to learn after conducting further interviews the suspect was female. He could not confirm how the suspect identifies, but said the department was considering the suspect female. A defense attorney for the suspect told District 1 Judge Theresa Slade at the May 8 hearings in Castle Rock the teenager uses “he” pronouns and a different name from what was listed on the docket. Two handguns were recovered during the investigation of the May 7 shooting, Spurlock said. Eighteenth Judicial District Attorney George Brauchler said he had not yet decided on charges for the suspects or if he would pursue charging the 16-year-old as an adult. If he does, the court ultimately decides whether the case would remain a juvenile case or not, he said. Charging the suspect as an adult would change the type of sentence he could face if found guilty. “This is the beginning of what’s likely to be a long process,” Brauchler said after the hearing. When officers brought Erickson into the courtroom, he barely looked up — face buried under thick hair dyed half black and half a bright

‘These are people that are still dealing with the fact that a little more than a day ago they had a son. Now they don’t.’ George Brauchler, 18th Judicial District attorney pink. He stooped deep in his chair and did not speak except for when Slade required he verbally answer a question instead of shaking his head. The 16-year-old, with short, cropped hair and a gray collared shirt, sat upright and looked up at the judge for most of his hearing. Seated in the courtroom were Castillo’s parents. The family did not comment during the hearing. “These are people that are still dealing with the fact that a little more than a day ago they had a son,” Brauchler later told reporters. “Now they don’t.” Also in attendance was 17-yearold Jack Denler, a junior at STEM. Denler said he was in the hall when the shooting broke out on May 7. As alarms started to ring, he rushed to his classroom and took cover. Denler heard two loud sounds, which he later realized were gunshots. Slade temporarily granted a motion from the people to suppress the case file entirely. Brauchler said the motion was temporary, and he would move to release the documents later. Slade also issued protection orders against both suspects that prohibit them from contacting victims named in the order, consuming alcohol or drugs, possessing firearms, visiting STEM or contacting each other. Brauchler said he would have 63 days following an arraignment to give notice of his plans on whether to pursue the death penalty. Before hearing room doors opened May 8, a group of people, including the juvenile suspect’s mother, stood huddled in a circle in the hallway, looking down and staying mostly silent. They did not respond to media requests for comment between their arrival and the start of the hearing.

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12 Parker Chronicle

May 17, 2019M

STEM students walk out of shooting vigil amid frustration Event falls into disorder; students decried political aspect

WHAT SPEAKERS SAID “This community has lived through Columbine, Aurora and now STEM. We are failing. We are failing when this happens over and over again and nothing happens … You already have my thoughts and prayers, but … you and your children deserve more.”

BY ELLIS ARNOLD EARNOLD@COLORADOCOMMUNITYMEDIA.COM

A vigil that brought politicians, activists and several hundred students and parents to Highlands Ranch High School after the nearby STEM School shooting devolved into chaos and chants, with many students expressing frustration with the event’s political overtones on gun policy. “Let STEM kids speak!” shouted one voice in the crowd May 8 during the event organized by Brady, which describes itself as a gun violence prevention organization. A day earlier, eight students were wounded and one — 18-year-old Kendrick Ray Castillo — was killed in a shooting at STEM. The vigil crowd at Highlands Ranch High’s gymnasium heard addresses from U.S. Rep. Jason Crow, U.S. Sen. Michael Bennet, area students and activists, but a long line of students decried the lack of speaking time for STEM students. Kallie Leyba, the president of the Douglas County School District’s teachers’ union, had her speech cut short by the student yelling for organizers to let STEM students address the crowd. Leyba responded that

— Democratic U.S. Rep. Jason Crow “Our kids have enough to do. Our kids have a job to do. Their job is not to fix America’s broken gun laws. Their job is not as Kendrick (Castillo) did yesterday, to so selflessly give up their lives” for others. — U.S. Sen. Michael Bennet, a Democrat running for president “We’re working hard to elect gun-sense candidates like Jason (Crow) … together, we will stop this epidemic of gun violence.” Students, including some from STEM School Highlands Ranch, hold up lit-up phones outside Highlands Ranch High School after walking out of a May 8 vigil amid frustration over STEM students not getting speaking time. A shooting May 7 at STEM School wounded eight students and killed one, 18-year-old Kendrick Ray Castillo. PHOTOS BY ELLIS ARNOLD

organizers hadn’t been able to coordinate with students from STEM before the event. “We’re right here,” a student in the crowd replied, to applause from the crowd. What began then was an unraveling of the event that laid bare the frustrations students had with its format.

Leyba told the STEM students in the crowd to come out into the hallway from the gym so organizers could rework the schedule to allow them to speak. Applause erupted when more than a dozen students who appeared to be from STEM left the bleachers and exited the gym. But just as the lights dimmed and cellphone flashlights turned on for a moment dedicated to the shooting’s victims, a woman identifying herself only as a mother walked up to the lectern and spoke into the microphone. She said the media had told STEM students to leave. Inside the gym, it wasn’t clear what spurred that statement. Many reporters taking video and photos were in attendance, and some followed students into the hall. Large parts of the crowd then stood up and funneled into the hallway amid murmurs about the media. Confusion and disorder took over the crowd, finding some STEM students and others — a few dozen people — gathered outside the school’s front doors. SEE WALKOUT, P16

— Laura Reeves, with Moms Demand Action, an organization that supports gun reforms We are “not a statistic … we are people, not a statement.” — A student speaking on the microphone after students walked out and returned “It’s the adults that take (the issue of shootings) into their hands, and I strongly object to that.” — A student on the mic shortly after

U.S. Rep. Jason Crow speaks at a May 8 vigil at Highlands Ranch High School for STEM School shooting victims and survivors.

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Parker Chronicle 13

May 17, 2019

District attorney on school shooting: ‘Here we are again’ Brauchler discusses effect of STEM shooting on community BY JESSICA GIBBS JGIBBS@COLORADOCOMMUNITYMEDIA.COM

South Metro Fire Rescue personnel line up, ready to pull injured victims from STEM School Highlands Ranch on May 7. Personnel from numerous local agencies responded to the scene of the shooting. COURTESY PHOTO

‘We’ve practiced for this’ BY DAVID GILBERT DGILBERT@COLORADOCOMMUNITYMEDIA.COM

First responders descended on STEM School Highlands Ranch within moments of the initial 911 call, said South Metro Fire Rescue spokesman Eric Hurst, and years of training paid off. “We’ve practiced for this,” Hurst said. “It’s about following the experience we all have, and applying it to a real-world worst-case scenario.” South Metro joined forces with Aurora Fire Rescue, West Metro Fire Rescue, Denver Fire Department and ambulances from as far away as Bennett and Strasburg. All told, 79 vehicles, 148 fire and medical personnel and three medical helicopters responded to the scene of the May 7 shooting that left one student dead and eight injured, Hurst said. The emotional toll of responding to a mass-casualty incident can be

intense for first responders, Hurst said, but in the moment, their training takes over. “It’s really beyond just doing tasks like applying tourniquets,” Hurst said. “Through our training sessions, they get accustomed to screams and sounds of gunfire. In the aftermath of the incident, when we have time to unwind and the adrenaline dissipates, that’s when the impact sinks in.” South Metro provides all its personnel with resources to deal with the trauma of horrible scenes, Hurst said, including peer support members, post-traumatic stress service dogs and mental health professionals. Years of coordination with other agencies was evident during the shooting, Hurst said. “This was a regional response,” Hurst said. “We were calling on neighbors to come and back us up. I’m thankful for them, and thankful we didn’t have more injuries than we did.”

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Eighteenth Judicial District Attorney George Brauchler lived in a home in Highlands Ranch for 18 years. His four children are in the Douglas County school system. His wife’s business is roughly one mile from the Douglas County Sheriff ’s Office substation in Highlands Ranch. Brauchler He knows the area

well. After all, he “grew up in these parts,” Brauchler, now a Parker resident, said. And if someone had told him that within 20 miles and 20 years of tragedies including the Columbine High School shooting of 1999, the Aurora theater shooting (which Brauchler prosecuted) of 2012, and the Arapahoe High School shooting

in 2013, there would be another fatal shooting in his community, he’d have thought they were “mad.” “Yet, here we are again,” he said May 8. One more school shooting was the reality as Brauchler spoke to media from the Highlands Ranch substation one day after two suspected student shooters entered STEM School Highlands Ranch and allegedly opened fire on their classmates. Senior Kendrick Castillo, 18, was killed, and eight other students were wounded. One student remained hospitalized in fair condition as of May 10 — at Littleton Adventist, according to a hospital spokesperson — while the others had been treated and released. Brauchler asked the community to remember that the shooting would traumatize far more than the students and their families who would technically be classified as victims in the case. The school comprises a student body of approximately 1,800 students. SEE BRAUCHLER, P22


14 Parker Chronicle

LOCAL

May 17, 2019M

VOICES

Acts of heroism, kindness supply hope amid grief

F

or many years, we watched from our office windows as the students at STEM High School Highlands Ranch left school for the day or headed over to the Starbucks across the street. The school is in the business complex right behind our former office on Highlands Ranch Parkway. Our Highlands Ranch reporter often walked down the street to interview students and teachers about the latest innovative program on which they were working. One of those stories included Kendrick Castillo, the 18-yearold killed as he bravely and selflessly rushed the shooter to help protect his classmates. His face beamed with joy

OUR VIEW in a photograph that showed him at his internship, working toward his dream of becoming an engineer. So, as our team of journalists rushed to the scene of the May 7 shooting, the feeling was surreal. We were as stunned and as heartbroken as our community. This was the third school shooting in the metro area in 20 years, after Columbine in 1999 and Arapahoe in 2013. The three schools are within a 10-mile span of each other, their tragic events seeming to encapsulate reverberating and undulating waves of sorrow that carry the same despairing question,

this time asked by a STEM parent: “How in the world could this happen?” The cycle seemingly repeats itself: The coming days and weeks will disclose more details and explanations. There will be renewed focus on the importance of mental health, gun control and school culture. There will be more talk about the need to provide more resources, more support, to make change that makes a definitive difference. All of that is important. But today, this week, we grieve. We grieve for the light and the gift lost in Kendrick Castillo. For the eight other students injured. For the hundreds of students, teachers, ad-

ministrators and parents whose lives — and outlook on life — are forever altered. We grieve for the two teenagers — and their families — who are suspected in the shooting. We grieve for our community and, really, our world, battered by violence that comes in so many different ways, without warning or respect for boundary. Still, evidence of humanity’s heart reminds us not all is lost, and that in difficult times, hope remains. SEE OUR VIEW, P23

For a life well done, have friends who are rare

A Number two block to success: Lack of authenticity

L

WINNING WORDS

Michael Norton

ast week we identified the impact of complacency in our pursuit of success. Today we will visit the power of authenticity in our success journey. And next week we will wrap it all up when we jump into the role of gratitude and appreciation as a major contributor to our success. Are we authentic? Maybe it has become kind of like, “We can be authentic with some of the people all the

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time. We can be authentic with all the people some of the time. But we can never be authentic with all the people all of the time.” Why is that? In a group discussion about potential barriers to success, this topic of being genuine or authentic came up. As the conversation continued, we debated the reasons why people SEE NORTON, P20

good friend was once defined as someone you could call at 2 a. m. and tell, “Bring a shovel, and don’t ask questions.” Plutarch said, “I don’t need a friend who changes when I change and nods when I nod; my shadow does that QUIET much better.” DESPERATION There are books filled with quotes about friendship, and books filled with stories about friendship. Arnold H. Glasow (don’t know him) said, “A true friend never gets in your way unless you are Craig Marshall going down.” I think my require- Smith ments in a friendship have changed over time, and I have decided I need very few good friends. A good friend and a friend can be distinguished by a shovel. I have plenty of good friends. I have four. However, two of them are out of state, and one of them doesn’t know what a shovel is. Harry doesn’t know what a shovel

is, true, but he also doesn’t know who the 45th president of the United States is, and that is a plus sometimes. Further, he knows nothing about crime, deceit, or cruelty. He is simply a happy entity, and fully enjoys my company. The perfect antidote to the brutalities of existence. I have friends I could call on, but probably won’t, in a time of lesser need than a nighttime mission, but whom I greatly appreciate. Would this then mean I have tiers of friendship? Maybe you do too. Jennifer (one of the four, certainly) and I watched the ending, just the very ending, of “Thelma and Louise.” It’s a story about good friends who wind up in a wingless flight in a Thunderbird. They were willing to die together after a crime spree that was initiated in a parking lot when Louise (Susan Sarandon) shoots and kills a man who assaulted Thelma (Geena Davis). They amscray, thinking no one will believe them. The movie pivots on that point.

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Parker Chronicle 15

May 17, 2019

OBITUARIES MORRISON

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James Ray Morrison

October 22, 1934 – May 7, 2019 James Ray Morrison, of Franktown, Colorado died peacefully Tuesday afternoon, May 7, 2019 in Swedish Hospital surrounded by family. Known as Jim, Dad, BUG (Big Ugly Grandpa) and Peepaw to those close to him, Jim Morrison was no ordinary man. Trying to distill his life into a few dates and facts on a page is like trying to describe the ocean while referring to a cup of salt water – It completely misses the point. But let’s start with the basics for those who just want a synopsis. Jim was born in the usual manner in Denver, Colorado on October 22, 1934 to Florence Alice Winn and Homer Berry Morrison. He was the youngest of 5 children (Dorothy, Dick, Barry, Barbara). Jim was devoted to his mother throughout her life. He grew up in north Denver and attended West High School. Jim’s primary career was in the union plumbing trade although he did a 2-year stint in the army, taught apprenticeship school, served on the State Plumbing Board and was an estimator, foreman, building inspector and business owner over the course of his work history. Jim was married to Fran Morrison, raised four

children and spent most of his adult life in the home he built in Franktown, Colorado. Jim is survived by his wife Fran Morrison and four children, James (Dodi) Morrison of Centennial, CO, Lisa (Rick) Randall of Greenfield, IN, David Morrison of Aurora, CO and Laura (Ashley) Fryer of Carnation, WA. Jim also leaves behind four grandchildren (Annie, Julia, Dustin and Bill), two great-grandchildren (Micah and Lenore), and his sisters Dorothy Cady and Barbara Powell as well as many nieces and nephews. To truly know the man, though, you have to dig a little deeper into his story. His life was focused on family, work and cars. He lived out his belief that “any job worth doing is worth doing well” and never allowed others to define his limits. He recognized that others “put their pants on one leg at a time” just like he did. Simply put, Jim lived the American Dream: he started with very little but through hard work and a belief in himself, he was able to achieve remarkable things and retire comfortably in his old age. Jim had a lifetime fascination with cars

CURRY

from his early years where he fixed-up and raced stock and sport cars for fun through his retirement years when he was finally able to restore a 39 Ford pick-up, a 68 mustang and a 39 Ford standard coupe. He had a lifetime of stories to share about makes, models and the “ones that got away”. Jim met the love of his life, Fran, on a blind date and celebrated over 58 years of marriage with her. He was fiercely proud of her spunk and was unswervingly loyal to her until he passed. Jim was a terrific dad. Part time medic, King of the school science project, teacher, drill Sargent, consummate storyteller, and toy assembler, he taught his children to work hard, do a job right the first time and stick up for each other. Although he worked a full-time job, taught apprenticeship classes in the evenings and worked to finish the house, he also carved out time to play board games and take his family fishing, hiking, camping and snowmobiling. Helping others was as natural as breathing for Jim. He regularly stopped to help stranded motorists on the side of the road

or dropped by a neighbor’s home to help them with a plumbing problem or automotive repair. Jim was generous with his time, his heart, and his know-how. He will be missed by all who knew him. In lieu of flowers, donations can be made to: Cornell Lab of Orinthology: https://give.birds.cornell.edu/page/40910/ donate/1?ea.tracking.id=LTB3#_ ga=2.211478997.1125537570.1557411813428677460.1557411813 National Wildlife Federation https://online.nwf.org/site/Dona tion2?idb=1509960940&DONATI ON_LEVEL_ID_SELECTED=5441&df_ id=42397&mfc_pref=T&42397. donation=form1&idb=[[S76:idb]] or a charity of your choice. CELEBRATION OF LIFE Saturday May 18, 2019 11:00 AM 2 Penguins Tap and grill 13065 Briarwood Ave. Centennial, CO 80112

George Clyde Curry 2/12/1937 - 5/6/2019

George Clyde Curry, age 82 of Irving, TX passed away on Monday, May 6, 2019, surrounded by family. George was born on February 12, 1937, in El Paso, TX. He was predeceased by his father Thomas Sherrod Curry Jr. and mother Rosalie Susie Williams(Curry). George graduated from Austin High School in 1954 as an honor student. He continued on to Texas Western College (now University of Texas at El Paso) where he got his pre-medical degree in 1958 and then earned his Medical Degree in 1962 at University of Texas Southwestern Medical School in Dallas. George was drafted into the Navy where he served as a physician on the USS Mahan in the Western Pacific, then began his residency training at Parkland Memorial Hospital in 1965. George went on to complete his fellowship training in cardiac radiology at the University of Florida College of Medicine in 1970. George discovered his passion for teaching early on and began his 40+ year career in academia in 1971 as an assistant professor of radiology at UT Southwestern Medical Center

later becoming a Professor of Radiology serving from 1977 to 2011. George served as director of the diagnostic-radiology residency program at UT Southwestern for 24 years as well as the president of the medical staff at Parkland from 1994 to 1996. George was also the inaugural holder of the M.R & E. Hudson Foundation Professorship in Radiology, in Honor of Edward E. Christiansen, M.D. George also received the inaugural ACGME Parker J. Palmer “Courage to Teach” award in 2001 which recognized outstanding program directors in Diagnostic Radiology. Notably, George was a founder of the Association of Program Directors in Radiology where he served as the chair of the organizations Review Committee. George’s favorite role was that of program

director where he could work with young residents and help them find their calling. George was an avid bird hunter for 60+ years and duck hunting was his passion. He loved getting up early and putting out a spread of decoys, sitting in a duck blind for hours on end waiting for a flock of ducks to come by then working them in with his duck call. Some of his favorite hunts were sitting in the blind with family and friends even when they did not see a single duck. George coached baseball for many years in the Irving Boy Baseball Association bringing his love for teaching to the Trinity River Bottoms where he coached his sons Mark

Parker and Elizabeth Funeral Home www.pfh-co.com

• Douglas Dorr, 81, passed away May 6, 2019 in Parker, CO. He was born July 20, 1937 to Harold and Velma (Dawley) Dorr in Van Nuys, CA. Douglas served in the US Navy and later worked as as a purchasing agent for Hughes Aircraft Company. Services will be at a later date. • Dr. George Curry, 82, of Aurora, CO passed away on April 6, 2019. He was a resident of Belleview Heights Assisted Living Center. James was born on February 12, 1937 in El Paso, TX and served in the Navy as a physician on the USS Mahan. The family is having a private service. • James Ray Morrison, 84, of Franktown, CO. passed away on May 7, 2019 at Swedish Medical Center. He was born in Denver, CO on October 22, 1934. James is am Army Veteran. Celebration of Life will be 5/18 at 2 Penguins tap and Grill from 11am-3pm. • Joseph John Falter, 89, of Parker, CO peacefully passed away on May 13, 2019. He was an Army Veteran. He leaves behind a daughter, Victoria Dieringer and her husband Gary. Inurnment will be at Fort Logan National Cemetery on Monday 20, 2019.

Parker and Elizabeth Funeral Home www.pfh-co.com

and Glen and countless other youth. George coached many young men in various adult softball leagues in Irving and Denver. George also twice rode the MS150 with his daughter Mimi. Gardening was also a favorite pastime for George. He would work for hours in the spring and summer months to get his yard in award winning shape. George’s sculpted Yaupon’s helped him earn the Las Colinas Yard of the Month award several times. In addition to his wife Miriam, he is survived by his three children Mark and his wife Julie and their children Jackie and Nicholas; Glen and his wife Julia and their children Casey and Chloe; Mimi and her husband John Falcon; brother Thomas Sherrod Curry III and his wife Mary and their son Thomas Sherrod IV, and niece Susan Boyd. The family is having a private service and asks that in lieu of flowers, donations may be made in memory of George C. Curry to the “Fischer Center For Alzheimer’s Research Foundation” (www.alzinfo.org)

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16 Parker Chronicle

May 17, 2019M

WALKOUT FROM PAGE 12

“It was all political,” a student said, as others talked among themselves and decried the political tone of the event. One speaker inside — Laura Reeves, with the organization Moms Demand Action — had mentioned the National Rifle Association, or NRA, as a reason she said national gun policy wasn’t adequate. “Don’t use Kendrick’s name for political reasons!” another student outside shouted, as chants of “Mental health!” and “(expletive) the media!” took hold. Said another student: “It’s not about the guns!” A chant then began to direct the group back inside, where many more gathered again around the lectern and students — including from STEM — began to speak. One person led the crowd in the gym to hold hands and bow heads in prayer that people could “fight not against each other, but for each other.” That served as a turning point, when a long succession of students took turns on the microphone amid a calmer crowd. One student said she met Castillo as a young child and went to school with him, adding he was “the kindest, gentlest soul you’d ever meet.” Another said he was angry that people “came to talk about gun control.” Some said they were friends with Castillo and attended school with him. One student

Hundreds of local students and parents light up their phones at a May 8 vigil at Highlands Ranch High School for STEM School shooting victims and survivors. called the vigil a “political stunt.” He added, “We walked out. We were not kicked out.” The group held a moment of silence for STEM School and Castillo. A news release announcing the vigil said speakers would include local elected officials, students with activist groups and “students, parents and teachers from STEM,”

ELLIS ARNOLD

among others. Some local students did speak, but STEM students in the crowd felt unheard. Organizers said they tried to reach members of the STEM community through personal connections but couldn’t connect with anyone willing to speak. For Highlands Ranch High teacher Emily Muellenberg, one of the event organizers, focusing on gun violence

prevention efforts can be a way of “community-based solutions seeking,” but she said she understands that “any feeling that a political message was being imparted felt upsetting and not appropriately sensitive.” “For those who spoke up, I am in awe of your strength, and I am proud of you for asking for what you needed in that moment. I am sorry we couldn’t do better, but your resilience and your passion will help fuel your healing,” Muellenberg said in the days after the vigil. “Your honoring of Kendrick Castillo was powerful, and we thank you for that. We sincerely hope that by the end, there was some chance to release and begin to heal for many of you.” Despite the tension toward the media expressed by some in the group that had walked outside, some students spoke to reporters at the end of the event. Logan Griffith, a STEM senior, said he was in the English classroom with 20 to 30 others when the shooting occurred in that room at his school May 7. “I think I speak for STEM when I say we do thank Highlands Ranch High School for hosting this,” Griffith said as the crowd dispersed. “However, this was for Kendrick Castillo. Not for our senator, not for anyone else.”’ He hopes people can honor Castillo and that the events at the vigil serve “as a statement to keep the politics where they belong — keep them in Congress.”

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Parker Chronicle 17

May 17, 2019

Restaurant provided a safe haven for fleeing school kids BY JESSICA GIBBS JGIBBS@COLORADOCOMMUNITYMEDIA.COM

Lucas DeLeon works as a manager for Rock Bottom Restaurant & Brewery, which sits at Lucent Boulevard and Plaza Drive in Highlands Ranch. As he drove to work May 7, he turned off Broadway and headed west on Plaza Drive, just in time to see two sheriff ’s office vehicles tear down the street. He neared the restaurant while more sirens and lights flooded the area. With a Wells Fargo nearby, he thought it might be a bank robbery. Then he saw a group of children, maybe six or seven of them, sprinting down Plaza Drive — holding hands. They didn’t seem to look at where they were going. At one point they skipped in front of a turning vehicle, narrowly avoiding a collision. DeLeon parked in Rock Bottom’s parking lot and watched the children, trying to figure out what they were doing. Inside Rock Bottom, bartender Julie Finkelstein and other restaurant employees had just watched a steady stream of other students walk through the front door and straight toward a private room near the back of the building, almost as if they knew where they were going. The general manager went to speak with the group, which eventually grew to between 30 and 40 children. That’s when they learned an active shooter had attacked the STEM School almost one mile away, sending students fleeing on foot. DeLeon believes the children he saw on Plaza were the last of the STEM students who self-evacuated to the restaurant. Neither DeLeon nor Finkelstein could say why the kids came to their restaurant. All DeLeon knew was: “A teacher told them to run.” Springing to action When Finkelstein heard why the students were there, her heart sank. She’d been through this before as a former teacher who taught at J.P. Taravella High School in Florida, the sister school to Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School. She was teaching at Taravella when the 2018 shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas left 17 people dead. Finkelstein’s first reaction May 7 was to calm the children and assure them they were safe. In the room, she found students huddled in a corner, lining the walls and crouched on the floor, as if they were still in lockdown. After running nearly a mile, they still didn’t feel safe, she said. DeLeon, another of several Rock Bottom employees with a teaching background, said they all knew exactly what to do thanks to their training as educators. He’d been through two lockdowns when teaching at a prep school in Colorado Springs. The kitchen started making nachos. They passed out candy and juice boxes. Staff locked every door and DeLeon stood post at the front entrance for the entire time the children stayed in their care.

“To make sure that no one was coming, no one was coming out,” he said. “Because at that point we had just started getting details that there might still be someone on the loose.” Children called their parents and over the next hour some adults arrived to pick them up. Other parents came to see if their children were at Rock Bottom, and if not, ran from business to business to see if they were somewhere nearby. More than an hour passed until an armored vehicle arrived at the restaurant, and the remaining children were released into police custody. The effect of drills, lockdowns and school shootings on children are long-term, DeLeon said. Finkelstein believes her son, a student at Taravella who had many friends at Marjory Stoneman Douglas during the shooting, likely suffers from post-traumatic stress disorder.

STEM students fled to this Rock Bottom Restaurant and Brewery May 7 when two shooters entered their school and opened fire, injuring eight students and killing one. JESSICA GIBBS

“Frightening is not the word,” she said when trying to describe school shootings. “Paralyzing. Life-altering.” Seeing another school shooting unfold so nearby is “shattering,” DeLeon said. “You just never know if it’s your

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school or the next,” DeLeon said. “Today or tomorrow.” Finkelstein said it’s clear the issue of threats against schools is not specific to one community or state, but everywhere. “It’s here,” she said. “I’ve seen it.”


18 Parker Chronicle

May 17, 2019M

Polis urges wildfire vigilance amid milder forecast Governor cautions against ‘false sense of security’ BY ELLIS ARNOLD EARNOLD@COLORADOCOMMUNITYMEDIA.COM

After an onslaught of raging wildfires in Colorado in 2018, this year’s fire season looks to be less severe, but state officials are urging the public not to let its guard down. “I don’t want it to lure people into a false sense of security,” said Gov. Jared Polis, speaking May 7 at the state’s 2019 wildfire outlook briefing. The event at Centennial Airport in unincorporated Arapahoe County, just south of Centennial, featured input from public safety officials who noted the wildfire season this year will likely be average to below average. “Today, we’re looking at 130 to 140 percent of average snowpack,” said Mike Morgan, director of the Colorado Division of Fire Prevention and Control. “It appears (this year) will have aboveaverage moisture and below-average

temperature.” Rising population and climate change have caused wildfires and other natural disasters to become more costly, Polis said. “Fires don’t know jurisdictional boundaries,” Polis said, noting that fires can start on federal land but spread to county or private areas. Officials emphasized the coordination between federal, state and local agencies to respond to blazes. Out of the 20 largest wildfires in Colorado’s history, five occurred in 2018, a fact sheet from the fire prevention division said. Thirteen happened since 2010, and all 20 occurred since 2000, according to the division. The 2019 outlook is “considerably better” than at this point in 2018, the division said. Although a repeat of last year’s severity is unlikely, an average year sees more than 6,000 fires that burn more than 100,000 acres on state and private land, with large fires still occurring, according to the division. In the Denver metro area, mountain communities in west Jefferson County bear risk because fires that start in vegetation can reach homes, Morgan said

Gov. Jared Polis gives an address on Colorado’s 2019 wildfire forecast May 7 at Centennial Airport. The event at 8082 S. Interport Blvd. in unincorporated Arapahoe County, just south of Centennial, featured addresses from public safety officials and upclose looks at aircraft and land vehicles used to fight wildfires. ELLIS ARNOLD

after his address. “We’ve been asked if what happened in California can happen in Colorado,” Morgan said, referring to that state’s recent, especially destructive fire season. “The answer is yes.” Stan Hilkey, executive director of

the state Department of Public Safety, joined other officials in a reminder that homeowners should take precaution. “While we all do our part as emergency responders,” Hilkey said, “individuals need to take proactive steps in preventing wildfires as well.”

Term-limit changes to be decided by voters BY NICK PUCKETT NPUCKETT@COLORADOCOMMUNITYMEDIA.COM

The Parker Town Council at its May 7 meeting agreed to place a question on this fall’s ballot asking whether to extend the term limits of elected officials to four terms, effective immediately following the Nov. 5 election. The original term limit was adopted from the Colorado Constitution Article XVIII, which has a standard limit of two four-year terms. If passed, the ordinance would institute a lifetime cap for any councilmember or mayor who serves a total of 16 years as either. Councilmember John Diak pointed to cities like Boulder, Denver and Aurora

that have a similar term limit ordinance and the effectiveness in which policy reform can get done with extended, more defined terms. “They have continuity. They have institutional knowledge that can serve their own municipalities better if you have that continuity,” said Diak. “Looking at what we’re doing from a trans standpoint it seems that we have momentum. I can only imagine, as we continue to grow, what the other members here…can do if they had the time and desire to serve their town as some of us have or would desire to do for the betterment of the town.” Mayor Mike Waid and Councilmember Debbie Lewis, who have served nonconsecutive terms, would both reach

their 16-year limit after their current terms are finished. The ordinance was originally slated for approval at the April 15 meeting, along with seven other clerical changes to the Parker Municipal Code to be put to a vote, which passed. After residents voiced concern over the vagueness of the language, the term-limit item was tabled for a third reading until revisions could be made. Residents were concerned about the ordinance’s lack of clarification on whether the proposed term limits applied to the mayor and council separately. The concern was that the proposed language could have allowed for three four-year terms to be served on council followed by three additional terms if

the councilmember was elected mayor, or vice versa. Residents also were concerned about the lack of an effectiveness date. Some suggested the ordinance be effective after the current members finish their terms to disable grandstanding or conflict of interest. “I think the way it was written before, it allowed somebody to essentially become a lifer and serve three terms, then three terms, then three terms to perpetuity or death,” said councilmember Josh Rivero. “I think this better addresses the want or desire of the people to have some term limits but still allows us to maintain historic knowledge and activity on very important regional boards and commissions.”

Former Merryhill worker gets probation for child abuse BY NICK PUCKETT NPUCKETT@COLORADOCOMMUNITYMEDIA.COM

A former Merryhill School worker in Parker was sentenced to 18 months of probation for misdemeanor child abuse May 13. Brenda Woodard, 47, pleaded guilty to negligent child abuse April 30 for using a Mr. Clean Magic Eraser to remove permanent marker from two children’s faces. Both children were 3 years old. The parents of one of the children, Caitlin and Josh Sims, spoke during the sentencing. Caitlin Sims said Woodard “attacked” her child and “ruthlessly” scrubbed his face. The children suffered chemical burns and trauma, the

Sims said. The incident was recorded by a surveillance camera. “You lost control and behaved in a punitive and oppressive manor,” Caitlin Sims said. “I watched in horror, in pain and shock with what happened to them by a person they trusted.” Woodard was cited in a December letter from the Colorado Office of Early Childhood in the department’s review of the school that includes a list of violations committed by the school during a 10-month probationary period from Jan. 4, 2018 to Oct. 29. The two children suffered chemical burns after Woodard attempted to clean marker off each of their faces using a Mr. Clean Magic Eraser sponge, which contains

formaldehyde. The product’s website, MrClean.com, labels it as an all-purpose household cleaner. On Dec. 17, the Colorado Department of Human Services sent a letter to Merryhill President Debra Pritchard informing her the school’s license renewal request had been denied following several violations during the school’s 10-month probation period in 2018. The letter listed the Magic Eraser incident as a founded concern of Stage 1 child abuse. Woodard was sentenced by Judge Susanna Meissner-Cutler, a Douglas County Court judge. In addition to the probation, Woodard must pay a $200 fine, which can be reduced to $100

if Woodard completes her required sentence, and was issued a mandatory protection order restricting Woodard from ever being a care worker for children again. “I can’t imagine what a 3-year-old would do to cause such a reaction to you that you would place these children in harm’s way and do so in a truly abusive manor,” Meissner-Cutler said. “The result is going to be you’re never going to work with these children again.” The parents of the affected victims, the Simses and Joel and Stacey Dant, are pursuing a civil lawsuit against Woodard, which is ongoing. The civil suit was filed in July 2018.


Parker Chronicle 19

May 17, 2019

Capitol report: Recapping major bills in 2019 Sex ed, affordable housing, family leave saw developments BY ELLIS ARNOLD EARNOLD@COLORADOCOMMUNITYMEDIA.COM

With power in both houses of the Legislature and the governor’s office, Democrats this year led lawmakers into some sweeping changes, as well as hard-fought battles that left the party short of some goals. A major overhaul of Colorado’s oil and gas rules turned the state’s focus away from encouraging production and made public safety and the environment a top priority, handing local governments new authority to regulate drilling. And the much-mentioned “red flag” bill — which allows firearms to be temporarily taken away from people deemed a significant threat to themselves or others — passed after an even more partisan debate than last year’s version faced. And it still faces a conservative-backed court challenge. A laundry list of other notable bills came up during the 2019 legislative session, the four-month part of the year when state lawmakers pass bills. It ended May 3. Sex ed curriculum updated After much public opposition, Democrats’ effort to strengthen sex education requirements succeeded. The law does not require schools to teach sex education, but if they do, schools must address topics including birth control and pregnancy, sexually transmitted disease prevention, consent, and abstinence, according to state House Speaker KC Becker, D-Boulder. Already-existing law had outlined “comprehensive” sex education standards, but the new law makes some updates on consent and healthy relationships, House Democrats have said. The 2019 proposal, House Bill 191032, spurred panic about teaching

Capitol Report

of the sex acts or practices of LGBT individuals, but the law’s text does not require that. It does mandate that sex ed include information that is “meaningful to the experiences and needs” of LGBT or intersex people, and it adds that sex ed cannot exclude “the health needs” of those groups. For the most part, that’s not new, aside from adding those who are intersex. The law also bars shamebased language or gender stereotypes. In 2013, the Legislature passed the “comprehensive” standards in connection with a grant program to support teaching sex education, but it didn’t fund the grant. The new law gives at least $1 million annually to the program, and rural schools and public schools that currently don’t offer comprehensive sex education would be prioritized for the funding. Late in the session, lawmakers amended the bill to maintain eligibility for charter schools for waivers that can exempt them from the comprehensive standards. State Senate Minority Leader Chris Holbert, R-Parker, said changes to the bill amounted to “a step in the right direction.” “We heard from thousands of Coloradans that were concerned about this piece of legislation,” Holbert said in a news release. “The majority of Republican senators remain opposed to the bill and stand with a parent’s right to teach and raise their children as they see fit.” Parents can still opt their kids out of sex ed classes. Vaccine bill falls Colorado lawmakers abandoned

legislation that would have made it harder to opt children out of vaccinations as time was running out in the legislative session with one day to go. Colorado allows parents to opt children out of vaccinations for medical reasons with a doctor’s note. Those who object for religious or personal reasons can also submit a statement to be exempted. House Bill 19-1312 would have limited the allowed reasons for a medical exemption. It would have also required those seeking religious or personal exemptions to initially apply in person at a local health department or the state health department. “Republicans were not willing to let the vaccine bill come to a vote without hours and hours of debate, which would have prevented us from delivering on priority bills,” including health care and education, said state Senate Majority Leader Stephen Fenberg, D-Boulder, according to the Associated Press. Drivers’ cellphone use slips by Senate Bill 19-012 would have made use of cellphones while driving — except with a hands-free device — illegal for everyone. Currently, state law bars anyone under 18 from using cellphones while driving. It passed the Senate but didn’t make it to a full vote in the House, instead postponed indefinitely in the House Judiciary Committee. Family leave yet to arrive The Democrats’ push to allow workers up to 12 weeks of paid family leave — to care for a sick family member, tend to a personal medical issue or take care of a new child — eventually lost steam, with lawmakers passing a study on the program instead. The program would have required the state to collect a premium on each person’s paycheck, with employees and employers sharing the cost. Someone earning between $12,001 and $20,000 a year would pay from $38 to $64 a year into the fund, and employees earning $60,001 to $80,000 would pay from $192 to $256, the Associated Press reported. Many in the

business community opposed the program. In its final form, Senate Bill 19-188 created a plan that will result in an independent analysis to be completed by December that will ensure a potential program would be “efficient” and “fiscally responsible” if passed, a news release by House Democrats said. Death penalty survives Democrats also fell short in a bid to end the death penalty, a debate that was personal for state Sen. Rhonda Fields, an Aurora Democrat whose son was murdered in 2005. Robert Ray and Sir Mario Owens were sentenced to die for the killings. Lawmakers have tried before to repeal Colorado’s death penalty, which has been applied just one time in the past 51 years. Senate Bill 19-182 would have taken effect for offenses charged on or after July 1, 2019. Democrats have a 19-16 majority in the Senate, but at least one, Fields, opposed the bill. At least four other party members hadn’t publicly committed to the repeal.

Putting money down Affordable housing gets a boost with the passage of two bills to increase the amount of money the state spends to drive the construction of less expensive dwellings. House Bill 19-1228 passed in the state Senate to increase the annual amount the Colorado Housing and Finance Authority can spend on tax credits each year, according to a news release by Senate Democrats. The amount, currently up to $5 million per year, will increase to up to $10 million from 2020 to 2024, giving incentive to developers to build more affordable housing in the state, the release said. House Bill 19-1322 will transfer up to $30 million over the next three years from the state’s Unclaimed Property Trust Fund to the Housing Development Grant Fund, another news release said, to improve funding for affordable housing options in Colorado. The Associated Press contributed to this report.

County real estate valuations see steady increases STAFF REPORT

Property owners should have received their notices of valuation, which reflect residential and commercial property values as of June 30, 2018, according to a news release from Douglas County. “Reflecting the excellent quality of life in Douglas County, real estate values have continued to experience steady increases for all property classifications, along with near recordsetting new construction,” Douglas County Assessor Lisa Frizell said in the release. Frizell reports that the median single-family detached home proper-

ty value is now $492,000, an increase of 14.5% from the 2017-2018 level of value, the release said. In 2017 and 2018, Douglas County saw the completion of more than 6,400 new residential properties, which has helped to keep Douglas County value increases significantly below that of other metro area counties. “We have experienced a smaller increase in property values than in any other Denver metro county, in part due to the growth in Douglas County’s housing supply from new construction,” Frizell said in the release. “As with the 2017 reappraisal, our condominium and townhome

housing saw the largest appreciation in value. These homes are in high demand in Douglas County and saw median increases of 16 percent.”

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20 Parker Chronicle

May 17, 2019M

Students honored for strength, perseverance DCSD, donor family provide $2,000 scholarships to 12 youths

in. I don’t think I could’ve changed it,” he said. “I did what I had to do.”

BY ALEX DEWIND ADEWIND@COLORADOCOMMUNITYMEDIA.COM

The Administrators’ Scholarship Program at Douglas County School District honors students who have overcome personal challenges and excelled in school. Since its inception in 1988, the program has awarded $175,000 in scholarships to nearly 200 recipients. Administrators and staff help contribute $1,000 to each student. For the past two years, a DCSD family has matched that amount. This year, 12 students received $2,000 apiece to go toward college expenses. Ben Rogers, Castle View High School To help support his mom and siblings, Rogers held a job through his four years of high school. He continues to save up so he can go to college in Alaska. “It was a situation I was put

NORTON FROM PAGE 14

are struggling with being genuine, several hypotheses were surfaced. One idea that garnered a lot of discussion was around this statement, “Some people are convinced that in order to succeed, they feel like they have to manipulate the outcome of every call, meeting, or interaction. They are confusing success with manipulation.” By manipulating others and being disingenuous we find ourselves trapped in a web of lies, fabrications, and an endless cycle of weak defenses and justifications. Some people have no issue with doing this and they repeat the behavior over and over again to create the best possible outcome for themselves, or to place themselves in the spotlight and as the center of attention. The

Alexia and Kelci Droogan, Chaparral High School Three years ago the Droogan twins lost their mother to cancer. School, they say, became a source of strength. This fall, Alexia will attend Colorado State University and Kelci will go to the University of Denver. Alexandra Nance, Douglas County High School In seventh grade Nance, struggling with anxiety, began self-harming. She spent the next several years rebuilding her life. She’s currently working on a novel and plans to study criminal law in college. Maci Ruder, Eagle Academy After a stint in rehab, Ruder decided to make a change. She poured herself into work and school and relied on her family for support. She hopes to work as a rehab therapist someday.

value of working hard and having fun. In the past four year she’s fully immersed herself into Highlands Ranch High School. She will attend Florida State University this fall. Andrew Voss, Legend High School Voss, who was born with two-thirds of his intestines removed, wants to study nursing in college to help others with physical challenges. “It’s always been, like, I’m just a normal kid who has to do a little extra to succeed,” he said. Vitalik Walle, Mountain Vista High School English is Walle’s third language, behind Russian and Ukrainian. Raised in an orphanage, Walle was adopted and moved to the United States five years ago. This fall he will attend Colorado Christian University.

Juliana Joyner, Highlands Ranch High School Joyner’s single mom taught her the

Jared Wilson, Plum Creek Academy Wilson’s anxiety makes human-tohuman interactions difficult. The twice-exceptional student, who is a skilled piano player, hopes to attend BYU-Idaho Pathway Program this fall for a degree or industry certificate.

problem is they actually believe they are fooling the rest of us, when in fact, most times we can see right through the disguise, pretense and manipulation. Lack of authenticity is a successkiller for sure. It damages brands, it tarnishes reputations, and it damages relationships, sometimes beyond repair. The amount of work that has to be done in order to undo the hurts and collateral damage, and re-establish credibility, is so much harder and takes so much more time than just simply being genuine and authentic right from the start. Being transparent and vulnerable takes courage, but as we become proficient at authenticity and transparency, our courage and confidence grow in parallel. And as this happens, we quickly recognize just how powerful these character traits are to the pursuit and achievement of our personal and professional success.

Integrity comes with authenticity. And integrity can be defined as living in such a way that we never have to look over our shoulder. It can also be defined as doing the right thing when no one else is looking. Being genuine, living, loving, and working with character and integrity sets us up to pursue our success from a position of authenticity. With authenticity comes trust, with trust comes deeper relationships, and with deeper relationships comes success. “You will make a horrible anyone else, but you will make the best you that ever lived.” Zig Ziglar If this is true, then why do we try and keep up with the Joneses? Why do we try and impersonate other people? Why do we spin stories and manipulate situations that could hurt others? It’s because we lack authenticity. Maybe we believe others won’t like who we really are. If that’s the case, maybe we have to

Yo u ’l l M o v e

M o u n ta i n s !

Mitch Lukes, Ponderosa High School Doctors were unsure if Lukes would survive a tragic mountain biking accident last fall that left him in a coma. He credits prayers and hope for his recovery. This fall he will attend Montana State University in Bozeman, where he will study business management. Sawyer Benson, Rock Canyon High School Benson, who was born with a rare disease that causes a smaller rib cage and lungs, has to carry a backpack with an oxygen tank inside. That doesn’t get in the way of his love for academics and computer science. This fall he will attend Neumont College of Computer Science in Salt Lake City. Samantha Golden, ThunderRidge High School Golden’s expectations for her senior year changed when her father became ill. She planned and spoke at his funeral, while keeping up with school. “She grieved but yet she was still standing strong,” said Meghan Cofer, her school counselor.

find different friends, people who accept us for exactly who we are. Or, if after a good hard look in the mirror, we can clearly see areas in our life that need to be changed. And then we take the time to become who it is we truly want to be. It is never too late to become authentic, genuine, transparent, and yes, even vulnerable. These are not successkillers; these traits are the building blocks of success. So how about you? Are you the real deal, the authentic and genuine article? Or is time to work on your own authenticity? I would love to hear your story at gotonorton@ gmail.com and when we can be the best “us” that ever lived, it really will be a better than good week. Michael Norton is a resident of Highlands Ranch, the chief revenue officer at Eventus Solutions Group, a strategic consultant and a business and personal coach.

Of all the places you will go…only one lets you dream big and move moutains.

C o n g r a t ul a t i o n s! Class of 2019!

MOVE

MOUNTAINS


Parker Chronicle 21

May 17, 2019

Class of 2019

How can you make a difference in the world? Colorado Community Media asked that question of soon-to-be graduates from across the south metro area. Here’s what some of them had to say: The arts are one of the areas that can have the most impact on people. The opportunity to tell someone else’s stories or share different viewpoints about things — creatively — can impact the way people see things. — Bri Angle, Lutheran

I hope to pursue my passion of becoming a physician in the future. Becoming a doctor would allow me to change patients’ lives for the better and make a personal, but meaningful, impact on those around me through healing. — Meghna Bagchi, Rock Canyon

I make a difference in the world every day. I never really know what impact my actions will have on other people nor to what degree, but I do my best to live a life where I help other people, even if that just means a smile in the hallway or holding open a door. — Sarah Gates, Ponderosa

I am hoping to make a difference in the world by being someone who listens. I am planning to major in human biology to become a pediatrician. One thing I’ve learned over the years is that taking the time to listen to others, especially children who can’t always voice their opinions or feelings, could impact one for a lifetime. I hope to use my platform to first listen to kids, then also to motivate and inspire them to be the very best they can be and not be afraid to pursue their God-given gifts and talents. — Francesca Belibi, Regis Jesuit

I think the biggest way someone can make a difference in the world is simply by being the best person they can be. With this comes kindness, selflessness and a mind geared toward helping every person to be the best person they can be. If we always live with kindness in our heart, I think that is the way that we can help change the world every day. If we put ourselves aside and look to the world, we can truly make a difference. — Emmy Hawkins, Arapahoe

I believe I can make a difference because of how strongly I support community service. I would like to encourage more people to get involved and giving back to their community. It may be required in high school, in order to graduate, but after that, it is a choice. I hope that more people will decide to help and give back, because it is so vital to create a stronger community. — Taylor Littlefield, Douglas County I can make a difference in the world by speaking out for change. I am eager to learn various perspectives and give a voice to those who are often overlooked. Through this, I hope to connect people, creating a better understanding among one another and a more united front for change. — Emma Slenkovich, Littleton

It’s a hard question to answer how I can change the world since I’m still so young, but my motto is just to leave everything better than I found it. — Marcus Miller, Cherry Creek

The little things. You don’t have to save the entire world to make a difference. If you can show even one person the love in the world that there is to offer, you have still made a difference. — Jaden Tactaquin, Castle View

I think I’ll be able to change the world through my willingness to work with people and forge relationships. I don’t think I’m even close to the smartest person in the world, and I think that mindset isn’t conducive to growth, so I always give everybody 100% and try to make connections with as many people I can. With these connections and my skills as a speaker, I believe I will be able to bring people together to make a difference. — Abhi Bhandari, Mountain Vista

The way I can make a difference in the world is by being a firstrate me and not a second-rate someone else. Like God makes each snowflake uniquely different and each fall’s leaves, he has made me unique in my own special way to help and care for others in my own way by treating each person with respect and love. — Raymond Jackson Jr., Grandview

I can make a difference by using my skills and personality traits to advocate for causes I’m passionate about, such as continuing my fundraising efforts for clean water. — Brock Mullen, Chaparral

Something that I learned at Smoky that can apply to how I can make a difference in the world is just how far kindness can go. Simply being a positive and kind person can go a long way and brighten a person’s day. — Cameron Kennedy, Smoky Hill

The most powerful change that anyone can make is in the lives of others. I can make a difference by empowering those around me and helping others maximize their potential. — Chuba Ozor, Eaglecrest

The way that I am going to make a difference in the world is by showing young people that it is possible to achieve your dreams. Everyone has a dream but it depends on if that person is going to catch it or not. — Sareina Thomas, Colorado’s Finest High School of Choice

I want to make a difference in the world using my education. I want to better my family and be a role model for my younger sister and cousins. I want them to know that anyone can go to college and pursue any career they choose. Since I’m the first one in my family to attend college I believe I have what it takes to change the world through them. — Triston Hercules Flamenco, Englewood Start small, to make a difference in the world you need to take it step by step. Spread your words of change, be someone people look up to and want to be like you. Make them realize they can do big things too; they just need to take those steps to start their journey. — Brandon Knight, Options

It’s important to use my own actions as a demonstration of how others can create change rather than complaining about the world’s problems. I strive to set myself apart from the rest of the world by getting involved and ultimately, connecting with people. Whether it be within my school, job, or on a larger scale, I can influence others by believing in something greater than myself. I owe all that I accomplish to God and it is my biggest desire to serve Him. — Addison Scherler, Valor Christian

I hope to one day make a difference with adoptable dogs and cats. Animals are a huge passion of mine that I would like to bring more attention to and change the ways of adopting pets. — Emily Vital, Heritage

I believe there are many ways. As big as having professional skills to improve the technology in major areas, to as small as smiling to all the people I met in daily life, offering help when they need it, bring positive influence to the community, and picking up all the trash in sight. — Yibo Yang, Legend


22 Parker Chronicle

May 17, 2019M

COMMUNITY

FROM PAGE 6

enforcement who responded to the shooting, along with STEM teachers and the Castillo family. At Northridge Recreation Center, community members funneled through a conference room, placing comfort food and necessities into buckets. Therapy dogs occupied the hallway. The event had a ripple effect. “This is as much healing for this staff as it is for them,” said Jamie Noebel, community relations manager for the Highlands Ranch Community Association. During the shooting, Northridge was designated as a reunification center for parents and students of the K-12 school.

Resources at school Schools are among the safest places to be, Davidon stresses. Douglas County School District’s network of mental health resources includes Prevention and School Culture and Mental Health Intervention departments. The departments — made up of counselors, mental health professionals and teachers — spearhead seminars on life skills and promote wellness campaigns in schools, such as Sources of Strength. The suicide prevention program takes an upstream approach by helping students focus on what is working in their lives.

HOW TO TALK TO YOUR CHILDREN The National Association of School Psychologists has advice for parents wanting information on how to talk to their children in the aftermath of tragedies like the one at STEM School Highlands Ranch on May 7. “High-profile acts of violence, particularly in schools, can confuse and frighten children who may feel in danger or worry that their friends or loved-ones are at risk,” the organization says on its website. “They will look to adults for information and guidance on how to react. Parents and school personnel can help children feel safe by establishing a sense of normalcy and security and talking with them about their fears.” The following is a brief summary of some of the organization’s tips for parents. More can be found at https://bit.ly/2vLD3XG • Reassure children that they are safe. • Make time to talk. • Keep your explanations developmentally appropriate. • Review safety procedures. • Observe children’s emotional state. • Limit television viewing of the traumatic events. • Maintain a normal routine. Each school has a crisis team that responds to building-level situations. Following the STEM tragedy, DCSD activated its district-level crisis team. Mental health professionals and administrators, in conjunction with the district’s community relations department and local law enforcement, work together to provide assistance to communities across the county.

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PARENT FROM PAGE 4

In January, Eucker filed a lawsuit against “Jane Doe” for what she called “defamatory statements” against the school. The lawsuit was filed in district court on Jan. 17, according to a copy obtained by Colorado Community Media. Eucker and STEM are listed as the plaintiffs. In response to the district’s initial email, Eucker and Mark Alpert, the president of STEM’s board of directors, sent a letter to the school’s parents on Feb. 1 outlining the allegations. In the emailed statement on May 9, the school provided background information on the allegations. “Some of the allegations were the type many schools receive – student drug-use, the pressure to perform well, and students with mental health concerns. Other allegations were more unusual – staff members or board members embezzling money and laundering it in China and Mexico, forcing students to clean up human feces with their bare hands, and teachers instructing students how to build bombs in class. “STEM’s administration team immediately opened an investigation to determine whether there was any substance to the allegations. As part of this investigation, and in the spirit of full disclosure, STEM reached out to its 2,800 parents to inform them of the complaint in the hopes that any student or family member with

BRAUCHLER FROM PAGE 13

Douglas County Sheriff Tony Spurlock said at least 600 would “definitely” be affected because of their proximity to the shooting on school grounds when it began. The next morning, more families were feeling the aftermath of the tragedy, Brauchler said. “Moms and dads, looking at each other, making decisions about whether or not to send their kids to

knowledge of the allegations would confidentially share that information. STEM did not receive responses from any parents or students with information about these allegations. While STEM took the allegations seriously, our investigation revealed no evidence to support any of the allegations raised in the anonymous complaint.” DCSD Superintendent Thomas Tucker would not comment on the matter when reached by phone May 9, directing inquiries to the district’s communications staff, which responded with contact information for STEM’s public relations firm. School board President David Ray also referred questions to the district’s communications department. STEM recently had its charter renewed for three years rather than the optimal five years. The charter renewal came with the following conditions: that the school adopt and publish a parent complaint and communication policy, show the school’s graduation standards meet the state’s requirements and provide a description of the school’s strategic plan to expand. In STEM’s May 9 statement, Eucker said the school’s highest priority is the safety and wellbeing of students and staff. “We are proud of the welcoming, inclusive community at STEM School Highlands Ranch, and we strive to meet each of our students’ unique needs,” Eucker said. “Like any school with more than 1,800 students, we receive complaints, all of which we take seriously and investigate promptly.”

school in one of the greatest school districts in the country because they don’t feel safe,” Brauchler said. Gov. Jared Polis joined Brauchler, Spurlock and other leaders at a 6 a.m. news conference on May 8 to provide updates on the shooting. Polis called the state resilient but frustrated with the number of shootings that have occurred throughout Colorado’s history. “Yes, we come together in grief,” Polis said. “We also come together to heal. And we come together to figure out what we can do better as a state and society.”

HOW TO MAKE A DIFFERENCE Editor’s note: How to Make a Difference listings are published free, on a spaceavailable basis. Listings are submitted by the community; to submit a listing, or to change or delete an existing listing, contact hharden@coloradocommunitymedia.com. Deadline is noon Wednesday a week before publication. Colorado Humane Society: Handles animal abuse and neglect cases. Need: Volunteers to care for pregnant cats, dogs and their litters, as well as homes for cats and dogs that require socializing or that are recovering from surgery or injuries. Contact: Teresa Broaddus, 303-961-3925 Colorado Refugee English as a Second Language Program: Teaches English to recently arrived refugees, who have fled war or persecution in their home country. In Colorado, refugees are from Afghanistan, Burma, Bhutan, Somalia, Iraq, Eritrea and

D.R. Congo, among others. Need: Volunteers to teach English. Tutoring takes place in the student’s home. Refugees live throughout Denver, but the largest concentrations are in Thornton, near 88th Avenue and Washington Street, and in east Denver/Aurora, near Colfax Avenue and Yosemite Street. Other Details: Tutors do not need to speak the student’s language. Most participants are homebound women and small children, adults who are disabled, and senior citizens. Many are not literate in their first language, and remain isolated from American culture. Requirements: Volunteers must attend training at Emily Griffith Technical College in downtown Denver. Sessions take place every 6-8 weeks. Go to www.refugee-esl. org for information and volunteer application. Contact: Sharon McCreary, 720-423-4843 or sharon.mccreary@emilygriffith.edu.


Parker Chronicle 23

May 17, 2019

OUR VIEW FROM PAGE 14

Last week, there were the first responders who rushed from all over the metro area. Some 79 vehicles, 148 fire and medical personnel, and three medical helicopters converged in the shooting’s immediate aftermath with one thought in mind — to help our young people. There were residents, local stores and churches that immediately gave what was needed to help. There was the restaurant that sheltered children and kept them safe. The students who fought for their right to mourn without politics.

And there was Kendrick Castillo who, with two other students who survived, fought the suspected shooter. Faced with a life-or-death decision, they chose life for those around them before themselves. John Castillo, Kendrick’s father, says now is not the time to issue blame and recriminations. Solutions are simpler, he says: “We have to be better people. If you are going to have kids in this world, you need to be all in.” Mike Shallenberger, Kendrick’s engineering teacher, believes we could change much in this world by putting down our phones and being present in the moment. “We just need,” he says, “to love each other.” Like Kendrick Castillo did.

SMITH FROM PAGE 14

It’s fulfilling as entertainment. In a real-life instance, I would hope the women would address the situation, and not wind up where they did. One of my good friends did what good friends do: He intervened. It’s a potent thing to do with anyone, especially with a curmudgeon. Another stood beside me when others had doubts about my testimony. Trust in a friendship is preeminent. “Louis, I think this is the beginning of a beautiful friendship.” (“Louis,” not “Louie,” is correct.) That’s one of the most famous final lines in film history. Can you name the film?

Mark Twain said, “Good friends, good books, and a sleepy conscience: This is the ideal life.” Can a good book be a friend? Yes. How about a good movie? Yes. I watch 10 minutes of an old friend before I fall asleep, just in case I die before I wake. For one, “My Little Chickadee,” starring W. C. Fields and Mae West, who were not friends. Some of Fields’ selfwritten lines are brilliant. He referred to West as “yon damsel with the hothouse cognomen.” However, I never close the day with “Casablanca,” the final-line film. It’s a good one, but it manipulates my emotions. A good friend won’t do that. Trust me. Craig Marshall Smith can be reached at craigmarshallsmith@comcast.net.

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The Bible Speaks – Israel

Last Tuesday, May 14, was the 71st anniversary of the founding of the modern state of Israel in 1948. Today’s Israel is the tangible proof of God’s promise that the nation of Israel will always exist (Jer 31:35-37). He has returned them to their ancient land, kept them through several wars & is now providing for their success politically, economically & culturally. Many civilizations have tried to destroy the Jewish people over the centuries. Among them are the Assyrians, Babylonians, Romans, Crusaders, Nazis & the Soviet Union. None exist today yet Israel does. All have failed, as will the current attempts by Israel’s Arab neighbors. In Isaiah 43:19 God says “See, I am doing a new thing! Now it springs up; do you not perceive it?” Yes Lord we do, in Israel your people, your nation. hfsmail@basicisp.net

To advertise your place of worship in this section, call Karen at 303-566-4091 or email kearhart@ColoradoCommunityMedia.com


24 Parker Chronicle

THINGS to DO

Castle Pines

Chip in for Kidz: Friday, May 24 at The Ridge at Castle Pines Golf Course, 1414 Castle Pines Parkway. Proceeds benefit veteran families, Colorado youth and disadvantaged kids across the Front Range. Sponsorships available. Learn more at www.4kidzsports.org or call 720-436-4026.

Castle Rock

Aerial MAYhem: 6 p.m. and 8 p.m. May 17 at AerialWorks Castle Rock, 1050 Topeka Way. An aerial variety show with aerialists on silks, trapeze, hoop, and more. Tickets at www.aerialworkscastlerock. com. Princess Tea Party: 3-6 p.m. May 18 in the east courtyard at the Outlets at Castle Rock, 5050 Factory Shops Blvd., Castle Rock. Come dressed in your favorite princess attire for a special meet and greet and photo opportunity with five surprise princesses and a prince. Go to https://www. outletsatcastlerock.com/event/ Princess-Tea-Party/2145525306/ Boozers, Brothels and Bare Knuckle Brawlers: 10 a.m. to noon May 18 at Philip S. Miller Library, 100 S. Wilcox St., Castle Rock. A look at the early days of Buffalo Bill’s Wild West show. Presented by Kellen Cutsforth. Go to http:/crcgs.org or http://events. r20.constantcontact.com/register/event?llr=sowkzelab&oeidk= a07efqhm5ky07f86435.

An Immigrant in the Sanctuary: When Faith and Politics Collide: 6-7 p.m. May 19 at Castle Rock Adventist Hospital, Ridgeline Conference Room. Group discussion about illegal immigration. Features a filmed interview with Rev. Mike Moran whose church offered sanctuary to Arturo Hernandez Garcia in a church basement. Contact Roy Koerner at 303-814-0142 or roykoerner@ msn.com. Tri The Rock Youth Triathlon: 6:30 a.m. to noon May 19 at Butterfield Crossing Park, 3952 Butterfield Crossing Drive, Castle Rock. For ages 5-14. Go to https:// events.com/r/en_US/registration/ tri-the-rock-youth-triathloncastle-rock-may-749421

May 17, 2019M

this week’s TOP FIVE Littleton Symphony Season Finale: Music from Eastern Europe: 7:30 p.m. May 17 at Littleton United Methodist Church, 5894 S. Datura St., Littleton. Featuring guest conductor Guenther Stegmueller from Heidelberg. Go to www.littletonsymphony.org or call 303-933-6824. Improv Survivor: 8 p.m. May 18 at The Studio at Mainstreet, 19600 Mainstreet, Parker. Eight improvisers compete for your laughs and applause; the audience votes improvisers out until only one is crowned survivor. Go to https://www.eventbrite. com/e/the-parker-players-present-improv-survivor-tickets-59004284403. Continental Divide Raceways Exhibit: 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. May 18 at Castle Rock Museum, 420 Elbert St., Castle Rock. See some dragsters up close and personal. A new painting of the Castle Rock Museum by local artist Cindy Welch will be

Centennial

Annual Book Sale and Potluck Luncheon: 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. May 21 at Lutheran Church of the Holy Spirit, 6400 S. University Blvd., Centennial. Several members will speak about their famous ancestors, as well as some with questionable reputations. Contact info@columbinegenealogy.com.

Englewood

Veterans Memorial Celebration: May 26 at Englewood High School Veterans Memorial, 3800 S. Logan St., Englewood. Memorial pavers for sale; contact Paul at pj2skis@skizinski.com or 303482-6184.

Greenwood Village

Celebrating the Art of Pastels: Pastel Society of Colorado’s Mile High National Pastel Exhibition is on display through June 29 at the Curtis Center for the Arts, 2349 E. Orchard Road, Greenwood Village. Go to www.pastelsocietyofcolorado.org or contact exhibition cochairs Sandy Marvin at sjmarvinart@yahoo.com or Marla Sullivan at marlasullivan@comcast.net.

Highlands Ranch

Estate Planning: 12:30-2 p.m. Saturday, May 18 at the James H. Larue Library, 9292 S. Ridgeline Blvd., Highlands Ranch. Leave with a broad understanding of estate planning in Colorado, from wills and trusts to powers of attorney and living wills. Go to https://willsandwellness.com/ rsvp to RSVP. Hooked on Fishing: 10-11:30 a.m. May 18 at Redstone Pond, 3280 Redstone Park Circle, Highlands Ranch. For ages 7-14; adapted for those with special needs. Care-

unveiled at 1 p.m. Go to www.castlerockhistoricalsociety.org. Turkey Vulture Day: 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. May 18 at Castlewood Canyon State Park, 2989 S. Highway 83, Franktown. Go to www. parks.state.co.us/Parks/ castlewoodcanyon/ Pages/CastlewoodCanyonHome.asp. Learn about turkey vultures and see one up close, courtesy of HawkQuest. An Indigenous History of Music in Colorado: 7-8:30 p.m. Monday, May 20 at Southridge Recreation Center, Upstairs Auditorium, 4800 McArthur Ranch Road, Highlands Ranch. Call 720-507-1639 or go to http://thehrhs.org/

giver must be present. Kids learn the basics of fishing, then grab a pole and hit the pond to catch fish. Poles and bait provided. To register, call Summer at 303-4717043. “Hairspray” Auditions: 6:30 p.m. May 22 at Spotlight Performing Arts Center, 6328 E. County Line Road, Ste. 102, Highlands Ranch. Class for ages 6-18; children learn singing, dancing and acting techniques while preparing a musical. Classes on Wednesdays from 6:30-8 p.m. from May to August; performance in August. Go to www.spotlightperformers.com or call 720-44-DANCE. Culture on the Green: 6:30-8 p.m. May 24, June 28 and July 26 at Civic Green Park, 9370 Ridgeline Blvd., Highlands Ranch. Pack a picnic and enjoy live entertainment. Go to https:// hrcaonline.org/aboutus/guides-communication/calendar-schedules/event-details/ culture-on-the-green Saturday Classic Car Cruise: 4-9 p.m. Saturdays, May 25, June 22, July 27, Aug. 24 and Sept. 28. Presented by the Highlands Ranch Hot Rodders. Go to www. hrhotrod.com for a map of the cruise route. Contact info@ hrhotrod.com or call Ron at 720201-7007. “Little Mermaid”: Theater classes for ages 3-9; classes from 3:454:30 p.m. Tuesdays or 4-4:45 p.m. Thursdays through August at

Spotlight Performing Arts Center, 6328 E. County Line Road, Ste. 102, Highlands Ranch. Performance in August. Children learn singing, dancing and acting techniques while preparing a musical. Go to www.spotlightperformers. com or call 720-44-DANCE.

Littleton

Pulmonary Hypertension Support Group: noon to 1 p.m. May 17 at South Denver Cardiology Associates, 1000 Southpark Drive, Littleton. Guest speaker is Samy El-Halawani, MD, who will share insights on living with pulmonary arterial hypertension. Registration required. Go to https://www. southdenver.com/eventregistration/?ee=8733 “Sister Act”: on stage Friday, May 17 to Sunday, June 16 at Town Hall Arts Center, 2450 W. Main St., Littleton. Show times are 7:30 p.m. Thursdays, Fridays and Saturdays; and 2 p.m. Sundays. Additional shows at 2 p.m. June 1 and 6:30 p.m. June 2. For tickets and information, call 303-7942787 x5, stop by the box office, or go to townhallartscenter.org/ sisteract. Birds of Prey Photoshoot: 8-10 a.m. May 18 at Hudson Gardens & Event Center, 6115 S. Santa Fe Drive, Littleton. Private photo shoot with HawkQuest. Check-in begins at 7:30 a.m. Registration is required; capacity limited to 50 photographers. Go to http:// hudsongardens.doubleknot.com/ event/birds-of-prey/2451024 ALS Car Show: 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday, May 18 at Seven Stones Chatfield Botanical Gardens

Cemetery, 9635 N. Rampart Range Road, Littleton. In memory of Domingo Bernal. All proceeds benefit the ALS Association Rocky Mountain Chapter. Call 303-7177117 or email info@discoversevenstones.com. Go to http://www. discoversevenstones.com/ Emma Hill Concert: 5 p.m. May 20 at Dirt Coffee Bar, Littleton. Allages show by Alaskan singer Hill, whose newest LP “Magnesium Dreams” was released May 10. Go to https://www.dirtcoffee.org/ events/2019/5/20/live-musicwith-emma-hill Railroads with Active Minds: 2 p.m. May 20 at Bemis Public Library, 6014 S. Datura St., Littleton. Review the rich history of railroads in the United States. Call 303-795-3961. Paint Box Guild Juried Show: on display through May 31 at Bemis Public Library, 6014 S. Datura St., Littleton. Go to https://www. paintboxguildlittleton.org/ 57th Anniversary Show: on display through June 16 at Depot Art Gallery, 2069 W. Powers Ave., Littleton. Littleton Fine Arts Guild members’ works. Go to http:// depotartgallery.org/ or call Mary Clark 720-951-5380.

Parker

Live Smart: Healthy Nutrition: 2-3 p.m. May 18 at Parker Library, 20105 E. Mainstreet. Parker. Learn seven principles of healthy nutrition to help you lose fat, improve digestion, increase performance, and more. Presented by Dr. Matt Pennetti. Registration is required at 303-791-7323 or DCL.org. Rocky Mountain Brass Band Festival: 6-9 p.m. Saturday, May 18 at the PACE Center, 20000 E. Pikes Peak Ave., Parker. Features three Colorado British-style brass bands. Purchase tickets at parkerarts.org. Vintage and Vibrant: 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. Wednesday, May 22 at the Parker Arts, Culture and Events Center, 20000 Pikes Peak Drive, Parker. Seniors’ Council of Douglas County event. Seating is limited. To register, contact 303-663-7681, dcseniorlife@douglas.co.us or scdc.colorado@gmail.com. Ms. Colorado Senior America Pageant: 2-4:30 p.m. May 25 at the PACE Center, 20000 E. Pikes Peak Ave., Parker. Tickets available at https://parkerarts.ticketforce.com/eventperformances. asp?evt=774. Editor’s note: Calendar submissions must be received by noon Wednesday for publication the following week. To place a calendar item, go to eventlink. coloradocommunitymedia.com.


Parker Chronicle 25

May 17, 2019

SAFETY FROM PAGE 3

Douglas County School District Board President David Ray, Superintendent Thomas Tucker, Douglas County Sheriff Tony Spurlock and Undersheriff Holly Nicholson-Kluth sat at tables in front of the board listening to public comment. Spurlock said his department does not have enough resources to provide the number of school resource officers needed in each district school. The district has 68,000 students — roughly the population of the county seat, Castle Rock — spread across 91 schools. The enrollment makes the district the third largest in Colorado. Every traditional high school has a school resource officer or SRO, Spurlock said, but not as many as the National Association of School Resource Officers (NASRO) recommends there be per student — a

ratio of one SRO for every 1,000 students. NASRO recommends considering such factors as campus size, school climate and location in determing the number of SROs per school. In Douglas County, some district SROs are responsible for overseeing more than 2,000 students and often split their time with a middle school. Spurlock said he would like to see nine more SROs placed in the district — one for every public high school and middle school he oversees. Spurlock said Douglas County was blessed to have access to $10 million but that it would take “a number of initiatives” to fund SROs. Lt. Lori Bronner with the sheriff ’s office said SROs are much more “than just a gun walking around.” They provide education about issues like cyberbullying and dating violence and engrain themselves in the student body. When threats are made against schools, they work with administrators to track down the origin. “They are part of that school com-

munity,” she said. “They are friends, they are family. That school, those students are part of their heart and their soul.” Tucker said memory of the STEM shooting was still at the forefront of his mind, and that the $10 million was an opportunity for community partners to work toward solutions and “put away our partisan politics.” “I still have a heavy heart as a father, a grandfather and one of the first school district responders who gathered, who descended upon STEM last Tuesday,” he said. He thanked voters for passing bond and mill levy override ballot issues in November, which he said helped pay for additional security measures in schools and that they’ve hired 75 counselors. “I hope that not a single school, not a single student, would ever have to endure what we saw last Tuesday,” Tucker said. “There’s just no excuse for that and there aren’t any words to really put that tragedy into perspective.”

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26 Parker Chronicle

LOCAL

LIFE

Enthusiasts say

rocks

Indoor gyms make the sport more accessible to all

WHERE TO BEGIN BOULDERING Earth Treks Earth Treks climbing gyms are a great place to get started climbing. It offers beginner classes and rental gear. More info at www. earthtreksclimbing.com/

BY CHRISTY STEADMAN CSTEADMAN@COLORADOCOMMUNITYMEDIA.COM

B

eing a climber for more than half his life, Kegan Minock has never heard an excuse that he thinks should deter someone from trying bouldering. It doesn’t matter your age or weight, he said, or even if you have a fear of heights. “Often, when people think of rock climbing, they think of going really high,” Minock said. “With bouldering, you’re not super high off the ground. But it’s just as challenging.” Minock, 27, general manager of ROCK’n & JAM’n gym in Centennial — ROCK’n & JAM’n also has a location in Thornton — has been climbing for 16 years and started focusing on bouldering about a decade ago. “To me, it’s more fun,” Minock said, adding he enjoys the gymnastics skills required and the problem-solving aspect of it. “It’s physical, but also mentally challenging.” In his blog written to serve as a beginner’s guide to bouldering, Willis Kuelthau, editor and climbing gear tester for 99Boulders.com, defines bouldering as “climbs that are protected by (landing/crash) pads rather than ropes.” He adds that bouldering is the physical act of completing “relatively short sequences that prioritize power and technique over long-term endurance.” A “boulder problem” is the common term for the climbing challenge, or route. It is “the sequence of holds (which have) a start point and end point,” Kuelthau wrote. Boulder problems have “various levels of difficulty.” Scott Rennack, marketing manager for The Spot Bouldering Gym, believes the term is coined boulder problems because of the problem-solving skills required to complete them. “You have to figure them out,” he said. “You can try a move 20 or 30 times before you figure it out. Even a hundred times isn’t that uncommon.” Rennack, 42, was introduced to climbing as a youth in the Boy Scouts, and “after 25 years, I’ve tried just about everything,” he said. Rennack was involved with starting the American Bouldering Series in 1998 — a competition that has since merged with USA Climbing and is now known as USA Climbing’s Bouldering Open National Championships. It took place this year on Feb. 1 and 2 in Redmond, Oregon. National championship titles went to Ashima Shiraishi for women and Sean Bailey for men. “Colorado has kind of always been in the center of the bouldering world,” Rennack said. And The Spot can also

May 17, 2019M

· 700 Golden Ridge Road, Golden. 303-2229564. · 1050 W. Hampden Ave., Englewood. 303242-3555. Outdoors According to Nomad Colorado, an online travel and outdoor guide specific to Colorado, two popular spots for beginner outdoor bouldering — just outside of the Denver area — are Castlewood Canyon State Park in Castle Rock and Morrison Bouldering in Morrison. For an outdoor inner-city experience, but still outdoors, Nomad Colorado suggests the man-made boulders/walls at Westlands Park in Greenwood Village and Central Park in Stapleton, Denver. Scott Rennack, marketing manager for The Spot Bouldering Gym who has been climbing for about 25 years, sets a route when the gym’s Boulder location opened in 2002. The Spot Denver opened on April 18. COURTESY PHOTO claim it contributed to the history, he added. The Spot’s Boulder location, which opened in 2002, was the first bouldering-only gym to open in Colorado. It “missed the title for all of the U.S. by about two months,” Rennack said. “A place in Salt Lake City opened just before (The Spot) did.” Just south of downtown, The Spot Denver opened on April 18. Though English mountaineer Oscar Eckenstein, circa 1880s, and French alpinist Pierre Allain, in the 1930s and 1940s, preceded him, many climbers point to John Gill as the father of modern bouldering. According to Gill’s website, www. johngill.net, he “initiated a gymnastic approach to short rock climbs, specifically bouldering, in America in the 1950s.” Gill’s article “The Art of Bouldering,” published in the American Alpine Club Journal in 1969, “encouraged the recognition of bouldering as an authentic form of climbing,” states Gill’s website. According to an article by Alex Beale, owner and editor of 99Boulders. com, John “Verm” Sherman created the V Scale — now the standard grading scale for the boulder problems in the U.S. — in the late 1980s while climbing in Hueco Tanks, Texas. The International Federation of Sport Climbing’s (IFSC) website states that climbing competitions largely began in Europe in the 1980s. The site states that “in 1991, the first World Championship was organized in Frankfurt, Germany,” and bouldering

“was officially introduced as a new climbing discipline” in 1998. As fun as bouldering may be, Rennack would remind people that there are dangers that can come with it — injuries due to not knowing how to fall properly or adverse outdoor elements, such as no padded landing spots. Luckily, bouldering is a “very social” sport, said Hilary Harris, founder and co-owner of EVO Rock + Fitness in Louisville. “Everyone gets to try” the boulder problem, she said, “and everyone cheers each other on.” Minock “absolutely recommends” that anyone going bouldering outdoors for the first time should go with someone who has some experience with the sport. But, he said, it’s probably best for people to start out in a gym to get a foundation for bouldering, then transition to the outdoors. Rennack agreed. An indoor gym is a controlled environment and it’s “cactus-free, guaranteed.” In addition, many gyms offer introductory clinics and/or safety briefings. Coloradoans in general are enthusiastic about the outdoors, Minock said. “People come from all over the world to test out what we have to offer,” he added. “We (indoor climbing gyms) try to bring that experience to everyone. But it doesn’t matter if you’re bouldering indoors or outdoors, as long as you’re just enjoying the climb.” One reason indoor gyms are becoming more popular may be because they are making bouldering more acces-

DENVER AREA BOULDERING Denver Bouldering Club, https://denverboulderingclub.com · 2485 W. Second Ave., Unit 18, Denver. 303351-5588. · 4131 South Natches Court, Unit E, Sheridan. 720-638-2767. The Spot Denver, www.thespotgym.com/ denver · 1235 Delaware St., Denver. 720-542-3326. Aqua Climbing Wall at Northridge — 8800 Broadway. 303-791-2500. Climbing Wall at Eastridge — 9568 University Boulevard. 303-791-2500. sible to everyone, Harris said. Bouldering gyms “are popping up all over the country,” Harris said, “especially in urban areas where people don’t have access to the outdoors.” Harris, 51, has been climbing for more than 30 years. She did some competitive climbing while living in Europe in the early 1990s, but it was her background as an architect — along with her love of the sport — that inspired her to open EVO Rock + Fitness. EVO Bouldering Golden, which will be a bouldering-only gym expected to open in the winter of 2020, will be the fourth EVO gym in the U.S. “Climbing is a canvas to let people discover their full potential,” Harris said. “You have to face challenges that you think are impossible, but you work it out, move by move.”


May 17, 2019

Parker Chronicle 27

LOCAL

SPORTS

Girls finished golf tourneys before weather went subpar

G

irl golfers haven’t had much time to fine-tune their games because of damp spring weather but all the state qualifying regional tournaments were able to be played before the rain and snow started falling last week. Katie Berrian captured medalist honors at the 5A Western Regional and will be one of the players to watch at the 5A State Tournament that will be held May 20-21 at Harmony Golf Club in Timnath. Berrian, a Regis Jesuit junior who lives in Castle Rock and tied for third in last season’s 5A state meet, was 4-under-par over the last six holes she played and fashioned a 4-under-par 67 at the Tiara Rado Golf Course in Grand Junction on May 7. Loveland won the Western regional title and Regis also qualified its team. Defending 5A state champion Emma Bryant of Eaglecrest carded a 2-overpar 74 to take medalist honors at the 5A South Regionals at Foothills Golf Club on May 6. Haena Kim of Highlands Ranch was second with a 75. Defending state champion Cherry Creek won the Southern team title and Highlands Ranch also qualified its team. Arapahoe, led by Ella Chism who

tied for second in the individual standings with a 3-over-par 75 along with ThunderRidge’s Lauren Tucker, won the 5A Central Regional team title held at Kennedy Golf Course on May 6. Grandview’s Morgan Ryan, the state runner-up last season, and teammate Amy Chitkoksoong, the 2017 state champion, tied for medalist honors in the 5A Northern Regionals at Aurora Hills with 2-over-par 74s. Rock Canyon won the Northern team championship and Grandview was the other team qualifier in the May 6 regional. Holy Family junior Hailey Schalk, the two-time defending Class 3A state champion, won medalist honors in the Region 3, Class 4A qualifying tournament at Fox Hill Golf Club on May 6 with a 78. The 4A state tourney is set for May 20-21 at Pelican Lakes in Greeley. Rising triathlon star Cassidy Hickey, a junior at Chaparral, is a rising star in a physically challenging sport. Considering most triathletes hit their stride post-college, Hickey seems to be few strides ahead of many other competitors. Hickey finished ninth in the junior

OVERTIME

women’s division on April 28 at the ITU Duathlon World Championships in Pontevedra, Spain, with a time of 1:03:16 and was the top American finisher. She ran the 5K in :19:02 and was timed in :32:03 in the 20K Jim Benton bike race and clocked in at :10:43 in the 2.5K run. “She wasn’t 100 percent satisfied with the results but from our perspective that’s an awesome showing for her first international event,” said USA Triathlon communications manager Caryn Maconi. Hickey has collected a handful of national titles in the past 12 months in the sports of triathlon (swim-bike-run) and duathlon (run-bike-run). She was the 2018 overall champion in the Triathlon Non-Drafting Sprint Duathlon National Championships and was the overall champ in the 2018 Triathlon Youth Elite National Championships. She captured the title in the 15-19 age group at the 2018 USA Triathlon Age Group Spring National Championships. This year Hickey was the overall

winner at the 2019 USA Triathlon High School National Championships and at the 2019 USA Triathlon NonDrafting Sprint Duathlon National Championships. There are obviously many different categories in these premier national events and Hickey also has three runner-up and a third-place finish in four other United States meets. Local flavor on World Cup team Former Mountain Vista soccer player and Highlands Ranch resident Mallory Pugh and Golden High School graduate Lindsey Horan were named to the 23-player United States women’s national soccer team that will compete in the FIFA Women’s World Cup tournament that begins June 7 in France. White Basketball Academy Former Legend High School, University of Colorado and UCCS standout basketball player Derrick White, who now plays for the San Antonio Spurs in the National Basketball Association, has become an associate with a local youth basketball development program. SEE BENTON, P39

EASTERN COLORADO

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28 Parker Chronicle

May 17, 2019M

Rock Canyon knocks off top-seeded Broomfield STAFF REPORT

Rock Canyon, seeded 16th in the Class 5A girls soccer playoffs, pulled off a big upset in the May 10 second round by eliminating topseeded Broomfield. Cade Sheahan scored in the 20th minute and the Jaguars (14-3-0) held on to avenge a 3-2 semifinal loss to the Eagles last season and advance into the third round. Quarterfinal matches were scheduled for May 15 with the semifinals set for May 18 at Echo Park Automotive Stadium in Parker. The championship game will be at 7 p.m. May 22 at Dick’s Sporting Goods Park in Commerce City. In other second-round 5A games involving area teams, defending 5A state champion and second-seeded Grandview, which downed Broomfield in last season’s title game, advanced with a 3-1 victory over No. 15 Cherokee Trail. Kacy Johnston, Caylin Lyuenko and Kendra Gipson scored for the Wolves. Arapahoe, the 12th seed, downed No. 5 Cherry Creek, 2-1, in a battle on longtime Centennial League rivals. Emma Purcell and Elsa Edmonds scored for the Warriors, and keeper Grace Cadorette made 11 saves. No. 6 Regis Jesuit lost 3-2 to 11th seeded Columbine in overtime. Several first-round 5A games involving Douglas County teams that were scheduled for May 7 were postponed until May 8 because of the STEM School Highlands Ranch shooting. Grandview, Rock Canyon, Cherry Creek, Regis Jesuit and Arapahoe

claimed opening-round wins. Kacy Johnston scored twice and keeper Madison Livingston had to make just one save as second-seeded Grandview notched a dominating 4-0 win over No. 31 Horizon on May 7. Freshman Anna Lantz had two goals in Regis’ 6-0 win over No. 27 Prarie View and Audrey Weiss paced Arapahoe’s 3-0 shutout over No. 21 Northglenn with two goals. Tenth-seeded Fossil Ridge edged No. 23 Valor Christian 1-0 in overtime. It was a cold, rainy evening on May 8 and three of the four Douglas County teams lost. Rock Canyon tied No. 17 Legacy, 1-1, but advanced by winning the shootout, 4-2. Sophomores Riley Morris and Addie Follett scored for Creek in a 2-0 win over No. 28 Legend. Fairview shut out No. 21 Mountain Vista, 2-0 and Cherokee Trail eliminated No. 18 ThunderRidge, 5-1. In a first-round 4A contest, No. 2 Pueblo Centennial blanked No. 31 Littleton, 2-0, on May 8. Lutheran, seeded 17th in the 3A playoffs, had six different players score and notched a 6-1 first-round 3A win over No. 16 DSST:Byers on May 8. Englewood lost 6-0 to Aspen. No. 11 SkyView Academy notched a 6-3 first-round victory over The Vanguard School as two second-half goals sealed the 4-3 halftime lead that the Hawks had established. Both Lutheran and SkyView Academy were shut out in secondround matches on May 11. Topseeded Colorado Academy blanked Lutheran, 4-0, and No. 6 Aspen eliminated the Hawks, 4-0.

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Parker Chronicle 29

May 17, 2019

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30 Parker Chronicle

May 17, 2019M

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To Advertise call Karen

For Local News Anytime of the Day Visit OurColoradoNews.com 303.566.4091

For Local News Anytime kearhart@coloradocommunitymedia.com of the Day Visit OurColoradoNews.com

Bathrooms

• Home Health Care • Child Care • Yard Work/ Clean Up/ Flowers • Snow Shoveling • Housecleaning/ Organizing • Property Management/ Maintenance • Clean Move Outs/ Move Ins • Errands

I Care About All Your Family’s Needs Call For An Estimate • No Job Too Big or Too Small

303-875-7271 • allisonfultoncares@yahoo.com

Carpet/Flooring

Qu

ality

SOLUTIONS

Specializing in complete bathroom remodels from design to completion. - Tile Enclosures - Lifetime Fixtures - Custom Shower Pans - Quartz - Granite - Solid Wood Cabinetry

“We are not just building bathrooms, we are building relationships.” Call Today and Save!

720-486-8528 www.buildabath.net

CARPET

•Re-StRetching • Pet Damage • RePaiR

n:

Call Ke

720-244-3623

Carpet/Flooring


Parker Chronicle 31

May 17, 2019

www.ColoradoServiceDirectory.com

To Advertise call Karen 303.566.4091

kearhart@coloradocommunitymedia.com Electricians

Construction

Construction

Precision Residential Contractors

CONSTRUCTION MANAGEMENT Projects Large & Small

Your construction project ran smoothly on time & on budget

Kendall Consultants, LLC. Rkendall789@gmail.com

303-356-1435

Kitchen - Bath - Electric - Plumbing - HVAC - Flooring

Call us for all your residential needs

(303)-956-6893 prc_contractors@yahoo.com Carpet/Flooring

Concrete/Paving

ThomasFlooring & Tile •Carpet Restretching• •Repair• •Bathroom Remodel• Residential & Commercial

303-781-4919 Cleaning

Construction

• patios • sidewalks • garage floors • • porches • stamped/colored • exposed agregate • lic.& ins. free estimates

720-218-8849 www.delsolconcrete.com

FREE Estimates For: - House Leveling - Foundation Repair - Mobile Home Leveling - Concrete Crack Repair - Waterproofing

BOOKING NOW!

for spring & early summer

Prime Site Work & Concrete, Inc.

HouseLevelingandFoundationRepair.com

Deck/Patio

UTDOOR

Residential and Commercial Cleaning • 15yrsexperience •WindowCleaning • Detailed,Honest, •Insured&Bonded Dependable •GreatCustomerService

ESIGNS, INC

“Specializing in Composite Redwood and Cedar Construction for Over 30 Years”

• Decks • Fences • Stairs • Overhangs •

Call Ali @ 720-300-6731 Concrete/Paving

Driveways • Walls • Footers • Sidewalks Barn & Garage Floors • Patios Front Porches & Steps Stone Textured Concrete Retaining Walls

Decorative stamped concrete Concrete power washed & sealed Timely estimates Quality work

Dump Truck & Skidsteer Services

720-445-1606

PRO FORM CONCRETE We do driveways, garage floors, walkways, front porches, steps, back patios, and always provide free estimates. Fully insured, local and perform quality work.

CALL FOR AN ESTIMATE All Phases of Flat Work by

T.M. CONCRETE

Driveways, Sidewalks, Patios Tear-outs, stamped & colored concrete. Quality work, Lic./Ins. Reasonable rates "Small Jobs OK!" 303-514-7364 tmconcrete.net

Please Recycle this Publication when Finished

303-888-7755

TLLC Concrete

WE DO ALL DECK & FENCE REPAIRS CALL US FOR A FREE ESTIMATE

SAND/WASH/STAIN 15% OFF! www.coloradodeckandfence.com codeckandfencepro@gmail.com

Scott, Owner - 720-364-5270 Garage Doors

FOR ALL YOUR GARAGE DOOR NEEDS!

Sanders Drywall Inc. All phases to include

Acoustic scrape and re-texture Repairs to full basement finishes Water damage repairs Interior paint, door & trim installs 30+ years experience Insured Free estimates Please no Solicitors

303-471-2323 A PATCH TO MATCH Drywall Repair Specialist Denver

Deck Builders

Making the Outdoors a part of your home

- Custom Designs by Certified Professional Engineer - Classic Composite or Redwood Decks - A+ BBB Rating Family Owned and Operated Licensed & Insured

Call Ron @ 303-726-1670 For a free estimate

BEST PRICES

Specialize in barn floors, Driveways, Remove and replacement

30+ years experience Clem: 303-973-6991

Any job over 400 SF give us a call!

Low rates, Free estimates

• Springs, Repairs • New Doors and Openers • Barn and Arena Doors • Locally-Owned & Operated • Tom Martino’s Referral List 10 Yrs • BBB Gold Star Member Since 2002

Darrell 303-915-0739

Ty Barrett

303-646-2355

Fence Services

Cowboy Fencing is a full service fence & gate company installing fences in Colorado for 23 6 years. Residential/Commercial/ Farm & Ranch Fencing

Drywall

Custom Concrete & Design Services

Ali’s Cleaning Services

Licensed and Insured. Residential or Commercial Ask about our Senior Citizen and/or Veteran discounts. Call (720) 925-1241

Deck/Patio

720.503.0879

Driveways Tear Outs & Replace

B&W Electric, LLC

FREE ESTIMATES

• Home Renovation and Remodel • 30 years Experience • Insured • Satisfaction Guaranteed

(303) 646-4499 www.mikesgaragedoors.com Handyman

Highly rated & screened contractor by Home Advisor & Angies list

Call Ed 720-328-5039 Electricians

Affordable Electrician

Over 25 years experience • Residential Expert • All electrical upgrades • No Job Too Small • Senior Discounts – Lic/Insured

Cell: 720-690-7645 Office: 720-621-6955

’s DeSpain HOME SOLUTIONS

Solving All your Remodeling & Repair Problems – Just Ask!

DEPENDABLE, RELIABLE SERVICE Over 30 Years Experience Licensed & Insured

Eric DeSpain 303-840-1874


32 Parker Chronicle

May 17, 2019M

www.ColoradoServiceDirectory.com

To Advertise call Karen 303.566.4091 Handyman

kearhart@coloradocommunitymedia.com

Fireplaces

Heating/ Air Conditioning

GAS FIREPLACE SERVICE, REPAIR, CERTIFICATION THE ORIGINAL FAMILY OWNED COMPANY - 27 YEARS IN BUSINESS Selling Your Home Soon? Home Inspection Problems? We Have The Solutions! OUR Techs are NFI Certified and Experienced In All Types Of Real Estate Transactions! If Your Fireplace Has Quit Working, Why Wait? Enjoy It Now And Know It’s Ready For Fall!

Serving the Front Range since 1955 Furnaces • Boilers • Water Heaters Rooftop HVAC • Mobile Furnaces Commercial • Residential Install • Repair • Replace

Free Estimates • 720-327-9214

Call Now! Don’t Wait Until October – Enjoy Your Fireplace Year Around! $10.00 OFF Service!

303-946-6535

Insurance

The Original and Only Name You Need For Gas Fireplaces!

Robert Pencak

General Construction Handyman Framing-Finish Carpentry-Plumbing Doors-Electrical-Windows-Drywall Decks-Tile-Paint Serving Castle Rock and surrounding areas

Quality*Integrity*Honesty

303-883-2461

Handyman

Exterior Home Repair Stucco  Brick  Morter  Siding  Concrete Waterproofing Replacement or Repair Commericial or Residental Architecutal grade materials.

Associated

INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY SOLUTIONS THAT WORK FOR YOUR BUSINESS. TM

HOME REPAIRS & REMODELING • Drywall • Painting • Tile • Trim • Doors • Painting • Decks • Bath Remodel • Kitchen Remodels • Basements & Much More! Call Today for a FREE ESTIMATE 303-427-2955

!

INSURED

JIM 303.818.6319

“HONEY-DO’S DONE… THAT YOUR HONEY DON’T DO.”

Construction Services

303.995.0222 | nlennerth@hotmail.com Hauling Service

Insurance

Cut Rate Hauling Trash / Rubbish / Debris and Junk Removal Professional and Reliable technology Year Round Service Rubin (720)434-8042 Kerwin (720) 519-5559

Home Improvement

Questions? Call Karl (303) 416-6304 www.theBig65.com

*Karl Bruns-Kyler is a Private Insurance Broker, a Certified Senior Advisor, CSA, with no affiliation to Medicare, CMS or any governmental organization.

— SMALL JOBS INSIDE AND OUT —

Kitchens • Baths • Basements

Hauling Service

70 West Trucking, LLC. Trash & Debri Removal for: Barns, Attics, Garages, Foreclosures, Evictions, Basements, Storage Units,

Outside Property Clean-Up: Fallen Trees & Brush, Equipment, Cars, Trucks, Sheds & Garages - Demo-ed & Removal

720-445-1606

No Job too small • Licensed & Insured Angies List 2018 Gold Star award

Landscaping/Nurseries

FREE ESTIMATES

720.635.4911

Stay in your home longer with an American Standard Walk-In Bathtub. Receive up to $1,500 off, including a free toilet, and a lifetime warranty on the tub and installation! Call us at 1-855-534-6198 _________________________________ BATHROOM RENOVATIONS. EASY, ONE DAY updates! We specialize in safe bathing. Grab bars, no slip flooring & seated showers. Call for a free inhome consultation: 888-912-4745

Lawn/Garden Services

Landscape & Concrete Landscaping • Yard Cleanup • Sod Concrete • Sprinklers • Fertilization Tree Trimming/Cutting • Planting Retaining Walls • Flagstone Fencing • Gutter Cleaning Power Raking • Aerating

720-436-6158 Landscape & Garden Sod, Rock, Mulch, Retaining Walls, Sprinklers, Sprinkler Repair, Flagstone, Fence Repair, Power Rake, Fertilize, Aeration, Yard Clean-Ups, Rock Removal, Weed Control, Shrub Trimming/Removal, Trash Hauling and Much More

Senior Discounts Year Round 720-982-9155 lawnservice9155@q.com

Alpine Landscape Management

Weekly Mowing, Aerate, Fertilize, Spring Clean Up, Power Raking, Trim Bushes & Small Trees, Senior Discounts

720-329-9732

Colorado Lawn Care, LLC SPRING/SUMMER:

Landscaping – Tree/Hedge Trimming Shrub Removal – Aeration – Sod Edging – Weekly Mowing – Power Washing – Deck/Fence Install/Repair coloadolawncareoflittleton@gmail.com Commercial – Residential 720-202-9975

Licensed/Insured

Lawn/Garden Services

Handyman Services Available

Visit our website at millerremodeling.net

Landscaping/Nurseries

LAWN MAINTENANCE Weekly Mowing – Weed Control by Licensed Professionals – Tree Care – Organic Fertilizer General Yard Clean-ups – Field Mowing Sprinkler System Installation & Repair

303-660-0708 FREE ESTIMATES www.apmcolorado.com apmchristyd@aol.com

15% OFF Our KIG Package Call for details!

Not Valid on individual services, Some Restrictions May Apply, Expires 8/31/2019

CONTINENTAL INC. Full Lawn Maintenance Mow – Edge - Trim Aeration & Fertilization Sprinkler Repair Call for a FREE quote

720-283-2155 Continental8270@yahoo.com

Lawn Mowing

Weekly Lawn Mow, small front/back in Cottonwood area. $25.00 a week. Phone number (303)725-8508 Please Recycle this Publication


Parker Chronicle 33

May 17, 2019

www.ColoradoServiceDirectory.com

To Advertise call Karen 303.566.4091 Painting

Painting We paint over 700 Homes Per Year No Deposit Ever Satisfaction Guaranteed 5 year, 7 year and 9 year Exterior Warranties 2 Yr. Interior Warranty Licensed & Insured up to $2 Million Locally Owned and Operated since 1989 Free Color Consulting & Samples

Residential Experts

Residential Experts

kearhart@coloradocommunitymedia.com

35% Off All Int. & Ext. 720-328-2572 720-569-4565

CALL TODAY FOR YOUR FREE QUOTE www.innovativepaintingllc.com Painting

Quality Painting for Every Budget • Exteriors • Interiors • Decks • Insured • Free Estimates • No Money Down

TEXT or Call 303-901-0947

Roofing/Gutters

Have a Hail Damaged Roof? - Call Golden Spike Roofing - We are 100% Local & Have Great References - Roofing • Siding • Paint • Windows • Gutters

- Call Dave Vaughn 720-427-7422 - davegoldenspikeroofing@gmail.com

www.lovablepainters.com

Good old fashioned American work ethic

P itrone g S ons

I N T Painting C!pany E R Hand Brushed Quality Since 1968 I 303-791-5000 O R w w w. p i t r o n e a n d s o n s . c o m Lawn/Garden Services

PROFESSIONAL

E X T E R I O R

Misc. Services

TREES/ SHRUBS TRIMMED Planted, Trimmed & Removal • Sod Work • Rock & Block Walls • Sprinklers • Aeration • Stumps Ground • Mulch

Licensed / Insured

DICK 303-783-9000

Fine Grading • Material Install • Demolition Concrete Removal • Yard Clean Up Tree Trimming and Stump Grinding

Call Now - Bill 303-562-5988 TractorExpress.net

For all your indoor & outdoor lighting needs, plus… • Internet/TV Cable & Outlets •Ceiling Fans •Thermostats •Wall-Mounted TV’s • And many more services Free Estimates All Work Guaranteed

Call 720-456-8196

720-301-0442

Interior • Exterior Residential Specialist Woodworking, Decks Fences: pressure washing / Drywall patch Free Estimates • Great Winter Rates

Highlands Ranch resident

Call Joseph

303-523-6372

303-948-9287

• Stain and Renew Custom Handrails • Custom Interior & Exterior • Residential & Commercial Painting • Paint Kitchen Cabinets • Free Estimates - Insured • 30 Years Serving Metro Denver • Satisfaction Guaranteed

A&G CONSTRUCTION LLC WINDOWS ROOFING SIDING GUTTERS RESIDENTIAL/COMMERCIAL

CELL: 267-720-7077

TALON410@YAHOO.COM PROUDLY SERVING COLORADO Plumbing

Residential: Hot Water Heat • Forced Air Water Heaters • Kitchens • Baths Service Repair • Sprinkler Repair

A+

Rating BBB

LS@LSPaintinginc.com www.lspaintinginc.com

Licenced & Insured

PEREZ PAINTING LLC

Cedar and Log Home Specialist Front Door Refinishing Free Estimates

Plumb-Crazy, LLC.

“We’re Crazy About Plumbing” CUSTOM HOMES • REMODEL FINISHED BASEMENTS SERVICE AND REPAIR Licensed • Insured

C H E C K I T O U T AT:

ColoradoCommunityMedia.com

All Types of Roofing New Roofs, Reroofs, Repairs & Roof Certifications Aluminum Seamless Gutters Family owned/operated since 1980 Call Today for a FREE Estimate • Senior Discounts

www.AnyWeatherRoofing.com • Sales@AnyWEatherRoofing.com C

Sprinklers

ALAN ATTWOOD, Master Plumber

PH: 303-472-8217 FX: 303-688-8821

HANDY MAN CALL DIRTY JOBS Plumbing repair & Drain Cleaning

720-298-3496

A

(303) 234-1539

Screwed up your plumbing?

Local ads, coupons & deals are just one click away!

Roofing/Gutters

ANCHOR PLUMBING (303) 961-3485

Painting

Littleton Based & Family Owned

Robert Dudley Lighting LLC

exterior • interior residential repaints Re-caulk all home complete prime all caulked areas / replace any damaged boards/ popcorn removal drywall and texture repair/fences and decks/insured and bonded

Painting

L.S. PAINTING, Inc.

Lighting

DANIEL’S PAINTING

BILLS BOBCAT SERVICE

OUTDOOR SERVICES

Siding

720-308-6696 www.askdirtyjobs.com Call for advice and Phone Pricing

D

PLUMBING & SPRINKLERS

Free Instant Phone Quote Repair or Replace: Faucets, Sprinklers, Toilets, Sinks, _ Disposals, Water Heaters, Gas Lines, Broken Pipes, Spigots/ Hosebibs, B Water Pressure Regulator, Ice Maker, Drain Cleaning, Dishwasher Instl., for coupons go to vertecservices.com CALL Vertec 303-371-3828


34 Parker Chronicle Sprinklers

Columbine Custom Contracting • Blow Outs $40 • Aerations $40 • Gutter Clean ups $40 • Fertilization $30 • Fence Repair & Painting • Power wash decks & houses • Clean Up / Tree service • Garage Doors • Painting • Licensed Plumber

Tony 720-210-4304 Sprinkler Solutions Professional Installations & Repairs Sod Installations

SAVE MONEY AND WATER

May 17, 2019M Tile

Tree Service

Thomas Flooring & Tile • All Types of Tile • • Granite-Ceramic • • Porcelain • • Natural Stone •Vinyl • •Bathroom Remodel•

32 Years Experience • Work Warranty

303-781-4919

Windows

ABE’S TREE & SHRUB CARE Abraham Spilsbury Owner/Operator

• Pruning • Removals • Shrub Maintenance • FreeEstimates Certified Arborist,Insured, Littleton Resident 720.283.8226 • C:720.979.3888 aspilsbury@msn.com

FREE Estimates

TOP WINDOW CLEANING #1 in Customer Satisfactions

10% OFF to NEW CUSTOMERS Over 20 Years Experience Insured / Bonded Call Today For A FREE Estimate Quality work guaranteed Gutter, Tree Trimming/Removal

720-400-6496 topwindowcleaning.net

ANYTHING TILE

Please Recycle this Publication when Finished

● Marble ● Repairs ● Granite Counter Tops Remodeling is my specialty! Call now for free estimate

(303) 646-0140

Fast, friendly service Lifetime Warranty! All Work Guaranteed!

www.sprinklersolutionscolorado.com

303-523-5859

Visit us online under the “Reader Services” tab to find locations to pick up your local paper P L A C E A D S O N L I N E 2 4/ 7 AT

www.ColoradoCommunityClassifieds.com

To Advertise call Karen 303.566.4091 ANNOUNCEMENTS

Misc. Notices A PLACE FOR MOM has helped over a million families find senior living. Our trusted, local advisors help find solutions to your unique needs at no cost to you. Call 855-741-7459 ____________________________ SAVE ON YOUR NEXT PRESCRIPTION! World Health Link. Price Match Guarantee! Prescriptions Required. CIPA Certified. Over 1500 medications available. CALL Today For A Free Price Quote. 1-866-293-9702 Call Now!

CASH FOR CARS: We Buy Any Condition Vehicle, 2002 and Newer. Nationwide Free Pick Up! Call Now: 1-800-8645960 ______________________________ Spectrum Triple Play! TV, Internet & Voice for $29.99 ea. 60 MB per second speed. No contract or commitment. More Channels. Faster Internet. Unlimited Voice. Call 1-877-338-2315

Denied Social Security Disability? Appeal! If you're 50+, filed for SSD and denied, our attorneys can help get you approved! No money out of pockets! Call 1-855-980-5461 _________________________________ Behind on your MORTGAGE? Denied a Loan Modification? Bank threatening foreclosure? CALL Homeowner Protection Services now! New laws are in effect that may help. Call NOW 1-844-2937187

kearhart@coloradocommunitymedia.com

Misc. Notices

BECOME A PUBLISHED AUTHOR! We edit, print and distribute your work internationally. We do the work... You reap the Rewards! Call for a FREE Author's Submission Kit: 866-951-7214 INVENTORS - FREE INFORMATION PACKAGE. Have your product idea developed affordably by the Research & Development pros and presented to manufacturers. Call 1-88-501-0236 for a Free Idea Starter Guide. Submit your idea for a free consultation. _______________________________ Financial Benefits for those facing serious illness. You may qualify for a Living Benefit Loan today (up to 50 percent of your Life Insurance Policy Death Benefit). Free Information. Call 1-855632-0124

Make a Connection. Real People, Flirty Chat. Meet singles right now! Call LiveLinks. Try it FREE. Call NOW: Call 1-877-737-9447 18+ WIDOWED MEN AND WOMEN OF AMERICA. A social club offering many exciting activities and life long friendships. Social hours for all areas of Metro Denver. Visit Widowedamerica.org for details In your area!

Garage Sales

Misc. Notices

DISH TV $59.99 For 190 Channels + $14.95 High Speed Internet. Free Installation, Smart HD DVR Included, Free Voice Remote. Some restrictions apply 1-800-718-1593 _________________________________

For Local News Anytim of the Day Visit OurColoradoNews.com

Colorado Statewide Classified Advertising Network To place a 25-word COSCAN Network ad in 91 Colorado newspapers for only $300, contact your local newspaper or call Colorado Press Association Network at 303-571-5117. WANTED

COLORADO PRESS ASSOCIATION NETWORK

Cash for Mineral Rights Free, no-risk, cash offer. Contact us with the details: Call: 720-988-5617 Write: Minerals, PO BOX 3668, Littleton, CO 80161 Email: opportunity@ecmresourcesinc.com

Buy a 25-word statewide classified line ad in newspapers across the state of Colorado for just $300 per week. Ask about our frequency discounts! Contact this newspaper or call Colorado Press Association Network 303-571-5117

FARM & AGRICULTURE

Garage Sales

Farm Products & Produce

Annual Meadowglen Garage Sale

Grain Finished Buffalo quartered, halves and whole

719-771-8742

Sell your merchandise on this page $25 for 2 weeks in 16 papers and online 303-566-4091

Sponsored by Community Realtor Dee Hodapp Friday, Saturday & Sunday May 17th, 18th & 19th 8am Community located surrounding 81st & Carr St Arvada

Castle Pines COMMUNITY GARAGE SALE May 17th & 18th 9am-2pm Over 100 Homes I-25 and Exit 188 www.cpnhoa.org Castle Rock

MOVING SALE Friday - Sunday May 17-19 8am 1948 Blue Sage Lane Castle Rock 80104 Power Tools, Furniture, New and Old Books 2 sets of dishes, Too much to list Downsizing Everything Must Go

Huge Annual Antique, Collectible & Horse Drawn Farm Equipment Sale Horse Drawn Farm Equipment, Wood Wheel Wagons, Buggy, Steel Wheels, Misc. Farm Tons of Collectibles Thurs-Sun May 30th, 31st & June 1st, 2nd 8:00AM-4pm 10824 E Black Forest Dr Parker 80138 720-842-1716 Littleton Multi Family Garage Sale Misc. Items, Glassware, Clothing, Friday & Saturday May 17 & 18 8am-2pm 4859 South Pierson Court Littleton

Local ads, coupons & deals are just one click away! C H E C K I T O U T AT:

ColoradoCommunityMedia.com


Parker Chronicle 35

May 17, 2019 Garage Sales

Estate Sales

Health and Beauty

FIRST ROUND ESTATE SALE

and your face still feels dry, tight and flaky or looks dull and ashy. Now what?

Parker

Multi-Family Garage & Furniture Sale

May 16th & 17th 8am-3pm 46649 Indian Brush Court Parker 80138 County Line & Delbert Furniture, Tools, Mis. Household Everything must go!

Thu-Fri, 5/16-5/17, 8a-6p Sat, 5/18, 8a-3p

We have FURNITURE GALORE!! Our PROFESSIONALLY RESTORED ANTIQUE FURNITURE features a stunning 100+ yr old Walnut Dining Table w/a built in leaf & 6 ornately carved chairs … a MUST- SEE! Also a 1930s Double Bed, beautiful Dressers, Highboys, Secretarys, Tables & much more … made of walnut, oak, mahogany wood! Our GARAGE SALE features 2 Roll-Top Desks in excellent condition, a Dining Table set w/6 chairs & matching small Hutch, a bedroom set w/5+ pcs. We have Clothes (all ages) - Kitchen - Linens - Home Décor - Craft Supplies Jewelry - Books - Sports - Electronics Toys, plus Home-Baked Goods!

Bicycles

Purchase one full regimen and receive free your choice of RODAN+FIELDS Sunless Tanner or Sunscreen SPF 30 (Offer good through July 31, 2019)

Medical New & Used Electric Bikes Starting at Only $899

Lakewood

Large Estate Sale 315 South Lee Street Lakewood (Alameda & Kipling) May 18th & 19th 9am-4pm Dishes, Antiques, Furniture, Matresses, Tools 2000 Buick Park Avenue Torro Mower battery start Books, Linens, Yard Tools and much more

1919 Federal Blvd, Denver, CO 80204

720-746-9958

BESTebikesUSA.com

Free Stuff 2000+ yards of very clean Dirt Not lose - No charge You need to remove Lakewood location 303-525-5256

Health and Beauty VIAGRA and CIALIS USERS! 100 Generic Pills SPECIAL $99.00 FREE Shipping! 100% guaranteed. 24/7 CALL NOW! 888-445-5928 Hablamos Espanol

www.ColoradoCommunityRealtors.com

To Advertise call Karen 303.566.4091

kearhart@coloradocommunitymedia.com

DENTAL INSURANCE. Call Physicians Mutual Insurance Company for details. NOT just a discount plan, REAL coverage for 350 procedures. 888-623-3036 or http://www.dental50plus.com/58 Ad #6118

Prince Street North of Main, CA zone district Mixed-Use office, medical/dental, health/wellness, retail. Several refurbished spaces still available from 150 to 1,200 Usable Sq Ft. Full Service Lease $24.00/ Sq Ft. including ample off street parking adjacent to building. Single level building with easy access throughout. Close to all things Downtown Littleton: Light-Rail (Littleton Downtown Station); Main Street Historic District restaurants, shops, services; Arapahoe County Administration Building; Littleton City Center.

Stew Meagher

COMMONWEALTH REALTY SERVICES 6025 South Quebec St . Suite 100, Centennial, C0 80111

303.908.1104 Direct voice/text 303.740.8100 DTC office

Commercial Property/Rent ®

ATTENTION OXYGEN THERAPY USERS! Inogen One G4 is capable of full 24/7 oxygen delivery. Only 2.8 pounds. FREE information kit. Call 877929-9587

Miscellaneous Cemetery Plot

Crown Hill Wheat Ridge 1 cemetery plot available $5000 if interested 303-422-1141 Mount Olivet in Wheat Ridge - Niche # 119 for two Cremains in the Circle Mausoleum; The first mausoleum built at Mt. Olivet In an open & peaceful area with easy access. Asking $6900 Call 303-422-3318 ME.

REAL ESTATE

Home for Sale Southwest Nebraska Home with 2 garages $45,000 cash, small town living in Fishing, Hunting, Boating and Retirement Community 970-472-5978

RENTALS

Fuller Real Estate, 5300 DTC Pkwy., #100 Greenwood Village, Colorado 80111

CEMETERY PLOTS FOR SALE: 2 Cemetery plots at Chapel Hill Cemetery, Littleton, CO. Plots located in Garden of Gethsemane. Price negotiable.

For Sale Clean 1969 Chevrolet El Camino Original 307/PH 350 $11,000 cash 303-549-4421

Contact Rhonda at 303/916-0502

Motorcycles/ATV’s

Wanted to Buy

Very Clean 1977 BMW 1000 cc's $2700 For more information lindarrellian@yahoo.com

Want To Purchase minerals and other oil/gas interests. Send details to: P.O. Box 13557 Denver, CO 80201

Wanted

Cash for all Vehicles!

PETS

Cars, Trucks, Vans, SUV’s Any condition • Running or not Under $500

(303)741-0762

TRANSPORTATION

Cell: (303)918-2185 for texting

Cash for all Vehicles!

CARS/TRUCKS WANTED!!! 2002 and Newer! Any Condition. Running or Not. Competitive Offer! Free Towing! We’re Nationwide! Call Now: 1-888-416-2330.

Bestcashforcars.com

Cars, Trucks, Vans, SUV’s Any condition • Running or not Under $500

DONATE YOUR CAR, TRUCK, BOAT, RV; Running or not, to www.developmentaldisabled.org Tax deductible! 303-659-1744. 20 years of service

(303)741-0762

Cell: (303)918-2185 for texting

Bestcashforcars.com

Home for Sale

SELL your home $ 2495

*when purchasing another home *1% fee if selling only *+ buyer agent co-op

Charles Paeplow

Free Market Evaluation No Upfront Fees M.L.S. Listing & Advertising Internet Advertising Professional Photography Showing & Feedback Service Sign & Lockbox Contracts & Negotiations Title Company & Escrows Settlement Representation Full Service Brokerage

20 Years Experience Best of the Best Realtor

720-560-1999 charlespaeplow@yahoo.com

Cornerstone Homes Realty

call, text, or e-mail

Misc. for Rent Find rentals at www.ForRentByOwner.com Or call us 303-663-0000 Dave Watts, Broker

www.FRBOPropertyManagement.com Located immediately off the I-70 & York St. exit, this 2,500 sq. ft. industrial space offers tremendous access. The space consists of 100% warehouse with one drivein door, 9’ ceilings and has two restrooms. Zoned I-A. For lease at $2,000/month plus utilities. Call Tanner Fanello, Brian Baker or Luke Maglio for additional information.

For sale 1971 Chevy truck, small trailer, snap on toolbox. Please call for pricing and pictures 720-308-6696.

______________________________

Income/Investment Property

Downtown Littleton Space For Lease

Donate Your Car to Veterans Today! Help and Support our Veterans. Fast FREE pick up. 100% tax deductible. Call 1-800-245-0398

Get ready for summer with RODAN+FIELDS multi-med therapies in four targeted regimens...

Contact: Linda Tobin Independent Consultant linda.tobin@yahoo.com

Our BBQ LUNCH starts at 11a with 1/3lb. Angus sirloin burger or brat plate for $5 or hot dog plate for $3.50. Shepherd of Love Fellowship 13550 Lowell Blvd., Broomfield (corner of 136th & Lowell Blvd.) Info: 303-466-5749 shepherdoflove.org

Autos for Sale

Winter's over

REDEFINE your dry, flaky skin REVERSE your dull, ashy skin and dark spots SOOTHE your sensitive, red rashy skin UNBLEMISH your adult acne break-outs

TEST RIDE A NEW YAMAHA ELECTRIC BIKE

Miscellaneous

Office Rent/Lease

I-70 & York Street Space For Lease

VARIOUS OFFICES 100-2,311 sq.ft. Rents from $200-$1750/month. Full service. 405-409 S Wilcox

www.FullerRE.com (303) 534-4822

Wasson Properties 719-520-1730

Castle Rock

Manufactured/Mobile Homes

New Manufactured Homes For Sale from Champion Homes in South Park Mobile Home Community in Englewood Colorado. Come see the new 960 Sq.Ft. 2 Bedroom, 2 Bath Model. 55+ Age restricted Community. Call for your appointment and pricing. Pets restricted.

303.761.0121


36 Parker Chronicle

May 17, 2019M

www.ColoradoCommunityMedia.com/Notices

PUBLIC NOTICES

Public Notices call Sheree 303.566.4088

legals@coloradocommunitymedia.com

County Warrents

Public Notice Commissioner’s Proceedings April 2019 Vendor Name 18TH JUDICIAL DISTRICT JUVENILE 18TH JUDICIAL DISTRICT VALE FUND 3M COMPANY AAPEXLEGAL SERVICES LLC ABSOLUTE GRAPHICS INC ACCLAIM SYSTEMS INC

$

ACORN PETROLEUM INC ADAMS COUNTY SHERIFF’S OFFICE ADAMSON POLICE PRODUCTS ADAPTIVE INTERVENTIONS ADVANCED PROFESSIONAL INVESTIGATIONS ADVANCED PROPERTY MAINTENANCE INC AET ENVIRONMENTAL AETNA HEALTH AGGREGATE INDUSTRIES AGING RESOURCES OF DOUGLAS COUNTY AGUILAR, ELIZABETH ALBERT FREI & SONS ALCOHOL MONITORING SYSTEMS INC ALDERTON, BEN ALEXANDER, MICHAEL D ALL ACCESS INC ALL ANIMAL RECOVERY ALLHEALTH NETWORK

Total 105,158.00 4,720.00 4,606.50 667.00 2,930.63 5,250.00 155,625.70 181.00 1,444.00 19,350.00 3,013.62 6,996.00 404.50 5,746.50 31,386.72 24,176.77 95.20 3,434.40 14,351.26 41.07 137.50 769.00 1,260.00 13,753.94

ALLIANT INSURANCE SERVICES INC ALLIED UNIVERSAL SECURITY SERVICES AM SIGNAL INC AMAILCO INC AMERICAN CIVIL CONSTRUCTORS AMERICAN DIVERSITY AMERICAN TOWER CORPORATION ANDREWS, CAROLYN ANSTETT, KARI LYNN

58,522.00 20,468.32 6,183.70 1,022.56 107,143.66 18,879.21 2,431.00 30.74 150.00

ANTHONY, ALISA APDC COLO LANGUAGE CONNECTION ARAMARK SERVICES INC ARAMARK SERVICES INC ARAPAHOE COUNTY HUMAN SERVICES ARAPAHOE COUNTY SHERIFF’S OFFICE ARAPAHOE/DOUGLAS WORKS

18.08 468.00 250.00 44,830.55 8,589.38 29.00 8,549.94

ARCHITERRA GROUP INC ARKADIN INC ARMOR CORRECTIONAL HEALTH SERVICES ARMORED KNIGHTS INC ASHWORTH, MARIA ASKINS, HAILEY ATTWOOD PUBLIC AFFAIRS AUBURN VENTURES LP AUT VENTURES AUTOMATED BUILDING SOLUTIONS AVERETT, ASHLEY AXIOM HUMAN RESOURCE SOLUTIONS AZTEC CONSULTANTS INC BALCOMB & GREEN BALDRIDGE, SAM BAROFFIO PSY D, JAMES R BASELINE ASSOCIATES INC BBVA COMPASS BCER ENGINEERING INC BEAUMONT, KAYDANNIELLE A BENNINGTON MERCANTILE BETTER DAY THERAPY BEYOND TECHNOLOGY INC BIERBAUM, PETER BJORK, PATSY BLACK HILLS ENERGY BLUE STAR POLICE SUPPLY LLC BOB BARKER COMPANY BOBCAT OF THE ROCKIES BOCEK, JANA BOHEMIAN SIGNS BORNHOFT, DAVID W BORNHOFT, JANINE BOSTROM, ERIK BOYD, CHRISTINE BRADBURY, ANDREA BRANNAN AGGREGATES BREAK THROUGHS INC BROKEN TREE COMMUNITY CHURCH BROPHY, CHRISTINA BROWN, BRIAN BROWN, JAMES CAIRY, MICHAEL CALUORI, PETER J CARVER MD, JOHN CASI COLORADO ASPHALT SERVICES CASTLE PINES CHAMBER OF COMMERCE CASTLE ROCK FIRE AND RESCUE CASTLE ROCK HOME CARE INC

20,481.80 8.86 214,731.25 2,115.60 265.52 201.61 7,000.00 984.00 37,500.00 1,920.00 200.91 174.00 6,650.00 6,686.81 650.00 36,165.00 980.00 81,594.00 7,500.00 214.95 5,230.00 195.00 6,120.25 89.90 261.70 45,357.38 450.00 2,923.84 9,591.94 25.00 50.00 4,998.50 3,104.68 49.77 500.00 90.78 51,434.73 2,715.00 1,762.26 290.25 115.00 107.64 394.30 132.55 16,665.00 2,405.20 1,000.00 100.00 1,742.00

Description Contributions Due to 18th Judicial Dist-VALE Sign Parts & Supplies Transcription Services Clothing & Uniforms/Office Supplies Software/Hardware Support/ Maintenance Fleet Tanks Fuel Process Service Fees Firearm Supplies Mental Health Services Investigation Services Other Repair & Maintenance Service Biohazard Waste Removal Employee Assistance Plan Aggregate Products & Asphalt Overlay Transit Solutions Program Travel Expense Aggregate Products Alcohol Monitoring Fees Metro Area Meeting Expense Travel Expense Other Repair & Maintenance Service Other Purchased Services Jail Based Behavioral Health Services Liability Insurance Security Services Detection Cameras Service Contracts Southern Connector Project Printing/Copying/Reports Building/Land Lease/Rent Travel Expense Fee Refunds - Community Justice System Travel Expense Other Professional Services Conference Hosting Expenses Inmate Meals Legal Services Process Service Fees Reimbursement for Community Services Parks & Recreation Improvement Telephone/Communications Medical, Dental & Vet Services Armored Car Services Travel Expense Travel Expense Lobbying Services Senior Transportation Program Analytic Predictive Risk Model Building Automation Services Travel Expense Computer Supplies Roads, Street, Drainage-Engineering Legal Services Veteran Stipend Mental Health Services Recruitment Costs Interest Roads, Street, Drainage-Engineering Travel Expense Clothing & Uniforms Mental Health Services Computer Supplies Travel Expense Metro Area Meeting Expense Utilities/Gas Clothing & Uniforms Prisoner Maintenance Supplies Other Machinery & Equipment Fee Refunds - Clerk & Recorder Other Professional Services Other Purchased Services Other Purchased Services Travel Expense Travel Expense Travel Expense Salt & Other Ice Removal Conference, Seminar, Training Fees Developmental Disabilities Mill Levy Grant Emergency Response Services Professional Membership & Licenses Travel Expense Travel Expense Fee Refunds - Clerk & Recorder Medical, Dental & Vet Services Asphalt & Asphalt Filler Professional Membership & Licenses Security Deposit Refund-Fairground Senior Homemaker/Personal Care Programs

CASTLE ROCK SENIOR CENTER CASTLETON CENTER WATER & SANITATION CBM CONSULTING CCAA-COLORADO COUNTY ATTORNEYS ASSOCIATION CCMSI CCMSI (FEE PAYMENTS ONLY) CCOM-CENTURA CENTERS FOR OCCUPATIONAL MEDICINE CCS PRESENTATION SYSTEMS CDW GOVERNMENT LLC CELEBRITY CUSTOM HOMES CELEBRITY DEVELOPMENT OF COLORADO LLC CENTENNIAL PRINTING CENTRAL SALT LLC CENTURA HEALTH CENTURY LINK CHATO’S CONCRETE LLC CHEMA TOX LABORATORY INC CHERRY CREEK BASIN WATER AUTHORITY CHOLEZ, BRIAN C CHRISTY, ROBERT CIANCONE, LAURA CINTAS CORPORATION CITY OF AURORA CITY OF AURORA CITY OF AURORA CITY OF CASTLE PINES CITY OF CASTLE PINES CITY OF LITTLETON CITY OF LITTLETON CITY OF LONE TREE CITY OF LONE TREE CL CLARKE INC CL CLARKE INC CLARK, JULIE CLAYTON-BYRD, CINDY COLORADO ASSESSORS ASSOCIATION COLORADO BARRICADE COMPANY COLORADO BOYS RANCH YOUTH CONNECT COLORADO BUREAU OF INVESTIGATION COLORADO CODE CONSULTING LLC

17,083.00 249.00 7,574.91 1,705.00 7,140.14 4,446.25

COLORADO DEPARTMENT OF REVENUE 2,716,584.74 COLORADO DEPARTMENT OF REVENUE 20,326.40 COLORADO DEPARTMENT OF STATE 11,320.00 COLORADO DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION 4,972.03 COLORADO DESIGNSCAPES INC 34,085.00 COLORADO INFORMATION SHARING CONSORTIUM 427.11 COLORADO JUDICIAL DEPARTMENT COLORADO PIPELINE REHABILITATION LLC

470.00 90,000.00

COLORADO SECRETARY OF STATE COLUMBINE PAPER & MAINTENANCE COMMUNITY SAFETY 1ST COMPASSCOM SOFTWARE CORP COMPUTRONIX INC COMSTOCK CONSULTING LLC CONTINUUM OF COLORADO CONTINUUM OF COLORADO CONTINUUM OF COLORADO

2.50 255.14 560.00 8,528.43 7,480.00 1,000.00 7,375.00 1,755.73 35,625.00

COOK STREET CONSULTING INC COOPERATIVE PERSONNEL SERVICES CORBETT, GERALD CORDANT HEALTH SOLUTIONS COSTAR REALTY INFORMATION INC

12,500.00 21,877.50 46.52 48.75 6,350.16

CPI GUARDIAN - CLEARWATER PACKAGING INC 1,338.16 CRISIS CENTER 31,250.00 CRISIS CENTER 14,723.84

CROWN TECHNOLOGY LLC CROWN TROPHY CORPORATE AWARDS CT LIEN SOLUTIONS CUB SCOUT TROOP #261 CUMMINS-ALLISON CORP CUSTOM ENVIRONMENTAL SERVICES INC DAVIS & STANTON DAVIS, IAN DAVIS, SARAH DAVIS, TAYLOR DAWN B HOLMES INC DANIEL OAKES HIGH SCHOOL DEERE & COMPANY

Conference, Seminar, Training Fees Workers Compensation Claims Review Fees/Bonds

1,545.00 Recruitment Costs 3,047.66 Software/Hardware Subscription 5,491.29 Lenovo Think Pads 2,500.00 Escrow Payable 16.00 Fee Refunds - Clerk & Recorder 254.00 Printing/Copying/Reports 109,578.30 Salt & Other Ice Removal 2,779.10 Medical, Dental & Vet Services 21,791.60 Telephone/Communications 314,100.02 Sidewalk Repair Projects 1,796.32 Medical, Dental & Vet Services 13,067.45 Due to State-Cherry Creek Basin 387.60 Travel Expense 134.40 Travel Expense 311.79 Travel Expense 14,850.00 Service Contracts 1,352.22 Contributions 21,198.15 Due to Aurora - Auto Use Tax 30,559.37 Intergovernmental-Aurora 59,140.55 Due to Castle Pines-Auto Use Tax 193,335.96 Intergovernmental-Castle Pines 3,647.24 Due to Littleton-Auto Use Tax 17,087.20 Intergovernmental-Littleton 3,685.17 Due to Lone Tree-MV License 934,284.31 Intergovernmental-Lone Tree 8,589.50 Other Professional Services 708.54 Travel Expense 5,000.00 Escrow Payable 181.28 Emergency Response Services 260.00 Conference, Seminar, Training Fees 1,679.20 Operating Supplies 2,351.00 Mental Health Services 9,539.50 Concealed Handgun Fee Remittance 1,300.00 Elevator Plan Review/Inspection Services 7,212.62 Newspaper Notices/Advertising 2,160.00 Conference, Seminar, Training Fees

COLORADO COMMUNITY MEDIA COLORADO COUNTIES INC COLORADO COUNTY WEED SUPERVISOR ASSOCIATION 50.00 COLORADO DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH & ENVIRONMENT 270.00 COLORADO DEPARTMENT OF HUMAN SERVICES 5,070.00 COLORADO DEPARTMENT OF HUMAN SERVICES 1,800.00 COLORADO DEPARTMENT OF HUMAN SERVICES 3,375.00 COLORADO DEPARTMENT OF REVENUE 536,581.77

CROSSPURPOSE

Senior Transportation Program Water & Sewer Other Professional Services

900.00 831.62 291.99 15.00 200.00 564.00 641.91 2,350.50 145.95 42.46 387.60 13,480.00 12.50 8,736.47

Professional Membership & Licenses Due to State-PH Marriage License Due to State-CO TBI Trust Due to State-HS Marriage License Intergovernmental Agreement Pledge Due to District-Specific Ownership Tax Due to State - Auto Use Tax Due to State -Drivers License Due to State - eRecording State-CDOT Contracted Snow Removal Software/Hardware Support/ Maintenance Due to State - Family Friendly Court Roads, Street, DrainageConstruction Due to State-Voter Confidentiality Janitorial Supplies Mental Health Services Cell Phone Service Other Professional Services Conference, Seminar, Training Fees Transportation Services Grant Fee Refunds - Clerk & Recorder Temporary Assistance to Needy Families Consulting Services Contract Work/Temporary Agency Travel Expense Medical, Dental & Vet Services Software/Hardware Support/ Maintenance Operating Supplies Contributions Reimbursement for Community Services Temporary Assistance to Needy Families Paint & Road Striping Other Repair & Maintenance Supplies Fee Refunds - Clerk & Recorder Security Deposit Refund-Fairground Other Repair & Maintenance Service Waste Disposal Services Employee Recognition Supplies Emergency Response Services Travel Expense Travel Expense Medical, Dental & Vet Services Security Deposit Refund-Fairground Cars, Vans, Pickups

DELVE, DEREK S 247.50 DENOVO VENTURES LLC 20,922.56 DENVER SOUTH ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT PARTNERSHIP 70,000.00 DESIGN CONCEPTS CLA INC 4,700.92 DETOMA, WILLIAM 134.92 DEVELOPMENT RESEARCH PARTNERS INC 1,850.00 DEVELOPMENTAL PATHWAYS INC 284,043.04 DIEXSYS LLC 17,208.00 DIMMICK, KARI 189.54 DISTRICT ATTORNEY 681,473.50 DLH ARCHITECTURE LLC 4,148.00 DODGE DATA & ANALYTICS 120.38 DOMINGOS, KYLE 186.78 DOUGLAS COUNTY DEPUTY SHERIFF’S ASSOCIATION 1,140.00 DOUGLAS COUNTY FAIR FOUNDATION 525.00 DOUGLAS COUNTY INMATE WELFARE ACCOUNT 3,600.00 DOUGLAS/ELBERT TASK FORCE DRAKE, NICOLE DUBOIS CHEMICALS INC DUDE SOLUTIONS INC DUDLEY, MELISSA DUMB FRIENDS LEAGUE DUNNING, KIRSTEN E3 SIGNS ECONOLITE CONTROL PRODUCTS INC EDGECONNEX HOLDING LLC EICH, BRIAN EIDE BAILLY LLP ELITE SPORTS LLC EMBASSY SUITES COLORADO SPRINGS EMBASSY SUITES HOTEL DENVER EMPIRE CARPENTRY EMPLOYERS COUNCIL SERVICES INC ENNIS-FLINT INC ENTERPRISE ENVISION IT PARTNERS EQUITY PROJECT LLC, THE ERO RESOURCES CORPORATION ER-SIMPLIFILE ESI LAND SURVEYING LLC ESKER SOFTWARE INC ESRI INC

5,979.25 649.00 5,670.00 3,315.00 278.34 5,109.00 639.00 15,474.20 2,233.92 24,498.19 387.60 98,940.00 100.00 7,455.00 918.00 4,875.00 219.00 4,843.88 489.95 6,066.73 4,950.00 5,596.15 73.09 1,375.00 2,703.42 156,000.00

EST INC 27,896.75 EVANS, SANDRA A 9,143.66 EVIDENT INC 498.22 EVINS, DONNA KAY 382.56 EWING IRRIGATION GOLF INDUSTRIAL 401.12 EXTRA PACKAGING LLC 2,965.39 EZ LINER INDUSTRIES 1,012.52 FACILITY SOLUTIONS GROUP 142.87 FASTENAL COMPANY 59.20 FEDEX 124.93 FELD, LORI 3,010.40 FELSBURG, HOLT AND ULLEVIG 49,362.65 FIRE ALARM SERVICES INC 6,670.00 FLASHBAY INC 2,046.00 FLOORZ LLLP 3,113.83 FOSTER AMERICA/TIDES CENTER 3,750.00 FOSTER, STUART 209.00 FOX, SARAH 63.80 FRAILEY ROOFING LLC 12,500.00 FRALEY, SUSAN 31.68 FRANKLIN D AZAR & ASSOCIATES PC 200,000.00 FRANKTOWN ANIMAL CLINIC 652.33 FRANKTOWN ANIMAL CLINIC 265.43 FREEDOM MOBILITY INC 29,980.88 FREMONT COUNTY SHERIFF’S OFFICE 38.21 FRIENDS OF THE NATIONAL RIFLE ASSOCATION 833.00 FRIESEN, JASON 387.60 GADES SALES COMPANY INC 1,050.00 GADZIALA, CAMILLE 169.87 GALLS LLC 15,032.10 GAME TIME 8,745.00 GANNETT FLEMING INC 22,871.90 GARTON-NORVELL, AUDRA 85.70 GIRARD, DAVID E 650.00 GMCO CORPORATION 96,800.00 GODDEN, GARY 84.70 GORMAN, THOMAS J 577.59 GORMAN, THOMAS J 14,146.83 GOUDY, MALISA 19.75 GRAINGER 415.61 GREY, TIFFANY 94.54 GRIFFEE, ROBERT L & KAREN L 299.07 GROUND ENGINEERING CONSULTANTS INC 33,033.50 H2O CAR WASH 875.00 HALLMARK, TIM 806.00 HANSEN, AMANDA 500.00 HANSON, TOMMY 134.40 HARRIS GOVERN FORT COLLINS USER GROUP 150.00

Instructor Travel Software Development Support 2019 Dues Parks & Recreation Improvement Travel Expense 3rd Quarter 2018 Economic Report Mill Levy Distribution Mar 2019 Roadway Safety Services Travel Expense Legal Services Parks & Recreation Improvement Newspaper Notices/Advertising Fee Refunds - Clerk & Recorder Security Services Cowboy Ball Tickets Other Professional Services/Booking Fees Reimbursement for Community Services Travel Expense Blower Motor Software/Hardware Subscription Travel Expense Other Purchased Services Travel Expense Signage Traffic Signal Parts 2018 BPPT Tax Rebate Travel Expense Accounting & Financial Services Clothing & Uniforms Student Travel Student Travel Property Maintenance Services Conference, Seminar, Training Fees Paint & Road Striping Travel Expense Software/Hardware Support/ Maintenance Other Professional Services Consulting Services Fee Refunds - Clerk & Recorder Other Professional Services Software/Hardware Support/ Maintenance Software/Hardware Support/ Maintenance Roads, Street, Drainage-Engineering Other Professional Services Operating Supplies Fee Refunds - Clerk & Recorder Operating Supplies Operating Supplies Equipment & Motor Vehicle Parts Operating Supplies Sign Parts & Supplies Postage & Delivery Service Other Professional Services Roads, Street, Drainage-Engineering Fire Systems Repairs/Inspections Recruitment Costs Carpet Replacement Other Professional Services Professional Membership & Licenses Travel Expense Repair & Maintenance Service Metro Area Meeting Expense Insurance Claims-Property Medical, Dental & Vet Services Operating Supplies Equipment & Motor Vehicle Parts Other Purchased Services Security Deposit Refund-Fairground Travel Expense Traffic-School Flasher Parts Travel Expense Clothing & Uniforms Parks & Recreation Improvement Roads, Street, Drainage-Engineering Metro Area Meeting Expense Other Professional Services Salt & Other Ice Removal Travel Expense Travel Expense Other Professional Services Travel Expense Operating Supplies Travel Expense Fee Refunds - Clerk & Recorder Construction Inspection Services Fleet Car Wash Services Tuition Reimbursement Tuition Reimbursement Travel Expense Professional Membership & Licenses

Continued to Next Page 935235

Parker Legals 5.17.19 1


Parker Chronicle 37

May 17, 2019

County Warrents Continued From Last Page: 935235 Page 2 of 2 HARTIG, JAMIE 517.53 HARTLEY, JOSEPH 2,346.50 HARVEY, MARLENE FLEMING 94.68 HC PECK & ASSOCIATES INC 3,028.00 HD SUPPLY CONSTRUCTION & INDUSTRIAL 479.08 HEALTH MANAGEMENT ASSOCIATES 18,127.50 HEALTHCARE MEDICAL WASTE SERVICES LLC 135.00 HEARD, JORDAN ALEXANDER 725.99 HELENA CHEMICAL COMPANY 170.00 HELTON & WILLIAMSEN PC 420.00 HEYDEN, BRADLEE 95.20 HICO DISTRIBUTING OF COLORADO INC 18.00 HILL RESEARCH CONSULTANTS 17,500.00 HIRERIGHT LLC 2,179.51 HITACHI DATA SYSTEMS 63,784.86 HML TRAINING INC 7,859.91 HML TRAINING INC 517.31 HODITS, SARAH 267.56 HOFSHEIER, TORI 104.64 HOME CARE ASSISTANCE OF DOUGLAS COUNTY 1,723.75 HOP SKIP DRIVE INC 1,426.16 HSS - HOSPITAL SHARED SERVICES 356.49 HUERTA, JENNIFER M 270.57 HUGHES, CLARENCE 23.80 HUMANE SOCIETY OF PIKES PEAK 34,975.00 HUTCHEON, IAN 224.00 ID INVESTIGATIVE SERVICES LLC 4,391.66 IDEAL FENCING CORP LLC 12,955.00 INFINITY HOME COLLECTION 5,000.00 INFOMEDIA INC 7,500.00 INSTRUQ LLC 200.00 INTEGRATED CLEANING SERVICES 36,024.45 INTELLECTUAL TECHNOLOGY INC 22,590.93 INTERNATIONAL CODE COUNCIL INC 98.40 INTOXIMETERS 266.50 IREA 169,486.56 IRON WOMAN CONSTRUCTION 2,500.00 ISC INC DBA VENTURE TECHNOLOGIES 9,655.15 ISC INC DBA VENTURE TECHNOLOGIES 7,600.00 J P MORGAN CHASE BANK 627,199.42 J P MORGAN CHASE BANK 737,690.23 JACOBS ENGINEERING GROUP INC 4,244.41 JAKUBOWSKI, MATTHEW 21.11 JAMES R PEPPER LLC 5,120.00 JAMS 2,142.50 JAROCKI, SAMANTHA 380.00 JAY DEE CLEANING & RESTORATION INC 4,650.00 JEFFERSON COUNTY HUMAN SERVICES 21,170.22 JOB STORE INC, THE 907.20 JOHN ELWAY CHEVROLET 259,274.00 JOHNSON AUTO PLAZA 427.38 JOHNSON, JOI 219.24 JOHNSON, STEVEN P 387.60 JOHNSTON, DAVID 43.16 JORDAN PHD, KENYON P 3,055.00 JWC ENVIRONMENTAL LLC 15,975.64 KAHAN, LIONEL 266.00 KANCIR, TYLER FOSTER 220.00 KANE, MICHELLE 242.96 KEN CARYL GLASS INC 6,988.00 KENNEDY - COLORADO LLC 13,322.30 KIEWIT INFRASTRUCTURE COMPANY 585.45 KIM, PETER 101.77 KIMLEY-HORN & ASSOCIATES 14,600.00 KINGSWAY CHRISTIAN ACADEMY 200.00 KLOTZ, MERLIN -- PETTY CASH 100.36 KNOTHEAD TREE AND LAWN CARE 8,385.00 KUBICZ, ELZBIETA J 388.38 KUBL GROUP LLC 2,250.00 KUCEWESKY, RANDY 348.38 L L JOHNSON DISTRIBUTING COMPANY 7,957.00 LABORATORY CORPORATION OF AMERICA 1,055.25 LANGUAGE TESTING INTERNATIONAL 180.00 LARIMER COUNTY 20.00 LAWSON CONSTRUCTION CO 2,500.00 LEE, LUANNE 16.70 LENNAR COLORADO LLC 2,500.00 LEVEL 3 COMMUNICATIONS 10,674.17 LEWIS, ROBERT D 165.00 LIGHTING ACCESSORY & WARNING SYSTEMS 641,208.90 LIVE FREE ASSOCIATION 1,482.50 LIVING CENTER LLC 380.00 LOANPAL OPERATING ACCOUNT 128.00 LOGAN COUNTY SHERIFF’S OFFICE 35.00 LOUVIERS WATER & SANITATION 437.53 LOWER DECK, THE 205.69 LOWNSDALE, JASON 236.50 LYLE SIGNS INC 1,125.00 LYLES, CELESTENE (TENA) 405.98 LYTLE WATER SOLUTIONS LLC 780.00 MADRIGAL, CESAR 266.00 MAKELKY, DAN 99.18 MALONEY, PATRICK 132.24 MARK VII EQUIPMENT INC 830.00 MARKUSFELD, ANDY 95.10 MARTIN, LESLEY 212.40 MASTER’S TOUCH, THE 30,500.00 MATABI, JOTHAM 621.06 MAY, CODY 168.00 MAZZA DESIGNS INC 830.00 MCCARTY, TROY A 278.53 MCINTOSH, MICHAEL 387.60 MERIDIAN METROPOLITAN DISTRICT 47.86 METRO MIX LLC 4,893.00 METRO TAXI 1,700.00 MILDREN, JODI B 421.66 MILLER WENHOLD CAPITOL 9,166.66 MILLER, THOMAS & BETH 182.59 MILLS, RANDY 37.92 MITCHELL, MICHAEL 187.40 MOHAWK RESOURCES LTD 34,674.45 MONTANA NARCOTICS OFFICERS ASSOCIATION 3,000.00 MONTROY SIGN & GRAPHIC PRODUCTS 1,080.00 MOON, JASON 4,346.50 MOORE, MICHAEL MOTOROLA SOLUTIONS INC MOUNTAIN VIEW ELECTRIC INC

82.00 765.31 250.00

Travel Expense Other Professional Services Travel Expense Right of Way Acquisition Services Other Construction Materials Mental Health Services Biohazard Waste Removal Fee Refunds - Clerk & Recorder Grounds Keeping Supplies Engineering Consulting Travel Expense Office Supplies Citizen Survey Recruitment Costs 2018 BPPT Tax Rebate Other Professional Services Travel Expense Travel Expense Travel Expense Senior Services Grant Student Transportation Services Security Services & Supplies Travel Expense Travel Expense Animal Control Services Travel Expense Other Professional Services Insurance Claims-Property Escrow Payable Support & Website Maintenance Conference, Seminar, Training Fees Cleaning Services ITI MV Kiosk Fees Payable Books & Subscription Operating Supplies Utilities/Electric Escrow Payable Computer Equipment Project Services PCard Purchases 02/05/19-03/04/19 PCard Purchases 03/05/19-04/04/19 Other Professional Services Metro Area Meeting Expense Roofing Inspections Other Purchased Services Travel Expense Other Professional Services Foster Care Collaborative Contract Work/Temporary Agency Cars, Vans, Pickups Fee Refunds - Clerk & Recorder Travel Expense Travel Expense Metro Area Meeting Expense Recruitment Costs Sewage Grinder Travel Expense Fee Refunds - Community Justice System Travel Expense Glass Repair & Maintenance Supplies Building/Land Lease/Rent Asphalt & Asphalt Filler Emergency Response Services Road Design Services Facilities Use Fees Employee Recognition Supplies Tree Trimming/Removal Services Instructor Travel Service Contracts Operating Supplies Commercial Landscape Equipment Forensic Testing Recruitment Costs Application Fee Escrow Payable Travel Expense Escrow Payable 2018 BPPT Tax Rebate Travel Expense Cars, Vans, Pickups Security Deposit Refund-Fairground Medical, Dental & Vet Services Fee Refunds - Clerk & Recorder Process Service Fees Water & Sewer Plan Checking Fees Travel Expense Sign Parts & Supplies Metro Area Meeting Expense Water Consulting Services Travel Expense Travel Expense Travel Expense Car Wash Supplies Travel Expense Fee Refunds - Clerk & Recorder Postage & Delivery Service Travel Expense Travel Expense Other Repair & Maintenance Supplies Travel Expense Travel Expense Water & Sewer Aggregate Products Transportation Services Grant Travel Expense Federal Lobbying Fee Refunds - Clerk & Recorder Travel Expense Travel Expense Fleet Machinery & Equipment Instructor Fee Computer Supplies Instructor Fee/Travel Reimbursement Emergency Response Services Repair & Maintenance Supplies Engineering Fee New Well

MOUNTAIN VIEW ELECTRIC INC MTM RECOGNITION MULLER ENGINEERING COMPANY INC MUNOZ, MARIA NARANJO CIVIL CONSTRUCTORS INC NATIONAL ELECTRICAL CONSTRUCTION INC NATIONAL MEDICAL SUPPLY INC NATIONAL WILD TURKEY FEDERATION NCAFC GROUP LLC NET TRANSCRIPTS NETSENTIAL.COM INC NEWMAN SIGNS INC NICOLETTI-FLATER ASSOCIATES NILEMO, KYLE NILEX INC NMS LABS NORRIS, AARON NORTHERN TRUST COMPANY NOVOTNY, ERIN F NULL, JASON H O’CONNOR SMITH, KATHRYN OFFERDAHL, BOB PACIFIC OFFICE AUTOMATION INC PAC-VAN INC PARKER SENIOR CENTER INC PARKER WATER AND SANITATION PARKISON, DONALD L PATRIOT CONCRETE PUMPING LLC PATRIOT ENTERPRISES INC PATTERSON REPORTING & VIDEO PATTERSON, DEBRA PATTERSON, SUSAN-PETTY CASH PAUP, BRANDON PAVLINEK, ERIC PEAK OFFICE FURNITURE INC PERKINELMER GENETICS INC PINERY HOMEOWNERS PINERY WATER & WASTEWATER DISTRICT PINYON ENVIRONMENTAL INC PITNEY BOWES INC PMI PIKES PEAK PORTER LEE CORPORATION

3,088.09 1,229.86 35,177.40 75.81 476,647.11 45,609.00 2,999.99 607.87 5,708.75 1,408.92 1,700.00 4,539.20 2,295.00 387.60 588.00 5,739.00 35.72 42.89 95.20 14.11 209.76 82.96 1,295.38 491.00 2,255.00 8,011.99 151.24 502.50 9,403.33 53.10 208.63 67.04 52.94 504.82 9,118.42 50.00 662.04 400.32 5,433.90 296.52 200.00 954.00

POWER EQUIPMENT COMPANY PRECISION DYNAMICS CORPORATION PRICE, GEORGE PRO COM - PRO COMPLIANCE PRO DISPOSAL & RECYCLING PUBLIC AGENCY TRAINING COUNCIL PUBLIC SERVICE COMPANY OF COLORADO PUBLIC TRUST ADVISORS LLC R.E. MONKS CONSTRUCTION RASTEH, RANA REAL TIME NETWORKS INC REDDING, TAYLOR REDWOOD TOXICOLOGY LABORATORY INC REMY CORPORATION REVISION INC

23,670.20 72.80 33.18 5,365.00 3,495.38 675.00 24.00 11,666.66 11,312.00 302.50 378.69 832.42 956.24 28,800.00 14,445.00

RIGHT ON LEARNING RIO GRANDE COMPANY RMAN-ROCKY MOUNTAIN ACCREDITATION NETWORK RMOMS-ROCKY MOUNTAIN OFFENDER MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS ROADSAFE TRAFFIC SYSTEMS ROBBINS, DEAN ROBENSTEIN, BRAD ROBERT HALF TECHNOLOGY ROBERTS, LUKE ROCK CHURCH, THE

16,000.00 1,395.00 250.00 3,020.00 269.32 104.00 106.95 6,640.56 236.50 2,486.80

Utilities/Electric Recognition Programs East West Regional Trail Project Travel Expense East West Regional Trail Project Lighting Heritage Regional Park Shower Chair for Disabled Security Deposit Refund-Fairground Other Professional Services Transcription Services Software/Hardware Support/ Maintenance Sign Parts & Supplies Medical, Dental & Vet Services Travel Expense Construction Materials Forensic Testing Metro Area Meeting Expense Printing/Copying/Reports Travel Expense Travel Expense Travel Expense Travel Expense Copier Charges Equipment Rental Senior Transportation Program Water & Sewer Travel Expense Other Professional Services Sewer Repair & Maintenance Legal Services Travel Expense Operating Supplies Fee Refunds - Clerk & Recorder Travel Expense Office Furniture Forensic Testing Security Services Water & Sewer Wetlands Monitoring Software/Hardware Support/ Maintenance Security Deposit Refund-Fairground Software/Hardware Support/ Maintenance Equipment Rental Operating Supplies Metro Area Meeting Expense Medical, Dental & Vet Services Waste Disposal Services Conference, Seminar, Training Fees Fee Refunds - Clerk & Recorder Accounting & Financial Services Southern Connector Project Travel Expense Repair & Maintenance Supplies Travel Expense Office Supplies Consulting Services Leadership Development Support Services Tutoring Services Construction Materials Professional Membership & Licenses

UA Testing Paint & Road Striping Travel Expense Travel Expense Contract Work/Temporary Agency Travel Expense Temporary Assistance to Needy Families ROCKSOL CONSULTING GROUP INC 21,535.35 Chambers Road Project ROCKY MOUNTAIN AIR SOLUTIONS 34.64 Operating Supplies ROCKY MOUNTAIN MAIL SERVICES 716.31 Postage & Delivery Service ROGGEN FARMERS ELEVATOR 748.25 Propane Gas ROTHERHAM JR, ROBERT H 540.20 Travel Expense ROXBOROUGH WATER & SANITATION DISTRICT 389.92 Water & Sewer RULLI, KYLE 51.62 Travel Expense RUTHERFORD, CEIJE 67.02 Emergency Response Services RYDERS PUBLIC SAFETY LLC 4,800.00 Clothing & Uniforms SAFETAC PUBLISHING 4,864.00 Instructor Fee SAFETY AND CONSTRUCTION SUPPLY 923.80 Sign Parts & Supplies SAFEWARE INC 41,814.62 First Responder Equipment SANCHEZ, SHAWN 85.00 Professional Membership & Licenses SANDLOT BASEBALL & SOFTBALL ACADEMY 200.00 Security Deposit Refund-Fairground SARAH LABOUNTY CONSULTING 752.07 Youth Services Coaching SARNO, NEIL 64.71 Operating Supplies SATHER, ELIZABETH L PSY D 1,500.00 Training Services - Booking Fees SCHENCK-KELLY, PAM 32.00 Travel Expense SCHEUBER & DARDEN ARCHITECTS 1,000.00 Other Professional Services SCHLEY, VICKIE 47.44 Travel Expense SCHMIDT, SANDY 1,633.50 Other Professional Services SCHRADER, ERIC J 134.40 Travel Expense SCHWARTZ, PATRICIA A 550.00 Other Professional Services S-COMM FIBER INC 28,510.00 Cable Installation SECURITY INSTALL SOLUTIONS INC 842.00 Other Repair & Maintenance Service SECURITY TRANSPORT SERVICES 8,150.05 Transportation of Prisoners SEDALIA LANDFILL 6,879.42 Waste Disposal Services SEDALIA WATER & SANITATION 3,632.00 Water & Sewer SEMPERA 13,567.50 Consulting Services SENTER, GOLDFARB & RICE LLC 8,171.00 Legal Services SHEA PROPERTIES LLC 148,990.40 Escrow Payable SHERMAN & HOWARD LLC 315.00 Other Professional Services SHILOH HOME INC 47,081.64 Building/Land Lease/Rent SHRED-IT 183.21 Waste Disposal Services SIGNAL BEHAVIORAL HEALTH NETWORK 1,427.68 Mental Health Services SIGNDESIGN 756.00 Fair Livestock Sale SILL-TERHAR MOTORS INC 38,250.00 Cars, Vans, Pickups SIOMA, STEVEN 100.92 Travel Expense SKY CLIFF CENTER 952.50 Transportation Services Grant SKYVIEW WEATHER 5,750.00 Weather Forecasting Services SLATE COMMUNICATIONS 1,611.00 Other Professional Services SLOAN, CURT 165.00 Travel Expense SMITH, KAREN A 600.00 Election Judges/Referee Fees SMITH, WILLIAM 18.91 Metro Area Meeting Expense SNOW LION 4,876.00 Equipment Rental SOCRATA INC 83,107.00 Software/Hardware Support/ Maintenance

SOURCE OFFICE PRODUCTS 7,871.66 Office Supplies SOUTH METRO FIRE RESCUE AUTHORITY 584.00 Building/Land Lease/Rent SOUTHERN COLORADO AUSTRALIAN BREED CLUB 44.00 Security Deposit Refund-Fairground SPECIAL MARKETS INSURANCE CONSULTANTS 8,580.00 Liability Insurance SPECIALIZED ALTERNATIVES FOR FAMILIES 1,125.18 Mental Health/Case Management Services SPYDERCO 187.00 Employee Recognition Supplies STADLER, BRANDY 157.47 Travel Expense STANLEY CONSULTANTS INC 20,187.50 Roads, Street, Drainage-Engineering STARCHASE LLC 20,829.12 Computer Equipment STARKEY, VICTORIA 58.84 Travel Expense STATE HEALTH DEPARTMENT 24.00 Printing/Copying/Reports STATE OF COLORADO 15,746.62 Postage & Delivery Service STATEWIDE INTERNET PORTAL AUTHORITY 10,366.40 Software/Hardware Support/ Maintenance STERICYCLE ENVIRONMENTAL SOLUTIONS 279.38 Operating Supplies STONE SECURITY 34,717.50 Video Management Software/ License STONEGATE VILLAGE METRO 884.39 Water & Sewer SUDS FACTORY CAR WASH & DETAIL CENTER 335.00 Fleet Car Wash Services SUMMERALL SMITH, DANIELLE 345.51 Travel Expense SUMMIT PATHOLOGY 358.50 Forensic Testing SUSO 4 ROXBOROUGH LP 11,041.96 Building/Land Lease/Rent T D MERTLICH INC 6,943.58 Other Professional Services T R TRAINING INC 5,708.75 Other Professional Services TAYLOR, VIVIAN A 10,872.91 Other Professional Services TECHNO RESCUE LLC 1,215.44 Operating Supplies TELERUS INC 750.00 Telephone/Communications TELLIGEN 2,041.66 Wellness Program TEZAK HEAVY EQUIPMENT CO INC 122,919.84 Pipe Rehabilitation/Pond Dredging THIESSEN, JANET 90.23 Emergency Response Services THIN LINE THREADS LLC 553.00 Clothing & Uniforms THOMAS, BRETT M. 39.55 Metro Area Meeting Expense THOMAS, LORA L 1,047.10 Travel Expense THOMPSON, STACY 187.50 Inmate Hair Care THOMSON REUTERS WEST 3,074.52 Software/Hardware Subscription TITAN LANDSCAPE MATERIALS INC 605.00 Fee Refunds - Clerk & Recorder TO THE RESCUE 4,770.00 Developmental Disabilities Mill Levy Grant TO THE RESCUE 1,810.00 Transportation Services Grant TOUCH PHRASE DEVELOPMENT LLC 11,471.38 Software/Hardware Support/ Maintenance TOWN OF CASTLE ROCK 478,694.97 Due to Castle Rock-Auto Use Tax TOWN OF CASTLE ROCK 1,145,962.20 Intergovernmental-Castle Rock TOWN OF CASTLE ROCK 500.00 Sponsorship TOWN OF CASTLE ROCK MILLER ACTIVITY 2,100.00 Employee Program Costs TOWN OF LARKSPUR 84.14 Due to Larkspur-MV License TOWN OF LARKSPUR 7,735.43 Intergovernmental-Larkspur TOWN OF PARKER 279,081.80 Due to Parker - Auto Use Tax TOWN OF PARKER 960,296.05 Intergovernmental-Parker TPM STAFFING SERVICES 541.01 Contract Work/Temporary Agency TRANSUNION RISK & ALTERNATIVE 600.60 Software/Hardware Support/ Maintenance ULINE 44.10 Operating Supplies UMB BANK 241.09 Banking Service Fees UMB BANK 30,100.00 Road Improvement Bond Interest UNCC-UTILITY NOTIFICATION CENTER OF COLORADO 2,338.74 Utility Notification Services UNIFIRST CORPORATION 886.72 Clothing & Uniforms UNITED RENTALS 450.00 Conference, Seminar, Training Fees UNITED REPROGRAPHIC SUPPLY INC 102.22 Operating Supplies UNITED STATES MARSHALS SERVICE 2,909.89 Sale of Seized Property UNITED STATES POSTAL SERVICE 235.00 Postage & Delivery Service UPS - UNITED PARCEL SERVICES 86.57 Postage & Delivery Service US BANK 4,513.36 Banking Service Fees US BANK EQUIPMENT FINANCE 295.00 Copier Lease Contracts VANCE BROTHERS INC 1,977.75 Asphalt & Asphalt Filler VERIZON WIRELESS SERVICES 657.70 Cell Phone Service VINCENT, BILL 42.68 Travel Expense VISA U.S.A. 350,652.89 2018 BPPT Tax Rebate VISITING ANGELS OF DENVER 3,364.00 Senior Services Grant VITAL RECORDS 20.00 Printing/Copying/Reports VONAGE BUSINESS 1,867.39 Telephone/Communications VOYAGES COUNSELING 825.00 Other Professional Services WAGNER EQUIPMENT COMPANY 61,338.00 Cars, Vans, Pickups WAGNER EQUIPMENT COMPANY 1,250.00 Equipment Rental WALPOLE, GAGE 387.60 Travel Expense WALZ, ELIZABETH 416.41 Travel Expense WASHBURN, CHRISTOPHER 266.00 Travel Expense WEITKUNAT, CURT 509.78 Travel Expense WELLS FARGO BANK 70,300.00 Interest WES TEST 940.00 Road Repair, Maintenance & Overlay WEST HEALTH ADVOCATE SOLUTIONS INC 2,333.20 Consulting Services WESTERN EQUIPMENT & SUPPLY CO 144.15 Operating Supplies WESTERN PAPER DISTRIBUTORS INC 684.12 Operating Supplies WESTERN STATES RECLAMATION INC 15,766.42 Erosion Control Supplies WESTSIDE TOWING INC 9,092.75 Vehicle Tow Services WETHERBEE, ERIN 489.75 Travel Expense WILDCAT SHOPPING CENTER LLC 10,035.82 Building/Land Lease/Rent WILLE, LACEY 387.60 Travel Expense WILLIAMS, CHRIS 165.00 Travel Expense WILMER, NICHOLAS SHAWN 210.53 Fee Refunds - Clerk & Recorder WILSON & COMPANY INC 14,569.67 Roads, Street, Drainage-Engineering WINSLOW, CODIE 50.46 Travel Expense WINTER EQUIPMENT COMPANY INC 107,221.96 Equipment & Motor Vehicle Parts WITTNER, MATTHEW E 346.50 Instructor Travel WIZ-QUIZ DRUG SCREENING SERVICE 360.00 UA Testing WIZ-QUIZ LAKEWOOD 20.00 UA Testing WL CONTRACTORS INC 2,878.00 Traffic Signal On-Call Service WOLLINS PC, DAVID H 10,000.00 Other Professional Services XCEL ENERGY 42,487.97 Utilities/Electric & Gas YAMADA, JILL - PETTY CASH DCSO 164.07 Operating Supplies YAVICH, HELEN 10.00 Professional Membership & Licenses YOUNG WILLIAMS PC 34,943.85 Contract Work/Temporary Agency ZAMBRANO, CARLOS 203.50 Travel Expense TOTAL AMOUNT OF DISBURSEMENTS FOR THE MONTH OF APRIL 2019

$ 16,859,826.97

THE ABOVE AND FOREGOING IS A CONDENSED STATEMENT OF THE BILLS APPROVED FOR PAYMENT DURING THE MONTH OF APRIL 2019 BY THE DOUGLAS COUNTY BOARD OF COMMISSIONERS UNDER WHOSE DIRECTION THIS NOTICE IS PUBLISHED. N. ANDREW COPLAND, CPA, DIRECTOR OF FINANCE Legal Notice No.: 935235 First Publication: May 16, 2019

Last Publication: May 16, 2019 Publisher: Douglas County News-Press

Please recycle this newspaper. Parker Legals 5.17.19 2


38 Parker Chronicle Public Trustees PUBLIC NOTICE Parker NOTICE OF SALE Public Trustee Sale No. 2019-0050 To Whom It May Concern: On 2/28/2019 3:13:00 PM the undersigned Public Trustee caused the Notice of Election and Demand relating to the Deed of Trust described below to be recorded in Douglas County.

Original Grantor: RUSSELL A. WALKER AND ANATASIA D. SHIVER Original Beneficiary: MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC. ACTING SOLELY AS NOMINEE FOR HOMEBRIDGE FINANCIAL SERVICES, INC. Current Holder of Evidence of Debt: NEWREZ LLC D/B/A SHELLPOINT MORTGAGE SERVICING Date of Deed of Trust (DOT): 5/20/2016 Recording Date of DOT: 5/24/2016 Reception No. of DOT: 2016032723 DOT Recorded in Douglas County. Original Principal Amount of Evidence of Debt: $353,380.00 Outstanding Principal Amount as of the date hereof: $340,944.98

Pursuant to C.R.S. §38-38-101 (4) (i), you are hereby notified that the covenants of the deed of trust have been violated as follows: Failure to pay principal and interest when due together with all other payments provided for in the Evidence of Debt secured by the Deed of Trust and other violations of the terms thereof. THE LIEN FORECLOSED MAY NOT BE A FIRST LIEN.

The property described herein is all of the property encumbered by the lien of the deed of trust.

Legal Description of Real Property: LOT 14, BLOCK 1, THE PINERY SOUTHWEST FILING 1A, COUNTYOF DOUGLAS, STATE OF COLORADO. Which has the address of: 5439 Ben Park Circle, Parker, CO 80134 NOTICE OF SALE

The current holder of the Evidence of Debt secured by the Deed of Trust described herein, has filed written election and demand for sale as provided by law and in said Deed of Trust.

THEREFORE, Notice Is Hereby Given that on the first possible sale date (unless the sale is continued*) at 10:00 a.m. Wednesday, June 19, 2019, at the Public Trustee’s office, 402 Wilcox Street, Castle Rock, Colorado, I will sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder for cash, the said real property and all interest of said Grantor(s), Grantor(s)’ heirs and assigns therein, for the purpose of paying the indebtedness provided in said Evidence of Debt secured by the Deed of Trust, plus attorneys’ fees, the expenses of sale and other items allowed by law, and will deliver to the purchaser a Certificate of Purchase, all as provided by law. If the sale date is continued to a later date, the deadline to file a notice of intent to cure by those parties entitled to cure may also be extended.

First Publication: 4/25/2019 Last Publication: 5/23/2019 Publisher: Douglas County News Press Dated: 3/4/2019 CHRISTINE DUFFY DOUGLAS COUNTY Public Trustee

The name, address and telephone numbers of the attorney(s) representing the legal holder of the indebtedness is: LISA CANCANON Colorado Registration #: 42043 11101 WEST 120TH AVENUE #280 Eldorado Bldg 2, BROOMFIELD, COLORADO 80021 Phone #: (303) 539-8601 Fax #: (303) 265-9628 Attorney File #: 47787307

*YOU MAY TRACK FORECLOSURE SALE DATES on the Public Trustee website : http://www.douglas.co.us/publictrustee/ Legal Notice No.: 2019-0050 First Publication: 4/25/2019 Last Publication: 5/23/2019 Publisher: Douglas County News Press PUBLIC NOTICE Parker NOTICE OF SALE Public Trustee Sale No. 2019-0055 To Whom It May Concern: On 3/5/2019 3:42:00 PM the undersigned Public Trustee caused the Notice of Election and Demand relating to the Deed of Trust described below to be recorded in Douglas County. Original Grantor: Hillary L. Turner and Bradley M. Turner Original Beneficiary: Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., as nominee for SWBC Mortgage Corp. Current Holder of Evidence of Debt: SWBC Mortgage Corporation Date of Deed of Trust (DOT): 8/26/2016 Recording Date of DOT: 9/8/2016 Reception No. of DOT: 2016061944 DOT Recorded in Douglas County. Original Principal Amount of Evidence of Debt: $328,000.00 Outstanding Principal Amount as of the date

and Bradley M. Turner Original Beneficiary: Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., as nominee for SWBC Mortgage Corp. Current Holder of Evidence of Debt: SWBC Mortgage Corporation Date of Deed of Trust (DOT): 8/26/2016 Recording Date of DOT: 9/8/2016 Reception No. of DOT: 2016061944 DOT Recorded in Douglas County. Original Principal Amount of Evidence of Debt: $328,000.00 Outstanding Principal Amount as of the date hereof: $316,701.16

Public Trustees

Pursuant to C.R.S. §38-38-101 (4) (i), you are hereby notified that the covenants of the deed of trust have been violated as follows: Failure to pay principal and interest when due together with all other payments provided for in the Evidence of Debt secured by the Deed of Trust and/or other violations of the terms thereof. THE LIEN FORECLOSED MAY NOT BE A FIRST LIEN. The property described herein is all of the property encumbered by the lien of the deed of trust. Legal Description of Real Property: LOT 12, BLOCK 1, STROH RANCH FILING NO. 9C, COUNTY OF DOUGLAS, STATE OF COLORADO. Which has the address of: 12726 Buckhorn Creek Street, Parker, CO 80134 NOTICE OF SALE The current holder of the Evidence of Debt secured by the Deed of Trust described herein, has filed written election and demand for sale as provided by law and in said Deed of Trust. THEREFORE, Notice Is Hereby Given that on the first possible sale date (unless the sale is continued*) at 10:00 a.m. Wednesday, June 26, 2019, at the Public Trustee’s office, 402 Wilcox Street, Castle Rock, Colorado, I will sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder for cash, the said real property and all interest of said Grantor(s), Grantor(s)’ heirs and assigns therein, for the purpose of paying the indebtedness provided in said Evidence of Debt secured by the Deed of Trust, plus attorneys’ fees, the expenses of sale and other items allowed by law, and will deliver to the purchaser a Certificate of Purchase, all as provided by law. If the sale date is continued to a later date, the deadline to file a notice of intent to cure by those parties entitled to cure may also be extended. First Publication: 5/2/2019 Last Publication: 5/30/2019 Publisher: Douglas County News Press Dated: 3/6/2019 CHRISTINE DUFFY DOUGLAS COUNTY Public Trustee The name, address and telephone numbers of the attorney(s) representing the legal holder of the indebtedness is: SCOTT TOEBBEN Colorado Registration #: 19011 216 16TH STREET SUITE 1210, DENVER, COLORADO 80202 Phone #: (720) 259-6710 Fax #: Attorney File #: 19CO00067-1 *YOU MAY TRACK FORECLOSURE SALE DATES on the Public Trustee website : http://www.douglas.co.us/publictrustee/ Legal Notice No.: 2019-0055 First Publication: 5/2/2019 Last Publication: 5/30/2019 Publisher: Douglas County News Press PUBLIC NOTICE Parker NOTICE OF SALE Public Trustee Sale No. 2019-0062 To Whom It May Concern: On 3/12/2019 12:32:00 PM the undersigned Public Trustee caused the Notice of Election and Demand relating to the Deed of Trust described below to be recorded in Douglas County. Original Grantor: SHARON K. ROSNIK AND SHARON K. ROSNIK AS TRUSTEE ON BEHALF OF THE JOHN AND SHARON ROSNIK LIVING TRUST Original Beneficiary: BOKF NA DBA COLORADO STATE BANK AND TRUST Current Holder of Evidence of Debt: BOKF NA DBA COLORADO STATE BANK AND TRUST Date of Deed of Trust (DOT): 12/22/2015 Recording Date of DOT: 12/31/2015 Reception No. of DOT: 2015092947 DOT Recorded in Douglas County. Original Principal Amount of Evidence of Debt: $190,000.00 Outstanding Principal Amount as of the date hereof: $161,615.01 Pursuant to C.R.S. §38-38-101 (4) (i), you are hereby notified that the covenants of the deed of trust have been violated as follows: the failure to make timely payments required under said Deed of Trust and the Evidence of Debt secured thereby. THE LIEN FORECLOSED MAY NOT BE A FIRST LIEN. The property described herein is all of the property encumbered by the lien of the deed of trust. Legal Description of Real Property: ALL THE FOLLOWING DESCRIBED LOT OR PARCEL OF LAND, SITUATE, LYING AND BEING IN THE COUNTY OF DOUGLAS AND STATE OF COLORADO, TO WIT: LOT 98, HIDDEN VILLAGE NO. 4 Which has the address of: 7375 Alpine Dr, Parker, CO 80134-6205

The property described herein is all of the property encumbered by the lien of the deed of trust. Legal Description of Real Property: ALL THE FOLLOWING DESCRIBED LOT OR PARCEL OF LAND, SITUATE, LYING AND BEING IN THE COUNTY OF DOUGLAS AND STATE OF COLORADO, TO WIT: LOT 98, HIDDEN VILLAGE NO. 4

Public Trustees

Which has the address of: 7375 Alpine Dr, Parker, CO 80134-6205 NOTICE OF SALE The current holder of the Evidence of Debt secured by the Deed of Trust described herein, has filed written election and demand for sale as provided by law and in said Deed of Trust. THEREFORE, Notice Is Hereby Given that on the first possible sale date (unless the sale is continued*) at 10:00 a.m. Wednesday, July 3, 2019, at the Public Trustee’s office, 402 Wilcox Street, Castle Rock, Colorado, I will sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder for cash, the said real property and all interest of said Grantor(s), Grantor(s)’ heirs and assigns therein, for the purpose of paying the indebtedness provided in said Evidence of Debt secured by the Deed of Trust, plus attorneys’ fees, the expenses of sale and other items allowed by law, and will deliver to the purchaser a Certificate of Purchase, all as provided by law. If the sale date is continued to a later date, the deadline to file a notice of intent to cure by those parties entitled to cure may also be extended. First Publication: 5/9/2019 Last Publication: 6/6/2019 Publisher: Douglas County News Press Dated: 3/15/2019 CHRISTINE DUFFY DOUGLAS COUNTY Public Trustee The name, address and telephone numbers of the attorney(s) representing the legal holder of the indebtedness is: STEVEN BELLANTI Colorado Registration #: 48306 7700 E. ARAPAHOE ROAD, SUITE 230, CENTENNIAL, COLORADO 80112 Phone #: (877) 369-6122 Fax #: Attorney File #: CO-19-848965-LL *YOU MAY TRACK FORECLOSURE SALE DATES on the Public Trustee website: http://www.douglas.co.us/publictrustee/ Legal Notice No.: 2019-0062 First Publication: 5/9/2019 Last Publication: 6/6/2019 Publisher: Douglas County News Press PUBLIC NOTICE Parker NOTICE OF SALE Public Trustee Sale No. 2019-0045 To Whom It May Concern: On 2/19/2019 3:57:00 PM the undersigned Public Trustee caused the Notice of Election and Demand relating to the Deed of Trust described below to be recorded in Douglas County. Original Grantor: RICH AIKEN Original Beneficiary: MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., AS NOMINEE FOR M&T BANK Current Holder of Evidence of Debt: M&T BANK Date of Deed of Trust (DOT): 12/15/2016 Recording Date of DOT: 12/16/2016 Reception No. of DOT: 2016092451 DOT Recorded in Douglas County. Original Principal Amount of Evidence of Debt: $382,936.00 Outstanding Principal Amount as of the date hereof: $371,051.76 Pursuant to C.R.S. §38-38-101 (4) (i), you are hereby notified that the covenants of the deed of trust have been violated as follows: Failure to pay principal and interest when due together with all other payments provided for in the Evidence of Debt secured by the Deed of Trust and/or other violations of the terms thereof. THE LIEN FORECLOSED MAY NOT BE A FIRST LIEN. The property described herein is all of the property encumbered by the lien of the deed of trust. Legal Description of Real Property: LOT 4, BLOCK 3, THE PINERY, FILING NO. 3-C, COUNTY OF DOUGLAS, STATE OF COLORADO Which has the address of: 6409 Mountain View Drive, Parker, CO 80134 NOTICE OF SALE The current holder of the Evidence of Debt secured by the Deed of Trust described herein, has filed written election and demand for sale as provided by law and in said Deed of Trust. THEREFORE, Notice Is Hereby Given that on the first possible sale date (unless the sale is continued*) at 10:00 a.m. Wednesday, June 12, 2019, at the Public Trustee’s office, 402 Wilcox Street, Castle Rock, Colorado, I will sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder for cash, the said real property and all interest of said Grantor(s), Grantor(s)’ heirs and assigns therein, for the purpose of paying the indebtedness provided in said Evidence of Debt secured by the Deed of Trust, plus attorneys’ fees, the expenses of sale and other items allowed by law, and will deliver to the purchaser a Certificate of Purchase, all as provided by law. If the sale date is continued to a later date, the deadline to file a notice of intent to cure by those parties entitled to cure may also be extended. First Publication: 4/18/2019 Last Publication: 5/16/2019 Publisher: Douglas County News Press

therein, for the purpose of paying the indebtedness provided in said Evidence of Debt secured by the Deed of Trust, plus attorneys’ fees, the expenses of sale and other items allowed by law, and will deliver to the purchaser a Certificate of Purchase, all as provided by law. If the sale date is continued to a later date, the deadline to file a notice of intent to cure by those parties entitled to cure may also be extended.

Public Trustees

First Publication: 4/18/2019 Last Publication: 5/16/2019 Publisher: Douglas County News Press Dated: 2/20/2019 CHRISTINE DUFFY DOUGLAS COUNTY Public Trustee The name, address and telephone numbers of the attorney(s) representing the legal holder of the indebtedness is: SCOTT TOEBBEN Colorado Registration #: 19011 216 16TH STREET SUITE 1210, DENVER, COLORADO 80202 Phone #: (720) 259-6710 Fax #: Attorney File #: 19CO00054-1 *YOU MAY TRACK FORECLOSURE SALE DATES on the Public Trustee website: http://www.douglas.co.us/publictrustee/ Legal Notice No.: 2019-0045 First Publication: 4/18/2019 Last Publication: 5/16/2019 Publisher: Douglas County News Press

PUBLIC NOTICE Parker NOTICE OF SALE Public Trustee Sale No. 2019-0053 To Whom It May Concern: On 3/5/2019 2:42:00 PM the undersigned Public Trustee caused the Notice of Election and Demand relating to the Deed of Trust described below to be recorded in Douglas County. Original Grantor: RITA M PREDMORE Original Beneficiary: NATIONAL CITY BANK Current Holder of Evidence of Debt: THE NEARGLEN GROUP, INC Date of Deed of Trust (DOT): 8/3/2005 Recording Date of DOT: 8/15/2005 Reception No. of DOT: 2005076490 DOT Recorded in Douglas County. Original Principal Amount of Evidence of Debt: $46,950.00 Outstanding Principal Amount as of the date hereof: $45,805.85 Pursuant to C.R.S. §38-38-101 (4) (i), you are hereby notified that the covenants of the deed of trust have been violated as follows: Failure to pay principal and interest when due together with all other payments provided for in the Evidence of Debt secured by the Deed of Trust and other violations of the terms thereof.

May 17, 2019M Public Trustees PUBLIC NOTICE Parker NOTICE OF SALE Public Trustee Sale No. 2019-0057

To Whom It May Concern: On 3/5/2019 3:46:00 PM the undersigned Public Trustee caused the Notice of Election and Demand relating to the Deed of Trust described below to be recorded in Douglas County.

Original Grantor: Cindy J Goyette and Timothy B Goyette Original Beneficiary: Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. as nominee for Freedom Mortgage Corporation, its successors and assigns Current Holder of Evidence of Debt: Freedom Mortgage Corporation Date of Deed of Trust (DOT): 2/15/2018 Recording Date of DOT: 3/1/2018 Reception No. of DOT: 2018012049 DOT Recorded in Douglas County. Original Principal Amount of Evidence of Debt: $433,374.00 Outstanding Principal Amount as of the date hereof: $430,161.06

Pursuant to C.R.S. §38-38-101 (4) (i), you are hereby notified that the covenants of the deed of trust have been violated as follows: failure to make timely payments as required under the Evidence of Debt and Deed of Trust.

THE LIEN FORECLOSED MAY NOT BE A FIRST LIEN.

The property described herein is all of the property encumbered by the lien of the deed of trust.

Legal Description of Real Property: LOT 59, STONEGATE FILING NO. 21B, COUNTY OF DOUGLAS, STATE OF COLORADO. Which has the address of: 10259 Riverstone Dr, Parker, CO 80134 NOTICE OF SALE

The current holder of the Evidence of Debt secured by the Deed of Trust described herein, has filed written election and demand for sale as provided by law and in said Deed of Trust.

Legal Description of Real Property: LOT 22, COTTONWOOD SUBDIVISION FILING NO. 10, COUTNY OF DOUGLAS, STATE OF COLORADO.

THEREFORE, Notice Is Hereby Given that on the first possible sale date (unless the sale is continued*) at 10:00 a.m. Wednesday, June 26, 2019, at the Public Trustee’s office, 402 Wilcox Street, Castle Rock, Colorado, I will sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder for cash, the said real property and all interest of said Grantor(s), Grantor(s)’ heirs and assigns therein, for the purpose of paying the indebtedness provided in said Evidence of Debt secured by the Deed of Trust, plus attorneys’ fees, the expenses of sale and other items allowed by law, and will deliver to the purchaser a Certificate of Purchase, all as provided by law. If the sale date is continued to a later date, the deadline to file a notice of intent to cure by those parties entitled to cure may also be extended.

Which has the address of: 16902 Dandelion Way, Parker, CO 80134

First Publication: 5/2/2019 Last Publication: 5/30/2019 Publisher: Douglas County News Press

THE LIEN FORECLOSED MAY NOT BE A FIRST LIEN. The property described herein is all of the property encumbered by the lien of the deed of trust.

NOTICE OF SALE The current holder of the Evidence of Debt secured by the Deed of Trust described herein, has filed written election and demand for sale as provided by law and in said Deed of Trust. THEREFORE, Notice Is Hereby Given that on the first possible sale date (unless the sale is continued*) at 10:00 a.m. Wednesday, July 3, 2019, at the Public Trustee’s office, 402 Wilcox Street, Castle Rock, Colorado, I will sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder for cash, the said real property and all interest of said Grantor(s), Grantor(s)’ heirs and assigns therein, for the purpose of paying the indebtedness provided in said Evidence of Debt secured by the Deed of Trust, plus attorneys’ fees, the expenses of sale and other items allowed by law, and will deliver to the purchaser a Certificate of Purchase, all as provided by law. If the sale date is continued to a later date, the deadline to file a notice of intent to cure by those parties entitled to cure may also be extended. First Publication: 5/9/2019 Last Publication: 6/6/2019 Publisher: Douglas County News Press Dated: 3/5/2019 CHRISTINE DUFFY DOUGLAS COUNTY Public Trustee The name, address and telephone numbers of the attorney(s) representing the legal holder of the indebtedness is: NICHOLE WILLIAMS Colorado Registration #: 49611 1199 BANNOCK STREET, DENVER, COLORADO 80204 Phone #: (303) 350-3711 Fax #: Attorney File #: 00000008128720 *YOU MAY TRACK FORECLOSURE SALE DATES on the Public Trustee website : http://www.douglas.co.us/publictrustee/ Legal Notice No.: 2019-0053 First Publication: 5/9/2019 Last Publication: 6/6/2019 Publisher: Douglas County News Press

Dated: 3/6/2019 CHRISTINE DUFFY DOUGLAS COUNTY Public Trustee

The name, address and telephone numbers of the attorney(s) representing the legal holder of the indebtedness is: TONI M. OWAN Colorado Registration #: 30580 355 UNION BLVD SUITE 250, LAKEWOOD, COLORADO 80228 Phone #: (303) 274-0155 Fax #: Attorney File #: 80912-FMC

*YOU MAY TRACK FORECLOSURE SALE DATES on the Public Trustee website: http://www.douglas.co.us/publictrustee/ Legal Notice No.: 2019-0057 First Publication: 5/2/2019 Last Publication: 5/30/2019 Publisher: Douglas County News Press

City and County Public Notice DOUGLAS COUNTY NOTICE OF PUBLIC MEETING

The US Department of Agriculture Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS), with assistance from local watershed sponsors, has completed a draft watershed plan supplement and environmental assessment (EA) for the proposed rehabilitation of Floodwater Retarding Structure (FRS) No. FP- B1 of the FranktownParker (Baldwin Gulch) Watershed, Douglas County (Baldwin Gulch Dam No. FP- B1). The sponsoring local organization for the project is: Douglas County Board of Commissioners A public meeting is scheduled for: PINE LANE INTERMEDIATE SCHOOL (CAFETERIA) 6485 E. PONDEROSA DRIVE PARKER, CO 80138 MAY 30, 2019 5:30 PM to 6:30 PM; MST

Parker Legals 5.17.19 3


Psychological Father of Javonte Johnson; BRANDON JOHNSON, D.O.B.: 6/29/1989, Possible Father of Javonte Johnson, Legal Custodian of Javonte Johnson; EMANUEL POLIDORE, a/k/a EMMANUAEL POLIDOR a/k/a IMMANUEL POLIDOR a/k/a EMANNUEL PLIDOR a/k/a IMANUEL POLIDOR, possible father of Javonte Johnson, and JOHN DOE, Possible Father of Javonte Johnson, Respondents;

May 17, 2019

Parker Chronicle 39

South metro teams advance in girls lacrosse tourney STAFF REPORT

Cherry Creek, Valor Christian and Regis Jesuit notched second-round victories in the CHSAA girls state lacrosse tournament and advanced to the May 15 quarterfinals. Junior Amelia McCar-

thy had four goals, while senior Katie Collins, freshman Molly Threlkeld and junior Morgan Haws each had three in second-seeded Creek’s 18-6 win over Mullen on May 10. Fifth-seeded Valor used four goals in the second half to complete a rally that

resulted in a 9-8 win over ThunderRidge in a May 11 contest. Freshman Tess Osburn, sophomore Payton Cheedle and sophomore Lauren Rismani had two goals apiece in the Eagles’ win. Regis, seeded sixth, jumped to a 12-2 halftime

and AMANDA HORVET, (Children’s God Mother), and SEAN GOODMAN, lead and didn’t let up in a (Fiancé of Amanda Horvet), Special Respondents. 21-3 win over Chaparral on

May 11. Attorney for Department: John Thirkell, #13865 Semifinal games will be Thomas Joaquin, #30941 4400 Castleton played MayCt.18 at the UniCastle Rock, CO 80109 versity of Denver, with the (303) 663-7726 Fax 877-285-8988 championship game set for jthirkel@douglas.co.us tjoaquin@douglas.co.us May 22 at DU. CASE NUMBER: 18JV233 DIVISION 7 Top-seeded Colorado AcadDEPENDENCY SUMMONS JOHN DOE emy, whichTO: played Fairview

in the quarterfinals, is the four-time defending champion and had won five state championships. Creek had played in the championship game in all 21 CHSAA girlsPublic stateNotice lacrosse contests and the Bruins have NOTICE OF PURCHASE OF REAL ESTATE won titles and been AT 10 TAXstate LIEN SALE AND OF APPLICATION ISSUANCE OF TREASURER’S DEED theFOR state runner-up 11 times.

This Summons is initiated pursuant to Rule 2.2 of the Colorado Rules of Juvenile Procedure, Rule 4 of the Colorado Rules of Civil Procedure, and Section 19-3-503, C.R.S. 2018.

To Every Person in Actual Possession or Occupancy of the hereinafter Described Land, Lot or Premises, and to the Person in Whose Name the Same was Taxed or Specially Assessed, and to all Persons having an Interest or Title of You are hereby notified that a petition has been Record in or to the said Premises and To Whom filed which alleges that the above-namedPachner, chilIt May Concern, andthe morehead especially to: who was coach is the new head boys basketball coach at parkerrec.com and for further dren are dependent or neglected as per the 17 seasons at D’Evelyn, wasSTEELE & information contact Marcus Mason at at Valor Christian. facts set forth in the Dependency andfor Neglect OCCUPANT - LOIS LOREE Petition, which can be obtained by contacting NANCY LOREE EARLS - LOIS LOREE head basketball Kuhle served 13 seasons as an Air Douglasnamed 303-921-5302. Thomas J. Joaquin, Assistant County the STEELE AS boys PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVE Attorney, contact information is in the caption. OF THE ESTATE He OF ALBERT LEE STEELE coach at Arapahoe. take over for Force and University of Denver assisFROM PAGE 27 LOIS LOREE STEELE AND NANCY LOREE Brad Jansen was 40-82 in- five tant basketball coach and spent one for Emanuel New basketball coaches An Adju dicatory Hearing Public Notice EARLSwho AS CO-TRUSTEES DOUGLAS Polidoreat and John has been scheduled O Uthe N T YWarriors’ - H A I C O Nhead SULTIN G INC season as head coach De LaDoe Salle at Valor, Arapahoe The inaugural Derrick White seasons CGRACETON as mentor. on July 1, 2019 at 9:00 a.m. in Division 7, DOUGLAS COUNTY LP - GEORGE E STEELE Douglas County District Court, 4000 Justice NOTICE OF PUBLIC MEETING (Calif.) high school. There was some movement in the Basketball Academy will be held ROBERT E STEELE - ARZELLA L STEELE Way, Castle Rock, Colorado, 80109. ROBERT M STEELE - CAROL A KATES His wife, Lindsay (Hulwick) is a ranks of head basketball coaches in June 24-27 at ofthe Parker Fieldhouse Jim Benton is a sports for The US Department Agriculture Natural LOIS LOREE STEELE writer AS CO-TRUSTEE Your presence this court is required to Resources Conservation Service (NRCS), with NANCY LOREE EARLS AS CO-TR USTEE graduate of Heritage Highbefore School the past week. with boys and girls aged 6-10 playing Colorado Community Media. He has defend against the claims in this petition. IF assistance from local watershed sponsors, has AKA NANCY L EARLS - JANET L ROBERTS and is the women’s coach at DU. A.J. Kuhle, the former team captain between 9 a.m. and plan noon and players been in the Denver YOU golf FAIL TO APPEAR, THE COURT WILLcovering completed a draft watershed supplement CAROL Asports KATES AKA CAROL ANN KATES PROCEED IN YOUR ABSENCE, WITHOUT and environmental assessment (EA) for the proROBERT MHe STEELE AS reached CUSTODIAN Kuhle replaces Troy Pachner, who and Most Valuable Player on the Air aged 11-17 participating between 1 area since 1968. can be atFOR FURTHER NOTICE, TO CONDUCT AN ADJUposed rehabilitation of Floodwater Retarding SETH D STEELE, EMILY K STEELE AND ALHEARING AND MAY ENTER A Structure (FRS) No. FP- B1 of the FranktownISON R STEELE UNDER THE COLORADO compiled a 77-29 DICATORY record in four seaForce Academy’s 2003-04 Mountain p.m. and 4 p.m. jbenton@coloradocommunitymedia. JUDGMENT BY DEFAULT THEREBY ADJUParker (Baldwin Gulch) Watershed, Douglas Public Notice UNIFORM GIFTS TO MINORS ACT CREcoach. West Conference championship team, sons as Valor’s head com or atATED 303-566-4083. Interested players register DICATING YOUR CHILDREN AS DEPENDCounty (Baldwin Gulch Dam No.can FP- B1). The BY 73 C.R.S. 11-50-101 - CAROL A ENT OR NEGLECTED CHILDREN. sponsoring local organization for the project is: DOUGLAS COUNTY DISTRICT COURT, KATES AS CUSTODIAN FOR JENNIFER E STATE OF COLORADO KATES AND BRIAN M KATES UNDER THE You have the right to request a trial by jury at Douglas County Board of Commissioners 4000 Justice Way, Castle Rock, CO COLORADO UNIFORM GIFTS TO MINORS the adjudicatory stage of this petition. You also Douglas County, CO 80109 ACT CREATED BY 73 C.R.S. 11-50-101 - MDC have the right to legal representation at every A public meeting is scheduled for: LAND CORPORATION A COLORADO CORstage of the proceedings by counsel of your own THE PEOPLE OF THE STATE PORATION - MDC LAND CORPORATION A choosing, or if you are without sufficient finanPINE LANE INTERMEDIATE SCHOOL OF COLORADO COLORADO CORPORATION C/O THE CORcial means, appointment of counsel by the (CAFETERIA) PORATION COMPANY REGISTERED AGENT Court. Termination of your parent-child legal re6485 E. PONDEROSA DRIVE In the Interest of: - JERRY C STEELE AKA JERALD C STEELE lationship to free your children for adoption is a PARKER, CO 80138 Public Notice CAMERON JORDAN, D.O.B.: 3/22/2015; and - SETH D STEELE - EMILY K STEELE AKA JAVONTE JOHNSON, D.O.B.: 4/21/2008, MAY 30, 2019 possible remedy in this proceeding. If that remEMILY KRISTINE STEELE AKA EMILY Children, 5:30 PM to 6:30 PM; MST edy is pursued, you are entitled to a hearing beNOTICE OF PURCHASE OF REAL ESTATE KRISTINE DUNN - ALISON R STEELE AKA fore a Judge. You also have the right, if you are AT TAX LIEN SALE AND OF APPLICATION ALISON RENEE STEELE - JENNIFER E And concerning: The public meeting is to seek input regarding indigent, to have the Court appoint, at no exFOR ISSUANCE OF TREASURER’S DEED KATES AKA JENNIFER ELLEN KATES - BRIRACHEL JORDAN, f/k/a RACHEL JOHNSON Watershed Project Plan Supplement No. 1 and pense to you, one expert witness of your own AN M KATES - CAROL A KATES, TRUSTEE and RACHEL BISHOP, D.O.B.: 7/03/1991, choosing at any hearing on the termination of Environmental Assessment (EA). A copy of the To Every Person in Actual Possession or OccuOF THE STEELE FAMILY TRUST - GEORGE Mother; completed document and this public notice may your parent-child relationship. If you are a minor, pancy of the hereinafter Described Land, Lot or E STEELE AS ATTORNEY IN FACT FOR WALLACE JORDAN, D.O.B.: 7/17/1989, be downloaded for review from the links below. you have the right to the appointment of a ROBERT M STEELE - GEORGE E STEELE Father of Cameron Jordan and Public comments will be accepted at the public Guardian ad litem to represent your best inPremises, and to the Person in Whose Name AS ATTORNEY IN FACT FOR CAROL A Psychological Father of Javonte Johnson; terests. hearing held on May 30, 2019 or submitted in the Same was Taxed or Specially Assessed, KATES - GEORGE E STEELE AS ATTORNEY BRANDON JOHNSON, D.O.B.: 6/29/1989, writing (see instructions below). and to all Persons having an Interest or Title of IN FACT FOR LOIS LOREE STEELE, CORecord in or to the said Premises and To Whom Possible Father of Javonte Johnson, You have the right to have this matter heard by TRUSTEE - GEORGE E STEELE AS ATTORIt May Concern, and more especially to: Legal Custodian of Javonte Johnson; a district court judge rather than by the magishttps://www.douglas.co.us/water/floodNEY IN FACT FOR NANCY LOREE EARLS EMANUEL POLIDORE, a/k/a EMMANUAEL trate. You may waive that right, and in doing so, control/baldwin-gulch-dam/ AS CO-TRUSTEE - GEORGE E STEELE AS OCCUPANT - GETRADO LIMITED POLIDOR a/k/a IMMANUEL POLIDOR a/k/a you will be bound by the findings and recomATTORNEY IN FACT FOR JERRY C STEELE ANTHONY S NOWAK - HAI CONSULTING EMANNUEL PLIDOR a/k/a IMANUEL mendations of the magistrate, subject to review The project is a federally assisted action authorGEORGE E STEELE AS ATTORNEY IN FACT INC - GRACETON LP - JEFFREY A WEINPOLIDOR, possible father of as provided by sec. 19-1-108(5.5), C.R.S. 2018, ized by section 14 of the Watershed Protection FOR NANCY L EARLS - GEORGE E STEELE MAN AS DULY QUALIFIED AND ACTING Javonte Johnson, and JOHN DOE, Possible and Flood Prevention Act, 16 U.S.C. Section and subsequently, to the right of appeal as AS ATTORNEY IN FACT FOR JANET L CHAPTER 7 BANKRUPTCY TRUSTEE OF Father of Javonte Johnson, Respondents; provided by Colorado Appellate Rule 3.4. 1012, as amended by section 313 of Public Law ROBERTS - GEORGE E STEELE AS ATTORTHE ESTATE OF GENE C GEIGER AKA 106-472. This section authorizes NRCS to NEY IN FACT FOR ROBERT M STEELE AS This summons is being initiated by the Douglas provide technical and financial assistance to locEUGENE GEIGER - GETRADO LIMITED A and AMANDA HORVET, CUSTODIAN FOR SETH D STEELE, EMILY K County Department of Human Services through al sponsors for rehabilitation of aging dams conBRITISH VIRGIN ISLANDS COMPANY C/O (Children’s God Mother), and STEELE AND ALISON R STEELE UNDER its counsel. structed under the Watershed Protection and DENNIS BROVARONE ATTORNEY AT LAW SEAN GOODMAN, THE COLORADO UNIFORM GIFTS TO Flood Prevention Act (Public Law 83-566). (Fiancé of Amanda Horvet), MINORS ACT CREATED BY 73 C.R.S. 11-50Dated: You and each of you are hereby notified that on Special Respondents. 101 - GEORGE E STEELE AS ATTORNEY IN Thomas J. Joaquin, #30941 FP B1 Dam was originally built in 1963 for the the 6th day of November 2014 the then County FACT FOR CAROL A KATES AS CUSTODIAssistant Douglas County Attorney primary authorized purpose of flood prevention Treasurer of the County of Douglas, in the State Attorney for Department: AN FOR JENNIFER E KATES AND BRIAN M and to protect property within the Franktownof Colorado, sold at public tax lien sale to John Thirkell, #13865 KATES UNDER THE COLORADO UNIFORM Legal Notice No.: 935246 Parker and Cherry Creek Watershed project ANTHONY S NOWAK the following described Thomas Joaquin, #30941 GIFTS TO MINORS ACT CREATED BY 73 First Publication: May 16, 2019 area from floodwater, sediment, and erosion real estate situate in the County of Douglas, 4400 Castleton Ct. C.R.S. 11-50-101 Last Publication: May 16, 2019 damage. The Hazard Classification of Dam FP State of Colorado, to wit: Castle Rock, CO 80109 B1 was raised from low to high hazard by the Publisher: Douglas County News-Press (303) 663-7726 You and each of you are hereby notified that on Fax 877-285-8988 Colorado Division of Water Resources, Dam ALL MIN INT IN PT SW1/4 17-7-65 (PARCEL the 5th day of November 2015 the then County jthirkel@douglas.co.us tjoaquin@douglas.co.us Safety Branch in a letter dated December 2, 14 - EVANS RANCH) MIN INT = 35.341 AM/L Treasurer of the County of Douglas, in the State Public Notice CASE NUMBER: 18JV233 DIVISION 7 2016. The dam is also classified as high hazard of Colorado, sold at public tax lien sale to by the NRCS. Due to this, the dam does not and said County Treasurer issued a certificate of DOUGLAS COUNTY the following described NOTICE OF PURCHASE OF REAL ESTATE DEPENDENCY SUMMONS meet current Colorado or NRCS dam performpurchase therefore to ANTHONY S NOWAK. real estate situate in the County of Douglas, AT TAX LIEN SALE AND OF APPLICATION TO: JOHN DOE ance and safety standards. The purpose is to That said tax lien sale was made to satisfy the State of Colorado, to wit: FOR ISSUANCE OF TREASURER’S DEED perform maintenance rehabilitation for Dam FP delinquent* taxes assessed against said real esThis Summons is initiated pursuant to Rule 2.2 B1 to meet current NRCS and Colorado Dam tate for the year 2013. That said real estate was 1/10 MIN INT IN NW1/4, W1/2SE1/4, To Every Person in Actual Possession or Occuof the Colorado Rules of Juvenile Procedure, Safety and engineering standards and maintain taxed or specially assessed in the name(s) of E1/2SW1/4, NW1/4SW1/4 4-10-65 TOTAL = pancy of the hereinafter Described Land, Lot or Rule 4 of the Colorado Rules of Civil Procedure, the present level of flood control benefits. GETRADO LIMITED for said year 2013 362.9 AM/L MIN INT = 36.29 AM/L Premises, and to the Person in Whose Name and Section 19-3-503, C.R.S. 2018. the Same was Taxed or Specially Assessed, That said ANTHONY S NOWAK on the 2nd day The recommended plan is to rehabilitate the and said County Treasurer issued a certificate of and to all Persons having an Interest or Title of of January 2019 the present holder of said certiYou are hereby notified that a petition has been dam by constructing a roller compacted conpurchase therefore to DOUGLAS COUNTY. Record in or to the said Premises and To Whom ficate, has made request upon the Treasurer of filed which alleges that the above-named chilcrete (RCC) spillway section and abandoning That said tax lien sale was made to satisfy the It May Concern, and more especially to: said County for a deed to said real estate; That dren are dependent or neglected as per the the existing earthen spillway. delinquent* taxes assessed against said real esa Treasurer’s Deed will be issued for said real facts set forth in the Dependency and Neglect The principal spillway will be replaced to meet tate for the year 2014. That said real estate was OCCUPANT - LOIS LOREE STEELE & estate to the said at 1:00 o’clock P.M., on the Petition, which can be obtained by contacting NRCS design standards for a dam with a high taxed or specially assessed in the name(s) of NANCY LOREE EARLS - LOIS LOREE 29th day of August 2019 unless the same has Thomas J. Joaquin, Assistant Douglas County hazard classification. LOIS LOREE STEELE & NANCY LOREE STEELE AS PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVE been redeemed. Said property may be reAttorney, contact information is in the caption. EARLS for said year 2014 OF THE ESTATE OF ALBERT LEE STEELE deemed from said sale at any time prior to the Submit written comments and inquiries to LOIS LOREE STEELE AND NANCY LOREE actual execution of said Treasurer’s Deed. WitRobert Molacek, P.E., Civil Engineer, EngineerAn Adjudicatory Hearing for Emanue l That on the 26TH day of January 2018 said EARLS AS CO-TRUSTEES - DOUGLAS ness my hand this 16th day of May 2019. ing, USDA-NRCS, Denver Federal Center, Polidore and John Doe has been scheduled DOUGLAS COUNTY assigned said certificate of COUNTY - HAI CONSULTING INC Building 56, Room 2605, PO Box 25426, Denon July 1, 2019 at 9:00 a.m. in Division 7, purchase to HAI CONSULTING INC. GRACETON LP - GEORGE E STEELE /s/ David Gill ver, Colorado 80225-0426. Written comments Douglas County District Court, 4000 Justice ROBERT E STEELE - ARZELLA L STEELE County Treasurer of Douglas County must be submitted and received by 5:00 PM, Way, Castle Rock, Colorado, 80109. That said HAI CONSULTING INC on the 30th ROBERT M STEELE - CAROL A KATES MST at this office on or before June 27, 2019 day of January 2019 the present holder of said LOIS LOREE STEELE AS CO-TRUSTEE Legal Notice No.: 935205 which is within 28 days after the public meetYour presence before this court is required to certificate, has made request upon the TreasNANCY LOREE EARLS AS CO-TRUSTEE First Publication: May 16, 2019 ing held on May 30, 2019. defend against the claims in this petition. IF urer of said County for a deed to said real esAKA NANCY L EARLS - JANET L ROBERTS Last Publication: May 30, 2019 YOU FAIL TO APPEAR, THE COURT WILL tate; That a Treasurer’s Deed will be issued for CAROL A KATES AKA CAROL ANN KATES CO-NRCS will distribute Watershed Project Plan Publisher: Douglas County News-Press PROCEED IN YOUR ABSENCE, WITHOUT said real estate to the said at 1:00 o’clock P.M., ROBERT M STEELE AS CUSTODIAN FOR Supplement No. 1 and Environmental AssessFURTHER NOTICE, TO CONDUCT AN ADJUon the 29th day of August 2019 unless the same SETH D STEELE, EMILY K STEELE AND ALment (EA) for interagency public review on May DICATORY HEARING AND MAY ENTER A has been redeemed. Said property may be reISON R STEELE UNDER THE COLORADO JUDGMENT BY DEFAULT THEREBY ADJU9, 2019, which begins the public comment rePublic Notice deemed from said sale at any time prior to the UNIFORM GIFTS TO MINORS ACT CREDICATING YOUR CHILDREN AS DEPENDview period. actual execution of said Treasurer’s Deed. WitATED BY 73 C.R.S. 11-50-101 - CAROL A ENT OR NEGLECTED CHILDREN. DOUGLAS COUNTY DISTRICT COURT, ness my hand this 16th day of May 2019. KATES AS CUSTODIAN FOR JENNIFER E Legal Notice No.: 935218 STATE OF COLORADO KATES AND BRIAN M KATES UNDER THE You have the right to request a trial by jury at First Publication: Thursday, May 9, 2019 4000 Justice Way, Castle Rock, CO /s/ David Gill COLORADO UNIFORM GIFTS TO MINORS the adjudicatory stage of this petition. You also Second Publication: Thursday, May 16, 2019 Douglas County, CO 80109 Douglas County Treasurer ACT CREATED BY 73 C.R.S. 11-50-101 - MDC have the right to legal representation at every Third Publication: Thursday, May 23, 2019 LAND CORPORATION A COLORADO CORstage of the proceedings by counsel of your own Publisher: Douglas County News Press THE PEOPLE OF THE STATE Legal Notice No.: 935221 PORATION - MDC LAND CORPORATION A choosing, or if you are without sufficient finanAccount Number: 00012184 OF COLORADO First Publication: May 16, 2019 COLORADO CORPORATION C/O THE CORcial means, appointment of counsel by the Last Publication: May 30, 2019 PORATION COMPANY REGISTERED AGENT Court. Termination of your parent-child legal reIn the Interest of: Publisher: Douglas County News-Press - JERRY C STEELE AKA JERALD C STEELE lationship to free your children for adoption is a CAMERON JORDAN, D.O.B.: 3/22/2015; and - SETH D STEELE - EMILY K STEELE AKA possible remedy in this proceeding. If that remJAVONTE JOHNSON, D.O.B.: 4/21/2008, EMILY KRISTINE STEELE AKA EMILY edy is pursued, you are entitled to a hearing beChildren, KRISTINE DUNN - ALISON R STEELE AKA fore a Judge. You also have the right, if you are ALISON RENEE STEELE - JENNIFER E indigent, to have the Court appoint, at no exAnd concerning: KATES AKA JENNIFER ELLEN KATES - BRI-

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Parker Legals 5.17.19 4


40 Parker Chronicle

May 17, 2019M

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