Page 1

1-Color

April 24, 2014 Douglas County, Colorado | Volume 13, Issue 14 A publication of

lonetreevoice.net

Schwab starts on third office building Construction of garage also ahead of schedule By Jane Reuter

jreuter @coloradocommunitymedia.com Charles Schwab is moving forward with construction on its third, five-story office building and parking garage ahead of its original schedule. Originally targeted as part of a second phase of development at the Lone Tree campus on Lincoln Avenue, Schwab said it can save money on construction by speeding the construction sched-

ule. The 187,500-square-foot third building will be complete by spring 2015. “It will have the same square footage as each of the other two buildings and similar footprint and design,” said Schwab spokeswoman Sarah Bulgatz. “Whether or not it will house a comparable number of Schwab employees is still to be determined.” The 1,233-car, five-level second parking garage could be finished by late 2014. In February, Schwab announced it will move almost half of its San Francisco-based workforce to other national Schwab offices; some of them likely will come to Lone Tree. About 1,000 of the 2,200 California workers will be relocated in the next three to

five years. Work on the first two large buildings, which combined will house about 2,200 employees, is in the home stretch. Schwab anticipates moving some of its Denver-area employees - now scattered among three leased buildings - to Lone Tree late this summer. Its retail branch building, a two-story structure at the corner of Park Meadows Drive and Lincoln Avenue, is set to open in early May. Schwab broke ground on the Lone Tree campus in May 10, 2013. “We’re very excited they’ve moved up their schedule for the third building,” said Lone Tree Mayor Jim Gunning. “I think it Schwab continues on Page 25

Charles Schwab is starting construction of its third office building as it nears completion on the first two at the new Lone Tree campus. All three will feature the same design. Photo by Jane Reuter

Schedule restoration continues Six of nine district high schools to do away with the block format By Jane Reuter

jreuter@coloradocommunitymedia.com

SCrAmbLE For eggs!

Eggs-cited children rush centerfield at the South Suburban Family Sports Dome in Centennial on April 19 for the annual egg hunt. Hundreds of brightly-colored empty plastic eggs were up for grabs and later traded for a variety of prizes, including healthy snacks, stuffed toys and even autographed sports merchandise. Photo by Deborah Grigsby

Boy finds his dream wings in Lone Tree Make-A-Wish provides gift of flight to 7-year-old By Jane Reuter

jreuter@coloradocommunitymedia.com Seven-year-old Max Vertin always wanted to fly like Iron Man. When Make-A-Wish Colorado finally helped him realize that dream, the experience left the boy from Hastings, Neb., feeling like someone else entirely. “It was more like Superman,” he said, adding quickly, “I like Superman, too.” Vertin and two of his brothers have Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy, a rare disease that causes muscles to slowly deteriorate. In a burgundy Iron Man-style flight suit sewn by staff members at Sky Venture, Max, his sister, two brothers and father flew April 15 in the enclosed vertical wind

tunnel of the Lone Tree business. From just outside the Plexiglas enclosure, his mother and youngest brother watched. Surrounded by cameras and far from home, Max stayed largely silent during his Sky Venture visit. But his father Jason said that didn’t last long. “He thoroughly enjoyed it,” he said. “It made his day.” Though three of the boys suffer from the same condition, the Vertins’ recent application to Make-A-Wish Nebraska was for Max only. “Because he’s older, he’s going to lose his ability to walk and be as mobile as he is at this point; we thought it was a good age to take advantage of it,” Jason said. Make-A-Wish ensured all seven family members got to take the trip to Colorado. “It was the first time our family’s ever taken a true family vacation,” Jason said. “We’ve either been going to doctors’ Wish continues on Page 25

All four of Highlands Ranch’s public high schools will return this fall to the more traditional class schedule most used until 2011-12. Two of Parker’s three high schools intend to follow suit a year later, while the other three county high schools intend to remain on the block schedule adopted countywide in 2012-13. An improving economy that’s putting more money back into the budgets of schools and enabling them to hire more teachers makes the reversion possible. Parent and teacher surveys show it’s what most of them want. Mountain Vista High School was the first to announce it will return to a modified version of the 5-of-7 schedule — under which teachers hold class during five of seven scheduled periods — in 201415. Highlands Ranch, Rock Canyon and ThunderRidge since have come to the same conclusion. In Parker, Legend and Chaparral plan to do so, but are waiting another year. Parker’s Ponderosa High School, and Castle Rock’s Douglas County and Castle View high schools will stay on their current schedules. All schools opting to change their schedules must hire more teachers to accomplish their goals. The decision lightens the load for existing staff, all of whom taught an extra class under the 6-of-8 — a decision that kept schools from cutting classes. Chaparral principal Greg Gotchey said returning to the more traditional schedule isn’t an easy task. Schedules continues on Page 25

max Vertin, with help from his mother betty, puts on the special Iron man suit made for him by Sky Venture workers in preparation for his April 15 make-A-Wishsponsored flight. Photo by Jane Reuter

Printed on recycled newsprint. Please recycle this copy.


2-Color

2 Lone Tree Voice

April 24, 2014

Long session makes for short fuses The most uttered words during any legislative session could be “bill” and “vote.” But, lately, one could make the case for other four-letter words that have bounced around the Capitol — ones that would make Quentin Tarantino blush. The session is winding down, but some lawmakers seem to be wound awfully tight. Over the last couple of weeks, tempers have flared and emotions have gotten the better of our grown men and women who create our laws. Here are a few recent examples: Rep. Chris Holbert, R-Parker, hurled an expletive toward fellow Republican Rep. Kevin Priola of Henderson on the House floor over his role in a vote on an education bill. That confrontation preceded a vote by Republicans to oust Priola as party whip, a position from which he would resign days later. Rep. Mark Waller, a Colorado Springs Republican who is running for attorney general, barked the same expletive toward Rep. Dan Pabon, D-Denver, after Pabon made a joke on the House floor about Waller’s delegate vote count at the recent GOP state assembly — Waller barely earned a spot on the Republican primary ballot that day. And it’s not just “Men Behaving Badly.” Reps. Crisanta Duran, D-Denver, and Cheri Gerou, R-Evergreen, have been on each other’s throats more than their Adam’s apples. Clearly, something’s in the water at

the Capitol these days. “It is unfortunate. I wish we could all get along,” said House Speaker Mark Ferrandino, DDenver, doing his best Rodney King impersonation. “I think that sometimes there’s a joke that this is high school at the Capitol. Sometimes, it feels like junior high.” Junior high? It’s been more like watching the best of “The Jerry Springer Show,” sans a hooting audience egging on the behavior — well, except for the press of course. Holbert acknowledged that his comments made to Priola on the House floor recently were made out of frustration. He was upset that Priola, who was House minority whip at the time, did not support a Republican amendment to the Student Success Act, a K-12 funding measure. The amendment had to do with how schools provide transparency over financial figures. Instead, Priola voted for a competing and prevailing Democratic amendment and, seeing as how he didn’t vote for the GOP version, he did not whip up votes for the failed effort. Holbert expressed his displeasure by

walking up to Priola and hurling a comment that begins with the sixth letter in the alphabet. “Tensions were probably running a little higher than normal,” Holbert said. But high tensions are the norm when it comes to the epic Duran and Gerou rivalry. Duran is the chairwoman of the all-important Joint Budget Committee and the House Appropriations Committee. Gerou serves on the same committees. VOTING VOTING ENDS ENDS Those committee hearings LOG ON NOW! really should have been held inside steel cages this year. The two really got into it during an April 2 hearing, where you could have played a drinking game based on the number of times that Duran used her chairwoman’s gavel. Things got ugly after Gerou suggested to a lawmaker that they “make a deal” over funding for bills they were carrying. Gerou later said she was kidding. Duran took Gerou as suggesting “quid pro quo” over legislation, which is a nono. Gerou was not happy with Duran’s interpretation of her comments and let her know it. “There’s nothing that I said that was

Hurry!

APRIL 30!

www.lonetreevoice.net

quid pro quo,” Gerou said angrily. “And if you are imputing my nature, my ethics, madam chair, I object!” Later that day, Duran said Gerou “hasn’t acted like a state representative” this legislative session and said her conduct has been unprofessional all year. Not to be outdone, Gerou said Duran is “young enough to be my daughter” and that she doesn’t quite understand the rules involved with chairing a committee. Mr. Speaker, what’s up with your members getting all Rowdy Roddy Piper on one another? “I think during the end of session, nerves and tempers get short,” Ferrandino said. “There’s no secret that there’s no love lost between Rep. Duran and Rep Gerou.” I suggested to Ferrandino that it would be quite entertaining to see the creation of a reality TV show called “Crisanta and Cheri” — two women who can’t stand each other, forced to live together in a city apartment, or a deserted island. The speaker said he would “neither confirm or deny that has been kicked around” as a possible skit that is part of the legislature’s end-of-the-year “Hummers” event, where lawmakers roast one another. Look, far be it from me to criticize bad behavior — after all, my cross streets are Sodom Avenue and Gomorrah Boulevard. Believe it or not, politicians are humans who sometimes say or do things they regret. It’ll be interesting to see if things settle down the rest of the session — although, I won’t be holding my breath. Gotta run, now. “Crisanta and Cheri” is on TV.

Vic Vela covers the Legislature for Colorado Community Media. He can be reached at vvela@coloradocommunitymedia.com. Or, follow him on Twitter: @VicVela1.

Property tax relief bill advances By Vic Vela

vvela@coloradocommunitymedia.com A bill aimed at providing tax exemptions for seniors and widows of military veterans who lose homes as a result of natural disasters is moving through the Legislature. It is a bipartisan effort that Rep. Steve Lebsock, D-Thornton, said, “is one of my favorite bills that I’ve sponsored. … It’s going to make a big difference for folks.” House Bill 1373 makes changes to the state’s Homestead Exemption, where qualifying seniors are exempt from having to pay a portion of their property taxes. Lebsock said the bill addresses two ineq-

uities in the program. Right now, seniors whose homes are destroyed by natural disasters, and who then move out of the flood plain, do not qualify for the tax relief. The bill would change that, so that seniors who are impacted by floods or wildfires are not left with an even bigger financial burden, just because they move. The bill also allows a surviving spouse of a fully disabled veteran who dies to also benefit from the tax exemption. Under current law, the exemption applies only to veterans who are living in their homes, but not the spouses who take over the property when the veteran dies. The bill passed the House with bipartisan support April 21. It now heads to the Senate.

13th Annual

Mental Health Benefit Luncheon Friday, May 9, 2014 | 11am-1pm Inverness Hotel & Conference Center

Register Now for Summer/Fall 2014 Classes!

Presenting Citywide Banks Wellness Colorado Community Media

-

Prevention

City of Glendale Colorado Access Lockton Companies, LLC Sky Ridge Medical Center USI Insurance (formerly known as Van Gilder Insurance Corporation)

Kevin Hines Cracked...Not Broken

Surviving and Thriving After a Suicide Attempt

Your support provides direct services to those in our community who are uninsured and enhances our suicide prevention services.

www.msudenver.edu/extendedcampus

Thank you to our sponsors!

Recovery

Addiction Research & Treatment Services (ARTS) Arapahoe & Douglas County Commissioners Aurora Mental Health Center Behavioral HealthCare, Inc Cherry Creek School District Community Reach Center Highlands Behavioral Health IREA Kaiser Permanente NAMI Arapahoe/Douglas Counties Signal Behavioral Health Network, Inc

Registration and event details at: Go to www.blacktie-colorado.com/rsvp and enter event code: ADMHN59 or call 303 779 9676.


3-Color

Lone Tree Voice 3

April 24, 2014

South Metro Chamber official leaves for Lone Tree Holwell taking economic development expertise south By Jane Reuter

jreuter@coloradocommunitymedia.com The South Metro Denver Chamber of Commerce’s chief operating officer and economic development director will join the City of Lone Tree’s staff late this month. Jeff Holwell starts his new post as the city’s economic development director April 28. “There really is no other community in south Denver that has as much opportunity as the City of Lone Tree for corporate and other types of business growth,” said

the father of two, who lives in Arapahoe County. “This is a great, long-term professional opportunity. I think the economic culture of Lone Tree is very bright. I plan to contribute all of my talents to the cause.” Lone Tree will pay Holwell, who left his position with the Centennial-based chamber on April 18, an annual salary of $99,000. A south Denver native, Holwell also worked as director of business development in the State of Colorado’s Office of Economic Development and International Trade. Those factors combine to give him an in-depth knowledge of state and south metro economics. Lone Tree City Manager Seth Hoffman, who stepped into the city’s lead role late last year, said Holwell fits with the city’s near and long-range plans. A recent analysis focused on goals stretching from three to 20 years into the future.

“We really wanted to make sure we had the right talent and resources in place to implement the mayor and city’s council’s strategy and vision for the city,” Hoffman said. That led to the search for an economic developHolwell ment director. “I called a lot of people in the economic development business and asked, `If you could hire anybody, who would it be?’ ” Hoffman said, adding Holwell’s name came up repeatedly. Holwell will assume many of the responsibilities that now fall to business development coordinator Torie Brazitis, who is moving into a new city position as management analyst. Holwell will oversee economic activity not just on the as-of-yet undeveloped east side of RidgeGate, but

the nearly developed west side, the pending redevelopment of the Entertainment District, the Park Meadows area and retention and growth of existing businesses. “I think the opportunities are significant throughout the city,” Holwell said. “Yes, the new development on the east side of course is the long-term activity. But the existing businesses, as well as the existing opportunities, will also be significant. Even north of Lincoln, there is still plenty of opportunity for business attraction and retention.” Holwell joined the staff of the South Metro Chamber in 2011 as the director of its Economic Development Group. He added the title of COO in the summer of 2013. His departure came about three weeks after the resignation of the chamber’s longtime president and CEO, John Brackney.

Chamber names interim director Rocky Mountain Staff report

The South Metro Denver Chamber of Commerce on April 21 named senior staffer Marcia McGilley to serve as its interim director until a permanent replacement for John Brackney is found. “Marcia is an extraordinary leader with extensive experience in strategic planning, business development and forging strategic alliances,” said Herm Brocksmith, chair of the chamber’s board of directors. “She has the skills, talent and vision to lead the chamber into an even more dynamic future.” McGilley has been the executive director of the South Metro Denver and Aurora Small Business Development Centers since January 2008. “I am honored to lead the chamber’s growth in the areas of economic development, public policy, education and sustainable infrastructure, which are vital to keeping our business community thriving,” she said. “We have a great staff, strong board of directors and many talented business leaders that

I look forward to collaborating with on our existing and new initiatives over the coming months.” McGilley has more than 20 years of public, private and nonprofit experience, helping with start-ups and McGilley expansions and providing consulting services. She has owned several of her own consulting and training businesses. McGilley will retain her position at the SBDC, where sales have increased from $800,000 to $9.4 million annually since she started, according the statement. In 2011, the center earned recognition from the United States Small Business Administration as one of the top 10 in the country, and in 2012, McGilley was named the state’s small-business advocate of the year by the Association of Small Business Development Center. She is a founding member of the Rocky Mountain Cleantech Open and served as its regional and national training director.

BEAD BAZAAR

Denver’s Premier Bead Event! 90+ Vendors • Demonstrations Classes Taught by Nationally Known Instructors

Sat. April 26, 2014 10am-7pm• Sun, April 27, 2014 10am-5pm Denver Mart – NE Corner of I-25 & 58th Ave • Open to the Public

Entry $800 (Cash Only) Good for Sat & Sun To view and register for classes, please go to rockybeads.org FREE Gift Bag on Sunday to the first 200 attendees!


4-Color

4 Lone Tree Voice

April 24, 2014

NEWS IN A HURRY City selling trees and flowers

The City of Lone Tree is offering trees and flowers for sale in honor of Arbor Day. The deadline to buy is April 25. Items will be available for pickup May 9 and 10. A flower sale will be held along with the pick-up from 9 a.m. to 11 a.m. May 10 at the Lone Tree Arts Center. To purchase trees and flowers, visit www.cityoflonetree. com/arborday. For more information, contact the City of Lone Tree Special Events Coordinator at Lesley.Johnson@cityoflonetree. com.

South Suburban seeks members for youth panel

South Suburban Park and Recreation District is looking for dynamic students to serve on its newly established Youth Commission. The teens will advise South Suburban staff on what’s important to youth and teens who live and play in the area, and provide opportunities for youth to volunteer. Volunteers will be exposed to local government, and learn about the parks and recreation industry. Eligible youth include middle and high school students in grades 8-12, who reside within the district and maintain a minimum 2.0 grade point average. The Youth Commission will serve in an advisory role to the Recreation and Community Services Department. Members will be selected through an application and interview process facilitated through the Youth Commission and staff liaison. Candidates will be appointed by the South Suburban Board of Directors. The Commission will meet monthly in the evenings, at least nine times a year. The Youth Commission will include a minimum of five, and a maximum of 10 members representing a cross section of the District. For more information and a membership application, visit www.sspr.org. Or contact Recreation Program and Facility Supervisor Allison Boyd at Allisonb@sspr.org, 303-483-7037. Applications are due May 23.

Slash/mulch site opens May 3

Douglas County will open its Castle Rock slash/mulch site for the 2014 season on May 3. The site, which will remain open through Oct. 25, will be available to county residents from 8 a.m. until 5 p.m. each Saturday at 1400 Caprice Drive. The county will make accommodations to allow mulch material to be picked up anytime during the season while the site is open to accept slash. Items accepted include tree branches and shrubbery with a maximum length of six feet and a maximum diameter of 12 inches. All loads must be covered and tied down when brought in. Stumps, roots, lumber, railroad ties, grass, dirt, household trash, loose pine needles, appliances and weeds are not accepted. In case of inclement weather, call 303-663-6274 to ensure the site is open.

Zumba party slated

South Suburban’s Lone Tree Recreation Center will celebrate Cinco de Mayo with a Fiesta de Mayo featuring a Zumba Fitness Party from 10 to 11:30 a.m. May 10. Along with a workout, snacks and giveaways will also be offered. The class is available to children 10 years and up (ages 10-11 must be accompanied by an adult.) Drop-in fees apply. Lone Tree Recreation Center is located at 10249 Ridgegate Circle, Lone Tree. For more information call 303-708-3514.

Mental health network gets new board members

Arapahoe/Douglas Mental Health Network recently welcomed five new board members. They include Linda Feighery, senior vice president of Citywide Banks; Paul Staley, operations director at Centura Health Colorado Health Neighborhoods; Laurie Habala-Riedmuller, captain with the Arapahoe County Sheriff’s Office; Sanjay B. Shah, principal with Deloitte Consulting and Paula J. Smith, an attorney with Litvak Litvak Mehrtens Epstein & Carlton.

Plains Conservation Center

WON $1,000 YOU COULD TOO! “ The Plains Conservation Center exists to bring the natural wonder of the prairie into the realm of personal experience by: preserving, educating and nurturing conservation and environmental ethics.”

Learn more online at:

www.plainscenter.org

At Applewood Plumbing Heating & Electric, we give $1,000 every month to a local charity or nonprofit nominated by YOU! We’ve contributed more than $95,000 over the past 9 years with our monthly giveaway, and we’re still at it...making a difference where it matters most, close to home. Nominate your favorite local charity or nonprofit to win at www.ApplewoodFixIt.com.

Denver South Economic Development Partnership president Mike Fitzgerald kicks off an April 16 Lone Tree Arts Center meeting about the economic impact of fracking. Photo by Jane Reuter

Fracking analysis focuses on economy Consortium pays for study that avoids other potential impacts By Jane Reuter

jreuter@coloradocommunitymedia.com A University of Colorado-Boulder Leeds School of Business study concludes that a statewide moratorium on hydraulic fracturing would put a drag on Colorado’s economy, though the study’s leader said they don’t know potential environmental impacts of the controversial practice, known as “fracking.” Such a moratorium is not currently proposed, though several Colorado municipalities have enacted fracking bans or moratoriums, and recent initiatives propose more local control and increased setbacks for oil and gas drilling. Researcher Brian Lewandowski talked about the fracking analysis during an April 16 meeting at the Lone Tree Arts Center. A consortium including the Metro Denver Economic Development Corporation, the Denver South Economic Development Partnership and a nonprofit economic think tank, Common Sense Policy Roundtable, contracted with the Leeds School to do the fracking analysis and other studies about economics tied to public policy. Lewandowski said the consortium pays them quarterly. Research subjects are decided by a panel vote including members of the Leeds School and the three groups. Lewandowski does not sit on the panel and said the outside agencies are “hands off” about the studies’ conclusions and methodology. According to the fracking analysis, the oil and gas industry and related activities contributed $29.6 billion to Colorado’s economy in 2012, which Lewandowski said was based on readily available facts. “We studied what we know about the industry,” he said. “We know employment, taxes, production. There are a lot of things we don’t know; we don’t know environmental impacts, air quality, water quality, noise pollution. The question is, `What value would you put on these topics?’” Lewandowski noted those issues and impacts also are being studied, but that will take many years. “I think it would be really haphazard for us to assign an arbitrary price to these things before they’re fully understood,” he said.

Fracking is the process of drilling into the earth, injecting a high-pressure mix of water, sand and chemicals and releasing oil and natural gas trapped in rocks, allowing it to flow out of wells. Statistics show more than 95 percent of Colorado’s oil and gas wells have been fracked. The practice is not new, but is becoming more prevalent, and horizontal drilling technology has greatly expanded its reach. Lewandowski said restricting fracking has economic tradeoffs, pointing to industry-related jobs that pay more than twice the average wages and are growing in number. Collectively in 2012, the industry contributed about $3.4 billion in income to Colorado households, or 2.8 percent of the state’s total salary and wages. “Property taxes are perhaps the largest payment from the oil and gas industry — about $675 million in 2012,” he said. “School districts represent the majority of this, more than half if you look at mill levies across the state. “When you stack up all these taxes, we estimate it to be between $1 (billion) and $1.3 billion that stays nested in the state of Colorado in any given year.” If a statewide moratorium ever were imposed, “Colorado could expect to lose about 68,000 jobs on average in the first five years (and) 93,000 jobs over the long view, between 2015 and 2040,” Lewandowski said. Current increased setback proposals wouldn’t have the same impact. “We modeled this on a worst-case scenario,” he said. Lewandowski cautioned that the Leeds School study shouldn’t be considered in isolation. “There’s so much data that demonstrates the economic importance of the industry that it’s hard to deny that from the economic standpoint that it wouldn’t be detrimental to the economy (to restrict it),” Lewandowski said. “The economics shouldn’t be the only thing you take into consideration. “The analogy I use is that when I’m buying a house, I look at the house itself, but I’m also looking at the view and the schools, the neighborhood, the amenities around it. This study should hopefully be part of the conversation, but I don’t think it should be the whole conversation.” He also noted that existing bans are in densely populated areas, where oil- and gas-related activity is minimal. Production is concentrated in Weld, Rio Blanco, Garfield, Montezuma and La Plata counties.

Reduced fee

mental health care

for children & teens WITHOUT insurance

• No appointment needed! • Walk-ins welcome • Monday - Friday - 8:00am - 11:00am 61 W Davies Ave, Littleton, CO 80120 Better days are just around the corner.

303 730 8858 admhn.org


5-Color

Lone Tree Voice 5

April 24, 2014

Bluffs Park construction nearing end

New business group seeks to build relationships

Parking lot project will resolve drainage issues, settle dust

Roundtable’s leaders have vision of collaborative platform By Hannah Garcia

hgarcia@coloradocommunitymedia.com

By Jane Reuter

jreuter@coloradocommunitymedia.com Douglas County hopes to repave the Bluffs Regional Park parking lot in about a month, just in time for summer hiking season to kick into full gear. “It’s right on track,” said Curt Sloan, Douglas County government’s manager of parks, trails and building grounds. “We’ll be paving hopefully by the end of four weeks.” That puts paving on the schedule for about mid-May, with the entirety of the $380,000 project complete by the end of June. County parks officials said heavy rains and runoff in 2013 pointed to a need for some drainage improvements in the parking lot to help protect the Lone Tree neighborhoods

Douglas County is improving storm drainage in the Bluffs Regional Park parking lot. Repaving is expected in mid-May, with the project due to be completely done in late June. Photo by Jane Reuter that flank it. Home construction in RidgeGate has heightened the potential impact of runoff, and the improvements are designed to keep water away from the houses east of the park. “Sediment control is a big focus of this project,” parks and trails director Randy Burkhardt said, adding the county has worked closely with homeowners. “The drainage wasn’t an issue when there weren’t any homes over there.” Paving the lot also will cut down on dust kicked up by vehicles on the gravel surface.

The parking lot to the popular loop trail has remained open throughout the construction, but at limited capacity. Park users also have been urged to park along Crooked Stick Trail, the street leading into the park, during construction. Bluffs Regional Park is a 253-acre parcel west of Lincoln Avenue and RidgeGate Parkway. The 2.7-mile trail that loops through its rolling terrain offers hikers, bikers and equestrians expansive views of the Front Range and eastern plains, and includes connections to the EastWest Regional and other trails.

National retailer comes to area Centennial location one of Conn’s first two Colorado stores Staff report A national retailer has again picked the south metro area as the site of one of its first Colorado locations. Conn’s, which sells home appliances, furnishings and electronics, has announced it will open a store in Centennial on April 26. The Texas-based retailer also will open a store in Aurora that same day. Between the two locations, the company expects to create 120 jobs by September. “We’re excited to bring the Conn’s HomePlus experience to Colorado,” David Trahan, president of the retail

Centennial will be one of the first two Conn’s locations in Colorado when it opens this store at 9555 E. County Line Rd. File photo division, said in a news release. “We’re a fresh alternative for people who are looking for high-quality, affordable products.” The 36,000-square-foot Centennial store is located at 9555 E. County Line Road, just north of Park Meadows and

less than a mile from the state’s first IKEA, which opened in 2011. “We are pleased to have a major retailer like Conn’s opening in the Centennial Promenade and are happy to welcome Conn’s to Colorado and our community,” said Centennial Mayor Cathy Noon. The Aurora store is at 60 South Abilene St. The retailer plans a promotion at both stores on opening day: The first 100 people to visit each location will receive a $100 Conn’s gift card, according to the news release announcing the openings. Conn’s has more than 75 retail locations in Texas, Arizona, Louisiana, Oklahoma and New Mexico. In addition to the two initial locations in Colorado, the 120-year-old company stated in the release it is considering stores in Arvada, Fort Collins, Colorado Springs and Sheridan.

if you are experiencing pain, including pain from a previouS replacement Surgery, pleaSe call today to Schedule a conSultation. • Board certified/Fellowship trained Orthopedic Surgeon in practice for 11+ years providing the safest and most advanced medical treatment for hip and knee surgery

Medicare Accepted

Located on the SkyRidge Medical Campus denverhipknee.com

Service beyond expectations. Quality funeral professionals. Trust built with honesty and integrity. Funerals, Memorials, Cremations, and Life Celebrations

Heflebowerfuneralservices.com

303-790-7181

theROBUSTOROOM

Cosmopolitan

C I G A R & C O C K TA I L L O U N G E

MON | KARAOKE THU | FREE POKER TUE | TRIVIA FRI+SAT | LIVE DJS WED | 50% OFF WINES SUN | AFTERNOON CHESS therobustoroom.com | 9535 Park Meadows Dr. Lone Tree, CO 80124 | 303.790.7363 located in the pedestrian courtyard of the United Artist Theater

You’re Invited to April’s Featured Author

Changing the funeral experience with service, quality and trust.

Specializing in non–operative management of hip & knee arthritiS

• 80% of minimally invasive hip replacement and partial knee replacement patients go home same day or next day

Two business leaders are trying to build a consortium of sorts to unite entities with economic interests. The Colorado Business Roundtable is in its infancy, with executive director Jeff Wasden and president Gayle Dendinger starting discussions to form the group in February and taking concrete actions in March. “Everyone we’ve approached has been really optimistic about the group,” Wasden said. “Nobody’s said `no.’ ” Wasden is also the owner of PROformance Apparel in Littleton and vice chair of public affairs for the South Metro Denver Chamber of Commerce. Dendinger is the CEO of shipping company CAP Logistics and publisher of ICOSA, an economic media company. Although both men are well versed in a business environment, Wasden and Dendinger said the roundtable is a collaborative effort that deviates from the corporate model. “It’s all about setting up connections and building relationships,” Dendinger said. Dendinger said he first attempted to found a Colorado-based business roundtable in 2001, but between the 9/11 attacks in New York City and the fizzle of the dot-com boom, 54 percent of members went out of business and the collaborative died out. With the economy making a recovery and the CBRT building momentum, Dendinger said he hopes participants will adopt a new philosophy. “Instead of shrinking, market harder,” Dendinger said. The group has various goals in different arenas, from public policy to education and plans to work with other organizations like Colorado Concerns on immigration issues and the South Metro Chamber on hydraulic fracturing. The group held its first event in Lone Tree on April 16 in conjunction with other organizations to discuss a study by the University of Colorado Leeds School of Business regarding the impact of a fracking ban on Colorado’s economy. Wasden said a big part of the mission is education. Dendinger said access to ICOSA will be big part of that. “Part of what we’re trying to accomplish is an organization of doers, who want to create the best and brightest in the state,” Wasden said. “We want to partner with other organizations for diversity and strength, to get that extra lens. Instead of working in a vacuum, the idea is to leverage and multiply, then educate.” The group operates under the larger umbrella Business Roundtable in Washington, D.C., which has roundtables in 25 other states in its network, Dendinger said. “It’s a sustainable model that endures, but also gets things done,” Dendinger said.

Mike Heflebower Funeral Director Jodi Childs Advance Planning Director

Wednesday April 30th 8:30am – 10:00am FREE Refreshments served

Ron Richards will be our featured author. He will be sharing about his book, “Dodging Dandelions”

8955 S. Ridgeline Blvd., Ste 100 Highlands Ranch, CO 80129 720-344-6087


6

6 Lone Tree Voice

April 24, 2014

Reproductive rights effort fizzles Democrats spike own bill before debate By Vic Vela

vvela@coloradocommunitymedia.com A Democratic effort to bolster women’s reproductive rights was introduced at the Legislature with fanfare, but went out quietly. The bill — which would have prohibited the state from interfering with a woman’s reproductive health care decisions — was killed by Democratic leadership before it ever came up for a highly anticipated debate in the Senate on April 16. The reason behind the last-minute decision by Democrats to kill the legislation depends on which lawmaker one speaks with. The bill sponsor, Sen. Andy Kerr, DLakewood, said the effort was pulled because Republicans had threatened to wreak havoc on the legislative process for the rest of the session, if the bill had gone forward. Kerr said Republicans were planning to use filibusters and other delaying tactics to interfere with key pieces of legislation that are still moving through the Capitol. “It became obvious that D.C.-style politics were going to be happening the last

three weeks of the session here,” Kerr said. That’s nonsense, said Republican leadership. “That’s ridiculous,” said Senate Minority Leader Bill Cadman, R-Colorado Springs. “What they ran into was a firestorm of public dissent, period; a firestorm of public opposition to this political hatchet job.” In the Senate gallery, onlookers who gathered to follow the vote — most of whom were opposed to the legislation — didn’t get much of a show. Senate Majority Leader Rollie Heath of Boulder gave no explanation for spiking the bill when he moved to lay over the measure until the day after the session ends, which kills the legislation this year. The bill would have prohibited state or local governments from enacting “any policy regarding reproductive health care that is inconsistent with or contrary to current evidence-based scientific data and medical consensus …” accompanying bill language states. The effort is a response to continued conservative efforts to restrict women’s reproductive rights, either through the Legislature or the ballot box. The sudden demise of the bill capped a wild, 48-hour sequence of events. Catholics converged on the Capitol to protest the bill on April 15. That’s the day debate on the bill was supposed to be

held in the Senate. However, the vote was delayed a day because Sen. John Kefalas, D-Fort Collins, went home sick. Kefalas’ vote was needed for the vote to pass in a Senate that Democrats control by a single vote. The next day, speculation swirled that the bill could end up being killed. Colorado Community Media was the first to report that Democratic leaders had spent the day figuring out whether they were going to move forward with the bill. Kerr asserts that he had all 18 Democrats on board, but the reaction afterward from a couple of Democratic lawmakers puts that in question. Kefalas voted for the bill in committee. But he later acknowledged that he struggled over his vote — and he never confirmed that he was going to vote yes in the first place. After the vote was killed, Kefalas did not directly answer questions by reporters as to how he would have voted. “All I can say is I express a concern about this and I listened to constituents,” Kefalas said. Sen. Rachel Zenzinger, D-Arvada, was also conflicted. When asked how she was planning to vote, Zenzinger said, “I honestly don’t know.” Zenzinger is a Catholic, first-term lawmaker who will face a tough election bid this November. Asked if she was relieved

that she didn’t have to cast a vote, Zenzinger said, “Yeah, I think so, being a Catholic woman.” Senate President Morgan Carroll, DAurora, did not speak with reporters on the Senate floor on April 16. Carroll instead sent an emailed statement, in which she was critical of Republican positions on women’s reproductive rights issues. At the same time, Carroll, like Kerr, said she didn’t want other important pieces of legislation being affected as a result of GOP outrage. “We have made our point, and in the interest of getting the remaining work done on education, jobs, higher education affordability and child care, we laid the bill over,” Carroll said. But Cadman — who denied any effort on the part of Republicans to disrupt the legislative process — said Democrats have only themselves to blame for the bill’s failure. Cadman also referenced last year’s Democratic legislative achievements on hot-button issues, many of which angered Republicans. “They got called on it and, unfortunately, they put their caucus and this entire institution through a significant turmoil over the last few days and dragged a lot of people out of their homes to come express their voices,” Cadman said. “The good news is this time, unlike last year, they listened.”

Student honored

Extra! Extra!

Castle View High School junior Riley Capp, left, receives the Congressional Medal from U.S. Rep. Cory Gardner April 16 at Gardner’s Castle Rock office. Young men and women ages 14 to 23 are eligible to earn the award by setting and achieving challenging goals in voluntary public service, personal development, physical fitness and expedition/exploration. On his way to the honor, Capp put in more than 100 hours of volunteer service at his local public library, studied Christian Science, worked on his tennis game and spent four days camping in the mountains.

Have a news or business story idea? We'd love to read all about it. To send us your news and business press releases please visit LoneTreeVoice.net, click on the Press Releases taband follow easy instructions to make submissions.

Free Sales Training for Small Business Owners Learn how to:  Grow your revenue, one customer at a time  Help customers choose you  Increase your average sale  Help an irate customer  Close the sale Tues, May 13 10am—12:00pm 2154 E Commons Ave, Suite 342, Centennial CO 80122 The South Metro Denver SBDC helps existing and new businesses grow and prosper through low-cost workshops and free consulting

To Register Visit www.SmallBusinessDenver.com

The South Metro Denver Small Business Development Center is partially funded by the U.S. Small Business Administration. The Support given by the U.S. Small Business Administration through such funding does not constitute an express or implied endorsement of any of the co-sponsors' or participants' opinions products or services. The Colorado SBDC is a partnership between the Colorado Office of Economic Development and International Trade, the U.S. Small Business Administration, Colorado's institutions of higher education, and local development organizations.

www.SmallBusinessDenver.com

(303) 795-0142

Courtesy photo

Red light camera ban could get green light Bill also would bar use of photo radar By Vic Vela

vvela@coloradocommunitymedia.com Red light cameras could be a thing of the past, under a bill that is making its way through the Legislature. The bipartisan legislation would prohibit the use of red light cameras and photo radars anywhere in the state. Communities sometimes use the technology to slow down speeding drivers and to increase revenues. The bill received initial approval in the Senate on April 17 and is expected to pass the chamber before the legislation moves to the House. Rep. Scott Renfroe, R-Greeley, a bill sponsor, contends that the use of red light cameras and other driving detection technology is a “cash grab” on the part of communities, and that their presence can have an adverse impact on public safety. Renfroe and other supporters argue that drivers sometimes slam on the brakes after noticing the equip-

ment, which can lead to the very accidents communities are trying to prevent. And bill supporters also said that a single picture of a vehicle crossing an intersection often doesn’t take into consideration other road factors that impact the way people drive. “A camera can take a picture, but it doesn’t tell the story,” Renfroe said. Supporters pointed to a number of areas of concern over the technology. Sen. Lucia Guzman, D-Denver, a bill co-sponsor, said there isn’t any evidence that indicates that the devices have “a tangible effect on public safety.” Sen. David Balmer, R-Centennial, said the flashes that emit from the cameras can trigger epileptic seizures. Balmer also said the devices interfere with a driver’s right to confront his or her accuser in court. But the bill had its share of opponents who said communities would suffer if the bill becomes law. Sen. Jessie Ulibarri, D-Commerce City, said the use of red light cameras at a problematic intersection in his hometown has saved lives. He also said the use of the technology is es-

pecially vital in areas where “human management is impossible.” “This is about safety,” Ulibarri said. “This is about life and death. This is about real folks who may be injured.” Amendments by Ulibarri and other bill opponents to either weaken or postpone the legislation failed to garner enough support to pass. Sen. Pat Steadman, D-Denver, said red light camera technology that has been placed at busy city intersections has impacted public safety in a positive way. Steadman also took issue with supporters of the bill who may not live in areas that have to deal with high-traffic concerns. “You represent districts and towns that don’t even have stoplights,” Steadman quipped. Sen. Linda Newell, D-Littleton, also opposed the legislation. She said that communities in her district want to see more driver detection technology, not less. “I have, in my district, communities that have requested me to vote no on this, who are begging me to vote no on this because of the safety factor,” Newell said.


7

Lone Tree Voice 7

April 24, 2014

Youth tanning legislation fails again

Real Estate

Advertise: 303-566-4100

Miscellaneous Real Estate

By Vic Vela

NOW IS THE TIME TO PURCHASE A HOME OR REFINANCE!

vvela@coloradocommunitymedia.com

*

WHY US...? OVER 30 YEARS EXPERIENCE AS A CPA MORTGAGE LENDER — NO BROKER FEES FULL PRODUCT SET INCLUDING CONVENTIONAL, FHA, VA, REHAB, USDA, JUMBO AND CHAFA CUSTOMIZED LOANS BASED ON YOUR FAMILY’S FINANCIAL POSITION MULTIPLE GOLD STAR AWARDS BY BETTER BUSINESS BUREAU OUR AVERAGE SALES VOLUME IS $4 BILLION DOLLARS!

SAVING YOU MONEY IS OUR “1” PRIORITY The Local Lender You Can “Trust” Randy Spierings CPA, MBA NMLS 217152 rspierings@primeres.com

BBB Rating

A+

MULTIPLE GOLD STAR AWARDS

Call 303-256-5748 Now Or apply online at www.bestcoloradomortgages.com

9800 Mt. Pyramid Court, Ste. 400 • Englewood, CO 80112 * Only one offer per closing. Offer Expires 5/31/2014. A Best Buy gift card for $500 will be given after closing and can be used toward purchase of a 50 inch TV or any other Best Buy products. Ad must be mentioned at closing. Program, rates, terms and conditions are subject to change without notice. Regulated by the Division of Real Estate. MLO 100022405

Home for Sale

Wanted Wanted: Mountain Cabin Vacant Town Business Building Shop w/office space, old filling station, small town or country home, along I25 corridor, Castle Rock to Fort Collins or Estes Park, call 785399-2298 or send information to Box 55, Kanorado Kansas 67741

WE BUY HOUSES Any condition. Anywhere. Cash fast! divorce, bankruptcy, lost job, transferred 720-557-9648 peakview9@gmail.com

Home for Sale

BUY & RECEIVE 1% or OF PURCHASE PRICE

* Everything Included * Free Market Analysis * MLS Placement * PlacementonRealtor.com * Internet Exposure

BANK FORECLOSURE & HUD PROPERTIES Homes in all areas

www.mustseeinfo.com or call Kevin 303-503-3619 HomeSmart Realty A 5280 Top REALTOR

NEED TO SELL YOUR HOUSE ? We’ll Pay Cash Or Buy On Terms Foreclosure Help We’ll Take Over Payments To Help You Avoid Bankruptcy And Save Your Credit Call Mike or Sandi 303-989-5777 www.Foothillsrei1.com

Miscellaneous Real Estate Pre-Purchase Residential Sewer Inspection

Includes a DVD of the Line. Locate tree roots, cracks, broken pipes, sags or other problems !! - before you close - !!

Jake The Snake Call Ken Nesbit

303-905-8047

www.fowlerpipeservices.com

SELL

* No Advertising Fees * Relocation Exposure * Realtors Show Home * Sign & Lockbox * No Upfront Fees

BEST O F THE BEST R E A L T O R S

Charles Realty

720-560-1999

+2.8% MLS CO-OP

FULL SERVICE BROKERAGE OWNER 25 YEARS!

denveRRealestateChaRles@gmail.Com

BARGAINS

Zero-down programs avail.

Bill falls 4-3 in Senate Appropriations Committee after passing House

Cemetery Lots

Commercial Property/ Rent

2 full size Cemetery Plots Crown Hill Wheat Ridge $3600 for 2 + transfer fee 720-218-2335

in Franktown - High Traffic corner lot Hwy 83/86 Location, Loca-

RENTALS

Multiple Spaces

tion, Location (303)200-0320

Condos/Townhomes Arvada West

Homes Across from park on 1 acre in Golden. 3bd up 1bd down, 1 3/4ba, 1 car gar, finished basement, fenced yard $1200 + utilities 1st month and $1,000 deposit. NS, references, credit check. 303-279-6084 11792 West 71st Ave in Arvada For lease 3 bed, 2 bath home Available May 1st Open to view Saturday April 26 11am-2pm For details call Frank 303 324 4267

WHY RENT A HOUSE WHEN YOU CAN OWN A HOME ! Bad Credit OK No Bank Financing Low Down Payments Call Mike or Sandi 303-989-5777 www.Foothillsrei1.com

Beautiful Sunrise Ridge Town Home for Rent/Lease $1,500 + deposit Clean, new paint 2 bdrm, 2.5 bath 2 car garage, private patio office loft, Fireplace Landlord paid HOA Amenities Open Basement, Comm. Pool Wired for security system Golf: Westwoods Courses (3) Schools: Fairmount, Drake, Arvada West Mountain & open space view No pet, No smoking Near 64th & McIntyre

303-452-1352

Office Rent/Lease VARIOUS OFFICES 100-2,311 sq.ft. Rents from $200-$1750/month. Full service. 405-409 S Wilcox

Castle Rock

Wasson Properties 719-520-1730 Please Recycle this Publication when Finished

Once again, an effort to curb artificial tanning among youths has failed at the Legislature. House Bill 1054 died after it failed to garner enough support to make it out of a Senate committee last week. The bill would have prohibited persons under 18 from using artificial tanning devices, particularly tanning beds. It is the third year in a row that a youth tanning bed restriction bill has died at the Capitol. “I was disappointed because I believe this is a very important piece of legislation to protect young children,” said Sen. Lois Tochtrop, D-Thornton, a bill sponsor. Tochtrop and other bill supporters cited the potentially cancer-causing ultraviolet rays that emit from tanning beds as motivation behind the effort. They believed that it was in the state’s best interest to prevent youths from using artificial tanning devices, because it would result in fewer cases of life-threatening melanoma skin cancer. More than 30 states place some sort of

limitations on youth tanning. Had the bill become law, businesses would have faced stiff fines for allowing youths to use their tanning devices. The bill had previously passed the House and a Senate committee prior to its demise in the Senate Appropriations Committee. The bill failed on a vote of 4-3, with Sen. Pat Steadman, D-Denver, joining committee Republicans in voting against the bill. The bill faced stiff odds even before it got to the Senate. It passed the Democrat-majority Senate by just two votes, with four Democrats voting against the effort. Many who opposed the bill said the effort was a government overreach that takes away the rights of parents to make their own decisions of what’s best for their children. The legislation was of particular importance to Rep. Cherylin Peniston, D-Westminster, the House bill sponsor. Peniston had tried unsuccessfully in previous legislative sessions to get a youth tanning ban through the Capitol. Because she is term-limited, this was Peniston’s last effort to get the bill through. “I am deeply disappointed about what happened in the Senate and I hope that somebody is here next year to pick this up and make it a reality,” Peniston said.


8-Opinion

8 Lone Tree Voice

April 24, 2014

opinions / yours and ours

Life has challenges; words have power Reading is one of the things I enjoy so very much in life. And as an avid reader, I have accumulated a vast and diverse book collection. Some are worn around the edges, some are dog-eared, sticky notes protrude from the tops of several, and many are filled with highlights and underscored words with my notes written in the margin. In my line of business, I find myself going back to some of my favorites for ideas and reminders on how to improve in some way or handle a situation. So the other day I was dealing with a very challenging family issue and it was happening right at the one-year anniversary of the loss of my wife and my kids’ mom. I took some time to sit in my library and meditate on what was happening around us and I was feeling sad, hurt and confused. And as I thought and prayed about the situation and events,

I looked up and some of the titles of the books literally seemed to come to life right before my eyes. Specific books and words seemed to become bigger in font size and boldness. They were books such as Zig Ziglar’s “Embrace the Struggle,” or “The Journey” by Billy Graham. There were also titles such as “Be Great” by Peter Thomas and “Results” by Gary Neilson and Bruce A. Pasternack. There are hundreds of books in my library, and as I continued to scan

letters to the editor Vote for Mark Rosser

Lone Tree is fortunate to have Mark Rosser running for the Southgate Water and Sanitation Districts Board of Directors in the May 6 Special District Election. In Lone Tree and throughout the districts, the ongoing challenge is two-fold: One, to maintain and extend the life of our current aging water and sewer infrastructure, created 30-50 years ago when our south metro homes and businesses were first being built; and two, to expand the current systems to accommodate the new growth in RidgeGate and other areas along the I-25 corridor and elsewhere throughout the district. Finding the balance between these two while limiting rate impacts is the challenge facing Southgate’s Board of Directors and Staff. And achieving this balance requires leaders with expertise. For 25 years Mark Rosser has been a water/ wastewater engineer, solving problems and improving utility systems that serve communities throughout Colorado and beyond. Among numerous projects, Mark led a team of engineers to augment the Town

of Parker’s Community Development Department, performing review and guidance for all new development. He also produced the Water Strategic Master Plan for the Town of Castle Rock, which set the vision for Castle Rock’s transition from relying on non-renewable (aquifer) water to a more sustainable mix of surface water supply and non-potable water reuse. Mark has also been the lead engineer on a number of projects throughout Colorado to assess the condition of existing water systems, pinpointing deficiencies and then recommending repair or replacement, to extend the life of those aging systems. In summary, Mark’s expertise and experience make him highly qualified to serve on Southgate’s Board of Directors. I urge you to vote for him. We need Mark Rosser on the Southgate Water and Sanitation Boards. Sincerely, Harold Anderson Lone Tree City Council Letters continue on Page 9

Bob Dylan thinks he’s a penguin I have been under the weather and I don’t really have the strength to write a column today. One is overdue, however, and rather than let down my editor, I am going to do my best. This will be highly unusual. It’s never been done anywhere before. I know it’s the easy way out, but I am weak. Please bear with me. You’ll have a full-fledged column next time. I am going to assemble a column out of nothing but headlines, book titles, song titles and the like. That’s crazy, huh? I realize that it’s manipulative and a tease, kind of like what they do on the TV news to keep you hooked through a commercial. “Bob Dylan thinks he’s a penguin. Details after the break.” So here we go. Nothing but headlines. No explanations, no stories to go along with them. Please: Use your imagination. That’s a good thing, right? How well do you know asparagus? A horse, a bucket and a spoon. Your comb over is scaring my grandson. The curious incident of the dog in the nighttime. Memories that hold your life together like glue. Living in the limelight the universal dream. Breathe deep the gathering gloom. The calendar on the wall is ticking the days off. I’m not the man you think I am, but I’m the man for you. Delightful spring recipes for neighborhood squirrel. Why dogs eat your homework. Smells on a bus. Hundreds sickened on cruise ship. Cruise ship experiences propulsion problems. Cruise ship overturns. Cruise ship generator breaks down. Cruise ship forgets to load shuffleboard pucks, passengers riot. Cruise ship runs out of deveined shrimp, passengers riot.

Are you OK? It’s been two whole minutes since you checked your messages. The dark side of Mr. Green Jeans. Lisping in Ithaca. My mother the car. Eating crackers in bed, rolling in the crumbs. This is not a dachshund. Lady writer on the TV. Talking about the Virgin Mary. I know you never read a book. Burning bridges shore to shore. This time, baby, I’ll be bulletproof. Every day it’s getting closer. Going faster than a roller coaster. The melody haunts my reverie. We all become brothers under the laws of Minerva. “I do not think you can name many great inventions that have been made by married men.” The French have a different word for everything. I’m just a teenage dirtbag, baby. Some had scars and some had scratches. A man, a plan, a canal, Panama. WDYT: The decay of language is the decay of mankind. If you go down to the woods today, you’d better go in disguise. You played it for her, you can play it for me. I think this is the beginning of a beautiful friendship. I’ll even ask for your forgiveness, though I don’t know just what I am asking it for. I am a champion and you’re going to hear me roar. Don’t know why there’s no sun up in Smith continues on Page 9

the shelves and titles I saw “Gung Ho” by Ken Blanchard and Sheldon Bowles and Wayne Dyer’s “The Power of Intention.” Although many other titles and books caught my attention, the final one I will include here is John Ortberg’s “God is Closer Than You Think.” Here I was, feeling extremely challenged and quite low, and one of the things that I enjoy most in life hit me right between the eyes: my books. Just think of the words alone and how powerful they are and how much encouragement they bring. “Embrace the Struggle,” “The Journey,” “Be Great,” “Results,” “Gung Ho,” “The Power of Intention,” and “God is Closer Than You Think.” Immediately my spirits were lifted and my attitude elevated. I am in a struggle, it will be a journey, as the leader of my family I have to be great in order to get the results we will need, this will require a gung-ho attitude,

it will be an intentional effort, and God has always been and will be right by my side. For me, words are powerful, the actions they inspire are incredible, and the adjustment in attitude is simply amazing. Most days I read for pleasure, to grow, and to learn. I find personal development materials such as books or audio programs to be an absolute asset to my success. And when needed personally or professionally, these powerful words are packed with wisdom. How about you, do you have a library or source of knowledge and encouragement? I would love to hear all about it at gotonorton@gmail.com. And as we benefit from the power of words, this really will be a better than good week. Michael Norton is a resident of Highlands Ranch, the former president of the Zig Ziglar Corporation and the CEO/founder of www.candogo.com.

Bill would battle sex trafficking It is not a well-known fact that the fastest-growing segment of organized crime, as well as the third-largest criminal enterprise in the world, is sex trafficking. And while many believe this is only an international problem that pervades Third World countries, the unfortunate reality is that sex trafficking also occurs here in the United States. The United Nations estimates that there is $9 billion in revenue generated from sex trafficking in the U.S. alone. Moreover, according to the Department of Justice, the average age of the women who are trafficked is between 13 and14 years old. In Colorado, over 30 percent of the human trafficking victims are minors, according to the National Human Trafficking Resource Center. This is striking given that the FBI cites an estimated 293,000 American youths are at risk of becoming victims of commercial sexual exploitation. The majority of these victims are runaways who live on the streets and who generally come from homes where they have been abused or from families who have abandoned them. Sadly, these women and young girls are too often sold to traffickers, where they are drugged and abused into submission. In 2000, Congress passed the Trafficking Victims Protection Act (TVPA), which created the first comprehensive federal law to address trafficking. The law allows for prosecution and severe punishment through newly formed federal crimes. According to

lone tree voice 9137 Ridgeline Blvd., Suite 210, Highlands Ranch, CO 80129

geRaRd healey ChRis RotaR RyaN BoldRey JaNe ReuteR ViC Vela eRiN addeNBRooKe JiM BouCheR audRey BRooKs sCott aNdRews saNdRa aRellaNo

President and Publisher Editor Assistant Editor Community Editor Legislative Reporter Advertising Director Sales Executive Business Manager Production Manager Circulation Director

We welcome event listings and other submissions. News and Business Press Releases Please visit lonetreevoice.net, click on the Submit Your News tab and choose a category from the drop down menu. Calendar calendar@coloradocommunitymedia.com Military Notes militarynotes@coloradocommunitymedia.com school accomplishments, honor roll and dean’s list schoolnotes@coloradocommunitymedia.com sports sports@coloradocommunitymedia.com obituaries obituaries@coloradocommunitymedia.com to subscribe call 303-566-4100

the FBI, this operation has succeeded in saving nearly 900 children from sex trafficking by successfully convicting more than 500 pimps, madams, and their associates. However, given the size and scope of this horrible industry of human exploitation, more needs to be done. Fortunately, many local and state law enforcement agencies have joined federal efforts to combat sex trafficking. In Colorado, the Colorado State Patrol created the Smuggling and Trafficking Interdiction Unit (STIU) to address these issues of human smuggling and human trafficking. Since 2006, this unit has launched efforts to eradicate our state of this type of organized crime. Recently, the STIU, along with other state and federal agencies, stopped organized human trafficking operations out of various massage parlors and spas in Colorado Springs and Pueblo. Our local operations along with national efforts have had some success, but there are other ways for Coffman continues on Page 9

A publication of

Phone: 303-566-4100 | Fax: 303-566-4098 On the Web: lonetreevoice.net Columnists and guest commentaries The Voice features a limited number of regular columnists, found on these pages and elsewhere in the paper, depending on the typical subject the columnist covers. Their opinions are not necessarily those of the Voice. Want your own chance to bring an issue to our readers’ attention, to highlight something great in our community, or just to make people laugh? Why not write a letter of 300 words or fewer. Include your full name, address and the best number to reach you by telephone.

email letters to letters@coloradocommunitymedia.com

we’re in this together Our team of professional reporters, photographers and editors are out in the community to bring you the news each week, but we can’t do it alone. Send your news tips, your own photographs, event information, letters, commentaries... If it happens, it’s news to us. Please share by contacting us at news@coloradocommunitymedia.com, and we will take it from there. After all, the Voice is your paper.


9

Lone Tree Voice 9

April 24, 2014

Commissioners sound off on job growth On the heels of the announcement that Douglas County logged the second-fastest job growth in the United States for the 12-month period ending in September 2013, the three-member Board of County Commissioners convened March 31 in a meeting open to the public to reflect on how this Denver suburb has become one of the most successful job magnets in the nation. Here are some of the highlights of that discussion, as captured by Douglas County’s communications staff. JILL REPELLA: Douglas County’s success is due in part to our belief — as a board — that the county’s most important role in economic development, is our strategic, intentional investment in the fertile environment for businesses to thrive. It’s multi-pronged. It’s our ongoing commitment to and investment in our transportation infrastructure; in public safety; in a viable, long-term water supply. It’s our business-friendly culture, our attitude as an organization, and our reputation for direct engagement with individual businesses as part of the process. Success is also due to our collaborative relationships with our cities and towns, as well as chambers of commerce and economic development councils in the county and region. JACK HILBERT: We also know there are certain drivers of business success — among them the knowledge that time is money. And when we understand and respect that, and our processes and attitude demonstrate it, everyone wins. Our commitment that the business community is successful in turn results in jobs for our citizens — and then all Douglas County communities have the opportunity to prosper. ROGER PARTRIDGE: Contributing to our success is also our understanding that the role of government is not to create jobs, but

Coffman Continued from Page 8

us to combat the growth of sex trafficking in the U.S. — we need to target its economic allies as well. Shockingly, there is big business in the online advertisements that facilitate this sex slavery. Online classified services are making millions of dollars of revenue generated from the advertisement of children for sex. Recent reports indicate that online prostitution advertising revenue generated $45 million in 2013 alone. Obviously, this is an issue that needs more attention from national policymakers. For this reason, I am proud to cosponsor H.R. 4225, the SAVE Act, which was recently introduced by Rep. Ann Wagner, R-Mo. The bill seeks to prohibit entities from knowingly selling advertising that leads to sex trafficking activities. Although larger measures

Smith Continued from Page 8

the sky. I told you I was trouble, you know that I’m no good. School board member addicted to popping bubble wrap. Charles Krauthammer is way over my head. If you go down to the woods today,

bachelor’s, graduate or professional degree.

From left, Douglas County Commissioners Roger Partridge, Jill Repella and Jack Hilbert. Courtesy photo to provide the foundation for businesses to succeed — the foundation for job creation. It includes all the elements Jill and Jack mentioned as well as our fiscally conservative approach to governing. Business and industry recognize the added value of our predictable, financially stable government. It’s another ingredient in the recipe of our success. HILBERT: How we work with our economic development partners is critical. It’s simple, really. We work collaboratively for the benefit of the entire county. If economic development is the conscious effort to go out and seek and recruit business — our focus as a county is in how we invest in the foundations for business to be successful here. Our compatible roles create a mutually beneficial partnership. PARTRIDGE: Our commitment to are needed to prevent issues like domestic violence that isolate young women from society, the SAVE Act will make this sex trafficking less profitable by cutting off methods of advertising. Moreover, the SAVE Act criminalizes this behavior and provides the tools to allow all levels of law enforcement to combat this pernicious exploitation of American women and children in the U.S. As a member of Congress, I will do what I can, but these repugnant sex traffickers operate outside both our legal and moral frameworks. Therefore, we need a total effort from our community, both local and national, to stop this heinous activity. If you would like to help the effort, I urge you to contact the Colorado Network to End Human Trafficking (CoNEHT) at 1-866-455-5075 or the Laboratory to Combat Human Trafficking at 303-295-0451.

Rosser the right choice

There couldn’t be a better choice than Mark Rosser for the Southgate Water and Sanitation Boards. Mark will not only bring his 25 years of water and wastewater engineering expertise, but also a conservative business acumen to ensure the reliability and quality of our water and sanitation services that the rest of us take for granted. Mark is ethical, openminded and respectful of all opinions. As an elected director of our local fire department’s board, I’m highly aware of how

REPELLA: Among the top drivers for any primary employer is workforce. That’s what attracts a primary employer — with the types of jobs we’re seeing come to Douglas County. PARTRIDGE: Credit is due to the county’s residents and the investment they’ve made in their education and careers. As a result, we rank eighth for all U.S. counties, with populations of 65,000 or more, for the highest percentage of residents with an associate’s,

HILBERT: I think it’s critical to note: there’s more to come…we’re not done. To continue on this journey of success we must continually listen to the business community and then ask ourselves as a board if there is more we can do and should do to further improve and partner with our local governments, chambers of commerce and economic development councils. As stewards of tax dollars, we will continue to invest in those foundational elements that are so important to the quality of life we’ve come to enjoy and that attracts business to the county. This will continue to move us forward in a positive direction.

WE WANT TO HEAR FROM YOU If you would like to share your opinion, visit our website at www.coloradocommunitymedia.com or write a letter to the editor. Include your name, full address and the best telephone number to contact you. Send letters to letters@coloradocommunitymedia.com.

U.S. Rep. Mike Coffman represents the 6th Congressional District, which includes Aurora, Centennial, Littleton and Highlands Ranch.

you’d better not go alone. Stopping by woods on a snowy evening. There is only one David Letterman. The top 10 rejected names for the seven dwarfs. Top 10 summer jobs in hell. Top 10 signs that Chef Boyardee is losing his mind. What’s so good about goodbye?

To place an Obituary for Your Loved One…

Craig Marshall Smith is an artist, educator and Highlands Ranch resident. He can be reached at craigmarshallsmith@comcast.net.

Private

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR Continued from Page 8

partnering is a pillar in the foundation of our success. It’s in how we work with our cities and towns in our mutually beneficial pursuit of and support for primary jobs here. We’re of the mindset — whether the jobs come to Castle Pines, Castle Rock, Highlands Ranch, Larkspur, Lone Tree, Parker, Roxborough, or somewhere else in Douglas County, we all win.

REPELLA: And for our workforce, one of the greatest companion stories to our job growth is the county’s diverse industry base. During this period of growth, the largest gains were in information tech (35.7 percent); professional services (21.8 percent); education, health services (11.3 percent); and financial services (10.9 percent). This means economic stability. It means the foundation for a balanced economy is in place and with it diverse employment options for our citizens and taxpayers. Another exhilarating outcome of the growth in primary jobs throughout Douglas County is the economic ripple. Existing businesses have the opportunity to grow a stronger customer base; individual employees of these businesses have greater opportunity to prosper. Recipients of sales tax and property tax revenue — local governments and special districts that provide services to businesses and citizens —receive increased revenue which allows them to reinvest back into the community through improved services which continues to strengthen economic foundations.

much our community depends on water availability, and I know we can rely on Mark to help provide for our continuing water needs in the future. Please join me in voting for Mark, either in the voting booth between 7 a.m. and 7 p.m. May 6 at the Lone Tree Civic Center, 8527 Lone Tree Parkway, or by applying for and then voting by absentee ballot. See www.southgatedistricts.org for the application form, districts maps, and more election information. Dave Jackson Board of Directors South Metro Fire Rescue Authority

303-566-4100 Obituaries@ColoradoCommunityMedia.com

Funeral Homes Visit: www.memoriams.com


10-Color

10 Lone Tree Voice

April 24, 2014

Casa Unida Foundation: An all-volunteer non-profit organization based on Christian beliefs

Education:

We believe education is the tool to break the chains of poverty. Volunteers building a classroom onto the School which serves 425 students K-12. The school needs seven additional classrooms.

Children:

The average educational level in the rural villages is usually only about 3rd or 4th grade. Normally only children with sponsors are able to finish high school. Sponsorship of $25.00 per month provides a child with uniforms, school supplies, backpack, school fees, food, and an annual physical by a doctor.

Housing:

People in rural mountain villages are very poor with an average annual income of $200.00 to $250.00. Houses are made of available materials with no running water or electricity.

To donate or volunteer or for more information, contact:

Casa Unida Foundation

1112 South Eaton St. Lakewood, CO 80232 www.casaunidafoundation.com bobmoorewr@aol.com 303-922-2470 We are a 501Š3 non-profit foundation


11-Color

Lone Tree Voice 11

April 24, 2014

KNOWLEDGE IS THE ULTIMATE

PREVENTATIVE

MEDICINE. University of Colorado Hospital is excited to bring you a helpful and informative seminar series at the Lone Tree Health Center. Get your questions answered and learn more about your health from the University of Colorado School of Medicine physicians, right here in your neighborhood.

UPCOMING SEMINARS INCLUDE: CAN I REALLY BE LOSING MY HEARING WHEN I’M SO YOUNG? Update on Surgical and Non-Surgical Treatment of Hearing Loss There are a number of reasons why people lose their hearing. Environmental factors, genetics, and aging issues can all cause hearing loss. Learn about surgical and non-surgical solutions to hearing loss and what can be done to prevent it. Presented by: Cristina Cabrera-Muffly, MD, FACS Assistant Professor, Otolaryngology Cory Portnuff, AuD, PhD Clinical Audiologist Wednesday, May 28, 2014 6:00 – 7:30pm Cost: Free

Cristina Cabrera-Muffly, MD, FACS

Cory Portnuff, AuD, PhD

CLASSES OFFERED AT: Lone Tree Health Center 9548 Park Meadows Drive Lone Tree, CO 80124 TO REGISTER AND FOR MORE INFORMATION GO TO: WWW.UCH.EDU/LONETREE Or call Amy Hurley at 720-553-1127 or email amy.hurley@uchealth.org


South MetroLIFE 12-Life-Color

12 Lone Tree Voice April 24, 2014

Euclid Hall gets magazine nod

Larry Zierer of LaZy B Acres in Wiggins brought four fuzzy angora goats to the April 12 Fiber Festival. Photos by Sonya Ellingboe

By Sonya Ellingboe

sellingboe@ coloradocommunitymedia.com In April, the Littleton Museum’s very special Navajo-Churro sheep are sheared, and it’s the occasion for an annual Fiber Festival. The hardy historic breed is the kind of sheep Littleton’s early residents would have raised on their farms — with thick coats of black and caramel-colored wool. In addition, the museum’s interpreters at the April 12 festival had a group of weathered-looking dye pots heating over open fires as they demonstrated dyeing techniques, hanks of variously colored yarn hung to dry, while the costumed women introduced new ones into the natural dye baths and answered questions from curious parents and children. At intervals, the

electric sheep shears were turned on as an assistant delivered a rotund ewe to the shearer. Explaining that if she couldn’t get both front feet on the ground, she wouldn’t think she could get away, he set her on her bottom and began to skillfully take off a year’s growth of wool — all in one thick piece. After about 10 minutes, the ewe looked much cooler and was carried back to her pen. Visitors could place a guess on how much a fleece weighed. Wide-eyed toddlers were as fascinated as the grown-ups over this bit of old-fashioned agricultural technique. There were also demonstrations of skirting, washing, carding, knitting and spinning spread around the 1860s farm under sheds topped with brush. And there were a few woolly visitors: from Gentle Spirit Alpaca Farm in Wiggins, Nancy Simmons Holloway brought an al-

paca and a paco-vicuna. Both were gentle and interested in the little people who bounced around the area. Holloway maintains a traveling “shop” and does about eight shows a year, she said. She is part of a group of alpaca raisers who exhibit together — as many as 20 booths at the National Western Stock Show. “There are a lot of fiber enthusiasts out there,” she said. From LaZy B Acres in Bennett, Larry Zierer brought four white angora goats and two angora rabbits — holding a soft, wriggly baby goat up to the fence so kids could pet it. Over in the meadow, there was a demonstration by a sheepherding dog to show another facet of a business that still goes on in Colorado. Families who enjoyed this sunny afternoon will no doubt be back next year for another time trip to the 19th century.

Denver’s Euclid Hall, in Larimer Square, has been praised for its food, mainly because of James Beard Award-nominated chef Jorel Pierce and co-owner Jennifer Jasinski, a “Top Chef Masters” finalist. Add one of America’s best beer bars to the accolades, courtesy of Travel + Leisure magazine. Here’s some of what T+L wrote about Euclid Hall: Jessica Cann and Jules Bouchard’s expert sourcing have made this brick-walled 1863 landmark building one of the best beer halls in all of Colorado — and according to Food & Wine, one of America’s best gastropubs in one of America’s best cities for foodies. Locals belly up for 12 taps, beer cocktails, and an extensive menu of bottles and cans quirkily ranked by mathematical difficulty (“Arithmetic” session beers to strong, complex bad boys under “Quantum Mechanics”). Bestsellers like Boulevard’s Tank 7 Farmhouse Ale and Avery IPA get paired with way-above-average bar bites by Jorel Pierce. Visit www.travelandleisure.com/articles/americas-best-beer-bars/9 for more information or go to www.EuclidHall.com to learn more about the restaurant.

Montgomery leaving 9News

One of my favorite TV news characters, Kirk Montgomery, is leaving 9News. According to a Denver Post story, the entertainment reporter-anchor at KUSAChannel 9 since 2001, is out at 9News. He will move to at WILX, the NBC affiliate in Lansing, Mich., reportedly to become anchor of a new 4 p.m. newscast. Montgomery announced his exit on his Facebook page April 16 after joking on the 4:30 p.m. broadcast about growing up in Michigan (and spending time on a llama farm). He earlier wrote about not being offered a full one-year contract at Channel 9. On Twitter he said, “Mixed emotion I say goodbye to CO and @9NEWS on 5/9/14.” Good luck, Kirk!

Zappolo, Adams hired by 9News

Speaking of 9News, the news ratings leader has hired former Fox 31 news anchor Ron Zappolo and ex-Rocky Mountain News sports columnist Sam Adams for an “experiment” in a segment of its newscast, The Denver Post reported. Zappolo retired a year ago after five years in the anchor chair at Fox 31 and stints as a sports anchor for KCNC-Channel 4 and then 9News. According to The Post story, Zappolo and Adams (now a comedian who has worked for several Denver TV stations) will talk sports within the weekend newscast.

Hudson Gardens lists shows

LEFT: Museum interpreters demonstrated techniques dating back to the 1860s for dyeing yarns. RIGHT: Nancy Simmons Holloway of Gentle Spirit Alpaca Farms in Wiggins brought an alpaca and a paco-vicuna to the April 12 Fiber Festival.

The Hudson Gardens and Events Center in Littleton has announced its 2014 summer concert schedule, and the musical slate includes the likes of Smokey Robinson, Chris Isaak and Boz Scaggs. Colorado favorites, the Nitty Gritty Dirt Band, open the concert schedule on June 1. Exclusive pre-sale for Hudson Gardens members only started on April 21. General public tickets go on sale on April 28. Purchase at www.AltitudeTickets.com. Hudson Gardens is located at 6115 S. Santa Fe Drive in Littleton. Parker continues on Page 13


13-Color

Lone Tree Voice 13

April 24, 2014

Museum highlights art from Colorado Kirkland Museum has opened its new “Colorado Art Survey” Number IX, as it continues to showcase its extensive collection of Colorado artworks, by more than 500 artists, dating from the 1870s to the 2000s in a timeline from realism to pure abstraction. The paintings are accompanied by decorative art from similar eras, in salon style. The Kirkland is at 1311 Pearl St. in Denver. Kirklandmuseum.org, 303-832-8576.

Art fair The Hilltop Art Fair will bring arts, crafts and music to the United Church of Christ Parker Hilltop at Flintwood and Democrat Roads, 10926 E. Democrat Road, Parker, from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. on May 3. Also, there will be a student art show and local historians at Douglas County’s historic Hilltop School House across the street. Free admission. Information: 303-841-2808. UCCParkerhilltop. org.

Movie auditions Prospective actors and writers are invited to visit MyTeenMovie.com for audition dates in Greenwood Village, Castle Rock and Parker and information about a movie to be produced in Colorado this year, with a horror theme and Nederland setting, according to Rhonda Beltzer, who is orchestrating the production.

Arts scholarship Arapahoe County high school art students

Parker Continued from Page 12

Check out the schedule and more details at www.hudsongardens.org or call 303-797-8565.

Walnut Room update complete

The Walnut Room has completed an expansion and renovation of the kitchen at its River North location, 3131 Walnut St. The six-week project doubled the size of The Walnut Room’s original kitchen, providing much-needed space to accommodate upgraded equipment, including two new pizza ovens. “These changes will allow us to run our food operations more efficiently and provide better quality food to our patrons,” said John Burr, The Walnut Room’s owner. The larger kitchen will make it easier for Chef Jonah Munson to eventually expand

are invited to apply for an annual scholarship if they plan to attend an arts school or college and major in visual or performing arts. Requirements: completed application, student portfolio, resume and two letters of recommendation. Applications available at the Curtis Arts and Humanities Center, 2349 E. Orchard Road, or on the City of Greenwood Village website, greenwoodvillage.com. The high schools attended by first- and secondplace winners will receive $300 and $200 in addition. Information: Jo Cole, 303-708-6110, jcole@greenwoodvillage.com.

A matter of Heritage

Artist/members of the Heritage Fine Arts Guild will display their works in a juried show from May 1 to 30 at Bemis Public Library, 6015 S. Datura St., Littleton. Juror is well-known Denver artist and teacher Victoria Kwasinski. A public reception is planned from 6:30 to 8 p.m. on May 6. Open during library hours: 9 a.m. to 9 p.m. Mondays to Thursdays; 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Fridays, Saturdays; 1 to 5 p.m. Sundays.

the restaurant’s menu, which features an array of pizzas, sandwiches and salads. Music fans may also notice that The Walnut Room’s concert hall also includes a new bar, since the last one was removed to make way for the new kitchen. The music venue still has capacity for 180 people for concerts and can host up to 65 for seated events, such as rehearsal dinners or private receptions. While concerts were suspended during the construction, the venue has resumed its regular slate of shows, which includes Simon Townshend of The Who on May 3. Penny Parker’s “Mile High Life” column gives insights into the best events, restaurants, businesses, parties and people throughout the metro area. Parker also writes for Blacktie-Colorado.com. You can subscribe and read her columns (Monday, Wednesday and Friday) at www.blacktiecolorado.com/pennyparker. She can be reached at penny@blacktie-llc.com or at 303-619-5209.

DONATE your gently used furniture to support our ministry.

FURNITURE THRIFT STORE

We offer FREE pick-up!

”Reasonable Prices” We are a single mom ministry. Our program goal is to educate, empower individuals so they can become employable and attain self-sufficiency.

“Sunrise in Autumn On Spanish Peaks” by Charles Partridge Adams is included in “Art Survey IX” at the Kirkland Museum of Fine and Decorative Art. Courtesy photo

Bird count

Getting jazzy

Look and listen. Birdwatchers with experience, ages 14 to adult, are needed to assist in the annual migrations survey from 6 to 10 a.m. on May 10 at South Platte Park in Littleton. Call 303-730-1022 ext. 21 to register. (Youths under 16 may participate if they have a personal interest.)

Englewood High School will hold a Jazz Night from 6 to 9 p.m. on April 29 at Englewood High School’s New Commons, 3800 S. Logan St. Tickets: $10 adults/$5 children and seniors includes dinner. Dinner, silent auction and great jazz by two groups of 18 musicians. Tickets: available from EHS band students or at the door.

UMB Bank presents

concerts.botanicgardens.org

Barenaked Ladies 08.01

Sara Bareilles 08.02 Sheryl Crow 08.13

At Chatfield • C-470 & Wadsworth

Careers

Advertise: 303-566-4100

We sell used furniture at very low, low prices. Visit our store!.. Second Chances Furniture Thrift Store 209 W. Littleton Blvd., #A Littleton, CO 80120

720-524-3891

www.secondchancesdenver.org

SUMMER WORK OPPORTUNITIES!

s

NOW HIRING: Housekeepers • Servers • Caregivers

(303) 731-0401

10001 S. Oswego Street Independent Living Parker, CO 80134 Assisted Living I-25 and Lincoln Avenue LincolnMeadowsSeniorLiving.com Transitional Memory Care Memory Care A SPECTRUM RETIREMENT COMMUNITY LM Community Papers 4 17 24 14


14-Color

14 Lone Tree Voice

April 24, 2014

Annual StarFest lands in Tech Center By Sonya Ellingboe

sellingboe @coloradocommunitymedia.com It’s time for the annual StarFest convention, and fans can expect what’s said to be the largest Star Wars Day celebra-

tion in the nation. Actually, it’s a full weekend with Light Saber Pinata Bashes, JarJar Binks Dunk Tank, Yoda Sound-Alike contest, R2D2 robots, storm troopers and costume contests as well as lots of guest performers — villains, heroes and sheroes. It takes place at the Marriott Tech

Center, 4900 S. Syracuse Ave., just north of Belleview Avenue and east of Interstate 25, opening at 2 p.m. May 2 and continuing to 6 p.m. May 4. Several other conventions are happening the same weekend: ComicsFest, HorrorFest, RoboFest and DigiFest. General-admission tickets are $20 for

May 2; $35 for May 3 or 4, Saturday or Sunday; $55 for a three-day pass. Halfprice for children 6-10; children younger than 6 free. Buy online and find more information at StarFestDenver.com. Upgrades and VIP are packages available.

ThingS To do

in your element

Editor’s notE: Calendar submissions must be received by noon Wednesday for publication the following week. Send listings to calendar@coloradocommunitymedia.com. No attachments, please. Listings are free and run on a space-available basis.

April 26

March for Babies Thousands will join in the March of Dimes annual March for Babies, the nation’s oldest walk fundraiser honoring babies born healthy and those who need help to survive and thrive. The 3-mile walk begins at 10 a.m. Saturday, April 26, at City Park. To register, visit www.marchforbabies.org. New this year is a Run for Babies 5K. Go to www.active.com to register and form information.

April 26

InnovAge Johnson Adult Day Program provides help for adults with memory loss and physical impairments. Activities and services include day trips, exercise, meals, socialization and more. It’s the single source for customized solutions that keep you living in your own home, independently. Call us to learn more. 855-487-6768 MyInnovAge.org

InnovAge Johnson Adult Day Program

7951_IA_AdultDayProg_PatioCouple_IJADP_678x6_M.indd 1

7951

Drug DiSpoSal Drive through and turn in unused or expired prescription and over-the-counter medication for safe disposal from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday, April 26, at the Douglas County Sheriff’s Office Highlands Ranch Substation, 9250 Zotos Drive. Items that cannot be accepted are needles and sharps, mercury (thermometers), oxygen containers, chemotherapy/radioactive substances, pressurized canisters, illicit drugs. Visit www.dcsheriff.net or www. highlandsranch.org.

April 29

MEntal hEalth first aid The South Metro Health Alliance and Arapahoe/Douglas Mental Health Network are offering an 8-hour interactive mental health first aid training classes, from 1-5 p.m. March 10-11 in Littleton, and from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. April 29 in Englewood. Seating is limited and registration is required at http://southmetrohealthalliance.org/meetings. Contact Traci Jones, SMHA communications specialist, at 303-793-9615 or traci@smhaco.org.

4/17/14 9:21 AM

InnovAge: CO Community Newsapers Patio Couple IJADP Ad 4 col. x 6; 4C

Size: 6.78 x 6

1 in 10 babies

in Colorado are born too soon.

You can change that.

April

26

our local sponsors

march to help all colorado babies city park in denver

register to walk at marchforbabies.org HealthONE family of hospitals including:

Fur b

“V May 1080 Chip Bret p.m. Frida Ticke


15-Color

April 24, 2014

CURTAIN TIME

Fur be it

theatre.org, Adult content.

“Venus in Fur” by David Ives plays May 3 to June 14 at Curious Theatre, 1080 Acoma St., Denver. It’s directed by Chip Walton and stars Karen Slack and Bret Aune. Performances: previews 8 p.m. May 1, 2; shows 8 p.m. Thursdays, Fridays, Saturdays; 2 p.m. Sundays. Tickets $18-$44, 303-623-0524, curious-

Old-timey teen angst “Spring Awakening” by Duncan Sheik, based on a play by Frank Wedekind, is a rock musical playing at Town Hall Arts Center, 2450 W. Main St., Littleton, through May 4. Nick Sugar is director and Donna K. Debreceni is music direc-

tor, with a live band. Performances: 7:30 p.m. Thursdays, Fridays, Saturdays; 2 p.m. Sundays and Saturday, April 26. Tickets: $20-$40, 303-794-2787, ext. 5 or townhallartscenter.com. Rated R.

Twain’s tales “Big River,” a musical by William Hauptman and Roger Miller, is based on

Lone Tree Voice 15

Mark Twain’s “The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn.” It will play through May 4 at Lone Tree Arts Center, 10075 Commons St., Lone Tree. Performances: 7:30 p.m. April 24, 30, May 1; 8 p.m. April 26, 27, May 2, 3; 1:30 p.m. April 26, 27, 30, May 4. (April 30 is a special Senior Matinee for $25). Tickets: $29-$48, plus a $3 fee, 720-5091000, LoneTreeArtsCenter.org.

Calm After the Storm

Local Focus

SM

• We have been here for 30 years • Family Owned and Operated • Free Inspections, No Creepy Door Knockers • The Preferred Local Roofing Company for Many Insurance Companies, Hundreds of Agents, and Thousands of Coloradans . . .

More News

WEÕ RE HERE!

22 community papers and websites Over 400,000 readers

303-425-7531

www.jkroofing.com

Visit us online at

ColoradoCommunityMedia.com

Discover Black Hawk’s premier dining experience. The Buffet features nightly Whole Maine Lobster, Alaskan Crab and USDA Prime Rib alongside an array of buffet favorites. Plus don’t miss the Champagne & Mimosa Brunch on Saturdays and Sundays.

2-FOR-1 BUFFET

Enjoy a 2-for-1 Buffet! Present this coupon with your Club Monarch card to the buffet cashier. Must be 21. No cash value. Gratuity not included. Limit one per person. Cannot be combined with any other offer. Other restrictions may apply. Team Members of Monarch Casino Black Hawk are ineligible to participate in these offers. Management reserves all rights. Expires 5/21/2014.

You bet it’s fun. P.O. Box 9 | 444 Main Street | Black Hawk, CO 80422 | 303.582.1000 monarchblackhawk.com | Bet with your head not over it. Gambling problem? Call 800.522.4700


16-Color

16 Lone Tree Voice

April 24, 2014

‘Spamalot’ is welcome bit of silliness on stage Monty Python play is pure audience-pleaser By Sonya Ellingboe

sellingboe@coloradocommunitymedia. com It takes place in medieval England and here — A.D. 932 and now. Many in the opening night audience knew almost every move in the Aurora Fox staging of “Monty Python’s Spamalot” — singing along on “Always Look on the Bright Side of Life” and other songs by Eric Idle, the former Monty Python member who wrote the book and lyrics and collaborated on the music with John Du Prez. They also started to laugh before the first pronouncement from the stilt-walking Knight of Ni and were appropriately bedazzled by the wonderful Sarah Rex as Lady of the Lake. They were ready for killer rabbits and flying cows and the “bring out your dead” scene (“I’m Not Dead Yet”) — and impressed that the Black Knight bit was pulled off successfully. The wise-head French guard brought another round of laughter as skilled director/choreographer Piper

Lindsay Arpan’s expeif you go rience with the show brought it all togeth“Monty Python’s er. (She performed in Spamalot” plays it on Broadway and in through May 4 at the national touring the Aurora Fox, show.) 9900 E. Colfax, AuThroughout, the rora. Performances: cast performed with 7:30 p.m. Fridays, tongue firmly in Saturdays; 2 p.m. cheek in this charmSundays. Tickets: ing spoof of the King $28/$24, 303-739Arthur legend — in1970, AuroraFox. cluding the apparorg. ently clueless king, played by mellowvoiced Stephen Day. Costumes verged on cartoon versions of medieval garments and the set has castles walls and crowded streets, with assorted imaginative props. One needs to pay attention to detail for full enjoyment. I’m certain that with a few more performances under the belt, comic timing will be even better. The musical is based on the film, “Monty Python and the Holy Grail,” a clever and silly spin on the King Arthur legend — reinvented with the fast-paced humor of the weekly “Monty Python’s Flying Circus” tele-

Bob Hoppe as Patsy and Stephen Day as King Arthur star in “Spamalot” at the Aurora Fox. Courtesy photo vision programs, beloved my millions. Nimble character and costume changes prevail: Daniel Langhoff is a goofy Sir Galahad (et al) and Michael Bouchard plays the timid Sir Robin (et al). Kurt Brighton is Sir Lancelot (et al); Jim Hindsley is Sir Belvedere (et al); Liam Speros is Prince Her-

bert (et al); and the nimble Bob Hoppe is King Arthur’s faithful servant Patsy, he who clacks the coconut shells as they canter along — and sometimes trot. Camelot it’s not — but it’s an entertaining evening for those who are somewhat familiar with the territory.

Pottery in motion as guild sets up sale Group’s 50th anniversary also offers demonstrations By Sonya Ellingboe sellingboe @coloradocommunitymedia.com The Colorado Potters Guild, at 50 years old, is the oldest artists’ cooperative in Colorado. With a studio located in an old creamery at 1541 S. Pearl St. in Denver, members work long hours on site and at home, creating functional and decorative

ceramic works that they sell at two annual shows at First Plymouth Congregational Church. They also have held workshops and contributed to nonprofit events through the years. A new project is collaboration with Denver’s South High School ceramics department in an ongoing partnership. The guild will give the school two potter’s wheels (there are four at present for 100 students). They will also hold firing workshops — gas, vapor and raku — and teach students how to make chemical glazes they

can take back to the school and apply to their work. Some pieces of student work will be included in the Spring Show and Sale on May 1, 2 and 3 at First Plymouth, and a portion of show proceeds plus a donation from the Potters Guild will help pay for the donation. Additional 50th anniversary activities include clay building and wheel demonstrations at the Cherry Creek Arts Festival Children’s Tent and donation of silent auction items to the annual KUVO Jazz public radio’s summer celebration in July. A surprise giant coffee mug giveaway

if you go The Colorado Potters Guild 50th Anniversary Sale will be on May 1, 2 and 3 at First Plymouth Congregational Church at the intersection of South Colorado Boulevard and East Hampden Avenue in Cherry Hills Village.

will take place at this summer’s Pearl Street Farmers Market, held on weekends through the summer. More information about the guild and its activities is available online: coloradopotters.org.

WE BELIEVE ENERGY STAR IS JUST A STARTING POINT. Tour our Two Model Homes!

WE ARE NEW TOWN BUILDERS. R

7 Days a Week No Appointment Necessary!

We’re inspired by classic Colorado architecture and passionate about craŌsmanship. Yet we geek out on the latest technology and building techniques. The thicker walls in our high performance homes allow for 60% more money-saving insulaƟon than in a convenƟonal home, and our roof is 6 inches higher than a typical home, so we get 2½ Ɵmes MORE insulaƟon in the aƫc. This reduces heat loss, and more importantly, reduces your energy bill!

BRAND NEW HOMES IN CASTLEWOOD RANCH!

Margaret Sandel - 303.500.3255 Margaret.Sandel@newtownbuilders.com 7001 Weaver Circle, Castle Rock

newtownbuilders.com

Walking Distance to Schools! Semi-Custom Homes on One Acre Up to 4-Car Garages 3 to 7 Bedrooms, 2-1/2 to 4-3/4 Baths 2,887 to 3,576 s.f. Homes 2-Story Plans Main Floor Master Plans

From the $400’s

Price, features, specifications, availability and other terms and conditions are subject to change without notice.


17-Color

Lone Tree Voice 17

April 24, 2014

Show marks photo business anniversary Littletown Building atrium to be site of Marquez exhibit By Sonya Ellingboe

sellingboe@coloradocommunitymedia. com In November 1992, photographer Andy Marquez and his wife, Teresa, opened their first gallery in downtown Littleton. With the exception of a few short years, he has been in the fine art photography business in Littleton since. On May 2 and 3, Marquez will have an exhibit of images shot through those years in the atrium of the Main Street Littletown Building, where his current gallery is located. It was first built as an automobile showroom by local businessman/civic leader Ivy Hunt in the 1930s. The light-filled atrium was added when the second two stories were built on in the1980s. Marquez traces his art show beginnings to a Texas flea market in May 1984 — the

date he’s celebrating. IF YOU GO Since then, he says he has participated Andy Marquez in nearly 900 art fairs will host an exhibit from coast to coast. of favorite images Have van, will travel from his 30 years are words to live by. as a photographer, He has also, with from 4 to 8 p.m. on one helper, traveled May 2 and 10 a.m. to 32 countries across to 3 p.m. on May 3 the globe, photoin the atrium of the graphing in mornings Littletown Buildand evenings. Favoring, 2329 W. Main ite journeys include St., Littleton. 303China, Cambodia, 797-6040. Africa and Chile. Favorite images from those travels will be included in his anniversary exhibit. When home in Colorado, he has published six books, including “Colorado: A Breath Away From Heaven.” (Three of his works are out of print. Others are available at the gallery.) Marquez is now occupied teaching workshops, which have been held in city and mountain locations; running photo contests; and continuing to produce new images of nearby subjects.

“When Dreams Take Shape” is one of photographer Andy Marquez’ most significant images. It was shot in Prague, his all-time favorite city. Courtesy photo

PHOTO CONTEST A photography contest, “Houses of Worship in the Denver Metro Area,” has a deadline of May 5. It is co-sponsored by Reed Art and Imaging and Englewood Camera and there will be a reception for winners on May 29 at Frame de Art, 3065 Broadway in Englewood, where photos will be exhibited through the month of June. They will be for sale.

To enter: send .jpeg images to andymarquezgallery@icloud. com. Entry fee is $10 each or $50 for six images, via PayPal on the website: andymarquez.com. Information: 303-797-6040. (In the future, there will be a “Springtime in Littleton” contest for images shot within the city limits. Keep it in mind as you enjoy the local flowering trees and bulbs. Details to come soon.)

Job N Cust SHO Pho

Twice as large as any other show in Colorado!

The Denver Mart

April 26th and 27th

Saturday 9am - 5pm • Sunday 9am - 4pm

$1 OFF COUPON www.tannergunshow.com

“Homecoming” is a favorite Marquez image, shot amidst Genessee Park’s buffalo herd. Courtesy photo

Actual Spectrum Residents

HERE, YOU’LL ALWAYS FEEL AT HOME (303) 731-0401

10001 S. Oswego Street Parker, CO 80134 I-25 and Lincoln Avenue, East of Skyridge Hospital LincolnMeadowsSeniorLiving.com A SPECTRUM RETIREMENT COMMUNITY LM Community Papers 4 10 24 14

FA M I LY F E E D #4 REG. $5440

SAVE $18 with this coupon

35

$

Limited time $500 waitlist special

ONLY

99

HickoryHouseRibs.com

cn TAKE-OUT ONLY No Substitutions • Full Rack Baby Back Ribs • 1/2 BBQ Chicken • BBQ Chicken Breast • 1 lb. Pulled Pork • Baked Beans (pint) • Cole Slaw (pint)

• Garlic Toast (5) •Bottle BBQ Sauce

NOT VALID FRI OR SAT

Limit 3 feeds • Sun.- Mon.-Tues.-Wed.-Thurs. Only • Thru

Independent Living Assisted Living Transitional Memory Care Memory Care

5/02/2014

10335 S. Parker Rd. Parker • 303-805-9742

To advertise your restaurant in this section, call:

HH 10.20.13ColoNwsFam.REVFeed#4.indd 1

10/20/13 8:54 AM

(303) 566-4100


18-Color

18 Lone Tree Voice

April 24, 2014

Wild Music explores how music is more than a human instinct, and runs deep in animals across the planet. From insects at the edge of the forest, to the song of the whale in the deep ocean, immerse yourself in opportunities to hear, see, feel, create and play the diverse songs and sounds of the Earth.

NOW OPEN!

The Wildlife Experience 10035 Peoria Street Parker, Colorado 80134 Near Park Meadows, 1 Mile East of I-25 on Lincoln Avenue

720.488.3344 thewildlifeexperience.org

Wing flying high as author of kids’ books Colorado children’s writer will appear at Castle Rock library

In many of them, readers will find a bit about “there arose such a clatter” or “children are dreaming,” references to the original By Sonya Ellingboe Night Before book — which sellingboe@coloradocommunitymedia.com should amuse kids who catch it — the beginning She has been publishing books for chilof that delightful process of dren for 23 years — 17 “Night Before …” Wing “connecting the dots” that titles and others such as “How to Raise a avid readers enjoy repeatDinosaur.” Author Natasha Wing lives in Fort Collins and works year-round writ- edly through their lives. Teachers use Wing’s books for rhyming books for children, visiting schools to talk with students about writing and vis- ing lessons as well, and Wing talks to kids iting locations such as the Philip S. Miller about the editing process — “like when the Library in Castle Rock to talk with parents, teacher marks your paper with a red penkids and librarians about her process and cil.” Illustrators are chosen by the ideas. publisher and the author seldom She will be at the library in IF YOU GO meets them, she says, which is Castle Rock from 6:30 to 8 p.m. Author Natasha Wing probably just as well. An editor on May 2. In addition to talkwill appear at the Philip once told her the writer might ing about her books, she will S. Miller Library, 100 S. be sitting there saying “put a talk with children about how Wilcox St., Castle Rock, poodle in there, please,” when it they can write their own stofrom 6:30 to 8 p.m. on was not a good idea. Amy Wumries. Light refreshments will be May 2. Pre-registration mer has illustrated Wing’s five available, there will be a craft is required for everyone most recent titles and Wing feels activity and Wing’s books will who plans on attendshe’s an excellent fit. be for sale and signing, including. Contact: Patty Wing has lived in Colorado ing: “The Night Before Mother’s Wright-Manassee, 303for the past four years. She grew Day,” “The Night Before Father’s 791-7323. up in Connecticut, went to colDay,” “The Night Before Sumlege in Arizona, where she met mer Vacation,” “The Night Beher husband, and lived in Califore Kindergarten,” “The Night Before My Birthday.” (They are published fornia for 22 years. From an early age, she in paperback.) “wanted to create magical moments for Wing said in a telephone interview April kids all over the world.” 12 that she has written about one per year She recently visited Costa Rica and of the “Night Before” titles and is always came back with an idea for an adult book, looking for new ideas, which may come she said. She writes about things she’s curifrom teachers or parents or children. One ous about and wants to write about artists mother asked for one about July 4 — her — “I’m tuned into artists.” son’s favorite holiday — and the publishChildren who are interested in writing er said books about summer don’t sell as will enjoy looking at Wing’s website, taiwell. (But it’s in the works, Wing said.) Next lored to young readers: “Why am I a writin line is “The Night Before Hanukkah.” A er?” “Why I write now.” There are photos of teacher has requested one on St. Patrick’s Wing through her life. (Natashawing.wordDay. press.com/about.)

Coming Fall 2014 To Parker “Every student, regardless of background or skill level, will achieve mastery and will demonstrate that they can succeed in high school, in college, and in their chosen career.” No exceptions. No excuses.

Informational Meeting

Please visit www.cecdc914.org to see the full schedule of meetings.

DATE AND TIME

LOCATION

Saturday, April 19 at 9:00 a.m.

Colorado Early Colleges Douglas County

Thursday, April 24 at 6:30 p.m.

Highlands Ranch Library

Wednesday, May 7 at 6:30 p.m.

Colorado Early Colleges Douglas County

Saturday, May 10 at 9:00 a.m.

Colorado Early Colleges Douglas County

Saturday, May 17 at 9:00 a.m.

Lone Tree Library

Colorado Early Colleges Douglas County 10235 Parkglenn Way Parker, CO 80138

Lone Tree Library 8827 Lone Tree Pkwy. Lone Tree, CO 80124

Highlands Ranch Library 9292 Ridgeline Blvd. Highlands Ranch, CO 80129

Due to CEC’s almost exclusively distinctive structuring as a school, I have been able to achieve much higher goals than I could have previously dreamed of elsewhere. I have attained the required 20 high school credits along with 65 college credits making an Associates of General Arts degree. ...I have saved my family over $96,000.” CEC Graduate, Jenelle Osborne

About CECDC: -Tuition-Free public charter school -Comprehensive college prep program -College courses provided on CECDC campus as part of a normal school day -Post-Secondary and Workforce Readiness Guarantee -Part-time opportunities for homeschool and private school students -College course opportunities through partnerships with: Arapahoe Community College, Community College of Aurora Metro State University, University of Colorado Denver, Red Rocks Community College 10235 Parkglenn Way Parker, CO 80138

www.cecdc914.org

Call for pricing in your area.

303-566-4091 ! This Weekend


19-Sports-Color

Lone TreeSPORTS

Lone Tree Voice 19 April 24, 2014

Jaguars handle Huskies in league affair

LEFT: Rock Canyon’s Kat Wood lines up a shot on goal April 17 as Douglas County’s Lindsey Rost (20) plays defense. Wood didn’t connect on her shot but the Jaguars did prevail, 3-0. RIGHT: Rock Canyon’s Maddie Brown (5) and Douglas County’s Gabby Scariano (19) battle for position in the first half of the Jaguars’ Continental League win April 17 at Shea Stadium in Highlands Ranch. Rock Canyon’s Shannon McFarland (10) looks on. Photos by Ryan Boldrey

Rock Canyon tops Douglas County 3-0, wins third straight By Ryan Boldrey

rboldrey@coloradocommunitymedia.com Ask Rock Canyon head coach Matt Henbest how his team has responded to its recent setback to No. 1 Mountain Vista, and he will tell you it’s taken a couple games to bounce back, but he feels his team is in a good place for the stretch run. The No. 2-ranked Jaguars (9-1, 6-1 Continental) won a pair of 1-0 games against Littleton and ThunderRidge after the loss

to the Golden Eagles and went into the half leading by the same count against Douglas County on April 17. That’s when Henbest let his team know that it was time to step it up, start being crisper with their passes and be more aggressive. The result was a resounding 3-0 win over the visiting Huskies (7-4-1, 4-3-1). “I was not very happy with the way they played at all in the first half so I kind of expressed that to them,” he said. “They answered the call. … That last half we put together was actually very good and we’ll use that as kind of a spring board into the rest of the season and hopefully be ready for the playoffs.” After a lifeless first half that had both coaches disappointed in the effort at the break, Rock Canyon came out firing. Junior

forward Rebecca Pousma laced a laser past Douglas County keeper Seanna Parker from just inside the top of the penalty box just 2 minutes, 46 seconds into the half for a 2-0 lead. The Huskies had their best scoring opportunity of the game roughly 10 minutes later, but with goaltender Julia Henning sprawling on the ground out of position and two Huskies converging on a loose ball at the goal line, sophomore defender Emily Sattem raced in and cleared the ball off the goal line, preserving the 2-0 lead. Senior Alex Sundberg then fielded a lengthy pass from Rachel Reinhardt up the left side of the field, got behind the Douglas defense, and shot one across Parker into the opposite corner of the net with 15:19 to go for her first tally of the season.

Also scoring for Rock Canyon was sophomore Dakota Wendell, who got things started for the Jaguars with her third goal of spring with 5:16 left in the first half. “I think it really started our whole attack,” Wendell said. “Before we were a little passive and then that started to get our fire going.” Both teams were playing without their leading scorers in the match. Rock Canyon was missing Kaycie Young (8 goals) and Douglas County was without Rachel Muller (9 goals), who sprained her ankle in the Huskies’ 4-0 win over Ponderosa on April 15. “I think were flat pretty much the entire game,” Douglas County coach Ron Kingery Soccer continues on Page 24

Golden Eagles pitch past No. 1 Grizzlies MLB scouts watch high school pitchers duel as Vista wins 3-0 By Jim Benton

jbenton @coloradocommunitymedia.com Armed with an electric fastball, a nasty curve and revenge, Nick Leonard pitched Mountain Vista to a victory over top-ranked and defending Class 5A state champion ThunderRidge. Leonard, a senior who has signed to play at Washington State, allowed four hits and struck out 13 batters in a seven-inning, 3-0 win in the April 16 Continental League confrontation played on a cool afternoon at ThunderRidge. Scouts from the Colorado Rockies and Miami Marlins watched Leonard and ThunderRidge starter A.J. Jones lock up in an entertaining pitcher’s duel that wasn’t decided until the sixth inning on Michael Dunnebecke’s bases-loaded triple. ThunderRidge, which scored seven runs in the first inning and rocked Leonard in a 16-3 secondround Class 5A state tournament triumph last May, looked to have the right-hander on the ropes after the first two batters reached base in the first inning. Leonard issued his only walk of the game to Grizzlies leadoff batter Aaron Germani, and he

moved to third on a misplayed double to centerfield by Josh Brown. That’s when Leonard had recollections of last May and he went into a revenge mode striking out ThunderRidge’s third, fourth and fifth batters to escape unharmed. “I remembered my performance in the playoffs last year against these guys,” explained Leonard. “They tattooed me early. They pretty much beat me in the first inning. I didn’t get the second out. “I just made a conscious decision after that second batter that I wasn’t going to let that happen again. That was a little motivation. It was time for a little payback.” Leonard retired 13 straight batters, nine via strikeouts, after the start when ThunderRidge had runners on second and third with nobody out in the bottom of the first. “I had good fastball command and my off-speed was breaking pretty well,” said Leonard. “I felt pretty good once I got past that first inning.” “My mentality is just to pitch effectively, get as many outs as I can as quick as I can. If it turns out I get strikeouts, it’s an added bonus. My mentality is to keep runners off base. If that means I have to get groundballs, fly balls or whatever it takes.” Leonard, who earned his sixth win of the season, lowered his

ERA to 0.85 and he has struck out 53 batters in 41 innings. His fastball was clocked in the low 90s and his breaking pitches kept the ThunderRidge hitters off balance in a masterful performance. “I heard I was throwing a little harder than usual,” said Leonard who labeled Dunnebecke as the game’s Most Valuable Player. “Usually I’m at 88-89 but I had a lot of adrenaline in me. The past couple starts my curve has been inconsistent. Against ThunderRidge, I decided I was going to throw the pitch and throw it with conviction and hopefully gets some outs. “Playing ThunderRidge and especially since they are the defending state champions, it was a big game. They have always been our hometown rival so we like to come out and play against them. A.J. Jones is one of the best pitchers I’ve ever faced. That’s the kid I wanted to pitch against. When we played them last year it was me against him.” Jones gave up four hits and fanned eight, but walks in the sixth inning were his downfall as the Golden Eagles scored three times on just one hit. He walked Dylan Formby and Marc Mummer and following a sacrifice bunt, Will Dixon was intentionally walked. Dunnebecke followed with his triple to leftcenter field. “I was just thinking, hit the ball

Mountain Vista starter Nick Leonard pitched seven innings, allowing four hits, no runs and striking out 13 batters in a 3-0 victory over ThunderRidge on April 16. Photo by Jim Benton hard and hopefully something will happen to help Nick out,” said Dunnebecke. “He threw a great game.” The victory kept Mountain Vista tied with Regis Jesuit for first place in the Continental League while ThunderRidge dropped

into a tie for third place. “We beat a good program,” said Mountain Vista coach Ron Quintana. “It was a great pitching performance by both of pitchers. That’s what you expect or at least Eagles continues on Page 24


20

20 Lone Tree Voice

Careers April 24, 2014

Careers

Help Wanted

Advertise: 303-566-4100

Help Wanted

Help Wanted

Attention Hair Stylists

New Creations Beauty Salon Located in the Wood Lawn Shopping Center in Littleton has a booth for rent $130/week (303)794-2248 / (303)794-2228 Ask for Jeanie or Carolyn

Colorado Statewide Classified Advertising Network

CHILD CARE TEACHERS! La Petite Academy is growing & seeking Group Lead Qualified Teachers! Must have 6 ECE credits and previous child care experience. Apply online at www.lapetite.com, click on Careers, click on Search Openings, use Requisition # 6310BR. Call 303-841-6160 w/ questions. EOE.

Looking for a fun place to spend your summer and have summer meals for half price. Wendy's is Hiring Friendly people to help with our summer volume increase. Apply on-line and then stop into the restaurant for an interview!! www.wendys.com Local company is looking for drivers to transport railroad crews up to a 200 mile radius from Denver. Must live within 20 minutes of Coors Field & 31st railroad yard, be 21 or older, and pre-employment drug screen required. A company vehicle is provided, paid training, and benefits available. No special license needed. Compensation is $.20 per mile and $9.00 an hour while waiting. Apply at www.renzenberger.com Drivers: $2,000.00 Sign-On Bonus! Local-Home Nightly! Flatbed Runs. CDL-A, 1yr Exp. Req. Estenson Logistics. Apply: www.goelc.com 1-888-399-5856

25 DRIVER TRAINEES NEEDED! Learn to drive for Swift Transportation at US Truck. Earn $750 per week! CDL & Job Ready in 3 weeks! 1-800-809-2141

EARN UP TO $150 DAILY -

Firefighter/EMT Exam

Take a written exam (basic knowledge skills) on June 2 that upon passing can place you on an eligibility list for hiring with 13 fire departments/districts in the Denver metro area. Visit www.drcog.org and click on services and resources or call 303.480.6730.

LEGITIMATE WORK AT HOME No Sales, no Investment, No Risk, Free training, Free website. Contact Susan at 303-646-4171 or fill out form at www.wisechoice4u.com

MODULAR HOMES FOR SALE

Brand New FACTORY BUILT HOMES From $25,383 + set and delivery. Construction to Perm Loans FHA/VA Loans 303-573-0067 Free Brochure, floor plans & price sheet www.coloradofactorymodulars.com

Hiring One Ton and 3/4 Ton Pickup trucks to deliver RVs. 10¢/mile Sign-On SYNC2 MEDIA Bonus, 4 Terminals & 8 Backhaul LocaBuy a statewide classified line ad in tions. Call 866-764-1601 or newspapers across Colorado for just www.foremosttransport.com $250 per week. Maximize results with PAID CDL TRAINING! our Frequency Deals! Contact this No Experience Needed! Stevens Transport will sponsor the cost newspaper or call SYNC2 Media at: 303571-5117 of your CDL training! Earn up to $40K first year - $70K third year! EOE 888-993-8043 www.becomeadriver.com

Call Center Representative Sooper Credit Union invites you to consider a rewarding career assisting our members with valuable counseling and affordable solutions. See our Careers page: www.soopercu.org.

GAIN 130 LBS!

Savio House needs foster parents to provide temporary care for troubled teens ages 12-18. Training, 24 hour support and $1900/month provided. Must complete precertification training and pass a criminal and motor vehicle background check. Call Michelle 303-225-4073 or visit saviohouse.org.

Gifted Education Consultant/Data Team Independent contract drivers needed to deliver flowers for Mother's Day holiday. Must use your own vehicle and provide MVR, insurance & license. Contact Mike at (720) 229-6800.

Implementation Coach, for member school districts of East Central BOCES. Master’s degree in Education Field; Colorado licensed. Working knowledge of the Gifted Education and Data Team process a must. The Gifted Consultant will work cooperatively with 20 member school districts to assist them as they meet the needs of their gifted students. The Data Team Implementation Coach will provide Data Team Implementation support for 3-4 rural school districts. Salary-Daily Rate based on experience, approximately 186 total days. Application can be accessed on the East Central BOCES website – http://www.ecboces.org. This website has compatibility issues with Internet Explorer, so use a browser other than Internet Explorer. Click on pull down tab labeled Jobs. Questions contact Don at (719) 775-2342, ext. 116 or email dona@ecboces.org. ECBOCES is an Equal Opportunity Employer.

Pre K Teacher Toddler Teacher &

needed Full Time, 12 minutes West of Golden on I70. Must be qualified by current state regulation. Looking for team players, some benefits provided. Please call Monday-Friday 7am-6pm 303-674-9070 and ask for Martha TECHNOLOGY CyberSource Corporation, a Visa Inc. company, currently has openings in our Highlands Ranch, Colorado location for: - Systems Analysts (141393) to be responsible for supporting the company’s production transaction processing systems. Apply online at www.visa.com and reference Job#. EOE

Work Wanted Part-Time Desk Position

Community Association in Highlands Ranch is seeking a qualified person to work the front desk at the community clubhouse. Seeking someone with computer skills, able to enforce policies, and excellent customer service skills. Professional administrative experience preferred. Currently this is a Friday and Saturday position. Please send resume to bchambers@ccmcnet.com.

SUMMERTIME MEANS… GARAGE SALE TIME! 8 lines in 18 papers

$

City of Black Hawk. Hiring Range: $17.59 $20.23 per hour DOQ/E. Unbelievable benefit package and exceptional opportunity to serve in Colorado’s premiere gaming community located 18 miles west of Golden. Requirements: High School Diploma or GED, valid Colorado driver’s license Class R with a safe driving record with the ability to obtain a Class A with P rating within one year of hire, and the ability to lift 80 pounds. To be considered for this limited opportunity, please apply online at www.cityofblackhawk.org/goto/ employee_services. Please note: Applicants are required to upload their resumes during the online application process. Please be sure your resume includes all educational information and reflects the past ten (10) years’ work history. Applicants must apply online and may do so at City Hall which is located at 201 Selak Street in Black Hawk. The City supports its employees and appreciates great service! EOE.

To place a 25-word COSCAN Network ad in 84 Colorado newspapers for only $250, contact your local newspaper or call SYNC2 Media at 303-571-5117. HELP WANTED - DRIVERS

Caregivers to provide in-home care to senior citizens who need assistance with activities of daily living. Call Today 303-736-6688 www.visitingangels.com /employment

STREET MAINTENANCE WORKER I

45

303-566-4091

303-566-4091

Join the Team

Colorado Community Media, Colorado’s second largest newspaper group and publishers of 22 weekly local community newspapers and 24 websites is seeking to find a Classified Sales Representative & Territory Sales Representative.

CLASSIFIED SALES REPRESENTATIVE

Candidate will receive: • Unlimited earning potential (no cap on commissions) • Hourly pay • Benefits package offered • Sell multiple programs to a wide array of clients • Current established accounts Helpful skills include: • Strong outbound contact with new and existing clients • Handle a fast paced environment in an ever changing industry • Be able to multi-task

TERRITORY SALES REPRESENTATIVES

Candidates will receive: • Unlimited earning potential (no cap on commissions) • Salary • Benefits package offered • Sell multiple programs to a wide array of clients – print, digital, direct mail, inserts, special projects and much more! • Able to sell multiple programs to all advertisers within territory – print, digital, direct mail, inserts, special projects and much more! (did we mention no cap on commissions?) • Current established accounts Helpful skills include: • Strong outbound contact with new and existing clients • Handle a fast paced environment in an ever changing industry • Be able to multi-task Please send cover letter, resume to eaddenbrooke@coloradocomunitymedia.com. Please include job title in subject line..

ColoradoCommunityMedia.com

Colorado Community Media offers competitive pay and benefits package. No phone calls please.

Local Focus. More News.

21 newspapers & 23 websites. Connecting YOU to your LOCAL community.

ColoradoCommunityMedia.com 303-566-4100

An

divo

p

Zer

&

ww

A

N

We He


21

Lone Tree Voice 21

April 24, 2014

Wisconsin-bound swimmer excels in pool Highlands Ranch’s Mueller picks his moments in top meets By Jim Benton

jbenton@coloradocommunitymedia.com Nathan Mueller is focused on swimming this season. The Highlands Ranch senior has already signed to swim at Wisconsin so he hasn’t had to deal with the recruiting process — which can sometimes sidetrack athletes. “Things have been going pretty good finishing up my senior year,” Mueller said. “Committing to Wisconsin earlier this year, it has been kind of fun just to focus on swimming and not have to worry about the recruiting process like I did last year.” Mueller is among the swimmers to log top times in his specialty events this season. For him, it’s been the 200- and 500-yard freestyle. He was clocked in a season-best



200 freestyle time of 1:44.55 during the Dick Rush Memorial in Thornton March 22. That is the ninth quickest reported in the state this season. At the same meet, Mueller swam a 4:42.30 in the 500 freestyle, which ranks as the state’s fifth best for Class 5A swimmers. “The way my training works, my times probably won’t be any lower until I actually swim at state and hopefully I can get my times down there,” he said. “But even then I don’t know if I’m looking for a best time necessarily. It’s a race and I’ll see what I can do.” Mueller has been a contender for the past three seasons in races at the state swimming championships. As a freshman he was 11th in the 200 freestyle and 10th in the 100 butterfly. He was third in the 200 freestyle and second in the 500 in 2012. Last season he was again third in the 200 and the runner-up in the 500.

Carter Griffin, the Chaparral graduate who swam for the Ponderosa co-op team, won the 200 and 500 freestyle events the past two seasons and is now swimming at the University of Missouri. “For the past two years, I’ve raced against Carter Griffin and he was a great swimmer,” said Mueller. “We really pushed each other in the pool and it came down to race strategy. I really want to see what I can do at state. I’ll have some great competition.” A few of the swimmers that Mueller will have to watch in the 200 and 500 include Smoky Hill’s Johan Hong, Jake Markham of Cherry Creek, Hennessy Stuart of Regis Jesuit and Thompson Valley’s John Thorne. “For the most part I’m an endurance swimmer,” explained Mueller. “If you are swimming the 50 freestyle, that’s a sub 30-second race, there’s not really a race strategy other than just swimming. “In the longer events like the 200 and 500, you look over at your competition at

all times during the race and see across the pool where they are at.” Most of the longer freestyle races are won or lost depending on which swimmer has the best endurance and timing. “One of the big trends to do is take off real fast and then toward the end of the race just throw down the hammer, throw down the hammer first and then just hold that threshold and win the race,” explained Mueller. “One of the things last year, looking at the competition between me, Carter and the other finalist, we were just looking over to see who was going to throw down the hammer first. That makes the race really exciting because it comes down to the last 100.” Mueller has learned that winning is mostly determined by the finish in both the 200 and 500 freestyles. “It’s a matter of who will drop the hammer first and hold on to it,” said Mueller. “You can drop the hammer too early and get caught in the last 25 of the race.”

  





  

Franktown

Lone Tree

Highlands Ranch

Highlands Church of God

Trinity Lutheran Church & School

Sunday Worship 8:00 & 10:45 a.m. Trinity Lutheran School & ELC (Ages 3-5, Grades K-8)

 303-841-4660 www.tlcas.org  Castle Rock  First United

UNITED METHODIST CHURCH “A man who was merely a man and said the sort of things Jesus said would not be a great moral teacher…You must make your choice. Either this man was, and is, the Son of God, or else a madman or something worse.” (C.S. Lewis)

Beginning March 9th: “Jesus–The Son of God”

Sunday mornings at Immanuel Lutheran 9:30 a.m. Sundays Lone Tree Civic Center, 8527 Lone Tree Parkway, Lone Tree, CO

www.ImmanuelLutheran–LoneTree.org

Littleton

 Services:  Saturday 5:30pm

Sunday 8am, 9:30am, 11am Sunday School 9:15am

Little Blessings Day Care www.littleblessingspdo.com

Weaving Truth and Relevance into Relationships and Life

worship Time 10:30AM sundays

www.gracepointcc.us

Line camp - Castle Rock Sundays 10 am DC Fairgrounds – Kirk Hall 2014 Holy Week and Easter www.savethecowboy.com at Christ’s Episcopal Church

“Loving God - Making A Difference”

A place for you

email: bobandtreva@yahoo.com

Sunday

8:30 a.m. 11:00 a.m.

Lone Tree

Lone Tree

Church of Christ

Palm Sunday Services – 8:00 and 10:30 a.m. Maundy Thursday The Seder – 6:30 p.m. Good Friday Tre Ore – noon Presentation on Walking the Labyrinth – 7:00 p.m. Tenebrae – 7:30 pm Easter Sunday Reflective Communion – 8 a.m. Gourmet brunch – 9:00 a.m. Easter egg hunt – 10:15 a.m. Festive Eucharist – 11:00 a.m. 615 4th Street Castle Rock, CO 80104 www.ChristsEpiscopalChurch.org 303.688.5185

Currently meeting at: Serving southeast Denver Acres Greenthe Elementary School 13524 Acres Green area Drive 303-688-9506 www.LoneTreeCoC.com

303-794-2683 Preschool: 303-794-0510 9203 S. University Blvd. Highlands Ranch, 80126

Parker

Where people are excited about God’s Word.

Alongside One Another On Life’s Journey

www.gracecolorado.com

You are invited to worship with us:

Sundays at 10:00 am

Grace is on the NE Corner of Santa Fe Dr. & Highlands Ranch Pkwy. (Across from Murdochs)

303-798-8485

Greenwood Village

Weekly children’s classes, devotions and study DouglasCountyAssembly@gmail.com 303.947.7540

Sunday School 9:00 & 10:30 am

www.HFCdenver.org

GRACE PRESBYTERIAN

The Bahá’í Faith

“The earth is but one country, and mankind its citizens.”

8:00 am Chapel Service 9:00 & 10:30 am Sanctuary 10:20 am St. Andrew Wildflower

2121 Dad Clark Drive 720.259.2390

1609 W. Littleton Blvd. (303) 798-1389 • www.fpcl.org

Parker

Sunday Worship

www.st-andrew-umc.com

Pastor Paul Flannery “It’s not about us... It’s about serving others... T hen God gets the Glory!”

Sunday Worship - 10:00am Bible Study immediately following Thursday Bible Study - 7:30pm

with Kevin Weatherby

Sunday Worship 10:30 4825 North Crowfoot Valley Rd. Castle Rock • canyonscc.org 303-663-5751

Phone: 303-910-6017

Littleton

Welcome Home!

303 798 6387

An Evangelical Presbyterian Church

Meeting Sun at 11am at Northridge Rec Center 8801 S. Broadway Highlands Ranch, CO 80126

9:00 am Sunday WorShip

9:00am Spiritual Formation Classes for all Ages 90 east orchard road littleton, co

Cowboy Church

Open and Affirming

First Presbyterian Church Non-Denominational of Littleton

Methodist Church  1200 South Street  Castle Rock, CO 80104 303.688.3047 www.fumccr.org

Highlands Ranch

Parker evangelical Presbyterian church Connect – Grow – Serve

Sunday Worship

8:45 am & 10:30 am 9030 Miller road Parker, Co 80138 303-841-2125 www.pepc.org

Sunday Worship: 10:45AM & 6PM Bible Study: 9:30AM Children, Young People & Adults 4391 E Mainstreet, Parker, Colorado 80134 Church Office – (303) 841-3836

www.parkerbiblechurch.org United Church Of Christ Parker Hilltop 10926 E. Democrat Rd. Parker, CO • 10am Worship www.uccparkerhilltop.org 303-841-2808

Abiding Word Lutheran Church 8391 S. Burnley Ct., Highlands Ranch

(Next to RTD lot @470 & University)

Congregation Beth Shalom Serving the Southeast Denver area

Call or check our website for information on services and social events! www.cbsdenver.org

303-794-6643

Worship Services Sundays at 9:00am

303-791-3315

pastor@awlc.org www.awlc.org

SErviCES:

Saturday 5:30pm

Sunday 8:00 & 10:30am

Education Hour: Sunday 9:15am Joyful Mission Preschool 303-841-3770 7051 East Parker Hills Ct. • Parker, CO 303-841-3739 www.joylutheran-parker.org

To advertise your place of worship in this section, call 303-566-4091 or email kearhart@ColoradoCommunityMedia.com.

Parker

Community Church of Religious Science Sunday 10:00 a.m. at the historic Ruth Memorial Chapel on Mainstreet

303.805.9890 www.ParkerCCRS.org


0.496 AM/L

22 Lone Tree Voice

and said County Treasurer issued a certificate of purchase therefore to Allen Hedrick. That said tax lien sale was made to satisfy the delinquent taxes assessed against said real estate for the year 2006; That said real estate was taxed or specially assessed in the name(s) of David P & Vickey A Chambers for said year 2006.

NOTICE OF PURCHASE OF REAL ESTATE AT TAX LIEN SALE AND OF APPLICATION FOR ISSUANCE OF TREASURER’S DEED

22

Government Legals

/s/ Diane A. Holbert County Treasurer of Douglas County

Public Notice

Legal Notice No.: 925308 First publication: April 24, 2014 Last publication: May 8, 2014 Publisher: Douglas County News-Press

NOTICE OF PURCHASE OF REAL ESTATE AT TAX LIEN SALE AND OF APPLICATION FOR ISSUANCE OF TREASURER’S DEED To Every Person in Actual Possession or Occupancy of the hereinafter Described Land, Lot or Premises, and to the Person in Whose Name the Same was Taxed or Specially Assessed, and to all Persons having an Interest or Title of Record in or to the said Premises and To Whom It May Concern, and more especially to: OCCUPANT - Allen Hedrick - Bud Turk, President, c/o Prestige Properties Ltd. David P Chambers & Vickey A Chambers - Jane S Meislahn, Secretary, c/o Prestige Properties Ltd - Prestige Properties Ltd You and each of you are hereby notified that on the 15th day of November 2007 the then County Treasurer of the County of Douglas, in the State of Colorado, sold at public tax lien sale to Allen Hedrick the following described real estate situate in the County of Douglas, State of Colorado, to wit: LOT 4 BLK 3 MERIBEL VILLAGE 1 0.496 AM/L and said County Treasurer issued a certificate of purchase therefore to Allen Hedrick. That said tax lien sale was made to satisfy the delinquent taxes assessed against said real estate for the year 2006; That said real estate was taxed or specially assessed in the name(s) of David P & Vickey A Chambers for said year 2006. That a Treasurer’s Deed will be issued for said real estate to the said Allen Hedrick at 1:00 o’clock P.M., on the 7th day of August 2014, unless the same has been redeemed. Said property may be redeemed from said sale at any time prior to the actual execution of said Treasurer’s Deed. Witness my hand this 11th day of April 2014. /s/ Diane A. Holbert County Treasurer of Douglas County Legal Notice No.: 925308 First publication: April 24, 2014 Last publication: May 8, 2014 Publisher: Douglas County News-Press

Government Legals

Public Notice NOTICE OF PUBLIC WORKSHOP Douglas County Community Development is conducting a public workshop to review proposed revisions to Section 18A of the Douglas County Zoning Resolution on Thursday, May 8, 2014, at 4:00 p.m. in the County Commissioners’ Hearing Room at 100 Third Street, Castle Rock, CO 80104. The proposed changes are an overall rewrite of Section 18A – Water Plan Overlay District (formerly known as the Water Supply Overlay District) and newly developed Section 18B – Adjusted Water Demand Standards. For more specific information or if you plan to attend the workshop, call Kati Rider, Principal Planner, Douglas County Planning Services at 303-660-7460 regarding file #DR2014-001. Legal Notice No.: 925348 First Publication: April 24, 2014 Last Publication: April 24, 2014 Publisher: Douglas County News-Press Public Notice NOTICE OF PURCHASE OF REAL ESTATE AT TAX LIEN SALE AND OF APPLICATION FOR ISSUANCE OF TREASURER’S DEED To Every Person in Actual Possession or Occupancy of the hereinafter Described Land, Lot or Premises, and to the Person in Whose Name the Same was Taxed or Specially Assessed, and to all Persons having an Interest or Title of Record in or to the said Premises and To Whom It May Concern, and more especially to: OCCUPANT - Gerald P Lucy and Gloria J Walsh - Stephen Bruce Gale - Stuart R Opp and Deidre A Opp You and each of you are hereby notified that on the 12th day of November 2009 the then County Treasurer of the County of Douglas, in the State of Colorado, sold at public tax lien sale to Stephen Bruce Gale the following described real estate situate in the County of Douglas, State of Colorado, to wit: LOT 4 BLK 4 REFILING OF WESTCREEK LAKES FLG 2 1.29 AM/L and said County Treasurer issued a certi-

ficate of purchase therefore to Stephen Commissioners Proceedings, March Bruce Gale. That2014 said tax lien sale was

made to satisfy the delinquent taxes asTotal against Description sessed said real estate for the year 2008; That said real estate was taxed 1 STOP TIRE & AUTO SERVICE $67.82 Equipment & Motor Parts of or specially assessed in Vehicle the name(s) 18TH JUDICIAL DISTRICT JUVENILE Stuart R Opp & Deidre A Opp for said ASSESSMENT CENTER 91,690.78 2014 Contribution-Juvenile Assessment year 2008. Center 3M 1,125.04 Sign Parts &Deed Supplies That a Treasurer’s will be issued for 402 WILCOX LLC 4,794.43 Building/Land said real estate to theLease/Rent said Stephen Bruce AAB AND BOTTS LLC 10.00 Fee Refunds Clerk & Gale at 1:00 o’clock -P.M., onRecorder the 7th day ABSOLUTE GRAPHICS INC 1,376.94 Clothing & Uniforms of August 2014, unless the same has AC SYSTEMS INC 4,113.90 Other Repair Maintenance been redeemed. Said& property maySupplies be reACORN PETROLEUM INC 136,046.69 deemed Fuel fromCharges said sale at any time prior to ADAME, LESA 950.88 Travel Expenseof said Treasurer’s the actual execution ADAMSON POLICE PRODUCTS 2,450.00 Firearms/Tasers Deed. Witness my hand this 11th day of ADAPTIVE MICRO SYSTEMS 3,373.80 Traffic Signal Parts April 2014. ADVANCED EXERCISE EQUIPMENT 2,050.00 Other Equipment ADVANCED PROPERTY MAINTENANCE INC 7,039.00 Repair & Maintenance Services /s/ DianeOther A. Holbert AFL MAINTENANCE GROUP INC 5,663.00 Service Contracts County Treasurer of Douglas County AGFINITY INCORPORATED 2,441.67 Fuel Charges AGGREGATE INDUSTRIES 48,454.16 Aggregate Products Legal Notice No.: 925307 AIRPLACO EQUIPMENT COMPANY 82,425.05 Cars, Vans, Pickups First publication: April 24, 2014 Last publication: May&8,Maintenance 2014 AIRVAC SERVICES INC 1,570.50 Other Repair Services Publisher: Douglas CountyServices News-Press ALCOHOL MONITORING SYSTEMS INC 23,495.84 Other Professional ALL ANIMAL RECOVERY 2,975.00 Other Purchased Services ALLIANCE SAFETY INC 134.40 Clothing & Uniforms ALSTON, MARSHA 178.36 Metro Area Meeting Expense AMAILCO INC 941.12 Service Contracts AMBU INC 234.09 Operating Supplies/Equipment AMERICAN CORRECTIONAL ASSOCIATION 35.00 Professional Membership & Licenses AMERICAN JAIL ASSOCIATION 96.00 Professional Membership & Licenses AMERICAN PLANNING ASSOCIATION 3,124.00 Professional Membership & Licenses AMERICAN SOLUTIONS FOR BUSINESS 10,397.00 Printing/Copying/Reports ANDERSON, LAURIE 127.80 Travel Expense ANDERSON, MARGARET M 410.32 Fee Refunds - Clerk & Recorder APEX DESIGN PC 9,781.54 Other Professional Services APPLIED PAVEMENT TECHNOLOGY 1,750.00 Other Professional Services APWA-AMERICAN PUBLIC WORKS ASSOCIATION 2,336.00 Professional Membership & Licenses AQUATIQUE INDUSTRIES INC 20.00 Fleet Outside Repairs ARAPAHOE COUNTY SHERIFF’S OFFICE 37.00 Other Purchased Services ARAPAHOE RENTAL 106.60 Operating Supplies/Equipment ARAPAHOE/DOUGLAS WORKS 7,500.00 Other Professional Services ARCHITERRA GROUP INC 3,531.48 Other Improvements ARNESON, SARAH JOAN 44.02 Travel Expense ASPEN FAMILY SERVICES INC 17,224.01 Other Professional Services AT CONFERENCE 36.76 Telephone/Communications AT&T MOBILITY 257.92 Cell Phone Service ATKINS NORTH AMERICA 45,921.50 Other Professional Services AUTOMATED BUILDING SOLUTIONS 597.50 Service Contracts AVERY, DANIEL 9.81 Travel Expense AVI ROOFING INC 153.25 Roofing Permit Fees-Refund AZTEC CONSULTANTS INC 500.00 Roads, Streets, Drainage-Engineering BALDRIDGE, SAM 300.00 Other Professional Services BALDWIN, MARY 87.66 Travel Expense BAMMES, DONALD RAY 1,520.00 Other Professional Services BASELINE ASSOCIATES INC 700.00 Recruitment Costs BASH, JERRY 91.58 Clothing & Uniforms BECHT, NICOLE 129.92 Travel Expense BECK, CHRISTINA 199.04 Travel Expense BENNETT, FREDERICK & LESLIE 91.07 Fee Refunds - Clerk & Recorder BENT COUNTY SHERIFF’S OFFICE 37.12 Other Purchased Services BEST BUY BUSINESS ADVANTAGE 840.98 Computer-Related BEST WESTERN PLUS COTTONTREE INN 6,744.89 Student Travel BEYER, DAVID 332.15 Travel Expense BEYOND TECHNOLOGY INC 3,765.44 Operating Supplies/Equipment BIG FISH TALENT 115.00 Other Professional Services BJORK, PATSY LEE 250.89 Metro Area Meeting Expense BLACK & VEATCH CORPORATION 3,431.86 Other Professional Services BLACK HILLS ENERGY 71,890.91 Utilities BOB BARKER COMPANY 935.39 Prisoner Maintenance Supplies BOBCAT OF THE ROCKIES LLC 4,505.71 Other Equipment BOBCAT OF THE ROCKIES LLC 170.00 Other Professional Services BOUCHARD, DREW P 1,155.00 Other Professional Services BOULDER COUNTY 50.00 Conference, Seminar, Training Fees BOYDSTUN, PERRY 276.64 Travel Expense BREDEHOEFT, JEFFREY MICHAEL 321.75 Travel Expense BRONCO FIRE ALARM SYSTEMS INC 180.00 Other Repair & Maintenance Services BURKHARDT, RANDALL 25.19 Office Supplies BURKHARDT, RANDALL 15.00 Travel Expense CAIRY, MICHAEL 119.66 Clothing & Uniforms CALABRESE, JENNIFER KATHERYN 115.58 Travel Expense CAMBRIDGE SYSTEMATICS INC 242,497.46 Roads, Streets, Drainage-Engineering CANTER, KIMBERLY D 343.39 Fee Refunds - Clerk & Recorder CAPITOL CAPITAL PARTNERS LLC 4,000.00 Other Professional Services CAPSTONE GROUP LLC 12,000.00 Other Professional Services CARE TRAK INTERNATIONAL INC 550.78 Operating Supplies CARNAHAN, PEGGY ANN 5,116.58 Other Professional Services CASI ASPHALT & CONCRETE 1,680.00 Asphalt & Asphalt Filler CASTER, KIM 595.00 Other Professional Services CASTLE ROCK ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT COUNCIL 20,000.00 Professional Membership & Licenses CASTLE ROCK PRINTING & BUS SUPPLIES 31.83 Operating Supplies/Equipment CASTLE ROCK ROCK INC 2,119.44 Aggregate Products CASTLETON CENTER WATER & SANITATION DISTRICT 387.00 Water & Sewer CATCO CLEAN AIR TRANSIT CO 2,593.29 Other Professional Services CBM MANAGED SERVICES 21,803.48 Inmate Meals CCMSI 40,327.33 Workers Compensation Claims CENTURY LINK 26,793.72 Telephone/Communications CENTURY MANUFACTURING CORP 131.96 Operating Supplies/Equipment

To Every Person in Actual Possession or Occupancy of the hereinafter Described Land, Lot or Premises, and to the Person in Whose Name the Same was Taxed or Specially Assessed, and to all Persons having an Interest or Title of Record in or to the said Premises and To Whom It May Concern, and more especially to:

OCCUPANT - Gerald P Lucy and Gloria J Walsh - Stephen Bruce Gale - Stuart R Opp and Deidre A Opp

Government Legals

You and each of you are hereby notified that on the 12th day of November 2009 the then County Treasurer of the County of Douglas, in the State of Colorado, sold at public tax lien sale to Stephen Bruce Gale the following described real estate situate in the County of Douglas, State of Colorado, to wit: LOT 4 BLK 4 REFILING OF WESTCREEK LAKES FLG 2 1.29 AM/L and said County Treasurer issued a certificate of purchase therefore to Stephen Bruce Gale. That said tax lien sale was made to satisfy the delinquent taxes assessed against said real estate for the year 2008; That said real estate was taxed or specially assessed in the name(s) of Stuart R Opp & Deidre A Opp for said year 2008. That a Treasurer’s Deed will be issued for said real estate to the said Stephen Bruce Gale at 1:00 o’clock P.M., on the 7th day of August 2014, unless the same has been redeemed. Said property may be redeemed from said sale at any time prior to the actual execution of said Treasurer’s Deed. Witness my hand this 11th day of April 2014. /s/ Diane A. Holbert County Treasurer of Douglas County Legal Notice No.: 925307 First publication: April 24, 2014 Last publication: May 8, 2014 Publisher: Douglas County News-Press Public Notice NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING BEFORE THE DOUGLAS COUNTY BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS In accordance with Douglas County Resolution No. R-994-062, a public hearing will be held before the Board of County Commissioners on Tuesday, May 13, 2014 at 2:30 p.m. in the Commissioners Hearing Room, 100 Third Street, Castle Rock, Colorado, to consider the Termination of a Declaration of Restrictive Covenants on 12.8 acres of Colorado Horse Park Metropolitan District property located at 7352 Bayou Gulch Road, Parker, Colorado 80134. For more information, please contact the Douglas County Division of Open Space and Natural Resources at 303-660-7495, 100 Third Street, Castle Rock, Colorado 80104.

Notices April 24, 2014

Public Notice

Public Notices That a Treasurer’s Deed will be issued for said real estate to the said Allen Hedrick at 1:00 o’clock P.M., on the 7th day of August 2014, unless the same has been redeemed. Said property may be redeemed from said sale at any time prior to the actual execution of said Treasurer’s Deed. Witness my hand this 11th day of April 2014.

Vendor Name

Public Notice

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING BEFORE THE DOUGLAS COUNTY BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS

In accordance with Douglas County Resolution No. R-994-062, a public hearing will be held before the Board of County Commissioners on Tuesday, May 13, 2014 at 2:30 p.m. in the Commissioners Hearing Room, 100 Third Street, Castle Rock, Colorado, to consider the Termination of a Declaration of Restrictive Covenants on 12.8 acres of Colorado Horse Park Metropolitan District property located at 7352 Bayou Gulch Road, Parker, Colorado 80134.

To advertise your public notices call 303-566-4100 Public Notice

Government Legals

DOUGLAS COUNTY LIBRARIES DOUGLAS COUNTY, COLORADO NOTICE OF FINAL PAYMENT

For more information, please contact the Douglas County Division of Open Space and Natural Resources at 303-660-7495, 100 Third Street, Castle Rock, Colorado 80104.

Re: Project: Philip S. Miller Library - Administration Remodel Contractor: Kennerly Construction Corp. Contract Dated: May 16, 2013

Legal Notice No.: 925350 First Publication: April 24, 2014 Last Publication: April 24, 2014 Publisher: Douglas County News-Press PUBLIC NOTICE From the Office of Teri Cox, Douglas County Assessor Colorado law requires the county assessor to hear objections to real property valuations annually. Objections to real property valuations for 2014 will begin May 1, 2014 and end June 2, 2014. Written objections must be postmarked no later than Monday, June 2, 2014. Real property valuation objections presented on-line will be accepted through 12 a.m. (midnight) June 2. Objections to personal property valuations will be heard beginning June 16, 2014. Objections to personal property valuations for 2014 must be delivered by close of business, or postmarked no later than July 1, 2014. The assessor’s office in the Wilcox Building at 301 Wilcox Street in Castle Rock will be open from 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. Monday through Friday to hear objections to valuations for the 2014 assessment of real and personal property. Information regarding the valuation process and appeals can be obtained on the Assessor’s web-site at www.douglas.co.us/assessor, or by phoning the office at 303.660.7450. Teri Cox, Douglas County Assessor Legal Notice No.: 925351 First Publication: April 24, 2014 Last Publication: April 24, 2014 Publisher: Douglas County News-Press Public Notice DOUGLAS COUNTY LIBRARIES DOUGLAS COUNTY, COLORADO NOTICE OF FINAL PAYMENT Re: Project: Philip S. Miller Library - Administration Remodel Contractor: Kennerly Construction Corp. Contract Dated: May 16, 2013

Government Legals

Notice is hereby given that DOUGLAS COUNTY LIBRARIES (the “Library”), located in Douglas County, Colorado, will make final payment at 100 South Wilcox Street, Castle Rock, CO 80104, on Monday the 11th day of May, 2014, at the hour of 9:00 a.m. to Kennerly Construction Corp. (the “Contractor”) for all work done by said Contractor for the above-referenced project. Any individual, corporation, government or governmental subdivision or agency, business trust, estate, trust, limited liability company, partnership, association, or other legal entity that has furnished labor, materials, sustenance, or other supplies used or consumed by the Contractor or its subcontractors in or about the performance of the work contracted to be done or that has supplied laborers, rental machinery, tools or equipment to the extent used in the prosecution of the work, and whose claim therefore has not been paid by the Contractor or its subcontractors, at any time up to and including the time of final settlement for the work contracted to be done, is required to file a verified statement of the amount due and unpaid on account of such claim, to DOUGLAS COUNTY LIBRARIES, Attn: Karen Gargan, 100 South Wilcox Street, Castle Rock, CO 80104 with a copy to: Icenogle Seaver Pogue, P.C., 4725 South Monaco Street, Suite 225, Denver, Colorado 80237, Attn: Jennifer L. Ivey, Esq., on or before the date and time hereinabove shown. Failure on the part of any claimant to file such verified statement of claim prior to such final settlement will release the Library, its Board of Directors, officers, agents, and employees of and from any and all liability for such claim. BY ORDER OF THE DOUGLAS COUNTY LIBRARIES Legal Notice No.: 925358 First Publication: April 24, 2014 Last Publication: May 1, 2014 Publisher: Douglas County News-Press

Government Legals PUBLIC NOTICE PUBLIC INVITATION TO BID Separate sealed bids for LINCOLN AVE (C H A MB ER S TO K EYSTON E) IMPROVEMENT PROJECT, DOUGLAS COUNTY PROJECT NUMBER CI 2013 – 033 will be received by the Owner, Douglas County Government, Department of Public Works Engineering, Philip S. Miller Building, 100 Third Street, Suite 220, Castle Rock, CO 80104, until Tuesday, May 20, 2014, at 2:00 p.m. This project consists of removal of existing concrete pavement, 30-inches of overexcavation, placement of geo-grid, ABC, curb & gutter, RCP, HMA pavement and epoxy striping. The Contract Documents may be examined at the above address after 10:00 a.m. on Monday, April 28, 2014, and copies of the Contract Documents may be obtained upon payment of $35.00 for each set. The $35.00 is non-refundable. (Additional charge if mailing is required.) A PRE-BID CONFERENCE will be held at 10:00 a.m. on Wednesday, May 7, 2014, at the Department of Public Works Engineering, Philip S. Miller Building, 100 Third Street, Suite 220, Castle Rock, CO 80104. The Bid Opening will be conducted at 2:00 p.m. on Tuesday, May 20, 2014, at the same address. The Project includes the following major items and approximate quantities: • Removal of Concrete Pavement – 38,000 SY • Unclassified Excavation –22,000 CY • ABC (Class 6) – 11,000 CY • ABC (Class 3) – 16,000 CY • HMA (Grading S)(75)(PG 64 – 22) – 12,000 TON • HMA (Grading SX)(75)(PG 64 – 22) – 6,000 TON • RCP (18”, 24” & 36”) – 810 LF Prior to submitting a Bid Proposal, Bidders shall have received prequalification status (active status) with the Colorado Department of Transportation to bid on individual projects of the size and kind of work as set forth herein. Any questions on the bidding process may be directed to Sean Owens, P.E., Project Manager at 303-660-7328.

Government Legals

For Planholder Information, Please Call 303-660-7490 (Front Desk)

Notice is hereby given that DOUGLAS COUNTY LIBRARIES (the “Library”), located in Douglas County, Colorado, will make final payment at 100 South WilPublic Notice cox Street, Castle Rock, CO 80104, on Monday theRepair 11th &day of May, Supplies 2014, at CHARLES D JONES COMPANY INC 6,932.45 Other Maintenance the hour 9:00 a.m. to&Kennerly CHARLES R DECOSTE LIVING TRUST 336.80 FeeofRefunds - Clerk Recorder Construction Corp. (the “Contractor”) for all CHATO’S CONCRETE LLC 35,510.62 Major Maintenance of Assets work done byDental said &Contractor CHEMATOX LABORATORY INC 1,225.00 Medical, Vet Services for the above-referenced project. CINTAS FIRE PROTECTION 6,700.76 Service Contracts CIRCLE K STORES INC 219.00 Fleet Outside Repairs Any individual, corporation, government CITY & COUNTY OF DENVER 2,057.14 Professional Membership & Licensesor governmental subdivision or agency, CITY OF AURORA 3,850.99 Due to Aurora - MV License Fee business trust, estate, trust, limited liability CITY OF CASTLE PINES 68,509.38 Due to Castle Pines MV License company, partnership, association, or othCITY OF CASTLE PINES 14,205.77 Intergovernmental-Castle Pines er legal entity that has furnished labor, CITY OF LITTLETON 438.74 Due sustenance, to Littleton-MVor License materials, other supplies CITY OF LONE TREE 3,183.00 to Lone Tree-MV License or its used orDue consumed by the Contractor CITY OF LONE TREE 215,290.18 Intergovernmental-Lone Tree performsubcontractors in or about the CITY OF LONE TREE 9,336.98 ance ofUse theTax-Building work contracted to be done or CLARION ASSOCIATES LLC 2,030.45 Other Professional Services that has supplied laborers, rental maCLARK, ABIGAIL 1,002.96 chinery,Travel toolsExpense or equipment to the extent CLARK, RAND M 74.48 inTravel Expense used the prosecution of the work, and CLEARWATER PACKAGING INC 1,058.65 Supplies/Equipment whose Operating claim therefore has not been paid COALITION FOR THE UPPER SOUTH PLATTE 25,000.00 Other Professional Services by the Contractor or its subcontractors, at COBB, GORDON 405.00 Equipment Fee Refund the time of fiany time up to and including COLORADO ALTERNATIVE SENTENCING nal settlement for the work contracted to PROGRAMS 40.00 Professional Membership & Licenses be done, is required to file a verified stateCOLORADO ASSOCIATION OF EXTENSION ment of the amount due and unpaid on ac4-H AGENTS 200.00 Seminar,to Training Fees count Conference, of such claim, DOUGLAS COLORADO COMMUNITY MEDIA 8,241.14 Newspaper Notices/Advertising COUNTY LIBRARIES, Attn: Karen GarCOLORADO DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH gan, 100 South Wilcox Street, Castle & ENVIRONMENT 207.00 Due80104 to State-PH License Rock, CO with Marriage a copy to: Icenogle COLORADO DEPARTMENT OF HUMAN SERVICES 1,380.00 to State-HS Marriage License SeaverDue Pogue, P.C., 4725 South Monaco COLORADO DEPARTMENT OF LABOR Street, Suite 225, Denver, Colorado & EMPLOYMENT 230.00 Subscription 80237, Books Attn: & Jennifer L. Ivey, Esq., on or COLORADO DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC SAFETY 21,207.50 CBI -and Concealed Handgun before Due the todate time hereinabove COLORADO DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC SAFETY 118.50 to CBI shown.Due Failure on- Fingerprinting the part of any claimant COLORADO DEPARTMENT OF REVENUE 2,060,496.79 Due to State - statement MV LicenseofFees to file such verified claim priCOLORADO DEPARTMENT OF REVENUE 14,411.40 Duefinal to State -Drivers License or to such settlement will release the COLORADO DEPARTMENT OF Library, its Board of Directors, officers, agents,State-CDOT-US and employees of and from any TRANSPORTATION 56,392.76 85 Improvements and allOther liability for &such claim. Supplies COLORADO DOORWAYS INC 8,750.64 Repair Maintenance COLORADO PETROLEUM PRODUCT 2,165.06 Oil & Lubrication BY ORDER OF THE COLORADO PUBLIC HUMAN RESOURCES DOUGLAS COUNTY LIBRARIES ASSOCIATION 250.00 Professional Membership & Licenses COLORADO PURE LLC 199.92 Service Contracts Legal Notice No.: 925358 COLORADO SECRETARY OF STATE 180.00 Conference, Seminar, Training Fees First Publication: 24, 2014& Licenses COLORADO SPORTS TURF MANAGERS 595.00 ProfessionalApril Membership Last Publication: May 1, 2014 COLORADO-WYOMING ASSOCIATION Publisher: DouglasMembership County News-Press OF MUSEUMS 20.00 Professional & Licenses COLUMBINE PAPER & MAINTENANCE 972.50 Janitorial Supplies COLUMBINE PAPER & MAINTENANCE 264.17 Office Supplies COMCAST 230.40 Telephone/Communications COMCAST BUSINESS 3,532.00 Data Communication Lines COMMERCIAL SPECIALISTS OF SOUTHERN COLORADO 1,505.00 Other Professional Services COMPASSCOM SOFTWARE CORPORATION 2,200.00 Software/Hardware Supplies/Maintenance COMPUTRONIX INC 97,612.50 Support & Maintenance CONGRESS FOR THE NEW URBANISM 195.00 Professional Membership & Licenses CONSOLIDATED ELECTRIC DISTRIBUTERS INC 121.06 Other Repair & Maintenance Supplies CONTINUUM OF COLORADO 6,250.00 Other Professional Services COOK, MELISSA CHRISTINE 339.44 Travel Expense COPPEDGE, JOHN A 400.00 Other Training Services COUNTY SHERIFF’S OF COLORADO 625.00 Operating Supplies/Equipment CPRCOLORADO.COM 500.00 Conference, Seminar, Training Fees CRISIS PREPARATION & RECOVERY INC 8,500.00 Other Professional Services CUMMINS ROCKY MOUNTAIN LLC 527.70 Other Repair & Maintenance Services CUNNINGHAM, DWIGHT 10,001.08 Other Professional Services D&H PLASTERING COMPANY INC 845.54 Building Permits-Refund DASH CONCRETE 124.59 Fee Refunds - Clerk & Recorder DAVIDSON FIXED INCOME MANAGEMENT 2,916.67 Accounting & Financial Services DAVIS, ANDREW & CHERYL 37.17 Fee Refunds - Clerk & Recorder DAVIS, KELLI NEWTON 4,889.67 Other Professional Services DE FIELDS, ALMA ELIZALDE 130.00 Other Purchased Services DEBARDI, DANI 22.36 Metro Area Meeting Expense DEEP ROCK WATER 53.00 Operating Supplies/Equipment DELL MARKETING LP 2,755.74 Computer-Related DENCOL SUPPLY COMPANY 5,832.09 Equipment & Motor Vehicle Parts DENOVO VENTURES LLC 310.00 Other Professional Services DENVER POLICE DEPARTMENT 45,043.19 Coplink Intel Lead-Refund DENVER SHERIFF’S DEPARTMENT 28.80 Other Purchased Services DENVER SOUTH TRANSPORTATION 22,217.00 Other Professional Services DENVER WATER 41.38 Water & Sewer DENVER WINAIR COMPANY 2,093.87 Other Repair & Maintenance Supplies DESIGN CONCEPTS CLA INC 1,360.00 Parks & Recreation Improvement DEVELOPMENTAL PATHWAYS INC 1,416,064.16 Other Professional Services DIAMOND DISCS INTERNATIONAL LLC 244.95 Operating Supplies DIAMOND DRUGS INC 17,076.65 Medical, Dental & Vet Services DICKENS, ALICIA L 581.72 Travel Expense DICKSON COMPANY 73.00 Operating Supplies/Equipment DISCOVER GOODWILL SOUTHERN & WESTERN COLORADO 3,011.00 Other Professional Services DISTRICT ATTORNEY 512,828.25 Legal Services DLH ARCHITECTURE LLC 2,826.00 Design/Soft Costs DLT SOLUTIONS LLC 75,941.42 Software/Hardware Supplies/Maintenance DORSEY, JIM 102.00 Professional Membership & Licenses DOUBLE R EXCAVATING 14,825.91 Roads, Streets, Drainage-Construction DOUGLAS COUNTY HOUSING PARTNERSHIP 60,000.00 2014-Member Assessment DOUGLAS COUNTY SHERIFF’S OFFICE 30.00 Other Purchased Services DOUGLAS COUNTY SHERIFF’S OFFICE 546.70 Refund-Conference Overpayment DOUGLAS COUNTY TEMPORARY SERVICES INC 5,244.00 Contract Work/Temporary Agency DRAKE, BARBARA 195.66 Travel Expense DUMB FRIENDS LEAGUE 2,697.00 Other Purchased Services E-470 PUBLIC HIGHWAY AUTHORITY 177,251.00 Due to E-470 Authority E-470 PUBLIC HIGHWAY AUTHORITY 31,483.32 Due to State-E470 Road Fees ECKHARDT, MARK E 61.16 Travel Expense

Legal Notice No.: 925359 First Publication: April 24, 2014 Last Publication: May 1, 2014 Publisher: Douglas County News-Press

Legal Notice No.: 925350 First Publication: April 24, 2014 Last Publication: April 24, 2014 Publisher: Douglas County News-Press

ECKLEY, TIEN-HSI 220.10 EIDE BAILLY LLP 45,110.00 ELK CREEK SAND AND GRAVEL LLC 27,587.94 ELMORE, WAYNE 35.47 ELY, CODY 120.00 EMSL ANALYTICAL INC 199.00 ENGINUITY ENGINEERING SOLUTIONS LLC 12,599.56 ENGLUND, GARTH 50.40 ENTERPRISE 1,315.61 ENTERSECT 158.00 ENVIROTECH SERVICES INC 138,056.79 ENVISION IT PARTNERS 5,259.00 EON OFFICE PRODUCTS 370.00 EPC USA INC 16,920.00 ERGONOMIC SOLUTIONS LLC 575.00 ERO RESOURCES CORPORATION 5,490.00 ESKER SOFTWARE INC 1,299.03 ESRI INC 1,950.00 EVANS, SANDRA A 7,676.50 EVANS, TAYLOR 298.20 EZ LINER INDUSTRIES 333.28 FACILITY SOLUTIONS GROUP 106.30 FAMILY TREE 3,258.74 FARIS MACHINERY COMPANY 901.00 FASTENAL COMPANY 37.01 FEARHEILEY, THOMAS 285.00 FEDEX 206.34 FELSBURG, HOLT AND ULLEVIG 14,501.06 FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE INSURANCE CO 64,830.00 FIEDLER, ANTHONY JAMES 48.56 FLINK COMPANY 29,928.00 FLYNT, DARLENE KAY 23.52 FOOTPRINTS CONSULTING & TRAINING 3,736.00 FORENSIC TRUTH GROUP LLC 140.00 FRANKTOWN ANIMAL CLINIC PC 453.36 FRAZIER, MIKE T. 170.78 FREDERICKS, FRANK 206.75 FRIEDERICHS, ALLISON 2,028.92 FRONT RANGE DUCT CLEANING 1,100.00 G&K SERVICES 1,445.39 GADES SALES COMPANY INC 368.00 GALLENTINE, JAY LEE 48.54 GALLS LLC 3,302.86 GAMETIME ATHLETICS 830.95 GARDA CL NORTHWEST INC 2,071.33 GAUCHER, GEORGE 83.17 GENERAL AIR SERVICE & SUPPLY 19.84 GERWIG, JAMES FREDERICK & LORRAINE 169.95 GMCO CORPORATION 220,400.00 GO VOICES LLC 1,581.25 GORMAN, THOMAS J 800.61 GORMAN, THOMAS J 14,006.92 GOVCONNECTION INC 19,251.82 GOVCONNECTION INC 2,179.61 GRAINGER 26.71 GRANITE SEED AND EROSION CONTROL 268.36 GROUND ENGINEERING CONSULTANTS INC 32,524.44 GYSIN, CLAY 163.01 H & E EQUIPMENT SERVICES INC 786.44 HALLMARK, TIM 244.22 HAMMERTON, JERRY LEE 25.50 HANSON, TOMMY 127.80 HARPER, TRACY J 1,255.00 HARRIS LOCAL GOVERNMENT SOLUTIONS 4,922.52 HARTMAN, DONNA J 3,563.27 HARTWIG & ASSOCIATES INC 6,709.67 HARVEY, WILLIAM P 269.80 HAULAWAY STORAGE CONTAINERS 147.50 HEALTH ONE CLINIC SERVICES 1,610.00 HEWITT, PAM 65.22 HICKS, JEANETTE (PETTY CASH) 190.17 HIGHLANDS RANCH METRO DISTRICTS 390.00 HIGHLANDS RANCH METRO DISTRICTS 305.00 HIGHLANDS RANCH METRO DISTRICTS 492.75 HITES RENTAL 138.11 HOFSHEIER, VICTORIA LYNNTORI 92.20 HORIZON LABORATORY LLC 3,481.75 HOSPITAL SHARED SERVICES 1,549.00 HOSPITAL SHARED SERVICES 77,145.54 HUMANE SOCIETY OF PIKES PEAK 63,616.66 IBM CORPORATION 2,438.33 nance ICENOGLE SEAVER POGUE PC 3,902.50 IDEAL IMAGE PRINTING 570.00 IMPROVE GROUP 1,956.89 INFORMATION SYSTEMS CONSULTING 2,377.20 INFORMATION SYSTEMS CONSULTING 365.12 INSIGHT PUBLIC SECTOR INC 265.20 INSIGHT PUBLIC SECTOR INC 314.27 INSIGHT PUBLIC SECTOR INC 15,932.00 INSTITUTE OF HAZARDOUS MATERIALS MANAGEMENT 140.00 INTEGRATED VOICE SOLUTIONS 711.41 INTEGRITY ELECTRICAL SOLUTIONS INC 40.00 INTERNATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF FAIRS & EXPOSITIONS 175.00 IREA 123,935.85 IRON MOUNTAIN OFF-SITE DATA 172.35 J & A TRAFFIC PRODUCTS 534.00

Travel Expense Accounting & Financial Services Aggregate Products Books & Subscription Clothing & Uniforms Other Repair & Maintenance Supplies Roads, Streets, Drainage-Engineering Travel Expense Travel Expense Software/Hardware Supplies/Maintenance Salt & Other Ice Removal Software/Hardware Supplies/Maintenance Printing/Copying/Reports Support & Maintenance Operating Supplies/Equipment Other Professional Services Support & Maintenance Software/Hardware Supplies/Maintenance Other Professional Services Travel Expense Equipment & Motor Vehicle Parts Operating Supplies/Equipment Other Professional Services Equipment Rental Other Repair & Maintenance Supplies Fee Refunds - Clerk & Recorder Postage & Delivery Services Other Professional Services Right-of-Way-Permanent Clothing & Uniforms Cars, Vans, Pickups Travel Expense Other Training Services Recruitment Costs Medical, Dental & Vet Services Clothing & Uniforms Travel Expense Other Training Services Service Contracts Clothing & Uniforms Traffic Signal Parts Clothing & Uniforms Operating Supplies/Equipment Other Repair & Maintenance Supplies Service Contracts Fee Refunds - Clerk & Recorder Equipment Rental Fee Refunds - Clerk & Recorder Salt & Other Ice Removal Other Professional Services Fuel Charges/Travel Expense Other Professional Services Computer-Related Operating Supplies/Equipment Operating Supplies/Equipment Operating Supplies Road Repair, Maintenance & Overlay Clothing & Uniforms Other Repair & Maintenance Services Clothing & Uniforms Books & Subscription Travel Expense Other Professional Services Software/Hardware Supplies/Maintenance Insurance Claims-Vehicle Repair Roads, Streets, Drainage-Engineering Travel Expense Equipment Rental Recruitment Costs Fee Refunds - Clerk & Recorder Operating Supplies/Travel Expense Bulk Water Metro Area Meeting Expense Water & Sewer Fee Refunds - Clerk & Recorder Travel Expense Forensic Testing Other Repair & Maintenance Supplies Security Services Animal Control Services Software/Hardware Supplies/MainteOther Professional Services Printing/Copying/Reports Other Repair & Maintenance Supplies Computer-Related Operating Supplies/Equipment Computer Supplies Operating Supplies/Equipment Support & Maintenance Professional Membership & Licenses Software/Hardware Supplies/Maintenance Electrical Permits-Refund County Fair Service/Fair Admin Utilities Other Professional Services Sign Parts & Supplies

Continued to Next Page No.: 925356 and 925357


• HMA (Grading SX)(75)(PG 64 – 22) – 6,000 TON • RCP (18”, 24” & 36”) – 810 LF

23

Lone Tree Voice 23

April 24, 2014

Prior to submitting a Bid Proposal, Bidders shall have received prequalification status (active status) with the Colorado Department of Transportation to bid on individual projects of the size and kind of work as set forth herein.

Government Legals

Government Legals

Any questions on the bidding process may be directed to Sean Owens, P.E., Project Manager at 303-660-7328. For Planholder Information, Please Call 303-660-7490 (Front Desk) Legal Notice No.: 925359 First Publication: April 24, 2014 Last Publication: May 1, 2014 Publisher: Douglas County News-Press

Public Notice REQUEST FOR PROPOSAL (RFP) #018-14 CREDIT CARD/E-CHECK PAYMENT ACCEPTANCE The Treasurer’s Office of Douglas County Government, hereinafter referred to as the County, respectfully requests proposals from responsible, qualified firms for the provision of an online and in-person (over-the-counter and telephone) payment acceptance

solution, including credit/debit card and E-Check. For property tax and building payments, a web based solution is required and the ability to restrict payments to only the amount due, plus, the capability to accept over-the-counter payments. All departments must have detailed payment reporting and should have the ability to choose from multiple products or services and your payment system calculate the balance due. The County may determine that it would be in our best interest to use the services of unique

Continued From Last Page 925356 and 925357 J P MORGAN CHASE BANK

419,528.28 Purchasing Card Transactions 02/05/14-03/04/14 JACKSON 105 FIRE STATION 14,000.00 2014 Payment-in-lieu of Taxes Distribution JAKE OF ALL TRADES 600.00 Emergency Response Services JAKUBOWSKI, MATTHEW 3.83 Travel Expense JAY DEE CLEANING & RESTORATION INC 19,760.00 Major Maintenance Repair Projects JEFFERSON COUNTY HUMAN SERVICE 435.04 Other Professional Services JJ’S MOBILE CARPENTRY SERVICES 183.56 Building Permits JOHN & LAURIE WILKES LIVING TRUST 765.00 Right-of-Way-Temporary JOHN E REID & ASSOCIATES INC 550.00 Conference, Seminar, Training Fees JOHNSON, DARYL RAY 300.00 Other Professional Services JOHNSON, KRISTINE 312.57 Travel Expense JOHNSON, LISA A 129.55 Clothing & Uniforms JORDAN PHD, KENYON P 2,280.00 Recruitment Costs JULIAN, JOE 174.72 Travel Expense JULIE A HARRIS ALTERATIONS 217.00 Clothing & Uniforms JURCZEWSKY, KEVIN 111.54 Travel Expense K-9 COMPANIONS FOR INDEPENDENCE 287.50 Security Deposit Refund-Fairgrounds KEITH, DONALD JIM 1,239.82 Other Professional Services KENNEDY - COLORADO LLC 12,139.83 Building/Land Lease/Rent KIM, JAE HACK & JAE WOO 107.37 Fee Refunds - Clerk & Recorder KIMBERLY CLARK CORPORATION 327.15 Fee Refunds - Clerk & Recorder KING, THOMAS 76.00 Books & Subscription KOLBE STRIPING INC 7,692.00 Contractor Road Marking KRUG, SHANNON LEIGH 332.08 Travel Expense KRYPILO, NIKOLINE J 71.32 Fee Refunds - Clerk & Recorder KUCEWESKY, RANDY 28.78 Travel Expense KWANG, BRENDA 214.38 Postage & Delivery Services KWANG, BRENDA 420.91 Travel Expense L3 COMMUNICATIONS 28,000.00 Service Contracts LA PLATA COUNTY SHERIFF OFFICE 18.44 Other Purchased Services LABORATORY CORPORATION OF AMERICA 114.00 Other Professional Services LARKSPUR CHAMBER OF COMMERCE 1,000.00 Professional Membership & Licenses LARKSPUR FIRE PROTECTION DISTRICT 7,000.00 2014 Payment-in-lieu of Taxes Distribution LASER TECHNOLOGY INC 160.00 Other Repair & Maintenance Services LAYLOCK, TRICIA 250.00 CJS-Post EM LEASE GROUP RESOURCES INC 4,163.89 Copier Charges LEON, FIDEL 158.72 Clothing & Uniforms LEWAN AND ASSOCIATES INC 2,911.95 Copier Charges LEWIS, ROBERT 84.34 Clothing & Uniforms LEXISNEXIS RISK DATA 537.00 Other Purchased Services LEXISNEXIS RISK DATA 2,100.00 Software/Hardware Supplies/Maintenance LI BUTTI, STEVEN D 3,500.00 Right-of-Way-Permanent LIFELOC TECHNOLOGIES INC 124.18 Other Professional Services LIGHTHOUSE INC, THE 1,580.00 Equipment & Motor Vehicle Parts LIGHTING ACCESSORY & WARNING SYSTEMS109,766.54 Cars, Vans, Pickups LIN, CHRISTINE 92.30 Travel Expense LINCOLN STATION METRO DISTRICT 615.08 Sales Tax Revenue-December 2013 LINCOLN STATION METRO DISTRICT 1,720.54 Sales Tax Revenue-January 2014 LINTZ, KORBY GENE 21.00 Metro Area Meeting Expense LOANDEPOT.COM LLC 10.00 Fee Refunds - Clerk & Recorder LODA ENTERPRISES INC 246.96 Operating Supplies/Equipment LOEWECKE, TRACEY 269.80 Travel Expense LONG, HEATHER 5,437.08 Other Professional Services LONG, HEATHER 396.52 Travel Expense LOUVIERS WATER & SANITATION DISTRICT 263.64 Water & Sewer LUCERO, LEONARD JOE 21.00 Metro Area Meeting Expense LUNDQUIST, PERRY 67.84 Travel Expense LYLES, CELESTENE (TENA) 100.74 Metro Area Meeting Expense LYONS, TERRY 69.60 Travel Expense LYTLE WATER SOLUTIONS LLC 1,590.00 Other Professional Services MADSEN, SCOTT T 33.84 Travel Expense MAKELKY, DAN 176.72 Travel Expense MARBLES KIDS TALENT INC 396.00 Other Professional Services MARK VII EQUIPMENT INC 10,500.00 Other Repair & Maintenance Services MARK VII EQUIPMENT INC 1,592.36 Other Repair & Maintenance Supplies MARX, CHELSEA BRANDON 6,586.50 Other Professional Services MATABI, JOTHAM 323.90 Travel Expense MCFARLAND, DOUG 188.13 Insurance Claims MCGRAW-HILL COMPANIES, THE 615.25 Newspaper Notices/Advertising MCKEE, ERIC P 17.58 Travel Expense MEIER, THOMAS J 300.00 Other Professional Services MEREDITH, RODNEY L 48.00 Travel Expense MESA COUNTY 42.50 Other Purchased Services METECH RECYCLING INC 1,420.77 Operating Supplies/Equipment METRO DENVER ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT CORP 10,000.00 Professional Membership & Licenses METRO INTERIORS INC 4,900.00 Other Equipment MICHAEL BAKER JR INC 67,596.67 Other Improvements MIG/MOORE IACOFANO GOLTSMAN 1,410.92 Other Professional Services MILLER ARCHAEOLOGY CONSULTING 5,022.50 Other Professional Services MILLER WENHOLD CAPITOL 20,000.00 Other Professional Services MILLER, JEFF 127.80 Travel Expense MIRACLE RECREATION EQUIPMENT 746.26 Other Repair & Maintenance Supplies MONTVILLE, PAUL 2,990.00 Conference, Seminar, Training Fees MOON JR, LYNN DOUG 8.30 Travel Expense MORIN, RYAN THOMAS 120.00 Clothing & Uniforms MORROW, ZACHARY PAUL 594.75 Fee Refunds - Clerk & Recorder MOTOROLA TRUNKED USERS GROUP 85.00 Professional Membership & Licenses MOUNTAIN AIR COMFORT 83.25 Mechanical Permits-Refund MOUNTAIN COMMUNITY FIRE PROTECTION DISTRICT 33,000.00 2014 Payment-in-lieu of Taxes Distribution MOUNTAIN STATES EMPLOYERS COUNCIL INC 300.00 Conference, Seminar, Training Fees MOUNTAIN STATES EMPLOYERS COUNCIL INC 50.00 Recruitment Costs MOUNTAIN VIEW BANK 10.00 Fee Refunds - Clerk & Recorder MOUNTAIN VIEW WASTE SYSTEMS 99.50 Waste Disposal Services MTM RECOGNITION 1,603.63 Recognition Programs MULHERN MRE INC 3,108.46 Other Professional Services MULLER ENGINEERING COMPANY INC 8,137.69 Other Professional Services MURRELL, KI BASSETT 175.00 Wellness Program MURRELL, TIM 1,051.33 Travel Expense MUSCO SPORTS LIGHTING LLC 1,250.08 Other Repair & Maintenance Services

payment providers for credit/debit card processing versus E-Check and, potentially, absorb the fees associated with E-Check. The RFP documents may be reviewed and/or printed from the Rocky Mountain E-Purchasing System website at www.rockymountainbidsystem.com. RFP documents are not available for purchase from Douglas County Government and can only be accessed from the above-mentioned website.

NATHAN BREMER DUMM & MYERS PC 10,118.59 NEVE’S UNIFORMS INC 3,104.08 NEW WORLD SYSTEMS INC 8,575.00 NEW WORLD SYSTEMS INC 262,210.96 NICOLETTI-FLATER ASSOCIATES 220.00 NIGRO, VINCENT JOHN AND ANDREW JOHN 5,000.00 NILEX CIVIL ENVIRONMENTAL GROUP 260.00 NORCHEM DRUG TESTING 628.05 NORTH AMERICAN SALT COMPANY 166,974.23 NORTH FORK FIRE PROTECTION 20,000.00 O J WATSON COMPANY INC 8,100.00 OCCASIONS CATERING 2,752.94 OFFICE DEPOT 203.19 ONEAL, TAMMERA RILEY & MAKENZIE RAE RILE 195.72 O’NEIL ALLEN, VIKKI 130.20 OPUS DESIGN BUILD LLC 67,061.20 ORACLE AMERICA INC 19,364.23 ORMSBEE, SONIA 18.70 ORR, LORI 177.50 OSTLER, CLAUDIA 246.96 OWENS, SEAN 184.86 PARKER ELECTRIC INC 325.00 PARKER GIRL SCOUTS 1,000.00 PARKER SENIOR CENTER INC 30.00 PEAK OFFICE FURNITURE INC 33,369.50 PEPPERDINE’S MARKING PRODUCTS 185.19 PETERSEN, STEVE 115.26 PETROSEVICH, STACEY 454.88 PHOENIX SUPPLY LLC 793.84 PINERY HOMEOWNERS ASSOCIATION 561.55 PINERY WATER & WASTEWATER DISTRICT 224.22 PINNACLE MORTGAGE GROUP 70.00 PIONEER SAND COMPANY INC 2,801.44 PLATTE VALLEY SIGNS 248.00 PLATTNER ENTERPRISES 540.00 PLUM CREEK CATERING 200.00 PLUMBLINE SERVICES 38.75 PLURALSIGHT LLC 424.15 PMAM CORPORATION 24,521.76 POINT BLANK ENTERPRISES 1,398.00 POLLACK, JOSEPH 135.00 POTTER, SHAWNA 31.92 PREMIUM TITLE 15.00 PRO FORCE LAW ENFORCEMENT 1,010.75 PROFESSIONAL COMPLIANCE AND TESTING 3,356.00 QUALITY LANDSCAPE AND SOIL PRODUCTS 657.62 QUANTUM CHANGE CONSULTING LLC 1,935.00 QUINN, TERENCE T 177.34 RASSBACH, BRIDGET HENRY 21.00 RAWWYO LLC 1,951.25 READY MIXED CONCRETE CO 29,665.92 RECREATION PLUS LTD 3,395.00 REDWOOD TOXICOLOGY LABORATORY INC 406.24 REESE, JERAMIAH 75.82 REGIONAL AIR QUALITY COUNCIL 19,000.00 RESPEC CONSULTING & SERVICES 3,975.00 REVOLUTION ADVISORS LLC 11,556.25 RIDER, KATHERINE 59.38 RMD - IAI 30.00 RMOMS 127.00 ROACH, PATRICIA R 27.00 ROBBINS, DEAN 125.00 ROBERT HALF TECHNOLOGY 19,973.25 ROBERTS, SHANNON & ROBERT CORKINS 107.96 ROBINSON TEXTILES 1,827.99 ROCKSOL CONSULTING GROUP INC 15,706.28 ROCKY MOUNTAIN MAIL SERVICES 862.05 ROCKY MOUNTAIN SECTION IMSA 820.00 ROTHERHAM JR, ROBERT H 62.00 ROTTINGHAUS, DAN 39.62 RR DONNELLEY 6,374.14 RUBBEROSION INC 425.00 RUFFER, CARRIE 49.09 RUFFER, CARRIE 1,000.00 SAFEWARE INC 278.75 SALAZAR, ALEX 79.38 SANCHEZ, TERRY K 66.20 SCHEUBER & DARDEN ARCHITECTS 1,500.00 SCHMIDT CONSTRUCTION COMPANY 1,573.34 SCHMIDT, SANDRA SUE 3,315.00 SCHROBILGEN, TIM 219.80 SCHULTZ, PAIGE KILOHIWAI 224.00 SCHUTTE, CHRIS 291.10 SCHWEIZER EMBLEM COMPANY 225.00 SCIARRO, DANIEL 13.11 S-COMM FIBER INC 19,360.00 SEMPERA 23,776.00 SERVICE NOW INC 1,638.43 SHEA HOMES COMPANY INC 51,975.40 SHERMAN & HOWARD LLC 981.25 SHERWIN-WILLIAMS 799.80 40.32 SHIPMAN, BARB SHULER CONSULTANTS LLC 2,212.00 SIRCHIE FINGER PRINT LABORATORIES INC 72.92 SKY RIDGE MEDICAL CENTER 39.00 SMATLA, PATRICIA L 209.94 SMYTH, RICHARD 52.18 SOOS, AMY G 309.68 SOTOMAYOR, NANCY 23.52 SOURCE OFFICE PRODUCTS 3,095.49 SOUTH METRO FIRE RESCUE AUTHORITY 4,500.00 SOUTHLAND MEDICAL CORPORATION 1,088.31 SPECIALIZED PATHOLOGY PC 3,300.00

Do you know what laws / ordinances are changing in your community?

Read the legal notices and you will!

Proposal responses will be received until 4:00 p.m. on Friday, May 9, 2014 by Douglas County Government, Finance Department, Purchasing Division, 100 Third Street, Suite 130, Castle Rock, Colorado 80104. Seven (7) hard-copies of your proposal response shall be submitted in a sealed envelope, plainly marked “Request for Proposal (RFP) #018-14, Credit Card/E-Check Payment Acceptance”. Electronic/ faxed proposals will not be accepted. Proposals will not be considered which are received

Legal Services Clothing & Uniforms Conference, Seminar, Training Fees Software/Hardware Supplies/Maintenance Other Training Services Right-of-Way-Temporary Other Construction/Maintenance Materials Other Professional Services Salt & Other Ice Removal 2014 Payment-in-lieu of Taxes Distribution Repairs-Equipment/Motor Vehicle Recognition Programs Office Supplies Fee Refunds - Clerk & Recorder Travel Expense Escrow Payable Support & Maintenance Travel Expense Travel Expense Travel Expense Travel Expense Other Repair & Maintenance Services Security Deposit Refund-Fairgrounds Metro Area Meeting Expense Other Equipment Operating Supplies/Equipment Travel Expense Travel Expense Prisoner Maintenance Supplies Other Purchased Services Water & Sewer Fee Refunds - Clerk & Recorder Aggregate Products Other Professional Services Other Repair & Maintenance Services Catered Meal Service Mechanical Permits-Refund Conference, Seminar, Training Fees Alarm Administration Expenses Clothing & Uniforms Software/Hardware Supplies/Maintenance Travel Expense Fee Refunds - Clerk & Recorder Firearm Supplies Recruitment Costs Aggregate Products Conference, Seminar, Training Fees Travel Expense Metro Area Meeting Expense Other Professional Services Salt & Other Ice Removal Other Equipment Other Professional Services Fee Refunds - Clerk & Recorder Regional Air Quality Other Professional Services Other Professional Services Travel Expense Professional Membership & Licenses Other Purchased Services Books & Subscription Clothing & Uniforms Contract Work/Temporary Agency Fee Refunds - Clerk & Recorder Prisoner Maintenance Supplies Roads, Streets, Drainage-Engineering Postage & Delivery Services Professional Membership & Licenses Travel Expense Fee Refunds - Clerk & Recorder Printing/Copying/Reports Other Repair & Maintenance Supplies Clothing & Uniforms Tuition Reimbursement Other Repair & Maintenance Services Travel Expense Travel Expense Other Professional Services Other Repair & Maintenance Supplies Other Professional Services Clothing & Uniforms Travel Expense Travel Expense Clothing & Uniforms Fee Refunds - Clerk & Recorder Other Professional Services Contract Work/Temporary Agency Computer Software Escrow Payable Legal Services Other Repair & Maintenance Supplies Travel Expense Other Professional Services Operating Supplies/Equipment Medical, Dental & Vet Services Other Professional Services Clothing & Uniforms Travel Expense Travel Expense Office Supplies Other Training Services Operating Supplies/Equipment Medical, Dental & Vet Services

after the time stated, and any proposals so received will be returned unopened. Douglas County Government reserves the right to reject any and all proposals, to waive formalities, informalities, or irregularities contained in a said proposal and furthermore, to award a contract for items herein, either in whole or in part, if it is deemed to be in the best interest of the County to do so. Additionally, we reserve the right to negotiate optional items and/or services with the success-

SPECIALTIES CONTRACTING 7,899.00 SPRINT 2,600.84 STARKEY, VICTORIA 34.48 STATE BOARD OF LAND COMMISSIONERS 5.00 STATE OF COLORADO 2,554.22 STEPHENS, MARK L 147.25 STEVENS, MARTIN JR & KATHY 108.27 STONEGATE VILLAGE METRO DISTRICT 801.68 STREFFCO CONSULTANTS INC 8,142.76 STURGEON ELECTRIC COMPANY 116,764.50 SUDS FACTORY CAR WASH & DETAIL CENTER 240.00 SUMMIT LABORATORIES INC 950.00 SUN ENTERPRISES INC 10,533.00 SVENDSEN, SHARON 61.80 SWEEPSTAKES UNLIMITED 1,035.00 SWINERTON BUILDERS INC 1,282,412.91 SYMANTEC SOFTWARE 26,261.40 TAYLOR FENCE COMPANY 24,650.00 TAYLOR, VIVIAN A 9,198.83 TECHNICAL SAFETY SERVICES INC 500.00 TELERUS INC 750.00 TELESPHERE NETWORKS LTD 3,165.86 THOMSON REUTERS WEST 151.00 THOMSON REUTERS WEST 490.27 THOMSON REUTERS WEST 5,906.00 TO THE RESCUE 8,333.32 TOWN OF CASTLE ROCK 293,598.51 TOWN OF CASTLE ROCK 169,721.79 TOWN OF LARKSPUR 67.00 TOWN OF LARKSPUR 378.98 TOWN OF PARKER 225,807.17 TOWN OF PARKER 235,811.59 TPM STAFFING SERVICES 280.50 TRACKER SOFTWARE CORPORATION 3,772.00 TRANSCRIBING SOLUTIONS LLC 395.40 TRAVCO INC 3,962.40 TRI-LAKES DISPOSAL 120.00 TRIP SAVERS COURIERS 165.50 TRUDEL, BARBARA 140.00 TRUDEL, BARBARA 95.44 TRUE NORTH SURVEYING & MAPPING 2,855.00 TRUJILLO, MICHELLE 177.50 TRW HOME IMPROVEMENTS 82.21 TST INC OF DENVER 5,624.00 U.S. CAVALRY 351.46 ULTRAMAX AMMUNITION 16,921.00 UMB BANK 2,208.58 UNCC 1,246.95 UNIFORMS WEST 13,845.00 UNION PACIFIC RAILROAD COMPANY 50,252.00 UNISOURCE WORLDWIDE INC 20.90 UNITED PARCEL SERVICES 14.34 UNITED REPROGRAPHIC SUPPLY INC 280.20 UNITED SITE SERVICES 331.00 UNITED STATES POSTAL SERVICE 160.00 UNITED STATES WELDING INC 20.48 US BANK 2,549.75 US POSTAL SERVICE 12,000.00 VERIZON WIRELESS SERVICES 1,572.58 VISIONARY INTEGRATION PROFESSIONALS LLC 11,264.00 WAGNER EQUIPMENT COMPANY 11,104.90 WALTON, ANNE 110.71 WATER & EARTH TECHNOLOGIES INC 15,925.27 WELCH EQUIPMENT COMPANY 1,983.15 WEMBER INC 13,125.24 WEST DOUGLAS COUNTY FIRE PROTECTION DISTRICT 26,000.00 WESTERN PAPER DISTRIBUTORS INC 5,197.29 WESTSIDE TOWING INC 339.50 WHARTON, PATRICIA 81.17 WILDCAT SHOPPING CENTER LLC 9,033.16 WILKERSON IV MD PC, JAMES A 3,575.00 WILLIAMS, KELLY ANN 153.44 WILSON & COMPANY INC 124,407.21 WILSON, DON 148.90 WILSON, DON 3.99 WILSON, GREG 2,346.00 WIRELESS ACCESSORIES UNLIMITED LLC 377.18 WITTNER, MATT 137.25 WL CONTRACTORS INC 1,089.00 WONG, KEVIN 80.30 WOODRICK, MARYJO 80.64 WRAY, KAREN L 178.67 WRIGHT, JAMES & VALERIE 257.87 WRIGHT, MICHAEL & DEBBIE 260.35 WYATT, AMANDA LEEANN 194.32 XCEL ENERGY 2,744.91 YOUNG & WILLIAMS PC 1,386.00 ZAMBRANO, CARLOS 330.00

ful firm. Please direct any questions concerning this RFP to Carolyn Riggs, Purchasing Supervisor at 303-660-7434 or criggs@douglas. co.us, 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m., Monday through Friday, excluding holidays. Legal Notice No.: 925364 First Publication: April 24, 2014 Last Publication: April 24, 2014 Publisher: Douglas County NewsPress

Computer-Related Cell Phone Service Travel Expense Printing/Copying/Reports Other Professional Services Clothing & Uniforms Fee Refunds - Clerk & Recorder Water & Sewer Other Professional Services Retainage Payable Fleet Outside Repairs Service Contracts Other Machinery & Equipment Travel Expense Other Purchased Services Construction-Justice Center Expansion Support & Maintenance Other Machinery & Equipment Other Professional Services Other Repair & Maintenance Services Telephone/Communications Telephone/Communications Books & Subscription Other Professional Services Software/Hardware Supplies/Maintenance Developmental Disabilities Grant Due to Castle Rock-MV License Intergovernmental-Castle Rock Due to Larkspur-MV License Intergovernmental-Larkspur Intergovernmental-Parker Due to Parker-Auto Use Tax Contract Work/Temporary Agency Software/Hardware Supplies/Maintenance Other Professional Services Contract Work/Temporary Agency Waste Disposal Services Postage & Delivery Services Metro Area Meeting Expense Operating Supplies/Equipment Other Professional Services Travel Expense Building Permits-Refund Roads, Streets, Drainage-Engineering Clothing & Uniforms Firearm Supplies Banking Service Fees Other Professional Services Clothing & Uniforms Roads, Streets, Drainage-Engineering Operating Supplies Postage & Delivery Services Computer Supplies Waste Disposal Services Postage & Delivery Services Other Repair & Maintenance Services Banking Service Fees Postage & Delivery Services Cell Phone Service Other Professional Services Equipment & Motor Vehicle Parts Travel Expense Other Professional Services Operating Supplies/Equipment Design/Soft Costs 2014 Payment-in-lieu of Taxes Distribution Janitorial Supplies Vehicle Tow Services Fee Refunds - Clerk & Recorder Building/Land Lease/Rent Medical, Dental & Vet Services Travel Expense Other Professional Services Clothing & Uniforms Travel Expense Travel Expense Communications Equipment Accessories Instructor Travel Traffic Signals - Construction Travel Expense Travel Expense Travel Expense Fee Refunds - Clerk & Recorder Fee Refunds - Clerk & Recorder Travel Expense Utilities Other Professional Services Travel Expense

TOTAL AMOUNT OF DISBURSEMENTS $11,649,973.63 FOR THE MONTH OF MARCH 2014 THE ABOVE AND FOREGOING IS A CONDENSED STATEMENT OF THE BILLS A PROVED FOR PAYMENT DURING THE MONTH OF MARCH 2013 BY THE DOUGLAS COUNTY BOARD OF COMMISSIONERS UNDER WHOSEDIRECTION THIS NOTICE IS PUBLISHED. N. ANDREW COPLAND, CPA, DIRECTOR OF FINANCE Legal Notice No.: 925356 and 925357 * First Publication: April 24, 2014 Last Publication: April 24, 2014 * Publisher: Douglas County News-Press

BE Informed! County and city governments run legal notices each week in this newspaper. Find out which laws are changing or new laws being considered; how the county / city is spending your tax dollars; liquor licensing requirements; bidding on government projects; final settlements for those projects; times and dates of public hearing; and others. Remember, the government works for you.


24-Color

24 Lone Tree Voice

April 24, 2014

Soccer

six goals. “Our heads weren’t in it today. As long as we get our heads back in it and work hard, we’ll be fine. We are looking forward to making the playoffs hopefully. That’s what we are shooting for.” The Huskies were slated to play at No. 1 Mountain Vista (10-0-1, 7-0-1) April 22, host Littleton (3-6-1, 0-6-1) April 24 and travel to ThunderRidge (5-4, 4-3) April 29 to close out the regular season before finding out if they accomplish that goal. Rock Canyon, which is a lock for the postseason had scheduled home games April 22 against Chaparral (0-10, 0-8) and April 24 against Highlands Ranch (65, 5-3). The Jaguars then close out with league games April 28 at Castle View (5-31, 3-3-1) and April 29 at Regis (6-1-3, 5-02), and play May 1 at Dakota Ridge (5-7).

Continued from Page 19

said. “We were always reacting to the way Rock Canyon was playing and we never got into making things happen. … We’ve had some games this season where we played very well and snuck by. We’ve also had times where we didn’t play well. Against Rock Canyon, you can’t bring your B game and expect to win. We just have to regroup.” “In the second half they stepped up and we definitely did not,” admitted Douglas County senior midfielder Cassi Fischer, who is third on the team in scoring with

Eagles

“I tip my hat to Leonard. He beat us. That’s what is going to happen in this league. Every team in this league can beat anybody. You get pitched to like that and that’s what is going to happen. We’ll be all right. We’re going to keep working. There are a lot of games left. We are in a gauntlet now. We have a long ways to go. When that kid (Leonard) is pitching, they are going to be able to beat anybody.” Mountain Vista improved to 13-1 overall and 6-0 in the Continental League with an 11-9 win over Legend April 18. The Golden Eagles were scheduled to face Chaparral April 21 and Ponderosa April 23. Their final regular season game is April 30 against Regis. ThunderRidge bounced back to improve to 10-3 overall and 5-1 in league play with a 12-1 win over Highlands Ranch April 18. The Grizzlies were slated to battle Heritage April 21 and meet Rock Canyon April 23.

Continued from Page 19

that’s what you hope with those two guys.” “By far it was Nick’s best performance as far as his fastball and off speed. That first inning striking out three, four and five kind of got his confidence going. Last year was in the back of all of the guys’ minds. They had that bad taste. That old cliché one game at a time but this one was huge game. ThunderRidge against Mountain Vista is a big rivalry.” ThunderRidge coach Joe White tipped his cap to Leonard. “He threw a great game,” confessed White. “He came out and just stuck it to us. He did a great job. I’m so proud of A.J. He threw great. Both pitchers threw great. It was a great high school game. He was dealing and A.J. was too.

Get social with us Colorado Community Media wants to share the news. Check us out on these social media websites: Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest and Linkedin. Search for Colorado Community Media.

Printed on recycled newsprint. Please recycle this copy.

Marketplace

Advertise: 303-566-4100

Auctions

Garage Sales

Classic Car Auction

HUGE CHURCH GARAGE SALE Friday & Saturday April 25th & 26th Friday 8am-4pm Saturday 9am-1pm. 4425 Kipling, Wheat Ridge. Use South Parking Lot.

April 26th 10am Memorabilia 9am Open 8am

Adams County Fairgrounds Brighton, CO To buy or sell call

970-266-9561

Specialty Auto Auctions www.saaasinc.com

Instruction

Estate Sales

Misc. Notices

Elizabeth Tools/Power Tools/Hotsy/ Snow Blower/HE Wash/Dryer/Sewing Equipment & Items /Green House/ Hydroponics /Camping / Gardening/Riding Lawn Mower/ Stairlift/Furniture/kitchenware April 24, 25, 26 8am-4pm 2713 Savage Rd. Elizabeth 80107 xrayceleste@yahoo.com

Bridal Salon closed.80+wedding Gowns to sell all at 50% off tag prices.Spread the word to all Brides-to-Be!!! APRIL 25-27, 10:00am - 3:00pm.All proceeds will go to benefit Rosies Ranch in Parker.This is a wonderful organization where children with deafness or other oral language hurdles can expand verbal and reading skills through equine connections. All of these dresses are new or Designer samples and will be selling at 50% off the retail tags. APRIL 25,26,27, 10:00 AM - 3:00 pm at Rosies Ranch, 10556 E Parker Rd. Parker, CO . PLEASE SPREAD THE WORD TO ANY FUTURE BRIDES YOU MAY KNOW AS THIS IS A GREAT SAVINGS!!!

N E S

PARK MEADOWS MALL

University Family Medicine at Park Meadows 8080 E Park Meadows Drive

PA

RK

M

MIT YOS E

EA

D

O

W

S

D

R.

Lone Tree Health Center 9548 Park Meadows Drive

To schedule your appointment online at any time, visit: uch.edu/find-a-provider

E470

Lone Tree Health Center Internal Medicine: Amy Ghaibeh, MD, Robert Leder, MD

VINTAGE GLASS SHOW & SALE: EAPG, Carnival, Cut, Depression Glass + Pottery and China, Deco/Modern. 1800's-1970's. Free seminars/glass ID. 4/26: 10a-5p, 4/27: 11a-4p. Douglas Cnty Events Center, Castle Rock, CO. I-25 & Plumb Creek Parkway, Exit 181. Admission $5 303-794-5988 www.rmdgs.com

Feed, Seed, Grain, Hay

2006 Ford F150 XLT $17,200 56866 miles 4 x 4 Super Crew cab,extended bed Mike 720-242-9814 or 2004hagan@gmail.com ELECTRIC BIKES Adult 2-Wheel Bicycles & & 3 wheel Trikes No Drivers License, Registration or Gas needed 303-257-0164

Firewood

$11.00 65 lb bales Brome Orchard 303-618-9744 Franktown

Split & Delivered $225 Stacking available extra $25 Some delivery charges may apply depending on location. Hauling scrap metal also available (appliances, batteries etc.) Call 303-647-2475 or 720-323-2173

GARAGE & ESTATE SALES

Reclining couch and matching recliner/rocker, great condition, no smoking or pets. Coffee table, two end tables, one end table has some damage on top but can be covered up. $800. 303-660-9771.

Garage Sales

Health and Beauty

Lakewood Quilt Shop Fabric and Notions Retail Fixtures and Office Equip. Also Multi-Family Household Goods May 2nd & 3rd from 9am-5pm No Early Birds Cash Only 10000 13th Place (13th Place & Kippling) See itemized list on Craigslist

Health Professional expanding in Denver area seeking 5 wellness focused individuals - enthusiastic collaborative for business partners. Exceptionally fun work, Limitless Income 303-666-6186

Centennial NEIGHBORHOOD GARAGE SALE IN CHERRY KNOLLS Arapahoe Rd & E Nobles Rd 70+ Homes! Maps Available Fri & Sat, May 2 & 3 SAVE THE DATE!

2007 Buick Lucerne CXL 61,000 miles, very clean, silver, $9800 (303)926-9645 2009 Dodge Ram 3500 SLT Quad cab 4x4, 23,600 miles 6.7 Liter Cummins Turbo Diesel 6 speed automatic, AM/FM Sirus, tow pkg w/5thwheel hitch Dually rear tires, 7 yr warr. (303)470-1620 $38,000 shown by appointment

Classic/Antique Cars

Pine/Fur & Aspen

Furniture

Horse hay for sale

Autos for Sale

Bicycles

3 vintage skin hand bags, brown leather shoulder bag Jarden-DesSacs, Poor Richard's 3/4 length suede coat 303-424-4321

Locally raised, grass fed and grain finished Beef & Pork. Quarters, halves, wholes available. Can deliver 720-434-1322 schmidtfamilyfarms.com

You may also schedule by calling: 720-848-2200 (Lone Tree Health Center) or 720-848-9300 (University Family Medicine at Park Meadows)

TRANSPORTATION

Farm Products & Produce 719-775-8742

University Family Medicine at Park Meadows: (from left) Debra Bislip, MD, Thomas Cherry, MD, Matt Leiszler, MD, Anna Svircev, DO, MPH

Antiques & Collectibles

Clothing

Grain Finished Buffalo

University of Colorado School of Medicine physicians are right here in your neighborhood. We provide preventive care and routine exams along with treatment of diabetes and high blood pressure. We also offer pediatric services at our University Family Medicine at Park Meadows clinic.

MERCHANDISE

FARM & AGRICULTURE

quartered, halves and whole

C470

E ST .

ACRES GREEN

DR.

W

minerals and other oil/gas interests. Send details to: P.O. Box 13557 Denver, CO 80201

Cats

Free to good home: 5 year old long-hair spayed female with the world's cutest face. Needs home with no other cats. Will provide a year's worth of free food. 719.248.8023.

Essential Oils, Nature’s Giftsfor Healing and Much More! BLOSSOM, a Lunch with Friends-Lunch & presentation, last Thrs ea mo. $25, May29, 11:30 AM, 1290 Williams St, Denver Must RSVP 303-359-7303 Meetup.com/BlossomLunch

Want To Purchase

You don’t have to look hard to find excellent health care in the neighborhood.

Thornton Multi-Family Yard Sale 2821 East 140th Ave Friday & Saturday April 25th & 26th 8:30am-3:30pm Lots of misc.

PIANO LESSONS!

Parker Location $25/half-hour $45/hour Call Stacey at 303 990-1595.

PETS

Miscellaneous FAST TREES

Grow 8-12 feet yearly. $17-$23 delivered. Potted. Brochure online:

www.fasttrees.com or 509

447 4181

True muscle car needs new home for someone to enjoy. 1966 Chevelle SS 396/360HP 4 speed car. Red/Red 90% Origional 303220-1371

RV’s and Campers Dont miss this! Why buy new, barely used 2010 Keystone Hideout 27' w/slide out Trvl trailer, over 1k extra accessories incl. $17,900 303-771-1688

Wanted Cash for all Cars and Trucks Under $1000 Running or not. Any condition

(303)741-0762 bestcashforcars.com

DONATE YOUR CAR, TRUCK, BOAT, RV; Running or not, to www.developmentaldisabled.org Tax deductible! 303-659-8086. 14 years of service

For local news any time of day, find your community online at

ColoradoCommunityMedia.com


25-Color

Lone Tree Voice 25

April 24, 2014

Arapahoe CC to host ‘Vagina Monologues’ Schwab Student Affairs Office presents Eva Ensler production at Houstoun Waring Theatre Staff report The Arapahoe Community College Student Affairs Office presents a performance of Eve Ensler’s “The Vagina Monologues” at 6 p.m. April 30 in the Houstoun

Wish Continued from Page 1

appointments or sporting events for my (13-year-old) daughter. I couldn’t have dreamt how much fun we would have.” Jason, who works as a salesman for a custom truck and trailer company, said he and his wife, Betty, don’t know what the fu-

Schedules Continued from Page 1

“We’ve got some 30 teachers that are interested in serving on a committee to look at what’s best for scheduling,” he said, adding that work will begin in May. “I think we like the seven-day period for kids. And we’re growing, so we have the opportunity to hire more teachers and make the 5-of-7 work and still maintain a good chunk of our offerings. But we’re going to hold off and investigate a lot of different schedules to see what’s best.” Statistics compiled at Legend High School suggest that while students may like the longer off-periods common to the current schedule, it’s not what’s best

Waring Theatre. The play is based on Ensler’s interviews with more than 200 women and is credited with the liberation of countless women to take control of their bodies and their lives. It is performed as reader’s theater, voicing many experiences and feelings. A meet-the-actresses session with light refreshments will follow in the student lounge.

Arapahoe Community College is at 5900 S. Santa Fe Drive in Littleton. Tickets: $5 in the Student Affairs Office (M2820) in advance, $7 at the door (cash only), will benefit The Blue Bench, formerly RAAP, which offers services to rape victims and 10 percent to V-Day Spotlight, which works to end violence against women and girls. Information: 303-797-5668, student. activities@arapahoe.edu.

ture holds for their three boys. “There’s not a timeline,” he said. “Muscular dystrophy does not have a cure. It is the most deadly genetic disease out there. Your focus as a parent is to keep them strong. “My wife and I are devout Catholics. We are very understanding that this is the cross we’re going to bear. But not so much us but (the children). We’re part of that and couldn’t imagine life without any one of them.

“The thing about diseases is, it doesn’t matter if it’s cancer or muscular dystrophy. It makes you realize the stark realization of life. Sometimes we get caught up in the stuff that doesn’t matter. You realize that each day is a blessing.” Among those days, April 15 will stand out in the family’s memory, he said. “Hats off to Make-A-Wish and Sky Venture for the whole thing,” Jason said. “It wasn’t just a wish for Max; it was truly a treat for everybody.”

for them. The numbers of Legend High School students with failing grades has increased sharply in the last two years. “We do have more Fs,” principal Corey Wise said. “Whether or not it’s statistically significant — I am not a statistician. My worry is, when kids have the off-time, is it really helping them? Are they really using that time for academic purpose?” Because the 90-minute periods of the current block schedule are longer than those offered under the 5-of-7, upperclassmen can have the long, back-toback off-periods more common to college students than high schoolers. Like Gotchey, Wise chose to wait one more year to change the schedule. The budget picture came into focus too late for his comfort. “It’s so late in April we felt to do it right and well would be hard,” he said.

“Between our SAC (School Accountability Committee), our teachers, and even some parents, we felt the 5-of-7 is what people want. So we’re going to look at which is the best 5-of-7 and work to do it next year. “While we stay one more year on the 6-of-8, we want to really have kids use their off-time better. Hopefully they’ll have a better GPA (grade point average). That’s going to be a key focus.” Like Gotchey and Wise, Rock Canyon High School principal Andy Abner found the majority of staff, students and parents supported returning to a modified version of the original schedule, but opinions varied. “Students felt the advantage of the 6-of-8 was they had more time off,” he said. “If you’re talking to parents, they felt that was a disadvantage.

crossword • sudoku

GALLERY OF GAMES & weekly horoscope

Continued from Page 1

shows continued confidence in the Lone Tree community and their commitment to our community.” It also shows that “there’s plenty of room for expansion and corporate commitment,” he said. The Fortune 500 financial securities firm, based in San Francisco, broke ground on its Lone Tree campus on May 10, 2013. The first phase of construction includes a 6,500-square-foot cafeteria, a building with a garden rooftop, outdoor amphitheater, parking garage with 18 electric charging stations, bike lockers, connections to area bike paths and walking trails, and interior walkways connecting the buildings. The company’s 76-year-old namesake leader started the San Francisco-based company 40 years ago with four employees. It now employs nearly 15,000 people and serves 8.2 million client brokerage accounts. At build-out, the campus could house 4,000 to 5,000 employees.

“The 5-of-7 still allows off-periods. It just brings things back into a more balanced spectrum.” Under the RCHS schedule for 201415, students and teachers will both have time together in the classroom and for one-on-one advisement. In an April 8 email to parents, ThunderRidge High School principal Carole Jennings said that school, too, would revert to the original schedule. “While both schedules have advantages, the seven-period schedule provides increased academic time per class (10.5 hours per year) while increasing academic support and enrichment opportunities for students,” she wrote. “The stakeholder meetings and input overwhelmingly supported moving back to the seven-period modified block schedule.”

SALOME’S STARS FOR THE WEEK OF ApRil 14, 2014

ARIES (Mar 21 to Apr 19) You’re doing better on the flexibility issue, but you still need to loosen up a bit to show you can be less judgmental and more understanding about certain sensitive matters. TAURUS (Apr 20 to May 20) Your personal aspect continues to dominate this week. But try to make time to deal with important career-linked matters as well. A change of plans might occur by the weekend. GEMINI (May 21 to Jun 20) Excuses are not really needed for much of the confusion occurring this week. However, explanations from all parties could help in working things out to everyone’s satisfaction.

crossword • sudoku & weekly horoscope

GALLERY OF GAMES

CANCER (Jun 21 to Jul 22) That surprising (but pleasant) recent turn of events continues to develop positive aspects. But be prepared for a bit of a jolt on another issue that needs attention. LEO (Jul 23 to Aug 22) Creating a fuss might bring you that attention you want. But are you prepared for all the explaining you’d have to do? Better to use more subtle ways to make your bid. VIRGO (Aug 23 to Sept 22) With education continuing to be a strong factor this week, this could be the time to start learning some new skills that can later be applied to a bid for a potential career move. LIBRA (Sept 23 to Oct 22) You might do well to reconsider some of your current time priorities before you get so deeply involved in one project that you neglect meeting a deadline on another. SCORPIO (Oct 23 to Nov 21) With an important decision looming, you need to be careful about the information you’re getting. Half-truths are essentially useless. Get the full story before you act. SAGITTARIUS (Nov 22 to Dec 21) Find out what everyone’s role is expected to be before accepting that workplace proposal. Getting all the facts now could prevent serious problems later on. CAPRICORN (Dec 22 to Jan 19) A flexible position on a workplace matter could be the best course to follow during the next several days. A personal issue also benefits from an open-minded approach. AQUARIUS (Jan 20 to Feb 18) involving too many people in your workplace problem can backfire. Remember: Allegiances can shift. Ask trusted colleagues for advice, but don’t ask them to take sides. PISCES (Feb 19 to Mar 20) Before submitting your suggestions, take more time to sharpen the points you want to make. The clearer the presentation, the more chance it has to get through when submitted. BORN THIS WEEK: Your clear sense of who you are gives you confidence when you need to tackle difficult situations. © 2014 King Features Synd., inc.


Services

26-Color

26 Lone Tree Voice

April 24, 2014

Services Painting

INNOVATIVE PAINTING Residential Experts

“Over 300 Houses painted in 2013” No Deposit Ever Satisfaction Guaranteed 5 year, 7 year and 9 year Exterior Warranties 2 Yr. Interior Warranty Licensed & Insured up to $2 Million Locally Owned and Operated since 1989

35% Off All Int. & Ext. 720-569-4565

CALL TODAY FOR YOUR FREE QUOTE www.innovativepaintingllc.com

Lawn/Garden Services

Lawn/Garden Services

A&M Lawn Service

S

Advertise: 303-566-4100

Painting

Plumbing

Quality Painting for Every Budget

Bryon Johnson

• Exteriors • Interiors • Decks • Insured • Free Estimates No Money Down

303-901-0947

Master Plumber • All plumbing repairs & replacement • Bathroom remodels • Gas pipe installation • Sprinkler repair

~ Licensed & Insured ~

www.lovablepainters.com

303.979.0105

Landscaping & Summer Mowing • SPRING FERTILIZATION/AERATION/CLEAN UP • SPRINKLER START-UPS/REPAIR •XERISCAPING • LANDSCAPING • FLAGSTONE OR PAVESTONE • SHRUB/TREE INSTALLATION & PRUNING • SPRINKLER • DESIGN & INSTALLATION - PATIOS & WALKWAYS -SOD & SOIL • AMENDMENTS - RETAINING WALLS - WATER FEATURES • LAWN MAINTENANCE - Commercial & Residential

Weekly Mowing • Fertilization Aeration - $8/1000 sq.ft. $35/5000 sq. ft. Power Raking & Vacuuming - $85/5000 sq. ft. or $17/1000 sq.ft. WATER FEATURES • SPRINKLERS Family 30 Years Owned & Exp. CALL FOR A FREE ESTIMATE Operated

303-791-5551

www.AMLandscapingServices.com

AMLandscaping@gmail.com

BB PAINTING Interior and Exterior

“We’re Crazy About Plumbing”

303.870.8434 WeeklY moWing

sign up before April 1st for

10% oFF

Alpine Landscape Management

Weekly Mowing, Power Raking Aerate, Fertilize, Spring Clean Up Trim Bushes & Small Trees, Senior Discounts

720-329-9732

Columbine Custom Contracting & Sprinkler Service • Sprinkler Start Ups $40 • Aerations $40 • Fertilization $30 • Power Rakes $60 & Up • Fence Repair & Painting • Power wash decks & houses • Clean Up / Tree service • Laminate/Hardwood Floors • Licensed Plumber

Tony 720-210-4304

Your monthlY bill throughout the summer (new customers only) AerAtion, FertilizAtion YArd CleAnup

www.denverlawnservices.com Established 2000

RON‘S LANDSCAPING Yard Clean-up, Raking, Weeding, Flower Bed Maintenance, Shrubbery Trimming Soil Prep - Sod Work Trees & Shrub Replacement also Small Tree & Bush Removal Bark, Rock Walls & Flagstone Work

FREE Estimates

Family owned business with over 35 yrs. exp.

Call or email Ron 303-758-5473 vandergang@comcast.net

SPRINKLER TURN ON MOWING & SPRING YARD CLEAN UP • Tree & Shrub Trimming • Aerate • • Fertilize • Gutter Clean Up & Repair • • Fence Installation & Repair • • Handyman Services •

Weekly Lawn Cutting, Aeration, Fertilization, Weed Control SPRING SPECIAL Free Fall Aeration with a Season of Lawn Care

Call Walter at 720-366-5498 walterquispe@msn.com

www.greentouchlandscapes.net

Painting

(303)730-9404

PROFESSIONAL OUTDOOR SERVICES TREES/ SHRUBS TRIMMED Planted, Trimmed & Removal • Sod Work • Rock & Block Walls • Sprinklers • Aeration • Stumps Ground • Mulch

Licensed / Insured

DICK 303-783-9000

Plumb-Crazy, LLC.

Interior Spring Specials

• Honest pricing • • Free estimates • We will match any written estimate! Same day service! No job too small or too big!

303-960-7665

CUSTOM HOMES REMODEL FINISHED BASEMENTS SERVICE AND REPAIR Licensed • Insured

Small jobs or large Customer satisfaction #1 priority Call Bert for FREE ESTIMATE

303-905-0422

Mike’s Painting & Decorating • Interior/Exterior • 35 years experience in your area • A-Rating with BBB • Fully Insured • I do the work myself • No job to small

Lic. MASTER PLUMBER FOR HIRE Robert #720-201-9051

Water Heaters • Water Softeners Gas & Water Lines • Repair, Remodel, Replace Whole House Water Filters • Consulting (for the do it yourselfer) • Kitchens, Bathrooms, & Basements • LOCAL

Complete Home Remodeling Basement Finish, Kitchen & Bath, Deck, Roofing, Painting, Drywall, Tile, Stone, Hardwood flooring, Windows & Doors No labor fees till job Completion.

Free Estimates 720 670 9957 Roofing/Gutters

ABE’S TREE & SHRUB CARE Abraham Spilsbury Owner/Operator

• Pruning • Removals • Shrub Maintenance • FreeEstimates Certified Arborist,Insured, Littleton Resident 720.283.8226 C:720.979.3888

All Types of Roofing New Roofs, Reroofs, Repairs & Roof Certifications Aluminum Seamless Gutters Family owned/operated since 1980 Call Today for a FREE Estimate • Senior Discounts

(303) 234-1539

www.AnyWeatherRoofing.com • Sales@AnyWEatherRoofing.com

Sprinklers

Like us on Facebook.

Fast, friendly service All Work Guaranteed!

dirty jobs done dirt cheap

303-523-5859

Drain Cleaning & Plumbing Repairs

720-308-6696 Free phone Quotes Residential/Commercial * Water Heaters Drain Cleaning * Remodel * Sump Pumps Toilets * Garbage Disposals

Plumbing

RALPH’S & JOE’S AFFORDABLE

Tile

Thomas Floor Covering

~ All Types of Tile ~ Ceramic - Granite ~ Porcelain - Natural Stone ~ Vinyl 26 Years Experience •Work Warranty

FREE Estimates

303-781-4919

Scan here

to like Colorado Community Media

on Facebook

Residential: • Hot Water Heat • Forced Air • Water Heaters • Kitchens • Baths • Service Repair • Sprinkler Repair •

ALL PRO TILE & STONE Your experienced Plumbers.

(303) 961-3485

HomeSkyInc.com

Tree Service

$AVE MONEY AND WATER

www.askdirtyjobs.com

Anchor Plumbing

303-791-4000

Professional Installations & Repairs Lifetime Warranty + SOD INSTALLATION

Painting

303-956-8803

General Repair & Remodel

Basements, Bathrooms & Kitchens "We Also Specialize in Electrical Projects" Licensed/Insured/Guaranteed

PH: 303-472-8217 FX: 303-688-8821

TCM

• Interior • Exterior • Free Estimates

Tile

ALAN ATTWOOD, Master Plumber

303-797-6031

“We Treat Your Home Like It’s Our Home.”

Remodeling

Insured & Bonded

Licenced & Insured

Family Owned & Operated. Low Rates.

Expert Tile, Marble, & Granite, Installations Free Estimates and Competitive Pricing All Work 100% Satisfaction Guaranteed

Call Paul (720) 305-8650

ColoradoCommunityMedia.com

PROFESSIONAL SERVICES GUIDE Bloomin’ Broom QCS, LLC Quality Cleaning Services Residential House Cleaning

We do concrete, sod, decks, sprinklers, outdoor kitchens, fire pits. We can build all of your landscaping needs, please call for a free estimate! 10 years in business. 303-621-0192 • cell 720-338-5275

5280 Residential Garage Doors LLC

• New Doors Installed • Openers • Maintenance • Repairs • Emergency Service

720-499-6262 Full Service – Low Rates

www.5280garagedoors.com

$30 off 1st Cleaning Service

Melaleuca EcoSense Products Bonded & Insured / Work Guaranteed

720-441-5144

www.bloominbroom.com • bloominbroom@msn.com

To advertise your business here, call Karen at 303-566-4091


Services

27-Color

Lone Tree Voice 27

April 24, 2014

Services Blind Repair

Concrete/Paving

Fast • Friendly • Reliable

303-564-4809 www.blindfix.net

Deck/Patio

Garage Doors

PRoFessional

AFFORDABLE & RELIABLE • Concrete lifting/leveling • Repairs and restoration • Stamped concrete restoration • A rating with BBB • Many satisfied customers • FREE ESTIMATE CALL NOW • CALL 303-638-0350 • www.concreterepairsdenver.com

303-261-6163 • Repairs • Sanding April 25% Off • Paint • Pressure Washing • Stain & Seal • FREE ESTIMATES www.coloradodeckandfence.com

Owner Operated

Service & Repair

Springs, Cables, Openers, etc…

10% Off with thiS ad Call or text anytime

303-716-0643

Handyman

Home Improvement

AFFORDABLE

HANDYMAN

Carpentry • Painting Tile • Drywall • Roof Repairs Plumbing • Electrical Kitchen • Basements Bath Remodels Property Building Maintenance

For ALL your Remodeling & Repair Needs

A+

HIGHLANDS HOME IMPROVEMENT, INC. General Repair, Remodel, Electrical, Plumbing, Custom Kitchen & Bath, Tile Installation & Basement Finish

Licensed/Insured

Free Estimates • Reliable Licensed • Bonded Insured • Senior Discount

FREE Estimates

303-791-4000

Ron Massa

For all your garage door needs!

Drywall

Joes Carpet Service, Inc.

Office 303-642-3548 Cell 720-363-5983 No Service in Parker or Castle Rock

A

Lan

PAUL TIMM

Joe Southworth

Commercial & Residential Sales

All Phases of Flat Work by

New Carpet Sales • Wholesale Pricing Installation • Restretch • Repairs Call foR youR fRee eStImate

720.227.1409

T.M. CONCRETE

Driveways, Sidewalks, Patios Tear-outs, colored & stamped concrete. Quality work, Lic./Ins. Reasonable rates "Small Jobs OK!" 303-514-7364

303-841-3087 303-898-9868

Drywall Finishing 35 Years Experience

Driveways Tear Outs & Replace

Residential & Commercial

303-781-4919

• patios • sidewalks • garage floors • • porches • stamped/colored • exposed agregate • lic.& ins. free estimates

Cleaning

Ali’s Cleaning Services

Residential and Commercial Cleaning • 15yrsexperience •WindowCleaning • Detailed,Honest, •Insured&Bonded Dependable •GreatCustomerService

Call Ali @ 720-300-6731

720-218-8849 www.delsolconcrete.com

FBM Concrete LLC.

Free Estimates 17 Years Experience Licensed & Insured Driveways, patios, stamp & colored concrete. All kinds of flat work. Let us do good work for you! (720)217-8022

“Your Priority List, Not Ours”

A continental flair

Detailed cleaning at reasonable rates.

Honest & Dependable

DAZZLING DAIZIES HOUSE CLEANING

FAMILY OWNED AND OPERATED

SINCE 1990 BONDED AND INSURED DEPENDABLE - EXPERIENCED With REFERENCES WKLY - BIWKLY - MONTHLY JODI - 303-910-6532

★ ★ ★ ★Cl★ a n e ing S★ e v i t er cu ★

★ vice

An Affordable Answer for a “CUSTOM” clean

303-250-2334 CALL NANCY

Drywall Repair Specialist

Handyman

• Home Renovation and Remodel • 30 years Experience • Insured • Satisfaction Guaranteed

Deck/Patio UTDOOR

ESIGNS, INC

“Specializing in Composite Redwood and Cedar Construction for Over 30 Years”

• Decks • Fences • Stairs • Overhangs •

Littleton

’s DeSpain Home SolutionS

Sanders Drywall Inc. All phases to include

Acoustic scrape and re-texture Repairs to full basement finishes Water damage repairs Interior paint, door & trim installs 30+ years experience Insured Free estimates

Solving All your Remodeling & Repair Problems – Just Ask!

DepenDable, Reliable SeRvice Over 30 Years Experience Licensed & Insured

David’s A+

HIGHLANDS HOME IMPROVEMENT, INC.

General Repair & Remodel Paul Boggs Master Electrician Licensed/Insured/Guaranteed

303-791-4000

25 Yea rs Exp . Fre e Est ima tes Ful ly Ins ure d

Service, Inc. REmoDElIng:

Kitchen, Bathroom & Basement. Interior & Exterior Painting. Deck Installation, Coating & Repairs. Window & Tile Installation. Plumbing. Home Repairs.

Bill 720-842-1716

Licensed & Insured 303-688-5021 www.oakvalleyconstruction.com

Hardwood Floors

Beautiful Hardwood Flooring Installations-All Types Free Estimates and Competitive Pricing All Work 100% Satisfaction Guaranteed

30+ years experience Clem: 303-973-6991

FREE ESTIMATES

A+

WA 30 Year Exp.

www.AMLa

Handyman Services Available

Free estimates

720.635.4911

Visit our website at millerremodeling.com

A HOME IMPROVEMENTS

15% Off

Honey-Do-Lists Decks * Landscaping Arbors * Sheds * Basements * Kitchens * Bathrooms * Handyman Stamped Concrete Patios Design * Free Estimates We now take credit cards! Decks and Patios

Week

Aera Tr

Colu

Sarge & Co. Stucco Repair

303-984-0663

pbabel@hotmail.com

Ton

Landscaping/Nurseries • Installation of new floors • Sanding, Refinishing, Staining existing floors • Free Estimates

303.591.7772 Mike Jamieson independent Hardwood Floor Co, LLC • Dust Contained Sanding • New or Old Wood • Hardwood Installation

trash hauling

• Home • Business • Junk & Debris • Furniture • Appliances • Tree Limbs • Moving Trash • Carpet • Garage Clean Out

Free

Family Owned and Operated • We are a full service design, installation and maintenance company.

www

Lawncare, Landscape, Sprinkler & Drainage

Call Don

at

303-915-6973

donlease@mtnhighlandscaping.com We Honor All Major Credit Cards • Spring Cleanup • Sprinkler Start-Up • • Lawn Care • Areate/Power Rake • • Weed Control • Drainage • • Tree & Shrub Care • Sprinkler System • Design, Installagtion, Repair & Startup

LANDSCAPE • Complete Landscape Design & Construction • Retaining Walls, Paver & Natural Stone Patios • Decks & Pergolas • Drainage Solutions • New Plantings • Landscape Lighting • Irrigation Systems and Repairs • Concrete Work • Clean-ups & Plant Pruning COLORADO REGISTERED LANDSCAPE ARCHITECT

Licensed

720.436.6340

Insured

www.arterralandscaping.com

Dirt, Rock, Concrete, Sod & Asphalt

Free estimates 7 days a Week

Fence Services

Call Bernie 303.347.2303 !

INSURED

Cowboy Fencing is a full service fence & gate company installing fences in Colorado for 23 years. Residential/Commercial/ Farm & Ranch Fencing

JIM 303.818.6319

“HONEY-DO’S DONE… THAT YOUR HONEY DON’T DO.” — SMALL JOBS INSIDE AND OUT —

Low rates, Free estimates

Bronco haulers

Affordable Rental/Garage Clean-Outs Furniture, Appliances

FREE ESTIMATES

Call 720-257-1996

Professional Landscape Service • Paver - Flagstone Patios • Planter, Retaining Walls • Full Landscape Service

303-525-4081

$350.00 off any complete project ask for details Insured – All work guaranteed

Lawn/Garden Services

Continental inC.

D & D FENCING

Commercial & Residential All types of cedar, chain link, iron, and vinyl fences. Install and repair. Serving all areas. Low Prices. FREE Estimates. 720-434-7822 or 303-296-0303

Front Range Handyworks Home repair interior & exterior Fence, Doors, Siding, Painting and Misc.

Call Troy 303-451-0679

• Hauling off of unwanted items/junk • Minimum charge only $60 depending on load • Also offer roll-off dumpsters

303.591.7772 Mike Jamieson

Wee F

Mountain high

insured/FRee estimates Brian 303-907-1737

Instant Trash Hauling

720-690-7645

STUCCO REPAIR

Classic Hardwood Floors

Scott, Owner - 720-364-5270

Just Details Cleaning Service BEST PRICES

No Job too small • Licensed & Insured

Call Paul (720) 305-8650

Hauling Service

25 yrs experience Remodel expert, kitchen, basements, & service panel upgrades. No job too small. Senior disc. Licensed/Insured

Repair • Power Wash Stain • Seal

Free Estimates Highly Experienced

Licensed & Insured

CALL 720. 351.1520

www.decksunlimited.com

Deck Restore

Kitchens • Baths • Basements

Serving Douglas County for 30 Years

Call Ray Worley CALL 303-995-4810

ALL PRO WOOD FLOORING

Affordable Electrician

720-635-0418

H Bathroom Oak Valley H Basements Construction H Kitchens Serving Douglas H Drywall County for 30 years BASEMENTS H | BATHROOMS Decks| KITCHENS

Power R

Call (303)908-5793

303-471-2323

Denver’s Premier Custom Deck Builder

303-427-2955

Weekly Mow

Www.SilvaBuildsIt.com

Call Ed 720-328-5039

FREE Estimates

HOME REPAIRS & REMODELING • Drywall • Painting • Tile • Trim • Doors • Painting • Decks • Bath Remodel • Kitchen Remodels • Basements & Much More! Call Today for a FREE ESTIMATE

Silva & Sons Carpentry & Remodeling

Electricians

Exclusively Serving Douglas County Specializing in Customer Service Locally Family Owned and Operated

When “OK” Just isn’t good enough -Integrity & Quality Since 1984 For more information visit: JustDetailsCleaningService.com Call Rudy 303-549-7944 for free est.

A PATCH TO MATCH

Eric DeSpain 303-840-1874

Residential • Commercial Move Outs • New Construction

720.283.2155

(303) 646-4499 www.mikesgaragedoors.com

Darrell 303-915-0739

As You Like It

Residential / Commercial • Quality Service • Affordable • Bonded/References

Patches • Repairs • Texturing Basements • Additions • Remodels We Accept • Painting & Wallpaper Removal All Major (303)988-1709 cell (720)373-1696 Credit Cards www.123drywall.com

Highly rated & screened contractor by Home Advisor & Angies list

• Detailed • Honest • Dependable• • Great References & Customer Service • • Insured/Bonded • • Green Products Used • Call Renee at 303-437-1791

Cleaning Service

• Springs, Repairs • New Doors and Openers • Barn and Arena Doors • Locally-Owned & Operated • Tom Martino’s Referral List 10 Yrs • BBB Gold Star Member Since 2002

Mike Martis, Owner

~ Carpet Restretching ~ Repair ~ Remnant Installs In home carpet & vinyl sales

•XERISC • SHR • DESIGN • AMENDM

Construction/Repair Drywall Serving Your Area Since 1974

Thomas Floor Covering

Exe ★

GaraGe Door

Restoration & Refinishing

Carpet/Flooring

References Available

GreGor

Deck & Fence

FIX a part of your team

We are a Family owned and operated. 15 years in the industry •Repairs made within 3 days•

Advertise: 303-566-4100

Colorado’s #1

blind repair

Make BLIND

S

Full Lawn Maintenance Mow – Edge - Trim Aeration & Fertilization Sprinkler Repair Call for a FREE quote

720-283-2155 Continental8270@yahoo.com

PR

OU TRE

• Sod W •A

DIC


28-Color

28 Lone Tree Voice

April 24, 2014

lonetreevoice.net All ballots here or online must be received by 11:59pm Wednesday, April 30th, 2014 Your contact information will only be used for clarification purposes only.

Submitter’s Name

Submitter’s Phone number Join our mailing list

Submitter’s Email Mail attn: BEST OF THE BEST or drop them at one of our offices: 9137 Ridgline Blvd., Ste. 210, HIghlands, CO 80129 110 N. Rubey Dr., Ste. 150, Golden, CO 80403 8703 Yates Dr., Ste. 210, Westminister, CO 80031

HOUSE & HOME Electrician_____________________ Garden Landscape Center ______________________________ Hardware Store ________________ Heating & A/C Company ______________________________ Home Repair/Remodeling ______________________________ Hot Tub/Spa Retailer ______________________________ Roofer/Roofing Company ______________________________ Windows ______________________ Maid/Cleaning Services ______________________________ Plumber ______________________ Garage Door Service ______________________________ Kitchen/Bath Contractor ______________________________ Trash Service __________________

AUTOMOTIVE Autobody _____________________ Auto Repair/Service ____________ Carwash/Detailing _____________ Towing _______________________ Auto Dealer ___________________ Tire Dealer ____________________

ENTERTAINMENT/LIFESTYLE PETS & ANIMALS

FOOD/BEVERAGE

Bowling Alley ______________________ Art Gallery ________________________ Family Entertainment Center __________________________________ Golf Course _______________________ Local Theater/Playhouse ____________ Best Place to Meet New People __________________________________ Singles Spot _______________________ Local Morning Radio Show __________________________________ Local Morning TV Show _____________ Live Music Venue ___________________

Pizzeria _________________________ BBQ Restaurant __________________ Asian Restaurant _________________ Greek/Middle Eastern ________________________________ Green Chili ______________________ Seafood ________________________ Breakfast Spot ___________________ Hot Wings _______________________ Sushi ___________________________ Café ____________________________ Steakhouse _____________________ Deli/Sandwich Shop ________________________________ Dessert _________________________ French Fries _____________________ Hamburger Joint _________________ Dessert _________________________ Italian Restaurant ________________ Burrito _________________________ Family Restaurant ________________ Happy Hour _____________________ Margarita _______________________ Sports Bar _______________________ Wine Bar ________________________ Ice Cream _______________________ Mexican Restaurant ________________________________ Bakery _________________________ Brew Pub _______________________ Butcher _________________________ Coffee Shop _____________________ Best Produce ____________________ Indian __________________________ New Restaurant __________________

MEDICAL Audiologist/Hearing Aids __________________________________ Chiropractor_______________________ Cosmetic Dentist ___________________ Cosmetic Surgery __________________ Dentist ___________________________ Eye Care Provider __________________ Hospital __________________________ Urgent Care _______________________ Orthodontist ______________________ Pediatrician _______________________ Physical Therapist __________________ Women’s Healthcare ________________ Wholistic/Naturopathic __________________________________ Acupuncture ______________________ Home Care Assistance_______________

RETAIL Book Store ________________________ Bike Shop _________________________ Clothing Store/Boutique __________________________________ Consignment Thrift Store __________________________________ Dry Cleaner _______________________ Florist ____________________________ Gift Shop _________________________ Sporting Goods Store _______________ Western Store _____________________ Jewelry Store ______________________ Kids Store/Toy Store ________________ Liquor Store _______________________ Music Store _______________________ Antique Store ______________________ Alterations ________________________ Shoe Repair _______________________

Veterinarian ______________________ Groomer _________________________ Boarder __________________________ Pet Supply Store __________________ Dog Park _________________________

REAL ESTATE Agent/Realtor ____________________ Real Estate Company ______________

RETIREMENT Retirement Community ____________

TRAVEL Travel Agency ____________________

PROFESSIONAL Attorney _________________________ Catering Service __________________ Computer Store/Repair_____________ Dance Studio/Company ____________ Funeral Home ____________________ Gymnastics_______________________ Bed & Breakfast ___________________ Nursery/Day Care Facility _________________________________ Photographer ____________________ Best Boss (name company) _________________________________ Hotel ____________________________

COMMUNITY Dog Park _________________________ Hiking/Biking Trail _________________ Public Art Display _________________ Swimming Pool/Waterpark _________________________________ Teacher/School ___________________ Local Non-Profit ___________________ Park _____________________________

BEAUTY/WELLNESS

Day Spa_________________________ Acupuncture ____________________ Haircut/Salon ____________________ Weight Loss Center _______________ Workout/Fitness Center ___________ Martial Arts _____________________ EVENTS Annual Event _____________________ Massage Therapist________________ Nail Salon _______________________ Aestetician ______________________ FINANCE Accountant_______________________ Waxing Services__________________ Bank/Credit Union_________________ Massage Company _______________ Financial Planner __________________ Mortgage Company _______________ Mortgage Agent/Consultant _________________________________

Best of the Best is a promotional contest voted on by the readers of Colorado Community Media publications. No purchase is required to vote or receive votes in this contest. All nominated businesses have an equal opportunity of winning. Contest Rules: Votes may be cast only one time per day, per person, via official paper ballot or on-line voting found at www.ColoradoCommunityMedia.com. Official voting begins at 12:01 a.m. April 1, 2014 and ends at midnight on April 30, 2014. Employees of Colorado Community Media are not eligible to participate. Votes will be calculated by Colorado Community Media via Second Street, an on-line ballot sorting 3rd party. Any business receiving the most votes in their category at the end of the voting period will be declared the winner in that category and receive “Best of the Best” designation from Colorado Community Media. Winners will be notified by Colorado Community Media via phone or e-mail no later than 30 days after the contest ends. To provide the most accurate results by geographical area, Colorado Community Media does not require, but does encourages, readers to vote for businesses in their immediate local community.

Lonetree Voice 0424