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FEBRUARY 15, 2018

A publication of

PROTECTING OUR PLANET: Ideas from around the world at the Colorado Environmental Film Festival P14

FREE

DOUGLAS COUNTY, COLORADO

SIGN OF SOMETHING BIG: A special metal beam is symbolic of the community’s hospital coming to life P4

SPLASHING SUCCESS: Valor Christian swimmers, divers excel at state meet P25

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CALL TO ACTION: Area emergency responders help in disaster situations across the nation P7

THE BOTTOM LINE

‘People do unthinkable things to people. Now and then, someone appears, like Zackari Parrish, and reminds me that life is worth living.’ Craig Marshall Smith | columnist, Page 12 INSIDE

VOICES: PAGE 12 | LIFE: PAGE 14 | CALENDAR: PAGE 22 | SPORTS: PAGE 24

HighlandsRanchHerald.net

VOLUME 31 | ISSUE 13


2 Highlands Ranch Herald

February 15, 2018F

Free event helps aging drivers be safer on the highway STAFF REPORT

An educational program that offers older adults the chance to check how well their personal vehicles fit them for greater comfort, control and safety is again offered in Centennial. The Reaching Older Adults Program will conduct its free CarFit program from 10:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Feb. 19, April 10, July 10 and Sept. 10 at the AAA Colorado Southglenn, 7400 S. University Blvd., Centennial. ROAD is funded by the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration and administered by the Colorado Department of Transportation. It was formed in response to research indicating that the population of aging road users will drive more and longer than any generation in history. Older drivers are often the safest

drivers in that they are more likely to wear their seatbelts, and less likely to speed or drink and drive. However, older drivers are more likely to be killed or seriously injured when a crash does occur due to the greater fragility of their aging bodies. During the CarFit event, trained technicians work with drivers to make small adjustments to things such as proper settings for their side mirrors and seat positioning, which can make a difference in a driver’s comfort level and help protect them and those around them. CarFit is an educational program created by the American Society on Aging and developed in collaboration with AAA, AARP and the American Occupational Therapy Association. The 20-minute checkup is free, but registration is preferred for CarFit. Interested drivers should call 303991-5740 to make an appointment.

HAVE AN EVENT? To submit a calendar listing, send information to calendar@coloradocommunitymedia.com.

MY NAME IS

CARTER CINGRANI Sophomore at Mountain Vista High School About me I’m 16 years old. I was born in Illinois and moved to highlands ranch when I was 6 weeks old. I live with my parents and my sister, Eden, who is 12 years old. She’s a seventh-grader at Mountain Ridge Middle School. We have one Yorkie named Molly. I run cross country and I play lacrosse in the spring. I’m also on the leadership team at Mountain Vista. On the weekend, I like to hang out with my friends and play sports outside. I work at Eastridge Rec Center as a lifeguard. Raising money for kids Mountain Vista has done Wish Week for the past four years. Our school comes together to raise money for a wish kid. We partner with MakeA-Wish Colorado. For the past three years, we’ve partnered with a brand called Be a Good Person to make T-shirts. During the week, we have plenty of fun events. Every night, there is a different restaurant in the community that gives a portion of sales to Mountain Vista. Last year, we raised more than $127,000. We hope to break that record from the T-shirt sales and different fundraisers. With that money, we will be able to grant the wish of one kid per month for the next year. As a lifeguard I started in early December. It was pretty rigorous training — 24 hours over a four-day weekend, learning from lifeguards and aquatic super-

Carter Cingrani, a sophomore at Mountain Vista High School, wears a t-shirt in honor of wish kid Gabby. The school had its Make-A-Wish week starting Feb. 12, which ended with a Hollywood-themed assembly on Friday. COURTESY PHOTO

visors. My day-to-day duties are watching the water and making sure everyone is safe. During my break, I make sure the pool stays clean, there is no trash and the guests are having an enjoyable time.

Fun fact I like to travel. This past year I went to Europe and I am going again next summer with a Mountain Vista program. I enjoy traveling with my parents or friends. European travel and history is probably my favorite. If you have suggestions for My Name Is..., contact adewind@coloradocommunitymedia.com

Project Linus to celebrate Make A Blanket Day Columbine tragedy sparked national effort to provide blankets to children going through traumatic times STAFF REPORT

Children going through traumatic times are gifted with the warmth and comfort of handmade blankets made by Project Linus. Blankets are made and donated to various outreach organization to assist and comfort children. Project Linus will celebrate Make a Blanket Day 2018 from 9 a.m. to noon Feb. 17 at Pax Christi Catholic Church, 5761 McArthur Ranch Road, Highlands Ranch. Fleece blankets will be cut and tied,

while various stages of the quilting process are completed. National Make a Blanket Day started in 1999, after the events that took place at Columbine High School, according to the Project Linus website. The group found that it was suddenly in need of a large number of blankets. Project Linus chapters put on “blanket bees” all over the country and then sent those blankets to local chapters in Denver. Because of the success of that effort, Project Linus learned that it had a national network of people who could help and decided to have an annual Make A Blanket Day. Each chapter could host activities to promote Project Linus and increase the group’s inventory of warm cuddly blankets. According to the Project Linus site, National Make A Blanket Day nets 75,000 to 100,000 blankets. For details, go to www.projectlinus. org/ or call Colette at 303-706-0442.


Highlands Ranch Herald 3

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4 Highlands Ranch Herald

February 15, 2018F

Construction workers, UCHealth leaders celebrate milestone BY ALEX DEWIND ADEWIND@COLORADOCOMMUNITYMEDIA.COM

On Feb. 6, a massive metal beam topped with an American flag and a small pine tree was craned onto the highest point of the future UCHealth Highlands Ranch Hospital in the Central Park development, east of Lucent Boulevard and north of Town Center. “It’s supposed to be representative of, you’ve given the building life,” Mike Ross, senior project manager at Mortenson Construction, said of the tree. “It’s a symbol of good luck.” Employees of Mortenson, the contractor of the building, and UCHealth leaders gathered in a white tent east of the project, where they signed the beam and watched it soar. Slated to open in early 2019, the six-story hospital will span across 33 acres of the emerging development, owned by Shea Properties. The $310 million project will include 72 inpatient beds, a two-story cancer center, birth center, intensive care unit, operating rooms, Level III trauma center and emergency department, advanced cardiac services and complete imaging, according to a news release from UCHealth. “UCHealth Highlands Ranch Hospital will deliver innovative, leadingedge care and advanced medicine to this community,” said Diane Cookson, president of UCHealth Highlands

Mortenson Construction employees working on the future UCHealth Highlands Ranch Hospital in the Central Park development install a metal beam adorned with a pine tree and the American flag on one of the tallest spots of the structure on Feb. 6. PHOTO COURTESY OF UCHEALTH

Ranch Hospital. “Every person working on this project has a hand in shaping the future of Highlands Ranch and helping to bring extraordinary care closer to home for residents of south

metro Denver.” Central Park is nearing completion — some restaurants and fitness studios in the retail area, east of Lucent Boulevard, are open. Single-family

homes and townhomes are filling the eastern portion of the development. And a regional park in the center of the development is beginning to take form.

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Highlands Ranch Herald 5

February 15, 2018

School board outlines criteria for permanent superintendent

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The Douglas County School Board’s decision to renew the charter contract of Hope Online Learning Academy received a standing ovation from dozens of parents and teachers in the audience at a Feb. 6 meeting. “When I look at Hope and my observation of the way our teachers and mentors interact with students and the students interact with them, I have two words to tell you about Hope, they are difference-makers,” Eric Peters, an employee of the school, said during public comment. The alternative school for at-risk students has an online program and 26 community learning centers across 12 school districts. The school opened in 2005 and Douglas County became its

authorizing district in 2007, allowing the school to operate independently but still receive state funding. Douglas County has one community learning center that serves 58 students. The majority of the school’s 2,172 students are from Aurora, Jefferson County and Denver. For the past seven years, Hope Online has been under watch by the Colorado Department of Education for low performance. Last April, school and district staff appeared before the state board of education to finalize an improvement plan, which outlines restructuring of the school’s learning model, recruiting quality educators and evaluating staff. The school’s performance ratings are grounds to revoke or not renew its charter contract, according to district documents. The school board voted to renew the contract until June 2019 to give Hope Online time to enact its latest improvement plan.

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District in Texas. In January 2016, the school board extended Kane’s contract through the 2017-18 school year. In December, the board voted 7-0 to hire a firm to conduct a national search for the permanent position.

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Using feedback from more than a dozen community meetings and an online survey, the Douglas County Board of Education has established the key characteristics it is looking for in a permanent superintendent. “We are so incredibly thankful to the 3,000-plus educators, administrators, support staff, parents, students, business leaders and non-parent community members who provided feedback by completing an online survey,” David Ray, president of the school board, said in a news release. “In addition, many others took time out of their busy schedules to attend community input meetings which were held across the school district last month. The outpouring of community support and input has been critical to our search process.” The school board has selected Ray and Associates, a school executive search firm based in Cedar Rapids, Iowa, to conduct the national search. Last year, Ray and Associates conducted a superintendent search for Jefferson County Public Schools and it is currently working with Boulder Valley School District to find its superintendent. The application process for the Douglas County superintendent position will close on March 12. Finalists will be identified in early April, according to the school district. In early January, interim Superintendent Erin Kane announced that she would apply for the permanent superintendent position. Kane was hired in 2016, at an annual salary of $240,000, after former superintendent Elizabeth Fagen resigned and took a position in the Humble Independent School

WHAT THEY’RE LOOKING FOR Per the school board, the permanent superintendent must meet the following 10 criteria: • Promotes a positive and professional environment that includes mutual trust and respect among district employees and the board. • Is strongly committed to a “student-first” philosophy in all decisions. • Possesses excellent people skills and can present a positive image of the district; is willing to listen to input and is a decision maker. • Inspires trust, has high levels of selfconfidence and optimism and models high standards of integrity and personal performance. • Has experience recruiting and maintaining exceptional staff for the district and schools. • Has experience as a classroom teacher or student support position in a school. • Is a strong communicator in speaking, listening and writing. • Has previous experience that will benefit the long-term financial health of the district, including successful experience in passing bond or mill levy increases. • Can develop and communicate a vision of quality education for the future of the board, staff and community. • Has knowledge of emerging research and best practice in the areas of curriculum/ instructional design and practice. For a full list of traits that the school board and community are looking for in a superintendent, visit www.dcsdk12.org/superintendent-search.

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6 Highlands Ranch Herald

February 15, 2018F

Metro area schools look to later start times Two of the largest districts consider making schedule shifts BY SHANNA FORTIER SFORTIER@COLORADOCOMMUNITYMEDIA.COM

Research says that a later school start time positively impacts alertness, mental health, wellness and behavior in high school and middle school students, which means students are better prepared to learn. Some area school districts have already implemented later start times. Others, including the Jefferson County and Douglas County districts, are exploring the possibility of making the move. The most recent district to commit to the switch is Littleton Public Schools, whose board of education voted Dec. 14 for later school start times for middle and high school students beginning with the 2018-19 school year. The decision to change school start times followed months of research analysis, parent presentations and extensive opportunities for parent, student and staff input through public forums, open houses and surveys. “If we truly rely on what we believe is compelling scientific research, the question is: Why wouldn’t we do it?” said Brian Ewert, superintendent of Littleton Public Schools. “The research is pretty clear about how much sleep adolescents should get, and more important is when they sleep.” According to Dr. Lisa Meltzer, National Jewish Health adolescent sleep expert, melatonin is a hormone released by the brain that controls the internal clock and prepares the body for sleeping. But during puberty, the timing of the melatonin release is delayed by up to two hours. This makes it nearly impossible for teens to fall asleep early. This shift is also seen in the morning hours, showing that when a teen wakes at 6 a.m. that is equivalent of an adult waking at 4 a.m. An adolescent’s brain is biologically asleep at that time. A 2014 study by the American Academy of Pediatrics recommends that middle and high schools delay start of classes to 8:30 a.m. or later. “Doing so will align school schedules to the biological sleep rhythms of adolescents, whose sleep-wake cycles begin to shift up to two hours later at the start of puberty,” the report reads. A National Sleep Foundation poll found 59 percent of sixth- through eighth-graders and 87 percent of high school students in the U.S. were getting less sleep than the recommended 8.5 to 9.5 hours of sleep on a school night. “Chronic sleep loss in children and adolescents is one of the most common — and easily flexible — public health issues in the U.S. today,” wrote pediatrician Judith Owens, in a policy statement from the American Academy of Pediatrics. A 2013 study by the Hanover Re-

Transportation schedules are one challenge that school districts must consider when weighing possible changes in start times. SHANNA FORTIER

search Institute also found that “school districts could increase student safety and boost adolescent academic success by instituting later start times for middle and high school students.” “It was courageous because it does create hardships,” Ewert said of the Littleton board’s decision. “But I absolutely believe it was the right decision to make and I applaud the board for putting into perspective why we’re doing this.” ‘A game-changer’ While Ewert said the shift will create some challenges, such as additional childcare needed for some elementary students, changes to the athletics schedule and reorganization of the transportation schedule, he thinks these obstacles should not get in the way of “doing the right thing for our adolescents.” “This one absolutely is in the best interest of our kids,” Ewert said. “It wasn’t about adults, it was about kids.” Ewert was involved in shifting the school start times when he was the superintendent of Englewood Public Schools. Although the shift in Englewood five years ago was less about the research and more about being able to share staff between schools when the new Englewood High campus was built, Ewert said after the first year they saw a positive impact on behavior, an

increase in attendance and a decrease in tardiness. “I just think kids are more awake and ready to engage in learning,” said Wendy Rubin, superintendent of Englewood Public Schools. “I think that the research is irrefutable — teenagers need more rest … it impacts brain development, social and emotional health and academics.” Cherry Creek School District implemented later start times for their middle and high school students this school year. While Deputy Superintendent Scott Siegfried said half a year is too early to track performance, the district is participating in a study with National Jewish Health to track changes in their students. Siegfried said his district has seen better first-hour attendance and fewer behavioral problems. “This is truly a game-changer for kids and I would encourage anyone to pay some serious attention to it,” he said. Pondering the shift Jefferson County Public Schools, Douglas County School District and Westminster Public Schools are all in the process of exploring later school start times for secondary students for future academic years. Westminster is in the early stages with what James Duffy, chief operating officer, referred to as creating draft proposals, policy discussions, internal vetting. Jeffco is a little further along as the

district will be hosting a meeting in mid-February to put a community task force together to examine the issue. While Jeffco Superintendent Jason Glass said the brain science concerning sleep patterns for teenagers sparked this discussion, transportation issues offer challenges for a large district like Jeffco. “There is a significant impact on transportation in the district,” Glass said, adding that traffic patterns and buses that run to multiple schools will need to be taken into account when working on a possible shift. “We time out to the minute how long we want buses to run,” Glass explained. “When you change something, it can have a cascading effect. It’s one of those things that we’ll have to look at.” Glass hopes the district can have a thoughtful discussion about the pros and cons of the issue. The final decision would be made by the school board. The research and changes that other districts have made also got Douglas County’s Board of Education to look at making a change. Staff is currently re-examining research and surveying stakeholders. Both the Douglas and Jeffco districts are not looking to make the possible change until the 2019-20 school year. “We want to go slowly, learn from our other districts before we jump in,” Douglas County School Board President David Ray said.


Highlands Ranch Herald 7

February 15, 2018

Colorado emergency responders provide disaster aid nationally Assignments offer increase in experience, assurance of assistance here if needed BY JESSICA GIBBS JGIBBS@COLORADOCOMMUNITYMEDIA.COM

When hurricanes make landfall or wildfires take off, and if earthquakes topple buildings or terrorists attack, it’s emergency responders who are tasked with protecting the public. In the event of large-scale emergencies, what unfolds is a multi-jurisdictional response drawing personnel from across the nation — including many from Colorado. Hurricane Irma, Hurricane Harvey and the Thomas and Lilac fires, two of the massive wildfires that plagued California in December and January, were just some of the most recent natural disasters to which Denver metro agencies deployed crews. It’s a call to action they’re happy to answer when the job is bigger than any one agency can handle, officials say, but there’s also a benefit to the local departments that respond. The first priority is offering aid in the form of manpower, equipment and other resources, agencies said. What they get in return is real-life experience and training they can use should a similar tragedy strike at home. Rod Tyus, a captain for West Metro Fire Rescue, also heads up the FEMAfunded Colorado Urban Search and Rescue Task Force, one of 28 task forces across the country that respond to local, state and national events. West Metro Fire Rescue sponsors the program in Colorado, which has more than 200 members from 23 agencies in the state. The task force had back-to-back deployments over the summer, first in Texas for Hurricane Harvey and then in Florida for Hurricane Irma. “We had over 100 members, close to 100 members deployed this past summer to hurricanes,” Tyus said. During Hurricane Irma, Eric Hurst of South Metro Fire Rescue deployed to an Air Force base in Georgia, although he was working as a communications unit leader for crews in Florida. His focus was making sure all the responders could communicate with one another. “There are various types of radios, as far as the frequency range, that they can talk on,” he said. “Where I was, my team was coordinating law enforcement resources from across the country. We had different federal agencies that were coming together for the first time.” Hurst can still recall his chilling two-day drive from Colorado to Georgia. As he traveled on a nearly empty southbound interstate toward the hurricane, the opposite lanes stood in a gridlock as locals attempted to evacuate. Pumps ran dry at gas stations, he said, and shelves were emptied of food. “As a responder going into a disaster

South Metro Fire Rescue’s Eric Hurst works alongside the ATF to check satellite phones before giving them to law enforcement officers headed to Florida for Hurricane Irma. COURTESY PHOTOS

West Metro Fire Rescue shared this photo to its Facebook page of firefighters working near the Thomas Fire in California. you are part of the disaster, essentially. You are not immune from not being able to get fuel,” he said, describing the trip as eerie. “We take a lot of things for granted in our daily lives. That the gas station is going to have gas and the grocery store is going to have food.” Despite the challenges in deploying to emergency zones, Hurst said the trip was well worth the trouble because of the lessons he learned. Battling California blazes Lt. Patrick Richardson with Castle Rock Fire and Rescue said crews from their department spent three days working the Lilac Fire in San Diego before working 11 days on the notorious Thomas Fire. The Thomas Fire was the largest wildfire in California history, burning in Ventura and Santa Barbara counties. The U.S. Forest Service announced the blaze was 100 percent contained as of Jan. 12, more than a month after it began. What caused the Thomas Fire remains unknown, but before its end, it burned 281,893 acres, destroyed more than 1,063 structures and damaged 280 more. The Lilac Fire started three days after the Thomas Fire in San Diego County. It burned 4,100 acres, de-

stroyed 157 structures and damaged 64. Richardson, with more than 20 years of experience in wildland fires, described the Thomas Fire as the “largest, most complicated and most expensive” fire in the state’s history. “We were protecting homes that were in excess of $15 million apiece,” he said. The crews will have ample opportunity to use the skills they learned in the California fires along the Front Range, Richardson said, which he describes as notorious for its winddriven fires. “A lot of people will look at wildland fires here on the Front Range and say, ‘Oh, it’s just a grass or weed fire.’ But if you ask a rancher what’s out in that field, they see feed,” Richardson said. “We can save that landowner quite a bit of money and feed for his livestock.” That task is easier when firefighters have learned to stay calm and focused on the job through deploying to events like the Thomas or Lilac fires, he said. The Castle Rock team, like personnel from West Metro Fire and Rescue that also worked the Thomas and Lilac Fires, were assigned to what they call “mop up.” In essence, the job means cleaning up after the fire has

A photo from South Metro Fire Rescue public information officer Eric Hurst’s drive toward Hurricane Irma shows heavy traffic moving the opposite direction as local residents evacuate. passed through an area to make sure it doesn’t reignite, or, working ahead of the fire to clear out fuel. “The vast majority of firefighting is not hero work. It’s dirty work. It’s grunt work,” Richardson said. Mike Johnston, an engineer with West Metro Fire Rescue, and Jonathan Ashford, a firefighter and paramedic with the agency, have both deployed to numerous natural disasters in the past, but each time, they learn something new. “It’s kind of mixed emotions,” Johnston said, “because we enjoy doing what we’re doing and you’re working hard and you’re sweaty and you’re dirty and you stink but you’re all doing it together. You have a huge feeling of accomplishment when you persevere through all of that.” Ashford said they learn something new each time they deploy, one more reason the trips are worthwhile. Overall, Tyus said, the system is reciprocal. Colorado agencies respond to other states’ emergencies knowing that the favor will be returned if there’s ever a local catastrophe, such as the Colorado floods in 2013. “We needed it in 2013, Texas needed it last year and Florida, and Puerto Rico needed it,” Tyus said. “It means a lot to be able to work with each other and be able to serve the nation and be able to help people in need.”


8 Highlands Ranch Herald

February 15, 2018F

Presidents Day Douglas County offices will be closed Monday, February 19 for Presidents Day. Many county services are available online at www. douglas.co.us

School district ordered to pay for private education of student with autism Case of Endrew F. dates to 2010 and was heard by the U.S. Supreme Court

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Eligible low income households in Douglas County may apply for energy assistance through the Low Income Energy Assistance Program (LEAP). For more information, please visit www.douglas. co.us and search for LEAP or email LEAPHELP@ discovermygoodwill.org

A federal judge has ordered the Douglas County School District to reimburse the family of a student with autism for costs associated with his private education. On Feb. 12, U.S. District Judge Lewis Babcock ruled the school district failed to provide an appropriate education for the student, identified only as Endrew F. in court documents. First filed in 2010, the case of Endrew F. versus Douglas County School District made it to the U.S. Supreme Court. Though frustrated with the amount of time it took to make a ruling on the case, Endrew F.’s parents, identified only as Joseph F. and Jennifer F. in court documents, are “obviously very pleased,” they said in an emailed statement provided by the family’s lawyer, Jack D. Robinson, of the Denver-based firm Spies, Powers & Robinson. “We’re hopeful the ruling will finally change how DCSD approaches educating not only the special need student population, but their entire student body including gifted and talented, twice gifted and neuro-typical students,” the parents said in the statement. Endrew F. was diagnosed with autism at the age of 2 and with attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder a year after that, court documents say. His autism affects his cognitive functioning, language and reading skills, and his social and adaptive abilities. He attended Douglas County schools from preschool through fourth grade. During that time, he received specialeducation services, including Individualized Education Plans, also known as IEPs. In 2010, Endrew F.’s parents pulled him out of Summit View Elementary in Highlands Ranch and enrolled him at Firefly Autism House, a private school in Denver that costs roughly $70,000 a year. His parents argued he wasn’t provided the level of public education under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act, which guarantees a “free appropriate public education” to all students with disabilities.” They sought reimbursement from the Douglas County School District for their child’s tuition and related expenses at Firefly. In August 2015, the United States 10th Circuit Court of Appeals ruled the school district did provide a “a free appropriate public education.”

Business Personal Property Tax Declarations due by April 15 2018 Business Personal Property Tax Declarations may be filed online at www.DouglasFilesOnline.org Business owners who own or lease business personal property with a total market value greater than $7,400, must report the property to the County Assessor. For more information visit www.douglas.co.us/assessor

Neighbors helping Neighbors If your new year’s resolution involves finding ways to serve others, Neighbor Network has some recommendations that may be just what you’re looking for – and close to home. To volunteer please fill out an application at www.dcneighbornetwork.org or call 303-814-4300.

Volunteer sought for part-time Veterans Service Officer position The Douglas County Office of Veterans Affairs has a parttime opening for a veteran to assist fellow veterans and their dependents with beneifts and services. Those interested may fill out an online application by February 23, 2018. Visit www.douglas.co.us and search for Veterans Service Office.

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‘We’re hopeful the ruling will finally change how DCSD approaches education not only the special need student population, but their entire student body ...’ Endrew F.’s parents Last March, the U.S. Supreme Court unanimously sided with the family. In the decision, Chief Justice John Roberts said it is not enough for school districts to offer minimal instruction for special-needs children. The school programs must be “reasonably calculated to enable a child to make progress appropriate in light of the child’s circumstances.” The ruling would have ramifications for special needs students across the country. The Supreme Court’s decision “constituted a paradigm shift in the educational rights of children with disabilities,” Robinson said over email. The Endrew F. case had been tied up in district court until the Feb. 12 ruling, when Babcock concluded that the school district didn’t meet the “undeniably higher standard set by the Supreme Court.” “While Petitioner’s educational program must be appropriately ambitious in light of his circumstances, the Supreme Court was clear that every child, including Petitioner, should have the chance to meet challenging objectives,” Babcock wrote. “In this case, Petitioner’s past educational and functional progress — as evidenced by the changes to his yearly IEPs after second grade — was minimal at best.” The family and their lawyer have until March 5 to submit damages to district court, which will be “in the seven figures,” Robinson said over email. Costs include private school education, transportation to and from school, pre-judgment interest, attorney’s fees and litigation costs, he said. The school district is in the processing of assessing the ruling and next steps, spokeswoman Paula Hans said. “Regardless of today’s outcome, DCSD will continue to support the learning and well-being of every student, thanks to our dedicated professionals who work with our 68,000 students on a daily basis,” Hans said.


Highlands Ranch Herald 9

February 15, 2018

County expands self-serve motor vehicle registration Lone Tree newest site to install kiosk after rollout in Castle Rock STAFF REPORT

A self-serve kiosk for motor vehicle registrations has been installed at Douglas County’s motor vehicle office in Lone Tree. The expansion of the Colorado MVExpress to Lone Tree follows a successful pilot in Castle Rock. The bright yellow and blue self-serve kiosk resembles a traditional ATM and is available from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Friday in the lobby of the Douglas County Motor Vehicle Office, 9350 Heritage Hills Circle, Lone Tree. The kiosk accepts checks, credit cards and debit cards (no cash). The Castle Rock kiosk is open from

7:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. at 301 Wilcox St. That kiosk accepts cash, checks, and credit or debit cards. These stand-alone machines serve the motor vehicle registration needs of Douglas County residents only. “The citizens of Douglas County have shown us by their use of our pilot kiosk in Castle Rock that this is the right decision, at the right time, for all the right reasons,” said Merlin Klotz, Douglas County clerk and recorder. To use the kiosk, users type in their license plate number using the touch screen and then pay taxes and fees due. The kiosk will produce a printed receipt, registration and license plate tabs immediately. To learn more about the self-serve kiosk and review commonly asked questions and answers, go to www. douglas.co.us/mv-kiosk/.

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10 Highlands Ranch Herald

February 15, 2018F

Businesses honored at annual chairman’s luncheon BY ALEX DEWIND ADEWIND@COLORADOCOMMUNITYMEDIA.COM

Once a year, many of the community’s business owners and employees come together to celebrate their involvement in the Highlands Ranch Chamber of Commerce. On Jan. 9, they met at the Falls Event Center, 8199 Southpark Court, for the annual Chairman’s Inaugural Luncheon. After networking for about an hour, guests assembled in a large room with a view of snow-capped mountains for lunch and a series of recognitions and awards. Tim Lindsey, founder of Bear Mortgage, 4 W Dry Creek Circle, has been named chairman. The following businesses

received glass plaques for their service in the community: • Emerging business: Inngi Float, 9567 S. University Blvd. • Home or small office: Blue Linden Weddings and Events, 4510 Canyonbrook Drive. • Small business: Abloom, 9325 Dorchester St. • Medium business: Woodhouse Day Spa, 8351 Southpark Lane. • Large business: Windcrest, 3235 Mill Vista Road. • Franchise: Eileen’s Colossal Cookies, 2201 Wildcat Reserve Pkwy. • Non-profit: CASA - Advocates for Children, 166 Main Street, Elizabeth. • Roxborough business: Seven Stones Botanical Gardens, 9635 N Rampart Range Road, Littleton.

t t

a F b a t u l r Highlands Ranch business owners and employees gather at the Falls Event Center, 8199 Southpark Court, r for the annual Chairman’s Inaugural Luncheon, hosted by the Highlands Ranch Chamber of Commerce. Dr. r Tammy Heflebower, a former teacher and current consultant, was the keynote speaker. ALEX DEWIND t

This little piece of trash leaves a ton of damage. When you notice a piece of trash, please stop and dispose of it properly. What isn’t collected today is picked up in the next rainstorm and sent directly into the nearest creek. From the moment this small piece of trash enters our waterways, it is responsible for so much damage. With your help, we can make a difference in keeping our water clean. Local stormwater agencies are teaming together to bring you this message. We take this so seriously that we posted this ad rather than send you more garbage in the mail. One thing is clear: our creeks, rivers and lakes depend on you.

THIS STOR MWAT ER MESSAGE B R OUGH T T O Y OU B Y

Visit onethingisclear.org to: • Report accidental and illegal dumping to your local agency • Search local volunteer events • Find more helpful tips Help keep our waterways clean: pick up one piece of litter every day and recycle when you can. Colorado Community Media agrees: Please recycle this newspaper responsibly and partner with our communities for a better tomorrow. Ad campaign creative donated by the Town of Castle Rock Utilities Department, Stormwater Division.


Highlands Ranch Herald 11

February 15, 2018

Bike-sharing program comes to Lone Tree Rentals are free through February; model doesn’t use stations

GET ON BOARD DOWNLOAD: The ofo app can be downloaded through Google store or iTunes, or through www.ofo.com FIND A BIKE: Open the app and find all the bright yellow bikes around you. TAP AND SCAN: When you’re at the bike, tap “unlock” and scan the barcode to automatically unlock and enjoy the ride. PARK AND LOCK: At your destination, simply park your bike and manually lock it to end the trip.

BY TABATHA STEWART TSTEWART@COLORADOCOMMUNITYMEDIA.COM

Lone Tree residents may have noticed a new addition to their community — dozens of bright yellow bicycles. The bicycles appeared around town and at the Lincoln light rail station Feb. 7, and are part of a pilot program between the City of Lone Tree and ofo, a bike-sharing company that uses a station-free model, so bikes can be picked up and dropped off at almost any location. Typical bike-share programs require that bikes be picked up and returned to a designated station. Bike rentals cost $1 per hour, but through the month of February rides are free.

An app called ofo must be downloaded to use the bikes. The app uses GPS technology to tell you where the closest bicycle is to your location. It could be outside your apartment, or across the street at the grocery store. Once a bike is found, tap “unlock” and scan the barcode on the bike. The bike is unlocked and ready to ride. When finished, find a safe place to park the bike. It is selflocking, so as long as it is not parked in

a public right-of-way or someplace that will pose a danger, just park and lock the bike. Austin Good, management analyst with the city of Lone Tree, said ofo reached out to the city several months ago about the project, and they have agreed to a trial pilot until June. There is no cost to the city for the service, but the city did grant a temporary license to ofo for the length of the pilot. “This is a great resource for the community,” said Good. “Lone Tree is a very bike-friendly city, and this will give residents the opportunity to take advantage of biking, whether it’s just a short trip or a day around the city.” Good said as the program progresses, it will become apparent where the bikes are most used, and ofo can add more bicycles to keep up with the demand. Ofo is also responsible for maintaining all the bicycles, and making sure they aren’t left in dangerous areas or abandoned on city streets.

Taylor Bennett, head of communication in North America for ofo, said they’re excited to bring this program to Lone Tree. “We’re thrilled to start serving Lone Tree and collaborating with the community to help enhance its transportation ecosystem and make the city an even better place to live, work and ride,” said Bennett. The yellow bikes parked along Lincoln Station drew interest from lightrail commuters the day they appeared, as people gathered around and tried to figure out what they were and how to use them. Thom Nguyen and some of his friends checked out the bikes on their way home, after exiting the E Line train. “I would try this. Not now, because I’m in a hurry, but maybe sometimes, when we want to ride around,” said Nguyen. The ofo app can be downloaded through Google Store or Itunes.

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12 Highlands Ranch Herald

I

LOCAL

February 15, 2018F

VOICES

When death took a stranger, it claimed a much-needed friend

didn’t know Zackari Parrish. Not at all. I know I have needed men and QUIET women like him my DESPERATION entire life. Not because of the fact that he was a good deputy, but because he was someone with a good heart, and a bright light in a world that often goes deeply cruel on me. (I’m writing this in first person for a Craig Marshall reason.) Smith I read about the 5K run/walk at the Douglas County Fairgrounds, and saw a picture of Parrish’s

wife and read what she said and sat there on the couch and cried. By some design that I cannot explain, there have been just enough good examples in my life against the other kind, of which there are many (too many). People do unthinkable things to people. Now and then, in the middle of it, someone appears, like Parrish, and reminds me that life is worth living. There are times when I have thought otherwise. The morning I watched the Murrah Federal Building fall, and heard there was a daycare full of kids in it. What happened in Los Angeles, my Los Angeles, after the Rodney King verdict. The Turpin kids.

I have had my own moments with the Douglas County Sheriff ’s Office. Back in my own darker days. Every single man and woman I met was kind to me. “Jack,” wherever you are, thanks for being compassionate to a drunk. In some countries, all I see is hate and evil and genocide, and there are no Parrishes, or if there are, they are swiftly punished or executed. Syria now. Cambodia once. Uganda. I wish there were more good people in America than there are. Our freedoms come with a gift card for the bad guys. I’ll take it over repression. I read that Parrish “used humor to de-escalate tense situations.” I do the same thing, only I am the tense situation. I don’t mean I am over here on pins and needles. I mean that

life’s curve balls and sliders get to me, and that’s when I contact Mark, or watch W. C. Fields or read Steve Martin. Mark can turn almost any word into something else, just like Groucho, or take a couple of words and turn them into a brilliant, surreal, non-sequitur, like Steven Wright. I have a number of saved movies, and before I turn off the lights at night, I watch 10 minutes of one that I may have seen a hundred times. I don’t want to go to sleep — or try to go to sleep —with the news of the day on my mind. I watch the same scene in “Sullivan’s Travels” over and over. SEE SMITH, P13

Working on fulfilling dreams with hope and encouragement

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plan, course-correct if necessary, ’m working on a dream, and get back in the dream game. though it can feel so far The hope and encouragement of away, I’m working on a others is awesome, it is fantastic, dream, our love will make it is enormous … and when it is it real someday, I’m working on coupled with the hope and encoura dream though it can feel so far agement we find within away, I’m working on a our own hearts, there redream, and our love will WINNING ally is no stopping us. make it real someday.” WORDS We have all probably - Bruce Springsteen, heard at some point in “Working on a Dream” Sometimes our dreams our lives that “Hope is not can feel so far away, can’t a strategy.” I always love they? Sometimes they feel to debate that statement, so far away we almost feel as I think hope is a major like giving up. Almost. strategic element of any But we don’t quit, we don’t successful endeavor. I get walk away, and we don’t the fact that we cannot give up. And one of the “hope” our way out of Michael Norton challenging situations reasons we persist and pursue our dreams with or trouble spots. But that vigor and conviction is because we doesn’t mean that we shouldn’t are surrounded by the hope and remain hopeful in those situations encouragement of others whose and keep “hope” alive so that we love will help us make them come can come up with an alternate true someday. plan or solution. When I am build“The doors of hope swing widest ing business plans and models, I on the hinges of encouragement.” absolutely include “hope” in my - Zig Ziglar strategic thinking, because as It is so true, isn’t it? And Dr. Alfred Adler shared, “Hope whether or not we have others in is the foundational quality of all our life who lift us up, and fuel our successful change; no hope; no hope with encouragement, we can change.” still pick ourselves up, look ourselves in the mirror, review our SEE NORTON, P13 “

FINANCIAL STRATEGIES

A look at what causes market volatility and how to deal with it

T Patricia Kummer

he shortest month of the year has brought the most negative volatility we have seen on Wall Street since 2012*, as of this writing. Usually, once we get past January, based on the old adage, “as January goes, so goes the year,” many investors breathe a sigh of relief. But not so fast. Maybe all of those voices of

A publication of

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caution you have been hearing for over a year are starting to make sense. This may be a good opportunity to remind our readers of what causes volatility and how to best navigate it going forward. Investors’ reaction to the first market pullback since the Brexit vote in June 2016 has been widespread. SEE KUMMER, P13

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Highlands Ranch Herald A legal newspaper of general circulation in Highlands Ranch, Colorado, the Herald is published weekly on Thursday by Colorado Community Media, 9233 Park Meadows Dr., Lone Tree, CO 80124. Send address change to: 750 W. Hampden Ave., Suite 225, Englewood, CO 80110

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Highlands Ranch Herald 13

February 15, 2018

KUMMER FROM PAGE 12

We have heard everything from, “Isn’t it about time?” to “Are we headed into recession?” The answer to both, in my opinion, is no. Markets don’t correct because of the calendar, and we are in the middle of a slow growth cycle, nowhere near the end of expansion. Let’s tackle the first one regarding the length of time we have been in recovery with virtually no volatility. When you look at the fundamentals of how stocks are priced it is clear to me that the upward trend is a response to double-digit corporate earnings and the potential for worldwide economic growth. Even though this recovery has been the longest on record, time in recovery is not a predictor of when it will end. The U.S. recovery has been slow due to the impact of global economies climbing back to good health. When our recession ended in 2009, Europe

NORTON FROM PAGE 12

And when building a business or a strategic plan, “encouragement” is a key element of my anticipated success. I look for family, friends, business partners, clients, co-workers, and associates at all levels to live and work in such a way that we are constantly encouraging one another. It is just too easy to go negative on someone or something. It is too easy to find the faults in a project or program. It’s only easy to go negative if we don’t live with and work with the full armor of hope and encouragement. How’s this for a question to ask your family, your company, or your organization: “Are we living and working with the spirit of hope and encouragement?” Now be truthful in your own response here as well, “Is my family, my business, or my organization living with the spirit of hope and encouragement?” How would you answer this question? How would others answer the question about you, your family, or your company? Would they see people who are life-lifters and encouragers, or would they see and feel a vibe of negativity? As Bruce Springsteen wrote in his song above, “Working on a Dream,” the way we achieve our goals and realize our dreams is when our love makes it real someday. We all have dreams,

SMITH FROM PAGE 12

Joel McCrea meets Veronica Lake in an “owl wagon” in Los Angeles at sunrise. I love that scene. (Even though I know what later happened to Lake. She was only 50 when she died. I have the same disease.) It sounds like Parrish had some of my father in him. Dad had a sense of

was still two years away from dealing with possible defaults on debt in Greece and almost seven years away from the potential demise of the Eurozone. It would be mid-2017 before the elections in Europe after the Brexit indicated other countries were not going to vote in favor of leaving the European Union and follow the lead from the UK. Then the effects of the work of the European Central Bank (ECB) could take hold and create enough liquidity to stabilize the Union. Meanwhile the United States is tightening the money supply through rising interest rates. This caused a reaction from China in early 2016 when they devalued their currency, the yuan, throwing our markets into a brief downturn. Since then we have been enjoying nice upward trends with the rest of the world following suit. So that is a short primer on why the recovery is taking so long. Now, how does that help us determine when we would head into reces-

our family members have dreams, our friends have dreams, our associates and co-workers have dreams. Our job, our responsibility to one another is to lift each other up, and open those doors of hope with positive encouragement and love. Anyone can go negative, that’s easy. But it is the difference-makers in life who fill their families, their communities, and this world with hope and encouragement. We all know someone very close to us who is working on a dream, don’t we? A dream to be cancer-free, a dream to beat addiction or have a loved one find sobriety, a dream to find a new job, a dream to start a new business, a dream for happy and healthy children, a dream of a loving and flourishing relationship, a dream of peace, and so many other dreams and goals. Let’s help them, let’s lift them up, let’s let our hope, encouragement, and love make it all real someday. So how about you? Are you working on a dream? Do you know someone who is? Are you filling them with hope, encouragement, and love? I would really love to hear your sources of motivation and inspiration at gotonorton@ gmail.com. And when we let the doors of hope swing open wide on the hinges of encouragement and love, it really will be a better than good week. Michael Norton is a resident of Castle Rock, the president of the Zig Ziglar Corporate Training Solutions Team, a strategic consultant and a business and personal coach.

humor, and he was my buffer, between my mother and me. When I began to look at it objectively, I realized that Dad could have left our messy little family. His life would have improved. He didn’t. Thanks, Zackari Parrish. I didn’t know you, but I needed you. Craig Marshall Smith is an artist, educator and Highlands Ranch resident. He can be reached at craigmarshallsmith@comcast.net.

sion again? It is important to understand where we are in the economic expansion cycle before we can determine how fast this cycle will come to an end. According to Fritz Meyer, economist, “Bull markets end when the yield curve inverts. That’s not happened, and it may not happen anytime soon. The economy is strong. But key fundamentals are changing.” He goes on to state that this change brings opportunity. According to William Greiner, CFA and chief investment strategist with Mariner Wealth Advisors, the market drawdown is being driven by three main fears: rising inflation; higher interest rates; and fear that the Fed may make a mistake. Any one of these could cause continued market volatility and we are currently facing all three. Consumers have been spoiled by low inflation and investors have come to expect continued increases in their investment accounts. Both of these conditions are showing signs of aging. It is important to

align yourself with a good strategy for navigating the changes in taxes, economic expansion, the rise of inflation and interest rates. The right kind of diversification is extremely important in this environment. You deserve to have a guide to help you traverse these changes rather than piecing together information from the media. They don’t know you. Find someone who is willing to learn about your fears and goals and help you make good decisions. * Bloomberg Patricia Kummer has been certified financial planner for 31 years and is president of Kummer Financial Strategies LLC, a Registered Investment Advisor in Highlands Ranch. Registration as an investment advisor does not imply a certain level of skill or training. Please visit www.kummerfinancial.com for more information. Any material discussed is meant for informational purposes only and not a substitute for individual advice.

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14 Highlands Ranch Herald

LOCAL

February 15, 2018F

LIFE

The Legacy Show captures spirit of voices past

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Danny Ledonne’s “Growing VEGI” takes a look at the San Luis Valley’s Valley Educational Gardens Initiative. VEGI works with schools and community programs to address the root causes of hunger and food insecurity by cultivating a relationship with nourishing foods from the soil up. The film will be shown at the Colorado Environmental Film Festival during the 4 to 6 p.m. session on Feb. 23. COURTESY PHOTOS

Film gathering aims to inform, inspire in 12th year

Colorado Environmental Film Festival brings together creators from all over world BY CLARKE READER CREADER@COLORADOCOMMUNITYMEDIA.COM

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here’s no accounting for the twists and turns that bring creative people together, but the first meeting of filmmakers Haley Thompson and Tomas Zuccareno was all too fitting, in light of the work they would end up doing together — they meet at The Local Food Convergence in Aspen back in early 2016. “We both wanted to make a movie about the next generation of farming, and sustainable and healthy food,” Zuccareno remembers. “We both recognized there was a problem in the farming communities we came from — that young people weren’t getting the support they needed to do this important work.” Now, after two years of filming and editing, the pair are ready for the world premiere of their first film, “How We Grow,” which will take place at the 12th annual Colorado Environmental Film Festival.

IF YOU GO WHAT: Colorado Environmental Film Festival WHERE: American Mountaineering Center 710 10th St., Golden WHEN: Feb. 22 through 24 COST: Tickets range in price from $8 per person for a single film screening session to $50 per person for access to all film screening sessions all three days of the festival. TICKETS: www.ceff.net The festival runs from Feb. 22 through 24 at Golden’s American Mountaineering Center, 710 10th St. About 56 films will be shown, some shorts and others closer to feature length, all of which are aimed at raising awareness of interconnected ecological, social and economic themes. International and local filmmakers will be represented. “Colorado is such a great place to host a festival like this, not only because of how active residents are, but because so many people are invested in protecting the environment,” said Nicole Bickford, festival director. “We want to show films that bring light to environmental issues, but also offer solutions and hope for the future.” The free opening night event, SEE FILM, P18

The Colorado Environmental Film Festival is returning to Golden for its 12th year. This year, there will be 56 movies screened, all of which tackle important environmental issues.

he Denver home of violinist and jazz musician George Morrison was always filled with music, as his granddaughter Trudi Morrison remembers it. That music was not only from the students who received lessons at the house, but from the jazz luminaries who stopped in — figures like Duke Ellington, Nat King Cole and Jelly Roll Morton. “Denver was strictly segregated at the time, so touring musicians weren’t able to stay at the hotels. Instead, they stayed with us at Big Daddy and Big Mommy’s COMING house,” Morrison said. ATTRACTIONS “Everyone knew who he was, and they still remember him. He was like Santa Claus and the Easter Bunny, all rolled into one.” Morrison (1891-1974) made his first violin from a corn stalk, a piece of wood, and some string, and first Clarke Reader played publicly with his brother in mining camps in the mountains west of Boulder. He married in 1911 and started “George Morrison and his Jazz Orchestra,” one of Denver’s first jazz orchestras. In 1920, he played a command performance in London for King George and Queen Mary. To celebrate Morrison and other visionaries of African-American musical and cultural history, the Arvada Center, 6901 Wadsworth Blvd., is hosting The Legacy Show at 7:30 p.m. on Feb. 24. The multimedia musical experience is anchored by music of African-American composers performed by violinist Tami Lee Hughes and pianist Byron BurfordPhearse. The program features classical music infused with a variety of styles, including spirituals, blues, gospel, hip-hop, and jazz. Portraying cultural themes of the Antebellum Period, the Harlem Renaissance, the Civil Rights Era, and Modern Times, the program includes poetry and visual media projected onto a large screen, providing images of people and places thematically related to the music. “As a classically trained violinist, I love traditional repertoire, but the music featured in the show is a fusion of all of the styles I heard growing up in Baton Rouge, Louisiana, including classical, jazz, gospel, spirituals, and blues,” said Hughes, whose artistic direction of the show is an extension of her debut solo recording. “As I researched music of African-American composers, I found a treasure trove of pieces rarely heard on the concert stage. Through The Legacy Show, I hope to share some of these works and celebrate the composers who SEE READER, P20


Highlands Ranch Herald 15

February 15, 2018

Book is bucolic look back at buddy bear

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olly Arnold Kinney, who grew up in the Morrison adobe replica of Bent’s Fort and now operates The Fort Restaurant, has written a picture book about her special childhood buddy — Sissy Bear, who was rescued by the Arnolds and lived at the Fort from 1963-1982, enchanting many SONYA’S guests at the restaurant. Kinney SAMPLER recalls napping with the cub and how it “kissed’ visitors and loved the family’s German shepherd, Lobo. The book includes photos and illustrations by Christine Wald. The author read a story, Sonya Ellingboe will sign books and talk at 6-7 p.m. Feb. 22 at the Denver Woman’s Press Club, 1325 Logan St., Denver. Free admission. Free parking in a lot north of the press club. Guests welcome, 303-8391519, dwpconline.org. Based on Shakespeare Colorado Ballet’s performance of “Romeo and Juliet” runs Feb. 16 to 25 at the Ellie Caulkins Opera House, in the Denver Center for the Performing Arts at 14th and Champa streets downtown, with choreography by Derek Deane, former artistic director of the English National Ballet and music by Sergei Prokovief, performed by the Colorado Ballet Orchestra. Tickets range from $30 to $155. 303-837-8888, ext. 2. Coloradoballet.org. Day camp “Colorado Wildlife” is the topic for a Presidents Day Nature Camp at South Platte Park in Littleton for 6- to 10-year-olds, from 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. on Feb. 19. Cost: $29/district resident, $39/non-residents, #674060. sspr.org, 303-798-5131. (Limited enrollment.) Eye of the Camera “Eye of the Camera,” presented annually by Littleton’s Fine Arts Board, will be exhibited Feb. 16-March 25 at the Littleton Museum, 6028 S. Gallup St., Littleton. The 2018 juror is Gary Reed of Reed Art and Imaging, who selected images exhibited and will announce winners on Feb. 16. 303-7953950, littletongov.org/museum. Englewood Library welcomes kids Included in February programs for children at the Englewood Public Library: “Messy Process Art” (toddler and preschool), 10:30 a.m. Feb. 23; Lego Maniacs, Feb. 24, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Feb. 24 — school-aged children stop in to create; under 5 welcome with an adult. Check out story time schedules; add name to email list: kpowers@englewoodgov.org. Ceramists at college Arapahoe Community College at 5900 S. Santa Fe Drive in Littleton will host a Ceramics Workshop with Julia Galloway, professor of ceramics at the University of Montana,

Goodbye to library fines The Arapahoe Library District has implemented a “no fine” policy for patrons, which also waives all existing overdue fines for items returned. (A replacement cost will be assessed for items not returned within 30 days of due date.) Arapahoelibraries.org, 303-LIBRARY.

Sissy, an orphaned bear cub, was adopted by the Arnold family and lived at the Fort Restaurant from 1963 to 1982. Holly Arnold Kinney napped with Sissy when a 9 year old child and has written a book about her furry friend, “Sissy Bear at the Fort,” which she will introduce at the Denver women’s Press Club at a public event on Feb. 22. COURTESY PHOTO from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. on Feb. 24-25 at the ACC Art and Design Center. She will demonstrate making utilitarian pottery-wheel-thrown and handbuilt, as well as surface design using slips and resist. Cost: $150/$100 ACC students and programs. RSVP. Coordinator: Katie Caron — katie.caron@ arapahoe.edu, 303-797-5948. Proceeds will benefit ACC ceramics students and programs. Springer to be discussed “John Springer’s Life and His Connection with the Cattlemen’s Beef Association” will be Barb Wilkinson’s topic for the Highlands Ranch Historical Society, held at the Highlands Ranch Mansion, 9950 E. Gateway Drive, Highlands Ranch, on Feb. 19. Springer was a past owner of the Mansion and prominent Colorado businessman. Come early — tours of the Mansion start at 6.p.m. and the talk starts at 7 p.m. Please preregister: programs@thehrhs.org. Free to members, a $2 donation suggested for non-members. Next: Legendary Ladies on March 19. Whodunit “Something’s Afoot,” a musical spoof of Agatha Christie mysteries and 1930s English musicals, will run Feb. 23 to March 25 at Town Hall Arts Center, 2450 W. Main St. in downtown Littleton. Performances: 7:30 p.m. Thursdays, Fridays, Saturdays; 2 p.m. Sundays. Robert Wells is director. Tickets: $24-$44, townhallartscenter. org, 303-794-2787, ext. 5. Audubon events “Backyard Bird Care and Spring Migration Workshop” will be presented by Audubon Society of Greater Denver’s Kate Hogan at 10-11 a.m. Feb. 17 at Tagawa Gardens, 7711 S. Parker Rd., Centennial. Join Joey Kellner’s monthly Bird Walk from 8-12 on Feb. 24 at Chatfield State Park. Billed as a “fairly easy” hike. No fee, but a state parks pass is required. Denveraudubon.org/events. 303-973-9530.

MOA Design and Build Applications will be accepted through March 30 for this summer’s Design and Build Art Apprenticeships at the Museum Outdoor Arts in Englewood. Open to graduates and graduate-bound art majors, with a summer-long studio experience and stipend. See moaonline.org. Orchestra performance “Great Music from the Movies” will be the Littleton Symphony Orchestra’s program at 7:30 p.m. Feb. 23, at Littleton United Methodist Church, 5894 S. Datura St., Littleton. “Red Violin,” “Schindler’s List,” “2001: A Space Odyssey,” Harry Potter” and more films provide soundtracks for the concert. Tickets: littletonsymphony.org, 303-9336824. CORE gallery Jeanette Chinelli’s “Reinventing the Chair” and Terrilynn Moore’s “Working from the Guff: Soul Searching Compositions” are exhibited through Feb. 19 at CORE

Gallery, 900 Santa Fe Drive, Denver. Hours: noon to 6 p.m. Thursday; 12-9 p.m. Friday; noon-6 Saturday; 1-4 p.m. Sunday. Reception noon-5 p.m. Feb. 16. Coreartspace.com; 303-2978428. Black Cube A recent addition to Englewood’s art community, Black Cube’s Executive Director Cortney Lane Stell is curator of “10 x,” celebrating of 10 years of Artist in Residence program at RedLine, 2350 Arapahoe St., Denver, with works by about 85 artists. Open through April 1. Admission free. Hours: 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Tuesdays through Sundays. Redlineart.org; 303-296-4448. ‘The Electric Baby’ Rick Barbour is director of “The Electric Baby,” by Stefanie Zadravec, playing in repertory through May 4 in the Black Box Theatre at the Arvada Center, 6901 Wadsworth Blvd., Arvada. Tickets: 720-898-7200, arvadacenter.org/theelectric-baby. Denver Concert Band “Up and Away!” is the name for the Feb. 25 concert of the 55-yearold Denver Concert Band, to be performed at 2 p.m. at the Lone Tree Arts Center, 10075 Commons St., Lone Tree. Guest Soloist will be Tim Hudson. Tickets: 720-509-1000, lonetreeartscenter.org.

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16 Highlands Ranch Herald

February 15, 2018F

‘See What is Unseen’ set to intrigue gallery visitors Exhibit of various artworks puts focus on concept of mystery BY SONYA ELLINGBOE SELLINGBOE@COLORADOCOMMUNITYMEDIA.COM

In Littleton, Stanton Gallery curators Moira Casey and Karina Elrod have searched for art that is a bit mysterious to coordinate with Town Hall Arts Center’s latest production, the musical “Something’s Afoot,” a spoof of Agatha Christie’s mysteries, which opens Feb. 23 at Town Hall Arts Center. “See What is Unseen,” with wall sculptures and paintings inspired by the concept of mystery, will fill the gallery through

IF YOU GO The Stanton Gallery in in Town Hall Arts Center at 2450 W. Main St., Downtown Littleton. Gallery is open 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. weekdays and during performances. 303-7942787, townhallartscenter.org. Gallery admission is free. Work is generally for sale. March 27, with an artists’ reception from 5:30-7 p.m. on March 2. Artists Deborah Howard, Mark Johnston and Kalliopi Monoyios will present their artworks. Deborah Howard, who studied at the Rhode Island School of Design and the University of Wisconsin-Madison, heads the painting program at the University of Denver. She exhibited “Migration and Memory” at the Venice (Italy) Jewish Museum in

Careers Help Wanted Help Desk Analyst Tier 2, for member school districts of

East Central BOCES. Minimum associate degree in a computer related major and three years experiences or commensurate. The Computer Technician will provide trouble ticket response and corrective action to document and track support issues. Technician will be expected to support Windows, Mac OS X, Chromebooks, a variety of mobile and desk phones and basic networking equipment. Salary range $46,000-$52,000 depending on experience. Generous benefit package also included. Application and job description can be accessed on the East Central BOCES website – http://www.ecboces.org. Click on “jobs” on the homepage.

Questions about application process contact Don at (719) 775-2342, ext. 116 or email dona@ecboces.org. ECBOCES is an Equal Opportunity Employer. Questions about job details contact Jarred Masterson at (719) 775-2342 ext. 118 or email jarred@ecboces.org.

2017. It included shoe sculptures and textiles printed with her paintings and photographs of the Ghetto and ancient and modern Jewish cemeteries on the Lido. The exhibit addressed migration as “universal and natural to human beings to survive and evolve since the beginning of time” (versus emigration and immigration—political constructs). Her 2003-2008 project: “Portraits of Child Holocaust Survivors” will soon be permanently placed in the Beck Collection at the University of Denver. Kalliopi Monoyios is a fine artist and illustrator whose work explores a deep fascination with the natural world — and our connection to it. In 2011, she was invited to co-found “Symbiartic,” a science and art blog for Scientific American, and “began

to immerse herself in the growing movement of “scienceart,” the intersection of science and art. (Look online at the blog — blogs.scientificamerican.com/ symbiartic — a treasure trove!) She has recently exhibited her work at the Art Students League of Denver and Littleton’s 2016 “Own an Original.” Mark Johnston, an Evergreen resident, is active in Art Students League of Denver and Center for the Arts, Evergreen. He writes: “A diverse background in construction and construction management taught me multiple disciplines that have led me to art … and mixed media is my direction.” He has sought out art communities on the East Coast, Puerto Rico, Virgin Islands, Gulf Coast (Katrina response), France, Switzerland and Evergreen.

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This position is within the advertising sales team and is responsible for maintaining current business and growing new business revenue from locally based businesses doing business in and around our local communities we cover. The sales focus will be on businesses that advertise heavily in local media and includes but is not limited to key retail, home improvement, medical, financial, government, legal/professional and educational entities. New business includes inactive advertisers and undeveloped business categories. This Advertising Sales Representative will spend 80% of each work week actively selling Colorado Community Media print and digital advertising solutions to accounts located in and around our local communities we cover.

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“Celestial Slippers” by Deborah Howard will be exhibited in “See What is Unseen” through March 27 at Town Hall’s Stanton Gallery. Unexpected objects present themselves through art. COURTESY PHOTO

Position requires heavy data entry, working with clients to collect payments and will back up employees as needed with covering accounts. Candidate must be proficient with all Microsoft products and have excellent customer service skills. Must be detail oriented and organized. Previous experience working with deadlines is highly desirable but not required. Must be able to work with multiple projects at one time, ensuring there are no errors. This position is part time with hourly pay working in our Englewood office. To apply please put Classified and Legal Assistant in subject line and email resume to eaddenbrooke@coloradocommunitymedia.com No phone calls please.

Sr. Software Development Engineers wanted by Travelport, LP in Englewood, CO. Performing problem/task isolation, analysis, resolution, deploying or supporting commercial, customer facing distributed or mainframe solutions. Bachelor's deg in Engg, Comp Sci or rel + 5 yrs rel exp. See addt'l job reqs on website. Visit & apply at https://www.travelport.com/careers, enter job ID# 5529BR under 'SEARCH'.

To advertise your business here, call Karen at 303-566-4091


Highlands Ranch Herald 17

February 15, 2018

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18 Highlands Ranch Herald

February 15, 2018F

FILM FROM PAGE 14

beginning at 5:30 p.m. on Feb. 22, will include a reception featuring light appetizers, drinks, opportunities to interact with local businesses and a special silent auction benefiting CEFF programs. Afterward, there will be a screening of the film “Chasing Coral” and awards ceremony, hosted by local activist and filmmaker (and former mayor of Golden) Jacob Smith. Over the following days, films on a variety of subjects — ranging from deforestation and ocean health to wolves and, in the case of Jane Zelikova’s film, “End of Snow,” the effects of climate change on snowpack in the Western United States — will be shown. It premieres during the 7 to 9 p.m. session on Feb. 24. “The film follows me, a climate change scientist, as I go on a journey to learn how snowpack is changing in the West and what changes we can expect in the future,” Zelikova explained. “The idea came from my own research on the impacts of dust on snowpack in the Snowy Range mountains in Wyoming.” Many filmmakers, like Thompson and Zuccareno, will be on hand for their screenings, and available for discussions and meetings afterwards. In “How We Grow,” which premieres at 7:30 p.m. on Feb. 23, Thompson and Zuccareno take a look at ambitious young farmers building community around locally grown food in the Roar-

Jane Zelikova’s film, “End of Snow,” explores the effects of climate change on snowpack in the western U.S., and will be shown at the Colorado Environmental Film Festival during the 7 to 9 p.m. session on Feb. 24. COURTESY PHOTO ing Fork Valley of Western Colorado. It examines the characters and systems of farming through the themes of education, legislation, community, food access and micro-finance — in order to tell the story of how these farmers are able to create resilient food systems. “There’s a lot stacked against these farmers and their communities,” Thompson said. “We hope the response to the film is that people are inspired to get their hands in the dirt and start working.”

For Zelikova, film is a way to bring the global challenge of climate change to people in a realistic, moving way. Stories help people connect to ideas and inspire them to tackle challenges, she added. “As much as it feels overwhelming, there are solutions we can implement today, solutions that don’t require a breakthrough invention or new technology,” she said. “These solutions come from people who want to be good stewards of their land and manage in a sustainable way, in the process helping

fight climate change.” It would be easy for the films shown in the festival to be all doom and gloom, but Bickford said that’s why CEFF focuses on films that inspire, as well as inform. “We’ve found that a festival atmosphere like this is great, because people really love to gather and talk about solutions after they see these kinds of movies,” she said. “We want people to walk away empowered and know that they want to get involved.”

To advertise your place of worship in this section, call Karen at 303-566-4091 or email Serving the southeast Denver kearhart@ColoradoCommunityMedia.com area Greenwood Village Castle Rock/Franktown

Castle Rock/Franktown

 First United  Methodist Church 1200 South Street Castle Rock, CO 80104 303.688.3047 www.fumccr.org

  Services:  Sunday Worship 4825 N. Crowfoot Valley Road Castle Rock, CO. 80108 303-663-5751 www.CanyonsCC.org 

Sunday Services:  9:30am – Traditional

9:00am & 10:45am

 9:00am - Sunday School

11:00am – Modern Traditional

Little Blessings Parents Day Out www.littleblessingspdo.com

 (Nursery & Sunday School offered during 11am service)  

   

   

Trinity Lutheran Church & School

Sunday Worship 8:00 & 10:45 a.m. Sunday School Bible Study 9:30am Trinity Lutheran School & ELC (Ages 3-5, Grades K-8)

  303-841-4660   www.tlcas.org

Parker

Centennial St. Thomas More

Sunday Services - 10 a.m.

Catholic Parish & School

Seven Sunday Masses Two Daily Masses Confessions Six Days a Week STM Catholic School Preschool – Grade 8

8035 South Quebec Street Centennial, CO 80112 303.770.1155

www.stthomasmore.org

Congregation Beth Shalom

Cimarron Middle School 12130 Canterberry Parkway Parker, CO 80138 www.CSLParker.org

Serving the Southeast Denver area

Call or check our website for information on services and social events! www.cbsdenver.org

303-794-6643

Highlands Ranch Pine Lane Elementary South 6475 E Ponderosa Dr. Parker, CO 80138 303-941-0668


Highlands Ranch Herald 19

February 15, 2018

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20 Highlands Ranch Herald

February 15, 2018F

FROM PAGE 14

have left a rich legacy through music we can all enjoy.” In addition to Morrison, the performance will feature music from Duke Ellington, David Baker, Daniel Roumain, Kerwin Young, and more. But for this Denver-based crowd, Morrison’s work will be the most personal to hear. Which is something his granddaughter understands perfectly. “We have a family history of breaking racial barriers, and we all stand of the shoulders of those who came before us,” she said. “Big Daddy’s story is one of striving and thriving in a time of deep-rooted segregation.” Hughes did plenty of research when putting The Legacy Show, and she hopes concert-goers learn about the different voices and styles of music from different generations and backgrounds. “The show is for everyone, but I especially like to see young people in the audience. There is distance between them and a lot of the history in the show, so the performance gives them context for understanding complex issues we are dealing with today,” she said. “I hope The Legacy Show inspires great conversations, including talks between people of different generations.” For tickets and more information, visit www.arvadacenter.org/the-legacy-show. Learn curling as the Olympics take over your screens With the Winter Olympics now in full swing, viewers may well be inspired to

TRAINING The Aurora-South Metro SBDC helps existing and new businesses grow and prosper through workshops and consulting.

Clarke’s Concert of the Week - Majid Jordan at the Gothic Canadian R&B duo Majid Jordan, made up of Majid Al Maskati and Jordan Ullman, have provided plenty of backing vocals for more well-known artists like Drake, but they took their skills to a whole new level on their sophomore album, “The Space Between.” Now Majid Jordan will be taking the stage at Englewood’s Gothic Theatre, 3263 S. Broadway, at 9 p.m. on Sunday, Feb. 18. “The Space Between” is easily one of

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BUSINESS

READER

try out a new sport after seeing some of the world’s best athlete’s competing. For those who see the broom-and-iceand-stone sport of curling and want to give it a try, the Denver Curling Club will be hosting an open house and drop-in learning classes on from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., and 7 to 9 p.m., on Saturday, Feb. 17, and from 2 to 4 p.m. on Sunday, Feb. 18, at the club’s headquarters, 14100 W. Seventh Ave. in Golden. Visitors can learn about throwers and how they practice their deliveries (also called pitches or throws), and sweepers, who use brooms to sweep the ice. Visitors are encouraged to hang out, enjoy the Olympics on television, see curlers in action, and talk to members about our adult leagues and junior programs — all children must bring a helmet of any kind to wear. For the drop-in classes, they last 30 minutes on the ice with instruction and a free nonalcoholic drink for $20. For more information, email curldenver@denvercurlingclub.com, call 303-321-1107, or visit www.DenverCurlingClub.com.

the year’s sexiest albums, but it explores all aspects of romantic relationships, including moving on from old loves to the fickleness of contemporary relationships. “One I Want” is one of the best singles of the year, and “Gave Your Love Away” shows the pair’s vocal range. While Majid Jordan is obviously heavily influenced by modern soul artists like Frank Ocean and Miguel, they add flourishes of electronic music that are all their own. Seeing and hearing how they translate all of this to the stage makes the show this week’s can’tmiss concert. To get tickets, visit www.gothictheatre.com. Life is a cabaret with the Denver Chorale The Denver Chorale is preparing to bring the laughs to audiences for its annual spring cabaret performance at the “Make ‘Em Laugh” Cabaret at Dazzle Jazz, 1512 Curtis St. in Denver, at 6 p.m. on Sunday, Feb. 18. The cabaret will feature a special guest performance by Third Kind Improv, which is the resident improv troupe for the Human, Kind Theater Project. From musicals to pop, every song choice will be performed by a talented member (or group) of the Denver Chorale, and is designed to have the audience rolling in the aisles. The chorale is a group of singers from throughout the metro area, and is led by founder and artistic director Valerie Montaño, a veteran music teacher. The group advocates the virtues of music, especially its healing power and guiding contribution to social movements.

There will also be a silent auction with the opportunity to bid on meals, theater tickets, original artwork, handcrafted items, overflowing themed gift baskets and more. To learn more, visit denverchorale. org. Turn up for Buffalo Bill’s birthday Many people in Golden and beyond are aware of the big Buffalo Bill Days festival the city throws every summer. That’s some ways away, but those looking for a taste of the Old West can get their fix at the man’s birthday party. The free Buffalo Bill Birthday Party will be from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. on Saturday, Feb. 24, at The Rock Rest, 16005 Mount Vernon Road in Golden. There will be hundreds of reenactors from all around the region celebrating William Frederick “Buffalo Bill” Cody’s birthday. Visitors can take a shot in one of the free outfits contests for a chance of winning cash and/or prizes from top artists and photographers. National best-selling author Reid Lance Rosenthal will be there selling and signing his books along with local authors Leslee Breene and Sam Pisciotta. Local favorites Timothy P. and Friends will perform, and there will also be free birthday cake and door prizes. For more information on the party, visit www.buffalobilldays.com. Clarke Reader’s column on culture appears on a weekly basis. A community editor with Colorado Community Media, he can be reached creader@coloradocommunitymedia.com.

FEB 17-18 WONDERBOUND APHRODITE’S SWITCHBOARD

LOS LOBOS

FEB 18 DU LAMONT SCHOOL OF MUSIC MOZART’S WINDS FEB 23 PSO GONE TOO SOON MAR 2 CJRO KINDA DUKE-ISH: THE MUSIC OF DUKE ELLINGTON MAR 3 LOS LOBOS MAR 9 HOW I BECAME A PIRATE MAR 11 FLAMENCO VIVO CARLOTA SANTANA MAR 16-25 NEIL SIMON’S LAUGHTER ON THE 23rd FLOOR MAR 23 THE UNCHARTED SERIES FACE - ALL-VOCAL ROCK

BUY TICKETS AT WWW.PARKERARTS.ORG OR CALL 303.805.6800 A nationally accredited program Funded in part through a cooperative agreement with the U.S. Small Business Administration.


Highlands Ranch Herald 21

February 15, 2018

Dancers, musicians team up to convey modern mythology IF YOU GO

BY SONYA ELLINGBOE SELLINGBOE@COLORADOCOMMUNITYMEDIA.COM

Garrett Ammon, choreographer/director of Wonderbound contemporary dance company, has again collaborated with the Denver psychedelic folk band Chimney Choir, the two companies previously produced the popular “Boomtown”, to produce a new artistic creation, “Aphrodite’s Switchboard,” which appears in three area theaters to herald spring, Valentine messages and assorted human relationships. Described as “a full length evening of theatrical dance,” it will feature the company’s dancers and music in a new album that features folk harmonies and instrumental melodies to create a landscape for masterful storytelling, in conjunction with the versatile band Ammon said the new project “pushed all of us into new territory while exploring themes that have captivated humanity through the ages. This production is a great example of the magical possibilities that arise through the collaborative process.” The band’s Kevin Larkin speaks of “new composition techniques and orchestration.” A cabin in Fairplay offered the musicians an opportunity to create new music, away from city distractions. An exploration of conveying ancient mythological tales with

“APHRODITE’S SWITCHBOARD” performances: 7:30 p.m. Feb. 17 and 2 p.m. Feb. 18 at the PACE Center, 20000 Pikes Peak Ave, Parker. Tickets: 303-805-6800, parkerarts. org. Final performance at 7 p.m. Feb. 24 at the Newman Center, 2344 E. Iliff Ave., Denver. Parking garage entry from Wesley Avenue, just west of South University Boulevard. Tickets: 303-871-6200, newmancenterpresents.com. contemporary music offered new experiences — and the first band production with Greek mythology as source. Formerly known as Ballet Nouveau, Wonderbound’s company began to change with Ammon’s arrival in 2007 — and his penchant for using live music. In 2012, the name Wonderbound and a symbol of a jumping red hare were adopted and the company moved its headquarters to Denver from Broomfield. (Check the website for announcements of performances and open rehearsals in this urban studio.) Chimney Choir began in 2011 with guitar, banjo, mandolin and suitcase drum and have toured nationally, while developing “layers of electronics, live looping and percussion. They remain fascinated with folk music and traditions while they constantly evolve and experiment …”

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22 Highlands Ranch Herald

THINGS to DO

THEATER

Moscow Festival Ballet: Cinderella: 7:30 p.m. Thursday, Feb. 15 at The Lone Tree Arts Center, 10075 Commons St., Lone Tree. Go to http://www.lonetreeartscenter.org/ Anglophile Afternoon Theatre: Mansfield Park: 2-4 p.m. Thursday, Feb. 15 at Koelbel Library, 5955 S. Holly St., Centennial. Go to arapahoelibraries.org. Something’s Afoot, A Musical Whodunit: 7:30 p.m. Thursdays, Fridays and Saturdays, and 2 p.m. Sundays, Feb. 23 to March 25 at Town Hall Arts Center, 2450 W. Main St., Littleton. Tickets available at townhallartscenter.org/ somethings-afoot.

ART/CRAFTS

Tween Time: Building with Legos: 5-6 p.m. Friday, Feb. 16 at Koelbel Library, 5955 S. Holly St., Centennial. Agges 9-12. Go to arapahoelibraries.org. Open Play: 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 17 at Englewood Public Library. Call 303-762-2560.

Learn About Outdoor Photography: 10 a.m. Wednesday, Feb. 21 at the Philip S. Miller Library, 100 S. Wilcox St., Castle Rock. Ages 50-plus. Registration is required at 303791-7323 or DCL.org. Messy Art: 10:30-11:30 a.m. Friday, Feb. 23 at Englewood Public Library. Art session. Craft monsters out of Play-Doh. Dress to get messy. Call 303-762-2560.

MUSIC

Live: Park Hill Brass: 1-2 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 17 at Koelbel Library, 5955 S. Holly St., Centennial. Park Hill Brass performance. Go to arapahoelibraries.org. Christopher Cross: 7:30 p.m. Sunday, Feb. 25 at the PACE Center, 20000 Pikes Peak Ave., Parker. Go to http://parkerarts.org/2019/ Shows-Events

FILM/MOVIES

Lifetree Café Discussion Group: 5-6 p.m. Monday, Feb. 19 (Does God Have a Plan For You? One Woman’s Quest to Save 300 Babies) at DAZBOG, 202 Wilcox St.,

February 15, 2018F

this week’s TOP FIVE Brains on Steroids Variety Show: 7:30 p.m. Friday, Feb. 16 at Theatre of Dreams, 735 Park St., Castle Rock. Three acts: the Dream Masterz, the Zip Code Man and the Psychic Soulmates Anthem and Aria. Reservations required. Call 303-660-6799 or go to http://tickets.amazingshows.com. The Hummin’Birds: Bluegrass & More: 7 p.m. Friday, Feb. 16 at Good Shepherd Episcopal Church, 8545 E. Dry Creek Road, Centennial. Old-time Appalachian tunes with country, bluegrass, gospel, swing and original songs. Concert is part of Good Shepherd’s Music with a Mission Concert Series. Free admission. A “love offering” will be collected for Heifer International. Go to gshep.org/music-with-amission-concert-series

Castle Rock. Call 303-814-0142. Go to LifetreeCafe.com.

FOOD/COOKING

Knights of Columbus Lenten Fish Fry: 4-6:30 p.m. Fridays in Lent (no service on Good Friday) at Ave Maria Catholic Church, 9056 E. Parker Road, Parker. Fish served with cole slaw, fried or baked potato, mac and cheese and dinner rolls. Takeout and drive-through available. Cost is $29 for a family; individual cost $10 for ages 13 and older, $5 for ages 5-12, and free for ages 4 and younger. Homemade desserts also sold.

READING/WRITING

The Hybrid Author: Explore Publishing Paths: 2:30-4 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 17 at Koelbel Library, 5955 S. Holly St., Centennial. Go to arapahoelibraries.org. Local Author Showcase: 2 p.m. Sunday, Feb. 18 at the James H. LaRue Library, 9292 Ridgeline Blvd., Highlands Ranch. For adults. Registration is required at 303-791-7323 or DCL.org. Meet the Author and Story Time: 10:30 a.m. Monday, Feb. 19 at Tattered Cover at Aspen Grove, 7301 S. Santa Fe Drive. Reading, craft and book signing of “Snow Sisters” by Kerri Kokias, who grew up in Littleton. Go to http://www.tatteredcover.com/ new-event-calendar#eventid-138191 Writers Group: 6:30-8:30 p.m. Wednesday, Feb. 21 at Englewood Public Library. Writing discussion and practice with prompts and exercises. All experience levels welcome. For adults.

Meet Malcolm X at D.I.N.E.: 2-4 p.m. Sunday, Feb. 18 at Maggiano’s Little Italy, 7401 S. Clinton St., Englewood. D.I.N.E. (Dinner, Ideas `N Exchange) program includes a three-course luncheon and presentation by Charles Everett Pace, who portrays Malcolm X. RSVP by Feb. 15 at http://www. coloradohumanities.org/products, or call Colorado Humanities at 303-894-7951. Opera Colorado’s ‘Cinderella’: 7-8:30 p.m. Thursday, Feb. 22 at Cherry Hills Community Church, 3900 Grace Blvd., Highlands Ranch. Concludes Highlands Ranch Cultural Association winter cultural series. Call 303-471-8859 or go to www. HRCAonline.org/tickets for tickets. Great Music from the Arts: From the Movies: 7:30 p.m. Friday, Feb. 23 at Littleton United Methodist Church, 5894 S. Datura St., Littleton. Littleton Symphony Orchestra concert. Call 303933-6824 or go to www.littletonsymphony.org.

EVENTS

Business Start-Up Basics: 6:30 p.m. Wednesday, Feb. 21 at the Castle Pines Library, 360 Village Square Lane. For adults. Registration is required at 303-791-7323 or DCL.org.

John Springer’s Life and His Connection with the Cattlemen’s Beef Association: 6-8:30 p.m. Monday, Feb. 19 at the Highlands Ranch Mansion, 9950 E. Gateway Drive, Highlands Ranch. Mansion tour starts at 6 p.m. Go to http:// thehrhs.org/

Unlock Social Security: 6:30-8 p.m. Thursday, Feb. 22 at Castlewood Library, 6739 S. Uinta St., Centennial. Go to arapahoelibraries.org.

Board Game Day: 1-4 p.m. Sunday, Feb. 18 at Englewood Public Library. Play games at the library. For all ages. No registration required.

Using Directories and Sanborn Maps to Learn About Ancestors: 9:30-11:30 a.m. Tuesday, Feb. 20 at Lutheran Church of the Holy Spirit, 6400 S. University Blvd., Centennial. Presented by Ed Storey, Pikes Peak Genealogical Society. Go to www.ColumbineGenealogy.com. Rich People Behaving Badly: 1-3 p.m. Tuesday, Feb. 20 at Lutheran Church of the Holy Spirit, 6400 S. University Blvd., Centennial. Presented by Dick Kreck, author and former Denver Post columnist. Go to ColumbineGenealogy.com. Tween Time: Building with Lego Bricks: 1-2 p.m. Tuesday, Feb. 20 at Smoky Hill Library, 5430 S. Biscay Circle, Centennial. Ages 9-12. Go to arapahoelibraries.org. Gamers Guild Indoor Sports: 3:30-4:30 p.m. Wednesday, Feb. 21 at Sheridan Library, 3425 W. Oxford Ave., Denver. Ages 9-17. Go to arapahoelibraries.org. Robotics: 9:30 a.m. Wednesday, Feb. 21 at the Philip S. Miller Library, 100 S. Wilcox St., Castle Rock. Presented by Pat Smith, Olli instructor. Go to douglascountyco.aauw.net. Contact Beryl Jacobson at 303-688-8088 or berylmjacobson@gmail.com.

Grow Your Nonprofit: 2 p.m. Friday, Feb. 23 at the Parker Library, 20105 E. Mainstreet. For adults. Registration is required at 303791-7323 or DCL.org. Fandom Fun: 4-5:30 p.m. Friday, Feb. 23 at Southglenn Library, 6972 S. Vine St., Centennial. Ages 9-17. Go to arapahoelibraries.org. Special Needs Sweetheart Dance: 7-9 p.m. Friday, Feb. 23 at Recreation Center at Southridge. Call 303-471-7043 or go to www. hrcaonline.org/tr Broken Tee Women’s 9 Hole Monday Golf League is seeking new members. League plays on Mondays from April to September at Broken Tee Golf Course, 2101 W. Oxford Ave., Englewood. Contact Sharron Quirin at 303-549-8545.

EDUCATION

Pat Dorsey Fly Tying Seminar: 6 p.m. Thursday, Feb. 15 at Orvis Park Meadows, 8433 Park Meadows Center Drive, Lone Tree. Led by guide, author and Blue Quill Angler co-owner Pat Dorsey, of Parker. Presentation is based on Dorsey’s best-selling book “Tying and Fishing Tailwater Flies.” Learn to tie is favorite guide flies for the South Platte and techniques for how to rig and fish them. Call 303768-9600.

Lawn and Landscape Lessons: 10 a.m. Thursday, Feb. 15 at the Castle Pines Library, 360 Village Square Lane. For adults. Registration is required at 303-791-7323 or DCL.org. Microsoft Excel, the Basics: 6:30-8 p.m. Wednesday, Feb. 21 at the Englewood Library, 1000 Englewood Parkway. Registration required. Call 303-762-2560. Buddhism: 1-2 p.m. Thursday, Feb. 22 at the Castle Rock Senior Center, 2323 Woodlands Blvd., Castle Rock. Active Minds program. Call 303-688-9498 to RSVP. Saudi Arabia: 10-11 a.m. Friday, Feb. 23 at Malley Senior Center, 3380 S Lincoln St, Englewood. Join Active Minds as we tell the story of this complex nation. Call 303-762-2660 to RSVP. STEM Conference for Girls: 10 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 24 at the University of Colorado, Boulder Engineering Center. For girls in 6th, 7th and 8th grades; hands-on workshops. Adult program focuses on strategies for supporting girls’ academic success and paying for college. Register at www.expandingyourhorizons.org/ conferences/Boulder. Learn to Tie Flies: 10 a.m. to noon Saturdays through Feb. 24 at Orvis Park Meadows. Orvis provides all equipmenty. Sign up at www. orvis.com/s/park-meadowscolorado-orvis-retail-store/620 or call 303-768-9600.

HEALTH

Anticoagulation Basics: Through Thick & Thin: 1:30-2:30 p.m. Feb. 19 at South Denver Heart Center, 1000 SouthPark Drive, Littleton. Call 303-744-1065 or go to www. southdenver.com to register. Diabetes, Prediabetes and Insulin Resistance: 11 a.m. to noon Feb. 19 at South Denver Heart Center, 1000 SouthPark Drive, Littleton. Join Susan Weitkunat, RD, CDE as she teaches the ins and outs of diabetes and how to control blood sugar. Call 303-744-1065 or go to www.southdenver.com to register. Editor’s note: Calendar submissions must be received by noon Wednesday for publication the following week. Send listings to calendar@coloradocommunitymedia.com. No attachments, please. Listings are free and run on a space-available basis.


Highlands Ranch Herald 23

February 15, 2018

Marketplace ANNOUNCEMENTS

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Misc. Notices

Cars, Trucks, Vans, SUV’s

GARAGE & ESTATE SALES

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TRANSPORTATION

MERCHANDISE

Any condition • Running or not Under $500

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Retiring Sled Dogs for Adoption. Siberian Huskies, make great family pets! Visit snowcapssleddogs.com for more info or call 970-453-7855 to meet your new buddy today. To approved homes only

Furniture

Lost and Found

Full Size Sleeper - Hidabed Lazy-Boy Excellent - Clean, Corduroy fabric in medium beige Price $150 Call: 303-770-3576

Bicycles Companion Interment Sites with 3 Granite Placements (1 is tall) 40% discount from Horan and McConaty • Price of $7,686. • Your price is $4,611. Location is at County Line and Holly overlooking golf course.

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Wanted to Buy

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Pet Services

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New & Used Electric Bikes & Trikes

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Miscellaneous

303-551-4930

(303)741-0762

Cell: (303)918-2185 for texting

Cash for all Vehicles! Cars, Trucks, Vans, SUV’s Any condition • Running or not Under $500

PETS

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Exercise Equipment Want To Purchase minerals and other oil/gas interests. Send details to: P.O. Box 13557 Denver, CO 80201

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24 Highlands Ranch Herald

LOCAL

February 15, 2018F

SPORTS

VYING FOR THE UPPER HAND

Small actions could create big things

L

Mountain Vista’s Garret Sweeney, left, and ThunderRidge’s Joey Rumbaugh get tangled diving for a loose ball. ThunderRidge broke open the game in the third quarter and held on for a 67-53 victory Feb. 9 at Mountain Vista. PAUL DISALVO

BY THE NUMBERS

48

More shots on goal by Valor Christian than first-year program Woodland Park in a 15-1 running clock hockey victory on Feb. 9.

4

Champions on the Ponderosa wrestling team at the Class 5A Region 4 tournament on Feb. 10.

2

Combined points scored by the SkyView Academy and Faith Christian girls basketball teams in the first quarter of the Hawks’ 25-13 loss on Feb. 9.

13

Rebounds by Highlands Ranch’s junior Kasey Neubert in the Falcons’ 88-31 girls basketball victory over Rock Canyon on Feb. 9.

12

Points scored in the third quarter by the Chaparral girls basketball team compared to 7 by Legend in a 32-27 Wolverines’ win on Feb. 9.

Standout Performers Liberty Line, Ponderosa The freshman guard was a standout in the closing 75 seconds of the girls basketball game as she scored six of her 21 points in the 50-44 win over Skyview on Feb. 6.

Brendan Temple, Douglas County The junior scored 20 points in a Feb. 6 win over Heritage and had 16 points in a boys basketball victory over rival Castle View on Feb. 9.

Autumn Watts, Highlands Ranch The junior increased her league-leading Continental League scoring average by collecting 25 points in an 88-31 girls basketball win over Rock Canyon on Feb. 9.

Tyson Cruickshank, ThunderRidge The senior contributed 18 points to the top-ranked boys basketball team’s 56-51 win over No. 2 Chaparral on Feb. 6.

Jared Goodman, Mountain Vista He had a hat trick in the 8-5 hockey triumph over Ralston Valley on Feb. 9.

Tyson Gilbert, Rock Canyon The senior went 6-for-6 at the foul line and scored 18 points in a 56-38 boys basketball triumph over Highlands Ranch on Feb. 9.

STANDOUT PERFORMERS are six athletes named from south metro area high schools. Preference is given to those making their debut on the list. To nominate an athlete, contact Jim Benton at jbenton@coloradocommunitymedia.com

ittle things can make a big difference in a basketball game and in life. Rock Canyon girls basketball coach Becky Mudd followed up on a good idea of creating a personal challenge for her players, and the game against Legend on Feb. 6 was designated OVERTIME the Small Actions-Big Changes game. Each girl selected a cause, person, family or group to play the game in honor of. The girls then had to commit to do a small action to support the person/cause they Jim Benton selected. Sophomore Molly McEowen played for Alzheimer’s awareness, a disease that touches a lot of people, including her grandfather. For her action, she gave up eating lunch for a week and donated the money to Alzheimer’s research. Sophia Kozmata’s grandmother passed away from Parkinson’s disease, so Kozmata played for Parkinson’s awareness and wore colored laces. The senior forward shared what basketball meant to the family as they suffered with the disease. Saving animals from puppy mills was the selected cause for sophomore guard Dana Weiss, who is a vegetarian to support animals and is vocal about the mistreatment of animals. Several players got pledges for points, wrote cards and letters to people, did random acts of kindness, made donations, and wore special colored gear. All shared their stories with the team about their causes, such as Charity H2O, breast cancer awareness, diabetes, pediatric cancer, the American Heart Association, pancreatic cancer, Dr. Jill Pechacek 29:11 Challenge, Make-A-Wish and the Pine Ridge Reservation. Talking football Dave Logan and Ed McCaffrey worked five seasons together broadcasting Denver Broncos football games on the radio as the play-by-play announcer and the analyst, respectively. I’m sure they probably talked a little about high school football, since Logan is the coach at Cherry Creek and three of McCaffrey’s four sons played for Valor Christian against Creek during that time. McCaffrey, who gave up his analyst duties last season, is now the head football coach at Valor. So once again Logan and McCaffrey will be talking high school football. SEE BENTON, P29


Highlands Ranch Herald 25

February 15, 2018

Valor posts strong showing at state swimming/diving BY SCOTT HANSEN SPECIAL TO COLORADO COMMUNITY MEDIA

4A, 5A GIRLS STATE SWIMMING AND DIVING RESULTS

Valor Christian finished third at the CHSAA Girls 4A State Swimming and Diving Championships, which concluded Feb. 10. Highlands Ranch finished in a threeway tie for sixth place at the meet in Thornton. Colorado Springs’ Rampart High School completed an undefeated season with the state championship. Valor Christian’s Lori Stenstrom won Swim Coach of the Year, while her colleague Alton Irvin won Dive Coach of the Year. Valor showed up as a dominating team in the relays, winning the 400yard freestyle relay and setting a new 4A state record in the 200-yard freestyle relay with a time of 1:35.90. “I’m so proud of them,” said Stenstrom, whose team also includes two of her daughters, junior Lindsay and freshman Ashley. “We had to overcome so much adversity this year and they had to dig deeper than we could have imagined. Their hearts and their desires to finish third in the state with the adversity we had to go through shows they can do anything.” Part of the adversity that the Valor Christian team overcame this year was the injury to last year’s diving state champion Izzi Mroz, who spent the entire regular season nursing a stress fracture. However, Mroz returned to dive in the state championships, where she reclaimed her title, finishing in first place over Rampart’s Maggie Buckley by just 0.15 points. “I didn’t think going into it that I could win state,” Mroz said. “It’s been pretty rough, but my parents always say that they don’t raise quitters, so I kept telling myself that I wasn’t going to quit, and I was going to fight through it. The win feels really good right now, Highlands Ranch • The Falcons’ new scoreboard will be tested when the Highlands Ranch girls basketball team ends the regular season Feb. 15 with a game against Mountain Vista. The Falcons are the highest-scoring team in the Continental League with a 64.5 average, and junior Autumn Watts is the league’s leading scorer with a 15.9 average. • Senior Brendan Sullivan is second in the Continental League boys basketball statistics in scoring and rebounding. He is averaging 20.9 points and eight rebounds a game. Mountain Vista • Roger Meyer finished third in the 132-pound class at the Class 5A Region 1 state qualifying wrestling tournament, which concluded Feb. 10. The Golden Eagles had five wrestlers qualify for the Class 5A state tournament, which

Class 5A Results for South Metro area swimmers and divers in the finals at the Class 5A state swimming championships at the Edora Pool Ice Center in Fort Collins: 200 medley relay: 2. Mountain Vista (Natalie Arky, Holley Dennis, Teagan Haberkorn, Annie Osmun) 1:45.53; 4. Cherry Creek (Lina Nakasone, Ella Drury, Sude Yilmazturk, Audrey Dixon) 1:46.47; 6. Rock Canyon (Makenna Mathieson, Olivia Luhnau, Jessica Beckwith, Chiara Robinson) 1:47.91; 7. Arapahoe (Delaney Smith, Anna Wetzel, Gabreece VanAnne, Lyndsey Wehr) 1:46.95. 200 freestyle: 8. Margaret Kroening, 1:56.93. 200 IM: 2. Delaney Smith, Arapahoe, 2:02.51; 7. Kaleigh Haworth, ThunderRidge, 2:09.20. 50 freestyle: 7. Gabreece VanAnne, Arapahoe, 24.44. Diving: 1. Franny Cable, Arapahoe, 531.45; 2. Samantha Tamborski, Douglas County/Castle View, 499.10; 5. Gretchen Wensuc, ThunderRidge, 465.20; 6. Kirsten Belitz, Arapahoe, 452.95

100 butterfly: 2. Natalie Arky, Mountain Vista, 55.67; 7. Jessica Beckwith, Rock Canyon, 57.75. 500 freestyle: 5. Britt Nichols, Rock Canyon, 5:11.22. 200 freestyle relay: 5. Cherry Creek (Audrey Dixon, Mikaela Kirton, Katie Steele, Meghan Atwell) 1:37.98; 6. Douglas County/Castle View (Madeline Bane, Faith McAllister, Emma Shumate, Margaret Kroening) 1:39.67. 100 backstroke: 3. Natalie Arky, Mountain Vista, 55.02; 4. Elsa Litteken, Douglas County/ Castle View, 55.35; 7. Makenna Mathieson, Rock Canyon, 56.63. 100 breaststroke: 4. Delaney Smith, Arapahoe, 1:04.31; 6. Holley Dennis, Mountain Vista, 1:05.38; 8. Kaleigh Haworth, ThunderRidge, 1:06.79. 400 freestyle relay: 4. Rock Canyon (Regan Mathieson, Chiara Robinson, Makenna Mathieson, Jessica Beckworth) 3:33.00; 5. Arapahoe (Miri Griffin, Gabreece VanAnne, Anna Berdahl, Delaney Smith) 3:33.36; 7 Mountain Vista (Annie Osmun, Kiara Jasunas, Natalie Arky, Holley Dennis)

3:33.91; 8. Cherry Creek (Allison Cremer, Nicole Bondurant, Ella Drury, Mikaela Kirton) 3:34.99. Class 4A Results for south metro area swimmers and divers in the finals at the Class 4A state swimming championships at the Veterans Memorial Aquatics Center in Thornton: 200 medley relay: 8. Heritage (Lizzie Hunt, Megan Deevy, Gabby Ostrander, Madison Mitchell) 1:50.93. 200 freestyle: 1. Kylie Andrews, Heritage, 1:49.65; 8. Grace Mortimer, Highlands Ranch, 2:00.54. 200 IM: 2. Ella Kirschke, Valor Christian, 2:03.20. 50 freestyle: 1. Anna Shaw, Heritage, 23.54; 2. Aimee Burton, Highlands Ranch, 24.02; 6. Lindsay Stenstrom, Valor Christian, 24.17. Diving: 1. Izzi Mroz, Valor Christian, 464.40; 4. Gigi Beattie, Valor Christian, 449.85; 9. Kyrianna Chambo, Highlands Ranch, 403.10. 100 butterfly: 5. Aimee Burton, Highlands Ranch, 56.91; 8. Makayla Hoehn, Valor Christian, 1:00.06.

especially over the competition here.” Mroz, a senior, was named the 4A Diver of the Year after the state championships. She has accepted a scholarship to Virginia Tech University, where she will be competing on the diving team. Stenstrom said the award for coach of the year was a humbling and mean-

ingful award for her. “It means everything. The reason is that this is an award voted on by my peers and I have so much respect for them,” Stenstrom said. “To see all that the other coaches do to put so much heart into their girls, and then for them to honor me, I’m really humbled.”

On campus:

ThunderRidge Joe Ortiz, coach of the boys basketball team, which is ranked first in the CHSAANow.com poll, picked up his 400th career victory with a victory over then-top ranked Chaparral on Feb. 6. He added victory 401 to his resume with a triumph over rival Mountain Vista on Feb. 9. The Grizzlies will host secondranked Rock Canyon in the regular season finale on Feb. 16 and the outright Continental League championship will be on the line for ThunderRidge

News and notes from local high school sports programs will be held Feb. 15-17 at the Pepsi Center. • The boys basketball team has lost four of its last five games heading into the final two games of the regular season. Rock Canyon Boys basketball coach Kent Grams is a 2002 graduate of ThunderRidge and he played basketball for Grizzlies coach Ortiz. On Feb. 16, Grams will be coaching against Ortiz when the Jaguars, ranked second in the CHSAANow. com Class 5A poll, face top ranked ThunderRidge in the final game of the Continental League season at ThunderRidge. The Grizzlies are unbeaten in the

league and Rock Canyon has one loss. Rock Canyon has a 3-9 overall record against ThunderRidge but has notched narrow wins in the past two games. SkyView Academy • The boys basketball team wraps up the regular season Feb. 15 with a game against Denver Jewish Day. Seniors Jordan Wilson and Mitch Steele have been the sparkplugs this season for the Hawks. Wilson is averaging 11.6 points a game with Steele close behind at 11.1 ppg. • Natalia Miller-Forrest is the top scorer for the girls basketball team with an 11 point-per-game scoring average.

Valor Christian • The hockey team has wrapped up the Highlands Conference title and will be idle until the start of the playoffs. The Eagles, 16-0-0 in the conference and 17-2-0 overall, are guaranteed of drawing a first round bye in the playoffs and won’t play until the second round on Feb. 23.

100 freestyle: 1. Kylie Andrews, Heritage, 50.66; 2. Ella Kirschke, Valor Christian, 50.84; 4. Anna Shaw, Heritage, 51:49; 6. Lindsay Stenstrom, Valor Christian,52.29. 500 freestyle: 6. Grace Mortimer, Highlands Ranch, 5:16.45; 8. Danielle Roney, Highlands Ranch, 5:25.00. 200 freestyle relay: 1. Valor Christian (Lindsey Stenstrom, Ashley Stenstrom, Makayla Hoehn, Ella Kirschke) 1:35.90 (4A state record); 2. Heritage (Kylie Andrews, Marissa Kiefer, Madison Mitchell, Anna Shaw) 1:36.68; 8. Highlands Ranch (Aimee Burton, Claire Bigler, Bryce Johansen, Mari Tobo) 1:40.33. 100 backstroke: 7. Lizzie Hunt, Heritage, 59.59; 8. Lauren VanFleet, Ponderosa, 1:00.03. 400 freestyle relay: 1. Valor Christian (Lindsay Stenstrom, Ashley Stenstrom, Makayla Hoehn, Ella Kirschke) 3:28.05; 3. Heritage (Caley Mitchell, Anna Shaw, Marissa Kiefer, Kylie Andrews) 3:33.59; 8. Highlands Ranch (Danielle Roney, Aimee Burton, Grance Mortimer, Keeley LaRiviere) 3:42.15.

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26 Highlands Ranch Herald

February 15, 2018F

Services

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Highlands Ranch Herald 27

February 15, 2018

Services Handyman

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28 Highlands Ranch Herald

February 15, 2018F

Services

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Highlands Ranch Herald 29

February 15, 2018

BENTON FROM PAGE 24

“Dave was a great inspiration to me,” said McCaffrey. “I watched somebody I respect who played at a high level and is one of the best in the business at broadcasting, yet he still has the passion while coaching football. “He’s had unbelievable success in his high school coaching. It’s because he loves what he is doing. I love this sport too and love coaching it. He kind of paved the way. He showed me you could have a family, have a profession, coach high school football and do the things you want to do. When I watch him coaching, meeting with coaches or drawing up plays, he is a happy man. He showed me this can be done.” Skill competition in ice hockey A few of the first high school hockey games I witnessed a few decades ago were like watching the movie “Slap Shot,” where players resorted to playing a violent style to become popular. There wasn’t much attention paid to hockey. Most of the interest centered around physical play on the ice, which often carried over off the ice by fans after the games. Times have changed and the skill level of high school hockey players is better.

“High school hockey is getting better and better by leaps and bounds,” said former University of Denver coach George Gwozdecky, who is now the Valor Christian head hockey coach. “Of course you have your programs that are developing a little slower than other programs. “More and more kids are starting to move towards high school hockey for many reasons, and as a result it is getting more competitive. Rosters on the varsity teams are getting deeper. Kids are starting to realize they can get to junior hockey from playing high school, whereas in the past most of those kids had to play triple A hockey.” The regular CHSAA season is ending and 24 teams will advance to the state playoffs. The top eight teams in RPI rankings get byes into the second round. First-round games are Feb. 20-21. Second-round and quarterfinals are Feb. 23-24. Frozen Four games are set for 5 p.m. and 7:30 p.m. March 5 at the Pepsi Center with the title game on tap for March 6 at the Pepsi Center. Top eight in the RPI after games of Feb. 9 were Regis, Valor, Monarch, Fort Collins, Steamboat Springs, Cherry Creek, Chaparral and Aspen. Jim Benton is a sports writer for Colorado Community Media. He has been covering sports in the Denver area since 1968. He can be reached at jbenton@coloradocommunitymedia.com.

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30 Highlands Ranch Herald

Public Notices Public Trustees

Notices

February 15, 2018F

Public Trustees

Public Trustees

To advertise your public notices call 303-566-4100

Public Trustees

Public Trustees

PUBLIC NOTICE

PUBLIC NOTICE

PUBLIC NOTICE

PUBLIC NOTICE

PUBLIC NOTICE

Highlands Ranch NOTICE OF SALE Public Trustee Sale No. 2017-0254

Highlands Ranch NOTICE OF SALE Public Trustee Sale No. 2017-0264

Littleton NOTICE OF SALE Public Trustee Sale No. 2017-0280

Highlands Ranch NOTICE OF SALE Public Trustee Sale No. 2017-0281

Littleton NOTICE OF SALE Public Trustee Sale No. 2017-0272

To Whom It May Concern: On 11/20/2017 11:21:00 AM the undersigned Public Trustee caused the Notice of Election and Demand relating to the Deed of Trust described below to be recorded in Douglas County.

To Whom It May Concern: On 12/7/2017 9:39:00 AM the undersigned Public Trustee caused the Notice of Election and Demand relating to the Deed of Trust described below to be recorded in Douglas County.

To Whom It May Concern: On 12/21/2017 4:47:00 PM the undersigned Public Trustee caused the Notice of Election and Demand relating to the Deed of Trust described below to be recorded in Douglas County.

To Whom It May Concern: On 12/22/2017 9:36:00 AM the undersigned Public Trustee caused the Notice of Election and Demand relating to the Deed of Trust described below to be recorded in Douglas County.

To Whom It May Concern: On 12/14/2017 2:32:00 PM the undersigned Public Trustee caused the Notice of Election and Demand relating to the Deed of Trust described below to be recorded in Douglas County.

Original Grantor: JOHN S MORRIS Original Beneficiary: MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., AS NOMINEE FOR CHERRY CREEK MORTGAGE CO., INC. Current Holder of Evidence of Debt: PENNYMAC LOAN SERVICES, LLC Date of Deed of Trust (DOT): 8/14/2015 Recording Date of DOT: 8/14/2015 Reception No. of DOT: 2015058075 DOT Recorded in Douglas County. Original Principal Amount of Evidence of Debt: $284,747.00 Outstanding Principal Amount as of the date hereof: $277,112.19

Original Grantor: CHRISTOPHER JAMES JARDINE Original Beneficiary: MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., AS NOMINEE FOR THE MORTGAGE COMPANY Current Holder of Evidence of Debt: PENNYMAC LOAN SERVICES, LLC Date of Deed of Trust (DOT): 3/31/2016 Recording Date of DOT: 4/1/2016 Reception No. of DOT: 2016019337 DOT Recorded in Douglas County. Original Principal Amount of Evidence of Debt: $353,802.00 Outstanding Principal Amount as of the date hereof: $347,847.88

Original Grantor: VAN ROMERO Original Beneficiary: MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., AS NOMINEE FOR FIRST HOME MORTGAGE Current Holder of Evidence of Debt: WELLS FARGO BANK, N.A. Date of Deed of Trust (DOT): 8/1/2003 Recording Date of DOT: 8/11/2003 Reception No. of DOT: 2003120582 DOT Recorded in Douglas County. Original Principal Amount of Evidence of Debt: $199,193.00 Outstanding Principal Amount as of the date hereof: $178,591.94

Original Grantor: LEO P CROSS AND JODIE L CROSS Original Beneficiary: OPTION ONE MORTGAGE CORPORATION Current Holder of Evidence of Debt: WELLS FARGO BANK, N.A. AS TRUSTEE FOR OPTION ONE MORTGAGE LOAN TRUST 2007-FXD1 Date of Deed of Trust (DOT): 7/28/2006 Recording Date of DOT: 8/3/2006 Reception No. of DOT: 2006066601 DOT Recorded in Douglas County. Original Principal Amount of Evidence of Debt: $357,000.00 Outstanding Principal Amount as of the date hereof: $299,130.83

Original Grantor: WILLIAM SIGLER AND JODIE SIGLER Original Beneficiary: MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., ACTING SOLELY AS NOMINEE FOR OPTEUM FINANCIAL SERVICES, LLC Current Holder of Evidence of Debt: HSBC BANK USA, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION AS TRUSTEE FOR OPTEUM MORTGAGE ACCEPTANCE CORPORATION, ASSET BACKED PASS-THROUGH CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2005-4 Date of Deed of Trust (DOT): 8/3/2005 Recording Date of DOT: 8/11/2005 Reception No. of DOT: 2005075614 DOT Recorded in Douglas County. Original Principal Amount of Evidence of Debt: $256,000.00 Outstanding Principal Amount as of the date hereof: $206,595.08

Pursuant to C.R.S. §38-38-101 (4) (i), you are hereby notified that the covenants of the deed of trust have been violated as follows: Failure to pay principal and interest when due together with all other payments provided for in the Evidence of Debt secured by the Deed of Trust and other violations of the terms thereof. THE LIEN FORECLOSED MAY NOT BE A FIRST LIEN.

The property described herein is all of the property encumbered by the lien of the deed of trust. Legal Description of Real Property: LOT 36, BLOCK 1, HIGHLANDS RANCH FILING NO. 14, COUNTY OF DOUGLAS, STATE OF COLORADO. Which has the address of: 9326 Daisy Ct, Highlands Ranch, CO 80126 NOTICE OF SALE

The current holder of the Evidence of Debt secured by the Deed of Trust described herein, has filed written election and demand for sale as provided by law and in said Deed of Trust.

THEREFORE, Notice Is Hereby Given that on the first possible sale date (unless the sale is continued*) at 10:00 a.m. Wednesday, March 14, 2018, at the Public Trustee’s office, 402 Wilcox Street, Castle Rock, Colorado, I will sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder for cash, the said real property and all interest of said Grantor(s), Grantor(s)’ heirs and assigns therein, for the purpose of paying the indebtedness provided in said Evidence of Debt secured by the Deed of Trust, plus attorneys’ fees, the expenses of sale and other items allowed by law, and will deliver to the purchaser a Certificate of Purchase, all as provided by law. If the sale date is continued to a later date, the deadline to file a notice of intent to cure by those parties entitled to cure may also be extended.

If you believe that your lender or servicer has failed to provide a single point of contact (38-38-103.1 CRS) or they are still pursuing foreclosure even though you have submitted a completed loss mitigation application or you have been offered and have accepted a loss mitigation option (38-38-103.2 CRS), you may file a complaint with the Colorado Attorney General (720-508-6006) or the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (855411-2372) or both. However, the filing of a complaint in and of itself will not stop the foreclosure process. First Publication: 1/18/2018 Last Publication: 2/15/2018 Publisher: Douglas County News Press Dated: 11/20/2017 CHRISTINE DUFFY DOUGLAS COUNTY Public Trustee

The name, address and telephone numbers of the attorney(s) representing the legal holder of the indebtedness is: SCOTT TOEBBEN Colorado Registration #: 19011 216 16TH STREET SUITE 1210, DENVER, COLORADO 80202 Phone #: (720) 259-6714 Fax #: (720) 259-6709 Attorney File #: 17CO00453-2

*YOU MAY TRACK FORECLOSURE SALE DATES on the Public Trustee website : http://www.douglas.co.us/publictrustee/ Legal Notice No.: 2017-0254 First Publication: 1/18/2018 Last Publication: 2/15/2018 Publisher: Douglas County News Press

Pursuant to C.R.S. §38-38-101 (4) (i), you are hereby notified that the covenants of the deed of trust have been violated as follows: Failure to pay principal and interest when due together with all other payments provided for in the Evidence of Debt secured by the Deed of Trust and other violations of the terms thereof. THE LIEN FORECLOSED MAY NOT BE A FIRST LIEN. The property described herein is all of the property encumbered by the lien of the deed of trust. Legal Description of Real Property: LOT 10, BLOCK 5, HIGHLANDS RANCH FILING NO. 5, COUNTY OF DOUGLAS, STATE OF COLORADO Which has the address of: 1481 Northcrest Drive, Highlands Ranch, CO 80126 NOTICE OF SALE The current holder of the Evidence of Debt secured by the Deed of Trust described herein, has filed written election and demand for sale as provided by law and in said Deed of Trust. THEREFORE, Notice Is Hereby Given that on the first possible sale date (unless the sale is continued*) at 10:00 a.m. Wednesday, March 28, 2018, at the Public Trustee’s office, 402 Wilcox Street, Castle Rock, Colorado, I will sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder for cash, the said real property and all interest of said Grantor(s), Grantor(s)’ heirs and assigns therein, for the purpose of paying the indebtedness provided in said Evidence of Debt secured by the Deed of Trust, plus attorneys’ fees, the expenses of sale and other items allowed by law, and will deliver to the purchaser a Certificate of Purchase, all as provided by law. If the sale date is continued to a later date, the deadline to file a notice of intent to cure by those parties entitled to cure may also be extended. If you believe that your lender or servicer has failed to provide a single point of contact (38-38-103.1 CRS) or they are still pursuing foreclosure even though you have submitted a completed loss mitigation application or you have been offered and have accepted a loss mitigation option (38-38-103.2 CRS), you may file a complaint with the Colorado Attorney General (720-508-6006) or the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (855411-2372) or both. However, the filing of a complaint in and of itself will not stop the foreclosure process. First Publication: 2/1/2018 Last Publication: 3/1/2018 Publisher: Douglas County News Press Dated: 12/8/2017 CHRISTINE DUFFY DOUGLAS COUNTY Public Trustee The name, address and telephone numbers of the attorney(s) representing the legal holder of the indebtedness is: NICHOLE WILLIAMS Colorado Registration #: 49611 1199 BANNOCK STREET, DENVER, COLORADO 80204 Phone #: (303) 350-3711 Fax #: Attorney File #: 00000007195308 *YOU MAY TRACK FORECLOSURE SALE DATES on the Public Trustee w ebsite: http://www.douglas.co.us/publictrustee/ Legal Notice No.: 2017-0264 First Publication: 2/1/2018 Last Publication: 3/1/2018 Publisher: Douglas County News Press

Pursuant to C.R.S. §38-38-101 (4) (i), you are hereby notified that the covenants of the deed of trust have been violated as follows: the failure to make timely payments required under said Deed of Trust and the Evidence of Debt secured thereby. THE LIEN FORECLOSED MAY NOT BE A FIRST LIEN. The property described herein is all of the property encumbered by the lien of the deed of trust. Legal Description of Real Property: LOT 479, ROXBOROUGH VILLAGE, FILING NO. 16-A, COUNTY OF DOUGLAS, STATE OF COLORADO. Which has the address of: 9798 Marmot Ridge Circle, Littleton, CO 80125 NOTICE OF SALE The current holder of the Evidence of Debt secured by the Deed of Trust described herein, has filed written election and demand for sale as provided by law and in said Deed of Trust. THEREFORE, Notice Is Hereby Given that on the first possible sale date (unless the sale is continued*) at 10:00 a.m. Wednesday, April 11, 2018, at the Public Trustee’s office, 402 Wilcox Street, Castle Rock, Colorado, I will sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder for cash, the said real property and all interest of said Grantor(s), Grantor(s)’ heirs and assigns therein, for the purpose of paying the indebtedness provided in said Evidence of Debt secured by the Deed of Trust, plus attorneys’ fees, the expenses of sale and other items allowed by law, and will deliver to the purchaser a Certificate of Purchase, all as provided by law. If the sale date is continued to a later date, the deadline to file a notice of intent to cure by those parties entitled to cure may also be extended. If you believe that your lender or servicer has failed to provide a single point of contact (38-38-103.1 CRS) or they are still pursuing foreclosure even though you have submitted a completed loss mitigation application or you have been offered and have accepted a loss mitigation option (38-38-103.2 CRS), you may file a complaint with the Colorado Attorney General (720-508-6006) or the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (855411-2372) or both. However, the filing of a complaint in and of itself will not stop the foreclosure process. First Publication: 2/15/2018 Last Publication: 3/15/2018 Publisher: Douglas County News Press Dated: 12/27/2017 CHRISTINE DUFFY DOUGLAS COUNTY Public Trustee The name, address and telephone numbers of the attorney(s) representing the legal holder of the indebtedness is: EVE GRINA Colorado Registration #: 43658 7700 E. ARAPAHOE ROAD, SUITE 230, CENTENNIAL, COLORADO 80112 Phone #: (877) 369-6122 Fax #: Attorney File #: CO-17-800753-LL *YOU MAY TRACK FORECLOSURE SALE DATES on the Pu blic Trustee website: http://www.douglas.co.us/publictrustee/ Legal Notice No.: 2017-0280 First Publication: 2/15/2018 Last Publication: 3/15/2018 Publisher: Douglas County News Press

Pursuant to C.R.S. §38-38-101 (4) (i), you are hereby notified that the covenants of the deed of trust have been violated as follows: failed to make the monthly mortgage payments as required by the terms of the Note and Deed of Trust. THE LIEN FORECLOSED MAY NOT BE A FIRST LIEN. The property described herein is all of the property encumbered by the lien of the deed of trust. Legal Description of Real Property: LOT 67, HIGHLANDS RANCH FILING NO. 122-N, ACCORDING TO THE RECORDED PLAT THEREOF, COUNTY OF DOUGLAS, STATE OF COLORADO Which has the address of: 10701 Bryce Ln, Highlands Ranch, CO 80126-7509 NOTICE OF SALE

Pursuant to C.R.S. §38-38-101 (4) (i), you are hereby notified that the covenants of the deed of trust have been violated as follows: Failure to pay principal and interest when due together with all other payments provided for in the Evidence of Debt secured by the Deed of Trust and other violations of the terms thereof.

THE LIEN FORECLOSED MAY NOT BE A FIRST LIEN. The property described herein is all of the property encumbered by the lien of the deed of trust. Legal Description of Real Property: LOT 2, HIGHLANDS RANCH, FILING NO. 95-A, COUNTY OF DOUGLAS, STATE OF COLORADO.

The current holder of the Evidence of Debt secured by the Deed of Trust described herein, has filed written election and demand for sale as provided by law and in said Deed of Trust.

Which has the address of: 9751 Clairton Place, Littleton, CO 80126

THEREFORE, Notice Is Hereby Given that on the first possible sale date (unless the sale is continued*) at 10:00 a.m. Wednesday, April 11, 2018, at the Public Trustee’s office, 402 Wilcox Street, Castle Rock, Colorado, I will sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder for cash, the said real property and all interest of said Grantor(s), Grantor(s)’ heirs and assigns therein, for the purpose of paying the indebtedness provided in said Evidence of Debt secured by the Deed of Trust, plus attorneys’ fees, the expenses of sale and other items allowed by law, and will deliver to the purchaser a Certificate of Purchase, all as provided by law. If the sale date is continued to a later date, the deadline to file a notice of intent to cure by those parties entitled to cure may also be extended.

The current holder of the Evidence of Debt secured by the Deed of Trust described herein, has filed written election and demand for sale as provided by law and in said Deed of Trust.

If you believe that your lender or servicer has failed to provide a single point of contact (38-38-103.1 CRS) or they are still pursuing foreclosure even though you have submitted a completed loss mitigation application or you have been offered and have accepted a loss mitigation option (38-38-103.2 CRS), you may file a complaint with the Colorado Attorney General (720-508-6006) or the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (855411-2372) or both. However, the filing of a complaint in and of itself will not stop the foreclosure process. First Publication: 2/15/2018 Last Publication: 3/15/2018 Publisher: Douglas County News Press Dated: 12/27/2017 CHRISTINE DUFFY DOUGLAS COUNTY Public Trustee The name, address and telephone numbers of the attorney(s) representing the legal holder of the indebtedness is: SUSAN HENDRICK Colorado Registration #: 33196 9745 EAST HAMPDEN AVE SUITE 400, DENVER, COLORADO 80231 Phone #: (303) 353-2965 Fax #: Attorney File #: CO170254 *YOU MAY TRACK FORECLOSURE SALE DATES on the Public Trustee website : http://www.douglas.co.us/publictrustee/ Legal Notice No.: 2017-0281 First Publication: 2/15/2018 Last Publication: 3/15/2018 Publisher: Douglas County News Press

NOTICE OF SALE

THEREFORE, Notice Is Hereby Given that on the first possible sale date (unless the sale is continued*) at 10:00 a.m. Wednesday, April 4, 2018, at the Public Trustee’s office, 402 Wilcox Street, Castle Rock, Colorado, I will sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder for cash, the said real property and all interest of said Grantor(s), Grantor(s)’ heirs and assigns therein, for the purpose of paying the indebtedness provided in said Evidence of Debt secured by the Deed of Trust, plus attorneys’ fees, the expenses of sale and other items allowed by law, and will deliver to the purchaser a Certificate of Purchase, all as provided by law. If the sale date is continued to a later date, the deadline to file a notice of intent to cure by those parties entitled to cure may also be extended.

If you believe that your lender or servicer has failed to provide a single point of contact (38-38-103.1 CRS) or they are still pursuing foreclosure even though you have submitted a completed loss mitigation application or you have been offered and have accepted a loss mitigation option (38-38-103.2 CRS), you may file a complaint with the Colorado Attorney General (720-508-6006) or the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (855411-2372) or both. However, the filing of a complaint in and of itself will not stop the foreclosure process. First Publication: 2/8/2018 Last Publication: 3/8/2018 Publisher: Douglas County News Press Dated: 12/15/2017 CHRISTINE DUFFY DOUGLAS COUNTY Public Trustee

The name, address and telephone numbers of the attorney(s) representing the legal holder of the indebtedness is: NICHOLE WILLIAMS Colorado Registration #: 49611 1199 BANNOCK STREET, DENVER, COLORADO 80204 Phone #: (303) 350-3711 Fax #: Attorney File #: 00000007219025

*YOU MAY TRACK FORECLOSURE SALE DATES on the Public Trustee w ebsite: http://www.douglas.co.us/publictrustee/ Legal Notice No.: 2017-0272 First Publication: 2/8/2018 Last Publication: 3/8/2018 Publisher: Douglas County News Press

Highlands Ranch * 1


NOTICE OF SALE Public Trustee Sale No. 2017-0282

Original Principal Amount of Evidence of Debt: $256,000.00 Outstanding Principal Amount as of the date hereof: $206,595.08

February 15, 2018

Highlands Ranch Herald 31

To Whom It May Concern: On 12/22/2017 11:36:00 AM the undersigned Public Trustee caused the Notice of Election and Demand relating to the Deed of Trust described below to be recorded in Douglas County.

Athletes sign to play at collegiate level

Pursuant to C.R.S. §38-38-101 (4) (i), you are hereby notified that the covenants of the deed of trust have been violated as follows: Failure to pay principal and interest when due together with all other payments provided for in the Evidence of Debt secured by the Deed of Trust and other violations of the terms thereof. THE LIEN FORECLOSED MAY NOT BE A STAFF REPORT FIRST LIEN.

The property described herein is all of the The encumbered third national signing property by the lien of the deed of trust. day for the class of 2018 was

Feb. 7, and schools submitted Legal Description of Real Property: LOT 2, HIGHLANDS RANCH, the following lists of athletes FILING NO. 95-A, COUNTY OF DOUGLAS, STATEsigned OF COLORADO. who letters of intent. If any athletes Which has the address of:are not on 9751 Clairton Place, Littleton,be, CO 80126 the list who should please OF SALE email JimNOTICE Benton at jbenton@ coloradocommunitymedia. The current holder of the Evidence of Debt secured com.by the Deed of Trust described herein,

has filed written election and demand for sale as provided by law and in said Deed of Trust.

Highlands

THEREFORE, Notice Is Hereby Given that on the first possible sale date (unless Ranchthe sale is continued*) at 10:00 a.m. Wednesday, April 4, 2018, at the Public Trustee’s Jessica office, 402 Wilcox Street, Castle Rock, Colorado, I will sell at pubShumer, soclic auction to the highest and best bidder for cer, University cash, the said real property and all interest of said Grantor(s), Grantor(s)’ heirs and assigns Sciences therein, for the purposeof of paying the indebtedness provided in said Evidence of Debtof secured and Arts by the Deed of Trust, plus attorneys’ fees, the expenses of sale andOklahoma; other items allowed by law, andWestin, will deliver to the purchaser a CertificKyle football, Rhodes ate of Purchase, all as provided by law. If the sale date is continued to a later date, the deadCollege of Tennessee; Josh line to file a notice of intent to cure by those Thompson, parties entitled to baseball, cure may alsoSeattle be extended.

University; Joe Alber, footIf you believe that your lender or servicer ball, South Dakota School has failed to provide a single point ofof contact (38-38-103.1 CRS) or they are still pursuMines; Grace Mortimer, swiming foreclosure even though you have submitted a completed loss mitigation applicaming, Marryville University; tion or you have been offered and have acJeremy Henning, football, Docepted a loss mitigation option (38-38-103.2 CRS), University; you may file a complaint the Colane Brelanwith Griforado Attorney General (720-508-6006) or the fin, football, Hastings College; Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (855411-2372) or both. However, the filing of a Matthew complaint in Blackwood, and of itself will baseball, not stop the foreclosure process. South Mountain Community College/Phoenix. First Publication: 2/8/2018

Last Publication: 3/8/2018 Publisher: Douglas County News Press

Mountain

Dated: 12/15/2017 Vista DUFFY CHRISTINE DOUGLAS Zach COUNTY Public Trustee

Paschke, The name, address and telephone numbers of the attorney(s) representing the legal holder of baseball, the indebtedness is: Metropolitan State Uni-

NICHOLE WILLIAMS versity; Matthew Johnson, Colorado Registration #: 49611 1199 BANNOCK STREET, Lutheran baseball, Bethany DENVER, COLORADO 80204 Phone #: (303) 350-3711 College; Jack Liffrig, baseFax #: Attorney File #: 00000007219025

*YOU MAY TRACK FORECLOSURE SALE DATES on the Public Trustee website: http://www.douglas.co.us/publictrustee/

Public Trustees

Legal Notice No.: 2017-0272 First Publication: 2/8/2018 Last Publication: 3/8/2018 Publisher: Douglas County News Press PUBLIC NOTICE Littleton NOTICE OF SALE Public Trustee Sale No. 2017-0282 To Whom It May Concern: On 12/22/2017 11:36:00 AM the undersigned Public Trustee caused the Notice of Election and Demand relating to the Deed of Trust described below to be recorded in Douglas County. Original Grantor: J DOUGLAS COOK AND LORA L COOK Original Beneficiary: ARGENT MORTGAGE COMPANY, LLC Current Holder of Evidence of Debt: DEUTSCHE BANK NATIONAL TRUST COMPANY, AS TRUSTEE FOR ARGENT SECURITIES INC., ASSET-BACKED PASS-THROUGH CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2005-W3 Date of Deed of Trust (DOT): 8/17/2005 Recording Date of DOT: 8/23/2005 Reception No. of DOT: 2005079344 DOT Recorded in Douglas County. Original Principal Amount of Evidence of Debt: $499,900.00 Outstanding Principal Amount as of the date hereof: $373,249.06 Pursuant to C.R.S. §38-38-101 (4) (i), you are hereby notified that the covenants of the deed of trust have been violated as follows: Failure to pay principal and interest when due together with all other payments provided for in the Evidence of Debt secured by the Deed of Trust and other violations of the terms thereof. Said Deed of Trust was rerecorded on 11/23/2005, under Reception No. 2005112785. THE LIEN FORECLOSED MAY NOT BE A FIRST LIEN. The property described herein is all of the property encumbered by the lien of the deed of trust. Legal Description of Real Property: LOT 71, HIGHLANDS RANCH FILING NO.

ball, University of Utah; Cooper Jamieson, baseball, Solano Community College; Tristan Smith, football, Colorado School of Mines; Ben Hildebrand, football, Wisconsin at La Crosse; Jack Govett, lacrosse, University of Delaware; Cameron Hancock, lacrosse, Hobart College; Ryan Nunes, lacrosse, University of Utah; Jonah Hirshorn, lacrosse, University of Utah; Duncan Cross, lacrosse, Colorado Mesa University; Griffin Bonjean, lacrosse, University of Utah; Garrett Breeling, lacrosse, Colorado State-Pueblo; Landon Nolta, lacrosse, Rochester Institute of Technology; Jamelah NOTICE Sawaged, PUBLIC soccer, Metropolitan LittletonJaelyn HenState University; NOTICE OF SALE dren, soccer, of Public TrusteeUniversity Sale No. 2017-0282 New Mexico; Maisie Paulson, To Whom It May Concern: On 12/22/2017 soccer, Jacksonville Uni11:36:00 AM the undersigned State Public Trustee caused the Notice of Election and Demand relatversity; Katy Harris, soccer, ing to the Deed of Trust described below to be recorded in Douglas County. Metropolitan State University; Mills, soccer, OriginalSavannah Grantor: J DOUGLAS COOK AND LORA L COOK University of Colorado-ColoOriginal Beneficiary: ARGENT MORTGAGE rado Springs; Ben Shepherd, COMPANY, LLC Current Holder of Evidence of Debt: soccer, D E U T S C HUniversity E B A N K N A Tof I O NNew AL TRUST COMPANY, AS TRUSTEERacanelli, FOR ARGENT Mexico; Kendall SECURITIES INC., ASSET-BACKED softball, Colorado Christian PASS-THROUGH CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2005-W3 Annalisa Ingui, University; Date of Deed of Trust (DOT): 8/17/2005 Recording Date of DOT: 8/23/2005 softball, Dakota State UniReception No. of DOT: 2005079344 versity; Makayla Hoselton, DOT Recorded in Douglas County. Original Principal Amount of Evidence of Debt: softball, Southwest Minnesota $499,900.00 State University; Sarah Outstanding Principal Amount as ofJohnthe date hereof: $373,249.06 son, softball, Geneva (4) College; Pursuant to C.R.S. §38-38-101 (i), you are hereby notified that the covenants of the deed of Erin Kerby , softball, Saint trust have been violated as follows: Failure to Joseph’s pay principal University-Philaand interest when due together with all other Rebecca payments provided for in the Eviddelphia; Gonzales, ence of Debt secured by the Deed of Trust and other violations of the terms thereof. softball, Metropolitan State Said Deed of Trust was rerecorded on 11/23/2005, under Reception No. 2005112785.

Public Trustees

THE LIEN FORECLOSED MAY NOT BE A FIRST LIEN. The property described herein is all of the property encumbered by the lien of the deed of trust. Legal Description of Real Property: LOT 71, HIGHLANDS RANCH FILING NO. 118-L, COUNTY OF DOUGLAS, STATE OF COLORADO. Which has the address of: 807 Ridgemont Cir, Littleton, CO 80126 NOTICE OF SALE The current holder of the Evidence of Debt secured by the Deed of Trust described herein, has filed written election and demand for sale as provided by law and in said Deed of Trust. THEREFORE, Notice Is Hereby Given that on the first possible sale date (unless the sale is continued*) at 10:00 a.m. Wednesday, April 11, 2018, at the Public Trustee’s office, 402 Wilcox Street, Castle Rock, Colorado, I will sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder for cash, the said real property and all interest of said Grantor(s), Grantor(s)’ heirs and assigns therein, for the purpose of paying the indebtedness provided in said Evidence of Debt secured by the Deed of Trust, plus attorneys’ fees, the expenses of sale and other items allowed by law, and will deliver to the purchaser a Certificate of Purchase, all as provided by law. If the sale date is continued to a later date, the deadline to file a notice of intent to cure by those parties entitled to cure may also be extended. If you believe that your lender or servicer has failed to provide a single point of contact (38-38-103.1 CRS) or they are still pursuing foreclosure even though you have submitted a completed loss mitigation application or you have been offered and have accepted a loss mitigation option (38-38-103.2 CRS), you may file a complaint with the Colorado Attorney General (720-508-6006) or the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (855411-2372) or both. However, the filing of a complaint in and of itself will not stop the foreclosure process. First Publication: 2/15/2018 Last Publication: 3/15/2018 Publisher: Douglas County News Press

Original Grantor: J DOUGLAS COOK AND LORA L COOK Original Beneficiary: ARGENT MORTGAGE COMPANY, LLC Current Holder of Evidence of Debt: University; Arky D E U T S C H E B ANatalie NK NATIO N A L ,T R U S T COMPANY, AS TRUSTEE FOR ARGENT swimming, University of DenSECURITIES INC., ASSET-BACKED ver; Kaitlin CERTIFICATES, Nats, swimming, PASS-THROUGH SERIES 2005-W3 Air Force Academy; Amanda Date of Deed of Trust (DOT): 8/17/2005 Keller, volleyball, University Recording Date of DOT: 8/23/2005 Reception No. of DOT: 2005079344 of Jordan DOTBridgeport; Recorded in Douglas County. MacArOriginal volleyball, Principal AmountCalifornia of Evidence of Debt: thur, $499,900.00 Lutheran University; Outstanding Principal Amount asSam of the date hereof: $373,249.06 Novak, volleyball, Colorado Pursuant to C.R.S. §38-38-101 (4) (i), you are hereby notified that the covenants of the deed of State-Pueblo; Bella Brown, trust have been violated as follows: Failure to volleyball, Concordia pay principal and interest when Univerdue together with allIrvine; other payments providedGordon, for in the Evidsity Meghan ence of Debt secured by the Deed of Trust and lacrosse, Academy; other violationsNaval of the terms thereof.

Jacob Leichner, swimming, Said Deed of Trust was rerecorded on 11/23/2005, under 2005112785. University ofReception SouthNo. Dakota. THE LIEN FORECLOSED MAY NOT BE A

FIRST Canyon LIEN. Rock The property described herein is all of the Joe Bryson, property encumbered by the lien of the deed football, Coloof trust. rado Mesa UniLegal Description of Real Property: versity; Cade RANCH FILING NO. LOT 71, HIGHLANDS 118-L, COUNTY OF DOUGLAS, STATE OF Chapman, COLORADO. football, Colorado Which has the address of: 807 Ridgemont State-Pueblo; Maren Clark, Cir, Littleton, CO 80126 lacrosse, Fort Lewis College; Vincent Curci, lacrosse, NOTICE OF SALE Colorado Mesa University; The current holder of the Evidence of Debt secured by the Deed of Trust described herein, Tyson Gilbert, basketball, has filed written election and demand for sale as Colorado Griffin provided by lawState-Pueblo; and in said Deed of Trust. Chaney , football, Colorado THEREFORE, Notice Is Hereby Given that on the first possible sale dateRegina (unless the sale is Mesa University; continued*) at 10:00 a.m. Wednesday, April 11, Gaglione-Kortbawi, softball, 2018, at the Public Trustee’s office, 402 Wilcox Street, Castle Rock, Colorado, I willHanna, sell at pubFlorida Tech; Zachary lic auction to the highest and best bidder for football, cash, the saidColorado real property Mesa and all interest of said Grantor(s), Grantor(s)’ heirs and assigns University; Keeley Kenton therein, for the purpose of paying the indebtedness provided in said Evidence of Debt secured Davis, volleyball, Creighton by the Deed of Trust, plus attorneys’ fees, the University; Masten, expenses of sale Sam and other items allowed by law, and will deliver to the purchaser basketball, University ofa Certificate of Purchase, all as provided by law. If the sale date is continued to a later Makenna date, the deadNorthern Colorado; line to file a notice of intent to cure by those Mathieson, parties entitled to swimming, cure may also beSan extended. Jose State University; NataIf you believe that your lender or servicer sha McClain, golf, Colorado has failed to provide a single point of contact (38-38-103.1 CRS) or they are still pursuMesa University; Nicholas ing foreclosure even though you have submitted a completed loss mitigation applicaMerone, baseball, University tion or you have been offered and have accepted a loss mitigation option (38-38-103.2 CRS), you may file a complaint with the Colorado Attorney General (720-508-6006) or the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (855411-2372) or both. However, the filing of a complaint in and of itself will not stop the foreclosure process.

Public Trustees

First Publication: 2/15/2018 Last Publication: 3/15/2018 Publisher: Douglas County News Press Dated: 12/27/2017 CHRISTINE DUFFY DOUGLAS COUNTY Public Trustee The name, address and telephone numbers of the attorney(s) representing the legal holder of the indebtedness is: NICHOLE WILLIAMS Colorado Registration #: 49611 1199 BANNOCK STREET , DENVER, COLORADO 80204 Phone #: (303) 350-3711 Fax #: Attorney File #: 00000007217870 *YOU MAY TRACK FORECLOSURE SALE DATES on the Public Trustee website: http://www.douglas.co.us/publictrustee/ Legal Notice No.: 2017-0282 First Publication: 2/15/2018 Last Publication: 3/15/2018 Publisher: Douglas County News Press

Misc. Private Legals Public Notice NOTICE OF PURCHASE OF REAL ESTATE AT TAX LIEN SALE AND OF APPLICATION FOR ISSUANCE OF TREASURER’S DEED To Every Person in Actual Possession or Occupancy of the hereinafter Described Land, Lot or Premises, and to the Person in Whose Name the Same was Taxed or Specially Assessed, and to all Persons having an Interest or Title of Record in or to the said Premises and To Whom It May Concern, and more especially to: OCCUPANT - THOMAS J MANCUSO THOMAS J HANSCH AND RHONDA KAY HANSCH - C ROGER ADDLESPERGER AS PRESIDENT OF DAWSON RIDGE METROPOLITAN DISTRICT NO 1 - DAWSON RIDGE

of Portland; Kieran McMullen, golf, Condordia College; Mitch Mullen, baseball, Western Nebraska; Madison Orgill, swimming, Carthage College; Keelyn Osoba, soccer, Air Force Academy; Ashlee Seltzer, softball, Webster University; Danielle Shafer, gymnastics, Boise State University; Emily Sloan, track, University of Oregon; Tanner Stopkoski, lacrosse, Sacred Heart University; Jamie Tatum, soccer, University of Wyoming; Christopher Theodore, cross country, Duke University; Kennedy Travis, lacrosse, Colorado-Colorado Springs; Aidan Uralli, lacrosse, Colorado Mesa University; Cayden Zimmerman, baseball, Air Force Academy.

SkyView Academy Hannah Dempsey, soccer, Taylor University; Emma Shumate, swimming, Luther College; Jimmy Scavuzzo, cross country/track, Benedictine College. ThunderRidge Sarah Cavanaugh, volleyball, Missouri University of Science & Technology; MadNotice die Duran,Public soccer, University ofNOTICE Northern Colorado; OF PURCHASE OF REALShae ESTATE AT TAX LIEN SALE AND OF APPLICATION Holmes, soccer, University of FOR ISSUANCE OF TREASURER’S DEED Washington; Sam Ostravich,

To Every Person in Actual Possession or Occupancy of the hereinafter Described Land, Lot or Premises, and to the Person in Whose Name the Same was Taxed or Specially Assessed, and to all Persons having an Interest or Title of Record in or to the said Premises and To Whom It May Concern, and more especially to:

Misc. Private Legals

OCCUPANT - THOMAS J MANCUSO THOMAS J HANSCH AND RHONDA KAY HANSCH - C ROGER ADDLESPERGER AS PRESIDENT OF DAWSON RIDGE METROPOLITAN DISTRICT NO 1 - DAWSON RIDGE METROPOLITAN DISTRICT NO 1 - DAWSON RIDGE METROPOLITAN DISTRICTS 1 - 5 C/O FOLKESTAD FAZEKAS BARRICK & PATOILE - DAWSON RIDGE METROPOLITAN DISTRINCT NO 1 A QUASI-MUNICIPAL CORPORATION AND POLITICAL SUBDIVISION OF THE STATE OF COLORADO - DCDC II INC - DCDC II INC C/O PARACORP INCORPORATED DCDC II INC A DELAWARE CORPORATION DOUGLAS COUNTY BOARD OF COMMISSIONERS - DOUGLAS COUNTY DEVELOPMENT CORPORATION C/O PARACORP INCORPORATED - DOUGLAS COUNTY DEVELOPMENT CORPORATION C/O PARACORP INCORPORATED REGISTERED AGENT DOUGLAS COUNTY DEVELOPMENT CORPORATION C/O PARACORP OF CALIFORNIA INCORPORATED - DOUGLAS COUNTY DEVELOPMENT CORPORATION C/O THE CORPORATION COMPANY REGISTERED AGENT - DOUGLAS COUNTY DEVELOPMENT CORPORATION - DOUGLAS COUNTY DEVELOPMENT CORPORATION A COLORADO CORPORATION - EMELINE W HANEY DIRECTOR DOUGLAS COUNTY DEVELOPMENT CORPORATION - FRANKLIN HARVEY, PRESIDENT DOUGLAS COUNTY DEVELOPMENT CORPORATION - FRANKLIN L HANEY FRANKLIN L HANEY DIRECTOR DOUGLAS COUNTY DEVELOPMENT CORPORATION FRANKLIN L HANEY PRESIDENT DCDC II INC - FRANKLIN L HANEY PRESIDENT DOUGLAS COUNTY DEVELOPMENT CORPORATION A COLORADO CORPORATION - JAMES M RATKOVIC AS MANAGER OF SBAB LLC A COLORADO LIMTED LIABILITY COMPANY JAMES M RATKOVIC REGISTERED AGENT SBAB LLC - LARRY D BLUST ESQ. BARNES & THORNBURG LLP - MERRICK & COMPANY RICHARD J EBERSOLE DIRECTOR DOUGLAS COUNTY DEVELOPMENT CORPORATION - ROGER P BAILEY SECRETARY DOUGLAS COUNTY DEVELOPMENT CORPORATION - RONALD B MERRILL ORGANIZER SBAB LLC - SAM BELZBERT MANAGER SBAB LLC - SBAB LLC C/O LYNN LANCASTER REGISTERED AGENT - SBAB LLC A COLORADO LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY SBAB LLC A COLORADO LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY C/O JAMES M RATKOVIC AS

golf, Northeastern Junior College; Grace Wenham, track, ColoradoColorado Springs; Tayven Bray, football, Chadron State College.

Valor Christian Public Notice Alexandra Daws, NOTICE OF PURCHASE OF soccer, REAL ESTATE AT TAX LIEN SALE AND OF APPLICATION University of Wyoming; Aeva FOR ISSUANCE OF TREASURER’S DEED Graber, soccer, Wheaton ColTo EveryLaura Person inKladde, Actual Possession or lege; soccer, Occupancy of the hereinafter Described Land, Lot or Premises, and to the Caroline Person in Whose Taylor University; Name the Same was Taxed or Specially AsNoonan, sessed, and tosoccer, all PersonsPrinceton having an Interest or Title of Record in orNichole to the said Premises and To University; Wright, Whom It May Concern, and more especially to: soccer, WheaOCCUPANT - THOMAS J MANCUSO ton College; THOMAS J HANSCH AND RHONDA KAY HANSCH - C ROGER ADDLESPERGER AS Ben AnderPRESIDENT OF DAWSON RIDGE METROson, football, POLITAN DISTRICT NO 1 - DAWSON RIDGE METROPOLITAN LindenwoodDISTRICT NO 1 - DAWSON RIDGE METROPOLITAN DISTRICTS 1 - 5 C/O FOLKESTAD FAZEKAS BARRICK & PATOILE University; - DAWSON RIDGE METROPOLITAN DISHunter TRINCT NO Carl1 A QUASI-MUNICIPAL CORPORATION AND POLITICAL SUBDIVISION OF THE son, football, STATE OF COLORADO - DCDC II INC - DCDC Colorado School of Mines; II INC C/O PARACORP INCORPORATED DCDC II INC A DELAWARE CORPORATION Jackson Eagle Ortiz, football, DOUGLAS COUNTY BOARD OF COMMISSIONERS - DOUGLAS COUNTY DEVELOPColorado State-Pueblo; Peyton MENT CORPORATION C/O PARACORP INRose, football, Colorado CORPORATED - DOUGLAS COUNTY DEVELOPMENT CORPORATION C/O PARACORP School of Mines; Preston INCORPORATED REGISTERED AGENT Rose, football, DOUGLAS COUNTY Colorado DEVELOPMENT CORPORATION C/O PARACORP OF CALIFORNIA School of Mines; Stefphon INCORPORATED - DOUGLAS COUNTY DEVELOPMENT CORPORATION C/O THE CORSherman, football, Hastings PORATION COMPANY REGISTERED AGENT College; Smith, foot- DOUGLAS Brandon COUNTY DEVELOPMENT CORPORATION - DOUGLAS COUNTY DEVELOPball, Taylor University; Blake MENT CORPORATION A COLORADO CORPORATION - EMELINE W HANEY DIRECTOR Stenstrom, football, UniDOUGLAS COUNTY DEVELOPMENT CORversity of Colorado; Trevor PORATION - FRANKLIN HARVEY, PRESIDENT DOUGLAS COUNTYWeber DEVELOPMENT Szilagyi, football, State CORPORATION - FRANKLIN L HANEY University; Matt Thibault, FRANKLIN L HANEY DIRECTOR DOUGLAS COUNTY DEVELOPMENT CORPORATION football,L HANEY Lindenwood FRANKLIN PRESIDENTUniverDCDC II INC -sity; FRANKLIN L HANEY PRESIDENT DOUGLAS Ryan Thibault, football, COUNTY DEVELOPMENT CORPORATION A Lindenwood University; Jadin COLORADO CORPORATION - JAMES M RATKOVIC AS MANAGER OF SBAB LLC A Watson, football, Lindenwood COLORADO LIMTED LIABILITY COMPANY JAMES M RATKOVIC REGISTERED AGENT University .

SBAB LLC - LARRY D BLUST ESQ. BARNES & THORNBURG LLP - MERRICK & COMPANY RICHARD J EBERSOLE DIRECTOR DOUGLAS COUNTY DEVELOPMENT CORPORATION - ROGER P BAILEY SECRETARY DOUGLAS COUNTY DEVELOPMENT CORPORATION - RONALD B MERRILL ORGANIZER SBAB LLC - SAM BELZBERT MANAGER SBAB LLC - SBAB LLC C/O LYNN LANCASTER REGISTERED AGENT - SBAB LLC A COLORADO LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY SBAB LLC A COLORADO LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY C/O JAMES M RATKOVIC AS MANAGER - SUSAN J SCNEIDER INCORPORATOR DOUGLAS COUNTY DEVELOPMENT CORPORATION

Misc. Private Legals

You and each of you are hereby notified that on the 6th day of November 2014 the then County Treasurer of the County of Douglas, in the State of Colorado, sold at public tax lien sale to Thomas J Hansch and Rhonda Kay Hansch the following described real estate situate in the County of Douglas, State of Colorado, to wit: TRACT IN SW1/4 28-8-67 & IN NW1/4 33-8-67 0.785 AM/L

and said County Treasurer issued a certificate of purchase therefore to Thomas J Hansch and Rhonda Kay Hansch. That said tax lien sale was made to satisfy the delinquent* taxes assessed against said real estate for the year 2013. That said real estate was taxed or specially assessed in the name(s) of Thomas J Mancuso for said year 2013

That said Thomas J Hansch and Rhonda Kay Hansch on the 8th day of November 2017 the present holder of said certificate, has made request upon the Treasurer of said County for a deed to said real estate; That a Treasurer’s Deed will be issued for said real estate to the said at 1:00 o’clock P.M., on the 24th day of May 2018 unless the same has been redeemed. Said property may be redeemed from said sale at any time prior to the actual execution of said Treasurer’s Deed. Witness my hand this 8th day of February 2018 /s/ Diane A. Holbert County Treasurer of Douglas County Legal Notice No.: 932563 First Publication: February 8, 2018 Last Publication: February 22, 2018 Publisher: Douglas County News-Press

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32 Highlands Ranch Herald

February 15, 2018F

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Highlands Ranch Herald 0215