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December 13, 2013

75 cents Arapahoe County, Colorado | Volume 93, Issue 43 A publication of

englewoodherald.net

Hearing slated for Chick-fil-A Eatery planned at former site of Funtastic Fun By Tom Munds

tmunds@ourcoloradonews.com

The bass drummer donned a Santa outfit as he marched with the band in the Dec. 7 Englewood Holiday Parade. The annual event went on despite the cold weather and afterwards people gathered in the Englewood Civic Center community room. Photos by Tom Munds

Parade goers brave the cold Band, marchers and spectators turn out for holiday event By Tom Munds

tmunds@ourcoloradonews.com Lots of layers hopefully kept the participants and spectators warm when they came to the Englewood Holiday Parade Dec. 7 and temperatures didn’t get out of the teens. The parade stepped off at 10 a.m. with the color guard leading the way. Marching next in line was a group seeking to establish a veteran’s memorial at Englewood High School. The Englewood High School/Englewood Middle School combined band was there, along with a

slew of floats, students from some of the elementary schools and Girl Scout Troop 2664. Near the end of the parade, an antique fire truck provided the method of transportation for Santa. The crowd along the parade route was small but applauded enthusiastically for each unit, float and group. “It is very cold today,” Pat Bernard said as she tightened her scarf. “I live in Longmont and, when my grandson told me he was going to be in the parade, I promised I’d be here to see him so here I am. I’m half frozen but he saw me and smiled so that warmed me up.” After the parade, many of the crowd gathered in the Englewood Civic Center community room where there was hot chocolate and the chance to see Santa. School choirs also came to entertain the crowd with songs of the season.

When the Dec. 7 Englewood Holiday Parade concluded, spectators and participants, including Santa, moved to the Englewood Civic Center Community Room. Vanessa Garcia, 9, smiles as she took her turn to sit on Santa’s knee and give him her Christmas list.

A public hearing on the Chick-fil-A rezoning request will be held as part of the Dec. 16 Englewood City Council meeting, which begins at 7:30 p.m. in the council chambers on the second floor of the Englewood Civic Center at 1000 Englewood Parkway. There also will be public hearing on an amendment to the subdivision associated with the same project. At the hearing, a city employee will present the proposal and the mayor will call up those who signed up to testify. Those testifying at the public hearing will be sworn in and their comments become part of the public record. The council’s normal policy is not to vote on second and final reading of a proposal on the same night as the public hearing. However, the agenda indicated the council could vote on second and final reading on these issues on Dec. 16. One public hearing is about the rezoning to a planned unit development necessary for the company’s proposal. The project would demolish the building at 3085 S. Broadway and two nearby houses on Acoma Street to create a 1.2-acre site that will become the location of the 4,600-squarefoot drive-thru restaurant and adjacent parking lot. The second public hearing is about the subdivision amendment involving the same area. A major aspect of the project involves the building on Broadway that held the Funtastic Fun indoor amusement establishment from 1994 until the doors were closed in 2011. The site has remained vacant. Hearing continues on Page 9

City council honors calendar artists 13 students’ works chosen for 2014 By Tom Munds

tmunds@ourcoloradonews.com Friends, relatives, teachers and school officials filled most available seats for the Dec. 2 meeting as the Englewood City Council honored the 13 students who had their works of art selected to be used in the city’s 2014 calendar. “This is an annual event we like to celebrate,” Mayor Randy Penn said. “It is our opportunity to thank not only the artists but their parents who supported them and the teachers who helped them develop

their talents.” Each student was called up individually. Each artist was given his or her artwork, framed and matted along with several gifts, plus they got to shake hands with the members of the city council. The first student honored was Billie Dornfeldt, a third-grader at Clayton Elementary School. Her drawing was selected as the cover for this year’s calendar. “I drew a snow globe with a snowman looking up at snowflakes,” the girl said as she and her family prepared to leave. “It was fun drawing this because I like to draw at school and when I am at home.” The artists were honored in the order their art was used in the calendar, from Artists continues on Page 8

POSTAL ADDRESS

Printed on recycled newsprint. Please recycle this copy.

Ann Dornfeldt, left, smiles at her daughter Billie. The third-grader created the artwork she is holding that was selected for the cover of the city’s 2014 calendar. Dornfeld and the other 12 student winners were honored at the Dec. 2 Englewood City council meeting. Photo by Tom Munds


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2 Englewood Herald

December 13, 2013

Real-estate pros tout smart growth Group planning hard look at Littleton Boulevard By Jennifer Smith

jsmith@ourcoloradonews.com Real-estate brokers across the nation are jumping on the smart-growth bandwagon, and the South Metro Denver Realtor Association is no exception. “Growth is `smart’ when it gives us great communities with more choices and personal freedom, good return on public investment, greater opportunity across the community, a thriving natural environment, and a legacy we can be proud to leave our children and grandchildren,” reads the Smart Growth Network’s website, which counts the National Association of Realtors among its 40 or so partners. Others include health organizations, architect and planner associations, environmental groups and more. On Dec. 5, SMDRA welcomed the NAR’s John Rosshirt to outline the concept, which advocates for things like pedestrian-friendly neighborhoods, transportation choices,

environmentally Stapleton Densmart growth principles sound construction ver is an example practices and fosterof a neighborhood • Mix land uses ing a strong “sense of that incorporated • Take advantage of compact building design place.” smart-growth prin• Create a range of housing opportunities and choices “What you want ciples into its de• Create walkable neighborhoods is for people to get sign, and the metro • Foster distinctive, attractive communities with a first off is that this is area is full of others. strong sense of place a really cool place,” In fact, the Smart • Preserve open space, farmland, natural beauty and said Rosshirt. “EvGrowth Network critical environmental areas erywhere has a place will showcase many • Strengthen and direct development toward existing that is strong and can of them during its communities be built on. What2014 New Partners • Provide a variety of transportation choices ever it is that’s your for Smart Growth • Make development decisions predictable, fair and distinctive thing, get Conference, Feb. cost effective behind it.” 13-15 at the Hyatt • Encourage community and stakeholder collaboration The class is one of Regency downtown. in development decisions the first concrete acRosshirt extions to come out of plained that the October’s Littleton 20th-century trends Community Retreat, which SMDRA mem- of single-family homes on large lots and ber Kay Watson was part of. She’s following sprawling covered shopping malls are fadup by planning a “charette,” defined as an ing as people’s lifestyles change. intensive, collaborative session to find a “Our American dream is not the same as solution to a problem that integrates the it was in the ‘40s or ‘50s,” he said. interests of a diverse community. This one People are having fewer kids today, and would focus on a smart-growth perspective many of those kids are choosing to remain on Littleton Boulevard. single longer, according to a study funded

in part by NAR. Many of them believe less stuff to pay for and less living space to take care of equals more freedom, and about 75 percent of them would be willing to pay more for housing to commute less. “The American dream is really about economic mobility,” said Rosshirt. The average household size is just 2.6 today, and in 2008, one-quarter of all American households were single, according to the study. So it takes more living units just to maintain population, which results in the dreaded “D” word - density. And that’s where smart-growth advocates often hit a brick wall in their communities. “Often the most vocal people are in the smallest minority,” he said. “You all know NIMBY. NIMBY always comes to those meetings. … There’s nothing bad about density, the problem is bad planning and design.” Proponents might find a surprising ally in seniors. According to the NAR study, the number of households headed by people 85 and older will double from 2005 to 2030. “They’re the ones that are competing with the Millennials for the downtown condos,” said Rosshirt.

correction

so much inside the herald this week

In last week’s story about the North Woods Inn seasoning, the source of the recipe was misidentified. Randi Sims should have been credited with sharing the ingredients.

Want more neWs?

Freedom Service: Graduating with honor, page 4

Villano: 'Christmas Magic' comes to Lone Tree, page 13

Way to open: Pirates drive past Alameda, 52-20, in first game at new gym, page 15

For breaking stories, more photos and other coverage of the community, visit our website at www. OurEnglewoodnews.com, the online home of the Englewood Herald.

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3-Color

Englewood Herald 3

December 13, 2013

Sloppiness cited in mental health delay Belleview, Uproar leads state to start process over By Kristin Jones

I-News at Rocky Mountain PBS Susan Beckman wants you to know that “a lot of sloppy work” — and not a conspiracy — were behind the state’s botched job of finding someone to run a network of walk-in mental health crisis centers. Beckman — a Littleton resident and former Arapahoe County commissioner — heads the administrative branch of the Colorado Department of Human Services, the office responsible for the failed solicitation process. The department has been accused of colluding with local actors — that is, local providers of mental health services — to elbow out a newcomer, but Beckman says a slew of mistakes were just human error. The department on Nov. 22 issued a new request for proposals to run the crisis centers, three weeks after deciding to rescind an award it had made on Oct. 16 to Crisis Access of Colorado, which set up shop in the state for the purpose of applying for the contract. Crisis Access is affiliated with a private Georgia-based crisis intervention company called Behavioral Health Link and Recovery Innovations, an organization with operations in Arizona, California

and Washington. Awards made to two Denverbased companies — Metro Crisis Services, to run a hotline, and Cactus Communications, for market- Beckman ing — were also scuttled. The contracts will determine who runs the keystone mental health initiative of the Hickenlooper administration. The crisis stabilization centers are meant to take pressure off of hospital emergency rooms, jails and prisons — which have become the main providers of services for people with mental illness — after decades of funding shortfalls. But so far, the piece of legislation meant to promote unity and cooperation among mental health service providers in Colorado has proven divisive, at best. Crisis Access has accused the state of making a political decision when it scrapped the contract. In a protest letter filed with the Department of Human Services on Nov. 11, the company called the decision unlawful, and alleged that the state skirted proper procedures and bowed to pressure from a consortium of local community mental health facilities that had lost out on the bid. “If there were concerns about the process, then the state should have required the regular protest procedures,” says David Coving-

ton, who left a job at Magellan Health Services to become CEO of Crisis Access. “That wasn’t done.” The state rejected Crisis Access’ protest last week. Beckman says the decision to scrap the award had nothing to do with pressure from the losing bidders. Instead, she blames plain old sloppiness for a bidding process that was “an embarrassment to the department.” Before the bid was even awarded, says Beckman, she became aware of “blatant” errors including missing scores, incorrect calculations and improper weighting. “We were wondering how we had gotten this far without checking our work,” says Beckman, adding that in retrospect, the award should never have been publicly announced. “It was just such bad timing. It was awkward. It was not good.” Her division instead referred the matter to the Colorado Department of Personnel and Administration. That office found that the bid process was not only stocked with errors, says Beckman, but didn’t meet the requirements of the legislation creating the new behavioral health crisis system, including principles of cultural competence, strong community relationships and building on existing foundations. Harriet Hall was among those who were unhappy with the way the bid went the first time. She heads the Jefferson Center for Mental Health, and is part of a

group of local partners who got together to apply to run the crisis centers. “Our sense of the competing bid was that those strong community relationships were nonexistent,” Hall says. “And yet if you looked at the scoring they were scored as high or higher as folks that have the community relationships.” But Covington says there was no requirement that the bidders have a history of operating in the state. Reviewers were impressed with Crisis Access’ focus on peer support and trauma-informed care, records show. If there’s any consensus, it’s that the state’s mistakes will be expensive to fix. A new bidding process means another costly effort by the mental health service providers applying for the job — not to mention those reviewing the proposals. Beckman says the disruption is worth it in order to re-do the bid process with a fresh crew and a clean slate. “When we’re done, everyone’s going to say, this is a really good process,” says Beckman. The state hopes to finalize the new contracts by Feb. 24 — four months later than planned. I-News is the public service journalism arm of Rocky Mountain PBS and works collaboratively with news media across Colorado. To read more, please go to inewsnetwork.org. Kristin Jones can be reached at kristinjones@rmpbs.org.

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YOUR WHOLE

COMMUNITY

University project nears end Staff report

The long-standing cone zone at Belleview and University in Arapahoe County is about to be a free-flowing intersection once again, hopefully by Christmas. An announcement from the Colorado Department of Transportation stated a final push to complete the project was initiated on Dec. 8. The final work on the project — which began in June — is slated to involve lane closures, turn restrictions and delays. The initial portion of the work involved closing the left turn lanes from University Boulevard to eastbound and westbound Belleview Avenue. The turn lanes will remain closed for the duration of the project. The CDOT announcement stated the turn lane closure is necessary to complete work on the center portion of the intersection. Weather permitting, work on the final phase of the project is scheduled to go on 24 hours a day. There also may be times when crews will close northbound University Boulevard. All construction on the intersection is scheduled to be complete by Dec. 24.

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xcelenergy.com/SaversSwitch © 2013 Xcel Energy Inc. Xcel Energy will donate to the American Red Cross $25 per Colorado customer, up to $100,000, signing up for Saver’s Switch between the dates of October 15, 2013, and December 31, 2013. This donation is not tax deductible. The American Red Cross name and emblem are used with its permission, which in no way constitutes an endorsement, express or implied, of any product, service, company, opinion or political position. The American Red Cross logo is a registered trademark owned by the American Red Cross. For more information about the American Red Cross, please visit www.redcross.org.

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Saver’s Switch is a free program that helps manage short-term electricity demands on extremely hot days. We install a small box next to your central air conditioner and give you $40 off your October energy bill for signing up. It’s just that simple. Sign up by December 31, 2013, and we’ll donate $25 to the American Red Cross. Good for your community. Good for you. Good for us all. So, why wait? To find out more or sign up, visit xcelenergy.com/SaversSwitch.

10/29/13 1:37 PM


4-Color

4 Englewood Herald

December 13, 2013

MILESTONES Education Andrew Taylor, of Englewood, earned the dean’s citation for academic excellence in the Monfort College of Business for the spring 2013 semester at the University of Northern Colorado. Carly Hamilton, of Englewood, received the Abby Marlatt Scholarship from the University of Wisconsin-Madison in recognition of excellence in the study of human ecology. Alex Berman, of Englewood, has earned National Field Hockey Coaches Association all-region recognition for the second-straight season. A graduate of Cherry Creek High

School, Alex elevated to the first-team after earning second-team all-region honors in 2012. Berman was a key part of the Denison defense which allowed only 17 goals in 19 contests this season. Berman started all 19 contests for the Big Red and has started 39 consecutive games dating back to the start of the 2012 season. Andrea Crawford, Savannah Morris, Jacob Oreskovich, Kristopher Rodgers and Ashley Signorelli, of Littleton, earned the dean’s citation for academic excellence in the Monfort College of Business for the spring 2013 semester at the University of Northern Colorado.

Thank you to our sponsors & to everyone who came out Sunday, December 1! Field Goal

TACKLING

Dogs and their new owners listen to a speaker during last December’s Freedom Service Dogs graduation ceremonies. There will be 16 graduating teams receiving diplomas at the Dec. 14 ceremonies at Hampden Hall, located on the second floor of the Englewood Civic Center, 1000 Englewood Parkway. File photo

Dogs, clients will graduate Dec. 14 Freedom Service Dog diplomas to be presented

First Down We raised more than

$12,000

Kick Off

to support the programs and services of Arapahoe/Douglas Mental Health Network!

Arapahoe House Aurora Mental Health Center Behavioral Healthcare Inc Citywide Banks Colorado Access Community Reach Center IREA

admhn.org

EXPERIENCE THE MAGIC!

By Tom Munds

tmunds@ourcoloradonews.com There won’t be caps, gowns or the traditional music but there will be 16 diplomas presented to some special canines and their respective owners during the upcoming Freedom Service Dogs graduation ceremonies. This is one of the largest graduating classes in recent history and included six professional therapy dogs as well as service dogs for 10 clients including a half dozen wounded warriors. The graduation ceremony begins at 1 p.m. Dec. 14 at Hampden Hall, located on the second floor of the Englewood Civic Center, 1000 Englewood Parkway. Freedom Service Dogs, established in 1987 to train dogs to provide assistance

to people with handicaps, has placed more than 200 dogs with clients since it was founded. All dogs entering FSD training are rescued from shelters. About half the dogs successfully complete the training, but no dog is returned to an animal shelter for not successfully completing the class because FSD locates homes for them. The training takes a little more than a year and each training program is unique because each dog is trained to perform services for a specific client such as turning on lights, opening doors and picking up items off the floor. Trainers work with the dogs and with the clients. For example, the trainer can accompany the dog-client team on field trips for on-the-spot experiences in locations like shopping malls. The organization is located at 2000 W. Union Ave. in Englewood. The facility includes exercise areas for the dogs as well as a dog training area constructed like an apartment complete with appliances and furniture.

RECOGNIZING HEROES

“Absolutely Awesome!” ~Ricardo C. “We had no idea how wonderful it would be. Thank you! Thank you!” ~Bonnie S. “Better than Manheim Steamroller!” ~Jim P. “The best Christmas Concert I’ve ever been to” ~Amanda L. “Fantastic! Such a joy…can’t wait till next year!” ~Lynette M.

Christmas Magic

Dave Villano’s

Members of the Englewood City Council shake hands with Erica Nutt and Max Murry on Dec. 2. The two Englewood Recreation Center lifeguards were among those honored for their efforts that helped save a 62-year-old man who was having a cardiac event in the rec center pool. Photo by Tom Munds

THINGS TO DO

A Holiday Concert

Traditional, Celtic & contemporary holiday music featuring 14 of Colorado’s top musicians with special guests guitar virtuoso Dave Beegle and American Idol contestant Devan Jones.

Tickets available at DaveVillano.com and at the door Military, Student, and Senior discounts available!

Thursday Dec. 12, 7PM

Thursday Dec. 19, 7PM

10 South Parkside Drive Colorado Springs

8700 Park Meadows Drive Denver (Lone Tree)

Stargazers Theatre & Events Center

Word of Life Christian Center

DEC. 12 VOLUNTEER ROUND-UP. The National Western Stock Show and Rodeo needs 150-200 volunteers in guest relations, children’s programs, horse and livestock shows, and the trade show. The 108th stock show is Jan. 11-26. To learn more about the volunteer opportunities and to set up an interview for a volunteer spot, attend the National Western volunteer roundup from 4-7 p.m. Thursday, Dec. 12, at the National Western Complex, 4655 Humboldt St., Denver. For information and to fill out a volunteer application, go to http://www.nationalwestern.com/volunteer/ or contact Kellie at 303-299-5562. DEC. 15 AARP NIGHT Join AARP at a Denver Nuggets game on Dec.

15, and bring in a children’s book suitable for ages kindergarten to third grade to donate to Serve Colorado. Stop by the AARP booth and learn about issues impacting those 50 and older. Discounted tickets are available on a first-come, firstserved basis. Go to www.nuggetstix.com/AARP1215.

THROUGH DEC. 15 GIFT CARD DRIVE. Resort 2 Kindness (R2K) hosts its BIG GIVE 2013 gift card drive to benefit the Colorado flood victims. The drive runs from Nov. 15 to Dec. 15. R2K will collect unused, unexpired gift cards valid at any restaurant, grocery store, home store or retail store in Colorado. All cards will be given to the Emergency Family Assistance Association. Gift cards can be mailed to Resort 2 Kindness, 9781 S. Meridian Blvd., Suite 200, Englewood, CO 80112. Monetary donations can also be made


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Englewood Herald 5

December 13, 2013

Honoring tHe wounded

SPECIAL

90 minute therapeutic massage for $60 First Time Clients Only Erin Woelfel 303-963-5900 Downtown Littleton on Main Street englewood herald

A number of veterans and Englewood Mayor Randy Penn, at right in coat and hat, took part in a traditional wreath ceremony Dec. 7 at the Purple Heart Memorial. Color guard member Mark Wakefield held the VFW Post 322 flag and Gerard Carter held the American flag at the state’s only memorial to men and women who have received the purple heart medal when they were wounded in action. Photo by Tom Munds

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(iSSn 1058-7837) (USPS 176-680) Office: 9137 S. Ridgeline Blvd., Suite 210, Highlands Ranch, CO 80129 PhOne: 303-566-4100 A legal newspaper of general circulation in Englewood, Colorado, the Englewood Herald is published weekly on Friday by Colorado Community Media, 9137 S. Ridgeline Blvd., Suite 210, Highlands Ranch, CO 80129. PERIODICALS POSTAGE PAID AT LITTLETOn, COLORADO and additional mailing offices. POSTMASTeR: Send address change to: Englewood Herald, 9137 S. Ridgeline Blvd., Ste. 210, Highlands Ranch, CO 80129 DeADLineS:

Email your ideas to Englewood Community Editor Tom Munds at tmunds@ourcoloradonews.com or call him at 303-566-4108.

Display advertising: Thurs. 11 a.m. Legal advertising: Thurs. 11 a.m. classified advertising: Mon. 12 p.m.

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Colorado’s Energy Resources Advanced at Colorado - Texas Energy Day in Houston Colorado has a rich and varied history in the extraction of natural resources. Fossil fuels are a natural resource which have recently seen a huge increase in development throughout the state due to advances in technology and increased global demand. At the forefront of this new mineral wealth is the production of shale oil available through new horizontal drilling and fracturing technologies. In November, the Houston chapter of the American Petroleum Institute (API) paid homage to Colorado as a key state for future oil & gas production and the South Metro Denver Chamber played a major role in the proceedings. Colorado - Texas Energy Day at the Petroleum Club of Houston included oil & gas vendor exhibits, an oil & gas executive roundtable, and the API luncheon moderated by Chamber President and CEO John Brackney with over 300 oil & gas executives present, including a contingent of South Metro Denver Chamber leaders. Sponsored by CAP Logistics, the Chamber delegation included Jacob Lorenz (Risk and Chance), Jim McGrath (Studley), Tom Wood (Willbros Construction), Torie Brazitis (City of Lone Tree), Howard Dieter (Rettew Associates), Dan Killeen (RK Mechanical), Andrew Casper (Colorado Oil and Gas Association), Jason Hallmark (Hallmark Photos), Patty Rodvold (WhippleWood CPAs), Gayle Dendinger (CAP Logistics), Emily Haggstrom (CAP Logistics), John Boner (CAP Logistics), Detlev Simonis (CAP Logistics), and Nancy Vorderstrass (CAP Logistics), Jeff Holwell (COO, South Metro Denver Chamber), John Brackney (President and CEO, South Metro Denver Chamber) and Colleen Schwake (South Metro Denver Chamber). Keynote speakers for the luncheon were Bob Fryklund, Chief Upstream Strategist for IHS and Jerry Eumont, Managing Director-Consulting, Energy & Natural Resources for IHS. Fryklund spoke on Colorado’s Energy, an Unconventional Renaissance, and Eumont spoke on the continued leadership of Texas in the industry. Throughout the day, the Colorado delegation met with several local oil & gas executives allowing them to focus on the state’s future in energy production. “This event was a great opportunity for the Chamber to showcase Colorado and a major South Metro Denver employer to the oil & gas

For a complete calendar of South Metro Denver Chamber events or more information, visit our web site at www.bestchamber.com or call 303-795-0142. Thursday, December 12th: Littleton Business Coalition Location TBD STEM-EC: Denver School of Science & Technology Site Visit DSST: Cole Middle School Campus, 3240 Humboldt St., Denver Left to right, front row: Jacob Lorenz (Risk and Chance), Jim McGrath (Studley), Tom Wood (Willbros Construction), Jerry Eumont (I.H.S), Colleen Schwake (South Metro Denver Chamber), Bob Fryklund (I.H.S), Torie Brazitis (City of Lone Tree), Andrew Casper (Colorado Oil and Gas Association) Left to right, back row: Jason Hallmark (Hallmark Photos), Patty Rodvold (WhippleWood CPAs), Gayle Dendinger (CAP Logistics), Jeff Holwell (South Metro Denver Chamber), John Brackney (South Metro Denver Chamber), Emily Haggstrom (CAP Logistics), John Boner (CAP Logistics), Detlev Simonis (CAP Logistics), Nancy Vorderstrass (CAP Logistics) Not pictured: Howard Dieter (Rettew Associates), Dan Killeen (RK Mechanical)

community of Texas. We were honored to be leading this effort in promoting our state to such an influential audience,” said Chamber COO and Director of Economic Development, Jeff Holwell. “Our CEO John Brackney and board member Gayle Dendinger of CAP Logistics were able to advocate on behalf of Colorado as a place to do business. Despite the politics of oil & gas fracturing, we are a strong energy state and we are open for business.” “Colorado has the opportunity to become a major player in the oil shale revolution and it will become an important economic driver for the state. The Chamber is honored to continue our collaboration with the energy industry. We will persist in our recruitment and advocacy and build Colorado’s energy portfolio including fossil fuels and renewable energy.”

MSU Denver Establishes Dual Enrollment Nursing Partnership with Community Colleges In an effort to establish new cost-effective education alternatives for Colorado nursing students, Metropolitan State University of Denver has partnered with Arapahoe Community College (ACC) and Front Range Community College (FRCC) to offer a dual-enrollment option that enables students to graduate in four years with a bachelor of science degree in nursing (BSN). “Employers are showing a hiring preference for graduates who have a BSN degree,” says Linda Stroup, associate chair of the MSU Denver Department of Nursing. “This initiative provides students with one of the most efficient and cost-effective pathways in the metro area for securing a bachelor’s degree in nursing.” In 2010, the Institute of Medicine issued a report recommending that the proportion of nurses with baccalaureate degrees increase from 50 to 80 percent by 2020. Based on projected nursing retirements and current graduation rates from Colorado universities, there is work to be done to address that goal, Stroup says. The RN-BSN dual-enrollment initiative will allow students to complete certain BSN elective credits at MSU Denver while finishing the required prerequisite courses from the nursing programs at their designated home school―ACC or FRCC. Once students complete their associate degrees in nursing and have accumulated 79 combined prerequisite credits, they will transition to MSU Denver to complete their BSN coursework. “We are excited about the partnership with MSU Denver and the pathway we are creating for ACC nursing students to achieve a BSN degree,” says Geri Rush, ACC director of nursing. “South metro area hospitals such as Sky Ridge Medical Center and Littleton Adventist Hospital have expressed great enthusiasm for the program and potential for clinical placements in these hospitals.” One unique advantage of the dual-enrollment program is the ability for students to secure financial aid toward classes taken at both the community college and MSU Denver. The home school will disburse financial aid for both institutions simultaneously. Previously under other similar arrangements, federal financial aid rules dictated aid could be applied only to a student’s home school coursework.

Calendar of Events

“This creates a seamless transfer for our students, especially those on financial aid,” said Sandy Veltri, FRCC associate vice president for student and academic services. “Together with our current associateto-bachelor’s degree partnership with MSU Denver, this new initiative creates even more opportunities for students.” “There is a national focus to help students better ensure academic credit transfers and we want to give students as many options as possible to obtain their degree in an efficient and cost-effective manner,” says Eric Dunker, MSU Denver Extended Campus director. “We have more than 100 courses to meet BSN general studies requirements, with classes available at multiple campuses, online or hybrid alternatives to meet each student’s needs.” MSU Denver will provide students with academic advisors to help them choose electives that will allow for degree completion in four years. Current students can access the program immediately, and the official rollout for new students will begin in Spring 2014. In addition to taking classes at MSU Denver’s primary downtown Denver campus, the University offers students satellite campus locations in Greenwood Village and Northglenn. For more information about the program visit http://www. msudenver.edu/nursing/programinformation/dualenrollment/ This program complements MSU Denver’s existing baccalaureatelevel nursing program in the Department of Health Professions, which also houses academic programs in gerontology, heath care management, human nutrition and dietetics, integrative therapies and recreation professions. MSU Denver’s baccalaureate nursing program has received full reaccreditation from the Accreditation Commission for Education in Nursing (ACEN), formerly the National League for Nursing Accrediting Commission (NLNAC). At its July 2013 meeting, the Board of Commissioners granted continuing accreditation to the program for eight years, the maximum time allowed. The first post-baccalaureate students graduated from MSU Denver’s medical laboratory science program in June 2013. The program was previously operated by the Colorado Health Foundation and is now managed by MSU Denver’s Extended Campus.

Centennial Business Coalition: Meet the Centennial City Council The Chamber Center, 2154 E. Commons Ave., Suite 342, Centennial E.L.I.T.E.: Executive Brain Tank with Adam Schlegel, CFO/CSO Snooze Eatery Snooze, Streets at SouthGlenn, 6781 S. York St., Centennial Chamber Health & Wellness Initiative / Women in Leadership Speaker Series The Chamber Center, 2154 E. Commons Ave., Suite 342, Centennial Friday, December 13th: 27th Annual Economic Forecast Breakfast: Creating a Thriving Community Hyatt Regency DTC, 7800 E. Tufts Ave., Denver Behind the Scenes Tour of CSU Powerhouse Energy Campus 430 S. College Ave., Fort Collins Saturday, December 14th: Grand Opening of Kaiser Permanente Lone Tree Offices 10240 Park Meadows Drive, Lone Tree Monday, December 16th: Save Lives & Sort Medical Supplies with Project C.U.R.E. 10337 East Geddes Ave., Centennial Tuesday, December 17th: Business Bible Study The Chamber Center, 2154 E. Commons Ave., Suite 342, Centennial Business Leaders for Responsible Government Board of Advisors The Chamber Center, 2154 E. Commons Ave., Suite 342, Centennial Wednesday, December 18th: Economic Development Group Board of Advisors The Chamber Center, 2154 E. Commons Ave., Suite 342, Centennial Southwest Metro Business Alliance Holiday Meeting Location TBD South Metro Denver Chamber Legislative Reception Location being finalized Thursday, December 19th: E.L.I.T.E. Board of Advisors The Chamber Center, 2154 E. Commons Ave., Suite 342, Centennial Friday, December 20th: Energy & Sustainable Infrastructure Council Board of Advisors The Chamber Center, 2154 E. Commons Ave., Suite 342, Centennial


6-OPINION

6 Englewood Herald

December 13, 2013

opinions / yours and ours

Help during the holidays, and beyond Almost 13 percent of Coloradans live below the poverty level, according to the most recent figures from the U.S. Census Bureau. That’s better than the national rate of more than 14 percent, but it’s still much too high. This time of year, the thought of families not being able to put food on the table — much less purchase holiday gifts — can be particularly disturbing. Maybe it should be equally as unsettling year round, but during a season of joy, and often excess, for so many, the plight of the poor stands out as a cruel contrast. Fortunately, there are avenues to help. For example, Dec. 10 was Colorado Gives Day, the annual push to raise money for nonprofits, many of which help the poor. More than $15.4 million was raised in

our view 2012, and we hope an even bigger haul was brought in this year. One of the many nonprofits helped by the effort was the Douglas/Elbert Task Force. The Castle Rock-based organization exists to provide basic necessities, like food and rent assistance, to residents of Douglas and Elbert counties in need. We applaud them for their year-round work. Recently, we were given rare insight into the plight of some of those who sought help from the task force. Colorado Community Media reporter Virginia

question of the week

What do you like best about the holidays? With Christmas just around the corner, we asked a few folks at Lone Tree’s Park Meadows shopping center what they like best about this time of year.

“Food. Anything German, green bean casserole and Christmas cookies. The food is like a present to me.” — Demi Rivera, Lone Tree

“Baking cookies, putting up Christmas lights, all the traditional activities.” — Alexis Shelton, Aurora

“It’s between the gifts and my family.” — Greg Cherabie, Centennial

“The decorations and the lights.” — Angelo Montanari, Denver

Get a haircut to get ahead Would you rather be alone, or not be alone but with one condition: You have to spend your time in bad company? Many of us would rather have companionship in a red-flag relationship, than have no relationship at all. I am not one of them. I currently have a five-year lease with Jennifer, but I spend most of my time in splendid isolation. (Jennifer lives somewhere else, with two of her three children, which is good for me. One of them needs to be driven to soccer, somewhere, on the hour. The other one would eat drywall if it had sauce on it. The kid will eat anything, and he is as skinny as a fishing rod.) Newspapers, magazines and television programs are filled with advice about hooking up with someone. I don’t think any of it really works. It’s all luck. Dating is as easy as pie. Anyone — anyone — can find someone to go out with once. The trick is to find someone you want to go out with twice, or who wants to go out with you twice. My best advice is simple. Get a haircut. Just about everyone needs a haircut. For one thing, this isn’t the Summer of Love. Please tell me what you think about this project of mine. There’s a very friendly woman who works in my grocery store. She stacks her hair like an undecided bird’s nest. The first time I saw her, I thought she had overslept, and just piled it up for the day. She piles it up every day. She needs someone to hairnap her, put her in the back of a car and take her to the nearest barbershop. This is what I am asking: Should I keep my mouth shut, or say something?

Grantier spent some time with the task force’s client service manager, Jenny Follmer. Grantier’s article, which appears this week in several Colorado Community Media publications as well as online, illustrates the very real stories of the less fortunate in a way statistics simply can’t. The two went over the files of 20 individuals and families who sought assistance on one day, and the article summarizes the needs of each applicant. It is as personal as it gets without names and faces. Even in the suburbs, this could be your neighbor, a friend in need. A small sampling: • “A Douglas County woman on disability, renter. Her ex-husband came back to Colorado with their three kids and then he left, and left the kids with her. She has

Broken records have a benefit Now I am not referring to breaking records like the most touchdowns thrown in a season, home runs hit in a career, or breaking the 3.43-minute mile. Nor am I referring to breaking other records recognized by Guinness World Records. The only record or recording that you may actually want to break is if I were to personally record a song, as I couldn’t carry a tune if it were strapped to my back. There would be true benefit to breaking that record for sure. You know the expression, “you sound like a broken record,” right? Well I am here to share with you that there are real benefits to sounding like a broken record. But then again there is the danger of being that broken record so often it begins to sound like a scratched record, nagging, and maybe even like nails on a chalkboard. We have to find the balance. For now, let’s focus on the benefits, sound fair? In many of my columns I focus on some consistent themes, words, or concepts and most if not all are characterized by a foundation of positive and encouraging intent. Some may say, and actually have accused me of sounding like a broken record when it comes to my constant promotion of showing gratitude, developing self-confidence, living with hope, the importance of staying positive, being optimistic, setting goals, and focusing on building winning relationships. Can I say thank you Zig Ziglar one more time? What we need to remember is that common sense is not always common practice, and that repetition holds its place as the “mother of learning,” the “father of success,” and even “the mother of skill.” So you see, there are many benefits to being a

Englewood Herald

9137 S. Ridgeline Blvd., Suite 210, Highlands Ranch, CO 80129 If I were to say something, I would try my best not to say, “What is wrong with your hair? Did your cat get into it?” I might say, “An attractive woman like you could use a more subtle hairstyle. Maybe one that didn’t look like you comb it with a blender.” No, that’s no good either. I’ll work on it. I have made arrangements to pay someone to cut her hair. I wonder if Bird’s Nest would be offended, or if she would be pleased that someone noticed and cared. Jennifer and I like to go to the airport and watch people, and keep track of haircuts - who needs one and who doesn’t. We have done this a number of times, and we have determined that 37 percent of the population at DIA needs a haircut. We are not the Rightful Arbiters. No one appointed us. But if someone is constantly swiping their hair, to get it out of their eyes, it’s an easy call: Get a haircut. If you still look like one of Dexys Midnight Runners, get a haircut. When I met Jennifer, she needed a

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President and Publisher Editor Assistant Editor Community Editor Advertising Director Sales Executive Business Manager Production Manager Circulation Director

We welcome event listings and other submissions. News and Business Press releases Please visit ourcoloradonews.com, click on the Press releases tab and follow easy instructions to make submissions. Calendar calendar@ourcoloradonews.com military Notes militarynotes@ourcoloradonews.com School accomplishments, honor roll and dean’s list schoolnotes@ourcoloradonews.com Sports sports@ourcoloradonews.com Obituaries obituaries@ourcoloradonews.com To Subscribe call 303-566-4100

Fax your information to 303-339-7499 Smith continues on Page 7

$85 left for bills after she pays the rent. But today, she just needs food.” • “A Castle Rock family, grandmother in her 70s, grown daughter and three granddaughters. The daughter works, but the rent is more than half her income. They come in today for clothing, food and Christmas assistance.” •“An Elbert County family, renters, three kids and husband and wife. Husband is facing several surgeries to correct past surgery. He’s in extreme pain, but works off some rent for landlord. Wife is working. They need help with food and Christmas assistance.” The holidays, of course, are a particularly busy time for the task force and groups like it. Then again, it’s always too busy.

deadline is noon Fridays.

broken record or taking the time to listen to others who may sound like a broken record but are delivering a very valuable and powerful message that could lead to our future success. So here it goes, my broken record is about to begin playing. It’s now your choice to keep on reading or listening to what I have stated repeatedly over the years, or you can simply choose to flip the page. Every one of us can reach higher, do more than we are doing for our family, our friends, and for our community. Every one of us is gifted and talented and has so very much to offer this world. We are the only ones in control of how we define, pursue, and achieve our success. Showing appreciation affords us the freedom and the power to build winning relationships that will last a lifetime. And every one of us is beautiful in the eyes of those who love us the most. I am a sucker for a broken record, I have a collection of personal and professional audio programs that I listen to over and over again. Even though I have listened to some hundreds of times over, the message still resonates and I still learn something Norton continues on Page 7

Colorado Community Media Phone 303-566-4100 • Fax 303-566-4098 Visit us on the Web at englewoodherald.net

Columnists and guest commentaries The Englewood Herald features a limited number of regular columnists, found on these pages and elsewhere in the paper, depending on the typical subject the columnist covers. Their opinions are not necessarily those of the Englewood Herald. Want your own chance to bring an issue to our readers’ attention, to highlight something great in our community, or just to make people laugh? Why not write a letter of 300 words or fewer. Include your full name, address and the best number to reach you by telephone.

email your letter to letters@ourcoloradonews.com

we’re in this together Our team of professional reporters, photographers and editors are out in the community to bring you the news each week, but we can’t do it alone. Send your news tips, your own photographs, event information, letters, commentaries... If it happens, it’s news to us. Please share by contacting us at news@ourcoloradonews.com, and we will take it from there. After all, the Herald is your paper.


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Englewood Herald 7

December 13, 2013

THINGS TO DO EDITOR’S NOTE: To add or update your club listing, email calendar@ourcoloradonews.com, attn: Englewood Herald.

Pamela Dombrowski-Wilson or Trini Martinez at 303-526-2318 for an application and information.

PROFESSIONAL

SOCIAL

AMERICAN ASSOCIATION OF UNIVERSITY WOMEN,

ARAPAHOE SERTOMA CLUB meets on Thursdays at the Englewood Elks Club, 3690 S. Jason, Englewood. Contact Ken Kelley at 303-789-9393 or kenkelley@allstate.com.

Littleton-Englewood Branch invites baccalaureates to participate in activities that further the goals of equity for women and girls, lifelong education and positive societal change. Meetings usually are Mondays each month, September through May, at Koelbel Library, Orchard Road and Holly Street, Centennial. Social time is followed by business meeting and informative program on subjects ranging from public policy issues to poetry. Call Linda Shell at 303-796-7702.

DENVER INVESTOR CLUB meets the first Thursday

each month at 7:30 p.m. at the IHOP on Clinton Street in Englewood. Call Gail Segreto at 303-810-9015 or e-mail gailsegreto@starband.net. This is a nonprofit educational club.

ENGLEWOOD CHAPTER OF THE JUNIOR CHAMBER OF COMMERCE (JAYCEES) needs men and women between

the ages of 21 and 40 to help re-establish the chapter. Jaycees work to help chapter members grow professionally and to help serve the community through hands-on projects. To become involved, call 303-914-0180 or visit www.coloradojaycees.org.

LETIP INTERNATIONAL, local chapter, is a professional

referral organization that meets at Maggiano’s at the Denver Tech Center, 7401 S. Clinton St., in Englewood. A Highlands Ranch chapter meets at LePeep’s, 7156 E. County Line Road. Call 303-789-7898 or visit www.letip.com.

NARFE (National Active and Retired Federal Employees), Chapter 1089 was merged into Chapter 81. The membership meetings are from noon to 1:30 p.m. the third Friday of every month, with an optional lunch at 11 a.m., at the American Legion Post 1, at the Southeast corner of I-25 and Yale Ave (5400 E Yale).  All current and retired federal employees are invited to attend. For information call, Hank at 303-779-4268 or Darlene at 303-771-2024. RECREATION CHERRY CREEK ANGLERS meets at 7 p.m. every second Thursday in the Lodge Meeting Room at Gander Mountain Sports, 14000 E. Jewell Ave. Call Dennis at 303-841-3612. KILOWATT EIGHTS is for people interested in square dancing. Dances are the first, third and fifth Friday each month at Malley Senior Center in Englewood. Call Ron at 303-759-4862. MOUNTAINEERS SQUARE Dance Club meets the first, third

and fifth Saturdays of the month at the Valley View Church of God, 4390 S. Lowell Blvd., Englewood, to square dance. Dances start at 8 p.m. Everyone is welcome to come and watch. This is a healthy activity for all. Call 303-798-4472.

POETRY NIGHT honors the great Edgar Allan Poe by reading poetry at The Attic Bookstore, 200 W. Hampden Ave., near Hampden and Bannock in Englewood. Take originals or an old favorite to read to others. Readings will be limited to five minutes. Sign up begins at 7 p.m. Readings begin at 7:30 p.m. All styles of poetry are welcome. Call 303-777-5352.

DAUGHTERS OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION,

Columbine Chapter meets at 1 p.m. every second Saturday at Castlewood Library, 6739 S. Unita St., Englewood. Call Michelle Brown at 303-979-7550.

DAUGHTERS OF THE BRITISH EMPIRE is a national or-

ganization with a philanthropic purpose. For almost a century, DBE has been a common bond for women of British heritage living in the United States. DBE is open to women who are citizens or residents of the U.S. who are of British Commonwealth birth or ancestry or who are married to men of British Commonwealth birth or ancestry. There are six chapters in Colorado, including chapters in Littleton, Englewood, Centennial, Evergreen and Boulder County. Call Chris at 303-683-6154 or Olive at 303-347-1311, or visit www.dbecolorado.org and use the contact form available.

SERTOMA CLUB OF DTC meets on Thursdays at Mangia Bevi Restaurant, Englewood. Contact David Oppenheim at 303-850-7888 or captdso@aol.com. EMBROIDERERS GUILD OF AMERICA COLORADO CHAPTER meets at Bethany Lutheran Church at Hampden

Avenue and Colorado Boulevard in Englewood the fourth Tuesday each month from 9:30 a.m. to noon, excluding December and July. Meetings include needlework projects, needle art education, lectures and workshops of all levels. Guests are invited. Call Marnie Ritter at 303-791-9334.

THE ENGLEWOOD LIONS CLUB meets at 7 a.m. every Thursday at the Grill at Broken Tee Golf Course, 2101 West Oxford Avenue. Previously the Lions Club met every Wednesday at noon. The change in time is being made to better accommodate working men and women in the Englewood area who are interested in serving the community. Please join the Lions for breakfast and a weekly program and learn more about Lions Club International and the activities of the Englewood Lions Club. THE ROTARY CLUB OF ENGLEWOOD meets each Wednesday at 12:15 p.m. at the Wellshire Inn, 3333 S. Colorado Blvd, Denver. For information, contact Josh Staller at 303-721-6845, or visit rotaryclubofenglewood.org. FRIENDSHIPS ARE GOLDEN, a Precious Moments collectors club, meets the fourth Thursday each month at Castlewood Library in Englewood. Dinner provided by club members at 6 p.m., meeting from 7-9 p.m. Give back to the community by doing local charity work. Talk and share stories about Precious Moments. Call Leota Stoutenger, club president, at 303-791-9283.

SERVICES

GRACE CHAPEL MOTHERS OF PRESCHOOLERS meets second and fourth Wednesdays from 9-11:30 a.m. at Grace Chapel, I-25 and County Line Road, Englewood. Call Karleen Wagner at 303-799-4900 or visit www.gracechapel.org.

HOMECOMING INC. offers caregivers of low-income seniors who are frail, disabled or unable to live alone without care in Adams, Arapahoe, Jefferson and Denver counties respite care. Assistance includes personal care and homemaking. Call

KIWANIS CLUB OF ENGLEWOOD believes it has an obligation to be involved in community projects. Members meet Wednesdays 7 a.m. at The Neighborhood Grille 1500 W. Littleton Blvd. Everyone is welcome to join and have breakfast

Smith Continued from Page 6

haircut. Every time I saw her after that I asked her, “Did you get a haircut?” I know it was annoying, but it worked. She no longer looks like one of the dancers on “Hullabaloo.” Sometimes we get stuck in a year or a decade, and we can’t let go. If you are stuck in a decade, and you are lonely, maybe you will meet someone who is

Norton Continued from Page6

new. I have read many books two and three and even four or more times, highlighting and underscoring the pages in different colors so I can see what I learned new each time. Yup, bring on those broken records, let me hear them over and over again and enjoy the benefits of applying what I hear

stuck in the same decade and is just as lonely. But if you get a contemporary haircut, you open yourself up to lots of other candidates. Here’s an example. Have you seen Melanie Griffith in “Working Girl”? After a haircut, she wound up with Harrison Ford. Harrison Ford is waiting for you, right around your next haircut. Craig Marshall Smith is an artist, educator and Highlands Ranch resident. He can be reached at craigmarshallsmith@comcast. net and learn. How about you? What are some of your favorite broken records or messages you can just never get enough of? I would love to hear all about it at gotonorton@gmail.com and as I have said each week for the past several years (broken record here) … let’s make it a better than good week. Michael Norton is a resident of Highlands Ranch, the former president of the Zig Ziglar Corporation and the CEO/founder of www.candogo.com.

WE WANT TO HEAR FROM YOU If you would like to share your opinion, go to www.ourcoloradonews.com or write a letter to the editor of 300 words or less. Include your name, full address and the best telephone number to contact you. Please send letters to letters@ourcoloradonews.com.

on Kiwanis. Call 303-783-9523.

Marina at 720-272-2846.

TOASTMASTERS - MERIDIAN MIDDAY. Experienced professionals and beginning speakers alike can benefit from our practical, face-to-face learning program. Whether you’re speaking to the board of directors, your customers, your co-workers or your kids, Toastmasters can help you do it better. We meet every Thursday from 11:35 a.m. to 12:35 p.m. at the American Family Insurance Building, 9510 South Meridian Blvd. in Englewood. For more information, contact our current VP of Membership, Brent Hilvitz at 303-668-5789. We hope you will visit us and check out Meridian Midday Toastmasters. www.meridianmidday.com

BREAST CANCER SUPPORT GROUP meets Tuesdays 5:306:30 p.m. at Swedish Medical Center, 501 E. Hampden Ave., Englewood, second floor Conference Center, Spruce B. Patients, survivors and caregivers are welcome to attend. Meetings are free and open to the public. RSVP to Kelly Topf, oncology patient care coordinator, at 303-319-8638.

NEWCOMERS AT GRACE CHAPEL in Englewood welcomes women who are new to the Denver area. Learn about the group’s ongoing Bible study, make new friends, and be encouraged about God’s faithfulness and what happens after the boxes are unpacked. Call Carolyn Chandler at 303-660-4042 for information on welcome teas, Bible study, field trips and get acquainted luncheons. ROTARY CLUB OF DENVER TECH CENTER meets from 11:45 a.m. to 1:15 p.m. Tuesdays at the Glenmoor Country Club in Englewood. Call Larry McLaughline at 303-741-1403. WIDOWED MEN AND WOMEN OF AMERICA, Come join us and make new friends and share in a variety of activities. Our monthly meetings are the third Wednesday of the month at 5 p.m. at Rox Bar and Grill, 12684 W. Indore Place, in Jefferson County. For more information call Mel at 303-973-8688or Nan at 728-981-1841. SOUTH SUBURBAN WOMEN’S CONNECTION, affiliated with Stonecroft Ministries, meets from 9-11 a.m. the second Wednesday of every other month beginning in January at Maggiano’s, 7401 S. Clinton St. The brunch includes a feature and an inspirational speaker. For details, reservations and complimentary nursery, call Rachel Lee at 303-866-1444 or e-mail rllee58@gmail.com. WHATCHA READIN’ meets at 7 p.m. monthly at The Attic Bookstore, 200 W. Hampden Ave., near Hampden and Bannock in Englewood. If having a prescribed reading list isn’t appealing, but gushing about an amazing or horrible read is, this is the right book club. Discuss books and get recommendations from other avid readers. Call 303-777-5352. SUPPORT ADULT CHILDREN OF ELDERLY PARENTS, a Denver-area group of caregivers and relatives of elderly looking for support and resources, meets twice monthly at Malley Senior Center, 3380 S. Lincoln Street, Englewood. Meetings often include speakers from medical, counseling and housing services. Call

HEPATITIS C SUPPORT GROUP. The group meets on the fourth Tuesday of every month at 1000 Englewood Parkway from 7-8:30 p.m. Contact is Deidrea at 303-504-1853. LUNG CANCER SUPPORT GROUP meets from 7-8 p.m. Tuesdays at Swedish Medical Center, 501 E. Hampden Ave., in the second-floor Conference Center, Spruce B, in Englewood. Patients, survivors and caregivers are welcome. Meetings are free and open to the public. To reserve a spot call Kelly Topf, oncology patient care coordinator, at 303-319-8638. MERIDIAN PARKINSON’S SUPPORT GROUP is a unique group. The group is open for Parkinson’s patients and their care-givers. The group will divide into patients in one group and care-givers in another at the April meeting, so that people will be able to get into particular issues and problems and share the successes and failures we experience in dealing with Parkinson’s disease.Attend meetings at 10 a.m. the third Tuesday of each month in the Sky Room of the Meridian building, 3455 S. Corona, Englewood. For more information, contact Gail Greenwood, facilitator, at 303 805 3590 NAMI SUPPORT GROUP for family members and friends of persons with mental illness meets from 7-8:30 p.m. the fourth Wednesday of the month January through October and the second Wednesday of the month November and December at Arapahoe/Douglas Mental Health Network, 155 Inverness Dr. West, second floor, Englewood. NAMI INFORMATION PROGRAMS for consumers, family members and friends meet from 7-8:30 p.m. the second Wednesday January through May and September and October at Arapahoe/Douglas Mental Health Network, 155 Inverness Dr. West, second floor, Englewood. OVEREATERS ANONYMOUS meets from 10-11 a.m. and from 7-8 p.m. Wednesdays in the Sedalia Room at New Hope Presbyterian Church, 2100 Meadows Parkway, Castle Rock. PERIPHERAL NEUROPATHY SUPPORT GROUP THE DENVER BRANCH meets from 3:30-5 p.m. the first and third

Thursdays of every month at Christ Church United Methodist, 690 Colorado Blvd., Denver; parking and entrance in the back.  For information about the Denver Branch meetings, call Dorothy Miller at 303-814-2112 or email dorthy_miller@ hotmail.com.

OBITUARIES

To place an obituary: Private Party

Contact: Viola Ortega 303-566-4089 obituaries@ourcoloradonews.com

Funeral Homes Visit: www.memoriams.com


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8 Englewood Herald

December 13, 2013

Are you drinking toilet water? Water-connection woes can cause human illness By Kristin Jones I-News at Rocky Mountain PBS

Feel like a nice cool glass of ice water? Before you take a sip, you might want to take a quick tour of your home. How’s the fill valve in your toilet? Do you have a vacuum breaker on your outside spigots? What about your boiler? Without the right plumbing bits and pieces in place, you could be at risk of drinking toilet water, sipping lawn fertilizers or slurping hazardous chemicals. If they aren’t protected, cross connections between the drinking water in your home and non-potable water sources can mean that dirty water gets mixed with the clean. It might take as little as a change in water pressure. And it’s not just in your home. Backflow can happen almost anywhere — from schools to restaurants to water treatment plants. A review of state records by I-News at Rocky Mountain PBS shows that throughout Colorado, hazardous cross connections rate among the most persistent public health risks in water distribution systems. I-News found that 30 percent of water providers

inspected by the state since 2009 were found to be in violation for something related to cross connections or backflow — most often issues related to documenting or managing risks. And 9 percent of the water systems were found to have potentially hazardous cross connections. Among schools operating their own small water systems, inspectors found cross connection issues to be even more prevalent. Roughly 47 percent were found to be in some kind of violation of cross connection or backflow rules, while risky cross connections were found in 19 percent of the schools, according to a recent analysis by the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment. If left unchecked, these routine plumbing problems can make people sick.

Hospital had trouble

Last fall, 26 people at a medical facility in Colorado Springs fell ill after drinking water that tasted and smelled odd. The building, which includes Memorial Hospital’s surgery and wound care centers, shut down until an investigation by state public health authorities identified the probable culprit: a faulty connection between the drinking water and the ventilation, or HVAC, system. Propylene glycol — an ingredient in antifreeze —

How to control cross connections A few simple steps can help protect your drinking water from contamination via backflow in your home. Hiring a backflow prevention technician or a licensed plumber is the best way to make sure your plumbing is safe. Faucets: Make sure the lower end of each faucet is at least an inch above the top edge of the sink or tub. Toilets: Lift the top of your toilet tank and look inside. Make sure the fill valve is at least an inch above the water. The bowl refill tube should also be above the water line. Boilers: Install a backflow preventer on your boiler. Otherwise, pressure from the boiler water — which is often treated with hazardous anti-corrosion chemi-

had been leaking into the pipes for three days, officials found. Investigators said other anti-corrosive chemicals may have gotten into the water, as well. NexCore Properties, which manages the building, had no comment on the state’s findings. Paula Freund, a spokeswoman for Memorial Hospital, said she’s confident the water problem has been fixed. Fred Spengler is one of a few technicians in the state trained to find and fix cross connections in homes and businesses. In Colorado, he says, it’s often older homes that have problems, or those with special features like solar panels or heated driveways. But issues turn up in mundane places, too. “Lots of the cross connections have to do with toilets,” says Spengler.

Homes at risk

A 2004 study conducted in Iowa by the University of Southern California’s Foundation for Cross Connection Control and Hydraulic Research found that nearly one in 10 homes had a direct connection to a health hazard — most often in the toilet, but also in heating and cooling systems, water softeners and outside spigots. Patrick Sylvester, the study’s project manager, said in an interview that he was surprised how many homes had faulty sewer connections — 14 of the 188 homes included in the study. Only 4 percent of the homes were fully protected from a direct or indirect cross connection, according to the USC report. “Most of the cross connections could be abated with a few dollars and a few minutes,” the study found, “but residents were un-

aware of the hazards existing in their own plumbing system.” As in larger water systems, faulty cross connections at home can cause health problems if a change in water pressure or a disruption to the water line coincides with an unprotected connection. In most instances, an illness caused by backflow would be tough to trace to its cause; it might be dismissed as a 24-hour bug. In some cases, the consequences can be serious. In Commerce City last year, Nick and Roxanne Cattaneo were awarded more than $900,000 from Aquakleen Products Inc. after their family’s sewer line was mistakenly connected to their drinking water during the installation of a water softener. Commerce City officials warned at the time that Aquakleen had installed water softeners at more than 100 households without a permit. Backflow from a household has the potential to pollute public water, too. A lawyer representing Aquakleen said the company had no comment.

Thousands of illnesses

From 1970 to 2001, according to the National Research Council, there were 12,000 reported illnesses from 459 instances of backflow. The number doesn’t catch unreported cases. “Because of the enormous range of contaminant sources involved, as well as the number of unprotected cross connections, backflow events collectively constitute the greatest potential health risk from distribution system contamination,” the National Research Council reported in 2006. In Colorado, state water

Artists Continued from Page 1

January to December. Each work of art is displayed as a full page in the calendar. The other students and the schools they attend are: Tess Bray, East High School; Jamie Valdez, Colorado’s Finest Alternative High School; Vincent Pino, Clayton Elementary School; Emilee Cirbo, Clayton Elementary School; Alize Galvan, Englewood High

cals — may be pushed into the potable water line. Garden hoses: Install a vacuum breaker on each outside spigot. Never leave a hose submerged in a bucket, hot tub or swimming pool. Contaminants from the yard can be sucked back into your drinking water. If you’re using a Miracle-Gro nozzle or other add-on to your hose, unscrew it when you’re done using it. Without a backflow preventer in place, fertilizer or other chemicals can contaminate your water. Sprinklers: Install a vacuum breaker well above the ground and above the level of all sprinkler heads in your yard, to ensure that chemicals, fertilizer or pet waste aren’t pulled into your drinking water.

quality inspectors periodically inspect larger water systems — which include anything from a school or a campground with its own well and filtration system, to a town or a city. Larger water systems like the city of Denver are required to keep records of the highest-hazard spots in their jurisdiction — places like the Denver Zoo, where the water district found in 2006 that water meant for washing down the lion’s den was mixed with employees’ drinking water. Nearly one in three water systems in the last five years has been dinged for failing to keep adequate testing records or for other backflow-related problems. Most schools aren’t routinely tested by the state — it’s left to their water providers to mitigate the risks. But schools with their own wells have a poor record of compliance.

School is example

The water system that supplies Caliche School in the northeastern Colorado town of Iliff, for example, failed to install backflow preventers in the mop sink, the auto shop and the training room, state inspectors found during the most recent inspection in 2010. School officials say the backflow preventers are now in place, and the water system is being upgraded. Officials from the state public health department downplay the risks associated with backflow, emphasizing that water pollution from a bad connection depends on a lot of things going wrong at the same time — for instance, a pressure change, an absence of protection, and the presence of a harmful contaminant. “It is a potential risk, and it is something that we evaluate,” says Ron Falco, who

School; Russell Watson, Charles Hay World School; Jake Hurtado, All Souls School; Isaiah Mendez, Cherrelyn Elementary School; Aushia Davis, Englewood Middle School; Sophie Castro, All Souls School; Shawn Michaelis, Colorado’s Finest Alternative High School; and Dominic Priefert, Clayton Elementary School. This is the 14th year Englewood has had a student calendar art contest. Olga Wolosyn, late Englewood mayor, was one of those who fostered the idea of using student art in the calendar. “Olga was the inspiration for this project,” said Leigh Ann Hoffhines,

manages the state’s safe drinking water program. “A cross connection by itself isn’t a contamination.” The state rarely punishes water providers solely for problems related to cross connections — even in cases of repeated problems. However, they acknowledge that the state regulations need updating — in part to offer more guidance to small, cash-strapped systems. After a salmonella outbreak in the southern Colorado city of Alamosa in 2008 that was unrelated to backflow, a team of investigators called for a series of reforms to prevent future incidents of waterborne illness, including updating state regulations related to cross connections. Four years after that report came out, however, the old rules are still in place. The outdated regulations don’t mention specific hazards to look out for — things like chemical laboratories, aircraft manufacturing facilities or mortuaries. They also don’t spell out specific backflow prevention methods or set testing standards. Falco, who was lead author of the 2009 report on Alamosa, says that the current rules don’t pose any risk to the public. He said that inspectors have stepped up surveillance of backflow-related risks since 2009, and expects to see improvements in water providers’ records. The new rules are expected to launch by January 2015. I-News is the public service journalism arm of Rocky Mountain PBS and works collaboratively with news media throughout Colorado. To read more, please go to inewsnetwork.org. Kristin Jones can be contacted at kristinjones@rmpbs.org

the city’s communications specialist, who oversees the calendar project. “We always honor all the sponsors who help make the calendar possible. Well, Olga’s mother Bernice always sends us a check every year for the project in memory of her daughter.” Hoffhines said this year’s contest drew more than 150 entries. A committee spent quite a few hours selecting the top 50 art works. Thirteen of the top 50 art works have been used as full-page displays in this year’s calendar. However, smaller pictures of the other 36 works will also be included in the calendar.


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Englewood Herald 9

December 13, 2013

Road work finished on US 85 New 4-lane stretch of Santa Fe Drive open By Virginia Grantier

vgrantier@ourcoloradonews.com

This is an artist concept of the site layout for the Chick-fil-A restaurant that is proposed for Broadway and Dartmouth. The project extends west to Acoma Street. The city council will hold a public hearing on the rezoning request on Dec. 16 Courtesy art

Hearing Continued from Page 1

Audra Kirk, Englewood planner, presented the proposal to the city council at the Dec. 2 meeting. She said the request to rezone the site as a planned unit development is necessary because the current MUB2 and MURA zoning doesn’t permit a drive-thru restaurant. “The Englewood Planning and Zoning Commission held a public hearing on the proposal on Nov. 5,” she told the council. “They forwarded the request to the council without conditions.” The proposal calls for a right-in, rightout entrance on Broadway and a full access entrance on Acoma Street. Kirk said a traffic study predicted increased traffic on Acoma, but the traffic will be within the volume of traffic found on some other local streets. “The traffic study suggested lengthening some left-turn lanes on Broadway and Dartmouth and restricting parking on the east side of Acoma adjacent to the Chickfil-A property,” she said. “The proposal also would vacate a south portion of the alley between Acoma and Broadway and relocate the entrance and exit to the alley farther north on Acoma.”

Kirk said the subdivision amendment is required as part of the project, particularly the vacation of the southern portion of the alley while creating a 90-degree turn that will take alley traffic onto the entrance into the restaurant from Acoma Street. Councilmember Jill Wilson said she looks forward to the public hearings so she can hear from the company and from the residents. Councilmember Joe Jefferson agreed. He also talked about traffic. “Traffic is a big issue for area residents,” he said. “I would ask that the city traffic engineer be at the public hearing to provide information when we discuss the issue of traffic.” In keeping with city requirements, the company held a neighborhood meeting July 31 at Mayflower Church about the Chick-fil-A proposal. About 35 people attended the meeting. Residents who spoke at the meeting were primarily concerned with the increased traffic on Acoma and alteration of the alley route. Steve Lewis, senior development manager for Chick-fil-A, attended the meeting and told the resident he heard and understood their concerns. “We will work with our designers and with the city to see what we can do to address the issues raised at this meeting,” he said.

Santa Fe Drive, from C-470 to Louviers, is now in that entire stretch a fourlane road because of the recent completion of a 1.3-mile section between Highlands Ranch and Louviers. The project, which cost $7.9 million and took almost 14 months to complete, also involved construction of two new bridges, new medians, curbs and gutters, a new storm drain system, detention ponds, landscaping and signing. Jody Allen, a project engineer for the Colorado Department of Transportation (CDOT), told Colorado Community

Media Dec. 9 that there weren’t any accidents during construction or major problems. Another positive: “One of the bridges provides passage for wildlife,” she said. Douglas County contributed $4 million toward the project and the state’s FASTER program contributed $2.4 million to the project, according to a past press release from CDOT. The speed limit on US 85 in that section, reduced to 40 mph during construction hours, is now back up to 55. There is still more work to do. Allen said that U.S. 85 is about 15.2 miles long from Douglas County’s county line south to Meadows Parkway. About 8.5 miles of that is now four-lane road, with about 6.7 miles still to be done. For more information, go to www.coloradodot.info.

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South Metrolife 10-Life-Color

10 Englewood Herald December 13, 2013

Rush’s show edges Rosen

Temple at Agrigento. Sicily. 6th Century B.C. is part of Sicily’s 10,000 years of recorded history. Photo courtesy of Christine Khorsand

Littleton resident sets up journey for 2014 By Sonya Ellingboe

sellingboe@ourcoloradonews.com Aix-en-Provence, Arles, Luberon, Marseille, Orange, Palermo, Agrigento, Siracusa, Taormina and more … Travelers interested in art and architectural history will find “food for the soul” on a daily basis as they embark on a tour offered May 17 to June 4 by veteran traveler Christine Khorsand of Littleton. Khorsand taught at Arapahoe Community College from 1991 to 2011 (French, Spanish, art history). And starting in 1993, she arranged summer art-related, faculty-led study trips to France and Italy for students and others. Tour members could paint, take photographs, study art history and French in various combinations, in various years — at various locations. When she retired, she started her own company: Christine’s Travels. ACC art professor Susan Goggins, who was on many of those trips, will be the art history lecturer in 2013. Many previous trips began, as this one does, with time in Aix-en-Provence, where Khorsand grew up — a city related to the others she plans to visit by reflecting thousands of years of accumulated layers of culture. One finds Roman and Greek ruins (an ancient theater is retrofitted to host jazz concerts), Medieval and Renaissance, Classical and Baroque and the landscapes that attracted the famous painters: Van Gogh, Cezanne, Picasso and more… Field trips by bus will visit surrounding points of interest,

while travelers will stay in Aix for eight nights. Next, a flight from Marseille will carry travelers to Palermo in Sicily for touring from May 25 to June 4, with stays at several different towns — and travel again by private bus. Sicily also has been home to dozens of civilizations, which have left a mark. Khorsand said she had not been there previously and she just returned from an extended visit, where she determined a route, visited ancient cultural sites, towns and prospective hotels and arranged for bus transportation — and built her level of excitement about its wonders. The estimated cost is $3,300, based on double occupancy, assuming the price of the euro doesn’t change dramatically. A deposit of $1,000 will be due by Jan. 15, 2014, so she can reserve hotels and transportation. That amount does not include round trip airfare from Denver to Marseille (probably about $1,000), but Khorsand will be happy to assist with the numerous choices. She thinks some people might want to spend some time in Paris before or after this excursion, for example, and she can help with arrangements. The limit would be 20 travelers, she says, and a minimum of 12 is needed for it to work financially. It might be possible to do one segment or the other as long as the minimum is covered. For more information, contact Khorsand at 720-261-8452, ckhorsand@msn.com

Handmade gifts add spice to holidays Unique items are offered by artists, craftsmen By Sonya Ellingboe

sellingboe@ourcoloradonews.com Now that Black Friday and Cyber Monday are over, shoppers might consider some close-to-home locations that sell items created by local artists and craftsmen. No two pieces of art are exactly alike, but all are created with great pride and skill. And these colorful, inviting places are relaxed, casual and fun to visit. We cite a few ongoing, year-round shops and galleries, rather than short-term artisan markets (which we also recommend.) In Littleton: • Depot Art Gallery, 2069 W. Powers Ave., is housed in a historic 1881 Santa Fe Railroad depot that served Littleton when early rail lines came to town. During the U.S. bicen-

In the Depot Art Gallery’s baggage room, an array of handmade gifts are available. Photo courtesy of Dustin Ellingboe tennial celebration, the depot was turned into an art gallery through a major effort by the Littleton Fine Arts Guild, with community support. It is owned and maintained by the City of Littleton and operated by members of the Littleton Fine Art Guild, who volunteer. For the holidays each year, it schedules “The Holiday Express,” a show/sale of crafts and small fine arts by members and invited artists. Here

one will find whimsical rotund ceramic critters, glass art, tree decorations, note cards, angels, animal wall plaques for a child’s room, scarves, jewelry, photographs (I especially liked an egret) and inexpensive matted paintings and prints. Open 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Wednesdays through Sundays. 303-7950781. • The Pottery Gallery Studio, 5739 S. Curtice St., is operated by potter Kim Louise Glidden

in a former Buick dealership garage in historic downtown Littleton. She represents more than 50 artists, including potters, sculptors, metal workers, jewelry makers and painters. 303-738-2275. • Willow — an Artisans Market, 2400 W. Main St. in downtown Littleton, is operated by Helen Rice. It represents more than 200 artists — most from Colorado — who create jewelry, pottery, garden art, greeting cards, clothing, accessories, glassware, paintings and prints. 303-730-8521. In Castle Rock: • Art on the Edge, 314 Wilcox St., is run by the Greater Castle Rock Art Guild, open Tuesdays through Sundays, which has a range of paintings, artwork called “Small Packages” (not larger than 12”x12”) and other gift items made by members. Also on exhibit: “Everything Watercolor” with works by Paul Valdez and Marcia Ames. 303814-3300. We will be interested in learning from readers about more locations in our south suburbs that feature original, locally created arts and crafts such as these.

Radio talk show conservative Mike Rosen, who turned 69 Dec. 5, is taking his show to a slightly different time slot beginning Jan. 2. “KOA (850 AM) is about the only station in the country that delays Rush (Limbaugh) two hours,” Rosen told me on his birthday. “The parent company of Clear Channel decided to (air) Rush live from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. `The Colorado Morning News’ show with Stefan (Tubbs) and April (Zesbaugh) will move to 5 a.m. to 10 a.m. and become five hours instead of four.” Changing the `Rush Limbaugh Show’ to live time left Rosen with the 1 to 3 p.m. time slot after working a 9 a.m. to noon spot. “I understand and it’s fine with me,” Rosen told me. “I’m on the air one less hour, which makes me on the air five hours less a week. But with show prep (answering emails, contacting advertisers, etc.), I still work 70 hours a week. So many people listen to my show online, so for them nothing will change.” Rosen said his contract with Clear Channel lasts another 1½ years, then he’ll see what happens. “I take it one contract at a time,” he said.

Manning minds manners

Perhaps the sure way to secure an autograph from Broncos quarterback Peyton Manning is to invite him to your wedding. Sounds more tidy than playing the postgame waiting game or bidding beaucoup bucks on a signed jersey during a charity auction. In the case of Anna and James, a couple with a wedding last fall, all they had to do was send No. 18 a formal invitation, according to a post on Reddit. A photo of the signed invite went viral after a Redditor “Lackadaisical Romp” posted the pic of the wedding invitation sent by his sister. Not only did Manning show his Southern gentlemanly manners by responding in a timely manner, but he checked off the “regretfully decline” box and added the inscription, “Anna and James, Best Wishes.” A Yahoo.com poster quipped, “Perhaps our favorite comment about the photo comes courtesy of Redditor `MasterSplinter21’ who writes, `Eli (Manning) replied too, but his response was intercepted.’ Even with two Super Bowl rings and the Giants’ current winning streak, poor Eli still gets treated like the little brother.”

Christkindl returns

Denver’s 13th annual Christkindl Market at Skyline Park on the 16th Street Mall and Arapahoe (across from the D&F Tower and ice skating rink) brings a German flair to Christmas shopping and entertainment through Dec. 21. This year’s market — Colorado’s largest and most authentic Christkindl venue — will be bigger and better than ever by adding more music, more beer and Gluehwein (mulled red wine), entertainment and more holiday spirit. Hours are 11 a.m. to 7 p.m. Sundays through Thursdays and 11 a.m. to 9 p.m. Fridays and Saturdays. Penny Parker’s “Mile High Life” column gives insights into the best events, restaurants, businesses, parties and people throughout the metro area. Parker also writes for Blacktie-Colorado.com. You can subscribe and read her columns (Monday, Wednesday and Friday) at www.pennyparker.blacktie-colorado.com. She can be reached at penny@ blacktie-llc.com or at 303-619-5209.


11-Color

Englewood Herald 11

December 13, 2013

Novel tells rousing tale of 1890 Denver Young lawyer plays role of truth-seeker By Sonya Ellingboe

sellingboe@ourcoloradonews.com “About half a dozen regular customers leaned on the bar in Murphy’s Denver Saloon … as good as any spot to spend the hot summer morning …” Then two angry men stormed in and a fight ensued over the attentions both had paid to a lady of the night, a “soiled dove.” At about that time, Andrew Coyle, Esq., a newly minted lawyer from Philadelphia, arrived by train and saw policemen escorting a prisoner along the street. He took the cable car to 17th and Larimer Streets and headed for the classy Windsor Hotel … Familiar names of buildings and businesses add to the fun of solving a mystery. Before he embarked on writing “Murder in the Rockies,” author G. Eldon “Gary” Smith had read a great deal of Denver history, circa 1890 — books by Tom Noel, Phil Goldstein and especially “Hell’s Belles: Prostitution and Vice in Early Denver” by Clark Secrest. (The third-generation Longmont native, who now lives in Centennial, notes that Secrest was two classes ahead of him at Longmont High School. ) “As I was doing my research about early days in Colorado, I kept coming across the year 1890 as a time when many events took place. It soon be-

Murder in the Rockies” by G. Eldon Smith is a murder mystery set in 1890s Denver and nearby mountain communities. Courtesy photo came apparent that my novel was going to take place in 1890. I put down the basic premise and the beginning and end of my novel and let the characters tell their own story. Many characters I had not forseen entered the story and changed the plot. I just used spell check and left the story up to the characters.” And he has a grand assortment of characters — some we have read about in history books and others who are figments of Smith’s imagination. They actually are reasonably well under the author’s control most of

the time. They cross paths in downtown Denver — described as it was then, visit restaurants and bars and courtrooms. Coyle defends a rancher accused of murdering a miner, although Coyle is convinced of his innocence. Smith said he had visited all the locations mentioned in the novel — some during Tom Noel’s and Dennis Gallagher’s historic walking tours/ lectures. Coyle had to do a quick study on Colorado statutes and had to figure out how to locate the actual murderer of Henry Defler, since he was certain his first client, Will Conway, was innocent — unfortunately, he had been heard to threaten Defler in that opening bar scene and most in town considered him guilty. The reader travels with the young attorney to Idaho Springs and up into mining country in search of the truth and Smith describes the dry, dusty, rutted roads and miner’s claims as we encounter other gun-toting characters. Coyle Esq. finally figures it out in Sherlockian manner, outwitting the murderer. (A local sheriff is discovering Arthur Conan Doyle’s books and talks of the technology such as fingerprint analysis.) And then, there is the pretty haberdasher’s daughter … “Murder in the Rockies” by G. Eldon Smith is available at all Tattered Cover stores in a $15.95 trade paperback. It would fit well in a scene with a big cozy chair and a cup of hot cocoa.

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12-Color

12 Englewood Herald

December 13, 2013

Dwyer behind Lone Tree show Many area theater fans will remember Paul Dwyer from the late, lamented Country Dinner Play House, where he acted, directed and produced more than 100 productions over many years, according to a reprint of a 2008 Denver Post story. He is now working with Starkey Theatrix and will direct a return performance to Lone Tree Arts Center of “Home for the Holidays,” which he worked with last season as well. It will have new material and cast members, yet retain its warm family-oriented flavor as more than 50 performers sing, dance and entertain. The production runs Dec. 12-22, with evening and matinee performances. Lone Tree Arts Center is located at 10075 Commons Street, Lone Tree. See LoneTreeArtsCenter.org for times and ticket prices, or call the box office, 720-509-1000.

Wind ensemble show

“High Country Holidays” is the title for Colorado Wind Ensemble’s Dec. 14 concert, at 7:30 p.m. at Littleton United Methodist Church, 5894 S. Datura St., Littleton. Local composer David Hanson’s “Fanfare for Mountains and Plains” will be featured, as will Christmas, Hanukkah and classical music. A benefit bake sale follows the con-

gested for visitors. Info@highlandsranchhistoricalsociety.org, 641-715-3900, ext. 147406#.

Spotlight on Spotlight

cert, plus a sale of $25 King Soopers Reward Cards. Tickets: $15/$12/$5 at the door or online at coloradowindensemble.org. Information: 303-394-4552.

South Park stories

Author Christie Wright will give a slide lecture based on her new book: “South Park Perils: Short Ropes and True Tales” for the Dec. 16 meeting of the Highlands Ranch Historical Society at 7 p.m. at Southridge Recreation Center, 4800 McArthur Ranch Road, Highglands Ranch. She will give a brief overview of Park County history and a look at some of the historic outlaw and murder stories from the second half of the 19th century. A book sale and signing will follow. Free for members, $1 donation sug-

Spotlight Performing Arts Center, 6328 E. County Line Road, Highlands Ranch, announces two performances and three auditions: “Annie,” a full-length musical production, will be at 7 p.m. Dec. 13-14. Tickets: $12 at the door. A “Holiday Variety Show” will be at 7 p.m. Dec. 20 and 2 p.m. Dec. 21. Tickets: $5, will provide food, clothing, gifts for those in need this holiday season. (Good opportunities for prospective students to see how this school operates.) Auditions are slated: Dec. 20, 4 p.m. — “Sound of Music” for teens and children 5 and older. Now to January — “Winnie the Pooh” for ages 3 to 9. Now to January — “Bye Bye Birdie” for teens and children 5 and older. Call to audition at 720-443-2623. Information: spotlightperformers.com.

It’s a thriller

Bestselling authors James Rollins and Rebecca Cantrell will introduce their new novel in the “Order of the Sanguines Series”: “Innocent Blood.” They will appear at

the Tattered Cover, 2526 E. Colfax Ave., at 7 p.m. Dec. 13 to discuss a mystery in which the answers are found in a gospel written in Jesus’ own blood. Archaeologist Erin Granger returns to the scene. (The pair will also appear at Old Firehouse Books in Fort Collins at 2 p.m. Dec. 14.)

Local authors

Sherry Ray of Centennial has just released “Finding Traction: Recapture Your Drive at Work,” which can be found at Ray’s website: sherryray.myshopify.com/ collections/frontpage/products/findingtraction. Ginny Mellick of Castle Rock has a new book called “Where Have All the Angels Gone?” which deals with the heart-wrenching experience of losing a child, and helpful responses. Available from: Dorrance Publishing ($8), dorrancebookstore.com.

Concert at church

“Jingle, Jangle, Jive” is a concert by the Denver Gay Men’s Chorus at 2 p.m. Dec. 15 at St. Andrew’s United Methodist Church, 9203 S. University Blvd., Highlands Ranch and 7:30 p.m. Dec. 18 and 19 at the Newman Center, 2344 E. Iliff Ave., Denver. Tickets are available at rmarts.org or call 303-325-3959.

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13-Color

Englewood Herald 13

December 13, 2013

Villano brings it on for Christmas Musician hopes for large crowd at Lone Tree church By Sonya Ellingboe

sellingboe@ourcoloradonews.com For the multi-talented Dave Villano, presenting his “Christmas Magic” concert at Word of Life Christian Center in Lone Tree on Dec. 19 is a particular pleasure. It’s in home territory. The 1996 Highlands Ranch High School graduate, who had started his first band at 13 and won a high school talent contest before he graduated, spent a few years away in Nashville, playing with a Christian band called Shaded Red and with others; underwent heart surgery; recovered; toured; wrote and recorded. In 2000, he moved back to Denver and continued his career as a successful, national, independent recording artist and performer at churches, arts and music festivals nationwide — selling his CDs as he travels and performs. He now lives in unincorporated Arapahoe County. When in town, he enjoys time with nearby family members — his parents still live in Highlands Ranch and siblings are close also. His brother Ed, an engineer by profession — and a percussionist with the

if you go The Word of Life Christian Center is located at 8700 Park Meadows Drive, Lone Tree. The concert is scheduled at 7 p.m. Dec. 19. Tickets are $20/$10/$5, in advance, with adult tickets costing $25 at the door, DaveVillano.com.

band — helps out as assistant producer when it’s holiday concert time. Both said that next year the band will transition to year round scheduling, with a series of outdoor summer concerts and expanded venues for Christmas concerts — hopefully in Fort Collins and maybe Boulder. This year, they performed Dec. 12 at Stargazers Theatre in Colorado Springs. The band’s special sound could be related to inclusion of some unusual instruments: Tina Gugler, for example, is a U.S. National hammered dulcimer champion and Eric Olson is well known for his performances on Uillean pipes, a smaller Irish form of bagpipe where the bellows are pumped with the elbow. Dave Villano plays an Irish pennywhistle, electric violin, guitar, Uillean pipes and more. Ed Villano plays a stumpf fiddle. Dave is proud that band member Dave Beegle, who was once Villano’s guitar

Dave Villano’s band includes: Top, l to r: Matt Weesner, keyboards; Christian Teel, drums; Devan Jones, vocals; Frank Lynn violin; Dave Villano, electric guitar, Irish whistle; Taylor Mesple, keyboards; Eric Olson, Uillean pipes. Seated: Michael Olson, Bass Guitar; Tina Gugler, hammered dulcimer; Taylor Jordan, vocals; Dave Beegle, electric guitar; Ed Villano, percussion, stumpf fiddle. The band will appear in Lone Tree on Dec. 19. Courtesy photo teacher, was named “Best Independent Guitarist of the Year” by Guitar Player magazine. “Through Dave, I met other players,” he said. The band leader was enthused about new vocalist Devan Jones, an “American Idol” contestant, as “filled with charisma, energy, soul …” He said he tries to find the best possible local talent and found James

by googling “American Idol, Denver,” which brought up a YouTube video. (Vocalist Taylor Jordan was also an “American Idol” contestant.) The band’s music is described as “traditional, Celtic, and contemporary holiday music … running the full gamut of musical experience … from classical to folk, rock and everything in between.”

Holiday Worship T H E BI RT H CHRISTMAS EVE SERVICES:

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St. Luke’s United Methodist Church

8817 S. Broadway • Highlands Ranch 80129

w w w. a l ls ai nt s m i n ist r y. c om

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Celebrate God’s Gift to Us

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Christmas Cantata

December 15th – 8 and 10:30 am

Christmas EvE sErviCE

4 pm Family Worship Service 7 and 9 pm, Candlelight Service with Holy Communion Childcare available at all services.

Joy LUTHERAN CHURCH, ELCA

7051 East Parker Hills Ct. • Parker, CO 303-841-3739 • www.joylutheran-parker.org

Candlelight Communion Christmas Eve Service

Sunday School 9:15 a.m. Sunday Service 10 a.m.

Christmas Eve Service 5 p.m. wellofhopechurch.org

Come with questions. Come as you are. Located at DCS Montessori School 311 Castle Pines Parkway Castle Pines, CO 80108 720.295.4271 woh.elca@gmail.com

Tuesday, Dec. 24, 5:30 p.m.

A CHURCH FOR ALL GENERATIONS

GracePoint

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Belleview Ave.

COMMUNITY CHURCH

Orchard Rd.

GRACEPOINT

COMMUNITY CHURCH

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Come Celebrate our Lords Birth!

Broadway

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90 E. Orchard Rd., Littleton

Arapahoe Rd. Dry Creek County Line Rd. C 470

University Blvd.

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JOY

S out h Bro a d w ay C h r i sti an C hu rc h D e c e mb e r 2 4 t h at 3 pm 2 3 L i nc ol n St re e t , D e nve r 8 0 2 0 3

CHILDREN’S: 1:00 & 3:00pm TRADITIONAL: 5:00 & 7:00pm COMMUNION: 9:00pm

IN

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OF

A well-staffed nursery is always available

303.798.6387 www.gracepointcc.us


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14 Englewood Herald

December 13, 2013

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Englewood Herald 15 December 13, 2013

pirates girls roll to victory Englewood beats Alameda 52-20 in first game in new gym By Tom Munds

tmunds@ourcoloradonews. com Cheers and pep band music rocked the walls of Englewood’s new north gymnasium when several hundred fans ignored the snow and cold Dec. 4 to fill the stands as the Englewood High School girls basketball team faced Alameda in the first varsity game in the facility. Winter sports competitions were held in the EHS Fieldhouse for about half a century. But this year, all the winter sports teams will be in the north gymnasium for home contests because the field house is undergoing total remodeling as part of the project creating a sevenththrough 12th-grade campus on the high school site. Before the Dec. 4 varsity contest, Superintendent Brian Ewert tossed up the ball for the ceremonial tipoff in the new gymnasium When the game started, Alameda scored the first basket but it was all Englewood from there as they rolled to a 52-20 win. “It is great to start the home court season with a win like this,” Coach Thomas Rode said after the game. “There was a lot of emotion surrounding tonight’s game as our brand new program came into this brand new gym to play rival Alameda.” He said the crowd was amazing as they cheered and screamed for Englewood teams playing at all three levels, freshman, junior varsity and varsity. The win gave the Pirates a 1-1

season record after they lost the Dec. 3 opener at Denver North, 34-30 before besting Alameda. For their next game, Englewood was to travel to Sheridan Dec. 6, and then they were to return home Dec. 13 against Jefferson. They wrap up the December portion of their schedule on the road Dec. 17 against Arvada. On Dec. 4, after Ewert’s role in the ceremonial tipoff, Alameda scored two points on a layup before Englewood’s offense got rolling. The home team then pushed the ball up the court and scored on layups as well as outside shots, outscoring Alameda 19-2 through the rest of the quarter. Englewood’s lead stretched to 27-9 at halftime as Elijah Daughtry spearheaded the attack with 18 first-half points. “It was a special night and I had a good time,” Daughtry said after the game. “It was special to play the first game in the new gymnasium. It was great going against a rival like Alameda and it was a big boost for our team to have a big crowd in the stands cheering us on.” She said this is her senior season and she took the court ready to play. For the game, she scored 23 points, pulled down 10 offensive rebounds and five rebounds off the defensive boards and blocked two shots. Her scoring included a pair of 3-pointers and 16 points on pullup jump shots. She smiled and said those shots were from her spot on the floor and she said it was a great way to start the season. Rode substituted frequently so that everyone on the roster got into the game, but the team continued to click and went on to win the game, 52-20. Game statistics show Miranda

Englewood’s Kadie Kavinsky (00) drives in for a layup during a Dec. 4 game against Alameda. Englewood won 52-20 to open the school’s new gym with a victory. Photo by Tom Munds Holman had six points, pulled down six rebounds and had a team-high five steals. Senior Kadie Kavinsky contributed to the win as she had seven points and three steals. “It was a good game for me and, since Alameda is one of favorite rivalry games of the season, it felt good to get this win,”

she said. “Our new coach pushes us hard to help us improve our play and that showed up in how we did tonight.” She said the night was special with the new gym and all the fans in the stands. “I was surprised to see so many people come out tonight,” she said. “Even one of the of-

ficials commented about our good, enthusiastic fans. I told him we were lucky to have them.” Kavinsky said her goals for the season are to get closer to her teammates and to be a senior leader. “I also want to work on getting off more shots and scoring more points,” she said.

Englewood wrestlers open season on mats Pirates split squad, grapple at two tourneys By Tom Munds

tmunds@ourcoloradonews.com

Englewood’s Kenny Gelinas works to turn his Regis opponent onto his back during the quarterfinals of the Dec. 7 Warrior Invitational Wrestling Tournament at Arapahoe High School. Gelinas won the match, 3-0 to advance to the 285-pound semifinals. Photo by Tom Munds

Englewood wrestling coach Jim Potter pointed to the fact that he has a young team as the reason he took only five kids to the Dec. 7 Arapahoe Warrior Invitational, while the remainder of his team traveled to a JV tournament at Fairview on Saturday. “I brought five wrestlers, a senior, three sophomores and a freshman to the Warrior Invitational,” Potter said. “I left it up to the underclassmen and four of them decided to come here and I agreed because I felt this would be good experience against top caliber competition. The other kids went to the Fairview JV tournament which will help them get experience and mat time at their level of competition.” Freshman Sam Westra (132), sophomores Tristan Cassilwatts (138), Kevin Mahler (195) and Ben McFarland (220)

and senior Kenny Gelinas (285) competed at the Warrior Invitational. Gelinas was the only Englewood wrestler to place, finishing sixth. The senior typically faces a tough battle at 285, because his opponents usually have a weight advantage. For example, in the Warrior Invitational championship quarterfinal, Gelinas — who weighs about 240 pounds — wrestled Mitch Howard of Regis who weighs about 280. “He was big and it is difficult to take him down, but I scored the points and won the match,” said Gelinas, who topped the Regis wrestler, 3-0. “I have worked hard to get better and I’ve come into the season stronger and faster than I was last season,” he said. “I know more moves this season and my wrestling techniques are better. I am working to get in better physical condition and improve my stamina and I am looking for this to be a pretty good wrestling season for me.” The Pirates wrestled their first home match Dec. 11 against Alameda after the Herald went to press, and will close out the 2013 portion of the 2013-14 schedule Dec. 14 at Denver North.


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December 13, 2013

Prep sports Scoreboard ENGLEWOOD HIGH SCHOOL Boys basketball Englewood 55, Summit 49 Sean Bowering has started to

find his shooting touch as he scored a team-high 18 points and also led the Pirates in rebounds with nine coming on the defensive side of the ball. Isaiah Mestas had five assists and Austin Trail recorded seven steals.

points, while Austin Trail had three assists and Sean Bowering had six rebounds.

Englewood 31, Berthoud 47 In a loss against Berthoud, Isaiah Mestas netted 12

Boys basketball

UPCOMING GAMES

PREP SPORTS SCOREBOARD Would you like to see your team on the board? Contact sports reporter Kate Ferraro at kferraro@ourcoloradonews.com. Or go to ourcoloradonews.com and click on the prep sports logo.

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Castle Rock

All major health plans accepted. Remember to use your benefits before they expire.

Highlands Ranch

Highlands Ranch

1200 South Street Castle Rock, CO 80104 303.688.3047 www.fumccr.org

Services:

Saturday 5:30pm Sunday 8am, 9:30am, 11am Sunday School 9:15am Little Blessings Day Care www.littleblessingspdo.com

Open and Welcoming

Sunday Worship

“Loving God - Making A Difference” 

A place for you

 Franktown

  

Trinity Lutheran Church & School

Sunday Worship 8:00 & 10:45 a.m. Trinity Lutheran School & ELC (Ages 3-5, Grades K-8)

Alongside One Another On Life’s Journey

You are invited to worship with us:

8:00 am Chapel Service 9:00 & 10:30 am

www.st-andrew-umc.com

Grace is on the NE Corner of Santa Fe Dr. & Highlands Ranch Pkwy. (Across from Murdochs)

Sunday School 9:00 & 10:30 am

303-798-8485

9203 S. University Blvd. Highlands Ranch, 80126

Littleton

(Next to RTD lot @470 & University)

303-791-3315

pastor@awlc.org www.awlc.org

Sunday

8:30 a.m. 11:00 a.m.

1609 W. Littleton Blvd. (303) 798-1389 • www.fpcl.org

Welcome Home!

Weaving Truth and Relevance into Relationships and Life

worship Time 10:30AM sundays 9:00am Spiritual Formation Classes for all Ages 90 east orchard road littleton, co

303 798 6387

Saturday 5:30pm

Sunday 8:00 & 10:30am

Education Hour: Sunday 9:15am Joyful Mission Preschool 303-841-3770 7051 East Parker Hills Ct. • Parker, CO 303-841-3739 www.joylutheran-parker.org

Lone Tree

Church of Christ

Currently meeting at: 9220 Kimmer Drive, Suite 200 Lone Tree 80124 303-688-9506 www.LoneTreeCoC.com

Connect – Grow – Serve

Sunday Worship

8:45 am & 10:30 am

Parker

Community Church of Religious Science Sunday services held in the historic Ruth Memorial Chapel at the Parker Mainstreet Center

...19650 E. Mainstreet, Parker 80138

New Thought...Ancient Wisdom Sunday Service

& Children’s Church 10:00 a.m.

Visit our website for details of classes & upcoming events.

303.805.9890

Denver Tech Center

Parker evangelical Presbyterian church

9030 Miller road Parker, Co 80138 303-841-2125 www.pepc.org

Lone Tree

Sunday Worship - 10:00am Bible Study immediately following Wednesday Bible Study - 7:30pm

8391 S. Burnley Ct., Highlands Ranch

Worship Services Sundays at 9:00am

SErviCES:

www.gracecolorado.com

 303-841-4660 www.gracepointcc.us www.tlcas.org  To advertise your place of worship in this section,  call 303-566-4091 or email kearhart@ourcoloradonews.com.



Parker

Joy

GRACE PRESBYTERIAN

Sundays at 10:00 am

 Sunday Worship 10:30  4825 North Crowfoot Valley Rd. Abiding Word  Castle Rock • canyonscc.org Lutheran Church 303-663-5751



Parker

LUTHERAN CHURCH, ELCA

Open hearts. Open minds. Open doors.

303-794-2683 Preschool: 303-794-0510

An Evangelical Presbyterian Church

Littleton

First Presbyterian Church of Littleton

First United Methodist Church



FRIDAY 7 p.m. - Englewood @ Jefferson MONDAY 7:30 p.m. - Englewood vs. Centaurus TUESDAY 7 p.m. - Englewood vs. Arvada

www.P a r k er C C R S.org P.O. Box 2945—Parker CO 80134-2945

Where people are excited about God’s Word.

Sunday Worship: 10:45AM & 6PM Bible Study: 9:30AM Children, Young People & Adults 4391 E Mainstreet, Parker, Colorado 80134 Church Office – (303) 841-3836

www.parkerbiblechurch.org Meets at the Marriott DTC 4900 S Syracuse St, Denver, CO 80237

10 am every Sunday Free parking

United Church Of Christ Parker Hilltop

December Study:

10926 E. Democrat Rd.

Pastor Mark Brewer

Parker, CO • 10am Worship www.uccparkerhilltop.org 303-841-2808

The Cast of Christmas


17

Englewood Herald 17

December 13, 2013

By Metro Creative Connection

T

he holiday season is a festive time of year when opportunities to entertain abound. The search may be on for the ideal food and beverage recipes to tie into the holiday season. Although just about any drink can be given a holiday spin with the right name (think Merry Martinis), you may want to come up with a theme drink that fits with your particular party. Explore these ideas for delicious and festive alcoholic and nonalcoholic options. White Christmas Hot Chocolate 3 cups light cream or half-and-half 3/4 cup vanilla candy melts, chopped 1 teaspoon vanilla Pinch of ground cinnamon 1 ounce Irish cream liqueur Combine 1 cup of the cream with the candy in a saucepan. Melt over low heat, being careful not to burn. Add the remaining cream, vanilla and cinnamon until everything is heated. Add the liqueur and stir. Garnish with more cinnamon. Serve warm. The Candy Cane 1 ounce vodka 1 ounce peppermint schnapps 1/2 ounce heavy cream Dash of grenadine for color Mix all ingredients in a cocktail shaker filled with ice. Pour into glasses filled with crushed ice. Garnish with a candy cane. Sweet Santa Shots 1 ounce Midori liqueur 1/2 ounce grenadine syrup Carefully layer the grenadine syrup and the Midori liqueur in a shot glass to have red and green layers. Holiday Sparkle 2 ounces apple cider 1 ounce club soda Cinnamon stick Mix cider with club soda and serve in a tall glass with a cinnamon stick garnish. A refreshing and nonalcoholic drink option.


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18 Englewood Herald

December 13, 2013

Bruins take team title at tourney Cherry Creek tops Arapahoe at Warrior Invitational By Tom Munds

tmunds@ourcoloradonews.com Cherry Creek amassed the points needed to edge rival Arapahoe and 11 other schools, earning the team title at the Dec. 7 Warrior Invitational Tournament. The Bruins and Warriors are traditional rivals and battled it out again this year for the 37th team title in the tournament’s long history at Arapahoe High School. Bruins coach Steve Luhring said his team is strong with 10 seniors in the lineup. “We have a lot of kids coming back plus some of last year’s JV wrestlers who are stepping up for us,” he said during a break in Saturday’s action. “We are good up and down the weight divisions. This is a good early tournament because we get a lot of mat time and get to see a lot of good opponents.” Warriors coach Steve Sisler will have a lot

of depth to play around with this year, and said he had the largest turnout in team history as 75 athletes turned out for the team. “We are enthusiastic and competitive,” he said during a break after Saturday’s quarterfinals. “We have a number of returning seniors who will help anchor our team this season so we should be pretty good. I have seen some good things from our wrestlers so far and I’ve seen some things we will be working on.” At that point in the tournament, Arapahoe was leading the team standings with 103.5 points and Cherry Creek was second with 102 points. But, when the championships were decided in all weight divisions, the Bruins had won seven titles and had four other wrestlers place, helping them capture the team title with 258 points. The Warriors battled hard and, while they didn’t win any weight divisions, they had a dozen wrestlers place, earning them enough points to take runner-up honors with 225 points. Lakewood was third in the team standings with 173 points.

Mike Griebel learned last week that he will no longer be the head coach of Heritage High School football. File photo

Griebel forced out as Heritage fotball coach No reason given; community urges his reinstatement By Tom Munds and Jennifer Smith Staff writers

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Heritage High School has decided to take its football team in a different direction, one that does not include longtime head coach Mike Griebel. A letter was sent to “Heritage Football Families” on Dec. 5 stating that Griebel “is no longer coaching” for the school. No reason for his dismissal was given. “It is not much fun,” Griebel said by phone Dec. 6. “The school told me their decision earlier this week. I didn’t do anything wrong, and I want the kids to know I did not leave them, that I did not resign or retire from coaching.” He said he already had put in the papers to retire from teaching in May. “I am retiring from teaching, but I had planned to stay on as a coach for the next three years while my son Mikey is here at Heritage,” he said. “It was not my decision to leave the position as Eagles head football coach.” The community is rallying behind Griebel, who coached the Eagles to the Class 4A state championship in 2009. As of the afternoon of Dec. 6, more than 1,100 people had signed a petition on change.org asking that he be reinstated. “Coach Griebel has taught more than football to these boys,” reads the petition. “Coach Griebel has given valuable life lessons both on and off the field. Coach Griebel has been the face of Heritage and the Heritage football program for more than 30 years. Coach Griebel is a coach that goes beyond his responsibilities as a high-school head coach. Coach Griebel builds fine young men with character who have come together as a team to play football to honor their school.” District officials say coaching decisions are made at the school level, but neither Heritage’s principal nor athletic director could be reached for comment. “Coaching changes occur every year in every school at all levels,” said Diane Leiker, director of communications for Littleton Public Schools. “Coaching positions are year-to-year supplemental assignments and are not part of a teaching position.” Griebel graduated from Cherry Creek High School and went to college at the University of Northern Colorado. He did his student teaching at Heritage and has been coaching football at the school in one capacity or another since the early 1980s. Griebel was named head coach in 1995. “As I said, this is a sad time, so I try to

the letter Below is the text of a letter sent to “Heritage Football Families.” The letter, dated Dec. 5, was signed by Heritage High School Principal Stacey Riendeau and Athletic Director Brock Becker. “As many of you may have heard, Mike Griebel is no longer coaching for Heritage High School. He has formally retired from his teaching career at the end of the current school year, as well. Mike has had a long, successful teaching and coaching career here at Heritage, and we sincerely thank him for his dedication and service to the students, parents and larger Heritage community. We wish him all the best in his retirement. “We will begin our search for a new coach in the upcoming weeks, and we will send you information about our next steps and how you as a parent or a student athlete can be involved in the process. As always, you may contact either of us via email if you have questions or concerns.”

remember all the good things,” he said. “I finish as the Eagles football coach with the most wins, I was named coach of the year six times and I was fortunate that our team won the state title in 2009.” The Eagles moved up in classification to 5A in the years since that championship and haven’t found the same kind of success. Heritage finished this past season 5-5 after falling to Mountain Range in the first round of the playoffs — a game in which Griebel’s son Mikey, a freshman quarterback, accounted for a pair of touchdowns. But Griebel’s impact clearly went beyond the win-loss columns. Many who left comments on the petition speak highly of Griebel’s integrity, calling him a leader and mentor who was a positive influence on students on and off the field. “Coach Griebel taught me how to be a man not only on the football field, but in every aspect of my life,” wrote Gus Nemechek of Littleton. “He went out of his way to encourage me and many others to succeed in school, sports, and was always a positive role model for everyone in the community. I honestly do not know where I would be without his influence.” Griebel said he heard about the efforts to get the school to reverse its position and said he appreciates the community support. But some parents who signed the petition aren’t sure their opinions will be valued. “I’m upset to see that Heritage administration made such a rash decision,” wrote Modesta Martinez of Centennial. “If our opinions are so valued, please hear us when we say we don’t want a new coach and wish our opinions would have been taken into consideration when making this decision.”–


WATER DIVISION 1, COLORADO NOVEMBER 2013 WATER RESUME PUBLICATION

19

December 13, 2013

TO: ALL PERSONS INTERESTED IN WATER APPLICATIONS IN WATER DIV. 1 Pursuant to C.R.S. 37-92-302, you are notified that the following is a resume of all water right applications and certain amendments filed in the Office of the Water Clerk during the month of NOVEMBER 2013 for each County affected. Public Notice

Public Notice NOTICE TO CREDITORS Estate of MARY SHEILA IMHOFF, a/k/a MARY S. IMHOFF, a/k/a MARY IMHOFF, Deceased, Case No.: 2013 PR 030532

Notice To Creditors Public Notice NOTICE TO CREDITORS Estate of DANIA J. MARSHALL, a/k/a DANIA JAI MARSHALL, a/k/a DANIA MARSHALL, Deceased Case No. 2013 PR 030480 All persons having claims against the above-named estate are required to present them to the Personal Representative or to District Court of Arapahoe, County, Colorado on or before March 31, 2014, or the claims may be forever barred. Marilyn Pinkerman Personal Representative c/o Hall & Evans, LLC, 1125 17th Street, Suite 600 Denver, CO 80202 Legal Notice No.: 4553 First Publication: November 29, 2013 Last Publication: December 13, 2013 Publisher: The Englewood Herald Public Notice NOTICE TO CREDITORS Estate of MARY SHEILA IMHOFF, a/k/a MARY S. IMHOFF, a/k/a MARY IMHOFF, Deceased, Case No.: 2013 PR 030532 All persons having claims against the above-named estate are required to present them to the Personal Representative or to District Court of Arapahoe, County, Colorado on or before April 14, 2014, or the claims may be forever barred.

Notice To Creditors

All persons having claims against the above-named estate are required to present them to the Personal Representative or to District Court of Arapahoe, County, Colorado on or before April 14, 2014, or the claims may be forever barred. Michael F. Imhoff Personal Representative c/o Hall & Evans, LLC, 1001 17th Street, Suite 300 Denver, CO 80202 Legal Notice No.: 4571 First Publication: December 13, 2013 Last Publication: December 27, 2013 Publisher: The Englewood Herald

PUBLIC NOTICE NOTICE TO CREDITORS Estate of Sharon L. Voegtle, aka Sharon Voegtle, Deceased Case Number: 2013 PR 30504 All persons having claims against the above-named estate are required to present them to the Personal Representative or to the District Court of Arapahoe County, Colorado on or before April 7, 2014 or the claims may be forever barred. Richard B. Voegtle Personal Representative 4021 S. Birch Street Cherry Hills Village, Colorado 80113 Legal Notice No: 4556 First Publication: December 6, 2013 Last Publication: December 20, 2013 Publisher: Englewood Herald

Michael F. Imhoff CITY OF SHERIDAN Personal Representative NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING c/o Hall & Evans, LLC, 1001 17th Street, Suite 300 ANNEXATION REGARDING Denver, CO 80202 Notice is hereby given that the City Council of the City of Sheridan shall hold a public Legal Notice 45718, 2014 at 7:00 p.m. in the City hearing on No.: January First Publication: December 13, City 2013Hall, 4101 South Council Chambers, Sheridan Last Publication: December 27, 2013 Federal Boulevard, Sheridan, CO, upon the proposed Publisher: The Englewood Herald annexation of a parcel of land located at 3371 WEST HAMPDEN AVENUE as requested by R&C Night LLC, and more specifically described in the petition of annexation which is attached hereto and made a part of this notice. Such hearing shall be for the purpose

Misc. Private Legals Public Notice ATTN: Former patients of Dr. Neil Cowen D.D.S. located at 3535 S Lafayette St, Ste 108, Englewood, CO 80113, 303-761-8688. We will be destroying patient records from 2006 on December 16th, 2013, and mid December ever year after for the next seven years until all records are destroyed. Please contact our office no later than December 31st, 2013 if you need your records prior to their destruction. Legal Notice No.: 4546 First Publication: November 22, 2013 Last Publication: December 13, 2013 Publisher: The Englewood Herald

Public Notice The office of Dr. Paul Weyman will be properly disposing of patient records for patients not seen since 2003 or 2004. If you were a patient of record and have not been seen in our office since 2003 or 2004, you may request your records by writing to our office by December 31, 2013. Email requests cannot be honored. You must give identifying information about yourself, such as name, birthdate, social security number. Please mail your request to Paul Weyman, D.D.S. 3601 S. Clarkson St. #310 Englewood CO 80113 Legal Notice No.: 4557 First Publication: December 6, 2013 Last Publication: December 27, 2013 Publisher: The Englewood Herald

Public Notice

of determining and finding whether the area proposed to be annexed meets the applicable requirements of Colorado Revised Statutes 31-12-104 and 31-12-105 and is considered eligible for annexation. Arlene Sagee, City Clerk City of Sheridan Legal Notice No.: 4535 First Publication: November 22, 2013 Last Publication: December 20, 2013 Publisher: The Englewood Herald

The office of Dr. Paul Weyman will be properly disposing of patient records for patients not seen since 2003 or 2004. If you were a patient of record and have not been seen in our office since 2003 or 2004, you may request your records by writing to our office by December 31, 2013. Email requests cannot be honored. You must give identifying information about yourself, such as name, birthdate, social security number. Please mail your request to Paul Weyman, D.D.S. 3601 S. Clarkson St. #310 Englewood CO 80113

Misc. Private Legals

Legal Notice No.: 4557 First Publication: December 6, 2013 Last Publication: December 27, 2013 Publisher: The Englewood Herald Public Notice DISTRICT COURT, WATER DIVISION 1, COLORADO NOVEMBER 2013 WATER RESUME PUBLICATION TO: ALL PERSONS INTERESTED IN WATER APPLICATIONS IN WATER DIV. 1 Pursuant to C.R.S. 37-92-302, you are notified that the following is a resume of all water right applications and certain amendments filed in the Office of the Water Clerk during the month of NOVEMBER 2013 for each County affected. 13CW3143 PROSPER FARMS INVESTMENTS, LLC, c/o Gregory A. Ruegsegger, Esq., 5641 N. Broadway, Denver, Colorado 80216. Stephen C. Larson, Esq., David F. Bower, Esq., Johnson & Repucci LLP, 2521 Broadway, Suite A, Boulder, Colorado 80304. Application for Conditional Underground Water Rights and Approval of Plan for Augmentation in ARAPAHOE COUNTY. Overview. Applicant owns property in Arapahoe County, Colorado that is being developed into a mixed use, master planned community (the “Property”). By this application, Applicant is seeking underground water rights for tributary ground water wells that will be used to supply water to the Property for irrigation and other purposes pursuant to the plan for augmentation described below. A map of the current Property boundaries and depicting the location of the subject wells is attached hereto as Exhibit A. APPLICATION FOR CONDITIONAL UNDERGROUND WATER RIGHTS. Name and Description of Structures and Water Rights. Name and Legal Description of Wells. The Prosper Box Elder Well Nos. 1–4 (collectively, the “Prosper Box Elder Wells”) will be an integrated alluvial well field used to supply water to the Property. The wells are anticipated to be drilled at the following locations, but may be located anywhere on the property Applicant owns in the NW1/4 of Section 5 and NE1/4 of Section 6, Township 4 South, Range 64 West, of the 6th P.M., as generally depicted on the Exhibit A inset and referred to therein as the North East Parcel: Prosper Box Elder Well No. 1. Prosper Box Elder Well No. 1 is located in the NW1/4 NW1/4 of Section 5, Township 4 South, Range 64 West, of the 6th P.M., at a point 230 feet from the north section line and 110 feet from the west section line of said Section 5 (Zone 13, NAD83, Northing 4398859m, Easting 535738m). Prosper Box Elder Well No. 2. Prosper Box Elder Well No. 2 is located in the NW1/4 NW1/4 of Section 5, Township 4 South, Range 64 West, of the 6th P.M., at a point 920 feet from the north section line and 390 feet from the west section line of said Section 5 (Zone 13, NAD83, Northing 4398634m, Easting 535821m). Prosper Box Elder Well No. 3. Prosper Box Elder Well No. 3 is located in the SW1/4 NW1/4 of Section 5, Township 4 South, Range 64 West, of the 6th P.M., at a point 1,580 feet from the north section line and 880 feet from the west section line of said Section 5 (Zone 13, NAD83, Northing 4398444m, Easting 535977m). Prosper Box Elder Well No. 4. Prosper Box Elder Well No. 4 is located in the SE1/4 NW1/4 of Section 5, Township 4 South, Range 64 West, of the 6th P.M., at a point 2,290 feet from the north section line and 1,770 feet from the west section line of said Section 5 (Zone 13, NAD83, Northing 4398226m, Easting 536247m). Source of Water. Ground water from the Box Elder Creek alluvial aquifer, tributary to Box Elder Creek, tributary to the South Platte River. Depth of Wells. Approximately 60 feet. Date of Appropriation. March 5, 2012. Appropriation was initiated by the formation of requisite intent, coupled with actions manifesting such intent sufficient to put third parties on notice. Amount Claimed in gallons per minute (gpm). 1,200 gpm, conditional. The maximum rate of withdrawal for all four of the Prosper Box Elder Wells, combined, will not exceed 1,200 gpm, conditional. Amount Claimed in acre-feet annually. 800 acre-feet/year, conditional. The maximum volume of withdrawal for all four of the Prosper Box Elder Wells, combined, will not exceed 800 acre-feet per year. Uses or Proposed Uses. Irrigation, municipal, domestic, commercial, industrial, recreation, construction and dust suppression, wetlands creation and maintenance, fire protection, and augmentation. The water may be used, reused and successively reused to extinction. Place of Use. Water withdrawn from the Prosper Box Elder Wells will be used on the Property. Name of Owner of Land Upon Which Structures are Located. All of the subject structures are on land owned by Applicant. APPLICATION FOR APPROVAL OF PLAN FOR AUGMENTATION. Name of Structures to be Augmented. The Prosper Box Elder Wells, as more particularly described in paragraph 3.A. above. Water Rights to be Used for Augmentation. Reusable effluent from the wastewater treatment plant to be constructed on the Property, delivered to the Box Elder Creek alluvium at or up-gradient of the Prosper Box Elder Wells. At full build-out, Applicant anticipates that approximately 400 acrefeet/year of reusable effluent will be available for augmentation of the wells. Lawn irrigation return flows (LIRFs) from irrigation on the Property with fully-consumable water, timed to the point of depletion on the Box Elder Creek alluvium. At full build-out, Applicant anticipates that approximately 400 acre-feet/year of LIRFs will be available for augmentation of the wells. Underground water rights from the nontributary Denver Basin aquifers underlying Applicant’s well field in Arapahoe County, as decreed on December 14, 2011, in Case No. 11CW22, Water Division 1. The nontributary water shall be delivered to the Box Elder Creek alluvium at or up-gradient of the Prosper Box Elder Wells. The nontributary water will also be used as the primary source of augmentation for the Prosper Box Elder Wells prior to the availability of reusable effluent and LIRFs, including use of the Prosper Box Elder Wells for development purposes or for agricultural irrigation on the Property before development commences. The average annual amount of ground water available to be withdrawn from each of the nontributary Denver Basin aquifers underlying the Property is as follows: Aquifer Type Annual Withdrawal (af/yr) Upper Arapahoe NT 1,314.0

13CW3143 PROSPER FARMS INVESTMENTS, LLC, c/o Gregory A. Ruegsegger, Esq., 5641 N. Broadway, Denver, Colorado 80216. Stephen C. Larson, Esq., David F. Bower, Esq., Johnson & Repucci LLP, 2521 Broadway, Suite A, Boulder, Colorado 80304. Application for Conditional Underground Water Rights and Approval of Plan for Augmentation in ARAPAHOE COUNTY. Overview. Applicant owns property in Arapahoe County, Colorado that is being developed into a mixed use, master planned community (the “Property”). By this application, Applicant is seeking underground water rights for tributary ground water wells that will be used to supply water to the Property for irrigation and other purposes pursuant to the plan for augmentation described below. A map of the current Property boundaries and depicting the location of the subject wells is attached hereto as Exhibit A. APPLICATION FOR CONDITIONAL UNDERGROUND WATER RIGHTS. Name and Description of Structures and Water Rights. Name and Legal Description of Wells. The Prosper Box Elder Well Nos. 1–4 (collectively, the “Prosper Box Elder Wells”) will be an integrated alluvial well field used to supply water to the Property. The wells are anticipated to be drilled at the following locations, but may be located anywhere on the property Applicant owns in the NW1/4 of Section 5 and NE1/4 of Section 6, Township 4 South, Range 64 West, of the 6th P.M., as generally depicted on the Exhibit A inset and referred to therein as the North East Parcel: Prosper Box Elder Well No. 1. Prosper Box Elder Well No. 1 is located in the NW1/4 NW1/4 of Section 5, Township 4 South, Range 64 West, of the 6th P.M., at a point 230 feet from the north section line and 110 feet from the west section line of said Section 5 (Zone 13, NAD83, Northing 4398859m, Easting 535738m). Prosper Box Elder Well No. 2. Prosper Box Elder Well No. 2 is located in the NW1/4 NW1/4 of Section 5, Township 4 South, Range 64 West, of the 6th P.M., at a point 920 feet from the north section line and 390 feet from the west section line of said Section 5 (Zone 13, NAD83, Northing 4398634m, Easting 535821m). Prosper Box Elder Well No. 3. Prosper Box Elder Well No. 3 is located in the SW1/4 NW1/4 of Section 5, Township 4 South, Range 64 West, of the 6th P.M., at a point 1,580 feet from the north section line and 880 feet from the west section line of said Section 5 (Zone 13, NAD83, Northing 4398444m, Easting 535977m). Prosper Box Elder Well No. 4. Prosper Box Elder Well No. 4 is located in the SE1/4 NW1/4 of Section 5, Township 4 South, Range 64 West, of the 6th P.M., at a point 2,290 feet from the north section line and 1,770 feet from the west section line of said Section 5 (Zone 13, NAD83, Northing 4398226m, Easting 536247m). Source of Water. Ground water from the Box Elder Creek alluvial aquifer, tributary to Box Elder Creek, tributary to the South Platte River. Depth of Wells. Approximately 60 feet. Date of Appropriation. March 5, 2012. Appropriation was initiated by the formation of requisite intent, coupled with actions manifesting such intent sufficient to put third parties on notice. Amount Claimed in gallons per minute (gpm). 1,200 gpm, conditional. The maximum rate of withdrawal for all four of the Prosper Box Elder Wells, combined, will not exceed 1,200 gpm, conditional. Amount Claimed in acre-feet annually. 800 acre-feet/year, conditional. The maximum volume of withdrawal for all four of the Prosper Box Elder Wells, combined, will not exceed 800 acre-feet per year. Uses or Proposed Uses. Irrigation, municipal, domestic, commercial, industrial, recreation, construction and dust suppression, wetlands creation and maintenance, fire protection, and augmentation. The water may be used, reused and successively reused to extinction. Place of Use. Water withdrawn from the Prosper Box Elder Wells will be used on the Property. Name of Owner of Land Upon Which Structures are Located. All of the subject structures are on land owned by Applicant. APPLICATION FOR APPROVAL OF PLAN FOR AUGMENTATION. Name of Structures to be Augmented. The Prosper Box Elder Wells, as more particularly described in paragraph 3.A. above. Wate r Rights to be Used for Augmentation. Reusable effluent from the wastewater treatment plant to be constructed on the Property, delivered to the Box Elder Creek alluvium at or up-gradient of the Prosper Box Elder Wells. At full build-out, Applicant anticipates that approximately 400 acrefeet/year of reusable effluent will be available for augmentation of the wells. Lawn irrigation return flows (LIRFs) from irrigation on the Property with fully-consumable water, timed to the point of depletion on the Box Elder Creek alluvium. At full build-out, Applicant anticipates that approximately 400 acre-feet/year of LIRFs will be available for augmentation of the wells. Underground water rights from the nontributary Denver Basin aquifers underlying Applicant’s well field in Arapahoe County, as decreed on December 14, 2011, in Case No. 11CW22, Water Division 1. The nontributary water shall be delivered to the Box Elder Creek alluvium at or up-gradient of the Prosper Box Elder Wells. The nontributary water will also be used as the primary source of augmentation for the Prosper Box Elder Wells prior to the availability of reusable effluent and LIRFs, including use of the Prosper Box Elder Wells for development purposes or for agricultural irrigation on the Property before development commences. The average annual amount of ground water available to be withdrawn from each of the nontributary Denver Basin aquifers underlying the Property is as follows:

Misc. Private Legals

Aquifer Type Annual Withdrawal (af/yr) Upper Arapahoe NT 1,314.0 Lower Arapahoe NT 626.0 Laramie-Fox Hills NT 1,310.6 Applicant reserves the right to use additional or alternative sources of replacement water in this plan for augmentation pursuant to C.R.S. § 37-92-305(8)(c). Complete Statement of Plan for Augmentation. Applicant shall replace all out-ofpriority depletions resulting from the operation of the Prosper Box Elder Wells from any of the replacement sources described above. Applicant will install measuring devices and implement such accounting procedures as may reasonably be required by the State or Division Engineer to ensure that depletions are fully replaced in time, place, and amount under this plan. Applicant shall submit accounting information to the Division Engineer on an annual basis, or such other basis as may be required by the State or Division Engineer. Projected Demand and Depletions Under this Plan. Applicant anticipates pumping no more than 800 acre-feet/year from the Prosper Box Elder Wells. Total out-of priority depletions arising from use of the Prosper Box Elder Wells water under this plan is anticipated to be approximately 700 acre-feet/year. Applicant reserves the right to operate this plan to replace depletions associated with a different mix of uses on th e Property so long as Applicant’s augmentation supply is sufficient to cover such depletions. Name of Owner of Land Upon Which Structures are Located. All of the subject structures are on land owned by Applicant. 7 pages including exhibit. THE WATER RIGHTS CLAIMED BY THESE APPLICATIONS MAY AFFECT IN

RIGHTS. Name and Description of Structures and Water Rights. Name and Legal Description of Wells. The Prosper Box Elder Well Nos. 1–4 (collectively, the “Prosper Box Elder Wells”) will be an integrated alluvial well field used to supply water to the Property. The wells are anticipated to be drilled at the following locations, but may be located anywhere on the property Applicant owns in the NW1/4 of Section 5 and NE1/4 of Section 6, Township 4 South, Range 64 West, of the 6th P.M., as generally depicted on the Exhibit A inset and referred to therein as the North East Parcel: Prosper Box Elder Well No. 1. Prosper Box Elder Well No. 1 is located in the NW1/4 NW1/4 of Section 5, Township 4 South, Range 64 West, of the 6th P.M., at a point 230 feet from the north section line and 110 feet from the west section line of said Section 5 (Zone 13, NAD83, Northing 4398859m, Easting 535738m). Prosper Box Elder Well No. 2. Prosper Box Elder Well No. 2 is located in the NW1/4 NW1/4 of Section 5, Township 4 South, Range 64 West, of the 6th P.M., at a point 920 feet from the north section line and 390 feet from the west section line of said Section 5 (Zone 13, NAD83, Northing 4398634m, Easting 535821m). Prosper Box Elder Well No. 3. Prosper Box Elder Well No. 3 is located in the SW1/4 NW1/4 of Section 5, Township 4 South, Range 64 West, of the 6th P.M., at a point 1,580 feet from the north section line and 880 feet from the west section line of said Section 5 (Zone 13, NAD83, Northing 4398444m, Easting 535977m). Prosper Box Elder Well No. 4. Prosper Box Elder Well No. 4 is located in the SE1/4 NW1/4 of Section 5, Township 4 South, Range 64 West, of the 6th P.M., at a point 2,290 feet from the north section line and 1,770 feet from the west section line of said Section 5 (Zone 13, NAD83, Northing 4398226m, Easting 536247m). Source of Water. Ground water from the Box Elder Creek alluvial aquifer, tributary to Box Elder Creek, tributary to the South Platte River. Depth of Wells. Approximately 60 feet. Date of Appropriation. March 5, 2012. Appropriation was initiated by the formation of requisite intent, coupled with actions manifesting such intent sufficient to put third parties on notice. Amount Claimed in gallons per minute (gpm). 1,200 gpm, conditional. The maximum rate of withdrawal for all four of the Prosper Box Elder Wells, combined, will not exceed 1,200 gpm, conditional. Amount Claimed in acre-feet annually. 800 acre-feet/year, conditional. The maximum volume of withdrawal for all four of the Prosper Box Elder Wells, combined, will not exceed 800 acre-feet per year. Uses or Proposed Uses. Irrigation, municipal, domestic, commercial, industrial, recreation, construction and dust suppression, wetlands creation and maintenance, fire protection, and augmentation. The water may be used, reused and successively reused to extinction. Place of Use. Water withdrawn from the Prosper Box Elder Wells will be used on the Property. Name of Owner of Land Upon Which Structures are Located. All of the subject structures are on land owned by Applicant. APPLICATION FOR APPROVAL OF PLAN FOR AUGMENTATION. Name of Structures to be Augmented. The Prosper Box Elder Wells, as more particularly described in paragraph 3.A. above. Water Rights to be Used for Augmentation. Reusable effluent from the wastewater treatment plant to be constructed on the Property, delivered to the Box Elder Creek alluvium at or up-gradient of the Prosper Box Elder Wells. At full build-out, Applicant anticipates that approximately 400 acrefeet/year of reusable effluent will be available for augmentation of the wells. Lawn irrigation return flows (LIRFs) from irrigation on the Property with fully-consumable water, timed to the point of depletion on the Box Elder Creek alluvium. At full build-out, Applicant anticipates that approximately 400 acre-feet/year of LIRFs will be available for augmentation of the wells. Underground water rights from the nontributary Denver Basin aquifers underlying Applicant’s well field in Arapahoe County, as decreed on December 14, 2011, in Case No. 11CW22, Water Division 1. The nontributary water shall be delivered to the Box Elder Creek alluvium at or up-gradient of the Prosper Box Elder Wells. The nontributary water will also be used as the primary source of augmentation for the Prosper Box Elder Wells prior to the availability of reusable effluent and LIRFs, including use of the Prosper Box Elder Wells for development purposes or for agricultural irrigation on the Property before development commences. The average annual amount of ground water available to be withdrawn from each of the nontributary Denver Basin aquifers underlying the Property is as follows:

Englewood Herald 19

Misc. Private Legals

Aquifer

Type Annual Withdrawal (af/yr) Upper Arapahoe NT 1,314.0 Lower Arapahoe NT 626.0 Laramie-Fox Hills NT 1,310.6 Applicant reserves the right to use additional or alternative sources of replacement water in this plan for augmentation pursuant to C.R.S. § 37-92-305(8)(c). Complete Statement of Plan for Augmentation. Applicant shall replace all out-ofpriority depletions resulting from the operation of the Prosper Box Elder Wells from any of the replacement sources described above. Applicant will install measuring devices and implement such accounting procedures as may reasonably be required by the State or Division Engineer to ensure that depletions are fully replaced in time, place, and amount under this plan. Applicant shall submit accounting information to the Division Engineer on an annual basis, or such other basis as may be required by the State or Division Engineer. Projected Demand and Depletions Under this Plan. Applicant anticipates pumping no more than 800 acre-feet/year from the Prosper Box Elder Wells. Total out-of priority depletions arising from use of the Prosper Box Elder Wells water under this plan is anticipated to be approximately 700 acre-feet/year. Applicant reserves the right to operate this plan to replace depletions associated with a different mix of uses on the Property so long as Applicant’s augmentation supply is sufficient to cover such depletions. Name of Owner of Land Upon Which Structures are Located. All of the subject structures are on land owned by Applicant. 7 pages including exhibit. THE WATER RIGHTS CLAIMED BY THESE APPLICATIONS MAY AFFECT IN PRIORITY ANY WATER RIGHTS CLAIMED OR HERETOFORE ADJUDICATED WITHIN THIS DIVISION AND OWNERS OF AFFECTED RIGHTS MUST APPEAR TO OBJECT WITHIN THE TIME PROVIDED BY STATUTE OR BE FOREVER BARRED. YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that any party who wishes to oppose an application, or an amended application, may file with the Water Clerk, P. O. Box 2038, Greeley, CO 80632, a verified Statement of Opposition, setting forth facts as to why the application should not be granted, or why it should be granted only in part or on certain conditions. Such Statement of Opposition must be filed by the last day of JANUARY 2014 (forms available on www.courts.state.co.us or in the Clerk’s office), and must be filed as an Original and include $158.00 filing fee. A copy of each Statement of Opposition must also be served upon the Applicant or Applicant’s Attorney and an affidavit or certificate of such service of mailing shall be filed with the Water Clerk. Legal Notice No.: 4572 First Publication: December 13, 2013 Last Publication: December 13, 2013 Publisher: The Englewood Herald


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20 Englewood Herald

December 13, 2013

Cupola cam is new and improved Anyone can see Littleton live, anytime, from anywhere By Jennifer Smith

jsmith@ourcoloradonews.com Littleton has a brand-new “cupola cam,” and it’s four times bigger and brighter than ever. The “cam,” a camera mounted on top of the Littleton Courthouse, sends a live feed that can be accessed and controlled from anywhere in the world. It was out of commission for several weeks while Cathy Weaver, the city’s webmaster, researched and replaced the original one with the new model. She explained that the old one was actually a security camera, so it could only be updated by the vendor. “A few months after the (first) camera was installed, the vendor went out of business,” she said. “Because we could not update the camera’s software, we had no choice but to just let it run until advances in software technologies made it obsolete. We knew that day would come, and felt

fortunate that it took more than 10 years to happen.” She said finding a system with privacyprotection features similar to the original camera was a bit tricky, but she settled on the one the city uses to detect vehicles stopped at intersections. “These cameras have an excellent picture, zoom and auto-focus controls, a weatherproof housing, a viewer timer and the ability to lock in preset views,” she said. “Also, just like the traffic detection cameras, Cupola Cam does not record the video that it sees.” The camera went live Nov. 26, just in time for the Candlelight Walk in downtown Littleton the day after Thanksgiving. Visitors to the site can, with a click of their mouse, aim the camera at preset views like Bega Park, Goddard Middle School, Colorado Center for the Blind, downtown Denver and more. If there is more than one person on the site, however, visitors will virtually line up to take control of the camera views for 60 seconds at a time. Even if one is not in control, though, they will be able to look at the views selected by someone else. Case Number: 2013PR030386 Division/ Courtroom: 21

Attorney For PETITIONER Public Notice (name and address): Charles A. Miller District Court Stutz, Miller & Urtz, LLC County, Colorado Lincolnsocial St. Suite 2850 websites: Colorado Community Media wants toArapahoe share the news. Check us out 1660 on these media Court Address: 7325 So. Potomac St. Denver, CO 80264 Centennial, CO 80112 Phone Number:303.861.1200 E-mail: cam@stutzmillerurtz.com In the Interests of: FAX Number: 303.830.0115 SAMANTHA ANDREWS Atty. Reg. #:5841

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Case Number: 2013PR030386 Division/ Courtroom: 21

Public Notice District Court Arapahoe County, Colorado Court Address: 7325 So. Potomac St. Centennial, CO 80112 In the Interests of: SAMANTHA ANDREWS

NOTICE OF HEARING BY PUBLICATION PURSUANT TO § 15-10-401, C.R.S.

Case Number: 2013PR030386 Division/ Courtroom: 21 Attorney For PETITIONER (name and address): Charles A. Miller Stutz, Miller & Urtz, LLC 1660 Lincoln St. Suite 2850 Denver, CO 80264 Phone Number:303.861.1200 E-mail: cam@stutzmillerurtz.com FAX Number: 303.830.0115 Atty. Reg. #:5841 NOTICE OF HEARING BY PUBLICATION PURSUANT TO § 15-10-401, C.R.S.

To: Deanna Andrews, and any other interested party Last Known Address, if any: P.O. Box 152 Moundridge, Kansas 67107 A hearing on Petition for Appointment of Conservator for Minor Samantha Andrews will be held at the following time and location or at a later date to which the hearing may be continued: Date: January 23, 2014 Time: 10:00 a.m. Courtroom or Division: 21 Address: Arapahoe County Justice Center 7325 So. Potomac St., Centennial, CO 80112

To: Deanna Andrews, and any other interested party Last Known Address, if any: P.O. Box 152 Moundridge, Kansas 67107 A hearing on Petition for Appointment of Conservator for Minor Samantha Andrews will be held at the following time and location or at a later date to which the hearing may be continued: Date: January 23, 2014 Time: 10:00 a.m. Courtroom or Division: 21 Address: Arapahoe County Justice Center 7325 So. Potomac St., Centennial, CO 80112 Legal Notice No.: 4550 First Publication: November 29, 2013 Last Publication: December 13, 2013 Publisher: The Englewood Herald

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To: Deanna Andrews, and any other interested party Last Known Address, if any: P.O. Box 152 Moundridge, Kansas 67107

A hearing on Petition for Appointment of Conservator for Minor Samantha Andrews will be held at the following time and location or at a later date to which the hearing may be continued: Date: January 23, 2014 Time: 10:00 a.m. Courtroom or Division: 21 Address: Arapahoe County Justice Center 7325 So. Potomac St., Centennial, CO 80112 Legal Notice No.: 4550 First Publication: November 29, 2013 Last Publication: December 13, 2013 Publisher: The Englewood Herald

Attorney For PETITIONER (name and address): Charles A. Miller Stutz, Miller & Urtz, LLC 1660 Lincoln St. Suite 2850 Denver, CO 80264 Phone Number:303.861.1200 E-mail: cam@stutzmillerurtz.com FAX Number: 303.830.0115 Atty. Reg. #:5841

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NOTICE OF HEARING BY PUBLICATION PURSUANT TO § 15-10-401, C.R.S.

Legal Notice No.: 4550 First Publication: November 29, 2013 Last Publication: December 13, 2013 Publisher: The Englewood Herald

Weaver often gets notes thanking her for letting them keep an eye on their hometown from afar, or for showing them where their children have moved or where they themselves are about to move, or just for the view of sunlight glinting off the snowcapped mountains. “A man called me from China a few days before Cupola Cam II launched, just to thank the city for its efforts to get a new camera installed,” she said. “His daughter lives in Littleton, and they were looking forward to being able to connect again once the new camera was ready.” The site averages 87 visits per day, with visitors spending about 2 ½ minutes at a time. The most visits it got on one day this year was on Feb. 24, with 396. To check out the weather or how much traffic is on Main Street before driving home, visit www.littletongov.org and look for “Cupola Cam II” under the “Community” tab at the top of the page. The cam has become so popular as a way to keep in visual touch with out-oftown friends and relatives that the city even created an “Official Cupola Cam Greeting

Site” at the bottom of the courthouse steps. So, if you see people in party hats holding a “Happy Birthday” banner and waving at the cupola, don’t worry, they don’t have bats in their belfries. But the cupola itself has been known to harbor a few. It’s a scary but very cool place where the cam sits, and those who scale the steep, dark and narrow wooden staircase are rewarded with an amazing view and a real sense of history. The courthouse was built in 1907, three years after voters chose Littleton as the Arapahoe County seat. Etched deeply into the cupola’s wall boards are things like “E.W. `18” — might E.W. have been in Littleton High School’s Class of 1918? Or might he or she have been the one to drape the fading red, white and blue bunting over the stairwell after some fair in days of yore? In the dusty corner are replacement bulbs for the Christmas lights around the outside of the cupola, purchased with proceeds from the South Metro Denver Chamber of Commerce’s annual Haunts of Littleton Ghost Walk. Visiting the cupola gives that a whole new sense of appropriateness.

Englewood Housing Authority will open its waiting lists for its Income QualiTo: Deanna Andrews, and any other fied 1 bedroom High-rise Apartments interested party and Public Housing Family Duplex Last Known Address, if any: P.O. Box 152 units at 8:00 a.m. on January 6, 2014. Moundridge, Kansas Pinterest 67107 will be available at: Facebook, Twitter, and Linkedin. Search for Colorado CommunityApplications Media. www.englewoodhousing.homestead.org A hearing on Petition for Appointment of and at the Englewood Housing Authority, Conservator for Minor Samantha An3460 S Sherman St #101, Englewood, CO drews will be held at the following time between the hours of 8:00 a.m. and 5:00 and location or at a later date to which the Public Notice p.m. (closed on Wednesdays). hearing may be continued: Date: January 23, 2014 WAIT LIST OPENS Englewood Housing Authority is Not Time: 10:00 a.m. Accepting applications for the Section 8 Courtroom or Division: 21 Englewood Housing Authority will open Housing Choice Voucher Program at this Address: Arapahoe County Justice its waiting lists for its Income Qualitime. Center 7325 So. Potomac St., Centennified 1 bedroom High-rise Apartments al, CO 80112 and Public Housing Family Duplex Englewood Housing Authority is an equal units at 8:00 a.m. on January 6, 2014. opportunity housing provider Legal Notice No.: 4550 Applications will be available at: First Publication: November 29, 2013 www.englewoodhousing.homestead.org Last Publication: December 13, 2013 and at the Englewood Housing Authority, Publisher: The Englewood Herald 3460 S Sherman St #101, Englewood, CO between the hours of 8:00 a.m. and 5:00 Legal Notice No.: 4570 Public Notice p.m. (closed on Wednesdays). First publication: December 12, 2013 Last publication: December 12, 2013 WAIT LIST OPENS Englewood Housing Authority is Not Publisher: Englewood Herald Accepting applications for the Section 8 Englewood Housing Authority will open Housing Choice Voucher Program at this its waiting lists for its Income Qualitime. fied 1 bedroom High-rise Apartments and Public Housing Family Duplex Englewood Housing Authority is an equal units at 8:00 a.m. on January 6, 2014. opportunity housing provider Applications will be available at: www.englewoodhousing.homestead.org and at the Englewood Housing Authority, 3460 S Sherman St #101, Englewood, CO between the hours of 8:00 a.m. and 5:00 Legal Notice No.: 4570 FOR THE WEEK OF DEC 11, 2013 p.m. (closed on Wednesdays). First publication: December 12, 2013 Last publication: December 12, 2013 ARIES (Mar 21 to Apr 19) Your Arian penchant for Englewood Housing Authority is Not Publisher: Englewood Herald Accepting applications for the Section 8 impatience shows, as you consider passing a probHousing Choice Voucher Program at this lem-prone project on to someone else. Best advice: time.

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Legal Notice No.: 4570 First publication: December 12, 2013 Last publication: December 12, 2013 Publisher: Englewood Herald

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GALLERY OF GAMES

Stay with it and work out those snarls yourself.

TAURUS (Apr 20 to May 20) Even patient Bovines can be frustrated when carefully made plans go awry. But crank up that “stick-to-it-ivity” you do so well, and you’ll soon find that your schedule is back in sync. GEMINI (May 21 to Jun 20) Your aspect favors using more resourceful means in dealing with a workplace situation. Some discreet checking around could help shed light on the root cause of the problem. CANCER (Jun 21 to Jul 22) You show an unusually strong streak of stubbornness in rejecting suggestions from friends and/or family members early in the week. But you become more receptive by the week’s end. LEO (Jul 23 to Aug 22) The Big Cat might find a gentler approach more effective when dealing with those who resist needed changes. Remember, the word “persuasion” starts with the sound “purr.” VIRGO (Aug 23 to Sept 22) A disappointing experience with someone you felt you could trust can be painful. But there just might be more to this situation than you’re aware of. Press for an explanation. LIBRA (Sept 23 to Oct 22) Changing your views about something you believe in isn’t easy. But you might reconsider as the facts come in. Keep your mind open, even if you’re uneasy about what you might learn. SCORPIO (Oct 23 to Nov 21) You might have to do some serious shifting of gears to get your project back on track. But cheer up. Your hard work starts to produce some positive results by the week’s end. SAGITTARIUS (Nov 22 to Dec 21) An unsettling mood at the start of the week soon lifts and gives way to a more positive attitude as you find fun and friendship beginning to dominate your aspect. CAPRICORN (Dec 22 to Jan 19) A delay in firming up holiday plans could work to your advantage. Use this time to scout out possibilities that might be more in line with what those close to you would prefer. AQUARIUS (Jan 20 to Feb 18) Some people might question some of the new friends you’ve welcomed into your life. But your ability to see beyond the obvious helps you recognize how special they are. PISCES (Feb 19 to Mar 20) Financial matters can be especially tricky this week. It’s best to follow a conservative investment path for now, and wait for a more fortuitous time to take a bolder approach. BORN THIS WEEK: Your warmth, your humor and your genuine concern for others make you someone people love to keep close to their lives. © 2013 King Features Synd., Inc.


21-Color

Englewood Herald 21

December 13, 2013

CAREERS

Advertise: 303-566-4100

Help Wanted

Advertise: 303-566-4100

OurColoradoClassifieds.com

Misc. Notices Want To Purchase minerals and other oil/gas interests. Send details to: P.O. Box 13557 Denver, CO 80201

Misc. Notices

We are community.

Farm Products & Produce Grain Finished Buffalo

quartered, halves and whole

719-775-8742

Grass Fed - Free Range Beef - All Organic, No Hormones, No Steroids, No Antibiotics. Whole, Half's and Quarters Available. Cut and Rapped to your specifications $4.00 per pound. Credit Cards Excepted 720-252-5387 Locally raised, grass fed and grain finished Beef & Pork. Quarters, halves, wholes available. Can deliver 720-434-1322 schmidtfamilyfarms.com

Garage Sales

minerals and other oil/gas interests. Send details to: P.O. Box 13557 Denver, CO 80201

Your Community Connector to Boundless Rewards

Moving Sale

Saturday Dec. 14th 10am-2pm 21798 Mount Field Dr/ Look Out Mt Misc items including exerc. equip, furn, office supplies,

Everything Must Go!! Estate Sales

Bicycles

Video Games

27" Mountain Bike .All components in good condition. Slanted bar makes for a good beginner's or girls bike. (812)322-2804

Large selection of video games, pin balls, air hockey, etc. Priced reasonably for Christmas. email: Christmasarcades@gmail.com or call 720-270-1797

Firewood

PETS

Pine/Fur & Aspen

Split & Delivered $225 Stacking available extra $25 Some delivery charges may apply depending on location. Hauling scrap metal also available (appliances, batteries etc.) Call 303-647-2475 or 720-323-2173

Needed immediately for large venue in Black Hawk. Training provided for servers with limited experience. No felonies last 7yrs. $10.75-12.00/hr. Call (303) 480-0070

Christmas Trees

Fri & Sat 9am-4pm 13551 W 43rd Dr I-70 & Youngfield We have moved two estates to our warehouse for this Holiday sale. Antiques, collectables, retro, xmas, books and lots more. Visit www.nostalgia-plus.com for photos & map reasonable prices both days cash or credit cards accepted.

Arts & Crafts ARVADA

Holiday Craft Sale

Fri & Sat December 13th & 14th 9am-4pm Handmade gift items & Homemade Goodies 10309 West 68th Ave. Come by and bring a friend

Bicycles

FOR THE LAST TIME! Safe, Natural Doctor Recommended Follow Up Provided Call Today! 303-885-9733

www.wl3030.com

Household Goods

Lost Lost black Labrador Retriever, (303) 805-1512

Home for the Holidays

Horse & Tack

Savio House is looking for Foster Parents to provide a temporary home for troubled teens ages 12-18. We provide training, 24/7 support and $1900/month. Adequate space and complete background and motor vehicle check required. Ideally there are no other teens in the home and one parent would have flexible daytime schedule. Contact Michelle for more information at 303-225-4073.

female. English style, very friendly. Lost in Parker, Country Meadows area. Microchipped.

ELECTRIC BIKES: New & used No Gas, License, or Registration. 303-257-0164

Riding Horses Available Boarding, leasing, lessons, Birthday Parties, Volunteering and Tours. Friends of Horses Rescue & Adoption 303-649-1155 www.getahorse.org

TRANSPORTATION

All Tickets Buy/Sell

(Denver metro)

Wanted

Miscellaneous

Tickets/Travel

Full-time, benefited PR&L Community Outreach Coordinator Salary: $64,475 - $80,593/year Closes: 12/30/13 Submit City of Westminster online applications thru 8:30 a.m. on close date http://www.cityofwestminster.us/jobs EOE

Pool Table 4x8 Solid Ash w/all accessories, exc. cond. Slate surface $1200 GE 14 CF refrigerator, auto defrost, almond color, like new cond. $250 (720)842-4895

Comfy chair and ottoman $60; 6 gun cabinet, no glass, locking drawer $30; Bun & Thigh Rocker by Jake $35; Dr.'s Healthometer scale/height $35; tools 4 drywall, concrete, tile, wallpaper cheap; legal hanging folders and files cheap. Commercial shelving. 303 688-9171

Performs highly skilled and semi-skilled mechanical repair and diagnostic work in the maintenance and/or repair of equipment and vehicles. Must be proficient in heavy equipment and light vehicle diagnostics. For position requirements, qualifications, and job description visit our web-site (http://co.gilpin.co.us) Open Until Filled. $18.40 - $20.24 DOQ. Applications are available at: Gilpin County Human Resources, 495 Apex Valley Road, Black Hawk, CO Monday through Friday 8:00 a.m. - 4:30 p.m. or on our website (http://co.gilpin.co.us). Please submit your application to: Gilpin County Human Resources, P.O. Box 366, Central City, CO 80427; Fax: (303) 951-3675. Gilpin County is Equal Opportunity Employer

Part-time, flexible hours hours for homecare patient visits in Douglas and Elbert counties. Great pay and benefits. Call Barbara or Kay at 303-663-3663 to schedule an interview.

for sale at Sedalia Conoco Weekends only until Christmas Fresh Cut Douglas Fir 303-647-2475 / 720-323-2173

Health and Beauty

Public Works:

Physical Therapist and Registered Nurse

Flowers/Plants/Trees

Cat Nap Recliner - hand remote to recline and bring to standing position, dark olive color. 1 year old used 3 weeks. $275 (720)379-8758

Fleet Mechanic

Colorado Statewide Classified Advertising Network

COOKS AND BANQUET SERVERS

LOSE WEIGHT

Golden

Call 303-774-8100. academyfordentalassistingcareers .com

Advertise: 303-566-4100

Furniture

Golden

January Classes for Dental Assisting and Dental Lab Technician.

Want To Purchase

MARKETPL CE FARM & AGRICULTURE

Academy for Dental Assisting Careers

Help Wanted

Cash for all Cars and Trucks Under $1000 Running or not. Any condition

(303)741-0762 bestcashforcars.com

DONATE YOUR CAR, TRUCK, BOAT, RV; Running or not, to www.developmentaldisabled.org Tax deductible! 303-659-8086. 14 years of service

NFL-NBA-NHL-NCAA-MLB WWW.DENVERTICKET.COM (303)-420-5000

Top Cash Paid for Junk Cars Up to $500 720-333-6832

TIME’S RUNNING OUT!

Get your cash for CHRISTMAS!

To place a 25-word COSCAN Network ad in 74 Colorado newspapers for only $250, contact you local newspaper or call SYNC2 Media at 303-571-5117. GUN SHOW GUN SHOW DEC 14-15 SAT. 9-5 & SUN 9-4 COLORADO SPRINGS FREEDOM FINANCIAL SERVICES EXPO CENTER (3650 N NEVADA) BUY-SELL-TRADE INFO: (563)927-8176 HELP WANTED Indian Creek Express is HIRING!!! *Local Driver *OTR Drivers, Singles/Teams *Fleet Mechanic (Entry-level/Advanced) *Dispatchers Benefits, Weekly pay, Drivers: home weekly, Mechanics & Dispatchers: FULL TIME 40+/wk.

877-273-3582

Call 303-566-4100

I EARN $500 A-DAY: Insurance Agents Needed, Leads, No Cold Calls, Commissions Paid Daily, Lifetime Renewals, Complete Training, Health/Dental Insurance, Life License Required. Call 1-888-713-6020

Public Works: Operates a variety of heavy equipment such as graders, loaders, dozers and tandem trucks; services and maintains assigned equipment. Plows snow and performs manual labor as necessary. For position requirements, qualifications and job description visit our web-site (http://co.gilpin.co.us). Open Until Filled $16.01 - $16.81 DOQ. Applications are available at: Gilpin County Human Resources, 495 Apex Valley Road, Black Hawk, CO Monday through Friday 8:00 a.m. - 4:30 p.m. or on our website (http://co.gilpin.co.us). Please submit your application to: Gilpin County Human Resources, P.O. Box 366, Central City, CO 80427; Fax: (303) 951-3675 *** CDL APPLICATON REQUIRED *** Gilpin County is Equal Opportunity Employer

HOUSEKEEPER/ LAUNDRY AIDE Life Care Center of Evergreen Full-time position available. Housekeeping and/or laundry experience in a long-term care facility preferred. High school diploma or equivalent required. We offer great pay and benefits in a team-oriented environment. Eileen Gandee 303-674-4500 | 303-674-8436 Fax 2987 Bergen Peak Dr. | Evergreen, CO 80439 Eileen_Gandee@LCCA.com Visit us: LCCA.COM EOE/M/F/V/D – 39756

Keep Kids Together Abused and neglected brothers and sisters are often separated in foster care. There just aren’t enough foster homes to keep them together. This leaves them sad, anxious and confused and they feel like it’s “all their fault.” Give the Gift of Hope-Become a Savio foster parent.

Can you spot a business opportunity? Because we have one for you!

The Denver Post is looking for dependable adults to deliver newspapers in the metro area. Need reliable vehicle, valid driver’s license, and proof of insurance. Early morning hours, seven days per week.

Earn up to $1,000 per month!

Call 303-954-CASH or 800-892-6403 anytime!

Call Tracy Stuart 303/225-4152

Valet Attendant openings in Black Hawk CO.

Your Community Connector to Boundless Rewards

25 DRIVER TRAINEES NEEDED! Learn to drive for Swift Transportation at US Truck. Earn $750 per week! CDL & Job Ready in 3 weeks! 1-800-809-2141 HELP WANTED

Equipment Operator I

Help Wanted

Sell YOUR unwanted items here.

HELP WANTED Iowa based Reefer Company hiring OTR Class “A” CDL drivers, late model equipment, excellent miles, scheduled home time. Call Chuck or Tim (800) 645-3748 HELP WANTED

Valet Attendant openings for local Casino’s in Black Hawk. Properties are open 7 days a week, 24 hours a day, year round with positions available on ALL shifts. Weekend availability is preferred and flexible schedules are available. Candidates must be 18 years of age with a valid Driver’s License and be able to pass a pre-employment background check and drug screen. Individuals should apply online at www.townepark.com for immediate consideration.

Caregivers to provide in-home care to senior citizens who need assistance with activities of daily living. Call Today 303-736-6688 www.visitingangels.com /employment

Laborers needed for shoveling snow at two office complexes. Several positions open! Call Steve 303-601-4216

Help Wanted PT Educational Audiologist, grades PreK-12 in Bennett, Strasburg, Byers, Deer Trail & Kiowa area. CDE licensure required; CCC's or ABA certificate; knowledge of current technologies in Audiology including fm systems and cochlear implants preferred. Experience with children 0-21 years old. Please contact Tracy at East Central BOCES for more information tracyg@ecboces.org or 719-7752342 ext. 101.

LEGITIMATE WORK AT HOME No Sales, no Investment, No Risk, Free training, Free website. Contact Susan at 303-646-4171 or fill out form at www.wisechoice4u.com


22-Color

22 Englewood Herald

December 13, 2013

REAL EST TE Home for Sale OurColoradoClassifieds.com

CAREERS

Advertise: 303-566-4100

Advertise: 303-566-4100

The City of Black Hawk, two (2) vacancies for POLICE OFFICER I. Hiring Range: $53,959 - $62,052 DOQ/E. Unbelievable benefit package and exceptional opportunity to serve in Colorado’s premiere gaming community located 18 miles west of Golden. The City supports its employees and appreciates great service! If you are interested in serving a unique historical city and enjoy working with diverse populations visit the City’s website at www.cityofblackhawk.org/goto/employee_services for more information or to apply online for this limited opportunity. Requires High School Diploma or GED, valid Colorado driver’s license with a safe driving record, must be at least 21 years of age, and must be Colorado POST certified by date of hire. The City accepts online applications for Police Officer positions year round. Applications will remain active for one (1) year from the date of submission. EOE.

ATTENTION HOME OWNERS! Now is the BEST time to sell in years! Do you know how much more your home is worth? We do - and we're working with buyers in every price range& neighborhood!

ATTENTION BUYERS! We have SPECIAL programs just for you! For more info call today!

Ruth - 303-667-0455 Brandon - 720-323-5839 BARGAINS

Zero-down programs avail.

BANK FORECLOSURE & HUD PROPERTIES Homes in all areas

www.mustseeinfo.com or call Kevin 303-503-3619 HomeSmart Realty A 5280 Top REALTOR

Open House

Saturday, December 14th 11am - 3pm

Visit our website at: theacademyk12.org/Employment for details.

Wobbler Toddler & Pre K Teacher needed

Full Time, 12 minutes West of Golden on I70. Must be qualified by current state regulation. Looking for team players, some benefits provided. Please call Monday-Friday 7am-6pm 303-674-9070 and ask for Martha

Medical Needed full time MA, LPN or RN in Ken Caryl area for busy pediatric office. Includes Saturday mornings Please fax resume to Nita 303-791-7756

Honored to be in business in Colorado for over 20 years. Excel Personnel is an Equal Employment Opportunity employer. M/F/D/V.

BUSINESS FOR SALE Lakewood Family Restaurant and Bar Excellent Location w/access to 6th Ave. Operating successfully for over 25 yrs Priced to sell Owners wishing to retire

GrandView of Roxborough Luxury Senior Community in Littleton

Lock in Pre-construction Pricing! Exclusive Opportunity to Own!

303-744-8000

LARGE 2 BDRM, HISTORIC GOLDEN

Fully remodelled, utils. incl., W/D, Pkng,, Internet $1500/Mo. Tel: 720-277-5508

Cemetery Lots

City of Golden Cemetery Plot

Beautiful single plot or 2 cremains Desirable location (sold out) IOOF Section. $1700. (970)224-0400.

Please Recycle this Publication when Finished

Office Rent/Lease VARIOUS OFFICES 100-2,311 sq.ft. Rents from $200-$1750/month. Full service. 405-409 S Wilcox

Castle Rock

Wasson Properties 719-520-1730

Room needed

Courteous, Zealous, Army.Vet Handyman seeking inexpensive board 720-628-3294

Sean.ball@live.com

NOW IS THE TIME TO For Local News, PURCHASE A AnytimeVisitof the Day HOME OR REFINANCE!

~C ~ Rep

O

*

Call Estim

Ac 86

Ali’

CUSTOMIZED LOANS BASED ON YOUR FAMILY’S FINANCIAL POSITION MULTIPLE GOLD STAR AWARDS BY BETTER BUSINESS BUREAU OUR AVERAGE SALES VOLUME IS $4 BILLION DOLLARS!

SAVING YOU MONEY IS OUR “1” PRIORITY The Local Lender You Can “Trust” BBB Rating

A+

MULTIPLE GOLD STAR AWARDS

Call 303-256-5748 Now Or apply online at www.bestcoloradomortgages.com

9800 Mt. Pyramid Court, Ste. 400 • Englewood, CO 80112 Please recycle thispublication when finished.

Tho

C

REHAB, USDA, JUMBO AND CHAFA

See our Careers page: www.soopercu.org or; Send your resume to recruiting@soopercu.org.

We

Ro .30 C for A Unde In

ColoradoCommunityMedia.com

Randy Spierings CPA, MBA NMLS 217152 rspierings@primeres.com

b

Make

R

FULL PRODUCT SET INCLUDING CONVENTIONAL, FHA, VA,

Sooper Credit Union invites you to consider a rewarding career assisting our members with valuable counseling and affordable solutions.

www

Roommates Wanted

Miscellaneous Real Estate

OurColoradoCareers.com

$

Cal

GOLDEN/APPLEWOOD Clean, furn ranch, $310 w/ldy + $50 utilities NS/NP. ST/LT lease 303.279.5212 /847.763.1701

MORTGAGE LENDER — NO BROKER FEES

Find your next job here.

G a

Exp

Room for Rent

6265 Roxborough Park Rd Refreshments will be served. www.grandviewlife.com

Condos/Townhomes

OVER 30 YEARS EXPERIENCE AS A CPA

always online at Senior Teller

Businesses for Sale/ Franchise

WHY US...?

1ST SHIFT MON – FRI: 6AM – 2:30PM $9.50/hr 2ND SHIFT MON – FRI: 2:30PM – 11PM $10.50/hr 3rd SHIFT WED – SAT (SWING 10HRS) 7AM – 5:30PM $9.50/hr ** Clerical/Filing tests required **

1. Go to www.excelpersonnel.com 2. Complete the application including your job history 3. Once completed, call Excel Personnel at 303-427-4600

Reh

Charles Realty 720-560-1999

190 seat capacity all FF&E+ food & liquor

OPEN HOUSE

work for the world’s leading provider of aeronautical data!

TO APPLY:

BANK - HUD - CORP - AUCTION

• 100’s of Forclose Homes! • Investors & Owner Occupant! • $10,000’s Instant Equity! • Fix &Flip Cash Flow! • $0 Commission paid! • Free Property Mng.! • Easy Qualify! • Free Credit &Appraisal! • 100% Purchases! • No cost loans! • Not credit driven! • Lender’sSecrets Revealed!

Contact: Dan Beaton RMR,Inc. (303)423-7750

A charter school in Westminster is hiring custodians.

Excel Personnel is now HIRING!! Excellent opportunity to put your filing and assembly skills to

• Save your credit! • Payment migraines? • Payment increasing? • Missed payments? • Unable to re-finance? • No more payments! • Eliminate $10,000’sdebt! • Bank pays closing costs! • Sold 100’sofhomes! • Experience pays! 25yrs!

BROKERAGE OWNER - 25 YRS EXPERIENCE!

The Academy

Apply online at: www.panerabread.com/about/careers/index.php Click on Hourly Associates and follow the prompts. Check with your local Panera Bread for special interviewing events!

BUY REPOS

SHORT SALE R.E. BROKER

denverrealestatecharles@gmail.com

Help Wanted

Come work in an atmosphere you love and feel good about the product you serve. We take pride in having a fun work environment with flexible hours to fit most scheduling needs. This is a year-round position. Day, evening and weekend shifts available. Full and part time positions with opportunity for advancement!

Home for Sale

I NEGOTIATE PENNIES ON THE $!!!

NOW HIRING POLICE OFFICERS

Superstar associates needed at your neighborhood Panera Bread!

Advertise: 303-566-4100

* Only one offer per closing. Offer expires 1/1/14. A Best Buy gift card for $500 will be given after closing and can be used toward purchase of a 50 inch TV or any other Best Buy products. Program, rates, terms and conditions are subject to change without notice. Regulated by the Division of Real Estate. MLO 100022405 DP-6995059

Resid • 15y • Deta Dep

Call


23-Color

Englewood Herald 23

December 13, 2013 Drywall

Acoustic scrape and re-texture Repairs to full basement finishes Water damage repairs Interior paint, door & trim installs

Advertise: 303-566-4100

Adult Care

ant!

UTDOOR

FREE Estimates

General Repair & Remodel Paul Boggs Master Electrician Licensed/Insured/Guaranteed

303-471-2323

303-791-4000 25 yrs experience Remodel expert, kitchen, basements, & service panel upgrades. No job too small. Senior disc. 720-690-7645

Cleaning

Goodmans appliance RepaiR

• DepenDable • • Thorough • • honesT •

Expert Appliance Repair

$25 Off Any Repair

12 years experience. Great References

Call or Text 303-828-6111

www.GoodmansAppliance.com

Denver’s Premier Custom Deck Builder

Fast • Friendly • Reliable

FREE ESTIMATES

Commercial & Residential All types of cedar, chain link, iron, and vinyl fences. Install and repair. Serving all areas. Low Prices. FREE Estimates. 720-434-7822 or 303-296-0303

FIX a part of your team

We are a Family owned and operated. 15 years in the industry •Repairs made within 3 days•

303-564-4809 jquintana_77@hotmail.com

Carpet/Flooring

Thomas Floor Covering

~ Carpet Restretching ~ Repair ~ Remnant Installs In home carpet & vinyl sales

Residential & Commercial

303-781-4919

Carpet Cleaning

Custom Cleaning Services

Tired of coming home to a dirty house? I have 16 years experience Weekly - Bi-Weekly Move-in - Move-out I clean top to bottom Call Christina (720)550-1410

Cleaning

Ali’s Cleaning Services

Residential and Commercial Cleaning • 15yrsexperience •WindowCleaning • Detailed,Honest, •Insured&Bonded Dependable •GreatCustomerService

Call Ali @ 720-300-6731

PAUL TIMM

Honest & Dependable

Drywall Finishing

Residential • Commercial Move Outs • New Construction References Available

720.283.2155

When “OK” Just isn’t good enough -Integrity & Quality Since 1984 For more information visit: JustDetailsCleaningService.com Call Rudy 303-549-7944 for free est.

35 Years Experience

Patches • Repairs • Texturing Basements • Additions • Remodels We Accept • Painting & Wallpaper Removal All Major (303)988-1709 cell (720)373-1696 Credit Cards www.123drywall.com

Drywall Repair Specialist

• Home Renovation and Remodel • 30 years Experience • Insured • Satisfaction Guaranteed Highly rated & screened contractor by Home Advisor & Angies list

Call Ed 720-328-5039

Concrete/Paving

Garage Doors GreGor

GaraGe Door

Owner Operated

Service & Repair

Mike Martis, Owner

A PATCH TO MATCH

Just Details Cleaning Service

D & D FENCING

Construction/Repair Drywall Serving Your Area Since 1974

303-841-3087 303-898-9868

Carpet Brite Colorado

Rotory-Steam-Jet-Extraction .30 Cents-Per-Sqr.-Foot! Why Pay for Areas That Are Never Cleaned! Under Beds, Dressers, Etc.! Price Includes Rotovac-ExtractionDeodorizer-Grooming Only Eco-Friendly Cleaning Products Used! Call Steve: 720-557-4547 for an Estimate. Go to:youtuberotovac & watch the Rotovac 360 in Action...You Will Be Amazed! 8600 Park Meadows Dr. #600 Lone Tree, Co 80124

Drywall

A continental flair

Detailed cleaning at reasonable rates.

A+

General Repair & Remodel “We Also Specialize in Electrical Projects” Licensed/Insured/Guaranteed

303-791-4000

Shawn EvanS Owner

S&E D r y w a l l I n c . • Specializing removal of popcorn ceilings & patches • No job is too big or too small • Personal attention & quality workmanship

720-331-0314

Springs, Cables, Openers, etc…

10% Off with thiS ad Call or text anytime

303-716-0643

Hauling Service

Bronco

HAULERS • Dependable • Affordable • • Prompt Service 7 days a week • • Foreclosure and Rental clean-outs • • Garage clean-outs • • Furniture • • Appliances •

FREE ESTIMATES

Call 720-257-1996

Low rates, Free estimates

blind repair

insured/FRee estimates Brian 303-907-1737

HIGHLANDS HOME IMPROVEMENT, INC.

Cowboy Fencing is a full service fence & gate company installing fences in Colorado for 23 years. Residential/Commercial/ Farm & Ranch Fencing

Scott, Owner - 720-364-5270

Make BLIND

FREE Estimates

www.decksunlimited.com

30+ years experience Clem: 303-973-6991

• Dust Contained Sanding • New or Old Wood • Hardwood Installation

Eric DeSpain 303-840-1874

Littleton

BEST PRICES

Blinds Cleaning

independent Hardwood Floor Co, LLC

Over 30 Years Experience Licensed & Insured

Fence Services

720-635-0418

Hardwood Floors

DepenDable, Reliable SeRvice

A+

HIGHLANDS HOME IMPROVEMENT, INC.

Affordable Electrician

Appliance Repair

’s DeSpain Home SolutionS

Solving All your Remodeling & Repair Problems – Just Ask!

Electricians

Dedicated to Life and Living Rehabilitation experts providing opportunities that lead to independence 1297 S. Perry St. Castle Rock, Colorado 80104 303-688-2500 telephone 303-688-2600 fax

Licensed & Insured

Licensed & Insured 303-688-5021 www.oakvalleyconstruction.com

Darrell 303-915-0739

ESIGNS, INC

• Decks • Fences • Stairs • Overhangs •

Serving Douglas County for 30 Years

Call Ray Worley CALL 303-995-4810

30+ years experience Insured Free estimates

Deck/Patio

“Specializing in Composite Redwood and Cedar Construction for Over 30 Years”

m

e

H Bathroom H Basements Construction H Kitchens Serving Douglas H Drywall County for 30 years BASEMENTS H | BATHROOMS Decks| KITCHENS

Oak Valley

All phases to include

ON

o.

Handyman

Sanders Drywall Inc.

S

es

Handyman

trash hauling

!

INSURED

JIM 303.818.6319

Instant Trash Hauling • Home • Business • Junk & Debris • Furniture • Appliances • Tree Limbs • Moving Trash • Carpet • Garage Clean Out

“HONEY-DO’S DONE… THAT YOUR HONEY DON’T DO.”

Dirt, Rock, Concrete, Sod & Asphalt

— SMALL JOBS INSIDE AND OUT —

Call Bernie 303.347.2303

AFFORDABLE

Home Improvement

HANDYMAN

Carpentry • Painting Tile • Drywall • Roof Repairs Plumbing • Electrical Kitchen • Basements Bath Remodels Property Building Maintenance Free Estimates • Reliable Licensed • Bonded Insured • Senior Discount

Ron Massa

Free estimates 7 days a Week

For ALL your Remodeling & Repair Needs

A+

HIGHLANDS HOME IMPROVEMENT, INC. General Repair, Remodel, Electrical, Plumbing, Custom Kitchen & Bath, Tile Installation & Basement Finish

Licensed/Insured

Office 303-642-3548 Cell 720-363-5983

FREE Estimates

303-791-4000

No Service in Parker or Castle Rock

For all your garage door needs!

• Springs, Repairs • New Doors and Openers • Barn and Arena Doors • Locally-Owned & Operated • Tom Martino’s Referral List 10 Yrs • BBB Gold Star Member Since 2002

(303) 646-4499

HOME REPAIRS & REMODELING • Drywall • Painting • Tile • Trim • Doors • Painting • Decks • Bath Remodel • Kitchen Remodels • Basements & Much More! Call Today for a FREE ESTIMATE

HOME REPAIRS INSIDE: *Bath *Kitchen's *Plumbing *Electrical, *Drywall *Paint *Tile & Windows OUTSIDE: *Paint & Repairs *Gutters *Deck's *Fence's *Yard Work *Tree & Shrubbery trimming & clean up Affordable Hauling

www.mikesgaragedoors.com

Local Focus. More News. 23 newspapers & websites. Connecting YOU to your LOCAL community.

ColoradoCommunityMedia.com 303-566-4100

Kitchen

303-427-2955

Call Rick 720-285-0186

Your

Dream Kitchen now

Floor to ceiling – Start to finish

“We do it all”

• Design • Cabinets • Fixtures • Installation Free estimates

303-933-0820

russrenovations.com russrenovations.com


24-Color

24 Englewood Herald

December 13, 2013

Advertise: 303-566-4100

Landscaping/Nurseries

Painting

Mountain HigH Landscape, irrigation, and Lawncare

Paint or Fix Up Now

Family Owned and Operated We are a full service design, installation and maintenance company.

$500 OFF - Complete Interior or Exterior

Plumbing

PLUMBING

(303) 249-8221

15% OFF FALL SAVINGS FREE INSTANT QUOTE Repair or Replace: Faucets, Toilets, Sinks, Disposals, Water Heaters, Gas Lines, Broken Pipes, Spigots/Hosebibs, Water Pressure Regulator, Ice Maker, Drain Cleaning, Dishwasher Instl., Vanity Instl., Etc. CALL WEST TECH (720)298-0880

Lawn/Garden Services

Plumbing

Remodeling

PROFESSIONAL

Anchor Plumbing

PENA’S REMODELING

Call Don

at

303-915-6973

donlease@mtnhighlandscaping.com

Fall Cleanup – Sprinkler Winterization aeration/poWer rake – Sprinkler DeSign inStallation anD repairS – laWnCare tree anD Shrub Care – WeeDControl

OUTDOOR SERVICES TREES/ SHRUBS TRIMMED Planted, Trimmed & Removal • Sod Work • Rock & Block Walls • Sprinklers • Aeration • Stumps Ground • Mulch

Licensed / Insured

DICK 303-783-9000

Expert Painting - Family Business

- Low Holiday Prices Handyman or Remodel Free Estimates ImaginePainting.net

Residential: • Hot Water Heat • Forced Air • Water Heaters • Kitchens • Baths • Service Repair • Sprinkler Repair •

(303) 961-3485 Licenced & Insured

Painting

NEW SIDING AND REPAIR WINDOW/DOOR INSTALLATION DEMOLITION HANDYMAN SERVICES DOING OUR BEST, FOR YOUR HOME

720-390-6144 Roofing/Gutters

Bryon Johnson

We will match any written estimate! Same day service! No job too small or too big!

303-960-7665

~ Licensed & Insured ~

303.979.0105

Interior and Exterior

Interior Winter Specials

Small jobs or large Customer satisfaction #1 priority Call Bert for FREE ESTIMATE

303-905-0422

Mike’s Painting & Decorating • Interior/Exterior • 35 years experience in your area • A-Rating with BBB • Fully Insured • I do the work myself • No job to small

(303) 234-1539

www.AnyWeatherRoofing.com • Sales@AnyWEatherRoofing.com

Plumb-Crazy, LLC.

• FREE ESTIMATES • CSU ALUMNI • LOCALLY OWNED & OPERATED • LICENSED INSURED

O

STATE UN

RSITY IVE

BB PAINTING

All Types of Roofing New Roofs, Reroofs, Repairs & Roof Certifications Aluminum Seamless Gutters Family owned/operated since 1980 Call Today for a FREE Estimate • Senior Discounts

OR COL AD

• Honest pricing • • Free estimates •

Master Plumber • All plumbing repairs & replacement • Bathroom remodels • Gas pipe installation • Sprinkler repair

“We’re Crazy About Plumbing” CUSTOM HOMES REMODEL FINISHED BASEMENTS SERVICE AND REPAIR Licensed • Insured ALAN ATTWOOD, Master Plumber

PH: 303-472-8217 FX: 303-688-8821

Tile

Thomas Floor Covering

~ All Types of Tile ~ Ceramic - Granite ~ Porcelain - Natural Stone ~ Vinyl

ShopLocalColorado.com

Local ads, coupons, special offers & more Before you shop, visit ShopLocalColorado.com for the best local deals and services.

26 Years Experience •Work Warranty

FREE Estimates

303-781-4919

303-797-6031 dirty jobs done dirt cheap

Perez Painting Interior and exterior painting, wall repair, refinishing and texturizing, deck repair and epoxi floors.

Drain Cleaning & Plumbing Repairs

720-308-6696 www.askdirtyjobs.com

Free phone Quotes Residential/Commercial * Water Heaters Drain Cleaning * Remodel * Sump Pumps Toilets * Garbage Disposals

RALPH’S & JOE’S AFFORDABLE

720- 298-3496

ABE’S TREE & SHRUB CARE Abraham Spilsbury Owner/Operator

Finish and Plaster Designs. Insured References Available

Tree Service

Your experienced Plumbers.

Insured & Bonded

Family Owned & Operated. Low Rates.

• Pruning • Removals • Shrub Maintenance • FreeEstimates Certified Arborist,Insured, Littleton Resident 720.283.8226 C:720.979.3888

To get your business listed on ShopLocalColorado.com contact us today at 303-566-4074.

Scan to like CCM on Facebook 23 community papers & 20 websites reaching over 400,000 readers.

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