Issuu on Google+

News

Elbert Co 10-10-2013

Elbert County

October 10, 2013

75 cents

A Colorado Community Media Publication

ourelbertcountynews.com

Elbert County, Colorado • Volume 118, Issue 37

County mill levy increase: Yes or no? Ballot question seeking to raise property taxes flies under radar By George Lurie

glurie@ourcoloradonews.com

Volunteer Frank Carnesi smooths concrete on Sept. 2 on the pentagon base that will serve as the foundation for the bricks of honor. Photos by George Lurie

Veterans memorial taking shape Project entirely funded by public contributions By George Lurie

glurie@ourcoloradonews.com “Bricks of honor” will soon be laid on a star-shaped platform poured last week at the Elizabeth Veterans Memorial. Located just past the entrance to the Elizabeth Cemetery, the Veterans Memorial project is a community effort and has been under construction for nearly a year. “We came up with the idea last September,” said Bill Mansell, who on the morning of Oct. 2 was helping pour concrete at the site. “We didn’t have any sort of veterans memorial here in Elizabeth, so some of us got together and decided it was time to change that. It took some time, but we finally got the Elizabeth Cemetery Board to donate the piece of ground for the project and we’ve been building on it ever since.” “My father was a veteran and a lot of my friends served in the military,” Mansell said, pausing for a minute to compose himself, and then apologizing because “I get emotional just talking about it.” “For me,” he added, speaking softly and slowly, “our veterans are very important. They’re the reason we have the freedom to do things like this. They need to be recognized.” Mansell is one of four Elizabeth Veterans Memorial board members, volunteers who have spent hundreds of hours so far on what is clearly a labor of love — and honor. Built on a 5,000-square-foot parcel located at the northeast corner of the cemetery, the monument has been 100 percent funded by donations from area residents and businesses. POSTAL ADDRESS

In early September, county commissioners gave final approval to ballot language for a proposed property tax mill levy increase. But a month before Election Day, not many folks around the county seem to be aware of the proposed tax hike. An informal poll conducted Oct. 2 asked 25 county residents if they were aware of the proposed mill levy increase. Only two answered yes, and both were county employees. “I don’t know anything about it,” said Susan Troidl, who lives in Overland Estates outside Elizabeth. “But then I’m not a big political person. I think we need to get rid of everybody and start anew. I think there’s a lot of dead weight in our county government.” Joshua McCarthey, a Kiowa resident, also had not heard about the proposed tax increase. “Where I come from in the Texas hill country, all the little towns are broke,” he said. “I’m not against raising taxes if that’s the only way to pay for keeping up the roads.” At the September special meeting, Commissioner Kurt Schlegel warned that the county was running out of money. “This is very serious,” he said. “We’re circling the drain.”

Hot-button issue

Elizabeth Veterans Memorial board member Bill Mansell stands at the site. laid brick by “honor” brick. To help finance the project, the group is selling bricks for $150 each. Each will be inscribed with information about a veteran. When finished, the memorial walls will contain 275 bricks, honoring 275 veterans. Artifacts inside “So far we’ve sold about 90 bricks,” Before the wall was stuccoed over, one Vietnam veteran placed inside several ar- said Mansell, who lives adjacent to the ticles from his tour of duty; another man cemetery and works as a welder or runput his father’s Korean War-era dog tags ning heavy equipment. In the summer of 2012, he and Lance Homer, the project’s inside the wall. Last week, Mansell and a half-dozen board chair, “started throwing some ideas others worked in the bright 70-degree around” for a veterans memorial. “We’d been talking about doing somesunshine, putting the finishing touches on the “pentagon” — a star-shaped con- thing like this for a long time,” said Homcrete pad upon which a series of memo- er, a Vietnam veteran who suffers from rial walls, the project’s centerpiece, will be Parkinson’s disease and uses oxygen and a wheelchair to get around. “One day Bill and I started mapping out the project in some sawdust on my garage floor,” Homer explained. “Then Bill built a scale model, we made some Printed on recycled drawings and then things just sort of took newsprint. Please off from there.” recycle this copy.

The still-evolving memorial features a set of tall flagpoles and a statue of an eagle perched atop a 6-foot-tall, curved white wall displaying five, 14-inch bronze memorial service plaques.

Companies pitch in

Bricks for the wall are being engraved Memorial continues on Page 14

Tax increases of any kind tend to be a hot-button issue in a conservative county where two of three county commissioners have a direct connection to the Tea Party — Board Chair Robert Rowland founded the Elbert County chapter, and Schlegel’s wife is its current president. But Schlegel and Rowland ultimately supported the proposed mill levy hike, arguing that it was necessary to bolster the county’s anemic coffers and continue funding critical public-safety services. The county is currently facing an estimated $194,000 shortfall in anticipated 2013 General Fund revenues and has already instituted a number of cost-cutting measures including layoffs, pay cuts and the reduction of the work week for county employees from 40 to 36 hours. Adding insult to injury, the county has just $20,000 in emergency reserve funds and county officials must also figure out a way to pay for at least $291,000 in projected new — and yet unbudgeted — expenses that will come due in 2014, outlays related, in part, to shoring up the county’s decaying infrastructure and hiring sorely needed additional county employees.

Officials warn of cuts

Both Rowland and Schlegel have warned that if voters do not approve the mill levy increase, significant and immediate cuts will have to be made in county services, including decreased funding of both public safety (police and fire) and road maintenance. “In 2009 the county receipts were $9.6 million and in fiscal 2012 those receipts had fallen to $7.4 million — a drop of over Levy continues on Page 14


2-Color

2 Elbert County News

October 10, 2013

State money is big help for libraries

Come meet the alpacas Enjoy their beautiful fiber

• • • • • • • • •

thirty alpaca ranches alpacas for sale an alpaca obstacle course raw fiber, rovings & yarn demonstrations & seminars door prizes every hour handcrafted alpaca items artisans & vendors Pappys Hillbilly Concession

FREE ADMISSION & PARKING Indoor at the “Events” Bldg

was finalized at the end of the last legislative session. During a time when all of us have had to make reductions to our materials purchases for libraries, this additional funding is most welcome. At Elbert County Library District, it means close to an 8 percent increase in our budget for books and other library materials. District staff plan to spend the money on additional educational videos and easy reader and chapter books, which are popular parts of our collections. For the Agate school district, serving less than 50 students total

FURNITURE THRIFT STORE

We offer FREE pick-up!

We are a single mom ministry. Our program goal is to educate, empower individuals so they can become employable and attain self-sufficiency. Second Chances Furniture Thrift Store 209 W. Littleton Blvd., #A Littleton, CO 80120

720-524-3891

www.secondchancesdenver.org

SALE LIghT TRuCk/SuV

gREAT Buy

TERRAmAx

tread design may vary

39 99

HARVEST DAY Saturday, October 12 10am - 3pm CALF at Historic Lowell Ranch

Free Admission Courtesy

smooth handling

STARTING AT

FREE INSTALLATION • AIR CHECKS ROTATIONS • FLAT REpAIR EQUAL VALUE REpLACEMENT

P155/80R-13

FREE

89 99 89

INSTALLATION • AIR CHECKS ROTATIONS • FLAT REpAIR EQUAL VALUE REpLACEMENT

P235/75R-15

PriCes gOOd tHrOUgH OCtOber 31, 2013

PASSEngER CAR

LIghT TRuCk/SuV

uLTRA z900

wILdCAT AT 2

all new! our Best! a

smooth, quiet riding

FREE

on sale

We publish: Adams County Sentinel, Arvada Press, Castle Rock News Press, Centennial Citizen, Douglas County News Press, Elbert County News, Englewood Herald, Foothills Transcript, Golden Transcript, Highlands Ranch Herald, Lakewood Sentinel, Littleton Independent, Lone Tree Voice, North JeffCo Westsider, Northglenn-Thornton Sentinel, Parker Chronicle, Pikes Peak Courier View, South Platte Independent, Teller County Extra, Tribune Extra, Tri-Lakes Tribune, Westminster Window, and Wheat Ridge Transcript.

www.Lesschwab.com

PASSEngER CAR

STARTING AT

Did you know...

Colorado Community Media was created to connect you to 23 community papers with boundless opportunity and rewards.

”Reasonable Prices”

low cost

Kari May lives in Elizabeth and is the director of the Elbert County Library District. She can be contacted through the library at director@elbertcountylibrary.org. Visit the library at www.elbertcountylibrary.org.

Have a wedding, anniversary, engagement, birth or special occasion coming up? Share it! Colorado Community Media invites you to place an announcement to share your news. Go to ourcoloradonews.com/celebrations for package and pricing information. Deadline is 10 a.m. Tuesdays the week preceding the announcement.

DONATE your gently used furniture to support our ministry.

TIRE

1000 Books Before Kindergarten, a program that encourages parents to read to their children to help increase learning preparedness. At the Elizabeth Library, Wonderful Wednesdays feature a different topic on the first Wednesday of each month, with a display and books related to each theme. The paperwork to receive the money has been filed, and libraries can purchase materials between now and June 2014. Visit your local library, encourage your child to check out an extra book from school — we are pleased to be able to put more resources in the hands of our youth!

LET US CELEBRATE WITH YOU

Visit our website www.AlpacasOnTheRocks.org info: 303-652-1419

INSTALLATION • AIR CHECKS ROTATIONS • FLAT REpAIR EQUAL VALUE REpLACEMENT

FREE

on sale

INSTALLATION • AIR CHECKS ROTATIONS • FLAT REpAIR EQUAL VALUE REpLACEMENT

Our Best Tire Value Promise is FREE with every passenger car and light truck tire purchase. Here’s what it includes…

Free Peace oF Mind Tire ProTecTion

Free liFeTiMe Tire and Mileage care

Whatever the road throws at you -from potholes to nails - if your tire is damaged from any road hazard, we will replace the value of your tire.

To help you get more miles out of your tires and more miles per gallon of gas.

tires • wheels • brakes • batteries • shocks • alignment

Historical Tours, and more!

Jefferson Cty Fairgrounds 15200 West 6th Avenue Golden, Colorado

Costume Contest for Kids and Canines Castle Rock Colts Country Music! Concessions by Flying Horse Catering Antique Tractors Agricultural Exhibits & Demonstrations Visit Our Website for More Information (nominal charge for some activities)

Hayrides

Sat. Oct 12th, 9am to 5pm Sun. Oct. 13th, 10am to 4pm

Pumpkins

17th Annual Open House

in kindergarten through fifth grade, it means being able to purchase 10 times the number of materials that they did this past school year. I spoke with Agate Superintendent Kendra Ewing, and she said that the students enjoy their library and use it frequently, but that she has not been able to add books to the collection in recent years due to funding constraints. Early literacy and early childhood education are a cornerstone of our libraries throughout Elbert County. Many studies and reports indicate that reading readiness — pre-literacy skills gained before a child enters kindergarten — and third-grade reading scores are two of the best indicators of a student’s success throughout school. Along with materials to support early literacy, we host several programs at our libraries. We host weekly story times in Elizabeth, Kiowa, and Simla. This fall we launched

Celebrate Fall Harvest Traditions

a “hands-on experience”

In the 2013 legislative session, the Colorado Legislature included an appropriation of $2 million in the state’s budget to fund the State Grants to Libraries Act. The funds will be available to eligible publicly funded school, public and academic libraries to fund grants for library materials as defined in the statute (see CRS 24-90-401). The purpose of the funds, as designated by the Joint Budget Committee, is for educational materials in libraries that support or enhance opportunities for early literacy and early learning. In Elbert County, this means that we will see close to $20,000 coming in to our county. All five school districts — Agate, Big Sandy, Elbert, Elizabeth and Kiowa — will receive the minimum distribution of $3,000 each, while the public library will receive closer to $5,500. I have been very excited to learn about this additional money coming into our county since the budget

Pie's The Limit Fundraiser!

5 DenVer area locations to serVe You! Parker

11265 Pikes Peak dr 303-840-0420

littleton

13331 W bowles ave 303-798-4071

aurora

3430 n tower rd 303-371-0666

DenVer

Thank You Ranch Sponsors!

2001 Federal blvd 303-455-9424

highlanDs ranch

945 sergeant Jon stiles dr 303-471-1512

coMing soon To coMMerce ciTy, ThornTon & cenTennial

Media Sponsor

Three miles south of Castle Rock on the east frontage road (next to Creekside Bible Church).

2330 S. I-25, Castle Rock, CO 80104 www.thecalf.org

303-688-1026


3

Elbert County News 3

October 10, 2013

Costs uncertain in 51st-state idea Secession might leave urban areas better off By Burt Hubbard

I-News at Rocky Mountain PBS Colorado could stand to benefit financially and would see some improvement in the educational and economic standings of its remaining citizens if 10 northeastern counties should make good on their threat to secede and carve out a new state of North Colorado. By those measures, Colorado’s attitude might be: Have fun out there, new state! But what’s left of Colorado would also lose half of its lucrative oil wells, much of its prime farmland and some of the lowest crime areas in the state. By those measures, Colorado’s attitude might be: Can’t we just all get along? In addition to the 10 northeast Colorado counties that have a secession vote on November’s ballot, Moffat County in far northwest Colorado also will vote on whether to leave. But Moffat apparently wants to become Baja Wyoming. I-News at Rocky Mountain PBS analyzed census, budget, crime and voter records to develop profiles of a new 51st state and a truncated Colorado. Suffice it to say, Colorado would no longer be considered a square state. And, of course, neither would Wyoming, with its new Moffat County panhandle. Residents of the 11 counties will decide next month whether to start the fraughtwith-difficulty political journey to leave Colorado and, in the case of the northeast counties, become a new state. West Virginia was the last state to manage such a separation, in 1863, during the Civil War, a move validated solely by a proclamation from President Lincoln, according to a state website. It isn’t that easy today. One impediment: Colorado and both house of the U.S. Congress would have to agree. But proponents of secession said rural Coloradans are tired of having unpopular laws like stronger gun control and mandatory alternative energy standards forced on them by a Front Range-dominated state Legislature. “What has happened is the urbanization of America has disenfranchised the rural population,” said Jeffrey Hare, one of the organizers of the 51st State Initiative.

Bills caused anger

John Straayer, political science professor at Colorado State University, said bills from the last legislative session appear to have aroused animosity toward the legislature. “In terms of the immediate trigger, guns and probably SB 252 (requiring use of alternative energy resources),” Straayer said. “They allege that it is more than that, not being treated properly by the Legislature on

A tractor motors past cornfields recently near Eaton in Weld County, which has been the epicenter of a movement to form a 51st state from 10 northeastern Colorado counties. Photo by I-News at Rocky Mountain PBS a variety of issues for a long time.” Those costs equal about 84 percent of cession would have on Colorado. The I-News analysis did not examine The eventual exodus, if the constitu- the state’s overall general fund spending tional minefield could be navigated, would in the secession-voting counties. Extrapo- how much money the counties currently create a North Colorado of about 336,000 lating forward, that would come to total receive directly from oil and gas operations. That’s money that would help run a new people, supplanting Wyoming as the least spending of about $620 million. populous state in the U.S. It would leave Bottom line: Colorado spends between state. More than half of Colorado’s oil and gas Colorado with about 4.7 million residents, about $60 million and $120 million or more dropping it to the 23rd most populous state per year in the 11 counties than the revenue wells would reside in the new state, mostly in Weld. behind Alabama. it receives. “It’s pretty amazing the amount of dolOne of the key questions is the financial “There’s still a lot of (state) money comviability of a new state and its impact on the ing back to these counties,” said Brian Le- lars that it generates,” Lewandowsk said. Weld County alone gets 55 percent of remainder of Colorado. wandowski, economist with the Leeds BusiFinancially, state government in Colo- ness School at the University of Colorado at its property tax revenue from exploration. That has resulted in a current $100 million rado would probably come out ahead if Boulder. the 11 counties left, according to I-News By comparison, a similar analysis of county contingency fund and no debt, said estimates of how much revenue the state Denver showed the county provides more Weld County Commissioner Sean Conway, receives from the counties compared to ex- tax and fee revenue to the state than it gets a leading proponent of secession who previously was chief of staff to former U.S. Sen. penditures there. back in state funding for programs. The counties generate between $360 “You’ve got densely populated areas Wayne Allard, R-Colo. 18005 U.S. Highway 24 - Post Office Box 275, Peyton, CO 80831-0275 During the recent flooding, the county million and $400 million yearly for the state where there is a lot of wealth like Denver Office (719) 749-2690 Free Fax 877-258-4474 E-mail: ed@edkovitz.com able to reopen its roads on its own. in sales tax, state income tax and the state’s County and Toll Douglas County,” said Lewan- was “We’ve done this on our own,” Conway said. share of vehicle registration fees. That ac- dowski. Visit our website at www.edkovitz.com “We haven’t got help from the state.” counts for about three-fourths of the revepoliticians in Weld County want nue Colorado receives from those counties  Professional  Real Estate Appraiser  Not RealallEstate Broker Figures inAuctioneer dispute each year from taxes and fees. However, advocates of secession dis- to secede. Tom Norton, the mayor of GreeExtrapolating forward, that would be agree with the I-News analysis and point ley and former Republican president of September 30, 2013 AdcounSent Via Email – PDF Format the–state Senate, wrote in a column in The the equivalent of between $500 million and to their own report that shows the Tribune $560 million in revenue lost to the state ties break even Please emailgovernment back verification of receipt of last thissummer email that, while with state on Greeley some state decisions have hurt rural Colofrom the 11 counties. spending and revenue. On the other side of the ledger, the state The differences between the two analy- rado, collaboration with the state, not seCommunity Phone: (303) 566-4100 spends about $520 Colorado million in the 11 coun- Media ses involved spending figures on K-12 edu- cession, is the solution. Classified - Attn: Ronrevenue Mitchell Fax: Demographically and politically, the two ties for K-12 school funding, Section incarceratcation, from the state income tax states — North Colorado and Colorado — ing criminals from 9137 the counties, providing and 210 severance taxes from oil Email: and gas develRidgeline Blvd., Ste. rmitchell@ourcoloradonews.com Medicaid, running the courts and the state’s opment. Highlands Ranch, CO 80129 share of running one university and three Gov. John Hickenlooper’s office had no State continues on Page 4 Deadline: community colleges. comment on what financial impact the se- Thursday 5 p.m.

Estate Sale

LOG HOME KITS

AMERICAN LOG HOMES IS ASSISTING LIQUIDATION OF LAND DEVELOPER’S ESTATE 3 Log Homes selling for BALANCE OWED. FREE DELIVERY • Model #101 Carolina $40,840 - BALANCE OWED $17,000 • Model #203 Georgia $49,500 - BALANCE OWED $22,900 • Model #305 Biloxi $36,825 - BALANCE OWED $15,700 • NEW – HOMES HAVE NOT BEEN MANUFACTURED • Make any design changes you desire! • Comes with Complete Building Blueprints & Construction Manual • Windows, Doors, and Roofing NOT INCLUDED • NO TIME ON DELIVERY View at www.thegreatamericanlogco.com Ready Only Reply. Call 704-602-3035 ask for Accounting Dept.

SAU 2x3

BRING THIS COUPON FOR $1 OFF ADMISSION

GUN & KNIFE SHOW

CASTLE ROCK, CO OCTOBER 19TH & 20TH SAT 9-5 & SUN 10-4 DOUGLAS CO. FAIRGROUNDS WWW.PESHOWS.COM • 800-519-0307

BUY - SELL - TRADE - NEW - USED - SELF-RELIANCE

ED KOVITZ AND ASSOCIATES, LLC

Dear Mitch, Please run this display ad as follows:

Saturday, October 12, 9:30 a.m. MDT Seller: Brian Scott Graves Estate

Elbert County News Only Dates To Run: Thursday, October 10.

9337 County Road 74-82, 9 miles north of Peyton, CO

Size: 2 columns x 5” Please reference billing – Graves Auction. We will mail some auction flyers and would appreciate your displaying them. If you have any questions please call. Columns Height Total size Cost per column inch Cost of ad Number of Inserts Total of ads

Estate Auction

2 5 10 8.75 $ 87.50 1 87.50

From Peyton go 3½ mi. north on Peyton Hwy to intersection, stay right on Peyton Hwy & continue north 4¾ mi. to Elbert County Sign, continue 1½ mi. to auction site.

Reloading equipment; 1974 Chevy Blazer w/Meyer snowplow; Didier 7” hyd. log splitter; JD snow blower; MTD riding mower; Automotive fluids; Tools; Automotive tools; Hardware items; Camping items; Household & World’s More! An Auction Flyer & additional directions are listed on our website, or contact us for an Auction Flyer & to be on our mailing list - Email or US mail.

Ed Kovitz & Associates, LLC Auctioneer * Real Estate Broker * Appraisal Phone: (719) 749-2690 Email: ed@edkovitz.com Website: www.edkovitz.com Successfully serving our friends & neighbors since 1978


4

4 Elbert County News

October 10, 2013

State Continued from Page 3

would look quite different, the I-News analysis showed. North Colorado would be predominantly Republican, with the fifth highest ratio of Republicans to Democrats in the U.S. Meanwhile, Democrats in Colorado would outnumber Republicans for the first time in years. “We would have a red state and a blue state,” Straayer said.

Education disparity

The would-be exiting counties are generally poorer and less educated than the rest of Colorado, according to Census data. College education levels in North Colorado would be on par with those of Tennessee and Oklahoma, while college graduation rates would rise in Colorado to the second highest in the nation. North Colorado would have among the lowest crime rates in the nation, ranking from fifth to 11th lowest among states for rape, robbery, burglary and car theft. Colorado’s overall crime rates would go up, with motor vehicle theft rates almost three times higher than those of the 51st state. North Colorado would have a higher percentage of families among its households, be younger on average and have a higher percentage of Latinos. In fact, the new state would have the sixth highest percentage of Hispanics in the U.S. But its black population would only be about 1 percent, the fifth lowest in the U.S. And then, of course, there are the issues of marijuana and tornadoes. Legal pot would stop at old Colorado’s borders. About half of the state’s tornados touch down every year in the counties that would leave Colorado. Even if approved by the counties involved, secession would appear to remain a long shot, as it would require both Colorado and federal approval.

State ratification could come in a citizens’ initiative — such as the one that legalized recreational marijuana — in a referred ballot measure from the legislature, or in an act of the legislature, said Richard Collins, professor at the University of Colorado School of Law. If that happened, it would then need approval by both houses of Congress. In the meantime, the effort has drawn national publicity and its share of political

TANNER GUN SHOW Twice as large as any other show in Colorado!

Denver Merchandise Mart

October 12 and 13 th

th

Saturday 9am - 5pm • Sunday 9am - 4pm Valet & Shuttle Parking

$1 OFF COUPON at www.tannergunshow.com

303-756-3467

elbert county news

(USPS 171-100) Office: 9137 S. Ridgeline Blvd., Suite 210, Highlands Ranch, CO 80129 PhOne: 303-566-4100 A legal newspaper of general circulation in Elizabeth, Colorado, the Elbert County News is published weekly on Thursday by Colorado Community Media. PERIODICALS POSTAGE PAID AT ELIZABETH, COLORADO and additional mailing offices. POSTMASTeR: Send address change to: 9137 S. Ridgeline Blvd., Suite 210, Highlands Ranch, CO 80129 DeADLineS:

Display advertising: Thurs. 11 a.m. Legal advertising: Thurs. 11 a.m. classified advertising: Mon. 12 p.m.

23 Community papers and websites. 400,000 readers. .com

quips. Last month, when Hickenlooper was looking at flood damage in Julesburg, which would be part of the new state, he assured officials there that all Colorado would be working together to overcome the disaster, before quipping, “then you all can get back to seceding.” And Conway could not resist a dig at his two least favorite counties when talking about interest in secession being voiced

Send uS your newS Colorado Community Media welcomes event listings and other submissions. Please note our new submissions emails. events and club listings calendar@ourcoloradonews.com School notes, such as honor roll and dean’s list schoolnotes@ourcoloradonews.com

elsewhere — including in some counties not involved in the current effort. “When we’re done, we might be voting Denver and Boulder off the island.” I-News is the public service journalism arm of Rocky Mountain PBS and collaborates with news outlets across Colorado. To read more, go to inewsnetwork.org. Contact senior reporter Burt Hubbard at bhubbard@ inewsnetwork.org.

Military briefs militarynotes@ourcoloradonews.com General press releases Submit through our website Letters to the editor letters@ourcoloradonews.com Fax information to 303-566-4098 Mail to 9137 S. Ridgeline Blvd., Ste. 210, Highlands Ranch, CO 80129


5

Elbert County News 5

October 10, 2013

Marijuana tax no shoo-in Opponents claim levy could drive buyers back to black market

‘If we overtax it, just watch. The whole thing’s going to collapse and the black market isn’t going anywhere.’ Larisa Bolivar, former dispensary owner

By Kristen Wyatt Associated Press

Marijuana sellers and growers in Colorado joke that it’s rare for an industry to seek a tax on its own product — in their case, a 25 percent tax rate that goes before voters next month. Republicans, Democrats and large dispensary owners agree the taxes will boost state revenues and pay for the nation’s first intense state oversight of the recreational pot business. But not everyone is happy about the proposed sales and excise taxes, which, if approved, would go into effect when sales begin on Jan. 1. A few dozen marijuana activists have banded together to oppose the tax rates, saying they’re too high and will keep people in the black market. They’ve organized three joint giveaways, events that don’t violate state law as long as the joints are free and recipients are over 21. Their protests have been spirited. At a Denver joint giveaway last week, activists jeered dispensary owners who support the tax and even Democratic Gov. John Hickenlooper, who attended a $1,000-a-person fundraiser to support the tax campaign. “If we overtax it, just watch. The whole thing’s going to collapse and the black mar-

 

ket isn’t going anywhere,” said Larisa Bolivar, a former dispensary owner in Denver and executive director of the campaign against the tax measure. If approved, Colorado pot taxes would be lower than taxes on tobacco but more than taxes on alcohol. Tobacco has a 34 percent excise tax. Colorado excise taxes for alcohol are 8 cents per gallon for beer, 7.33 cents per liter for wine, and 60 cents per liter for liquor. The Nov. 5 ballot measure includes a 15 percent excise tax and an initial 10 percent sales tax. State enforcement has been estimated to cost about $7 million. Still, all sides agree that there’s no way to know what the marijuana tax rate should be. Economists can only guess what pot users are paying now and how much they’d pay to shop in a regulated store, not grow their own or shop on the black market. Economists at Colorado State University have warned the taxes may not raise enough money to pay for the state’s proposed enforcement scheme. In an April report, Colorado State’s Colorado Futures Center predicted the rates won’t make a big difference in the state

budget. The forecasters used a higher rate than the one proposed to voters — a 30 percent combined sales and excise tax — and put the post-legalization price at $185 an ounce, including taxes. They said that marijuana demand may not spike just because it’s legal, depressing a possible tax windfall. “Revenue from marijuana taxes will contribute little or nothing to the state’s general fund,” the report concluded. “There are likely to be offsetting effects of those attracted to marijuana or inclined to consume larger quantities because it is now legal and those who lose interest in marijuana now that the `forbidden fruit’ aspect of marijuana use is eliminated.” Washington state, the only other place in the U.S. that has legalized recreational pot, will tax retail pot at 75 percent. That rate was included in the ballot measure voters there approved last year. Colorado’s rate requires separate voter approval because of state tax law. Up to $40 million in excise tax is designated for school construction, with the rest designated for marijuana enforcement. The architects of Colorado’s marijuana

amendment insist the taxes are fair. They pointed to a recent U.S. Department of Justice memo that makes clear states need vigorous pot enforcement to avoid federal intervention. “The country is looking at us, and we have an obligation to create the greatest regulatory scheme we can,” said Rick Ridder, a political consultant who attended this week’s fundraiser. They also point out that most folks don’t use marijuana, so voters need an incentive to approve the drug that doesn’t relate to their personal use. “It’s one of the primary reasons people support marijuana, to get the tax revenue to take this product out of the hands of cartels,” said Brian Vicente, a lawyer who helped write the legalization measure. Some lawmakers this spring feared that Coloradans would reject a tax measure, leaving the state with a hefty tab for enforcing pot sales but little cash to pay for it. Despite the debate, the campaigns for and against taxes won’t be too visible to most. Campaign finance reports filed with the state show the pro-tax side with just about $10,000 raised by the end of September. Those numbers don’t include the recent fundraiser but likely won’t allow television advertising, campaign managers said. Pot tax opponents had less than $2,000 by the end of last month. That figure doesn’t include an important “in-kind” donation — hundreds of free joints protesters say have been donated by an anonymous supporter. Protesters plan to keep handing out the joints until the vote Nov. 5.

   



 Castle Rock Franktown   First United Trinity Methodist Church    Lutheran 1200 South Street Castle Rock, CO 80104 303.688.3047 www.fumccr.org 

 

   Services:    Saturday 5:30pm

Sunday 8am, 9:30am, 11am Sunday School 9:15am

Church & School

Sunday Worship 8:00 & 10:45 a.m. Trinity Lutheran School & ELC (Ages 3-5, Grades K-8)

303-841-4660   Little Blessings Day Care www.tlcas.org www.littleblessingspdo.com   Highlands Ranch CENTER FOR SPIRITUAL LIVING Affiliated with United Church of Religious Science   Sunday Services 10 a.m. Castle Rock Recreation Center

 2301 Woodlands Blvd, Castle Rock  www.OurCenterforSpiritualLiving.org 720-851-0265 Open hearts. Open minds. Open doors. 

Open and Welcoming

  Sunday Worship An Evangelical Presbyterian Church

Sunday Worship 10:30 4825 North Crowfoot Valley Rd. Castle Rock • canyonscc.org 303-663-5751 “Loving God - Making A Difference”

303-794-2683 Preschool: 303-794-0510 9203 S. University Blvd. Highlands Ranch, 80126

Englewood

Abiding Word Lutheran Church

Bible Study on The Harbinger At 4200 South Acoma, Englewood 6pm Wednesday nights starting September 11th-October 16th

303-912-5939

8391 S. Burnley Ct., Highlands Ranch

(Next to RTD lot @470 & University)

Worship Services Sundays at 9:00am

303-791-3315

pastor@awlc.org www.awlc.org

Parker

Parker

Joy LUTHERAN CHURCH, ELCA

GRACE PRESBYTERIAN Alongside One Another On Life’s Journey

SErviCES:

www.gracecolorado.com

You are invited to worship with us:

Sundays at 10:00 am

Grace is on the NE Corner of Santa Fe Dr. & Highlands Ranch Pkwy. (Across from Murdochs)

303-798-8485

Sunday

8:30 a.m. 11:00 a.m.

1609 W. Littleton Blvd. (303) 798-1389 • www.fpcl.org Acts 2:38

(for children and adults)

Littleton

9:00am Spiritual Formation Classes for all Ages 90 east orchard road littleton, co

303 798 6387 www.gracepointcc.us

Joyful Mission Preschool 303-841-3770 7051 East Parker Hills Ct. • Parker, CO 303-841-3739 www.joylutheran-parker.org

Connect – Grow – Serve

Sunday Worship

8:45 am & 10:30 am 9030 Miller road Parker, Co 80138 303-841-2125 www.pepc.org

9:00 am

7:00 pm

Additional Meeting Times: Friday 6:30 pm Prayer Saturday 10:30 am—12:00 noon Open Church (Fellowship/Canvassing)

worship Time 10:30AM sundays

Education Hour: Sunday 9:15am

Parker evangelical Presbyterian church

Breakfast 8:15 am Prayer 6:00 pm

Prayer 5:45 pm Dinner 6:15 pm

Weaving Truth and Relevance into Relationships and Life

Sunday 8:00 & 10:30am

Morning Worship Service 10:30 am Evening Worship Service 6:30 pm

Bible Study

Welcome Home!

Saturday 5:30pm

60 W Littleton Blvd, Unit 101 Littleton CO 80120 303 523 7332

Sunday School

Sunday School 9:00 & 10:30 am

www.st-andrew-umc.com

Littleton

First Presbyterian Church of Littleton

8:00 am Chapel Service 9:00 & 10:30 am

A place for you

Victory Fellowship

Highlands Ranch

Hilltop United Church Of Christ 10926 E. Democrat Rd. Parker, CO 10am Worship Service www.hilltopucc.org 303-841-2808

Lone Tree Lone Tree

Church of Christ Sunday Worship - 10:00am Bible Study immediately following Wednesday Bible Study - 7:30pm Currently meeting at: 9220 Kimmer Drive, Suite 200 Lone Tree 80124 303-688-9506 www.LoneTreeCoC.com

Parker

Community Church of Religious Science

Pastor David Fisher Fellowship & Worship: 9:00 am Sunday School: 10:45 am 5755 Valley Hi Drive Parker, CO 303-941-0668

www.SpiritofHopeLCMC.org

Sunday services held in the historic Ruth Memorial Chapel at the Parker Mainstreet Center

...19650 E. Mainstreet, Parker 80138

New Thought...Ancient Wisdom Sunday Service

& Children’s Church 10:00 a.m.

Visit our website for details of classes & upcoming events.

303.805.9890

www.P a r k er C C R S.org P.O. Box 2945—Parker CO 80134-2945

To advertise your place of worship in this section, call 303-566-4091 or email kearhart@ourcoloradonews.com.

Where people are excited about God’s Word.

Sunday Worship: 10:45AM & 6PM Bible Study: 9:30AM Children, Young People & Adults 4391 E Mainstreet, Parker, Colorado 80134 Church Office – (303) 841-3836

www.parkerbiblechurch.org


6-Opinion

6 Elbert County News

October 10, 2013

opinions / yours and ours

We love letters, but stay within lines In an era in which readers are more likely to post comments at the bottom of an online article or on a blog or on Facebook, we believe there is still a place for the good old-fashioned letter to the editor. Unlike online commenting, letters to the editor must go through something of a vetting process before being published. Largely, this is in order to maintain a measure of civility that, sadly, is often lacking online. On our opinion pages, we aim to provide a forum to stir community conversation. We appreciate diversity of thought and do not pick which letters run or don’t run based on our viewpoint. If you’re wondering why your letter wasn’t printed or are hoping to have one that is, read what follows. These do’s and don’ts will make the process easier for you and our editors. Do: • Your homework. In other words, check your facts. We have a small staff and can’t

our view do this for you. If you’re unsure of something, look it up. If you include a nugget of information that is not widely known, include where you found that fact. • Express your opinion. Tell us what you like or dislike. We particularly appreciate it when you comment on our articles and opinion pieces regarding local issues. But state, national and world issues are also on the table, if they are of relevance to our readers. • Keep it short. Our policy calls for letters of 300 words or fewer. Sure, we try to be a little flexible, and from time to time, you might see a letter a little longer but still in the ballpark. If you must go way over the limit, it won’t run, at least not as a letter to the editor. Consider requesting a guest

question of the week

What was the most unusual gift you got? People give gifts of all types, some mundane and some very different. Colorado Community Media asked people in a variety of local locations about an unusual gift they had received.

“The most unexpected gift I ever received was several years ago at Christmas. I expected the usual gifts but my husband surprised me with a very nice camera and a vacation in Hawaii.” — Cheryl Adamson, Englewood

“The most exciting gift I ever received was when my mother gave me a horse for Christmas when I was 13 or 14.” — Vicky Gordon, Phoenix

“I have been thinking and I don’t think anyone has ever given me an unusual gift. I get gifts but they are pretty stock items like socks, shirts and ties.” — Joe Sack, Highlands Ranch

“It was a shirt from my girlfriend that was wrapped in four boxes, in a bag and the shirt was folded up in a box. The shirt was nice and the wrapping made me laugh.” — Victor Limon, Sheridan

Prank is anonymous, but it leaves paper trail The neighbors’ trees were toiletpapered last night. This is what is known as a prank. What toilet-papering accomplishes I do not know. And I have never known if it is a malevolent exercise or not. Are the victims disliked or embraced? It could be just a way of letting someone know that you were thinking of them when you walked past the 12-rolls-half-off display. It’s a fairly benign prank, and certainly doesn’t carry as much heft as, say, having your home and trees littered with mud or seafood. If you went out some morning and found hundreds of carp on your roof, that might hold much deeper implications. How did this — toilet papering — get started? It is most commonly associated with Halloween and graduation, which are just about the same thing. Maybe you know the story of the Frisbee. In 1938 Fred Morrison and his future wife Lucile were offered a quarter for the cake pan they were tossing back and forth on the beach in Santa Monica, Calif. At the time, cake pans were a nickel, so

column instead — but we have limited space for these. • Email your letter to letters@ourcoloradonews.com. You can also email one of our editors, but it is more efficient to send your letters to the address specifically designated for them. • Let us know who you are. Include your full name, address and phone number with your letter. We won’t publish your digits, don’t worry. We just need to give you a call to make sure the letter was actually written by you. Yes, “letter-to-the-editor fraud” does happen. Don’t: • Put words in someone’s mouth. You can write in support — or opposition — of another person, such as a candidate for public office, but don’t assign any thoughts, opinions or actions to an individual that haven’t been publicly documented. If you do so, we may consider it a news tip and investigate the validity of your claim, but we won’t run it as a letter to

the editor. • Buy a stamp. “Snail mail” isn’t efficient when it comes to letters to the editor. As mentioned, we have a small staff and can’t take the time to retype your letter (which, we’re guessing, was written on a computer anyway). Email your letter to the address mentioned earlier. It will get to us faster, something you will appreciate if you want to see it published in the upcoming edition of the newspaper. • Inundate us with letters. By this, we mean from one person. We want everyone to have their say, so don’t expect to see more than two of your letters printed in any given month. • Be surprised if we edit for grammar or punctuation. We approach this very judiciously, however. A tip: DON’T WRITE IN ALL CAPS or use a lot of !!! • Use profanity or call someone a word you wouldn’t use in front of your mother. Your letters really do matter. We look forward to seeing more of them.

In-between is really middle of nowhere Some of you may remember the Gerry Rafferty song, “Stuck in the Middle,” and then again, since it was written and first performed in 1972 by Stealers Wheel, maybe there are more of you who don’t have a clue about what I am referring to. That’s OK. The point is this: Are you stuck in the middle? Are you in the middle of a project, the middle of a decision, the middle of a quarrel, or just stuck in the middle of anything? You see, it’s the middle that gets us. It’s not the “yeses” or the “noes” that derail us, it is the “maybes” that bring us the greatest frustration. It’s when we get paralyzed by indecision or suffer paralysis by analysis as we overthink each and every single thing we do. You know what I mean, right? It’s that in-between stuff that really muddles the middle. Those “tweener” situations where we do not know if we are in or out, or on which side, or whose side we will fall. The real questions are why and how we find ourselves in this position. Is it because we are over-accommodating and work so hard at pleasing everyone that we find ourselves in the middle so that we do not offend anyone? And you know what happens when we are in a relationship, friendship, or partnership and both people strive to accommodate the other

Elbert County News 9137 S. Ridgeline Blvd., Suite 210, Highlands Ranch, CO 80129

gerard healey President and Publisher Chris rotar Editor sCott gilBert Assistant Editor erin addenBrooke Advertising Director audrey Brooks Business Manager sCott andrews Creative Services Manager sandra arellano Circulation Director ron ‘MitCh’ MitChell Sales Executive

person, it’s like ending up in a reverse arm wrestling match. Instead of strenuously trying to “push” our opponent’s hand to the table, both sides try and let the other person win and end up in an extreme game of tug of war as we “pull” our own hands toward our side of the table. What are we afraid of? Are we fearful that we may make the wrong decision? Here’s the deal, we can make and will make a million wrong decisions in our life. But there is nothing we can ever do, within reason, that will torpedo our lives or our relationships or any business venture that we are pursuing that cannot be overcome as long as our decisions are in alignment with our values. And as Roy Disney said, “It’s not hard to make decisions when you know what your values are.” Norton continues on Page 7

Colorado Community Media Phone 303-566-4100 • Fax 303-566-4098

Columnists and guest commentaries The Elbert County News features a limited number of regular columnists, found on these pages and elsewhere in the paper, depending on the typical subject the columnist covers. Their opinions are not necessarily those of the Elbert County News. Want your own chance to bring an issue to our readers’ attention, to highlight something great in our community, or just to make people laugh? Why not write a letter of 300 words or fewer. Include your full name, address and the best number to reach you by telephone.

email your letter to letters@ourcoloradonews.com Fred had an idea. I think you know exactly where this is going, so I will fast-forward to the first Frisbees, which were called Pluto Platters. The name was changed to Frisbee after Wham-O bought the rights, and it was learned that Northeastern college students were calling them Frisbies. The Frisbie Pie Co. was located in Bridgeport, Conn. What began as a cake pan on the beach became a multimillion-dollar success, and a major American pastime and sport, for people and dogs of all ages. Marshall continues on Page 7

We welcome event listings and other submissions. news and Business Press releases Please visit ourcoloradonews.com, click on the Press releases tab and follow easy instructions to make submissions. Calendar calendar@ourcoloradonews.com Military notes militarynotes@ourcoloradonews.com school accomplishments, honor roll and dean’s list schoolnotes@ourcoloradonews.com sports sports@ourcoloradonews.com obituaries obituaries@ourcoloradonews.com to subscribe call 303-566-4100

we’re in this together Our team of professional reporters, photographers and editors are out in the community to bring you the news each week, but we can’t do it alone. Send your news tips, your own photographs, event information, letters, commentaries... If it happens, it’s news to us. Please share by contacting us at news@ourcoloradonews.com, and we will take it from there. After all, the News is your paper.


s

cient As an’t ch, uter ss r, ant ition

e one

n

r

ITE

ord er. k

7-Color

Elbert County News 7

October 10, 2013

D.C. should follow Colorado example As Congress wastes time in endless debate over shutting down the government and allowing the nation to default on its debt, Coloradans are working together and recovering in the aftermath of unprecedented flooding. The heroism and generosity we’re seeing in Colorado both during and after the flood is in stark contrast to the ideology and bluster coming out of Washington. In Colorado, we had a year’s worth of rainfall in one day alone. It led to historic floods that caused unimaginable destruction. The disaster damaged more than 18,000 homes, forced tens of thousands of Coloradans to evacuate, flooded hundreds of agricultural fields and pastures, and crippled infrastructure. Roughly 50 bridges and more than 200 miles of major roadways were destroyed. In total, the floodwaters consumed more than 2,000 miles across 17 counties. Most tragic of all, we

Marshall Continued from Page 6

y

Even though there is no money to be made in toilet-papering, I assume, it too has endured. It was going on when I was in grade school. Ike was in office. But it had to start somewhere. I picture one of two things. A workers’ riot at Charmin. My father sold ball bearings, or more exactly, he sold the balls for ball bearings. They came in all sizes, and some of them, used as projectiles in a factory riot, could be mighty dangerous. And that’s exactly what happened, and the factory was closed. But a workers’ riot at Charmin would be laughable. And that’s what might have happened. It went from a riot to a good time, and the hilarity went off-campus, and employees started to see their homes and trees being toilet-papered by co-workers, perhaps as a symbol of unity. arm My other theory is that some of emy ployees got intoxicated, and on their lunch o break took some rolls outside and began er tossing them back and forth. The employgame ees tried to throw to each other, but half ds the time the toilet paper landed in the

l

make ut

ur hat me nt d, you

Norton Continued from Page 6

It’s when we don’t put our stake in the ground and waffle about everything we need to do that places us in a perpetual state of limbo and unable to move forward. ourcolorado And we usually choose not to take a stand or make a decision because we are operating out of a mode of fear or scarcity

lost nine lives. In the face of this tragedy and destruction we witnessed the resilience, courage, and selflessness of Coloradans from across the state. It has been inspiring. From the first responder who rescued Lyons resident Cheron Boland in the bucket of an excavator to the Boulder Flood Relief volunteers who have been going door-todoor helping homeowners shovel mud from their houses, we have seen Coloratrees and streamed down. Too drunk to clean up their mess, it was left. It being homecoming weekend, some local high school kids thought it was Charmin’s way of saying “Go Mechanicsburg!” and a tradition was born. Do you have a better idea? I have never been on either end — he said — of toilet papering, but I am certain that the application is a lot more enjoyable than the removal. I said that I assumed that there was no money to be made in toilet papering, but there is money to be made in almost anything. There could be TP hit squads for hire. If you are my age and wanted to TP the Waterhavens, you could just hire someone to do it for you. It’s not a lot of fun to read the news today, is it? It’s very frustrating, adult-stuff, unfortunately. But I think we all can get a moment’s reprieve by seeing something as silly as a home that has been papered. For some reason, it has been passed along, generation to generation, and there is no end in sight. Forgive me. Craig Marshall Smith is an artist, educator and Highlands Ranch resident. He can be reached at craigmarshallsmith@comcast. net

Commercial Property/ Rent 2880 square feet finished commercial building 11'6" ceilings, office, bath & shop 5 miles east of Elizabeth on Highway 86 $1500 per month Larry 1719-892-0029 or 1-719-446-5360

RV’s and Campers KIP STORAGE Campers, Vehicles, Misc. Fenced, lighted, locked outdoor storage $20 up to 25' $1 per ft over 25' 5 miles east of Elizabeth on Hwy 86 Ken 303-204-3031 Joni or Larry (719)446-5360

Drywall

LETTER TO THE EDITOR Amendment 66 is wrong course

Referendum C set TABOR’s tax baseline at the highest amount collected between 2005 to 2010. Ref C’s big-spending advocates promised that its tax burden would last only five years. But Coloradans still pay $1 billion each year. Now our state wants Amendment 66, an additional $1 billion annually. Rather than its ever-expanding bloated budget, the state should eliminate inefficiencies and consolidate or privatize government functions. Education consumes 37 percent of the budget, roughly $10,000 per pupil. Still, despite billions of tax dollars spent

on education, pupil achievement remains essentially flat. Moreover, the state will impose more regulations, taking yet more control of their children’s schooling away from parents. High taxes stifle the economy, reduce the amount individuals have to spend, and limit the ability of businesses to expand or to maintain employee benefits. Amendment 66 carries a $1 billion price tag that will grow every year. Its goals cannot be measured. Colorado taxpayers deserve better. Peg Brady Centennial

GET SOCIAL WITH US The Elbert County News wants to share the news. Check out and like our page on facebook. Search for Elbert County News. While you are there search for Colorado Community Media's page too.

OBITUARIES

.com

Tile

PAUL TIMM

303-841-3087 303-898-9868 House Cleaning Housecleaning

Weekly/Bi-Weekly Residential/Commercial/ or New Construction Very Honest and Dependable

(303)646-7168

Painting

ROOFING PAINTING WINDOWS GUTTERS Insurance Claims Assistance

Like Like us us on on Facebook Facebook

Like us on Facebook Like us

on Facebook

303.44.PAINT Locally owned and operated family business

For local news any time of day, find your community online at

OurColoradoNews.com

Private Party Contact: Viola Ortega 303-566-4089 obituaries@ourcoloradonews.com

Construction/Repair Drywall Serving Your Area Since 1974

Concrete/Paving

Please Recycle this Publication when Finished

Democrat Michael Bennet has represented Colorado in the U.S. Senate since 2009.

Michael Norton, a resident of Highlands Ranch, is the former president of the Zig Ziglar organization and CEO and founder of www.candogo.com

TO ADVERTISE, CALL 303-566-4100

Home for Sale

These stories of teamwork and resilience are ones that politicians in Washington would do well to follow. Congress has failed to pass a farm bill or take action to fix our broken immigration system. It has not made progress on an energy plan or taken serious steps to improve our infrastructure or education system. Now the debate has spiraled into a shouting match risking the full faith and credit of our country and we’ve had the first shutdown of our government in 17 years. When Coloradans faced a crisis they came together, rolled up their sleeves, and went to work. Washington should do the same and reach across the aisle to find common-sense, middleground solutions on issues like immigration and our debt and deficit.

rather than a mode of growth or abundance. What are you waiting for? What’s the big or even little decision that is holding you back? I would love to hear all about it at gotonorton@gmail.com and when we resolve to leave the “tweener” in us behind, it really will be a better than good week.

CLASSIFIEDS Foreclosure 3bed, 2bath 2602 sq.ft. Attached 3 car garage, on 7.8 acres, Needs work, priced at $139,900. (303)995-7517 Agent

dans of all different ages, backgrounds, and beliefs pull together to overcome this tragedy. In the small town of Jamestown, residents who were cut off from the outside world pooled their resources to ensure that no one in their community went without food or shelter. They rigged a makeshift pulley system to carry food, medicine, and supplies to people stranded on the other side of Little James Creek and built impromptu bridges with donated lumber. In Boulder, the University of Colorado football team swapped helmets for hairnets and served hot meals to first responders and families who had been evacuated. In Greeley, local businesses organized a Family Fun Night for children who were forced to leave their homes, and in Miliken, a selfless farmer turned a floodgate valve to divert overflowing waters away from homes and into his own crops.

OurColoradoNews.com OurColoradoNews.com OurColoradoNews.com

Funeral Homes Visit: www.memoriams.com


8-Life-Color

8 Elbert County News

October 10, 2013

Flu vaccine widens range of protection This year’s treatment covers four strains By Lauran Neergaard Associated Press

More children than ever got vaccinated against the flu last year, and health officials urged families to do even better this time around. Far too many young and middle-aged adults still forgo the yearly protection, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention warned Sept. 26. And this year, Americans have an unprecedented number of vaccine options to choose from: The regular shot; the nasal spray; an egg-free shot for those allergic to eggs; a high-dose shot just for those 65 and older; and a tiny-needle shot for the squeamish. The bigger change: A small number of the regular flu shots, and all of the Flu-

Mist nasal vaccine, will protect against four strains of influenza rather than the traditional three. “There’s something for everyone this year,” said CDC’s Dr. Anne Schuchat. A severe flu strain swept the country last winter, sparking a scramble for last-minute vaccinations. There’s no way to predict if this year will be as bad. But it takes about two weeks for the vaccine to take effect, so health officials say early fall — before flu begins spreading widely — is the best time to start immunizations. “Now is the time to get vaccinated,” said Dr. Paul Biddinger of Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston. “Don’t wait until it’s in your community.” Boston declared a public health emergency last January when hospitals were filled with flu patients, and Biddinger said he treated many who openly regretted not having been vaccinated. January and February typically are the peak flu months in the U.S. But small num-

bers of flu cases circulate for much of the year, and Biddinger said a couple of people have been hospitalized already. “That first cough or fever is not the time to think about influenza vaccine,” Schuchat said. Flu vaccine is recommended for nearly everyone ages 6 months and older. Yet just 45 percent of the population followed that advice last year. Flu is particularly risky for seniors, children, pregnant women and people of any age with asthma, heart disease and other chronic diseases. Two-thirds of adults 65 and older were vaccinated last year. So were nearly 57 percent of children, an increase of 13 percentage points over the past two years. The number is even higher among babies and toddlers — 77 percent — and Schuchat said pediatricians get the credit for pushing flu vaccination in recent years. About half of pregnant women are vaccinated, a number also on the rise since the 2009 flu pandemic illustrated that popula-

tion’s vulnerability. But only 42 percent of adults younger than 65 were vaccinated, Schuchat said, with rates even lower among 18- to 49-yearolds. It’s not clear why. But “there are no good reasons to skip the influenza vaccine,” said Dr. William Schaffner of Vanderbilt University and past president of the National Foundation for Infectious Diseases. The flu shot cannot give anyone the flu, he stressed. But while it’s estimated to cut by about 60 percent the chances of getting the flu, Schaffner said it’s “a good vaccine, but it’s not a perfect vaccine.” How to choose among the vaccine options, including the new four-strain version? The CDC doesn’t recommend one type of flu vaccine over another. All flu vaccine protects against two strains of Type A flu, typically the most severe kind, and one strain of Type B. The new so-called quadrivalent versions protect against two Type B strains.

Education tax plan debated in discussion held at library School-finance proposal includes two-tiered hike By Jane Reuter

jreuter@ourcoloradonews.com Opponents call it the biggest income tax increase of our time, and say it’s a disproportionately designed, untested proposal. Proponents say Amendment 66 exacts a minimal fee that in the long run will translate into an improved economic scenario for all. Four people, including the co-author of the amendment, argued on both sides of

the issue during a Sept. 26 Highlands Ranch library forum sponsored by the League of Women Voters as the upcoming election nears. The ballot question will ask voters to approve a two-tiered income tax hike that would raise about $950 million for public school funding. Colorado’s current flat income tax of 4.63 percent would change to 5 percent for those earning $75,000 or less. Those above that mark would pay 5 percent on the first $75,000 and 5.9 percent on earnings above that. State Sen. Mike Johnston, who also led the charge for Colorado educator effectiveness law in 2012 — also known as Senate

Bill 191 — said Amendment 66 will transform Colorado’s education funding. “Not just where those dollars go, but the results we get from those dollars,” he said during the forum. The money would fund full-day kindergarten, allow for schools to extend school days and/or calendar years, expand technology and education options, restore programs lost to budget cuts and change the funding formula to avert looming future financial snags. But opponent Steve Durham, a former Colorado senator, said there’s no proof the proposed changes will work as intended, adding that higher income taxes could de-

ter productivity and ding the economy. “I’ve always come from the school that if you tax something, you’ll get a little less of it,” he said. Great Education Colorado director Liane Morrison said the amendment will more equitably distribute education funds so children in poorer communities have opportunities similar to those in Douglas County. “You want (your children’s) colleagues to have an equal experience like you’re trying to get your kids,” she said. “We either put it in at this end, or the other end. If you put it in early, society reaps great benefit.”

Want more neWs? For breaking stories, more photos and other coverage of the community, visit our website at www.OurElbertCountyNews.com, the online home of the Elbert County News.


n

9-Color

Elbert County News 9

October 10, 2013

MOOSE ON THE LOOSE

23 Community papers & websites. 400,000 readers.

nger said, year-

good said Uniional

e flu, o cut tting cine,

e opverone vacpe A d one adripe B

This moose was spotted by Elbert County resident Jenny Kusmider the afternoon of Oct. 2 near the town of Elizabeth. She said the moose seemed very hungry and did not mind the people around him. Moose are rare this far from mountainous areas. Elbert County Sheriff Shayne Heap said there have been two moose spotted and they have been seen in the south Elizabeth area. “They’ve been pretty docile and haven’t caused any problems,” Heap said. “They’re just eating people’s flowers.” Courtesy photo by Jenny Kusmider

Gardener program seeks participants By Sheila G. Kelley

CSU Director, Elbert County Do you enjoy working with plants, soil, insects, trees, wildlife, flowers and people? Then the Colorado State University/Elbert County Master Gardener program is for you. The Master Gardener Program in Elbert County is made up entirely of volunteers. These volunteers help the local CSU Extension office provide unbiased, researchbased gardening and horticulture information to Elbert County residents. Master gardeners are also involved in many community activities and projects such as writing articles for newspapers and newsletters, offering and facilitating educational workshops and seminars, staffing informational booths at special events and assisting with community-based garden projects. Anyone with an interest in gardening and helping others can apply for the Master Gardener Program. No particular gardening skill level is required. Applications may be obtained from the Elbert County Extension Office. Upon returning your application, you will be contacted to set up a time for an interview. If accepted into the program, master gardener apprentices are required to attend college-level classes covering topics such as plant growth and development, soils, plant nutrition, insects, disease and diagnosis, floriculture, vegetables, turf management,

Take the BEST of the BEST with you wherever you go.

2013 Winne 130 categ ories | 18 communitie

rs Guide

s | Over 2,00

A Special

0 winners

Supplement of

Scan here to view with your smart phone

xeriscaping, houseplants, wildlife and more. The classes begin in January and run through the end of March. They are held once a week from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. at the Douglas and Arapahoe county extension offices. Upon completing the classes, master gardener apprentices are required to spend 50 hours working from the Elbert County Extension Office between mid-March and October. Thirty-six of those hours are spent working in the master gardener office, answering questions and assisting customers with samples of plants or insects for diagnosis. The remaining 14 hours are to be spent on outside projects. There is no fee to submit an application. However, once accepted into the program, participants are charged a fee to cover the one-time cost of resources provided during training. Financial assistance is available, if needed. This is a great way to increase your gardening skills, meet some wonderful people and be of service to the community all at the same time. If you are interested in becoming an Elbert County master gardener, please call 303-621-3162 to obtain further information and an application. Applications are due Oct. 25 to the extension office in Kiowa. The office is in the Ag Building at the Elbert County Fairgrounds, located at 95 Ute Ave. The Master Gardener Program is a cooperative venture between Colorado State University and Elbert County.

Glow: Living Lights a fascinating look into the rare world of Bioluminescence, creatures who create their own light

Get to know Earth’s closest neighbor, the Moon with astronomer Win Pendleton

Explore the Haunted Graveyard, collect treats, make creepy crafts and bound through the bounce house

Calm After the Storm

SM

• We have been here for 29 years • Family Owned and Operated • Free Inspections, No Creepy Door Knockers • The Preferred Local Roofing Company for Many Insurance Companies, Hundreds of Agents, and Thousands of Coloradoans . . .

WEÕ RE HERE!

303-425-7531

www.jkroofing.com


10-Color

10 Elbert County News

October 10, 2013

Apartments might bump plans for retail Proposal eyes northeast corner of Parker Road, Cottonwood Drive By Chris Michlewicz

cmichlewicz@ourcoloradonews.com As many as 900 apartments and 40,000 square feet of commercial space could be built on a highly visible, undeveloped property near E-470 and South Parker Road. The owner of 46 acres of land on the northeast corner of South Parker Road and Cottonwood Drive, just north of Costco, earned a recommendation for approval from the Parker Planning Commission Sept. 26 on an amendment to overhaul the original plan for Vantage Point. Edward K. Fitzpatrick, the landowner and executive vice president of the Shopoff Group, is asking the town to reduce the amount of previously approved commercial space from approximately 280,000 square feet and 306 residential units to roughly 40,000 square feet of commercial uses and 900 apartment units. The planning commission recommended 5-0 that Parker Town Council approve the amendment. Council will consider the proposal during a meeting at 7 p.m. Oct. 21 at town hall. StackLot Development Services and the Stanton Group, who are representing the project on behalf of the Shopoff Group, said

The Parker Planning Commission recommended approval of an amendment to Vantage Point, a proposed development on the northeast corner of South Parker Road and Cottonwood Drive that includes up to 900 apartments and 40,000 square feet of retail. Photo by Chris Michlewicz the “weak market for commercial at the moment” puts an emphasis on the need for residential development to create a population to support the planned commercial uses within Crown Point, an area that includes Parker Adventist Hospital. According to the proposal, “it would be unwise to attempt to duplicate the overwhelming amount of commercial area within Crown

Point.” “Land use is all a balance,” Fitzpatrick said. “I’ve seen it before in other locations: There’s too much retail land available and it’s not supported by enough rooftops nearby.” The Shopoff Group is a real estate venture capital and investment firm. The company’s mission, as stated on its website’s

ridgegate.com

Road project underway from Franktown east Staff report The Colorado Department of Transportation has begun upgrading Highway 86 in the Franktown area. The project, which started Oct. 4, includes rotomilling the old surface and paving the six-mile segment between Highway 83 in Franktown and the Douglas/Elbert county line. Project hours are 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. Monday through Friday. The work was scheduled to begin in Franktown and proceed east. A pilot car and flaggers will alternate eastbound and westbound traffic through the work zone, requiring stops of up to 15 minutes. The speed limit will be reduced to 40

A more natural approach to new urbanism.

Seattle-based retailer will employ 20, provide culinary program glurie@ourcoloradonews. com

RidgeGate, it means walkable shopping, dining, and cultural venues. Plus over 1,000 acres dedicated to preserved natural open space. Three new neighborhoods are coming to life with a variety of home options. Naturally, we’d love for you to come visit. RidgeGate is just south of Lincoln Avenue in Lone Tree.

mph in the project area during work hours. “This is primarily for preventive maintenance that’ll extend the lifespan of the road surface about another 10 years and provide the traveling public with a much smoother roadway,” says CDOT project engineer Brock Johnson. “The new striping also will enhance safety by improving highway visibility and lane delineation, especially after dark.” The $1 million project, contracted to Westminsterbased Martin Marietta Materials, is scheduled for completion next month. Information about this or other CDOT projects can be found at www.cotrip.org or by calling 511.

Sur La Table coming to area

By George Lurie

New urbanism doesn’t always mean lots of concrete and no backyards. At

S

home page, is “creating wealth through real estate investing.” Multifamily housing would occupy 26 acres, at 22.5 units per acre, while the commercial components would be reduced to 6.5 acres. Roughly 12 acres of park space is required, but with town council’s approval, the developer could dedicate park land elsewhere in Parker or pay an “in lieu fee per acre.” Although the E-470 Character Area allows for a higher intensity of uses, and is likely where Parker’s skyline will take shape, the proposed project is adjacent to the Valley Hi subdivision, with homes on one-acre lots. The Town of Parker’s senior planner on the project, Patrick Mulready, said there initially was no response from the neighbors when they were asked in March to comment on the proposal. “History tells me this will be a controversial request. I was not satisfied by the fact we didn’t get a response from this, so I instructed the applicants to have a neighborhood meeting with them,” Mulready said. Valley Hi residents are concerned with traffic, noise and building heights, which would be capped at 45 feet. At least three homes on Valley Hi Drive are up for sale. Bryce Matthews, comprehensive planning manager for the town, said singlefamily detached residences are not recommended in the E-470 Character Area, but the applicant can use single-family homes as a transition between the proposed multifamily uses and the large lot residential to the north.

Billing itself as “the retail destination for those with a passion for cooking and a love for food,” Seattle-based Sur La Table is coming to The Streets at SouthGlenn. The company’s new Centennial store will encompass 5,727 square feet and be staffed with 20 fulland part-time employees — “many of them serious cooks themselves (who will) share their expertise and enthusiasm for cooking every day,” according to a company press release announcing the store opening.

Sur La Table’s SouthGlenn location is scheduled to open Oct. 23. The company, a favorite with “foodies,” began in Seattle’s Pike Place Market in 1972 and now has more than 100 stores across the country, with 40 of those stores offering cooking classes as well as a leading selection of global food and cooking brands. Sur La Table’s SouthGlenn store will have a “resident chef” and also offer cooking classes. “From essential basics to hard-to-find specialty tools and cookware, Sur La Table is sure to have something for every cook,” the company press release states. The store will be managed by Danielle Vorthmann and will be open Monday through Saturday from 10 a.m. to 9 p.m. and on Sundays from 11 a.m. to 6 p.m.


11-Life

South Metrolife

Elbert County News 11 October 10, 2013

17 Mile House fest goes the distance Arapahoe County’s historic 17 Mile House will be open for tours as the county hosts a Fall Festival from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Oct. 19 on the grounds at 8181 S. Parker Road in Centennial. A pumpkin patch, blacksmith shop, gold panning, antique farm implements, kids’ pioneer crafts and games will be featured, as well as a tour of the house, which was a stop for westbound wagon trains. Also, there will be a petting farm, food trucks (one with waffles, one barbecue) and a horse-drawn trolley ride to/from Tagawa Gardens along historic Cherry Creek. Pumpkins and food/beverages can be purchased. Admission is free.

Library hosts craft fair A pumpkin patch at Hudson Gardens, near the Mary Carter Greenway. Courtesy photo by Ian Ross

Halloween events pop up Haunted holiday offers fun for all By Sonya Ellingboe

sellingboe@ourcoloradonews.com Choose a pumpkin, get lost in a maze and enjoy ghost stories in October: • Under the watchful eye of John Marchetti, pumpkins have been growing bigger and bigger at Hudson Gardens in the patches on the west side of the garden near the Mary Carter Greenway. Now it’s time for FestiFall on Oct. 26, when the Gardens will host a family event to support the ongoing education programs planned by Melanie Feddersen. Children from across the metro area want to visit the Gardens and sometimes, scholarship help is needed. FestiFall, with a $3 admission charge, runs from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. with a Giant Pumpkin Sale, starting at 11 a.m. (prices start at $5, based on weight); live owl demonstrations presented by Wild Wings Education; a straw bale maze; meet the beekeeper; craft stations; storytelling; music by DJ Da Boogieman; and local food trucks. Bring a wagon or wheelbarrow to haul away that pumpkin! Proceeds will help with outreach throughout the Denver metropolitan area. Hudson Gardens is at 6115 S. Santa Fe Drive, Littleton. Hudsongardens.org. 303-797-8565.

• Denver Botanic Gardens at Chatfield, at C-470 and Wadsworth, hosts its Corn Maze Fridays, Saturdays and Sundays through Oct. 27, with extra haunting after dark on Fridays and Saturdays. Also at Chatfield: the Pumpkin Festival Oct. 1113 with a pumpkin patch, music by Stray Dog, Colorado arts and crafts, pony rides, food and more. Admission is charged. botanicgardens.org. • Harvest Festival at the Littleton Museum, 6028 S. Gallup St., Littleton is 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. October 12 and offers pumpkins for sale, wagon rides, games, music and food. Tickets for some events. 303-795-3950. • Victorian Halloween at the Littleton Museum, 6026 S. Gallup St., Littleton. Visit the 1890s Farm from 1 to 4 p.m. Oct. 26 for games, pumpkin carving and spooky activities. Free. Children must be accompanied by an adult. 303-795-3950 • Walking With the Dead is an afterdark tour on Oct. 26 of the Littleton Museum’s 1860s farm, beginning at 6 p.m. Walks will start every 20 minutes until 9 p.m. Timed tickets are required — available now at the museum. Appropriate for age 10 and older. Children must be accompanied by an adult. 303-795-3950. • Frightful Friday: An Evening With Edgar Allan Poe at Bemis Library, 6015 S. Datura St., Littleton, from 7 to 9 p.m. October 25. David Skipper will perform as Poe, with accomplice in horror Joan Mattey. Enjoy free popcorn and lemonade.

303-795-3961. • Reinke Brothers Haunted Mansion at 5663 S. Prince St. in downtown Littleton draws folks from across the metro area with its special effects and creepy characters. Lights-on tour for children from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturdays and Sundays through Nov. 3. Hours: 6 to 10 p.m. Mondays to Thursdays; 6 p.m. to midnight Fridays; 3 p.m. to midnight Saturdays; 3 to 10 p.m. Sundays. Admission: $15 ($1 discount with canned food donation.) • Hauntings at the Hangar — Wings over the Rockies Air and Space Museum is haunted from noon to 4 p.m. October 27. Lowry Air Force Base Hangar near Alameda and Quebec. Admission: $11/$9/$6. Free under 4. Wingsmuseum. org, 303-360-5360, ext. 105, info@wingsmuseum.org. • Festival of Scarecrows in Olde Town Arvada on Oct. 12 from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Vote for your favorite scarecrow between 10 a.m. and 1 p.m. To enter a decorated scarecrow, find application at historicarvada.org or call 303-420-6100. Also, a decorated pumpkin contest. (Do not carve or puncture.) Applications: arvadafestivals. com. Pumpkins can be purchased at the Pumpkin Patch, with proceeds to the Arvada community Food Bank. Pumpkin seed spitting, pie eating, potato sack and three-legged races, pumpkin dish cooking contest (no pies here). Face painting, hayrides, alpaca petting zoo, games. Kids costume parade at noon.

PACe Center is truly a pacesetter Programming for fall covers a lot of bases By Sonya Ellingboe

sellingboe@ourcolorado news.com Parker’s PACE Center offers audiences a menu of entertainment plus classes of all sorts through the fall. A sampler of Main Stage programming plus a couple of children’s shows follows: • Scottish folk singer Julie Fowlis appears on Oct. 17. Many have heard her voice in Disney’s film “Brave.”

• A troupe from Chicago’s gift to us all, Second City, will present “Happily Ever Laughter” on Oct. 18, ready to involve the audience in their clever improvisation. • Denver Brass ensemble brings fanfairs, flourishes, classics and contemporary hits to the stage on Oct. 19. • Wonderbound, formerly Ballet Nouveau, performs “A Gothic Folktale,” a new full length ballet that explores American myth, folk culture and magic realism. Director Garrett Ammon developed it in cooperation with illusionist/mentalist Professor Phelyx

and singer/songwriter Jesse Manley. Shows: Oct. 26, 27. • The Parker Symphony Orchestra will join forces with Legend High School’s Cantores Choir to present Verdi’s “Requiem” to mark the 200th anniversary of Guiseppe Verdi’s birth on Nov. 1. • Nov. 2 brings Modern Jazz with an Urban Twist by New Orleans native Jon Batiste, who has collaborated with Wynton Marsalis, Prince… • At the Mainstreet Center: Classic Acts presents “Charlotte’s Web” on Oct. 19 (2 and 6 p.m.) and the Missoula Children’s Theater presents “Alice

in Wonderland” on Nov. 9 (2 and 6 p.m.). For kids at loose ends over fall break, the Parker Theater Company is directing a weeklong theater camp Oct. 14-19, 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. It will include choreographed numbers from “Matilda” and “Newsies,” and a show based on individual talents at 11 a.m. Oct. 18. The PACE Center’s Renaissance Guild will celebrate New Year’s Eve Motown Style this year, but this show sold out by mid-November in 2012. For tickets and information: pacecenteronline.org, 303-805-6800.

Bemis Library will host its annual International Craft Fair from noon to 4 p.m. Oct. 19 at 6014 S. Datura St., Littleton. Proceeds from sales benefit poor craftspeople in many countries. Items and jewelry will be for sale from Indonesia, India, Egypt, Nepal, Uganda, South Africa, Asia, Vietnam, Bulgaria, Peru, Brazil, Haiti and more. New vendors are added to this year’s event. From 2 to 3 p.m. the Kutandira Marimba Experience will perform in Sophie’s Place. 303795-3961.

Fresh Eyre

Highlands Ranch-based Performance Now begins its new season with the Regional Premiere of “Jane Eyre” from Oct. 1120 at the Lakewood Cultural Center, 470 S. Allison Parkway, Lakewood. Performances: 7:30 p.m. Fridays, Saturdays; 2 p.m. Saturdays and Sundays. Tickets: $28/$25/$21; 303-987-7845, performancenow.org.

Ephron sisters

“Love, Loss and What I Wore” by Nora and Delia Ephron will be performed by Backstage/Breckenridge Oct. 18-27 at Town Hall Arts Center, 2450 W. Main St., downtown Littleton. Performances: 7:30 p.m. Fridays, Saturdays; 2 p.m. Sundays. Tickets: $25, 303-794-2787, ext. 5.

Heritage Fine Arts

“This is Colorado,” an annual juried exhibit presented by the Heritage Fine Arts Guild, will be held this year from Oct. 21 to Nov. 15 at the Colorado Gallery of the Arts, Arapahoe Community College. Well-known local artist and teacher Phyllis Vandehaar is the 2013 juror. The gallery is in the Annex at the northeast side of the main campus, 5800 S. Santa Fe Drive, Littleton. Hours: noon to 5 p.m. Mondays to Fridays; noon to 7 p.m. Tuesdays. An artists’ reception for the public will be held from 5 to 7 p.m. Oct. 25.

Scottish Book Club

Author Corinne Joy Brown, who wrote “MacGregor’s Lantern,” will speak at the 1 p.m. Oct. 20 meeting of the Scottish Book Club of the St. Andrew Society at Highlands Ranch Library, 9292 S. Ridgeline Blvd., Highlands Ranch. Copies can be purchased from Brown’s website: corinnejoybrown. com. Light refreshments will be served during the presentation and discussion. Please RSVP to bwarner@mindspring.com or 303795-9677. There will be a drawing for another of Brown’s books.

Littleton Symphony

“Great Stories in Music, With Narration” is the theme for the 2013-2014 Littleton Symphony season, which begins by featuring the Colorado Chorale at 7:30 p.m. Oct. Sonya continues on Page 12


12

12 Elbert County News

October 10, 2013

Sonya

Acclaimed author has humble backstory

Continued from Page 11

18 at Littleton United Methodist Church, 5894 S. Datura St., Littleton. It will be repeated at 3 p.m. Oct. 20 at Bethany Lutheran Church, 4500 E. Hampden Ave., Cherry Hills Village. The chorale will sing Poulenc’s “Gloria” and Randall Thompson’s “Testament of Freedom.” Monika Vischer will be guest narrator for the “Lieutenant Kije’ Suite” by Prokofieff. The orchestra will also perform the dramatic “Siegfried’s Death and Funeral March” in commemoration of Wagner’s 200th birthday. Tickets cost $15, $12 and can be purchased online at littletonsymphony.org; at the Gorsett Violin Shop, 8100 S. Quebec St., Centennial; or at the door. Information: 303-933-6824, info@littletonsymphony.org.

Sweet Charity Affair

The annual Alpha Xi Delta alumnae fundraising event, Sweet Charity Affair and Luncheon, will be held from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Oct. 19 at Calvary Baptist Church, 6500 E. Girard Ave., Denver. Proceeds from the bake sale, live and silent auction, boutique and lunch, catered by Taste of the Season, will fund a number of local charities. Purchase tickets ($20) from Barbara Vietti, bvietti@comcast.net, 303-979-7561.

CD release

The Reunited Young Adult Choir of St. Andrew United Methodist Church will celebrate the release of its first CD at its Fall Concert at 7:30 p.m. Oct. 18 at St. Andrew, 9203 S. University Blvd. Highlands Ranch. Admission is free. The group of a dozen 20-somethings formed in 2009, led by Nathan and Matthew Grooms, who wanted to reconnect with old friends to sing after college. Music director Mark Zwilling is accompanist and music adviser.

Turano pens four novels within 18-month stretch By Chris Michlewicz

cmichlewicz@ourcolorado news.com Within weeks of beginning her career as an author, Jen Turano’s friends had her convinced she should be on Oprah’s couch discussing the finer points of her latest book. While publishers didn’t immediately see it that way, the up-and-coming historical romance writer has found herself much closer to the coveted sitdown than she ever imagined. Turano, 48, has developed a devoted audience, selling tens of thousands of books worldwide since November, a nearimpossible feat for an unknown author. This month, she is celebrating the release of her third novel, “A Talent for Trouble.” Things didn’t start out so easily. The decision to change from department store manager to stay-at-home mom hit her over the head, literally. “I worked in retail for years,” she said. “One day, a lady hit me in the head with her handbag because I wouldn’t take her return. That’s when I hung up my heels forever.” Her transition into the literary world a few years later wasn’t quite as violent. Eschewing the traditional children’s tales, the Parker mom made up her own stories for her then-9year-old son. His rave reviews led the duo to create their own

book about smelly lizard creatures called “Fanglers,” and the reaction from Turano’s ParentTeacher Organization friends boosted her confidence. What she didn’t anticipate was the level of competition for such material; publishing companies were being flooded with sci-fi/fantasy manuscripts. Turano changed genres once again when she discovered historical romance. Shortly after her father passed away, Turano plunged into writing and penned a 170,000-word women’s fiction saga. Upon receiving advice to pare it down by 90,000 words and direction to improve her author point of view, she took off. In a three-week period, she wrote another book, “Almost a Lady,” and received 18 requests from interested publishers who wanted to learn more. Her initial discouragement all but evaporated. “I didn’t realize it was odd for agents to contact you,” she said. “Most people don’t hear back.” Turano was cleaning the shower when, out of the blue, she came up with the outline for all four books in her first series. That series has earned her acclaim from prominent bloggers, and most recently, a spot on Book List’s Top 10 Romances for 2013 for her work on “A Most Peculiar Circumstance,” the second installment in the series. She is now writing the fourth and final book of the series, “A Match of Wits,” due out next year. She despises house cleaning, but admits it’s her source of inspiration. “If something’s not working

“A Talent for Trouble” is Jen Turano’s third book to released in the last year. Courtesy image and I need to change it, I pull out the vacuum,” she says. Turano writes for the “inspirational market” and has a “faith-element thread” in her novels, but they are not reliNotice tend gion-based and Public simply

Public Notice

Public Notice NOTICE OF PURCHASE OF REAL ESTATE AT TAX LIEN SALE AND OF APPLICATION FOR ISSUANCE OF TREASURER’S DEED TSC# 2010-01201 Public Notice

Name Changes PUBLIC NOTICE Public Notice of Petition for Change of Name Public notice is given on September 13, 2013 that a Petition for a Change of Name of an adult has been filed with the Elbert County Court. The Petition requests that the name of Walter Armell Fox Sr. be changed to Sebastian Josiah Fox Sr. Case No.: 2013 C 39 Cheryl A. Layne Clerk of Court By: JoLeen Jenkins Deputy Clerk Legal Notice No: 927778 First Publication: October 3, 2013 Last Publication: October 17, 2013 Publisher: Elbert County News

Notice To Creditors PUBLIC NOTICE NOTICE TO CREDITORS Estate of Marie A. Myrick, Deceased Case Number: 2013 PR 30016 All persons having claims against the above-named estate are required to present them to the Personal Representative or to the District Court of Elbert County, Colorado on or before January 30, 2014 or the claims may be forever barred. Berton C. Myrick Personal Representative 1025 Linda Lane Evergreen, Colorado 80439 Legal Notice No: 927771 First Publication: September 26, 2013 Last Publication: October 10, 2013 Publisher: The Elbert County News

Government Legals Public Notice NOTICE OF PURCHASE OF REAL ESTATE AT TAX LIEN SALE AND OF APPLICATION FOR ISSUANCE OF TREASURER’S DEED TSC# 2009-00914 To Every Person in Actual Possession or Occupancy of the hereinafter Described Land, Lot or Premises, and to the Person in Whose Name the Same was Taxed or Specially Assessed, and to all Persons having an Interest or Title of Record in or to the said Premises and To Whom It may

NOTICE OF PURCHASE OF REAL ESTATE AT TAX LIEN SALE AND OF APPLICATION FOR ISSUANCE OF TREASURER’S DEED TSC# 2009-00914

Government Legals

To Every Person in Actual Possession or Occupancy of the hereinafter Described Land, Lot or Premises, and to the Person in Whose Name the Same was Taxed or Specially Assessed, and to all Persons having an Interest or Title of Record in or to the said Premises and To Whom It may Concern, and more especially to: Rhonda Y Moore: You and each of you are hereby notified that on the 17 day of November A.D. 2009 the then County Treasurer of the County of Elbert, in the State of Colorado, sold at public tax lien sale to Cameron D Mee the following described real estate situate in the County of Elbert, State of Colorado, to wit: Section: 25 Township: 6 Range: 64 Subdivision: SUN COUNTRY MEADOWS FIL 4 (PUD) Lot: 012B 08291 CONESTOGA CT and said County Treasurer issued a certificate of purchase therefore to Cameron D Mee. That said tax lien sale was made to satisfy the delinquent taxes assessed against said real estate for the year 2008; That said real estate was taxed or specially assessed in the name(s) of Rhonda Y Moore for said year 2008. That a treasurer’s Deed will be issued for said real estate to the said Cameron D Mee at 3:00 o’clock P.M., on the 8th day of January, A.D. 2014, unless the same has been redeemed. Said property may be redeemed from said sale at any time prior to the actual execution of said Treasurer’s Deed. Witness my hand this 18th day of September, A. D. Richard Pettitt County Treasurer of Elbert County Legal Notice No.: 927773 First Publication: September 26, 2013 Last Publication: October 10, 2013 Publisher: The Elbert County News Public Notice NOTICE OF PURCHASE OF REAL ESTATE AT TAX LIEN SALE AND OF APPLICATION FOR ISSUANCE OF TREASURER’S DEED TSC# 2010-01201 To Every Person in Actual Possession or Occupancy of the hereinafter Described Land, Lot or Premises, and to the Person in Whose Name the Same was Taxed or Specially Assessed, and to all Persons having an Interest or Title of Record in or to the said Premises and To Whom It may Concern, and more especially to: Perry Leyden: You and each of you are hereby notified that on the 9th day of November A.D. 2010 the then County Treasurer of the County of Elbert, in the State of Colorado, sold at public tax lien sale to HGT ENTERPRISES the following

To Every Person in Actual Possession or Occupancy of the hereinafter Described Land, Lot or Premises, and to the Person in Whose Name the Same was Taxed or Specially Assessed, and to all Persons having an Interest or Title of Record in or to the said Premises and To Whom It may Concern, and more especially to:

Government Legals

Perry Leyden: You and each of you are hereby notified that on the 9th day of November A.D. 2010 the then County Treasurer of the County of Elbert, in the State of Colorado, sold at public tax lien sale to HGT ENTERPRISES the following described real estate situate in the County of Elbert, State of Colorado, to wit: Section: 32 Township: 6 Range: 64Subdivision: SPRING VALLEY RANCH PHASE 1 Block: A Lot: 31 42071 N PINEHURST CIR and said County Treasurer issued a certificate of purchase therefore to HGT ENTERPRISES. That said tax lien sale was made to satisfy the delinquent taxes assessed against said real estate for the year 2009; That said real estate was taxed or specially assessed in the name(s) of Perry Leyden for said year 2009. That a treasurer’s Deed will be issued for said real estate to the said HGT ENTERPRISES at 3:00 o’clock P.M., on the 8th day of January, A.D. 2014, unless the same has been redeemed. Said property may be redeemed from said sale at any time prior to the actual execution of said Treasurer’s Deed. Witness my hand this 18th day of September, A. D.. Richard Pettitt County Treasurer of Elbert County Legal Notice No.: 927774 First Publication: September 26, 2013 Last Publication: October 10, 2013 Publisher: The Elbert County News Public Notice NOTICE OF PURCHASE OF REAL ESTATE AT TAX LIEN SALE AND OF APPLICATION FOR ISSUANCE OF TREASURER’S DEED TSC# 2010-01202 To Every Person in Actual Possession or Occupancy of the hereinafter Described Land, Lot or Premises, and to the Person in Whose Name the Same was Taxed or Specially Assessed, and to all Persons having an Interest or Title of Record in or to the said Premises and To Whom It may Concern, and more especially to: Perry Leyden: You and each of you are hereby notified that on the 9th day of November A.D. 2010 the then County Treasurer of the County of Elbert, in the State of Colorado, sold at public tax lien sale to HGT ENTERPRISES the following described real estate situate in the County of Elbert, State of Colorado, to wit: Section: 32 Township: 6 Range: 64Subdivision: SPRING VALLEY RANCH PHASE 1 Block: A Lot: 32 42081 N PINEHURST CIR

E

NOTICE OF PURCHASE OF REAL ESTATE AT TAX LIEN SALE AND OF APPLICATION FOR ISSUANCE OF TREASURER’S DEED TSC# 2010-01202 To Every Person in Actual Possession or Occupancy of the hereinafter Described Land, Lot or Premises, and to the Person in Whose Name the Same was Taxed or Specially Assessed, and to all Persons having an Interest or Title of Record in or to the said Premises and To Whom It may Concern, and more especially to: Perry Leyden: You and each of you are hereby notified that on the 9th day of November A.D. 2010 the then County Treasurer of the County of Elbert, in the State of Colorado, sold at public tax lien sale to HGT ENTERPRISES the following described real estate situate in the County of Elbert, State of Colorado, to wit:

Government Legals

Section: 32 Township: 6 Range: 64Subdivision: SPRING VALLEY RANCH PHASE 1 Block: A Lot: 32 42081 N PINEHURST CIR and said County Treasurer issued a certificate of purchase therefore to HGT ENTERPRISES. That said tax lien sale was made to satisfy the delinquent taxes assessed against said real estate for the year 2009; That said real estate was taxed or specially assessed in the name(s) of Perry Leyden for said year 2009. That a treasurer’s Deed will be issued for said real estate to the said HGT ENTERPRISES at 3:00 o’clock P.M., on the 8th day of January, A.D. 2014, unless the same has been redeemed. Said property may be redeemed from said sale at any time prior to the actual execution of said Treasurer’s Deed. Witness my hand this 18th day of September, A. D.. Richard Pettitt County Treasurer of Elbert County Legal Notice No.: 927775 First Publication: September 26, 2013 Last Publication: October 10, 2013 Publisher: The Elbert County News Public Notice NOTICE OF PURCHASE OF REAL ESTATE AT TAX LIEN SALE AND OF APPLICATION FOR ISSUANCE OF TREASURER’S DEED TSC# 2010-01237 To Every Person in Actual Possession or Occupancy of the hereinafter Described Land, Lot or Premises, and to the Person in Whose Name the Same was Taxed or Specially Assessed, and to all Persons having an Interest or Title of Record in or to the said Premises and To Whom It may Concern, and more especially to: Pioneer Plastics Inc: You and each of you are hereby notified that on the 9th day of November A.D. 2010 the then County Treasurer of the County of Elbert, in the State of Colorado, sold at public tax lien sale to Cameron D Mee the following described real estate situate in the County of Elbert, State of Colorado, to wit: Section: 7 Township: 8 Range: 64Subdivision: ELIZABETH GARLANDS ADDITION Block: 008 Lot: 0016 THRU:Lot: 0018 372 N BANNER ST and said County Treasurer issued a certificate of purchase therefore to Cameron D Mee. That said tax lien sale was made to satisfy the delinquent taxes assessed against said real estate for the year 2009;

NOTICE OF PURCHASE OF REAL ESTATE AT TAX LIEN SALE AND OF APPLICATION FOR ISSUANCE OF TREASURER’S DEED TSC# 2010-01237

to “appeal to people who want to share the book with their daughter and not be embarrassed.” She refuses to include sex scenes. For more information, visit To Every Person in Actual Possession or www.jenturano.com. Occupancy of the hereinafter Described

To Every Person in Actual Possession or Occupancy of the hereinafter Described Land, Lot or Premises, and to the Person in Whose Name the Same was Taxed or Specially Assessed, and to all Persons having an Interest or Title of Record in or to the said Premises and To Whom It may Concern, and more especially to: Pioneer Plastics Inc: You and each of you are hereby notified that on the 9th day of November A.D. 2010 the then County Treasurer of the County of Elbert, in the State of Colorado, sold at public tax lien sale to Cameron D Mee the following described real estate situate in the County of Elbert, State of Colorado, to wit: Section: 7 Township: 8 Range: 64Subdivision: ELIZABETH GARLANDS ADDITION Block: 008 Lot: 0016 THRU:Lot: 0018 372 N BANNER ST

Government Legals

and said County Treasurer issued a certificate of purchase therefore to Cameron D Mee. That said tax lien sale was made to satisfy the delinquent taxes assessed against said real estate for the year 2009; That said real estate was taxed or specially assessed in the name(s) of Pioneer Plastics Inc for said year 2009. That a treasurer’s Deed will be issued for said real estate to the said Cameron D Mee at 3:00 o’clock P.M., on the 8th day of January, A.D. 2014, unless the same has been redeemed. Said property may be redeemed from said sale at any time prior to the actual execution of said Treasurer’s Deed. Witness my hand this 18th day of September, A. D.. Richard Pettitt County Treasurer of Elbert County Legal Notice No.: 927776 First Publication: September 26, 2013 Last Publication: October 10, 2013 Publisher: The Elbert County News Public Notice NOTICE OF PURCHASE OF REAL ESTATE AT TAX LIEN SALE AND OF APPLICATION FOR ISSUANCE OF TREASURER’S DEED TSC# 2010-01226 To Every Person in Actual Possession or Occupancy of the hereinafter Described Land, Lot or Premises, and to the Person in Whose Name the Same was Taxed or Specially Assessed, and to all Persons having an Interest or Title of Record in or to the said Premises and To Whom It may Concern, and more especially to: SJR REAL ESTATE COLORADO LLC: You and each of you are hereby notified that on the 9th day of November A.D. 2010 the then County Treasurer of the County of Elbert, in the State of Colorado, sold at public tax lien sale to Cameron D Mee the following described real estate situate in the County of Elbert, State of Colorado, to wit: Section: 30 Township: 7 Range: 64 Section: 25 Township: 7 Range: 64Subdivision: RUNNING BROOK ESTATES THIRD AMENDMENT Lot: 58B-1 and said County Treasurer issued a certificate of purchase therefore to Cameron D Mee. That said tax lien sale was made to satisfy the delinquent taxes assessed against said real estate for the year 2009; That said real estate was taxed or specially assessed in the name(s) of SJR REAL ESTATE COLORADO LLC for said year 2009. That a treasurer’s Deed will be issued for said real estate to the said Cameron D

Land, Lot or Premises, and to the Person in Whose Name the Same was Taxed or Specially Assessed, and to all Persons having an Interest or Title of Record in or to the said Premises and To Whom It may Concern, and more especially to:

SJR REAL ESTATE COLORADO LLC: You and each of you are hereby notified that on the 9th day of November A.D. 2010 the then County Treasurer of the County of Elbert, in the State of Colorado, sold at public tax lien sale to Cameron D Mee the following described real estate situate in the County of Elbert, State of Colorado, to wit: Section: 30 Township: 7 Range: 64 Section: 25 Township: 7 Range: 64Subdivision: RUNNING BROOK ESTATES THIRD AMENDMENT Lot: 58B-1 and said County Treasurer issued a certificate of purchase therefore to Cameron D Mee. That said tax lien sale was made to satisfy the delinquent taxes assessed against said real estate for the year 2009;

Government Legals

That said real estate was taxed or specially assessed in the name(s) of SJR REAL ESTATE COLORADO LLC for said year 2009. That a treasurer’s Deed will be issued for said real estate to the said Cameron D Mee at 3:00 o’clock P.M., on the 8th day of January, A.D.2014, unless the same has been redeemed. Said property may be redeemed from said sale at any time prior to the actual execution of said Treasurer’s Deed. Witness my hand this 18th day of September, A. D.. Richard Pettitt County Treasurer of Elbert County Legal Notice No.: 927777 First Publication: September 26, 2013 Last Publication: October 10, 2013 Publisher: The Elbert County News Public Notice NOTICE OF VACANCIES ON THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS OF THE SPRING VALLEY METROPOLITAN DISTRICT NOS. 1-3 TO WHOM IT MAY CONCERN, and particularly to the electors of the Spring Valley Metropolitan District Nos. 1-3 of Elbert County, Colorado. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to Section 32-1-808, C.R.S., that vacancies currently exist on the board of directors of the Spring Valley Metropolitan District Nos. 1-3 (“Districts”). Any qualified, eligible elector of the Districts interested in filling such vacancies and serving on the board of directors should file a Letter of Interest with the board on or before the close of business on October 21, 2013. Letters of Interest are available and can be obtained from the Spring Valley Metropolitan District Nos. 1-3, c/o Lisa A. Johnson at Special District Management Services, Inc., 141 Union Boulevard, Suite 150, Lakewood, CO 80228, (303) 9870835. SPRING VALLEY METROPOLITAN DISTRICT NOS. 1-3 By: /s/ Lisa A. Johnson Secretary Legal Notice No.: 927782 First Publication: October 10, 2013 Last Publication: October 10, 2013 Publisher: The Elbert County News


ElbertSportS 13-Sports

Elbert County News 13 October 10, 2013

Sean Herr lines up a putt during the boys 4A state golf championships at Hiwan Golf Club. Courtesy photos

Cardinals wrap up golf season Pair of Elizabeth players compete at state By Scott Stocker

Special to Colorado Community Media Overall, the 2013 golf season was considered a success by Elizabeth coach Dave Strang and his Cardinals. They just wish it could have ended on a higher note. Elizabeth won the Colorado Seven League title. But when it came to state, only two team members were able to qualify for the tournament held Sept. 30 and Oct. 1 at the Hiwan Golf Club in Evergreen. Thus, leading the way for Elizabeth were Ross Galmon and Sean Herr. Galmon shot 92 on his first round then followed with an 84 for a 176 total to finish 57th in the 84-player field. Herr shot 97 on the first round and 99 on the second for a 196. Galmon, who will head for the University of Colorado in Colorado Springs in the Fall, capped his high school career going out as the league champion. “It certainly was a good season and I enjoyed it,” Galmon said. “State was fun, but I just wish we all could have been there as a team. The Evergreen course was tough, especially when it came to putting. We had a couple of practice rounds and felt we could do well, but it just didn’t turn out that way. “League was really good for us. I was the conference champion and all four of us were all-league. That’s good. Again, I just wish we all could have been at state. My long game was good, but putting was just crazy. I’m not going to play golf on the college team.” Herr felt confident heading into state, but his results were not what he had hoped. “I felt I was prepared but I didn’t perform well,” said Herr, a junior. “I had more

strokes putting than I did on the fairways. It’s a tough course and it certainly tested your abilities as a golfer. We had a couple of practice rounds. It was a course that tests your abilities.’ Indeed, it was a tough go for Herr. He started on the 10th hole on day two and shot a heart breaking 10 strokes on the hole to open the day. “You have to show up on a course like this and I just wasn’t too ready to play,” Herr said. “We won all our league meets this season and I thought our whole team would make it to state. We gave it our best all season, we were in the right mind set, we worked together and we did what needed to be done. We thought we would go to state as a team, but it didn’t work out. It felt good to win league, I just wish we could have carried our season to a much better conclusion.” While the regular season was solid for Elizabeth, Strang had also hoped for a better finish. “It was a great season winning the league,” Strang said. “We almost had the team qualify for state, but Dave Walstrom and Adam Eveleth just missed for us. The kids looked forward to state with great anticipation, but they did struggle. It was a tough course, but one that was in great shape. Yet, it was tough on everyone, not just us. Being in the mountain, the course was up and down, too. “Sean had a tough second day, getting a 10 on his first hole,” Strang continued. “But he showed a lot of character and continued to play hard after that. It was good competition overall for all the golfers. We’re looking forward to next season. We have a fine junior varsity and I think we have a fine outlook for next year.” Coronado’s Isaac Peterlilie won medalist honors with a score of 144. He shot a 70 on opening day then followed with a 74 on

Ross Galmon watches his ball fly at the boys 4A state golf championships. his second round. That first round proved to be the winner as runner-up Wilson Belk of Cheyenne Mountain carded a first round 71 then also followed with a 74. The bronze medal was won by Pueblo West’s Glen Workman with a 147. He had been tied with Petersilie after the first round, but zoomed to a 77 over his second round. Valor Christian, out of Highlands Ranch, came through to win the team champion-

ship with a score of 454. Silver Creek finished in second with a score of 456, followed by Cheyenne Mountain with 463. Jake Staiano led Valor Christian with his fourth-place finish, carding a 148. Teammates Ross McDonald and Josh Seiple finished seventh and ninth, respectively. McDonald finished with a score of 152, Seiple, 154. The fourth member of the team, Cody Welch, tied for 13th in the individual standings with a 156.


14

14 Elbert County News

October 10, 2013

Group appeals ruling on killing of wildlife USDA program was created to protect livestock interests

HUGP MEEET

Associated Press

SWA

OCTOBER 12-13 NEW LOCATION: National Western Complex, Denver For show details and discount tickets, visit

www.COSnowmobileExpo.com

CollegeInColorado.org Go Further Go To College Students and Parents: October is College Application Month!

Explore Colleges and Programs Choose a School Apply for Admission

Get the FREE help you need At CollegeInColorado.org Practice Applications • Financial Aid • Scholarships

Ask your teacher or guidance counselor today A free service from the State of Colorado

Conservationists with ties to Colorado have appealed a federal judge’s rejection of their lawsuit in Nevada aimed at shutting down a federal program that spends more than $100 million a year to subsidize the killing of coyotes, mountain lions and other predators that threaten livestock. The appeal filed Oct. 3 targets a ruling in March by U.S. District Judge Miranda Du of the U.S. District Court for Nevada, who dismissed most of the WildEarth Guardians lawsuit that claims the Depression-era program of the U.S. Agriculture Department is illegal because it relies on scientific and environmental data that is nearly two decades old. Among other things, Du said the harm cited by the conservationists would not be alleviated by shutting down the Wildlife Services operation in Nevada — where 6,000 coyotes are killed annually and federal officials spend about $1.5 million a year — because the state has said it would carry out the killings itself. Lawyers for WildEarth Guardians, which has offices in Denver and Boulder, said in its appeal to the 9th Circuit Court of Appeals that Nevada doesn’t have the resources to continue all the work. A state wildlife official agreed. “We wouldn’t have the manpower,” Nevada Department of Wildlife

Memorial Continued from Page 1

by a firm in Denver. Local companies that have contributed money or services to the project include American Legion Post #82, CW Hauling, Winchelo Hauling, Gaither Hauling and Services, Will White, Bank of the West, Haas Excavating, Outback Liquor, Franks Feed, Greenlee’s Pro Auto Care,

Levy Continued from Page 1

$2 million,” said Tim Buchanan, who lives in the town of Elbert and runs a consulting firm called Timotheos Inc. He is also a professor at Regis University and teaches a course in behavioral economics. Buchanan was hired last month as a consultant to the board of county commissioners and is being paid $15,000 through November 15 to help shepherd the proposed mill levy increase and with “organizational leadership issues — one of my specialties.” On Oct. 2, Buchanan and the three commissioners held a community forum at the Rattlesnake Fire Training Facility in northwest Elbert County. About 20 people attended the meeting, which was called “to discuss the county revenue shortfalls and its increasing impact on county services.” Two more public meetings are scheduled for later this month: one on Oct. 22 at 7 p.m. at Legacy Academy in Elizabeth and another on Oct. 23 at 7 p.m. at the county fairgrounds in Kiowa. “The county has laid off personnel, delayed maintenance and trimmed expenses to the point it is no longer

spokesman Chris Healy said Oct. 4. “They are in some wild places in Nevada doing that kind of predator work where we have zero personnel. We already have a full plate.” The conservationists said the program that spent $127 million to exterminate more than 5 million animals in 2010 should be suspended nationally until USDA updates its scientific analysis that’s based largely on an environmental impact statement conducted in 1994 when the program was much smaller. In 1988, Wildlife Services spent $26 million to control 17 target species, compared to 2010 when it spent $126 million on a list of about 300 species, court documents state. New research includes “scientific analysis on the critical ecological role of carnivores, the proven ineffectiveness of trapping and availability of non-lethal alternatives,” group lawyer Ashley Wilmes, of Boulder, wrote in the appeal. She also said recent studies show it is more cost-effective to compensate livestock producers for losses than to pay for expensive methods, such as aerial gunning. The nonprofit group based in Colorado has failed to win similar lawsuits during the past 20 years mostly because courts have ruled they lacked legal standing due to failure to demonstrate actual harm. Judge Du concluded a Nevada member of the group, Don Molde, had in fact established actual harm as a result of a reduction in his ability to view coyotes, mountain lions and ravens. But she agreed with the government’s argument that “there’s no relief they can obtain that would redress their al-

leged injury.” Brian Collins, a Justice Department lawyer representing USDA, likened it to a case involving the Goat Ranchers of Oregon in 2010, when the 9th Circuit held that the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife would trap and kill cougars if federal officials didn’t do the job. “Nevada has unequivocally stated its intent to carry out its wildlife management activities regardless of whether it receives assistance from Wildlife Services,” he said in court documents. Du agreed, ruling that Molde’s “injuries” would continue to occur as a result. She based her conclusion on a 2010 letter from then-Nevada Department of Wildlife Director Kenneth Mayer who stated that without federal participation, “NDOW would, by statute, carry out the management of wildlife with existing personnel or contract the work to other capable entities.” Healy said that wasn’t meant to suggest there would be no impact on predator management in Nevada. Of the $1.5 million USDA spends on the program in Nevada, only about $300,000 to $400,000 annually goes to predator control aimed at protecting wildlife such as mountain lions feeding on mule deer herds or ravens ravaging sage grouse nests. The state would continue to do its best to carry out that work with a portion of the money collected from big game tags because “we still have some statutory responsibilities we can’t ignore,” Healy said. “But would we be able to fill the void? Not the whole void created by their actions,” he said.

Frank Conte, Bender Menders, Bob Holt (Big O Tires), the Elizabeth Fire Department, Ogan Painting, Cosentio’s Diner, Elizabeth True Value and Advanced Auto Repair. “This is a bare-bones deal,” said Mansell, while watching volunteer Frank Carnesi smooth out freshly poured concrete. “People like Frank have donated their time and money. There’s no government backing for this. It’s strictly a community effort.” The group plans to have honor

walls finished before year’s end. As the project continues to take shape, Homer said people driving past the cemetery on Highway 86 “stop by all the time to look at it, pay their respects and tell us what a great job we’re doing.” To learn more about the project or to buy a “brick of honor,” call Mansell at 720-300-4927. For more information about the Elizabeth Veterans Memorial, go to www.EVMF.WEBS.com.

BALLOT QUESTION DETAILS

several years, the average homeowner will invest less than 20 cents a day,” he said.

Here is the ballot question Elbert County voters will see regarding the proposed mill levy increase: Shall Elbert County taxes be increased $1,045,374.60 annually (first full fiscal year dollar increase) by such amounts as may be generated annually thereafter by the imposition of an additional mill levy of not to exceed four mills for General Fund purposes and applied for the purpose of funding Elbert County General Fund operating expenditures, and shall Elbert County be permitted to collect, retain and expend all revenues derived from such taxes and any earnings thereon, regardless of whether the annual revenues from such taxes in any year after the first full fiscal year in which it is in effect exceed the estimated dollar amount stated above, either as a voter-approved revenue change or an exception to limits on revenues and spending, and without limiting the collection or spending of any other revenues or funds by the County under Article X, Section 20 of the Colorado Constitution or any other law?

sustainable,” Buchanan said. “The current mill levy will only partially replace this loss of receipts for the county.” Buchanan estimated the proposed mill levy increase, if approved, would add about $63.68 annually to the taxes on a $200,000 property. “This means that in order to keep the county financially strong and replace the lost revenue over the last

Employees at risk

A proposed repeal of the “tool tax exemption,” which applies mainly to oil, gas and wind energy producers, will also be on the Nov. 5 ballot, and Buchanan pointed out that if voters OK the repeal, the additional revenue “will assist the (county’s) Road and Bridge (department) in replacing some of their lost revenue.” Although county commissioners are prohibited by law from publicly lobbying for or against the mill levy hike, Buchanan said last week: “If it doesn’t pass, it’s going to be a devastating thing for county employees.” Contacted on Oct. 2 outside the Elizabeth library, Elizabeth resident Giget LoManto said that she was not aware of the proposed mill levy increase but would support it “as long as the county does something with the money and doesn’t just pocket it.” “The roads are awful around here,” said LoManto. “Every time it rains, even with new tires, you just about slide off the road. And when you go to the building department, the people who work there don’t seem to know what they’re doing. Whenever I go to Kiowa to the courthouse, everything is just so slow.”


15-Color

Elbert County News 15

October 10, 2013

Oct. 10

Things To do

Business after hours. Welcome Tim and Renee Brown at a business after hours, ribbon cutting and open house from 5-7 p.m. Oct. 10 at Tim Brown Jewelers, 210 S. Elizabeth St., in the Safeway Center. Refreshments will be served. Call Beverly at the Elizabeth Area Chamber of Commerce at 303-646-4287 or director@ elizabethchamber.org. Visit www.elizabethchamber.org.  Oct. 11 GOlf tOurnament. The Elizabeth Chamber of Commerce golf tournament was rescheduled to Oct. 11 at Spring Valley Golf Course. Tournament starts at 8 a.m. Visit www.elizabethchamber.org. Harvest festival. The Elizabeth Area Chamber of

elizaBetH Guitar Group. Elizabeth guitar circle

DivOrce anD Post-Decree Clinic. Elbert and Lincoln County Pro Se Divorce Clinic is offered from 9 a.m. to noon the third Friday of each month at the Elbert County Justice Center, 751 Ute St., in Kiowa. For information, call 303-520-6088 or email morgan@hayday.org. The

the o to

tHe elizaBetH Food Bank, 381 S. Banner in Eliza-

Oct. 26

OnGOinG

ct or nsell

DOuGlas-elBert cOunty Music Teachers’ Association meets at 9 a.m. every first Thursday at Parker Bible Church, between Jordan and Chambers on Main Street. All area music teachers are welcome. Call Lucie Washburn, 303-814-3479. beth (next door to Elizabeth Presbyterian Church) needs to let the public know that we are available to help anyone who needs food. The hours are Friday 12:30-3 p.m. and Saturdays from 9-11:30 a.m. Other times by appointment.

Commerce presents the Harvest Festival from noon to 3 p.m. Oct. 26 on Main Street in Elizabeth. Food, music, games and more. Spend an afternoon in Elizabeth for a safe Halloween by coming for trick-or-treat street throughout the town and enjoying games, vendors, food, and more on Main Street. Visit www.elizabethchamber.org.

d. As hape, t the by all pects e do-

clinic is free for parties who have no attorney and who are going through dissolution of marriage, legal separation, or post-decree cases. All walk-ins are welcome, and will be assisted on a first-come, first-served basis.

will meet on the first and second Wednesday of each month at the Elizabeth Library. Traditional protocol/ courtesy. Country, pop, bluegrass, cowboy, Beatles, 50s, 60s, 70s, blues, jazz and more. We who play for pleasure would love to meet more of same. Acoustic or power down. Come prepared to share a few songs, perform, play along, sing along with others. Enjoy new guitar friends to jam with. Gerry Vinson hosts on the first Wednesday from 6:30-9 p.m., and Laurie Smith hosts on the second Wednesday from 6-9 p.m. Uncertain? Drop by and observe. Banjo, ukelele, mandolin welcome. Call Laurie at 720-363-3531.

lawyers at the Library, a free legal clinic for parties who have no attorney, will be offered from 6-9 p.m. the

second Tuesday of every month at the Elizabeth Library, 651 W. Beverly St. Volunteer attorneys will answer questions, help fill out forms and explain the process and procedure for the areas of family law, civil litigation, criminal defense, property law, probate law, collections, appeals, landlord-tenant law and civil protection orders. Walk-ins are welcome. Everyone will be helped on a first-come, first-served basis.

Overeaters anOnymOus meets from 10-11 a.m. and from 7-8 p.m. Wednesdays in the Sedalia Room at New Hope Presbyterian Church, 2100 Meadows Parkway, Castle Rock. saturDay GenealOGy Fun meets at the Elbert Public Library at 1 p.m. on the seocnd Saturday of each month. Beginning to advanced genealogy enthusiasts are invited to attend. The Elbert Public Library is in the Elbert School library at 24489 Main Street in Elbert. Call 303-648-3533 for more information. seniOrs meet in Elizabeth every Monday at 11 a.m.

for food, fun and fellowship at Elizabeth Senior Center, 823 S. Banner St. Bring a dish for potluck on the first Monday of each month. Other Mondays, bring a sack lunch. Bingo, games and socializing. New leadership. Call Agnes at 303-883-7881 or Carol at 303-646-3425 for information

eDitOr’s nOte: Calendar submissions must be received by noon Wednesday for publication the following week. Send information to calendar@ourcoloradonews. com, attn: Elbert County News. No attachments. Listings are free and run on a space-available basis. 

CurTain Time

c.s. lewis and Joy Davidman

“Shadowlands” by William Nicholson is a love story about British author C.S. Lewis and Joy Davidman, based on Nicholson’s book. Directed by Craig Bond and Lorraine Scott at Vintage Theatre, 1468 Dayton St., Aurora. Performances: 7:30 p.m. Fridays and Saturdays; 2:30 p.m. Sundays. Tickets: $25 ($20 advance). 303-8567830, vintagetheatre.org.

three generations

“Door to Door” by James Sherman is a tribute to American women of three generations, with a Jewish

perspective. It plays through Nov. 10 at Pluss Theater, MACC, 350 S. Dahlia St., Denver. Performances: 7:30 p.m. Oct. 19, 26, Nov. 2, 9; 8 p.m. Oct. 12; 2 p.m. Sundays. Tickets: $20-$25, 303316-6360, maccjcc.org.

Korean-american family story

“99 Histories” by Julia Cho, plays Oct. 24 to Nov. 16 at Vintage Theatre, 1468 Dayton St., Aurora, presented by Theatre Esprit Asia, TEA, Colorado’s only Asian American Theatre Company, in its second year. Performances: 8 p.m. Fridays, Saturdays; 7 p.m. Sundays Oct. 24-Nov. 16. Tickets: $25/$23

advance/$20 seniors, students. 303856-7830, theatre-esprit-asia.org.

Puppets for adults

“Avenue Q” features the original Denver cast from the original Vintage Theatre run in this clever show, populated with sometimes-raunchy puppets. Directed by Bernie Cardell, it plays through Nov. 3 at the Aurora Fox, 9900 E. Colfax Ave, Aurora. Performances: 7:30 Fridays, Saturdays; 2:30 p.m. Sundays. Produced by Ignite Theatre. Tickets: $28/$19, 720-3622697, Lucent_Performing_ Arts@mail. vresp.com.

adindex The Elbert County News is made possible thanks to our local advertisers. When you spend your dollars near your home – especially with these advertisers – it keeps your community strong, prosperous and informed. AUTO Automotive KOVITZ & ASSOCIATES (TS) ......................................... 3 LES SCHWAB DIRECT ..................................................... 2 AUTO Building Construction FRESH FORM MARKETING ........................................... 8 AUTO Community ALPACAS ON THE ROCKS ............................................. 2 AUTO Communication VIAERO WIRELESS AUTO Entertainment COLORADO AGRICULTURAL LEADERSHIP FOUNDATION ................................................................. 2 METRO NEWS AD SERVICES ......................................16 RESORTS AT WENDOVER ............................................. 4 TANNER GUN SHOW INC. ............................................ 4 WILDLIFE EXPERIENCE ................................................. 9 AUTO House & Home J & K ROOFING.................................................................. 9 AUTO Hunting and Fishing PESHOWS ............................................................................ 3 AUTO Membership Assoc. SOUTH METRO CHAMBER .........................................14 AUTO Non-Profit SECOND CHANCES FURNITURE THRIFT STORE .. 2 AUTO Real Estate RIDGEGATE INVESTMENTS INC. ............................10 AUTO Shopping VIAERO WIRELESS.....................................................3, 15


16-Color

16 Elbert County News

October 10, 2013


Elbert county news 1010