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News

Elbert Co 8-29-2013

Elbert County

Elbert County, Colorado • Volume 118, Issue 31

August 29, 2013

75 cents

A Colorado Community Media Publication

ourelbertcountynews.com

County poised to quash pot shops Ordinance would ban grow labs, test facilities, retail sales By Deborah Grigsby

dgrigsby@ourcoloradonews.com

Nicole Brock is determined to convince this reluctant calf that victory awaits them if they can just reach the finish line during the U.S. National Campdrafting Competition, which made its nationwide debut in Kiowa on Aug. 25 at the Elbert County Fairgrounds. Photos by Deborah Grigsby

Campdrafting arrives in Elbert County Australian horsemanship event makes its U.S. debut in Kiowa By Deborah Grigsby

dgrigsby@ourcoloradonews.com While it’s not exactly the Australian Outback, Elbert County is now the birthplace of the U.S. National Campdraft Association’s first-ever event on American soil. Competitors from several neighboring states flocked to the Elbert County Fairgrounds Aug. 25 to try their hands — and hooves — at the Australian cowboy sport believed to have evolved from informal competitions among stockmen and drovers in Queensland. According to Elizabeth Area Chamber of Commerce President Beverly Durant, folks from Down Under are just as excited about the event as the Yanks. “This is really generating a buzz not Campdraft continues on Page 8

Cowboy Andrew Lyons takes a tight turn during the nationwide debut of campdrafting in Kiowa. A traditional equine sport from Australia, mounted competitors must convince a calf to negotiate a slalom-like course within a specified time limit.

A proposed ordinance that would ban commercial marijuana operations within unincorporated areas of Elbert County is one step closer to becoming final. On first reading, the Board of County Commissioners unanimously approved a draft of Ordinance 13-01 during its regular board meeting on Aug. 14. According to Alex Beltz, attorney for the county, the ordinance must be published in the local newspaper of record, and then come back to the board for a second reading before becoming final. The move comes in response to the recent state-approved Amendment 64, which allows for the personal use and commercial sale of marijuana. “Under the constitutional provision (of Amendment 64), local governments are afforded the rights to prohibit the commercial elements of marijuana within their jurisdictions, and this ordinance effectively does that,” explained Beltz. “This (ordinance) will prohibit the operation of marijuana cultivation facilities, marijuana testing facilities and retail marijuana stores within the unincorporated areas of the county.” Although the controversial amendment to allow non-medical use of cannabis was rejected by a majority of Elbert County voters, it passed statewide with slightly more than 55 percent of the vote. The initiative gained notoriety for its conflict with federal prohibition laws, prompting many counties to declare moratoriums and eventually outright bans. “I’m not clairvoyant,” said District 2 Commissioner Kurt Schlegel, “but I believe within the next couple of years, this will become legal at the federal level.” According to Beltz, should the ordinance

Pot continues on Page 8

Cardinals could challenge for 4A football title Elizabeth team took 3A championship in 2010 By Scott Stocker

Special to Colorado Community Media Brody Oliver would like nothing better than to see Elizabeth go out a state champion in football, thus looking back at the way he came in. POSTAL ADDRESS

Elizabeth, coached by Chris Cline, won the Class 3A title in 2010, beating Glenwood Springs 29-6. The Cardinals are now up in the 4A ranks and competing in the Colorado Seven League. And, all things considered, this could be another season in which the Cardinals can challenge for a title. “We have a tough schedule,” said Oliver, Elizabeth’s quarterback and defensive back. “Week by week I want to play as hard as I can, but that’s what we all want. I can’t let

myself get rattled.” Elizabeth began the season on a threegame losing streak. But the Cardinals battled back to win the inaugural league title with a 7-0 record. Yet the season ended as it had begun, as the Cardinals were beaten in the first round of the state playoffs by Silver State, 33-14. The season thus ended with a 7-4 record, not the way Oliver or teammates wanted. “I just want to make sure that I focus, be calm and get the most out of my abilities as I can,” said Oliver, who weighs in at 175 pounds at 6 feet, 2 inches. “We want to be able to move the ball and that’s important to me. We’ll probably have a tough game Printed on recycled again in our league with Fort Morgan, but newsprint. Please we’re not overlooking anyone. It certainly recycle this copy. would be nice to get further in the playoffs than we did a year ago.” The numbers are certainly solid for Elizabeth, as well — ones that are quick to put a smile on Cline’s face. The Cardinals return eight starters on offense and nine on de-

fense. “I think we’re going to have a good team this season,” said Cline, beginning his 14th season. “We have a fine core of returnees to work with. The key will be to be consistent with our play on the lines. Coming off the league championship is good, a confidence builder. “We just hope to advance in all phases of our game,” Cline said. “We won a couple of summer 7-on-7 tournaments — Englewood and the King of Springs in Colorado Springs. I just feel good about the kids and we should be solid. We’ve got about 75 out, a great turnout. Now, we’ll just have to see how everything works out.” Chase Nicholas (6-0, 170) has also won all-league honors the past two seasons as has linebacker Kevin Parades. The two seniors are key players to be sure. But they both know they have to be going all out Cardinals continues on Page 8


2-Color

2 Elbert County News

August 29, 2013

Poll: Only 45 percent want another term for governor Hickenlooper just slightly ahead of Tancredo in survey By Ivan Moreno Associated Press

Just 45 percent of Colorado voters want Democratic Gov. John Hickenlooper reelected, and half disapprove of his stance on new gun laws and the death penalty after his refusal to set an execution date for a convicted mass murderer, according to a poll released Aug. 23. The Quinnipiac University poll puts Hickenlooper’s approval rating at 48 percent, and he’s statistically tied with potential Republican gubernatorial candidate Tom Tancredo, who’s known mostly for his tough position on immigration. Hickenlooper leads the former congressman 46 percent to 45 percent in the 2014 race, with-

in the poll’s margin of error. The poll also provides a preview of the 2016 presidential race here, presenting Colorado once again as a battleground state with Democratic former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton deadlocked with Republican New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie if both were to run. The numbers underscore the fact that Hickenlooper is going through one of the most tumultuous times in his political career, after years of popularity dating back to his time as Denver mayor. Two of his biggest challenges came in the past six months. He signed new gun laws in March, including more background checks and limits on ammunition magazine sizes. Then in May he granted an indefinite stay of execution to Nathan Dunlap, who killed four people at a Chuck E. Cheese’s in 1993. Both decisions played badly with potential voters, according to the poll. Forty-

eight percent of voters polled disapprove of how he’s handled the death penalty, while 27 percent approve. On gun policy, 52 percent disapprove of him, while 35 percent approve. “Gov. Hickenlooper has gone against popular opinion on the death penalty and gun control, but he is doing better on that bread-and-butter issue — the economy. Let’s see how that plays out in the next 14 months,” said Tim Malloy, assistant director of the Quinnipiac University Polling Institute. But even in what’s supposed to be a bright spot, Hickenlooper’s numbers aren’t high. Fifty percent of poll participants approve of Hickenlooper’s handling of the economy. The poll of 1,184 registered voters was taken Aug. 15-21 and has a sampling error margin of plus or minus 2.9 percentage points. The poll was conducted through live

interviews by cell phones and land lines. Against other potential Republican gubernatorial candidates, Hickenlooper leads Colorado Secretary of State Scott Gessler 47 percent to 42 percent, and state Sen. Greg Brophy 47 percent to 40 percent. Brophy has announced his candidacy but Gessler has not. On the 2016 presidential race, possible candidates Clinton and Christie are in a dead heat, with Christie leading 43 percent to 42 percent. Against Republican U.S. Sen. Ted Cruz of Texas, Clinton leads but is within the margin of error with 45 percent to 42 percent. Both Christie and Cruz are ahead of Vice President Joe Biden. Biden is behind Christie 50 percent to 33 percent and Cruz 45 percent to 39 percent. Colorado voters were not asked about Hickenlooper as a possible presidential contender.

Library is answer to ‘who you gonna call’ Libraries support lifelong learning, providing resources and information to satisfy everyone’s thirst for knowledge, at any age. With school back in session, students are certainly primed to learn. Sometimes they need some help outside the classroom, and outside of school hours. A statewide virtual reference service, AskColorado, is available 24/7 to answer their questions. But the service isn’t just limited to students — librarians can answer ANY of your information questions! Ask us anything, anytime, anywhere. Seriously, we mean it. Elbert County Library District (ECLD) is a member of a worldrenowned chat reference service called AskColorado. ECLD patrons have the power to access accurate information of all kinds, day or night, through that membership. A librarian is available to chat with you whenever you have a question.

Coordinated by Kris Johnson of the Colorado State Library, AskColorado enlists an army of librarians to help you with any inquiry. Providing useful answers to both simple and difficult question is the quest of AskColorado librarians. How do I know this? I’m one of them. You can chat with us from your home. All you need is a computer or mobile device and Internet access. You might be thinking, “Google has all

the answers I need.” But trying to find accurate information on Google, especially when doing research, is like using a vacuum to find a stud earring in shag carpet. Search engines like Google don’t discriminate between opinions, hearsay, and quality information. They often just suck up every web page, put their advertisers at the top of the results, and rank everything else as best they can by way of tags and keywords. AskColorado librarians have precision tools to give you better answers. We’ve been trained to sift through the landfills of Internet refuse and find the treasures within. Plus, we’ve already researched and organized thousands of reliable resources for common research inquiries. Anytime you use AskColorado for research, we’ll show you how to use our tools to find accurate information. We call this teaching “Information Literacy” — giving you tools to help

make your future searches for information more fruitful. I hope you’ll start using the service right away. We make it easy for you. Just visit www.elbertcountylibrary.org and you’ll notice the AskColorado chat box to your left on the main page. Type in your question and click on the “Ask Now!” button. A librarian will start researching your question in no time. I look forward to helping you soon. AskColorado and its sister queue AskAcademic (www.askacademic.org) will be celebrating their 10th anniversary on Sept. 3. Elbert County Library District has supported the service since its inception. Tim Miller is the branch manager of the Simla Library of the Elbert County Library District. He lives in Simla with his wife and two young sons.

Local Focus. More News.

23 newspapers & websites. Connecting YOU to your LOCAL community.

OurColoradoNews.com 303-566-4100


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3

Elbert County News 3

August 29, 2013

Firefighters and attendees of Franktown Fire’s 50th anniversary celebration push a new brush truck into the garage bay Aug. 17.

Franktown Fire marks 50 years

Nearly 400 people helped celebrate Franktown Fire Protection District’s 50th anniversary Aug. 17. Visitors had an opportunity to get close to ambulances and fire engines, a Douglas County Sheriff’s Office squad car and incident dispatch truck, and a HealthOne Airlife Helicopter landing. They also observed auto-extrication demonstrations. Children were entertained with an inflatable safety fire house, Castlewood Canyon’s reptile friends, dunking the chief and their favorite firefighters, and trying on equipment and spraying fire hoses. The day finished off with a dedication of Franktown’s new brush truck, which firefighters and community members pushed into the station’s bay.

Firefighters with the Franktown Fire Protection District talk with kids during an anniversary celebration at the station Aug. 17. Community members had the opportunity to get close to fire trucks and helicopters. Courtesy photos

Poll: Voters oppose recalls over gun laws Fate of Morse, Giron to be decided in September By Ivan Moreno

ary Associated Press and Most Colorado voters oppose recall efforts against two Democratic legislators

who supported stricter gun laws, but a majority of voters disagree with the new legislation and don’t believe tougher restrictions would have prevented mass shootings, according to a poll released Aug. 22. The Quinnipiac University poll showed that 54 percent of voters don’t think Senate President John Morse should be recalled, and 52 percent oppose the recall of Sen.

Angela Giron. But the poll is statewide, not specific to their districts — Colorado Springs for Morse and Pueblo for Giron. Colorado Democrats this session passed a package of new gun laws without Republican support. By a margin of 54-40, Colorado voters opposed the new laws. However, registered Democrats were more supportive of

the legislation than Republicans, the poll found. Seventy-eight percent of Democrats participating in the poll support the gun laws, while 89 percent of Republicans oppose them. The telephone poll of 1,184 registered voters was taken from Aug. 15-21 and has a margin of error of plus or minus 2.9 percentage points.

Reaching

higher to achieve success.

“I chose UCCS because I wanted to stay close to home. For someone coming out of high school who is looking for strong academic programs, UCCS is a great choice. Students here really want to do more with their lives and I love that the professors want to see you succeed in whatever you choose to do. UCCS is a special place.” — Rhian Sanders,Sophomore in Business Administration

To Reach higher: www.uccs.edu | 800-990-UCCS (8227)


4

4 Elbert County News

Margaret Marshall Rhyne, co-founder of Allis Ranch Winery, and an author, marketer and creator of of nonprofit foundations, among other pursuits, does a bit of everything at the winery.

August 29, 2013

Dave Rhyne, an architect by day, and winemaker other times, the co-founder of Allis Ranch Winery, creates and ages the wines in the 100-year-old Sedalia ranch house he and his wife renovated several years ago. Photos by Virginia Grantier

Ranch is refuge amid heartache Architect, author create beauty, wonderful wines following loss By Virginia Grantier

vgrantier@ourcoloradonews.com At a recent wine-tasting event in Castle Rock, there was a Sedalia winery, its husband and wife owners there, and it all seemed so perfect — a lovely, carefree life. The winemaker, an architect by day, poured samples of

his wines that were aged in, and seem to thrive in, the constantly cool basement of the 100-year-old farmhouse he and she renovated. “It’s creative, and fun, kind of a people thing … kind of a mystery and difficult,” he said about winemaking. And he likes the challenge. “If it was easy, everyone could do it,” he said. He is Dave Rhyne, with father-wisdom gentle eyes and gray locks of hair in the tousled hairstyle of someone who had better things to do this day than comb. It’s an appropriate look for someone reputed to lean into life, heading always in the direction of adventure. She is Margaret Marshall Rhyne, sitting nearby, married to him. Beyond sharing her husband’s zest for things interesting and challenging, she is a mother and grandmother, and still has the model face that people once said should be in Pepsi commercials. And she is an author, public speaker, marketer and magician who takes can’t-be-done-anytimesoon ideas and does them soon. One of her projects: Turning the dream of former Denver Broncos quarterback Brian Griese — a foundation for grieving children — into a quick reality through her major fundraising efforts. When Griese was 12, he lost his mom to breast cancer.

House project begins

It wasn’t even a thought to start a winery, when, after Dave Rhyne designed and they built their dream home in the Sedalia area, they then took on renovating the nearby Allis Ranch house, which had been built from a Sears catalog kit. They took on the beyond-dilapidated structure so they could then rent it to a nice family who could sometimes help them with Alexis, Margaret’s adult daughter from a previous marriage. When Alexis was born, it was initially thought she was “normal.” But she stopped smiling at age 1½ and she never progressed like other children, Margaret said. She stayed at the level of a 3-month-old baby — never could sit up, or feed herself or speak. Starting in November 2004, the couple would spend hundreds of hours renovating the house, which was in an abandoned state, taken over by field mice and wasp nests. They still weren’t done with it when one morning before getting coffee Dave walked into Alexis’ room in 2005 to

elbert county news

(USPS 171-100) Office: 9137 S. Ridgeline Blvd., Suite 210, Highlands Ranch, CO 80129 PhOne: 303-566-4100 A legal newspaper of general circulation in Elizabeth, Colorado, the Elbert County News is published weekly on Thursday by Colorado Community Media. PERIODICALS POSTAGE PAID AT ELIZABETH, COLORADO and additional mailing offices. POSTMASTeR: Send address change to: 9137 S. Ridgeline Blvd., Suite 210, Highlands Ranch, CO 80129 DeADLineS:

Display advertising: Thurs. 11 a.m. Legal advertising: Thurs. 11 a.m. classified advertising: Mon. 12 p.m.

LOCAL ADS, COUPONS, SPECIAL OFFERS & MORE ShopLocalColorado.com

check on her and greet her — and found she had passed away. “I felt like half of my soul had been torn away,” said Margaret, who credits Alexis with many things, including teaching her about unconditional love.

Work helped with healing

Finishing the house became a part of the healing. And friends and family were a part of creating a memorial garden in the house’s front yard, with bleeding hearts flowers and forget-me-nots and a bench with Alexis’ name on it in front of the house. Efforts to continue on, despite their grief, included spending time with their remaining grown children and a new grandchild and getting involved in new challenges. An interest in collecting wine progressed to much research and trying to make wines — and later, in the cool farmhouse basement, they created the Allis Ranch Winery. Dave, the winemaker, and Margaret, the assistant, have received praise. Robert M. Parker Jr., often touted as one of the world’s most respected wine critics, gave one of their wines a 90 rating on his 100-point rating system. And Dave, who had brought Parker a couple of the Allis wines to a dinner they both attended, remembers Parker exclaiming he was very surprised, that he didn’t know “Colorado wines would be that good.” “That’s huge,” Dave said about Parker’s comments. Allis Ranch Winery - which Dave describes as very small, a “boutique winery” that produces 300 to 400 cases annually — has also received gold medals at the Colorado Governor’s Cup Wine Competition, hosted by the state’s Colorado Wine Industry Development Board. While Dave was working on wine, Margaret was writing a memoir published in 2009, “Remembering Alexis: Finding Perspective in Love and Loss.” Later, she was encouraged to give talks about writing a memoir. But early efforts to do that were nearly impossible, despite years of public speaking, because she couldn’t trust herself to speak. She said at times her brain would reach a “dead end.” She couldn’t think of anything, just blackness, symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder, she said. It has taken a lot of work to climb through it. One therapy has been to produce beautiful things. She said she and Dave, her soul mate, like to create beauty. And then she left the interview to care for things, make things prettier. Mow the grass — around the ranch house brought meticulously back to beauty. And around the beautiful memorial garden. But maybe there’s always beauty around her, now, regardless. She can recount moments, experiences, “signs,” that tell her the beautiful spirit of brown-eyed Alexis is still with them. And just that can make life beautiful, at times, again.

Want more neWs? For breaking stories, more photos and other coverage of the community, visit our website at www.OurElbertCountynews.com, the online home of the Elbert County News.


5

Elbert County News 5

August 29, 2013

Smokin’ Brew BBQ to hit Parker Competitors contend for prizes, fill hungry patrons’ stomachs By Chris Michlewicz

cmichlewicz@ourcoloradonews.com Fifty of Colorado’s best barbecue artists are preparing to fire up their grills in downtown Parker. The smell of freshly cooked meat will hover over the fifth annual Smokin’ Brew BBQ in the Parker Station parking lot Aug. 30-Sept. 1. The Kansas City Barbeque Society-sanctioned event could bring more than 20,000 people to the area for a taste of summer, and the master grillers are ready for the hungry crowds. Competitors are judged in different categories and awarded for best sauces, seasonings and meats. They’re contending for $8,500 in prize money, trophies and titles.

LIVE MUSIC PERFORMERS/TIMES Thomas Harvey Moore III, 4 to 5:30 p.m. Friday Groove 22 Band, 6 to 9 p.m. Friday The Tripping Griswolds, 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday The Indulgers, 3 to 6 p.m. Saturday Lewis and Floorwax-Groove Hawgs, 7 to 9 p.m. Saturday Black Jack Canyon Band, 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. Sunday Catfish Kray Blues Band, 2 p.m. to 5 p.m. Sunday But it’s truly the patrons who win during the Smokin’ Brew, which was founded by the Cherry Creek Valley Rotary Club of Parker. John Diak, a member of the club and a Parker town councilman, says the familyoriented event has something for everyone. Aside from the delicious barbecue and wide assortment of side dishes, there is a lineup of live music culminating with headlining band the Groove Hawgs.

has been unable to travel the barbecue competition circuit in recent years because of the success of his seasonings and sauces, four of which are selling well at Kroger and Whole Foods in the Rocky Mountain region. Gaining notoriety among the die-hard barbecuers is something of an accomplishment. Last year, Golden Toad’s ribs had the best showings. This year, the brisket has been placing better. The distinctions and publicity have been a catalyst for revenue, but Jilbert breaks down one of his main goals with a simple statement. “It’s all about bragging rights,” he says. “It’s competitive.” Hours for the event are 4 p.m. to 10 p.m. Aug. 30, 10 a.m. to 10 p.m. Aug. 31 and 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. Sept. 1. The event is free, but tickets must be purchased for food and drink. For more information, call 303-3048085 or visit www.smokinbrewbbq.com.

NEWS IN A HURRY Mounted shooting slated

email at jusropn@yahoo.com.

Cowboy mounted shooting is one of the fastest-growing equine sports in the world. Those who like guns and fast horses will want to attend the Colorado Regulators Rendezvous Shoot, Sept. 14-15. Details are still being finalized, but a jackpot event is scheduled, as are a long gun competition, barbecue and potluck. For more information and updates, contact Dan Perusek at 970-301-8816 or by

Castle Rock

Democrats host picnic

The Elbert County Democrats will host a picnic at 2 p.m. Sept. 15 at the Casey Jones Park Pavilion, 4189 Highway 86, in Elizabeth. There will be food, a pie auction and lots of opportunities to learn about the oil, gas and water issues facing the county. The Elbert County Water Panel will answer questions regarding water rights,

Highlands Ranch

Littleton

water adjudication, how aquifers work and how hydraulic fracturing may impact the county. Vic Meyers, who is challenging Republican Congressman Cory Gardner, will be on hand to talk about his candidacy and his platforms. A speaker from the Mothers’ Project, a global coalition of mothers united on behalf of children, will discuss the exploitation of natural gas by hydraulic fracturing. For more information, contact

Parker

1200 South Street Castle Rock, CO 80104 303.688.3047 www.fumccr.org

Services:

Saturday 5:30pm Sunday 8am, 9:15am, 10:30am Sunday School 9:15am Little Blessings Day Care www.littleblessingspdo.com

Open and Welcoming

Sunday Worship 8:00 am Chapel Service 9:00 & 10:30 am

Sunday School 9:00 & 10:30 am

www.st-andrew-umc.com

Welcome Home!

Weaving Truth and Relevance into Relationships and Life

worship Time 10:30AM sundays

Affiliated with United Church of Religious Science

303-794-2683 Preschool: 303-794-0510

9:00am Spiritual Formation Classes for all Ages 90 east orchard road littleton, co

Castle Rock Recreation Center 2301 Woodlands Blvd, Castle Rock

9203 S. University Blvd. Highlands Ranch, 80126

303 798 6387

CENTER FOR SPIRITUAL LIVING Sunday Services 10 a.m.

www.OurCenterforSpiritualLiving.org 720-851-0265

Abiding Word Lutheran Church 8391 S. Burnley Ct., Highlands Ranch

(Next to RTD lot @470 & University)

An Evangelical Presbyterian Church

Sunday Worship 10:30  4825 North Crowfoot Valley Rd. Castle Rock • canyonscc.org  303-663-5751

First Presbyterian Church of Littleton

Sunday Worship: 10:45AM & 6PM Bible Study: 9:30AM Children, Young People & Adults 4391 E Mainstreet, Parker, Colorado 80134 Church Office – (303) 841-3836

www.parkerbiblechurch.org

Parker

LUTHERAN CHURCH, ELCA

SErviCES:

Saturday 5:30pm

Sunday 9:30am

Joyful Mission Preschool 303-841-3770 7051 East Parker Hills Ct. • Parker, CO 303-841-3739 www.joylutheran-parker.org

Parker evangelical Presbyterian church Connect – Grow – Serve

Sunday Worship

8:45 am & 10:30 am 9030 Miller road Parker, Co 80138 303-841-2125 www.pepc.org

Parker

Community Church of Religious Science Sunday services held in the historic Ruth Memorial Chapel at the Parker Mainstreet Center

...19650 E. Mainstreet, Parker 80138

Sunday Service

& Children’s Church 10:00 a.m.

Visit our website for details of classes & upcoming events.

303.805.9890

www.P a r k er C C R S.org P.O. Box 2945—Parker CO 80134-2945

303-791-3315

pastor@awlc.org www.awlc.org

In observance of Labor Day on Sept. 2, all Elbert County offices and libraries will be closed. Regular business hours will resume on Sept. 3. For more information, contact the county at 303-621-2341, or the library at 303-646-3416.

New Thought...Ancient Wisdom

Worship Services Sundays at 9:00am



Sunday

8:30 a.m. 11:00 a.m.

Hilltop United Church Of Christ 10926 E. Democrat Rd. Parker, CO 10am Worship Service www.hilltopucc.org 303-841-2808

Greewood Village

Pastor David Fisher Fellowship & Worship: 9:00 am Sunday School: 10:45 am 5755 Valley Hi Drive Parker, CO 303-941-0668

www.SpiritofHopeLCMC.org

1609 W. Littleton Blvd. (303) 798-1389 • www.fpcl.org

“Loving God - Making A Difference”



www.gracepointcc.us

Locations close for holiday

Joy

Where people are excited about God’s Word.

Open hearts. Open minds. Open doors.

Elbert County Democrats Chairwoman Jill Duvall at jduvall908@aol.com.

Parker

First United Methodist Church



A place for you



  

Cow Pie Bingo, a fundraiser that was introduced last year, will be back by popular demand. A 50-foot-by-40-foot grid is painted on the ground and surrounded by a fence. A cow is led onto the grid to do its “business” and the owner of the square with the majority of the cow pie will win half the amount raised in sold tickets, up to $10,000. The main attraction, however, lies in the finely honed techniques and secret recipes concocted by the grill masters. From brisket and ribs to chicken and pulled pork, the succulent meats ensure that no one leaves with an appetite. The exhibition helps local companies, like Littleton-based Golden Toad Inc., make a name for themselves. Golden Toad, created by entrepreneur Todd Jilbert, is participating in the Smokin’ Brew BBQ for the fourth time. It has earned the top prize in the sauce category, along with other notable top-10 finishes. Jilbert

Franktown

GRACE PRESBYTERIAN

Acts 2:38

Alongside One Another On Life’s Journey

www.gracecolorado.com

Trinity Lutheran Church & School

Sunday Worship 8:00 & 10:45 a.m. Trinity Lutheran School & ELC (Ages 3-5, Grades K-8)

 303-841-4660 www.tlcas.org 

You are invited to worship with us:

Sundays at 10:00 am

Grace is on the NE Corner of Santa Fe Dr. & Highlands Ranch Pkwy. (Across from Murdochs)

303-798-8485

60 W Littleton Blvd, Unit 101 Littleton CO 80120 303 523 7332

Sunday School

(for children and adults)

9:00 am

Morning Worship Service 10:30 am Evening Worship Service 6:30 pm

Erev Rosh Hashanah - September 4, 7:00 pm First Day Rosh Hashanah - September 5, 9:30 am Second Day Rosh Hashanah - September 6, 9:30 am Kol Nidre / Erev Yom Kippur - September 13, 7:00 pm Yom Kippur - September 14, 9:30 am

Join us at Sheraton Denver Tech Center

7007 S Clinton Street in Greenwood Village, CO 80112 (right off of I25 and Arapahoe).

303-794-6643

shalom@cbsdenver.org • Like us on Facebook

Breakfast 8:15 am Prayer 6:00 pm

Bible Study

Prayer 5:45 pm Dinner 6:15 pm Additional Meeting Times: Friday 6:30 pm Prayer Saturday 10:30 am—12:00 noon Open Church (Fellowship/Canvassing)

7:00 pm

To advertise your place of worship in this section, call 303-566-4091 or email kearhart@ourcoloradonews.com.


6-Opinion

6 Elbert County News

August 29, 2013

opinions / yours and ours

Word is, people’s voices can say a mouthful I was listening to the car radio the other day and heard a voice that is such a monotonous drone it could make you reach for the Kool-Aid. And I thought: Shouldn’t radio be the number-one place for nothing but agreeable voices? Then I remembered Tiny Tim, who was a fairly creepy novelty act in the 1960s, who must have made a million dollars with his unbearable (to me) high falsetto, vibrato voice. His looks were a perfect accompaniment. Long, scraggly hair that seemed to have been unlaundered for days or weeks. You know the car radio voice I am referring to, but I am not going to name names. Voice-only talents are desirable because some voices can be good for marketing simply because they are unforgettable, even Kool-Aid ones. Some voice talents, like Mel Blanc, have become well-known solely because of their vocal distinctions. You can always recognize Mel’s voice, but you would never recognize Mel on the street. The first time I ever thought about distinctive voices was the first time I heard

Froggy, when I was a kid. He was one of the stars in the “Our Gang” films in the early 1940s. He first appeared at age 8, and his voice already sounded like a frog’s croak, so actor Billy Laughlin was nicknamed “Froggy.” He sounded like a much older actor named Eugene Pallette. No one knows who Pallette was, but I was determined to learn how to imitate his voice after seeing him in “My Man Godfrey.” Eventually, and to this day, I can. But who would know? Who would ever say, “That’s a very good Eugene Pallette”? Froggy was delivering newspapers in real life when his motor scooter was hit by a bus. He died instantly, age 16.

Pastors provide spiritual support I just hired a publicist to help me take my book sales and the Big League message, “Your Life Matters” to more people. Now I am surprised with the fact that I have a publicist and an agent. It always seemed that rich, famous people were ones with publicists and agents. Now I know that is not always the case. I also have an accountant that does my taxes and keeps my 501 c (3) in compliance with the government. My dentist and doctor help me keep my mouth and body healthy. It is quite a team that I have to help me live life and take on challenges that are bigger than I am. Another important member of “Team Dan” is my pastor. Recently a situation reminded me how important my pastor is to me and what an important part of my life he is. This experience exceeded the normal Sunday sermon, as important as that is. Each week he seeks to hear from God in a way that is faithful to the Holy Scriptures so that he can bring a message that strengthens the lives of those who listen. It is not that I need to be told how to live as much as his message so often matches what has been stirring in my spirit because of the challenges of everyday life. When I hear his message it is a confirmation to me, often expressed in a way that is memorable, of who God is and how important He is to me and my circumstances. There was a situation at work that troubled me. I was upset and could not find peace as far as what to do. Thankfully I ran into him at a coffee shop. Our relationship began at a coffee shop when the only empty seat on a busy Monday morning was next to him. That suits my lifestyle as I feel like the Lead Pastor at the “St. Arbucks” parish. I am at the coffee shop so often. He took time to listen to me for a few minutes then offered a perspective that I had not thought of, but was exactly what I needed to hear. I left, thankful that I had such a wise, Godly and caring influence in my life. Throughout most of my adult life I did not have a pastor — I was the pastor. It was an honor to be called Pastor Dan but that side of the relationship did not give me the vantage point to appreciate the enormity of the contribution of a pastor’s work to the life of a parishioner. As a Hospice chaplain, there are more times when the benefits of my efforts in the lives and circumstances of the recipients are more quickly apparent.

It is not easy work to stand with people at the dramatic time of their loved one’s sickness and passing from this life to the next, but it is rewarding to feel the value of my work. Nearly all of the churches in our town have a priest or pastor. Many have a staff of pastors with specializations. Youth pastors make it possible for students to have a pastor who they can go to with concerns that their youth pastor understands. Pastors of men’s or women’s ministries focus their efforts on subjects and settings that minister to their target audience. A relatively new specialization that comes in a larger church is a minister of Pastoral Care. Gifts of compassion and insight guide this person to listen, comfort and be present in the lives of the church family during sickness, divorce, traumatic accidents and problems that are too complicated to share with the general public. While some Pastors have been derelict in their duties or disappointed their parishioners with ethical or moral failure, the vast majority sacrificially minister so that their congregation receives inspiration, insight and even correction so that God will be real and relevant in the lives of their parishioners. My taxes are too complicated for me to do them by myself. I can’t work on my teeth or prescribe meds to treat an infection. I need my dentist and doctor. My agent knew how to get a book published and his expertise benefited me and I hope my publicist will benefit me as much so sales will grow and the message will spread. But not everybody needs a publicist, but everyone needs a pastor and they are all eager to add another parishioner to their care. Dan Hettinger is director of pastoral services at Hospice of Saint John and president of The Jakin Group, a ministry of encouragement, especially to Christian workers. You can email him at dhettinger@ hospiceofsaintjohn.org or dan@welcometothebigleagues.org.

There are some voices — no names — that drive me crazy. I avoid newscasters, sportscasters and other personalities if there’s a voice involved that makes me cringe. Can we do anything about our voices if we don’t like them? Of course. Like a nose job, you can get a voice job. I’m not sure where, or how, but everything else can be augmented or modified. Our voices change naturally. Boys’ choirs are just that. I was at a May D&F one day, and I thought I heard someone over in towels who might be having an afternoon helium. I followed the sounds and found a woman who was in her 50s, and who sounded like a Saturday morning cartoon. She was an employee. I decided to buy a few hand towels and say something about her unusual voice. She said she wasn’t surprised. “Happens to me all the time.” Then she told me that she was a voiceonly performer, and that it was quite lucrative. Sometimes it takes more than one voice to get the job done. I was given a tip about the Everly Brothers, that they might break

up before, during, or after a performance at Knott’s Berry Farm in July 1973. So I was in the audience that night, and sure enough. Phil walked off the stage leaving his brother Don to carry on — but one Everly brother isn’t the same, and he was booed off the stage. I should mention that Don was drunk and couldn’t remember lyrics, which was why Phil was so upset. The brothers barely spoke to each other for the next 10 years. Eventually they repaired the relationship and I went to see them at the Paramount Theatre in Denver in 1998. Whenever I am asked to give a public talk about my art work, I always finish my presentation by saying that my one regret in life is that I wasn’t one of the Everly Brothers. Their harmonies have always meant so much to me. At the Paramount Theatre that night they received a standing ovation. Craig Marshall Smith is an artist, educator and Highlands Ranch resident. He can be reached at craigmarshallsmith@comcast. net

Doing the hardest things first The other day I found myself facing a situation where I had to have a difficult conversation with someone very close and special to me. And the more I thought about it and waited, the more difficult the conversation was becoming in my head and I almost talked myself out of raising the issue and having the discussion. Then I remembered something that Zig Ziglar used to say, “If you ever have to kiss a frog you will want to kiss it right away, because the longer you wait, the bigger and uglier that frog is going to become.” And then the thought will become so gross that we will eventually just avoid it completely. Have you ever been in a situation where there was a difficult task, or something that you just did not want to do? Maybe it was going to be a terrible or fierce conversation you had to have and the simple thought of it was giving you heartburn and a headache. The fact is that the more we delay or avoid the task or discussion, the more our minds take over, and our imagination creates scenarios that are far worse and more horrific than what the reality will actually be. Additionally, as we go about our day, or our week, or maybe even our weekend, the more that we carry the burden of having to do what we ultimately have to do, the less productive we are in all other areas of life. Not only are we less productive, we become distracted, and other things that we enjoy doing and people we appreciate being around are forced to suffer along

Elbert County News 9137 S. Ridgeline Blvd., Suite 210, Highlands Ranch, CO 80129

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with us as we are just not ourselves during this time. On the positive side, when we finally get the action item we have been dreading off our plate, deal with it and get it past us, we are liberated and have freed ourselves up to get back to doing the things that bring us happiness and allow us to focus on our goals and other tasks at hand. Now don’t mistake this as a suggestion for rushing into action and calling someone out, initiating a tough talk, or tackling a less than desirable activity. The recommended approach is to make sure that we have taken the time to consider the “why” behind the difficult task, thinking through and considering carefully what we have to say or do. Maybe at least practicing the 24-hour rule to give ourselves time to think it through is the minimal approach. But at the end of the day, when we have thought it through and know with absolute cerNorton continues on Page 7

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Columnists and guest commentaries The Elbert County News features a limited number of regular columnists, found on these pages and elsewhere in the paper, depending on the typical subject the columnist covers. Their opinions are not necessarily those of the Elbert County News. Want your own chance to bring an issue to our readers’ attention, to highlight something great in our community, or just to make people laugh? Why not write a letter of 300 words or fewer. Include your full name, address and the best number to reach you by telephone.

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7-Color

Elbert County News 7

August 29, 2013

Study seeks super agers’ secrets Researchers look to protect others from memory loss By Lindsey Tanner Associated Press

They’re called “super agers” — men and women who are in their 80s and 90s, but with brains and memories that seem far younger. Researchers are looking at this rare group in the hope that they may find ways to help protect others from memory loss. And they’ve had some tantalizing findings: Imaging tests have found unusually low amounts of age-related plaques along with more brain mass related to attention and memory in these elite seniors. “We’re living long but we’re not necessarily living well in our older years and so we hope that the SuperAging study can find factors that are modifiable and that we’ll be able to use those to help people live long and live well,” said study leader Emily Rogalski, a neuroscientist at Northwestern University’s cognitive neurology and Alzheimer’s disease center in Chicago. The study is still seeking volunteers, but chances are you don’t qualify: Fewer than 10 percent of would-be participants have met study criteria. “We’ve screened over 400 people at this point and only about 35 of them have been eligible for this study, so it really represents a rare portion of the population,” Rogalski said. They include an octogenarian attorney, a 96-year-old retired neuroscientist, a 92-year-old Holocaust survivor and an 81-year-old pack-a-day smoker who drinks a nightly martini. To qualify, would-be participants have

to undergo a battery of mental tests. Once enrolled, they undergo periodic imaging scans and other medical tests. They also must be willing to donate their brains after death. The memory tests include lists of about 15 words. “Super agers can remember at least nine of them 30 minutes later, which is really impressive because often older adults in their 80s can only remember just a couple,” Rogalski said. Special MRI scans have yielded other remarkable clues, Rogalski said. They show that in super agers, the brain’s cortex, or outer layer, responsible for many mental functions including memory, is thicker than in typical 80- and 90-year-olds. And deep within the brain, a small region called the anterior cingulate, important for attention, is bigger than even in many 50- and 60-year-olds. The super agers aren’t just different on the inside; they have more energy than most people their age and share a positive, inquisitive outlook. Rogalski said the researchers are looking into whether those traits contribute to brain health. Other research has linked a positive attitude with overall health. And some studies have suggested that people who are “cognitively active and socially engaged” have a reduced chance of developing Alzheimer’s disease, but which comes first — a healthy brain or a great attitude — isn’t known, said Heather Snyder, director of medical and scientific operations for the Alzheimer’s Association. Snyder said the SuperAging study is an important effort that may help provide some answers. Edith Stern is among the super agers. The petite woman looks far younger than

her 92 years, and is a vibrant presence at her Chicago retirement home, where she acts as a sort of room mother, volunteering in the gift shop, helping residents settle in and making sure their needs are met. Stern lost most of her family in the Holocaust and takes her work seriously. “What I couldn’t do for my parents, I try to do for the residents in the home,” she said, her voice still thick with the accent of her native Czechoslovakia. Stern acknowledges she’s different from most people at the home, even many younger residents. “I am young — inside. And I think that’s the difference,” she said. “I grasp fast,” she adds. “If people say something, they don’t have to tell me twice. I don’t forget it.” She’s different in other ways, too. “When you get old, people are mainly interested in themselves. They talk about the doctor, what hurts,” she said. “You are not so important that you just concentrate on yourself. You have to think about other people.” Study participant Don Tenbrunsel has a similar mindset. The 85-year-old retired businessman doesn’t think of himself as a super ager. “Neither do my children,” he says, chuckling. But Tenbrunsel says his memory has been sharp “from the time I was born. My mother used to say, ‘Donald, come sing with me — not because I had a good voice, but because I always knew the words,” he said. “I think I’m just lucky, not only with respect to my memory, but I’m able to get around very well; I walk a lot and I have a pretty good attitude toward life itself.” Tenbrunsel volunteers several hours a week at a food pantry run by the Chi-

cago church where he is a parishioner. One recent morning in the sun-filled rectory kitchen, he nimbly packaged ham and cheese sandwiches, set out bags of chips and cans of soda, and cheerfully greeted a steady stream of customers. “Good morning, good to see you,” he said, standing at the pantry’s bright red door. He gave everyone their choice of chips — a small gesture but important, he said, because it gives them some sense of control over their hard-luck lives. “I enjoy doing it. I probably get more out of it than I give,” Tenbrunsel said. Ken Zwiener, of Deerfield, Ill., is another super ager. He had “more than an inkling” he might qualify for the study, and his kids encouraged him to enroll. “They said, ‘Dad, your brain is the best thing about you,’” the 81-year-old retired businessman recalled. He’s a golfer and Broadway musical “nut” who created a 300-plus-page computer database of shows. Zwiener uses an iPad, recently went hot-air ballooning and is trying to learn Spanish. He also pours himself a vodka martini every night and is a pack-a-day cigarette smoker, but says he doesn’t think his habits have made much difference. His healthy brain, he says, may be due to heredity and genes, but Zwiener said he hopes the study comes up with more “scientific insights”. “My dad lived into his middle 90s and was pretty sharp right up until the day he died,” Zwiener said. Zwiener’s motivation for joining the study was simple: The best man at his wedding died of Alzheimer’s disease before age 50. “To lose a mind ... is just a terrible way to go,” he said.

thiNgS to do Sept. 7 AnniverSAry open house. Elbert Lincoln School 42 will celebrate 100 years at an open house from 1-4 p.m. Sept. 7. Sept. 12 BuSineSS After Hours. The Elizabeth Area Chamber of Commerce presents a Business After Hours from 5-7 p.m. Sept. 12 at Running Creek Elementary in Elizabeth. Come learn how your local schools are shaping our future leaders. The public is welcome. Contact the chamber at 303-646-4287 or director@ elizabethchamber.org.  Sept. 13 Golf tournAment. The Elizabeth Area Chamber of Commerce presents the chamber golf tournament on Sept. 13 at Spring Valley Golf Club. A scramble format starts 8 a.m. Registration begins at 7 a.m. Enjoy a continental breakfast, 18 holes of golf, and a barbecue lunch.  Awards will be given out for many levels.  Fun surprises at some holes this year with special awards. Contact Beverly for information 303-646-4287 or go to www.elizabethchamber.org and look under events for forms. Sept. 14 Boot cAmp. A family fun boot camp to benefit Bright Pink, a nonprofit group focused on the prevention and early detection of breast and ovarian cancer while providing support to individuals at high risk for these diseases, is planned for 10 a.m. Sept. 14 at Lincoln Park, across from Chaparral High School in Parker. The event includes a family boot camp, fitness expo, free massages, temporary tattoos for kids, raffle prizes and music. Registration cost is $15 at 4EverBeFit.com. Free men’s bamboo tee or women’s sports bra to the first 50 registrants. Sept. 19 A riBBon cutting and open house at the new location for Through Your Eyes Photography, 276 E. Kiowa Ave. in Elizabeth, is from 5-7 p.m. Sept 19. Come see Kimberly’s new studio and have some fun. For information, contact the chamber at 303-646-4287 or director@elizabethchamber.org. The public is welcome. Sept. 30 Golf tournAment. Mark Wiebe will again host the 8th

annual Adam’s Camp charity golf tournament, presented by Re-

Norton Continued from Page 6

tainty that we must take care of the issue or challenge, we should make it the very next thing that we do. Is there something looming over your head or heart that you know that you need

tirement Plan and Investment Providers, to raise funds for the children, youth and families of Adam’s Camp. The tournament is on Sept. 30 at the Colorado Golf Club in Parker, and 132 golfers will have the opportunity to play the exclusive course, home to the 2013 Solheim Cup. Lunch, provided by Noodles and Company, will begin at 11 a.m. and the tournament shotgun start will be at 12:30 p.m.. Play will be followed by cocktails, dinner, live auction and prizes. Foursomes are $1,600, individual registration is $400 and limited sponsorships are available.  Proceeds will support the children, youth and families of Adam’s Camp, of Centennial, which provides intensive therapy camps to children with developmental disabilities and their families as well as recreational camps for youth and young adults with disabilities. To sponsor, register or to learn more, visit  www.adamscamp. org, call 303-563-8290 or email sarah@adamscamp.org.

oct. 9 chAmBer luncheon. The Elizabeth Area Chamber of Commerce will have a luncheon at 11:30 a.m. Oct. 9 at Spring Valley Golf Club. Lunch sponsored by Intermountain Rural Electric Association. Come hear a great presentation and learn what IREA is doing for you. RSVP at 303-646-4287 or director@ elizabethchamber.org. The public is welcome. oct. 26 hArveSt feStivAl. The Elizabeth Area Chamber of Commerce presents the Harvest Festival from noon to 3 p.m. Oct. 26 on Main Street in Elizabeth. Food, music, games and more. Spend an afternoon in Elizabeth for a safe Halloween by coming for trick-or-treat street throughout the town and enjoying games, vendors, food, and more on Main Street. Visit www. elizabethchamber.org. the outBAck Express is a public transit service provided through the East Central Council of Local Governments is open and available to all residents of Cheyenne, Elbert, Kit Carson and Lincoln counties and provides an economical and efficient means of travel for the four-county region. Call Kay Campbell, Kiowa, at 719- 541-4275. You may also call the ECCOG office at 1-800-825-0208 to make reservations for any of the trips. You may also visit http://outbackexpress.tripod.com. DouGlAS-elBert county Music Teachers’ Association meets at 9 a.m. every first Thursday at Parker Bible Church, between Jordan and Chambers on Main Street. All area music teachers are welcome. Call Lucie Washburn, 303-814-3479.

to do but have put it off out of dreading the event or outcome? I would love to hear all about it at gotonorton@gmail.com, and when we tackle those ugly frogs first, the rest of our day will be better than good. Michael Norton, a resident of Highlands Ranch, is the former president of the Zig Ziglar organization and CEO and founder of www.candogo.com

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Contact: Viola Ortega 303-566-4089 obituaries@ourcoloradonews.com

Funeral Homes

Visit: www.memoriams.com


8-Color

8 Elbert County News

August 29, 2013

Blue Thunder rides again 14th annual Ron King ride takes to streets By Ryan Boldrey

rboldrey@ourcoloradonews.com A total of 71 bikes revved their engines in unison at the Robert A. Christensen Justice Center in Castle Rock, bringing Julie Widmer to tears. The 14th annual Blue Thunder Ride Benefit and Poker Run, ridden in honor of Widmer’s stepfather, Douglas County Sheriff’s Deputy Ron King, is part celebration of life/ part fundraiser for Douglas County children. “It took me a long time before I was able to participate in a ride,” said Widmer. “I would see a motorcycle and think of him, think of how he died. But once I got on the back of (a bike) and was surrounded by family and by people all here for the same reason I am, it really calmed me down a lot. This year’s ride was Aug. 18 and it wound

Cardinals Continued from Page 1

from the start of the season and continue through the year. “The main thing for me is that we bring our intensity to a high level and not let ourselves get flat,” Nicholas said. “The key at linebacker is to be physical and to stop the run and at the same time bring our running game up. There is still much we can improve on. We’re small, but I think physical, and I think that should help us make up for our lack of size.” Cline will also be looking for senior running back Jordan Buchnam (6-0, 195) to take some of the pressure off Oliver and Nicholas. Cline knows that size is definitely going to play a part in success or failure. As noted, size this season is going to be a factor. Just look at the position of linebacker where Parades is a leader. He begins the season at 5-9, 170.

from Castle Rock to Monument, east into Black Forest and north to Kiowa. The event raised $2,600 for the Ron King Organization’s scholarship fund as well as financial aid money to help select area high school students pay for things like school supplies, athletic fees and instruments. King was killed in the line of duty 14 years ago after being hit by a drunk driver. Finishing up his shift, King was riding his motorcycle south on U.S. 85 back to the station when a van pulled out of The Matchbox Bar — which has since been leveled — and plowed into him and his partner, Chris Washburn, who was riding with him. Washburn, now a sergeant with the department, wound up in the ICU requiring reconstructive surgery. King was pronounced dead at the scene. One of the first D.A.R.E. officers with the department, King had dedicated his life to helping people make the right choices when it came to using drugs and alcohol and getting behind the wheel, something that made his death that much harder for

“We just want to put down some hard work, get better, and do what we can to watch each other’s backs,” Parades said. “We want to get into it and keep the mistakes down. I want to focus on offense, too, and there’s always a little more to work on. I think we’re looking at a successful season. We just want to stay close and take care of the things that each of us need to do.” When it comes to protection and blocking on the lines, Elizabeth will certainly be looking to senior tackle Dallas Reins (6-5, 295), who is super agile for his size. Adding experience on the lines will be senior guard Jaxon Braber (5-11, 190) and center Coby Cline (5-10, 245). Oliver will also have a pair of returning receivers to aid his passing game. Back are tight end Hayden Freisner (6-1, 185), who also doubles as a defensive back, and wide receiver Jacob Burgett (6-1, 175). Elizabeth will also be counting on another quartet of returning defensive standouts behind end Cyrus Barrett (6-2, 185) and backs Logan Weber (6-0, 155), Julius Antunez (5-11, 140) and Willie Weber (5-10, 155), all seniors.

many. “Someone like Ron that gave so much to the community, trying to take care of our

Campdraft Continued from Page 1

only here in the U.S., but in Australia as well,” said Elizabeth Area Chamber of Commerce President, Beverly Durant. “The videos and photos have officially gone viral and we hope to make this an annual event.” Cowboys and cowgirls from several neighboring states filled the fairgrounds for a chance to compete in the first-ever Australian-style equine event, with several categories based on rider and horsemanship skill. Campdraft riders on horseback must sort one calf from a herd in the yard or the “camp.” They must then block and turn the beast two or three times to demonstrate control. Finally, the rider must force the calf out of the yard and through a figure-eight

Pot Continued from Page 1

HAVE A STORY IDEA? Email your ideas to Elbert County Reporter Virginia Grantier at vgrantier@ourcoloradonews.com or call her at 303-566-4087.

The best seat in the house at the 14th annual Blue Thunder Ride Benefit and Poker Run was owned by this dog, who paid no extra to participate in a sidecar. Photos by Ryan Boldrey

be adopted and federal law change, the county always has the option to rescind its decision. “We are actually limited in what we can

youth and trying to mentor and educate them on right and wrong and how to grow up and be a good citizen, to be stricken

course involving a series of sharp right- and left-hand turns in less than 40 seconds. Sunday’s event followed a three-day workshop held for both judges and riders, which Durant says has created many new friendships, as well as pumped muchneeded tourist dollars back into the community. “This was really a local idea that kinda went global,” explained Durant. “One of our goals was trying to figure out how to make Elbert County a destination location, and one of our committee members said, ‘Let’s bring campdrafting here.’” That member was Mary Harris, president of the U.S. Campdrafting Association, and owner of Kiowa and Elizabeth Feeds. Durant credits Harris, along with Angie Calve and Sandi Maldonado, with bringing the event to Kiowa. “We plan on this event being bigger and better each year,” said Durant.

say in this ordinance in accordance with the state constitution,” he said, “strictly limiting it to the prohibition of retail marijuana stores, cultivation facilities and testing facilities, and so we’ve stayed well within our parameters of what the state has outlined.” Beltz anticipates the second reading of the ordinance will occur during the Sept. 11 board meeting.

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9-Color

Elbert County News 9

August 29, 2013

2013 county fair results

ANIMAL DIVISION

2ND - Clayton Liss

2ND - Bailey Kramer

2ND - Ashley Baller

BEEF SR Showmanship

3RD - Kort Henderson

3RD - Reilly Blakeslee

3RD - Kellie Boykin

1St - Kort Henderson

3RD - Dirk Murphy

JR ShOwMANShIp

SR wEStERN hORSEMANShIp

3RD - Emma Rademacher

1St - Taylor Hutson

1St - Ashley Baller

3RD - Rebecca Sewald

2ND - Kelli Kerchal

2ND - Kellie Boykin

3RD - Kimberly Stone

3RD - Bailey Martell

3RD - Jordyn Butler

3RD - Wesley Maranville

NOVIcE ShOwMANShIp

SR wEStERN pLEASuRE

3RD - Clayton Liss

1St - Samantha Guthrie

1St - Ashley Baller

MARkEt hEIFER

SR gELDINg

2ND - Lillian Esterl-Byrne

1St - Sydney Anderson

1St - Trea Allen

3RD - Jordyn Butler

SuMMER YEARLINg hEIFER

2ND - Kelli Kerchal

SR RANch pLEASuRE

1St - Brody Schneider

3RD - Kaitlyn Boykin

1St - Tess Allen

2ND - Maxin Hagans

SR MARE

2ND - Kinsee Dodge

SpRINg YEARLINg hEIFER

1St - Kyle Hutson

3RD - Ryan Stuchlik

1St - Chastain Spiller

2ND - Anna McKillip

SR RIDINg

2ND - Ethan Freund

3RD - Kellie Boykin

1St - Ashley Baller

3RD - Ethan Freund

SR ENgLISh Show Hack

2ND - Lillian Esterl-Byrne

2ND - Cole Pennington 3RD - Samantha Trehal INt ShOwMANShIp 1St - Cauy Pennington 2ND - Riley Maranville 3RD - Justin Doubet JR ShOwMANShIp 1St - Morgan Jantz 2ND - Wesley Maranville 3RD - Raelyn Kelty NOVIcE ShOwMANShIp 1St - Josiah Cabrera 2ND - Kimberly Stone 3RD - Rebecca Zunker MARkEt StEER 1St - Chelsea Kelty 1St - Cauy Pennington 1St - Cole Pennington 1St - Dalton Chambers 1St - Kelli Kerchal 1St - Justin Doubet 1St - Lonny Trehal 1St - Lonny Trehal 2ND - Hayden Stout 2ND - Morgan Jantz 2ND - Riley Maranville 2ND - Justin Doubet 2ND - Ethan Freund 2ND - Samantha Trehal 2ND - Cecilia Hermes

cOw & Calf

1St - Ashley Baller

3RD - Mai M Samhouri

1St - Menzi Spiller

2ND - Kellie Boykin

SR REININg

2ND - Rebecca Zunker

3RD - Lillian Esterl-Byrne

1St - Kellie Boykin

BEEF FIttINg tEAM

SR tRAIL

2ND - Ashley Baller

1St - Dalton Chambers

1St - Lillian Esterl-Byrne

3RD - Anna McKillip

1St - Kelli Kerchal

2ND - Tess Allen

INt ENgLISh ShOw hAck

1St - Kaitlyn Rector

3RD - Ashley Baller

1St - Kaitlyn Boykin

2ND - Justin Doubet

SR ENgLISh Equitation

2ND - Ashley Gerczyski

2ND - Lonny Trehal

1St - Lillian Esterl-Byrne

3RD - Kyle Hutson

2ND - Samantha Trehal

2ND - Kellie Boykin

INt tRAIL

hORSES

3RD - Anisa Rose Samhouri

1St - Kaitlyn Boykin

SR ShOwMANShIp

SR ENgLISh Control

2ND - Reilly Blakeslee

1St - Lillian Esterl-Byrne

1St - Lillian Esterl-Byrne

3RD - Anna Haszelbart

2ND - Ashley Baller

2ND - McKayla Evans

INt ENgLISh EquItAtION

3RD - Kellie Boykin

3RD - Ashley Baller

1St - Kaitlyn Boykin

INt ShOwMANShIp

SR ENgLISh Pleasure

2ND - Reilly Blakeslee

1St - Kaitlyn Boykin

1St - Lillian Esterl-Byrne

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Fair continues on Page 10


10-Color

10 Elbert County News

August 29, 2013

2013 county fair results

Continued from Page 9

3RD - Trea Allen INT ENGLISH CONTROL 1ST - Kaitlyn Boykin 2ND - Reilly Blakeslee 3RD - Trea Allen INT ENGLISH PLEASURE 1ST - Kaitlyn Boykin 2ND - Trea Allen 3RD - Reilly Blakeslee INT WESTERN 1ST - Kaitlyn Boykin 2ND - Trea Allen 3RD - Reilly Blakeslee INT WESTERN PLEASURE 1ST - Kaitlyn Boykin 2ND - Bailey Kramer 3RD - Kyle Hutson INT RANCH PLEASURE 1ST - Trea Allen 2ND - Reilly Blakeslee 3RD - Ashley Gerczyski INT RIDING 1ST - Kaitlyn Boykin 2ND - Trea Allen 3RD - Ashley Gerczyski INT REINING 1ST - Kaitlyn Boykin 2ND - Trea Allen 3RD - Reilly Blakeslee JR ENGLISH SHOW HACK 1ST - Isabelle Veed 2ND - Taylor Hutson JR TRAIL 1ST - Bailey Martell 2ND - Taylor Hutson 3RD - Clara Lindauer JR ENGLISH EQUITATION 1ST - Taylor Hutson 2ND - Bailey Martell 3RD - Isabelle Veed JR ENGLISH CONTROL 1ST - Isabelle Veed 2ND - Bailey Martell 3RD - Taylor Hutson JR ENGLISH PLEASURE 1ST - Taylor Hutson

2ND - Bailey Martell

2ND - Rickie Schafer

1ST - Cauy Pennington

3RD - Isabelle Veed

3RD - Tess Allen

2ND - Trea Allen

JR WESTERN

SR POLE Bending

3RD - Reilly Blakeslee

1ST - Isabelle Veed

1ST - Rebecca Sewald

SHEEP

2ND - Taylor Hutson

2ND - Jessica Ramirez

SR SHEEP Showmanship

3RD - Bailey Martell

3RD - Rickie R Schafer

1ST - Shelly Chambers

JR WESTERN PLEASURE

SR KEYHOLE RACE

2ND - Mallory Patterson

1ST - Kelli Kerchal

1ST - Rickie Schafer

3RD - Rickie Schafer

2ND - Isabelle Veed

2ND - Rebecca Sewald

INT SHEEP Showmanship

3RD - Taylor Hutson

3RD - Jessica Ramirez

1ST - Samantha Chambers

JR RANCH Pleasure

INT BARREL RACING

2ND - Bailey Turco

1ST - Bailey Martell

1ST - Kendall Klein

3RD - Casey Cornelius

2ND - Ezekiel Cabrera

2ND - Kylie Fitzsimmons

JR SHEEP Showmanship

3RD - Cameron Klein

3RD - Randi Potthoff

1ST - Quentin Churchwell

JR RIDING

INT FLAGS

2ND - Liam Patterson

1ST - Bailey Martell

1ST - Randi Potthoff

MARKET LAMB

2ND - Cameron Klein

2ND - Kendall Klein

1ST - McKenna Henderson

3RD - Isabelle Veed

3RD - Cauy Pennington

1ST - McKenna Henderson

HORSES - JR Reining

INT POLE BENDING

1ST - Marlene Snell

1ST - Taylor Hutson

1ST - Cauy Pennington

1ST - Samantha Chambers

2ND - Bailey Martell

2ND - Kyle Hutson

1ST - Samantha Chambers

3RD - Cameron Klein

3RD - Randi Potthoff

1ST - Shelly Chambers

BREAKAWAY ROPING

INT KEYHOLE RACE

1ST - Shelly Chambers

1ST - Jeremy Butler

1ST - Trea Allen

1ST - Shelly Chambers

1ST - Cauy Pennington

2ND - Shae Bray

1ST - Mallory Patterson

2ND - Kyle Hutson

3RD - Kendall Klein

2ND - Aubri Strachan

3RD - Taylor Hutson

JR BARREL RACING

2ND - Aubri Strachan

STEER OR Calf Daubing

1ST - Cameron Klein

2ND - Reilly Blakeslee

1ST - Jeremy Butler

2ND - Raelyn Kelty

2ND - Rickie Schafer

1ST - Cauy Pennington

3RD - Bailey Martell

2ND - Jacob Chambers

2ND - Kort Henderson

JR FLAGS

2ND - Alexander Burns

2ND - Trea Allen

1ST - Cameron Klein

2ND - Bailey Turco

3RD - Jordyn Butler

2ND - Raelyn Kelty

2ND - Bailey Turco

3RD - Reilly Blakeslee

3RD - Bailey Martell

2ND - Liam Patterson

GROUND ROPING

JR POLE BENDING

3RD - Jenalea Hood

1ST - Cauy Pennington

1ST - Cameron Klein

3RD - Marlene Snell

1ST - Jessi Dodge

2ND - Raelyn Kelty

3RD - Reilly Blakeslee

2ND - Kort Henderson

3RD - Isabelle Veed

3RD - Reilly Blakeslee

2ND - Trea Allen

JR KEYHOLE RACE

3RD - Anisa Rose Samhouri

3RD - Jeremy Butler

1ST - Raelyn Kelty

3RD - Mai Samhouri

3RD - Reilly Blakeslee

2ND - Cameron Klein

3RD - Samantha Chambers

SR BARREL Racing

3RD - Aubrey Barbarigos

3RD - Shae Bray

1ST - Faleena Castleberry

SR RANCH HORSEMANSHIP

3RD - Liam Patterson

2ND - Jessica Ramirez

1ST - Cody Hancock

PEN OF THREE LAMBS

3RD - Rebecca Sewald

2ND - Tess Allen

1ST - McKenna Henderson

SENIOR FLAGS

3RD - Kellie Boykin

1ST - Anisa Rose Samhouri

1ST - Rebecca Sewald

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JR RANCH HORSEMANSHIP

1ST - Kinsee Dodge

1ST - Trea Allen

EWE LAMBS O/A 1/1/12

2ND - Kaitlyn Boykin

1ST - Marlene Snell

3RD - Cauy Pennington

2ND - Cheyenne Chambers

SR RANCH CATTLE SORTING

3RD - Samantha Chambers

1ST - Cody Hancock

EWES DROPPED 1/1/10-1/1/12

2ND - Ashley Baller

1ST - Cheyenne Chambers

3RD - Jessi Dodge

2ND - Samantha Chambers

JR RANCH Cattle Sorting

3RD - Marlene Snell

1ST - Cauy Pennington

EWES DROPPED 1/1/09-1/1/10

2ND - Taylor Hutson

1ST - Dalton Chambers

3RD - Reilly Blakeslee

2ND - Marlene Snell

SR RANCH Trail

3RD - Liam Patterson

1ST - Kellie Boykin

GOATS

2ND - Tess Allen

SR GOAT Showmanship

3RD - Jeremy Butler

1ST - Victoria Allyn

JR RANCH TRAIL

2ND - Mallory Patterson

1ST - Kaitlyn Boykin

3RD - Mai Samhouri

2ND - Reilly Blakeslee

INT GOAT Showmanship

3RD - TreaR Allen

1ST - Bailee Allyn

SR INDIVIDUAL COW

2ND - Marlene Snell

1ST - Jeremy Butler

3RD - Kendall Klein

2ND - Cody Hancock

JR GOAT SHOWMANSHIP

3RD - Kinsee Dodge

1ST - Liam Patterson

JR INDIVIDUAL Cow Fair continues on Page 11


11

Elbert County News 11

August 29, 2013

2013 county fair results

Continued from Page 10

2nd - Clara Lindauer 3rd - Cameron Klein novice Goat ShowmanShip 1St - Raegan Massey 2nd - Ezra Cabrera meat Breed Does 1St - Rebecca Zunker 2nd - Anisa Rose Samhouri 3rd - Shelby Smith meat Breed over 1 year 1St - Marlene Snell 1St - Cade Wolbert 2nd - Rebecca Zunker 2nd - Anisa Rose Samhouri 3rd - Victoria Allyn dairy doe KidS 1St - Mallory Patterson 2nd - Garrett Decker 3rd - Liam Patterson dairy doe KidS 1St - Mai Samhouri 2nd - Anisa Rose Samhouri 3rd - Anisa Rose Samhouri dairy yearlinG doeS 1St - Jarrod Decker 2nd - Kendall Klein 3rd - Garrett Decker dairy milKinG/dry 1St - Rickie Schafer 1St - Liam Patterson 2nd - Mai Samhouri 2nd - Rickie Schafer 3rd - Anisa Rose Samhouri dairy milKinG/dry 1St - Mai Samhouri 2nd - Rickie Schafer 3rd - Mallory Patterson pyGmy doeS over 1 year 1St - Clara Lindauer 2nd - Rickie Schafer 3rd - Rickie Schafer marKet Goat 1St - Lindsay Golding 1St - Rickie Schafer 1St - Soren Freund 1St - Mallory Patterson 1St - Ben Williams 2nd - Marlene Snell 2nd - Mai Samhouri 2nd - Rickie Schafer 2nd - Cade Wolbert 2nd - Cade Wolbert 3rd - Lindsay Golding 3rd - Justin Weiman 3rd - Raegan Massey 3rd - Ben Williams Utility Under 1 yr 1St - Rebecca Zunker Utility over 1 yr 1St - Keely Villyard

2nd - Anisa Rose Samhouri

3rd - Jacob Chambers

1St - Rose Barber

3rd - Kendall Klein

3rd - Samantha Chambers

1St - Rose Barber

Swine

3rd - Abby Baker

1St - Kalyssa Karpunin

Sr Swine ShowmanShip

3rd - Nash Sigmon

1St - Abby Rollyson

1St - Jacob Sewald

Jr GiltS under 6 mo

2nd - Rose Barber

2nd - Tawni Strachan

1St - Tucker Monroe

2nd - Rose Barber

3rd - Rilie Hudler

2nd - Samantha Chambers

3rd - Rose Barber

int Swine ShowmanShip

3rd - Temma Monroe

3rd - Rose Barber

1St - Temma Monroe

Sr GiltS Under 1 yr

Jr doe

2nd - Justin Doubet

1St - Samantha Chambers

1St - Kayla Mulkin

3rd - Kimberly Stone

dairy - JR Heifer Calves

1St - Savannah Wassil

Jr Swine ShowmanShip

1St - Colton Rochlitz

1St - Rose M Barber

1St - Brindelyn Schneider

dairy - JR Yearling Heifers

1St - Shane Grantz

2nd - Kallie Lemon

1St - Dillon Rochlitz

1St - Courtney Montgomery

3rd - Tucker Monroe

raBBitS and cavieS

1St - Courtney Montgomery

novice Swine ShowmanShip

Sr ShowmanShip

2nd - Rose Barber

1St - Caleb Churchwell

1St - Brianna Allen

2nd - Rose Barber

2nd - Hannah Akerley-France

2nd - Ceiturin Thomas

2nd - Courtney Montgomery

3rd - Rickie Schafer

3rd - Hannah Oguin

3rd - Kayla Mulkin

marKet Swine

int ShowmanShip

3rd - Rose Barber

1St - Emmie Sellers

1St - Kaitlyn Boykin

int BUcK Class 6

1St - Emmie Sellers

2nd - Shane Grantz

1St - Brianna Allen

1St - Brindelyn Schneider

3rd - Madison Martell

int doe Class 6

1St - BrodyR Schneider

Jr ShowmanShip

1St - Savannah Wassil

1St - Manuel Torres

1St - Evan Turner

1St - Brianna Allen

1St - Reilly Blakeslee

2nd - Savannah Wassil

1St - Brianna Allen

1St - Justin Doubet

3rd - Mikayla Pollick

Sr BUcK

1St - Justin Doubet

meat pen

1St - Danielle Bogner

1St - Soren Freund

1St - Brianna Allen

1St - Kayla Mulkin

1St - Soren Freund

2nd - Savannah Wassil

1St - Kayla Mulkin

1St - Kallie Lemon

3rd - Brianna Allen

1St - Evan Turner

1St - Tucker Monroe

commercial marKet Fryer

1St - Mikayla Pollick

1St - Nash Sigmon

1St - Savannah Wassil

1St - Savannah Wassil

1St - Morgan Phillips

2nd - Savannah Wassil

1St - Savannah Wassil

1St - Ben Williams

3rd - Rickie Schafer

1St - Brianna Allen

2nd - Tawni Strachan

FUr

1St - Shane Grantz

2nd - Jacob Sewald

1St - Kayla Mulkin

1St - Shane Grantz

2nd - Jacob Sewald

1St - Kayla Mulkin

1St - Annika Bankert

2nd - Donald Negus

1St - Kayla Mulkin

1St - Tanner Grant

2nd - Donald Negus

1St - Brianna Allen

1St - Makenna Karpunin

2nd - Hannah Akerley-France

1St - Brianna Allen

1St - Courtney Montgomery

2nd - Kallie Lemon

1St - Rickie Schafer

1St - Abby Rollyson

2nd - Temma Monroe

1St - Tanner Grant

1St - Lani Lease

2nd - Temma Monroe

1St - Tyler Grant

1St - Devin Mayer

2nd - Cash M Vanek

1St - Lani Lease

2nd - Bailey Martell

2nd - Wes Bray

1St - Devin Mayer

2nd - Rose Barber

2nd - Wes Bray

2nd - Brianna Allen

2nd - Shane Grantz

2nd - Hailee Sigmon

2nd - Brianna Allen

2nd - Ceiturin Thomas

2nd - Luke Sigmon

2nd - Brianna Allen

2nd - Courtney Montgomery

2nd - Ben Williams

2nd - Rickie Schafer

3rd - Madison Martell

3rd - Anna Owens

2nd - Kaitlyn Boykin

3rd - Mikayla Pollick

3rd - Jada Sachetti

2nd - Kelly Lynch

3rd - Savannah Wassil

3rd - Gaige Ashmore

3rd - Kayla Mulkin

3rd - Shane Grantz

3rd - Chase Golding

3rd - Brianna Allen

3rd - Aspen Goettl

3rd - Colton Rochlitz

3rd - Brianna Allen

Sr doe

3rd - Brindelyn Schneider

3rd - Brianna Allen

1St - Kayla Mulkin

3rd - Brody Schneider

3rd - Rickie Schafer

1St - Hannah Oguin

3rd - Manuel Torres

Jr BUcK

1St - Hannah Oguin

3rd - Tyler Webb

1St - Kayla Mulkin

1St - Savannah Wassil

3rd - Breean McElroy

1St - Hannah Oguin

1St - Brianna Allen

3rd - Cody Wild

1St - Rose Barber

1St - Brianna Allen

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12 Elbert County News August 29, 2013

Tritt kicks off PACE Mainstage 2013-14 season Travis Tritt will headline the 2013-2014 Mainstage season at the PACE Center, in Parker, where a schedule of national and regional acts is planned through May 18. Tritt, a multi-instrumentalist, vocalist and songwriter, will perform at 7:30 p.m. Sept. 19 with his band. Tickets cost $75, available at pacecenteronline.org or 303-805-6800. Also scheduled: Second City in October; Jonathan Batiste; Leahy Christmas; “Bingo,” a musical; Colorado Symphony; Celtic Nights; Wonderbound dance, Denver Brass and more. See the website for more information.

Brother-sister Soap Box Derby racers JP and Allison Pankoff, of Parker, have racked up roughly 100 trophies during their careers. Allison, 14, placed second in the National Derby Rally national championships in Bowling Green, Ky. Photo by Chris Michlewicz

Racing is how they roll Soap Box Derby competitors among tops in nation By Chris Michlewicz

cmichlewicz@ourcoloradonews.com There is nothing more pure in racing than a side-by-side duel that ends with a photo finish. Just ask Parker teens Allison and JP Pankoff, who have racked up nearly 100 trophies over their careers as Soap Box Derby racers. Things have changed a bit in the sport, one that has become somewhat of a lost art with the advent of video games and skateboards and smart phones. Whereas the car-building process took a year for one race during the heyday of Soap Box Derby racing, the drivers now bring their vehicles to organized competitions all over the country

throughout the year. There is very little difference between the cars — slight modifications for track conditions and the like are allowed — and races are ultimately decided by the skill of the drivers. As the Pankoffs’ dad, Buzz, puts it, a race is “one giant physics experiment.” It’s a straight race at a 6 percent grade for 1,000 feet. The cars reach up to 40 mph, and many sprints are decided by inches. Allison, 14, laments the fact that she was edged out of first place by a mere .010 seconds during the National Derby Rally national championship in Bowling Green, Ky., July 28-Aug. 3. But she and her family are nonetheless proud to take second in a highly competitive contest against the best racers in the country. The Pankoffs consider it a “family win.” Together, they travel, discuss car adjustments, and, if all goes as planned, celebrate. The educational piece is a bonus, but Buzz Pankoff doesn’t lose sight of the

biggest benefit. “The foremost thing is using it as another outlet to spend time with the kids,” he says. “That time is irreplaceable.” Buzz Pankoff, who acts as coach along with his wife, Judy, grew up racing Soap Box Derby cars and passed the tradition on to his kids. JP, a 15-year-old sophomore at Legend High School, recently retired from the sport, but enjoyed an accomplished career. He began racing Soap Box Derby cars at the age of 9. JP says someday he will probably introduce his own children to the pastime. For now, he is using his knowledge to help his little sister on the racetrack. And it’s clearly working. “He gave us all of the information we needed to make both cars competitive,” said Buzz Pankoff, referring to the recent derby nationals. In almost the same breath, he gives a nod to his daughter’s abilities, noting that second place in a national competition is a major achievement.

Weekend offers Taste, football, mountains Much to do around metro area as summer ends By Sonya Ellingboe

sellingboe@ourcoloradonews.com With a long weekend ahead, lucky metro area residents have multiple entertainment options (assuming weather gods cooperate) that include food, art, football, mountains and Taste of Colorado/Festival of Mountain and Plain. We’ll focus on that festival, which started many years ago as a way to entice folks to come to downtown Denver, and was restarted more recently for the same reason. It’s now known as Taste of Colorado. Admission for four days of activities, food and music is free. Tickets for food and carnival rides are sold. The fest boasts five music stages, 50 restaurants and food trucks, a marketplace with about 280 vendors, a

If you go Civic Center is between Broadway and Bannock streets, 14th and Colfax avenues. With good weather, attendance might reach 500,000, so parking spots are at a premium and the light rail gets one close. Information can be found at ATasteofColorado.com. 303-295-6330. kids’ area, Culinary Showcase, a Festival of Mountain and Plain area that teaches about state history, nature and environment, and traditional arts and crafts. Included: Navajo weaving, spinning, rug braiding, lace crocheting, felting, quilting and blacksmithing. The Raptor Foundation will also bring live birds to the area and teach about conservation. The five stages are: Main, Rock and Roll, Country, Colorado Heritage Stage and Kidz Stage. Three Highlands Ranch-based bands will perform: • Tunisia will play at 8:15 p.m. Aug. 31 on the Rock and Roll Stage. It’s a

10-piece group with three lead singers, three horns and a five-piece rhythm section that plays classic rock, R&B, contemporary hits, Motown and hiphop. • The four-member Five 13 band is scheduled at 3:45 p.m. Sept. 2 on the Rock stage, with originals and covers influenced by the great arena bands of the past plus today’s favorites. • After Midnight, which brings the Benny Goodman songbook and other music from that era, will perform on the Colorado Heritage Stage at 10:45 a.m. Aug. 31. The KidZone and Kidz Stage will have kid-friendly food vendors nearby, plus an ongoing program of clowns, magicians, musicians and more, including a baby station with rockers, changing tables and diapers. To welcome the festival’s start, fireworks will blast off at about 9 p.m. Aug. 30 after the Dennis DeYoung: Music of Styx performance on the Main Stage.

What’s it worth?

Bemis Library, 6014 S. Datura St., Littleton, hosts its annual Antique Appraisal Fair from noon to 7 p.m. Sept. 13. Bring a maximum of two items — dishes, jewelry, coins, toys, books, lamps, glassware, or photos of large items, to be evaluated by local appraisers. To register for a time slot, call 303-7953961.

Memories

The Littleton Independent is celebrating its 125th anniversary and would love to hear from readers about memories of the Independent — was there a special story about you or your family, a notable event or person? Email a short paragraph to sellingboe@ourcoloradonews.com.

Reminder to artists

The Twelfth Annual Lone Tree Art Exhibition and Sale entry deadline is Sept. 15. Artists may submit up to three images on CaFE (callforentry.org) in oil, pastel, water media, mixed media, sculpture. Entries cannot have appeared at Lone Tree previously. A $35 entry fee can be submitted online or mailed to Art Exhibition, 10075 Commons St., Lone Tree, CO 80124. The exhibit will run Nov. 16 to Jan. 5. Katherine Smith Warren is juror. Cash awards estimated at $4,000. Best of Show winner will have 30 days of gallery space. See City of Lone Tree website for more information, www.cityoflonetree. com.

Asian cuisine and more

Chef Andrea McGrath, a Johnson & Wales University graduate who has studied Asian cuisine in Thailand and Singapore, will teach and demonstrate at 6:30 p.m. Sept. 5 at Highlands Ranch Library, 9292 Ridgeline Blvd. On Oct. 3, chef Elizabeth Buckingham will teach Indian cuisine at Parker Library and on Nov. 7, Chef Monte Johnson will talk about American comfort food/holiday cuisine. Register in advance at douglascountylibraries.org.

Art at ACC

The Fine Arts Faculty and Friends Exhibition will be located in the Colorado Gallery of the Arts in the Annex at Arapahoe Community College, 5900 S. Santa Fe Drive, Littleton, from Sept. 5 to Oct. 9. An opening reception will be from 5 to 7 p.m. Sept. 6. More than 25 artists have confirmed that they will participate. Gallery hours: noon to 5 p.m. Mondays through Fridays. Open Tuesdays until 7 p.m.


13

Elbert County News 13

August 29, 2013

Medical building is ‘Alexander’ for reason Exhibit explains building name, doctor’s history By Virginia Grantier

vgrantier@ourcoloradonews.com South of the new Castle Rock Adventist Hospital is a new medical building, offices of various physicians, and it has a name: The Alexander Building. Local historians said recently they wanted people to understand why it was named that — and so they spent about a year gathering documents, information and artifacts about Dr. George Everett Alexander, who moved to Castle Rock in 1893 to set up a practice. It was a different environment for the East Coast doctor, born in Connecticut and educated in New York state: There might have been, possibly, a couple hundred people in Castle Rock then, said Angie DeLeo, director of the Castle Rock Museum. The results of her research and the work of the museum’s collections curator, Jim Hansmann, are now in the building’s lobby — a permanent exhibit that includes a photo of the doctor in his office holding his dog, as well as some of his instruments, his doctor’s diary, prescription pad and so on. She said he initially would have used a horse to get around, but he was also known to ride a bicycle — one picture shows his dress pants, sharply pressed, creased down the legs, but with bicycle clips at the ankles so he can safely ride. Later, he would buy one of the first automobiles in town, a 1911 REO.

Life held tragedy

In his life of being there for people in emergencies, his own life had traumas. Lionel Oberlin, a longtime resident and historian, who with his wife started the Castle Rock Historical Society and the museum, owns the house where Alexander practiced and lived for most of his time in Castle Rock. He said recently that Alexander’s second wife, Bessie, hanged herself behind the

Angie DeLeo, director of the Castle Rock Museum, and Jim Hansmann, the museum’s collections curator, spent about a year researching so they could create the exhibit about Dr. George E. Alexander. Photo by Virginia Grantier house, which is located at 203 Cantril St., in a building that is no longer there. It was reported in the Oct. 4, 1907, Castle Rock Journal that Bessie died “by hanging herself this morning.” She was mother of three sons, the youngest only about a year old, and the paper reported she had been having “difficulties,” Hansmann said. But Alexander, a second-time widower, would marry a third wife, widow Nina Thomas, have another son, and live and practice medicine in Castle Rock for another 40 years until he died in 1947. Alexander was born in Connecticut on Jan. 9, 1859. In 1885 he graduated with honors from New York’s University of Buffalo medical school, and married his first wife, Arlene Harris, on Feb. 13, 1889. They moved from New York state to Fort Collins in 1891 because of her health. In 1892, Arlene Alexander, who had tuberculosis, died. In 1893, Alexander moved to Castle Rock. It’s not clear where his initial office was located in Castle Rock. In 1898, he mar-

ried Bessie Shaw, daughter of a Canon City minister, and in 1902 he bought the house at 203 Cantril St. It’s called the Hammer House, and is now on the National Register of Historic Places. It was built by Benjamin Hammer, who owned the Colorado Stone Co. and built the town’s first train depot, which is now the Castle Rock Museum.

Basement treasures

The house was in the family until the Oberlins bought the then-vacant house in the 1980s from the estate. They were told they could keep whatever was left in the basement, their oldest son Dirk Oberlin said recently. Lionel Oberlin and his wife, Starr, now deceased, while rummaging through basement things, found a large original pencil and charcoal drawing of Alexander as well as other items now displayed throughout the house. A copy of the drawing is part of the Alexander Building’s lobby display. Another house that Alexander lived in

sometime before he bought the Hammer House was a nearby frame house at 121 Cantril St., DeLeo said. Alexander was known to have a “wonderful voice,” was a baritone and sang for various community events as well as acted in plays. “He was well-known in the community … kind of a Renaissance man,” DeLeo said. Alexander was known as a “friend, counselor, advisor, community historian, banquet toastmaster and leading citizen,” according to information at the display. He played some baseball on a team called the Castle Rockers, but the researchers noticed that after a game in which he got hit in the head with a ball, it was never mentioned that he played again. He only “umped,” Hansmann said. He would sometimes visit Central City where his brother, Ed Alexander, managed a gold mine the brothers owned called “Vindicator,” in what was called the Yankee Hill area. At one point, the mine was producing 1.5 ounces per ton.

Recognition for doctor

Alexander also saw patients throughout the county, had part-time office hours in Sedalia, and when the DuPont Company doctor couldn’t figure out what was wrong with a patient in the company town of Louviers, Alexander arrived and diagnosed appendicitis and drove the patient to the nearest hospital at the time, Denver’s St. Anthony. Alexander has been nationally recognized as one of the longest-practicing physicians in the United States. In the future, when needed, there will be additional medical buildings built near Castle Rock’s hospital, and it’s already known the next building will have a woman’s name on it — possibly longtime Castle Rock nurse Mary Briscoe Enderud. But anyone who knows of women with notable histories in the medical field in the Castle Rock area is asked to email the museum with the names and any information about them: crmuseum@comcast.net.

Work to begin on car gallery, storage adindex

Vehicle Vault will be located near Lincoln Avenue, Twenty Mile Road By Chris Michlewicz

The Elbert County News is made possible thanks to our local advertisers. When you spend your dollars near your home – especially with these advertisers – it keeps your community strong, prosperous and informed.

cmichlewicz@ourcoloradonews. com A gallery of the world’s most sought-after collectible cars will make its home in Parker. The people behind Vehicle Vault, an expansive development that will provide secure storage and display space for some of the rarest and most valuable vehicles ever made, are set to break ground Aug. 23 southwest of Lincoln Avenue and Twenty Mile Road. Occupying roughly 20 acres, Vehicle Vault will include twelve storage condos for collectors of high-end automobiles. They will have the ability to maintain and display their prized collections in a country club-like atmosphere, and have access to services like waterless car washes. The cornerstone of Vehicle Vault, however, is a 25,000-square-foot gallery that will showcase a collection of 38 exotic and classic cars owned by cofounders Erin and Daniel Dilley. The interactive and rotating exhibit displays and programs will be “designed to educate, inspire and foster an appreciation for this key element of our past, present and future,” an announcement about the groundbreaking ceremony says. Erin Dilley’s upbringing was marked by her self-described “obsession” with cars of all kinds. Likewise, Daniel grew up restoring classic cars and drove a 1968 Pontiac GTO as his first car. Erin Dilley’s father, who sold a

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Vehicle Vault, a collectible car storage facility and gallery, allows owners to maintain and display cars. Courtesy photo company that developed a popular software program used in pharmacies, was always an avid collector, and she has amassed her own fleet of beautiful vehicles over the last five years. A few years back, after having trouble finding room to store the collection — ranging from trucks to an antique horseless carriage to the beefiest muscle cars — she floated the idea of creating a car museum. “We all love cars and it keeps us together and bonded,” Erin Dilley said. “It’s an excuse to do what we love.” Her father offered his guidance, but insisted that the couple build the venture from the ground up themselves. After a year of design work and reviews, the Dilleys approached Parker officials with the idea. Parker Town Council signed off on

the project earlier this month. Erin and Daniel Dilley, who have lived in Parker for five years, “felt strongly that this needed to be in Parker” because of their close connection with the town. A grand opening is tentatively targeted for next June. The gallery will be open to the public five days per week and admission will likely be around $10-$12. It will also host car shows and special events. Local car clubs will be invited to gather and start cruises, for example. “There is a culture in the community of car lovers,” said Greg Masinton, public relations representative for the project. For more information, visit vehiclevaultco.com or call 720-883-6518.

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14 Elbert County News

August 29, 2013

Papermaker’s new works exhibited Tomasso has studio in Englewood home

If you go “Forgotten Latitudes” will be at the Ice Cube Gallery, 3320 Walnut St., Denver, through Sept. 14. Gallery hours: Noon to 6 p.m. Thursdays, Saturdays; noon to 9 p.m. Fridays. 303-292-1822, icecubegallery.com.

By Sonya Ellingboe

sellingboe@ourcoloradonews.com “‘Forgotten Latitudes’ is a new series of work in paper, exploring the textures of the blank spaces on maps. It is a search for the isolation, the wind and passage of time that takes place here unnoticed by anyone. The work evokes the names of places that have been changed or have never existed,” said Ray Tomasso’s artist’s statement about his new exhibit at Ice Cube Gallery in Denver, where he has exhibited previously. “Forgotten Latitudes” runs through Sept. 14. Tomasso has lived and worked in Englewood since 1980, with his Inter-Ocean Curiosity Studio, where he pulverizes rags and makes handmade papers, in addition to housing a collection of antique letterpresses. He was born in Omaha, Neb., in 1949, studied art and printmaking and created his first work of art in paper in 1974. He received an MFA in printmaking from CUBoulder in 1979, where he studied with Clinton Cline and Robert B. Ecker. After locating his studio in Englewood, he traveled internationally studying papers, history and techniques in this ancient craft. He was involved in founding the International Association of Hand Papermakers and Paper Artists, headquartered in Switzerland. He has exhibited his art locally and in-

Notice To Creditors

ternationally and continued to operate his studio. His website has photographs of the complicated and lengthy process involved in creating each work. He offers a condensed description: “A composition is set up using string, tape, found objects and textures, both found and made. The work to be cast represents a mirror image with the negative space above the composition. “The work is made up of three layers of new, wet handmade paper, dropped from the paper mould. The first two layers are of recycled archival rag paper to capture the texture of the composition, the third layer is blue jean for strength and shrinkage. The result is a sheet of paper 8’x 8’ or 8’x 12’. “This is glued to a wooden frame, sanded, and paint and pure pigment are applied. The surface is finished with layer after layer of paint and pigment with an eye to enhancing the textural qualities of the surface.” His works are abstract and powerful, with varied linear and textural effects, different from most work an art lover sees in this area. When RTD was building the Southwest Light Rail line, Tomasso was commissioned

Notice To Creditors

PUBLIC NOTICE

PUBLIC NOTICE

NOTICE TO CREDITORS Estate of Virgil H. Hedlund, Deceased Case Number: 2013 PR 29

NOTICE TO CREDITORS Estate of Michael Conrad Kelley, aka Michael C. Kelley, Deceased Case Number: 2013 PR 30012

All persons having claims against the above-named estate are required to present them to the Personal Representative or to the District Court of Elbert County, Colorado on or before December 23, 2013 or the claims may be forever barred.

All persons having claims against the above-named estate are required to present them to the Personal Representative or to the District Court of Elbert County, Colorado on or before December 30, 2013 or the claims may be forever barred.

Gary Hedlund Personal Representative 959 North Terrace Hill Drive Salt Lake City, Utah 84103

Mary Kay Kelley Personal Representative 1327 Conifer Place Elizabeth, Colorado 80107

Legal Notice No: 927750 First Publication: August 22, 2013 Last Publication: September 5, 2013 Publisher: Elbert County News

Legal Notice No: 927754 First Publication: August 29, 2013 Last Publication: September 12, 2013 Publisher: Elbert County News

“Crossing the Bosporus” by Ray Tomasso of Englewood is included in “Forgotten Latitudes” works in paper, which opened Aug. 22 at Ice Cube Gallery in Denver. Courtesy photo to create art for the Englewood station. It is made of cast glass, with found objects em-

bedded in it, which show when light flows through.

When government takes action, it uses local newspapers to notify you. Reading your public notices is the best way to find out what is happening in your community and how it affects you. If you don’t read public notices, you never know what you might miss.

Notices are meant to be noticed. Read your public notices and get involved! Notice To Creditors

Public Notice GENERAL FUND HEALTH FUND ROAD & BRIDGE FUND SALES AND USE TAx FUND LEA FUND HUMAN SERVICES FUND REITREMENT FUND CHAPPARAL VALLEY FUND IMPACT FUND CONSERVATION TRUST FUND TOTALS Vendor Name

Description

$281,818.37 $6,594.42 $300,474.06 $556,989.71 $5,042.30 $76,428.88 $18,140.50 $150.00 $2,020.05 $51,495.35 $1,299,153.64 AMT

1 STOP TIRE AND AUTO OPERATING EXPENSE 1,425.92 A & E TIRE INC OPERATING EXPENSE 1,054.72 ACOMA LOCKSMITH SVC OPERATING EXPENSE 223.00 ADVANCED QUALITY AUTO VEHICLE MAINT 50.14 AGATE MUTUAL MTHLY SERVICE 23.05 AIRGAS INTERMOUNTAIN OPERATING EXPENSE 1,148.68 ARAPAHOE HEATING SVC OPERATING EXPENSE 7,486.38 ARC ELECTRIC OPERATING EXPENSE 1,750.00 ARROWHEAD FENCING OPERATING EXPENSE 20,064.00 ASHCRAFT RANCH OPERATING EXPENSE 540.00 ASHLEY BALLER OPERATING EXPENSE 250.00 ASHLEY GERCZYNSKI OPERATING EXPENSE 150.00 Asphalt Specialties Company OPERATING EXPENSE 536,453.71 AT&T JUNE BILL SIMLA 153.79 AUTOMATIC DOOR DOCTORS BUILDING REPAIR 2,020.05 BASS VIVA I. REIMBURSEMENT 1,016.00 BERG HILL GREENLEAF & RUSCITTI LITIGATION 4,090.00 BIG O TIRES TIRES 562.12 BIG TIME BUCKING HORSE OPERATING EXPENSE 1,200.00 BLACK HILLS ENERGY MONTHLY SERVICE 724.07 BLASTER BOUNCER FAIR EXPENSE 2,153.57 CAROLYN BURGENER MONTHLY CONTRACT 200.00 CASP REGISTRATION AND DUES 90.00 CATHERINE LAMBERT OPERATING EXPENSE 47.75 CCOM/CHC, LLC OPERATING EXPENSE 144.00 CDAC TRAINING 85.00 CENTENNIAL MENTAL HEALTH OPERATING EXPENSE 60.00 CENTURYLINK MONTHLY SERVICE 904.40 CERTIFIED LABORATORIES OPERATING EXPENSE 124.90 ChemTox OPERATING EXPENSE 17.50 CO ASSESSORS ASSOCIATION CONFERENCE 300.00 CO ASSOC OF TAX APPRAISERS CONFERENCE 570.00 CO COALITION/ SEXUAL ASSAULT DUES 135.00 COLORADO COMMUNITY OPERATING EXPENSE 36.25 CO DEPT OF PUBLIC SAFETY OPERATING EXPENSE 316.00 CO DEPT OF REVENUE OPERATING EXPENSE 63.00

ELBERT COUNTY VENDOR PMT LIST JULY 2013

CO EAST COMM. ACTION AGENCY OPERATING EXPENSE 50.00 CO OLD TIME FIDDLERS FAIR EXPENSE 750.00 CSU EXTENSION QUARTERLY PAYMENT 3,075.00 COMCAST MONTHLY SERVICE 595.60 COMMUNITY MEDIA OF CO PUBLICATIONS 299.00 Corporate Billing OPERATING EXPENSE 3,198.33 CORRECTIONAL HEALTHCARE MEDICAL INMATE SERVICE 11,146.16 CREATIVE CARPENTRY OPERATING EXPENSE 5,477.00 CREDIT UNION OF CO CREDIT CARD TRANS. 12,361.91 CYNTHIA HIGDON REIMBURSEMENT 64.00 D-J PETROLEUM INC. UNLEADED FUEL 55,741.21 DEEP ROCK MONTHLY SERVICE 8.45 DEERE & COMPANY OPERATING EXPENSE 19,870.43 DENVER INDUSTRIAL SALES OPERATING EXPENSE 636.16 DIANA HARTSOUGH REIMBURSEMENT 16.00 DIGBY PROPERTIES SIMLA JULY RENT 725.00 Dominion Voting Systems OPERATING EXPENSE 13,400.95 DRIVE TRAIN INDUSTRIES INC OPERATING EXPENSE 1,994.12 EC COALITION FOR OUTREACH MONTHLY CONTRACT 760.00 EIDE BAILLY LEAP AUDIT 3,640.00 EL PASO COUNTY AUTOPSY 5,400.00 ELBERT COUNTY EXTENSION OPERATING EXPENSE 3,000.00 ELBERT COUNTY FAIRBOARD 2013 FAIR EVENTS 4,700.00 ELBERT COUNTY JAIL BLACK FOREST FIRE 1,543.56 ELBERT COUNTY R&B OPERATING EXPENSE 1,964.18 ELBERT COUNTY TREASURER OPERATING EXPENSE 125,146.66 EMILY SHAUMAN REIMBURSEMENT 225.69 ENERTIA CONSULTING OPERATING EXPENSE 19,654.20 FAIR POINT COMMUNICATIONS MONTHLY SERVICE 382.00 FASTENAL COMPANY OPERATING EXPENSE 140.41 FREMONT CTY SHERIFF’S OFFICE OPERATING EXPENSE 38.33 FRONTIER BUSINESS MONTHLY CONTRACT 99.00 FRONTIER COMm. MONTHLY CONTRACT 995.96 G&K SERVICES OPERATING EXPENSE 606.18 GLENN A. OHRNS CONTRACT WAGES 1,450.00 GRAINGER CHANGING TABLES 870.60 GRANT THAYER PLNING COMMISSION MEETINGS 188.00 GREAT WEST LIFE & ANNUITY COUNTY RETIREMENT 40,763.70 GROUND ENGINEERING OPERATING EXPENSE 7,915.00 HEADS UP COLORADO YOUTH TANF 4,156.25 HEATHER HARCOURT TDM-1 150.00 HENSLEY BATTERY LLC DEKA BATTERIES 227.66 HOME DEPOT CREDIT SERVICE OPERATING EXPENSE 1,437.69 HONEYBEE PUMPING SERVICE OPERATING EXPENSE 270.00 HONNEN EQUIPMENT COMPANY EQUIPMENT EXPENSE 2,055.91 ICON ENGINEERING OPERATING EXPENSE 6,922.60 ILENE ALLISON OPERATING EXPENSE 2,239.80 IMCO TRAILER RECEPTACLE 81.58 IREA MONTHLY SERVICE 8,842.50 INTERSTATE BATTERY BATTERIES 76.82 J&S CONTRACTORS SUPPLY CO CARBON GRADER BLADES 13,264.91

JAMES ROBERT WARE PLNING COMMISSION MEETINGS 117.00 JAMI TORRES REIMBURSEMENT 100.86 JOHN DEERE FINANCIAL OPERATING EXPENSE 44,817.60 JOHN ELWAY CHEVY 2013 CHEVY TAHOE 29,884.00 KANSAS STATE BANK JULY PAYMENT 2,384.75 KARA GERCZYNSKI FAIR EXPENSE 235.72 KATHRINE KRUSE SYLVESTER TRAVEL EXPENSE 118.94 KELLEY MIKE PLNING COMMISSION MEETING 51.00 KIOWA STORAGE KIOWA STORAGE 720.00 LARRY ROSS REIMBURSEMENT 19.50 LIFE SUPPORT BEHAV. INSTITUTE OPERATING EXPENSE 937.50 Lone Star Silversmith OPERATING EXPENSE 278.50 LYLE SIGN INC NM 7165 MISC. SIGNS 2,182.98 M7 BUSINESS SYSTEMS LETTERHEAD ENVELOPS 157.70 MARY LOUISE JACOBSON REIMBURSEMENT 64.79 MATT MARTINICH CORE SERVICES 3,374.75 McAfee Inc WEB AND EMAIL PROTECTION363.78 MEDVED FORD PARTS OPERATING EXPENSE 179.91 MHC KENWORTH OPERATING EXPENSE 1,818.20 Micrographic Supply Inc SERVICE CALL 300.00 MINES & ASSOCIATES PC EMPLOYEE ASST. PROGRAM 267.90 MOUNTAIN VIEW ELECTRIC MONTHLY SERVICE 305.67 MOUNTAIN VIEW TENT CO RENTAL 1,754.45 MUDDY TIRES LLC FRIDAY NIGHT BAND 2,000.00 NEXTEL COMMUNICATIONS CELL PHONES 2,248.16 Norchem Drug Testing Labatory DRUG TESTING 15.60 OTEROCTY SERVE PAPERS 39.40 PARKER PORT-A-POTTY INC. BLACK FOREST FIRE 2,834.00 PARTMASTER OPERATING EXPENSE 320.22 PATTY ANN’S CAFE FOOD, BLACK FOREST FIRE 209.82 ARNOLD AND ASSOCIATES JUNE CHILD WELFARE ATTY FEES 7,030.00 PAUL CRISAN PLNING COMMISSION MEETING 152.00 PAULA KOCH PLNING COMMISSION MEETING 80.00 PHOENIX TECHNOLOGY ENHANCED MANAGED SERVICES 6,030.75 PIONEER PLUMBING & HEATING OPERATING EXPENSE 90.00 PITNEY BOWES INC SERVICE AGREEMENT 1,221.00 POSTMASTER GENERAL POSTAGE 1,926.00 POTESTIO BROTHERS OPERATING EXPENSE 940.82 POWER MOTIVE CORP QUARTERLY MAINTENANCE 272.00 PRO AG SOLUTIONS OPERATING EXPENSE 2,288.74 PUREWATER DYNAMICS INC LEASE EQUIPMENT 50.00 QUILL CORPORATION OFFICE SUPPLIES 796.54 QWEST MONTHLY CHARGES 7,499.90 RECYCLED MATERIALS CO. OPERATING EXPENSE 9,814.98 REVIZE LLC OPERATING EXPENSE 5,450.00 RI TEC MOLLY D 225.00 RICHARD BROWN PLNING COMMISSION MEETINGS 166.00 ROBERT L FAGER PORTAPOT RENTAL 195.00 ROBERT ROWLAND PLNING COMMISSION LUNCH 22.36 ROCK PARTS COMPANY OPERATING EXPENSE 3,526.88 Ron Turner PLNING COMMISSION MEETINGS 186.00

RR Donnelley NOV’S PACKAGES 3,381.39 RT SERVICES CORP LLC MONTHLY SERVICE 211.05 SCHMIDT CONSTRUCTION HOT MIX 77,404.14 SECURE NETWORK SYSTEMS COLOR RIBBON 170.00 SHERYL GUERRA REIMBURSEMENT 32.00 SIGNAL GRAPHICS BUILDING PERMIT CARDS 117.78 SPRINT CELL SERVICE 575.10 STAN WILMER REIMBURSEMENT 13.97 STAPLES ADVANTAGE OFFICE SUPPLIES 2,829.09 STATE OF COLORADO ANNUAL FEE 1,905.00 STATE WIRE & TERMINAL OPERATING EXPENSE 319.77 STEPHENS-PECK OPERATING EXPENSE 85.00 DEISEL AND UNLEADED FUEL 23,261.57 STONE OIL CO INC STORAGE ONE STORAGE 110.00 SUBURBAN PROPANE EQUIPMENT EXPENSE 78.20 SUE LINK PLNING COMMITTEE COMMISSION144.00 SUNDANCE PRINTING PRINTING 886.95 SUSAN SAINT VINCENT PLNING COMMISSION MEETINGS 84.00 SYSCO FOOD SERVICES VARIOUS FOODS 3,373.04 THE JUST DESIGN GROUP OPERATING EXPENSE 38.38 THE LIGHTHOUSE LED LAMP 63.08 Thimgan Inc. OPERATING EXPENSE 4,000.00 TINA ARNOLD TRAINING 117.51 TODD PEDERSON DEPUTY COMP 1,200.00 TOM BESHORE PLNING COMMISSION MEETINGS 92.00 TOWN OF KIOWA JUNE WATER 7,616.45 TOWN OF SIMLA WATER,SEWER,TRASH 117.07 TRUE VALUE HARDWARE OPERATING EXPENSE 1,063.29 TYLER TECHNOLOGIES INC AGREEMENT 24,243.00 UMB BANK NA PAYING AGENT FEE 150.00 US VENTURE INC OPERATING EXPENSE 6,160.69 USA MOBILITY WIRELESS PAGERS 80.91 VERIZON WIRELESS CELL PHONES 1,122.93 VIAERO WIRELESS TELEPHONE 130.62 WAGNER EQUIPMENT OPERATING EXPENSE 1,578.90 WASTE MANAGEMENT MONTHLY SERVICE 723.92 WELD ADOLESCENT RESOURCES OPERATING EXPENSE 7,411.01 WESTERN CARTOGRAPHERS OPERATING EXPENSE 60.00 WESTPACI OPERATING EXPENSE 266.54 WINPUMP OPERATING EXPENSE 52.19 WITT BOYS-NAPA OPERATING EXPENSE 1,553.34 XEROX CORPORATION MONTHLY SERVICE 817.07 Y Time AUGUST SERVICES 60.48 YOUNG WILLIAMS CHILD SPT JUNE CONTRACT 4,918.08 Zee Medical OPERATING EXPENSE 215.95

Legal Notice No.: 927755 First Publication: August 29, 2013 Last Publication: August 29, 2013 Publisher: Elbert County News


ElbertSportS 15-Sports-Color

Elbert County News 15 August 29, 2013

flows

Valor Christian’s starting offensive line, a group made up of all seniors, stands tall and wide in the trenches. From left are tackle Isaiah Holland, guard Sam Kozan, center Cody Bratten, guard Ryan Cummings and tackle Alec Ruth. The unit averages more than 290 pounds. Photo by Chris Rotar

Linemen ready to rock the block Multitalented players key teams’ attacks By Jim Benton

jbenton@ourcoloradonews.com Offensive linemen used to be pictured as big, dumb guys who like to push and knock people around. That stereotype has changed. Valor Christian coach Rod Sherman has an all-senior starting offensive line this season that could physically match up with many college lines. Left tackle Alec Ruth is 6-foot-6, 300 pounds, and right tackle Isaiah Holland is 6-5, 310 pounds. They sandwich guards Ryan Cummings (6-5, 295) and Sam Kozan (6-2, 265) and center Cody Bratten (6-3, 280). Valor’s line averages 290 pounds, but Sherman claims it takes both brawn and brains to be a good offensive lineman.

“First, it takes intelligence to be able to diagnose different defensive schemes and be able to adjust on the fly,” said Sherman. “I know sometimes in the world there is a stereotype of football players not being intelligent, but that is so not true. Our left tackle is being recruited hard by Ivy League schools and our center scored 35 on his ACT and is looking at schools like MIT.” It takes more than just hitting a blocking sled hard to become a good offensive lineman. A potential All-League offensive lineman these days needs to be versatile, quick, explosive off the ball and a technique master to learn various kinds of blocks. “Second, you need kids that want to work hard and aren’t worried about getting the glory,” added Sherman. It’s not a glorious position being an offensive lineman, you have to work and be patient. “Bigger kids, when the ball gets rolled out their freshman year, are not able to play at the level they want because their

bodies might be bigger and it might take them a little more time to improve their coordination,” he said. “Some of those kids when they get to their junior and senior years, their hard work starts to pay off. “We are blessed. There are not a ton of teams that can say that both their offensive tackles are being recruited by Pac 12 and Big 12 schools.” Cherry Creek’s offensive line doesn’t measure up to Valor’s in size, as the Bruins put a premium on agility. “It obviously starts up front on both sides of the ball,” said coach Dave Logan. “If you are not good up front on offense or defense, you are going to have a hard time winning. “This year our biggest offensive linemen will be about 235 to 240 pounds. We ask them to do a lot of different things. So being mobile is as important to us as being really, really big. We ask them to zone block, we’ll run different concepts to the running game, power, counter, toss, and

we ask them to pass block.” Development takes time. “There are a lot of things we are asking that take time for guys to feel comfortable with, and sometimes time is a full year,” emphasized Logan. “We throw a lot at these kids and we ask a lot of them. Back in the old days of just lining up in a threepoint stance, getting off the ball and blocking for a running game, those days have been long gone for a lot of people.” Sherman isn’t shy about reminding his offensive linemen about basics. “They can’t get tired of doing the fundamentals,” he said. “They have to continue to prefect their craft from pass protection to run blocking. I believe the attention to detail is important in every position, but it is just magnified at the line of scrimmage. “Oftentimes if you hear a lineman’s name called, it is because of something they did not do well. It takes a certain type of kid to have that character and we’re blessed to have a group of those kids.”

Elizabeth volleyball team has hopes for better ending Squad lost twice in 2012 regional tourney By Scott Stocker

Special to Colorado Community Media Elizabeth seniors Sabra Ross and Shawnee Montoya-Briddle are certainly looking for a different ending to the 2013 volleyball season than they experienced in 2012. Elizabeth, coached by Russ Haman, ended the regular 2012 volleyball season on a high note with a 21-1 record. However, the season came to an untimely end as the Cardinals lost twice in the Regional Tournament to D’Evelyn and Broomfield to close out the year. “It’s going to be a mental game and I feel we have the abilities this season to do well,” said Ross, a strong outside hitter for Elizabeth. “It all boils down to teamwork and how we work together. I just want to be a good

leader and help keep the team up. “We want to play happy and we’re excited for a good year,” continued Ross, who will head to Adams State College next year. “We just want this to be a fine year for everyone on our team. I’m going to Adams State and I do hope to play there.” Montoya-Briddle will enroll at Colorado State University next fall, but is not sure whether or not she will continue her volleyball career. “It’s our mental game that we have to be sharp for this season,” Montoya-Briddle said. “We’re all expecting a good year, and for me I’m expecting to have an exciting year. This is Elizabeth and we know what we have to do. We both want to go out and do what is expected of us and to not let our teammates down. “Last year didn’t end the way we had hoped,” said Montoya-Briddle. “We have some talent, that’s for sure. All through the lineup we can play hard

and go for our success. It’s going to be an interesting season.” Indeed, the outlook for Elizabeth’s 2013 campaign is looking good, and Haman is pleased with the leadership Ross and Montoya-Briddle pass on. “Sabra and Shawnee are just fine all-around players for us,” Haman said. “Both are special people as they work tremendously hard to be the best they can and to encourage the others. “Sabra is unique as she’s also a fine basketball player and so successful in both sports,” Haman said. “Shawnee is just a committed individual in all she does and just helps our team balance so much. They go out and do what is expected of them. But, that’s what all the girls are out there for.” Yet, as mentioned, this is a team with experience back. “We only lost two seniors off last year’s team so we do have good numbers back,” Haman said. “But we’re going to be cautious about

the year. Volleyball is one of those sports where things can change on the drop of a dime. We were 12-0 and champions of the Colorado Seven League. That’s certainly something great to build upon.” Outside hitting juniors Emily Luke and Shay Piper, sophomore setter Aly Morgan and junior libero Kayla Kagan are also primed to play. “Aly can play anywhere, but we certainly like her at setter,” Haman said. “These girls move very well on the court. They are just strong and add so much to our team. Their hitting and defense has been wonderful and we want them to keep it up. Kayla has grown tremendously for us and she is such a fine passer and defender. “The girls are all technical in their play,” Haman said. “They back each other up and know their way around the court. We’re all looking for success once again. And, yes, we certainly would like to go further this season.”


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16 Elbert County News

August 29, 2013

‘High Five’ run for Kiowa cross country Three girls, two boys working with first-year coach By Scott Stocker

Special to Colorado Community Media When it comes to cross country, all hopes are running high for the “High Five.” That’s due to the fact that as the season gets underway for Kiowa and first-year coach Katie Trenda, there are only five runners on the team — two boys and three girls. Leading the way for the girls will be senior Beth Campbell, the only state quali-

fier for Kiowa last season. She finished 40th with a time of 23 minutes, 22.4 seconds and already knows that she will be able to fashion better times this season. “I just want to find a new ways to challenge and push myself,” Campbell said. “I want to dig deep with that challenge and to do want I need. Last year I ran 21:33 during the regular season and I feel that I’m very much capable of having better times this season. “I also think we have a great team, despite not having big numbers,” Campbell said. “Of course we are so short in numbers, but we’re proud of our sport. We just wish, too, that we had the numbers to compete for team titles. I know I want to buckle

down and give a good show and do something that I and my team will be proud of.” Trenda said she is excited to be coaching Kiowa this season and hopes to make the program grow in numbers through this season. The other two girls are junior Hanna Maben, who comes over from Elbert, and home-schooled freshman Heather Reilly. “We only have the five right now,” Trenda said as practice opened. “But I think we might be able to gain a few more as the season progresses. This is my first year and I’m glad to see the excitement from the kids.” The only boys running for Kiowa at this point are juniors Andrew Van and Aaron Ryals-Ison. Van’s best outing last season was 20:19 and he’s confident he’s going to pull the number down big time.

“I’m confident that I’m up to the challenge this season and I do need to step up and be a leader,” Van said. “I feel I will be going out and bringing the time down big. I want to make it to state this year and that challenge has given me a lift. “And, I’m really going to be doing my best to beat Beth,” Van said with a chuckle. “She’s a good one, no doubts, and a runner we look up to. I’ve been able to lift weights more, I’ve watched my diet and I just know that it’s time to buckle down. Our team is smaller this year, but we’re on a large recovery.” Trenda certainly wants to see the numbers grow on her team this season. But, she has good feelings about what these five can contribute to the sport.

Indians golf team small, but hoping to reach state tourney 2012 squad garnered academic honors By Scott Stocker

Special to Colorado Community Media The Kiowa golf team finished the 2012 season as the Colorado High School Activities Association’s Academic Champions — a great accomplishment and goal, to be sure.

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But there is no doubt Kiowa and coach Rick Kolm would like to be state champions on the course or certainly come through with a state finish. Those are lofty goals, but winning the Class 3A state golf championship with one of the smallest teams in the state, only six players, could be out of the question. Senior Jake Sewald is expected to lead the way for Kiowa, and he harbors good thoughts about making a bid to reach the

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state tournament at the Pueblo Country Club, Sept. 30-Oct. 1. “I just think I need to be the best I can,” said Sewald, who consistently shot in the 90s last season. “It’s that simple, but certainly takes a lot of work. I just want to make myself better every time out and improve on every aspect of my game. I think we’ll have a solid team this season with the six of us.” “I feel confident,” Sewald said. “Yes, we are a small team, also playing against big schools. But on the golf course, we can all be the same.” Good thoughts, ones that sit well with Kolm. Kiowa already has two tournaments in the young season under the tent. The Indians finished sixth in both the Fowler and La Junta meets. “The boys work well together and they feed off each other,” Kolm said. “They’ve been making practice and have had a lot of fun in the early going. I think we are getting to the point where we can get the kids shooting well. The project is to get

them all shooting under 100. Jake will be our leader, but we also have two other seniors to go with him.” The other two seniors striking the ball for Kiowa will be Cody Rosburg-Celbert and Tyler Rollick. “Both these boys have come a long way with their hitting and putting,” Kolm said. “They’ve gained a lot of confidence and I’ve gained a lot of confidence in them. I’m looking for good things on the course from this pair.” Sophomore A.J. Smith and freshmen Cole Pennington and Skeet Ericson round out the field for the youthful Indians. “Skeet has been playing the game since he was 10 years old and we feel and know what he can do,” Kolm said. “He’s certainly a fine addition to the team. A.J. improved tremendously and Cole is also a fine addition to the team. But all the boys are behind each other and they all just want to do the best they can.” Getting A-plus grades on the golf course would certainly go with this group when it comes to the classroom.

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