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News

Elbert 6-13-13

Elbert County

June 13, 2013

75 cents

A Colorado Community Media Publication

ourelbertcountynews.com

Elbert County, Colorado • Volume 118, Issue 20

School board defends action Brief time period to apply for opening stirs criticism By Chris Michlewicz

cmichlewicz@ourcoloradonews.com

Patrick Geipel of Elbert keeps a tight hold on the rope during his June 7 bull ride at the Elizabeth Stampede. Xtreme Bulls was the Stampede’s opening-night rodeo. It attracted an all-star lineup of rodeo cowboys, including six bull-riding qualifiers from the 2012 Wrangler National Finals Rodeo in Las Vegas.

Boots, bulls and big bucks Photos by Deborah GriGsby Outgoing Elizabeth Stampede Queen Caroline Ginn makes one of her final laps around the arena as she carries the American flag during the Stampede’s June 7 opening ceremonies.

In its 49th year, the Elizabeth Stampede rodeo attracts some of the top talent across the country. Nearly 100 of the 287 contestants in the three Professional Rodeo Cowboys Association events over the June 7-9 weekend were former world champions, National Finals Rodeo participants, or Circuit Finals challengers. This year’s Stampede again welcomed Xtreme Bulls, a professionally sanctioned bull riding event that pairs up the country’s best riders with the toughest bulls on the circuit, for thousands of dollars in prize money. Winners will go on to the Xtreme Bulls World Finals to be held in Ellensburg, Wash., over the Labor Day weekend. More than 300 volunteers helped make the Stampede possible. See more coverage on Page 11.

Governor signs renewable energy bill Republicans irked at increase in costs for rural Coloradans By Ryan Boldrey

rboldrey@ourcoloradonews.com While Democratic leaders applauded Gov. John Hickenlooper for signing Senate Bill 13-252, which increases renewable energy standards for energy co-ops in the state, Republican lawmakers claimed the bill will hurt rural Coloradans. The bill, signed on June 5, will go into effect July 1 and require Colorado energy cooperatives — including Intermountain

Rural Energy Association — to double their existing requirements for renewable energy from 10 percent of all energy used to 20 percent prior to 2020. IREA currently obtains its renewable energy through a long-term pur- Hickenlooper chase agreement with Xcel Energy, and according to a statement on its website cannot unilaterally increase the amount it requires from Xcel, which creates an issue. IREA says on the site that it is a supporter of renewable energy, but it was opposed

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what the renewable enerGy bill Does • Increases renewable energy standards for cooperative electric associations serving more than 100,000 meters from its current 10 percent by 2020 to 20 percent. • Provides extra credit for new renewable resources acquired through 2015. • Allows both methane capture and pyrolysis of solid waste to count toward the renewable energy standard, as long as the production is greenhouse gas-neutral. • Ensures that no utility bill will increase by more than 2 percent as a result of bill. to the bill because it believes “the arbitrary imposition of a renewable requirement without regard to existing infrastructure and contracts will only lead to costly waste.” IREA serves customers in, among other areas, Elbert and Douglas counties. Hickenlooper stated the bill was “imperfect,” but in an executive order accompanying the signing of it, said an advisory committee was being assembled that will work to address concerns such as the timetable for implementing the new requirements as Energy continues on Page 15

The Elizabeth School District is defending against an allegation that a brief application period to fill a school board vacancy did not allow some to be considered. The board of education says the vacancy was announced May 7, the day after school board member Cindy Miller submitted her resignation because of family health issues. But longtime Elbert County resident Norm Happel says the opening wasn’t announced on the district’s website until May 10, and the May 14 deadline to file letters of intent left only three business days for interested parties to put their name in for consideration. Carol Hinds, who has two children in the district, was appointed to the position May 20. She was one of three applicants. The Colorado Department of Education allows for up to 60 days to replace a board member, but the Elizabeth School District C-1 wanted to appoint a new director as soon as possible for collective decisionmaking on next year’s budget, said Chuck Williams, who has served on the board for nearly four years. Hinds was an ideal candidate because she served on the district accountability committee and has attended multiple school board meetings, Williams said. While Happel does not discredit Hinds as an appropriate replacement for Miller, he questions the integrity of the process and says it appears the board already had its sights set on Hinds. “The thing that’s so disappointing is there were going to be other candidates, but they didn’t get it in,” said Happel, who says he was not among the hopefuls for the position. “They must do their best to announce and advertise the vacancy. I can’t say for sure (the appointment) was preconceived, but it didn’t give others the opportunity.” Williams said the board’s actions were “well within the guidelines” set by the CDE and Colorado Association of School Boards. However, he acknowledged that the duration of the application period was shorter than most. “Looking back on this, we could have maybe extended (the deadline) out,” Williams said. Hinds will fill the position until November, when an election will take place to fill that seat and two others. Those who aren’t appointed or elected to the school board have the opportunity to join committees that help fulfill the district’s mission, Williams said. Williams referred to Happel as a “watchdog of the community” and said his intentions are good, but denied any wrongdoing in the appointment of Hinds and said the district is “trying to be as transparent as we can be.” The board is familiar with Hinds’ background and Williams says she is there to serve students. “I think we made the right decision,” he said.


2-Color

2 Elbert County News

June 13, 2013

GED test preparation available at library Preparation and tutoring for the GED (General Educational Development) exam are among the many services that the Elizabeth Library offers the community. The GED tests are a group of five subject tests which, when passed, certify that the taker has American high-school-level academic skills. The tests measure proficiency in science, mathematics, social studies, reading and writing. This test may be taken by students 18 years old and older for the purpose of earning a high school equivalency credential. This past year, six students have prepared for the GED at the Elizabeth Library. They range in age from young adult to midlife. Students begin by taking pre-tests in each of the five subjects to identify strengths and areas needing remediation. The pre-tests are an excellent indicator of how students will do on the actual exam. Each student receives individual instruction as part of their test preparation. Tutoring is tailored to each student’s needs and time frame. Working with these students has been extremely gratifying to me as the instructor, and the students benefit from one-onone instruction in a non-threatening environment. Once students are comfortable with the tutoring they have received, they then proceed to a GED testing site to complete their exams. The closest exam sites are in Douglas and Arapahoe counties. To date, two students have earned their GED credential, and the remaining four students have completed some portions of the exam successfully. My only request is that the students let me know when they have passed all portions of the test! On January 2, 2014, GED Testing Ser-

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vices will unveil a brand new test. The new assessment will continue to provide the opportunity to earn a high school credential, but will also measure career and college readiness skills. The new test will also have four content areas — literacy, math, science and social studies. The tests will measure knowledge and skills essential for career and college readiness. Students open the door of opportunity to further their education and career prospects by passing the GED exam. Several of the students I have worked with have thanked me for helping them pass the GED and understand the profound impact this accomplishment has on the next phase of their lives. Through the GED test prep program, the Elizabeth Library is pleased to contribute to the success of these students — and our community is the beneficiary. For more information about the GED tutoring services offered at the Elizabeth Library, contact Lisa Hughes at 303-6463416. Lisa Hughes is a retired high school foreign language teacher who works at the Elizabeth Library. Visit the library at www.elbertcountylibrary.org.

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elbert county news

(USPS 171-100) Office: 9137 S. Ridgeline Blvd., Suite 210, Highlands Ranch, CO 80129 PhOne: 303-566-4100 A legal newspaper of general circulation in Elizabeth, Colorado, the Elbert County News is published weekly on Thursday by Colorado Community Media. PERIODICALS POSTAGE PAID AT ELIZABETH, COLORADO and additional mailing offices. POSTMASTeR: Send address change to: 9137 S. Ridgeline Blvd., Suite 210, Highlands Ranch, CO 80129 DeADLineS:

Display advertising: Thurs. 11 a.m. Legal advertising: Thurs. 11 a.m. classified advertising: Mon. 12 p.m.


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Elbert County News 3

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Congr atul ations, teaChers, your investment in Color ado kids will l ast a lifetime.

AnnounCinG ThE winnERS oF ThE 2013 –2014 GREAT-wEST GREAT-TEAChERS® GR AnT PRoGR AM. Lisa Benjamin Bridges of silence Adams County 14

anne Garcia Columbine elementary Boulder Valley School District

moLLy moyer new emerson elementary school Mesa County District 51

sue BLau mark spencer horizon middle school Falcon School District 49

mandy GruenBerGer landmark academy Brighton 27J

jane neLms grand Junction high school Mesa County District 51

sTephani hardon meridian elementary Adams 12 Five Star Schools

amBer oLiver goddard middle school Littleton 6

meGan koBzej the new america school Jefferson County Public Schools

jiLL parker elizabeth middle school Elizabeth C-1

marcus Lee george washington high school Denver Public Schools

kaThy reed howbert elementary Colorado Springs School District 11

dana curTon Centennial elementary Adams 12 Five Star Schools

sharon LuTes sunny vincenT gilpin County elementary school Gilpin County School District RE1

kaThryn rockWeLL rock Canyon high school Douglas County

ruTh deLzeLL west middle school Cherry Creek Schools

Therese LuTkus kohl elementary Boulder Valley School District

jeff diTanna st. anne’s episcopal school Denver Public Schools

jozeTTe marTinez-Griffin west generation academy Denver Public Schools

sherry dreher stratton schools Stratton R-4

jennifer miLLer Pioneer elementary school Douglas County

erin dupper meridian elementary Adams 12 Five Star Schools

cynThia mor an aLicia needham antelope trails elementary Academy District Twenty

meG Brake most Precious Blood Catholic school Archdiocese of Denver auTumn cave-crosBy discovery Canyon Campus Academy District Twenty Lindsay cocos grant Beacon middle school Denver Public Schools

mervaT saWaGed lincoln academy Charter school Jefferson County Public Schools Lynn scanLon Centennial elementary Adams 12 Five Star Schools kaThryn sonnkaLB Prospect valley elementary Jefferson County Public Schools jared zenTz west middle school Cherry Creek Schools

For the investment they make in our kids’ lives every day, Great-West Financial would like to thank the winners of the 2013–2014 Great-West Great-Teachers Grant Program. We salute them for teaching our kids personal financial literacy. For coming up with programs that bring financial principles to life. For helping our kids learn valuable finance lessons. And for that we say: thank you.

To learn more, visit GreatWestGreatTeachers.com


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4 Elbert County News

June 13, 2013

Creekside 4-H cleans up roadway ‘Most Nasty’ prize has tough competition By Katie Listul

Special to the Elbert County News After cleaning up the Elbert Highway during the Annual Trash Walk on June 2 and having a delicious potluck, the Elbert Creekside 4-H Club gathered for its regular meeting. After the meeting, there was a competition/discussion on who found the “Most Valuable,” something someone kept, and the “Most Nasty” item on the trash walk. Awarded “Most Valuable” was a tire with a hub cap. That treasure was found by Tyler Heap. The item that was kept was found by Clay Hendrix; he found a lawn mower attachment and decided it could be a nice robot arm. There were many candidates for “Most Nasty,” like a half-eaten burrito and dirty underwear, but the winner was a bottle full of unknown liquid. Overall, everyone had a great time and served our community well. In the meeting, Treasurer Hayden Stout — now known as vice-vice president — called the meeting to order, and the Pledge of Allegiance was said to the American flag on Tyler Heap’s hat. Stout read the treasurer’s report and Emmi Lindsay gave the secretary’s report.

In old business, the club discussed its upcoming fairgrounds painting nights on June 13, June 26 and July 1, all at 6 p.m. Creekside’s clean-up day for the fairgrounds is July 26, and those unable to attend on that date must attend after-fair clean-up on August 5. Livestock record books need to be checked and signed on or before July 26. In new business, there was a birthday celebration for Madison Heap, McKenna Henderson and Jessi Hood. In presentations, Julia Proper presented her experiment on “Height Balls Bounce”; Jessica Proper presented “How to Make a Box”; and Johnny Proper talked about “The Beatles.” When asked if that was his favorite band he said, “No, Big Time Rush is.” Finally, Danielle Bogner taught us how to start a scrapbook and all the different things to put in one. Nominations are due June 15 for Making the Best Better and Citizen of the Year awards. July 1 is when fair entries are due; these are just the forms that say what participants are doing at fair this year. Open scales will be 8 a.m. to noon June 8 and 5:30 to 8:30 p.m. June 26. The next meeting of the Elbert Creekside 4-H Club will be at 3 p.m. July 7 at the Elbert Christian Church. All are welcome to experience the awesome club and join in the fun.

milestones Education Jesse Fernandez and Amanda Short, of Elizabeth, earned bachelor’s degrees from the University of Northern Colorado. Fernandez received a degree in music education, while Short’s degree is in theater arts. Brendon Jeremy Anderson and Luke Dillavou, of Elizabeth, graduated from McPherson College. Siri M. Burlew, of Elbert; Justien Evans, Donyelle K. Inhulsen, Samantha L. Tallent and Nicole L. Vander Kooy, of Elizabeth; and Matthew D. Biery, of Kiowa, were named to the spring 2013 dean’s list at Colorado State University-Pueblo. William V. Hayne, of Parker, has been named to the dean’s list at the Colorado School of Mines for the last four consecutive semesters. Hayne is a 2011 graduate of Ponderosa High School. He is pursuing a degree in mechanical engineering. Andrew Escandon and Sara Escandon, of Parker, were named to the spring 2013 dean’s list at Washburn University.

Let us ceLebrate with you Have a wedding, anniversary, engagement, birth or special occasion coming up? Share it! Colorado Community Media invites you to place an announcement to share your news. Go to ourcoloradonews. com/celebrations for package and pricing information. Deadline is 10 a.m. Tuesdays the week preceding the announcement.

House Approves Coffman’s Improving Job Opportunities for Veterans Act On May 21st, the U.S. House Representatives passed H.R. 1412, the Improving Job Opportunities for Veterans Act of 2013, with overwhelming bipartisan support. The legislation was introduced by U.S. Representative Mike Coffman (R-Colo) in response to his concerns for the growing number of unemployed Iraq and Afghanistan veterans. “As a Marine Corps Combat veteran, I understand the unique experiences and challenges of armed services members returning home from abroad. It is imperative that we maximize the opportunities for the thousands of young men and women returning from Iraq and Afghanistan,” said Rep. Mike Coffman The Improving Job Opportunities for Veterans Act will increase the availability of on-the-job training and apprenticeship programs to help veterans make the transition to the civilian workforce. This legislation builds on an existing, yet little known and under-utilized, on-the-job training programs that help veterans learn a trade or skill by participation in an approved apprenticeship or on-the-job training program. “The on-the-job training benefit within the New GI Bill, which we strongly supported, is one of the most underutilized benefits available to veterans for job skills

training. IAVA stands ready to support and promote innovative ideas like this to end the veterans’ unemployment crisis once and for all,” said Tom Tarantino of Iraq and Afghanistan Veterans of America (IAVA). Congressman Coffman explained that, “We have nearly 400,000 veterans in Colorado and unemployment for them, especially young returning veterans from Iraq and Afghanistan between ages 20 and 24, was 19% in April. These young individuals have great leadership capabilities and unique skills sets they learned while in uniform but need help in connecting to opportunities in the domestic job market.” H.R. 1412 will incentivize employers to reach out to veterans because the legislation authorizes the VA to pay a portion of the veteran’s salary for the first two years while the veteran is gaining on the job skills and certifications. “Companies in my district have told me how beneficial this legislation can be for their operations because they know that veterans are hardworking, team-oriented individuals who are capable of learning the highly technical skills that are prevalent in many industries,” said Rep. Mike Coffman. Ken Anderson, Chief Executive Officer of Tri-State

Colorado SBDC launches “Connec2DOT” website for small businesses in the transportation industry

The Colorado Small Business Development Centers Network (SBDC), in partnership with Colorado Department of Transportation (CDOT), launched the Connect2DOT website this week (www.connect2dot.org). Connect2DOT provides free consulting, training and online resources for small businesses in the transportation industry. It is managed by the SBDC and funded by CDOT. The new website, which offers quick and easy access to essential information on doing business with CDOT, is part of Connect2DOT’s ongoing efforts to provide small and disadvantaged contractors with quality information and educational tools necessary to grow and succeed. “The SBDC helps small and medium-size businesses with all aspects of their business, and for us to branch out to assist with providing more resources in this specialized area of transportation makes perfect sense,” said Kelly Manning, State Director of the Colorado SBDC Network. “We are thrilled to partner with CDOT and help our businesses advance in this area of expertise.” The website is organized to help contractors that are just getting started and those that are looking to build their business. Resources have been collected from various sources and consolidated into one centralized location, making it easier to find CDOT project opportunities, get certified as a small business, connect with prime contractors, and register for relevant training and events.

Brandon Schrupp, of Parker, graduated with a bachelor’s degree in sport management from Peru State University. Sela Harcey, of Parker, graduate cum laude with a bachelor’s degree from Midland University. Shae P. Anderson, Meghan A. Cofell, Mary E. Good, Madelynne C. Kasten, Mollie K. Lowery, Zakery J. Slavik and Stephanie J. Zoesch, of Parker, were named to the spring 2013 dean’s list at Colorado State University-Pueblo. Tristan Pexton and Sydni Robson, of Castle Pines, earned bachelor’s degrees from the University of Northern Colorado during spring 2013 graduation ceremonies. Pexton earned a degree in sport and exercise science. Robson earned a degree in interdisciplinary studies. Jacob Theodore Pederson, of Castle Rock, earned a bachelor’s degree in physics from Doane College. Hanna Jackson, of Castle Rock, earned a bachelor’s degree in nursing from Oklahoma Christian University.

“The launch of the Connect2DOT website marks a key milestone in our overall plan to expand small business resources to communities throughout Colorado under the direction of the Colorado SBDCs. There is now a one-stop online resource for contractors that puts all of the information they need to compete for CDOT contracts right at their fingertips,” said Greg Diehl, Manager of the CDOT Civil Rights & Business Resource Center. Other features of the website include an industry-wide event calendar, an interactive map of statewide SBDC locations, an opt-in bid matching system, and an email newsletter. Please visit www.connect2dot.org for the best and most up-to-date information on small business contracting in the Colorado transportation industry. As the program evolves, Connect2DOT kiosks with website access, monitors and printers will be placed at strategic locations throughout the state. One such kiosk will be placed at the South Metro Denver Small Business Development Center located at the Chamber. These kiosks will be free to use by any company interested in growing their business in the transportation industries. “We are excited to host one of the Connect2DOT kiosks at the South Metro Denver SBDC. We will have a consultant dedicated to assisting clients grow their businesses in the transportation industry,” said Marcia McGilley, executive director of the South Metro Denver SBDC. The Colorado SBDC is a partnership between the Colorado Office of Economic Development and International Trade, the U.S. Small Business Administration, Colorado’s institutions of higher education, and local development organizations. For more information on what the South Metro Denver SBDC can do to help your business grow, visit www.smallbusinessdenver.com.

Calendar of Events

Generation and Transmission Association said “As an employer of 152 veterans, the Improving Job Opportunities for Veterans Act of 2013 will provide an U.S. Representative Mike Coffman important tool in the continuation of our efforts to reach out to those men and women who have served their country and place them on a promising career path.” This legislation passed alongside several other bills concerning veteran issues and each will now move to the Senate for consideration. “I hope the Senate sees the value of my bill because it helps connect companies to a great pool of available talent returning from military service,” said Rep. Coffman.

Presents

Armed Forces Family Fun Day

For a complete calendar of South Metro Denver Chamber events and for more information, visit our web site at www.bestchamber.com or call 303-795-0142. Thursday, June 13th Technology Advocates Group Discussion The Egg & I, 6890 S. University Blvd., Centennial Women in Leadership Meeting: Lisa D’Ambrosia presenting. The Chamber Center, 2154 E. Commons Ave., Suite 342, Centennial HYPE Board of Advisors The Chamber Center, 2154 E. Commons Ave., Suite 342, Centennial WIL Afterhours hosted by Irresistibles SouthGlenn Streets at SouthGlenn, 2154 E. Commons Ave., Centennial Friday, June 14th Economic Development Group Breakfast Discussion The Chamber Center, 2154 E. Commons Ave., Suite 342, Centennial 1st Annual DCSD Love Our Schools Luncheon Denver Marriott South at Park Meadows, 10345 Park Meadows Drive, Lone Tree Saturday, June 15th 2013 Littleton Home & Garden Tour Colorado Center for the Blind, 2233 S. Shepperd Ave., Littleton Armed Forces Family Fun Day In front of the Chamber Center, 2154 E. Commons Ave., Suite 342, Centennial Monday, June 17th Save Lives and Sort Medical Supplies with Project CURE. 10337 East Geddes Ave., Centennial Tuesday, June 18th Business Bible Study. The Chamber Center, 2154 E. Commons Ave., Suite 342, Centennial 2013 Chamber Golf Tour: SouthGlenn Country Club 1489 E. Easter Ave., Centennial Business Leaders for Responsible Government Board of Advisors. The Chamber Center, 2154 E. Commons Ave., Suite 342, Centennial Wednesday, June 19th Economic Development Group Board of Advisors The Chamber Center, 2154 E. Commons Ave., Suite 342, Centennial Southwest Metro Business Alliance: Home is Where the Heart Is! Location TBD Thursday, June 20th Building Momentum: 18th Annual EDG Real Estate Breakfast. Denver Marriott South at Park Meadows, 10345 Park Meadows Drive, Lone Tree Southwest Metro Business Alliance Board of Advisors Location TBD Friday, June 21st Social Marketing for Business: Using Video in Social Media Marketing The Chamber Center, 2154 E. Commons Ave., Suite 342, Centennial Energy & Sustainable Infrastructure Council: Houston Trade Mission, CleanTech Open, Denver Water The Chamber Center, 2154 E. Commons Ave., Suite 342, Centennial

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5

Elbert County News 5

June 13, 2013

Gun law affects domestic abusers Restrictions got no GOP support in Legislature By Vic Vela

vvela@ourcoloradonews.com

Gov. John Hickenlooper speaks to reporters on June 5, following the signing of several pieces of legislation. Photo by Vic Vela

Firefighter labor bill signed Compromise measure allows ballot issues, talks on safety

‘Their safety and the

By Vic Vela

effectiveness of their

vvela@ourcoloradonews.com In one of his final actions taken on bills that passed the Legislature this year, Gov. John Hickenlooper on June 5 signed into law a measure that expands labor rights for firefighters in Colorado. There was uncertainty as to whether the governor would sign Senate Bill 25, especially after he had threatened to veto the original version of the bill earlier this year. Former Gov. Bill Ritter vetoed similar legislation while he was in office. But Hickenlooper did indeed provide his signature to the Colorado Firefighter Safety Act, two days before the deadline passed for all bills to be signed into law. The law allows Colorado firefighters to have bargaining discussions on issues pertaining to job safety, regardless of whether individual municipalities prohibit collective bargaining. However, the legislation does not mandate collective bargaining rights on compensatory matters, such as salary, as was laid out in the original version of the bill. Nor does it mandate union organizing without a vote taking place in that particular community. Hickenlooper said the final version of the bill was a compromise that he could accept. “Clearly we had to do something to allow firefighters to meet and confer,” Hickenlooper told reporters after signing the bill. “It doesn’t make it any easier for them to get collective bargaining ....” The legislation gives professional fire-

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equipment and training are a matter of mixed state-local concern.’ Gov. John Hickenlooper fighters the opportunity to put labor rights issues on the ballot and allows them the opportunity to openly participate in the political process — something that is prohibited by some municipalities. Republicans argued during the legislative process that the bill usurps the authority of local governments to make bargaining rights decisions on their own. And the Colorado Municipal League criticized the governor’s decision to sign the legislation. Hickenlooper took issue with those concerns in a written statement that was distributed to reporters following his remarks. “As we witnessed last summer, firefighters from various locales were deployed to risk their lives outside the boundaries of their own immediate communities,” Hickenlooper wrote. “Their safety and the effectiveness of their equipment and training are a matter of mixed state-local concern.” The bill was sponsored by Sen. Lois Tochtrop of Thornton and Rep. Angela Williams of Denver, both of whom are Democrats.

Military briefs militarynotes@ourcoloradonews.com General press releases Submit through our website Letters to the editor letters@ourcoloradonews.com Fax information to 303-566-4098 Mail to 9137 S. Ridgeline Blvd., Ste. 210, Highlands Ranch, CO 80129

Domestic violence offenders will find it more difficult to own or transfer guns under a bill that was signed into law by Gov. John Hickenlooper on June 5. Senate Bill 197 places greater gun restrictions on persons who either are convicted in cases involving domestic violence, or those who have been served with a court-issued protection order. Prior to the bill being signed, Colorado law had already prohibited domestic violence offenders from having guns. The new law puts in place a system by which state courts ensure that offenders relinquish their weapons. Sen. Evie Hudak, D-Westminster, a bill sponsor, said an incident from about 20 years ago motivated her to carry the bill. A former teacher, Hudak said that a student of hers was shot to death by an ex-boyfriend, who had a restraining order against him. “I’ve wanted this to happen for a very long time,” Hudak said. “I think a lot of women and children

will be safer because of this.” Under the new law, persons who have received court-imposed protection orders must relinquish any firearms and ammunition in their possession for the duration of the court order. The same rules will apply to persons convicted of domestic violence cases. They can then either sell or transfer their weapons to a licensed gun dealer or to someone who has successfully completed a gun background check. The weapon may also be given to a law enforcement agency for storage. Before transferring a gun back to the offender, a firearms dealer or local law enforcement agency will be required to request a background check from the Colorado Bureau of Investigation, to ensure that the person can lawfully possess the weapon. The bill was part of a package of Democrat-sponsored gun-control bills that passed the Legislature and have been signed into law by Hickenlooper this year. Republican lawmakers unanimously opposed the bill. Hudak’s sponsorship of the legislation, along with her votes on other gun bills, led to a recall petition effort being waged against her. That effort recently was suspended by recall organizers.

Illegal immigrants gain access to driver’s licenses Three Democrats broke with party to oppose plan By Vic Vela

vvela@ourcoloradonews.com Undocumented immigrants living in Colorado will soon be able to obtain driver’s licenses under a bill that was recently signed into law by Gov. John Hickenlooper. Senate Bill 251 allows immigrants to apply for “separate category” types of stateissued IDs that can only be used for driving purposes. The licenses will indicate that the user is a non-citizen, and they will not be able to use the IDs to obtain benefits, board planes or register to vote. Hickenlooper and other supporters of the legislation, which was sponsored by Democrats Sen. Jessie Ulibarri of Commerce City and Rep. Jovan Melton of Aurora, argue that people who are here illegally are driving anyway, and that it’s in everyone’s best interest that they can do so lawfully. During the legislative process, bill supporters cited data from other states that have similar laws, such as Utah and New

Mexico. Statistics from those states indicate that the numbers of insured motorists rose substantially after the laws were enacted. “You’re gonna have to have a driver’s license that allows people to drive to get to work … to make sure they have insurance, make sure they can testify in an automobile accident (court hearing), but at same time identifies that they aren’t full citizens,” Hickenlooper told reporters on June 5, the day he signed the legislation. The law, which takes effect in August, requires those applying for these types of licenses to show certain forms of legal documentation, such as an ID from their native countries, and proof that they have filed state and federal income taxes. That’s in addition to standard driving tests. The bill did not garner a single Republican vote in the General Assembly. And three Democrats voted against the bill in the House of Representatives. Sen. Kevin Lundberg, R-Berthoud, said during an April 10 Senate committee hearing that he didn’t think the bill would make roads safer, and worried that more people would come to Colorado illegally for the driving privilege.


6-Opinion-Color

6 Elbert County News

June 13, 2013

opinions/yours and ours

A smart direction on school safety Armed guards patrol banks, ballparks and airports. It is rarely argued they are out of place in those venues. Schools are different. They are places of learning, places for children, our nation’s most precious resource. Years after Columbine, months after Sandy Hook, talk of placing armed security personnel in schools evokes a broad range of reactions. If done wrong, such a move could be disruptive and create fear among students. But if done right, there is little to lose and perhaps, lives to be saved. We see a partnership in Douglas County between the school district and local law enforcement agencies as an example of a way to bolster security while allowing for an unfettered learning environment. Beginning with the next school year in August, plainclothes officers from the sher-

our view iff’s office and three police departments will patrol the county’s public elementary and middle schools. At the high school level, armed resource officers have been a presence on campus for years. A safety committee’s work on this new program began shortly after December’s mass shooting at Sandy Hook Elementary in Connecticut. It is a multifaceted plan that incorporates security measures beyond the presence of officers, including improved screening of visitors and enhanced use of technology.

question of the week

How do you travel with kids or pets? Colorado Community Media asked four people in the Arapahoe Lake neighbor-

hood for their best tip on traveling by car or plane with kids or pets.

“Entertainment. Entertainment. Entertainment. And keep it charged.” — Elizabeth Price, Englewood

“I try to make sure we’re all prepared before we even leave the house. Everyone is fed, has all their stuff … and then I pack blankets, pillows, snacks and water.” — Jodi Page, Englewood

“Be aware of the temperature inside the car. … If you have to stop, make it brief, park in the shade, crack the window and always have fresh water for the animal.” — Jody Schmidt, Lone Tree

“I don’t really travel with my pets, but I do think it’s important to always leave them in good, dependable hands and with someone you trust.” — Mark Wienckowski, Wautoma, Wis.

That’s not what I’m talking about I have no idea when “I have no idea” replaced “I’m not sure.” Most of the time when we say we have no idea we do have an idea, but “I’m not sure” is simply not as melodramatic. All I know is that I am tired of hearing “I have no idea.” I am at the end of my rope. I am at my wits’ end. It has become another “overly conventionalized linguistic expression,” and nearly a cliché by now. Most things that are said, you know, over and over become annoying, at least to a few of us who listen when someone is talking. What would you think of anyone other than Rodney Dangerfield who started every thought with “I have no idea”? Rodney could get away with it, because he would tug at his necktie, jerk his head, and say, “I was so ugly when I was born that the doctor slapped my mother.” Elocution has gone the way of handwriting. Most of us no talk so good no more. We get by, because it’s no longer expected to be any better. Ah, but when it occurs it can be wonderful. There are some things that are said over and over that I never get tired of hearing. For one, “I love you.” Unless it’s from Mr. Holly Martins in area rugs. We resort to clichés because they are familiar, handy, and readily understood. Few of us have a gift for making ourselves understood without them. That’s what I’m talking about. That’s one of them right there. It was somewhat clever 10 years ago. Now it’s a nuisance. The French gave us the word “cliché.” It comes from typesetting, and the reuse of single slug of metal for phrases that were used repeatedly. “A cliché is often a vivid depiction of an abstraction that relies upon analogy or exaggeration for effect, often drawn from everyday experience,” a Wikipedia entry says. “Used sparingly, they may succeed, however, the use of a cliché in writing or speech is generally considered a mark of inexperience or a lack of originality.” It’s not rocket surgery. It’s been a hard day’s night. Abstinence makes the heart

grow fonder. See? Clichés and other phrases can be turned around, inverted, and even made into a malaprop. Shakespeare referred to the “comprehension of two auspicious characters.” There is a song, “Please Don’t Let Me Be Misunderstood,” and few of us want to be misunderstood, so it’s much easier to speak the tried and true (like “tried and true”) than to go out on a limb (there’s another) and offer something obtuse. But it can be fun when you connect, and the more you try to connect the dots (another) the better your chances are. You can’t win if you don’t play, although Fran Lebowitz said she has the same chances of winning the lottery whether she plays or not. Words and phrases sometimes cross over from our occasional use to habitual use, and some of us don’t even know it, or seem to mind, that they can be mindnumbing. If I hear the word “transparency” one more time, applied to the IRS, for example, I will have an ax to grind. But it occurred to me that it might be kind of nice to be the father of a cliché, to be the one responsible for generating an expression heard night and day, around the world. I’d like to see how my verbal child was translated into German and Japanese. So I worked on a few, and I think I have one that will be picked up right away: The early goat gets the moisturizer. I have no idea what that means. Craig Marshall Smith is an artist, educator and Highlands Ranch resident. He can be reached at craigmarshallsmith@comcast.net

But the move to place armed officers on campuses, announced May 30, is what has made headlines. That’s understandable. Creating a police state at our schools is not something anyone should want. To be clear, though, that’s not what is being planned in Douglas County. The School Marshal Program will see deputies and police officers assigned to schools in nearby proximity, and the officers will be a daily presence at the schools. The plan is to allow for greater ability to respond to an incident, as well as be a deterrent to those with ill intent. “We’re not aware of any other program like this in the country,” said Elizabeth Fagen, superintendent of the Douglas County School District. Strengthening community bonds is among the most laudable elements of the

program. Douglas County’s safety committee has representatives from law enforcement agencies, the school district and various community members. Some may question whether the program will be worth its price tag — at least $500,000 on the part of the school district and an undisclosed amount absorbed by the law enforcement agencies. It’s a fair question, but we’re not prepared to set a dollar limit on children’s safety. Douglas County is among the most affluent areas of the entire nation, and the program’s cost may make it prohibitive for many school districts and communities to fully implement. But the root ideas of a multi-pronged approach and community cooperation are worthy of serious consideration in Colorado and around the country.

Happy Father’s Day from an imperfect dad This past year has been very enlightening for me as I look back over the past 12 months and remember how I reacted or responded to the trivial as well as the major challenges and opportunities presented to me by my children. Some may argue that the larger issues or problems are really small or trivial in most cases and just blown out of proportion by an over-reactive father or parent. And I would have to plead guilty as charged. And as I recall conversations with other parents over the past year I have been reminded that it’s not just my children who get into trouble or make mistakes. I love my children dearly, and I would have to agree that in most cases I could have responded better instead of overreacting and making things worse or under-reacting and not doing enough. The life lesson in this for me is to learn how to take the time to respond instead of react. I know they sound very similar and some would say that they mean the very same thing. The difference, I believe, is found in the way we think about each word. If we were to get sick and our doctor prescribed a medication that caused us to break out in a rash or some other side effect, it could be said that we are having a “negative reaction” to the medication. Conversely, if we were prescribed that same medication and started improving immediately, we would say we were “responding favorably” to the medication. And as a dad, I can look back over the past 12 months as well as an entire lifetime and remember all the little mistakes and huge errors I have made. And thankfully my children have not over-reacted, they

Elbert County News 9137 S. Ridgeline Blvd., Suite 210, Highlands Ranch, CO 80129

gerard healey President and Publisher Chris rotar Editor sCott gilBert Assistant Editor erin addenBrooke Advertising Director audrey Brooks Business Manager sCott andrews Creative Services Manager sandra arellano Circulation Director ron ‘MitCh’ MitChell Sales Executive

have simply responded and loved me and forgiven me in the same way that I have loved and forgiven them. That is the wonderful thing about forgiveness, it goes both ways, and it goes such a long way in building and sustaining loving relationships with our family and friends. If you are one of those dads or parents that I have spoken with or exchanged emails with or that just feels like you have had a brutally tough year with a noncompliant child, trouble-attracting teen, or mistake-magnet kid, just remember that as big as each of those challenges seem, at the end of the day they are all just trivial. And it’s not about how we react, it is how we choose to respond, love and forgive that will be the difference-maker in all of our relationships. Happy Father’s Day! I would love to hear all about how your Father’s Day weekend goes at gotonorton@gmail.com, and let’s respond our way to a better than good week. Michael Norton, a resident of Highlands Ranch, is the former president of the Zig Ziglar organization and CEO and founder of www.candogo.com

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7-Color

June 13, 2013

Art opens windows as dementia closes doors

Elbert County News 7

Marple

Mary Janice Marple

November 28, 1948 - June 3, 2013

Mary Janice Marple, of Castle Rock, CO, passed away on Monday, June 3, 2013. She was 64. She was born on November 28, 1948 in Jefferson, Iowa. She is survived by her three children, Jeremiah Marple, Desarae Hundley, Steve Rounsville, two grandchildren, Sydnie and Steven Rounsville, and her sister Linda Armstrong. Memorial services will be held at 10:00am on Saturday, June 15, 2013 at Jubilee Fellowship Church 809 Park St. Castle Rock, CO 80109.

mitce-

oast Her intense blue eyes ict by study the watercolor sitting on the table before her. r “The lipstick is not a good,” she says. Her voice is as fragile the as Sue Rhodes looks. She is a delicate, 87-year-old e i- woman with dark gray, eas chin-length hair, thin shoulders slightly bowed. ous Her right hand trembles as the she scrutinizes the painting, a profile of a woman with a Lois Lane hairstyle, bright red lips and a soft pink blouse. “This looks like ladies in the ’40s and ’50s,” says Lisa Hut, a volunteer artist sitting next to Sue. “Think of a name for it. Does it remind you of anybody?” “No, but I’ll do what you tell me to do.” “I’m not going to tell you to do anything,” Lisa says gently. Sue glances at her painting again. “It looks all right, like that.” “How about a story? Does it make you think of anything?” “She did so-and-so.” “I wonder what so-andso is,” Lisa muses. Sue takes her brush and he slowly deepens the pink oes edges of the blouse. Then in she holds up the painting. “Oh, my gosh,” Lisa says. “It looks so good.” nts Sue nods softly. She smiles. ave Lisa: “She looks happy m- to me.” “She does to me, too,” at Sue says, “except …” m, at And her voice trails al. away as she begins anow other painting, her mind, that perhaps, chasing a fleeting ur memory.

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The light-filled room is replete with remembrances, some unwittingly captured on paintings scattered across the tables, others flitting in and out, coming close, teasing their owners but then darting away. The eight men and women, in their 70s and 80s, work intently, dipping brushes into Styrofoam cups of water, swirling them into the chosen hue of their watercolor paints, then stroking the color onto paper. Intermittent conversation and laughter interrupt the tranquility. They are grandmothers and grandfathers, a hydrologist, a children’s vocational nurse, a dentist, an FBI secretary. All in varying stages of dementia or Alzheimer’s, they share the painful reality of a fading mind. They’ve come to their weekly painting class, where they sometimes discover lost memories, but always find companionship and joy and moments of peace. “So much of this disease is hard and sad,” says Sara Spaulding, spokesperson for the Alzheimer’s Association of Colorado, whose husband died at 63 in 2010 of Younger Onset Alzheimer’s after battling the disease for 10 years. “This program, however, offers light and laughter … not only to the participants but for their families.” The program is Memories in the Making. It provides archival supplies — the same brushes, paints and 140-pound paper used by professional artists — to participants, who with

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Kim Franklin, life enrichment director at Emeritus Denver, stands with artist John George beside his painting, “The Steer Leader.” Courtesy photo by Lisa Hut guidance from volunteer artists, create art that often correlates to hidden memories. Research shows short-term memory generally declines first, while the part of the brain associated with distant memories is often the last to go. Art and music are among the few

ways a patient — whose confusion has impaired verbal skills — can still communicate. “They have a point of contact,” Spaulding says. “They’re not able to really remember family and friends. But looking at the art … they’re talking to the

Kelley

Michael Conrad Kelley, August 26, 1968 - June 1, 2013 Michael Conrad Kelley, 44, of Elizabeth, CO, died on June 1, 2013 after a brief battle with cancer. He was born to Michael and Kathleen Kelley on August 26, 1968 in Denver, CO. He graduated from Heritage High School in Littleton, CO, in 1986. He was married to Mary Kelley and was the proud father of two children, a step son, Enrique, and a daughter, Kendall. Michael worked in the wireless communications industry as a manager of sales and service for over 20 years, most currently as vice president and operations manager of Frontier Radio Communications. His true passion was fast pitch softball. He played for over 20 years on the International Softball Congress sanctioned

Pueblo Bandits, a men’s major competitive team, where he had been named an All-American. He was an assistant coach for Elizabeth Parks and Recreation Little League teams. In his leisure time Michael enjoyed outdoor activities with his family including snowboarding, boating, camping, and golf. Michael is survived by his wife and children; his parents; a sister, Deanna Green, of Blackwood, NJ; and a brother. He is also survived by eight nephews and three nieces. A memorial service to celebrate Michael’s life was held on Saturday June 8 at 10 am at New Hope Presbyterian Church in Castle Rock. Memorial donations may be made to Enrique Diaz and Kendall Kelley.

volunteers, to each other. It keeps the brain active. That socialization is really important. Then there’s the self-esteem. They have a purpose — to come to class to create something.” The volunteer artists

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8-Color

8 Elbert County News

June 13, 2013

Healey Continued from Page 7

don’t do any of the work. They might help a hand close around a brush or suggest direction. But “we never draw a line,” says Lisa, who volunteers at Emeritus Denver, a care facility in southwest Denver, one of 45 in the metro Denver-Boulder area that offers the program. Kim Franklin runs Memories in the Making at Emeritus Denver. A former hairstylist who worked her way from styling residents’ hair to life enrichment director, she believes God brought her here to help guide residents “through their final journey home.” “I put myself in their shoes,” she says. “Can you imagine at 88 years old, going to a door and it’s locked and you can’t get out? I just want to give them that dignity here …. They kind of go into another world when they’re painting.” John George looks at a photograph of an old Lincoln as he dips his brush into the black circle of paint in his watercolor box. John, once a hydrologist, is 82 with a deep gravelly voice and a gray mustache that matches his hair. “I’m not much of an artist,” he says. “I just go slow.” He peers through his glasses, comparing the painting to the photograph. “I’m just transferring some data from that nice photograph to something less than nice. I’m trying to figure out what to do with the grill.” He hums, a throaty low rumble, and dabs his brush on a paper towel. “This is not gray enough,” he says of the grill.

Then: “It’s fun to fool around. Be sure we’re taking this as seriously as necessary, calling it a fool-around. Paul’s good. Paul’s the talented one of the group.” Paul Schoolcraft sits across the table, a blue cap on his head. He is intently sketching a sailboat in front of a train on a bridge. Various photographs of trains and sailboats are scattered around him as he glances from them to the paper and back again. A former dentist, now 85, he is so focused he doesn’t respond. “How old am I?” John asks in response to a question. “You’re 27,” answers a woman with cottony white hair painting at the next table. Bettie Van Zetten smiles. John laughs. “Turn it around. More like 72. Wait — more like 74!” “Best review,” he says, looking at his painting, “this is a no-talent thing. Patience — patience is more important than talent.” With a little urging from Lisa, John talks about a long-ago passion for cars. “As a young man I worked on cars,” he tells her. “That was the only way you could keep them running.” A painting he completed some time ago, depicting a lake with a lighthouse, brought back memories of days spent at his grandparents’ lakeside home in Michigan, tales his family hadn’t heard in a while. “We’re able to pull from them these nuggets of memories,” Spaulding says. “It’s a real bright spot for families.” His painting finished, John closes his watercolor box. “You’re an amazing artist,” Lisa says, studying the Lincoln, shaded in varying tones of black against an eddying backdrop of green bushes. “Well,” John says, “thank you. It’s fun.” Not every painting elicits recollections

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Bettie Van Zetten, who worked as a switchboard operator and secretary for the FBI, said the red box in her angel painting is the FBI’s secrets. Courtesy photo by Lisa Hut for the artists. And “sometimes, you never know if the stories are true or not,” Lisa says. “But then you get to the point where it doesn’t matter, because it’s true to them.” Although John, who had never picked up a paintbrush before starting the class about 1½ years ago, will say he’s not talented, he is. “He’s a really, really good artist,” Lisa says. He’s so good that two of his paintings were selected for the annual Memories in the Making auction, held last week in Denver. Some 4,000 pieces are submitted from program participants throughout Colorado. Juried by professional artists, about 75 are selected. Some are then paired with 30 professional artists, who choose a piece of artwork and reinterpret it the way they see it. Morrison artist Margaretta Caesar, who paints with oils, has participated for about four years. She still remembers the first time she walked into the exhibition room with tables covered in “magnificent” watercolors. “We were told to find the one that speaks to us. But you look at the mixture of talent — the joy, the passion, the emotion — and on the backs are little stories about their inspirations. You just get so moved by it.” This year, John’s painting of a steer called “The Steer Leader” captured her interest. A longhorn lives not too far from her home. But even more than that connection, “what really grabbed me was the composition. The artist really nailed it …. He had worked very, very hard to capture the color in the background. I just thought the piece was top-notch.” For families, selection of loved ones’ art for the auction, which raises more than $400,000 for the association statewide, is an optimistic moment. “Often the call that comes from a care facility is about a new difficult behavior or yet another loss of skill or memory proving challenging for the staff,” Spaulding says. “The call from one of our volunteers letting them know a watercolor created by mom, dad or a spouse has been selected for the auction brings a moment of joy, and once they see the piece, often of wonder that a loved one created something beautiful with no previous art ability — and warmth for a memory shared.” Before the auction, a tea is held for participants where they see their work displayed. John attended with his wife, Lee. “The Steer Leader” was one of the showcase paintings. “He had a hard time understanding why people were making such a fuss over him,” Lee says. She told him the painting was his. “But I didn’t do that.” “John, that’s your signature.” John’s big hobby throughout his life had been photography. And, Lee says, he always had a good sense of light and space, which seems to have translated into his new pastime. She’s watched how he enjoys painting. “He’ll spend a long time — his attention is fixed right in the painting the whole time he’s doing it,” she says. “He is amazing.” But John, like many others, doesn’t remember what he paints. Bettie Van Zetten bends toward the paper, concentrating, brushing small black strokes along the outline of an angel, sketched from the small, wooden figure on the table. “Do you think you want to do some blue

up here?” Kim Franklin encourages, pointing to the background behind the angel. “More blue sky,” Bettie, 80, agrees. “Not too much. I’ll thin it out.” “See,” Kim says, “you do a good job.” Bettie, her once jet black hair now completely white, blots water off her sky. “See the box there?” Kim asks, pointing to the box cradled in the angel’s hands. “What is the box supposed to be?” Bettie wonders. “I was going to say it’s the FBI’s secrets.” “Oooooh,” several people around the table say. “What color box would the FBI have?” Kim asks. “One of the things about working for the FBI, they were never, ever evil to you.” Bettie leans back and clasps her hands. “They would say, ‘We are special and so are you.’ ” She holds up the painting. “A red box — all the secrets in there.” And she dips her brush into the red paint. Bettie did work for the FBI in Washington, D.C., and in Denver as a switchboard operator and secretary. She has letters from J. Edgar Hoover commending her for good work and her research and help in the Coors kidnapping case in 1960. The mother of two children, she raised them on her own after a divorce when her oldest, her son Barry, was 10. At one time, she did paint. But what her children remember most is how she made flower sculptures from discarded aluminum sheets, how she decorated objects with paper cut-outs, how she loved music and even tap-danced. “She was always creating something or trying to create something,” says daughterin-law Eileen Van Zetten, Barry’s wife. Born in Kansas, she traveled with her family to many rural areas during the Great Depression and came to love the outdoors. Her paintings often reflect that inspiration and her deep faith, her family says. “I can see her spirituality in them and her love of the outside,” Eileen says. “For all of us, it’s a way to see that what she’s actually thinking and feeling is beautiful.” For the auction, Bettie’s landscape, a mountain scene draped in blue, gold and green hues that she named “God’s Beauty,” was paired with a photograph from renowned Colorado nature photographer John Fielder. Unbeknownst to event organizers, over the years Bettie had collected just about every Ansel Adams book of nature photographs; son Barry is a huge Fielder fan. So when Eileen and Barry saw her painting next to his photograph, they held hands and cried. “We were both so touched by how this came together, her vision and his vision, and it was almost overwhelming,” Eileen says. “It was one of the most moving things I’ve seen in many years.” For Barry, his mother’s paintings keep them close, Eileen says. “This is like a way of holding onto a piece of something she feels for him.” Bettie, absorbed in the angel, adds color to a wing. “I’d love to be an artist,” she says. “Wouldn’t it be fun to be an artist?” “OK, Bettie, last thing,” Kim says. “Do you want to do something for the dress?” She hands Bettie the angel so she can feel the wood and understand the texture. “How would I make it?” Bettie asks. Lisa: “We have silver paint.” There is silence as Bettie adds water to black paint. “This looks gray, doesn’t it?” Kim: “Probably if you use less water.” “It’s getting more, more silver.” “So,” says Kim, “every artist names their painting.” Bettie quickly responds. “Good thing I’m not an artist.” The class ends and Bettie, Sue, John, Paul and the others close their watercolor boxes, each labeled with their names. They leave quietly, with smiles and goodbyes to each other, and a few hugs for Lisa and Kim. On the table is Bettie’s angel. It wears a silver-gray dress and holds a red box. The sky behind her is Colorado blue. Kim has written Bettie’s name on the back, along with the title Bettie gave it: “Secrets of the FBI.” To contact the Alzheimer’s Association of Colorado, call 800-272-3900 or go to alz. org/co. Ann Macari Healey’s column about people, places and issues of everyday life appears every other week. She can be reached at ahealey@ourcoloradonews.com or 303-5664110.


South Metrolife 9-Life-Color

Elbert County News 9 June 13, 2013

Dancers will get around at Gardens

Elizabeth’s Main Street was hopping with activity and throngs of people June 8. ElizaBash, presented by the Elizabeth Area Chamber of Commerce, featured vendors, games, food, entertainment and more.

Elizabeth lets good times roll Photos by Chris rotar

Main Street was the place to be June 8 in Elizabeth, where crowds turned out for the annual ElizaBash street fair. Dozens of sponsors helped with support for ElizaBash, held in conjunction with the world-renowned Elizabeth Stampede rodeo. The band Cactus Jack entertained the crowd on Main Street during ElizaBash.

Families gear up for Parker Days Downtown festival runs June 13-16

The Hannah Kahn Dance Company will bring five dancers to Hudson Gardens and Event Center for a free 45-minute performance at 10:30 a.m. June 14 (Friday morning). “This is a program we have been performing in schools over the last eight months,” Kahn said. It’s an introduction to dance with excerpts from “Pass Along,” “Gathering,” “Ruckus,” “Songs Without Words” and “(Pro)longing and Infusion.” The five fully costumed dancers illustrate contrasting styles, musical accompaniment, costumes and moods. Music ranges from Tunisian jazz to Mendelssohn to Swedish folk/rock. Hudson Gardens is at 6115 S. Santa Fe Drive, Littleton. Garden admission is also free. • Also at Hudson Gardens: “Meet the Beekeeper” from 9:30 to 11:30 a.m. June 15. Observe and ask questions. (Classes available also.) And June 15 is the Gardens’ 17th birthday.

Call for artists

• “This is Colorado,” a show featuring Colorado artists, but not necessarily Colorado scenes, will accept applications for entry until Aug. 1. The exhibit will be in a new venue this year: Colorado Gallery of the Arts at Arapahoe Community College. For a prospectus, email mkstudio@comcast. net. Sponsored by Heritage Fine Arts Guild, heritage-guild.com. • Kaleidoscope Juried Exhibition entries are due from 9 to 11 a.m. July 8. Submit actual entries, no slides. Entry fee: $10 per entry. They will be juried that day and unaccepted work may be picked up from 1 to 3 p.m. Information: Trish.Sangelo@arapahoe.edu.

Summer walks

South Suburban Parks and Recreation is offering two walks. Go to sspr.org for more information. • Sunset Bird Walk for adults will be from 6 to 8:30 p.m. June 20 at South Platte Park. Practice using binoculars with a naturalist guide. Cost, $11/$8 resident; class number 675376. • Full Moon Walk for 6 years to adult. A naturalist guides a moonlight adventure from 8:30 to 10 p.m. on June 22. Cost, $9/$6 resident; class number 674016.

By Chris Michlewicz

cmichlewicz@ourcoloradonews.com Kids and adults alike are counting the days until Parker’s most prominent summer blowout. Now in its 36th year, the Parker Days Festival is known for delivering memorable days and nights filled with thrilling rides, exhilarating games, hip-shaking live music, succulent food and plenty of people-watching opportunities. The 2013 incarnation has all of the attractions of years past, plus a few experimental features. Starting with a carnival sneak preview June 13, Parker Days runs through June 16, taking over O’Brien Park, downtown parking lots, vacant properties and streets. It’s the perfect way for school kids to kick off their summer break, but there is a bit of nostalgia involved for longtime festivalgoers. Those who grew up with Parker Days as a seminal part of their summer are now returning with their own kids. Like their parents did, they make sure that the second weekend in June is blocked out, so as not to mistakenly schedule a conflicting family vacation. Joshua Rivero, a town council member

Nature-writing `how to’

Riders shriek during the quick descent on Super Shot, one of the many carnival rides set up for last year’s Parker Days Festival. File photo who has lived in Parker for 24 years, describes the atmosphere as that of a “huge neighborhood block party.” He runs into old high school friends, visits booths for impulse buys, listens to music and takes in the revelry. The festival has been an anchor for Parker and presents an opportunity to “showcase” the town to outsiders who

Parker Days highlights • Street performers and buskers, including jugglers, fire performers and “live” statues, will again be part of the action. • Radio Disney will pump out music from the O’Brien Park gazebo from noon to 5 p.m. June 15 and 16. • The PACE Center will have daytime programming and have five professional chalk artists on hand creating masterpieces. • More than 100 classic cars will be on display downtown during the Parker Car Fest from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. June 16. • Wright Amusements, the longtime contractor for amusement rides, is coming with 45 carnival attractions. • At various times, four separate stages will host country line

dancing, belly dancers and mini game shows. • Between 350 and 400 volunteers will pitch in to help the festival go smoothly. • Three recycling bins will be set up, including two near the main stage, and Boy Scout troops will help man the bins to make sure no trash is thrown in them. • Kids can look forward to the ever-popular swimming pool hamster balls and bounce houses. • A strongman competition is set for 11 a.m. June 15 near the main stage.

might be considering a move to a place with a true hometown feel. Organizers made a few tweaks this year. The KYGO-featured country music act, Tyler Farr, is playing on the main stage on Friday night instead of Saturday. Sara Crowe, event coordinator for Events, Etc., which was contracted by the Parker Chamber of Commerce, said the main music act was moved to Friday to help spread out the crowds. There is already a built-in audience on Saturdays. Chamber leaders are expecting around 120,000 people, although that number hinges largely on the weather; Crowe is keeping her fingers crossed for “perfect, 82-degree” days and calm nights. The festival is the chamber’s largest annual source of revenue, and much of the money comes from alcohol and ticket sales. Additionally, the 2012 Parker Days Festival generated an Festival continues on Page 10

Naturalist Mary Taylor Young of Castle Rock, whose most recent book, “The Guide to Colorado Mammals” is nominated for a Colorado Book Award, will teach two oneday seminars at Rocky Mountain National Park in July: • “They Wrote it Here!” is about how writers described particular sites. It is from 9 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. July 13. Visit spots described by Isabella Bird, James Michener, Milton Estes, Enos Mills and others, then write a piece or journal entry of your own. • “Paint Your Prose: Creating a Sense of Place Using Nature-Writing Techniques” is offered from 9 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. July 14. Cost for each is $70. For information or to register, see listing and syllabus at rmna. org.

Chief Manitou topic of talk

“Chief Manitou and His Contributions to the Pikes Peak Region” will be Robert Cronk’s topic at 7 p.m. June 20 when he presents a program about Pedro Cajete, a Tewa Indian from the Santa Clara Pueblo who had a cave near Cave of the Winds at Manitou. His travels had an impact on the tourist industry. The free event will be at the Palmer Lake Town Hall, 28 Valley Crescent, Palmer Lake. Palmerdividehistory.org.


10-Color

10 Elbert County News s! Join u

June 13, 2013

THINGS TO DO

17th Annual Biergarten Festival Celebrating German Traditions and Culture!

July 12 – 14

Authentic German Food, Drink, and Live Music

Frühschoppen: The new Fahrvergnügen www.biergartenfest.com

JUNE 13 SUMMER READING. Elbert County Library District libraries kick off the summer reading season with nationally known kindie musician Steve Weeks at 10:30 a.m. June 11 at the Simla Library; at 10 a.m. June 13 at the Elizabeth Library; and at noon June 13, at the Kiowa Library. Weeks performs with humor and purpose. He has four albums, multiple hits on Kids Place Live and several awards. JUNE 13 BUSINESS AFTER hours. The Elizabeth Area Chamber of Commerce Business After Hours is from 5-7 p.m. June 13 at the Elizabeth Library Meeting Room on Beverly Street. Your hosts will be the Elizabeth Lion’s Club. Learn about the Club and all the good things they are doing for our community. Network with other businesses and residents. Everyone is welcome. JUNE 18, JUNE 20 SUMMER PROGRAMS. Elbert County Library District presents weekly summer reading programs. First up is Buried Treasure, June 18 and 20. Travel with pirates and hunt for buried treasure. Next is Digging History on June 25 and 27. Explore Colorado’s past, focusing on jobs and industries that drew people to our state. Third is a program about Fossils July 9 and 11. Learn what fossils are, who studies them and where they can be found. Kids will see what a fossil looks like by making one to take home. Underground critters will be the topic of the next programs July 16 and July 18. Read about prairie dogs, badgers and bears. The craft will be a puppet of one of the animals. Local musican Roann Keene, aka Ms.Ro, presents her interactive Dig Into Music performance July 23 and July 25. Programs are offered at 10:30 a.m. Tuesdays at the Simla Library, at 10 a.m. Thursdays at the Elizabeth Library; and at noon Thursdays at the Kiowa Library. For a complete list, to register or for information, visit www.elbertcountylibrary.org or call 303-646-3792. JUNE 19 BLOOD DRIVE. Walmart community blood drive is from 2-6 p.m. June 19 inside Bonfils’ mobile bus at 2100 Legacy Circle, Elizabeth. For information or to schedule an appointment, contact Bonfils Appointment Center at 303-363-2300 or visit www.bonfils.org. JUNE 20 CHAMBER LUNCHEON. Elizabeth Area Chamber of Commerce presents the chamber luncheon from 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. June 20 at the Western Trails Steakhouse on Colorado 86 between Elizabeth and Kiowa. The public is welcome. Learn all about identity theft from the Colorado Bureau of Investigation. Enjoy meeting other area business people and

Festival Continued from Page 9

estimated economic impact of $1.5 million for the downtown district. Kicking off the festival weekend is the annual parade, which has 73 entries

networking. RSVP to Beverly at 303-646-4287 or director@ elizabethchamber.org.

JUNE 21, JULY 19 LEGAL CLINIC. A free clinic for parties who have no attorney and who are going through divorce, legal separation, custody, post-decree cases or protection order cases is offered from 9 a.m. to noon the third Friday of each month at the Elbert County Justice Center, 751 Ute St., in Kiowa. All walk-ins are welcome, and everyone will be assisted on a first-come, firstserved basis. Upcoming dates are March 15; April 19; May 17; June 21; July 19; Aug. 16; Sept. 20; Oct. 18; Nov. 15; Dec. 20. THROUGH JUNE 21; JULY 19-20 QUILT ENTRIES. Firehouse Quilts is looking for quilt entries for its eighth annual quilt show to support its mission of helping children in crisis in Colorado. Early bird entries submitted by May 17 are taken at a discounted entry fee ($15). Otherwise, the fee is $18 per item, and the final deadline is June 21. This year’s show has a special theme, Patriotic, along with 13 other categories. The show is from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. July 19-20 at the Douglas County Events Center in Castle Rock. All forms and instructions are available at www.firehousequilts.org; click on the Quilt Show link at the top. JUNE 22 SAFETY FAIR. Join the Elbert County Sheriff ’s Office and many of the wonderful response agencies in the community for their annual safety fair from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. June 22 in the Walmart parking lot in Elizabeth. The whole family can gain valuable knowledge on everything from bike safety, cyber safety, to lessons on the consequence of drinking and driving. Check http:// www.elbertcountysheriff.com/ for details and information. JUNE 29 KIOWA STREET Fair. Come see the treasures within Elbert County and enjoy a family fun filled day at the Kiowa Street Fair from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. June 29 at AF Nordman Park. Food, live music, vendors, activities and more. Visit www.townofkiowa. com. Then head on over to the Elbert County Fairgrounds for the Cowboy Up Rodeo in Kiowa. Starts at 6 p.m. and will give you an evening of excitement and rodeo adventure. www.cowboyupinkiowa.org. The evening ends with Fireworks, weather permitting, provided by the Kiowa Fire Protection District. JULY 4 PIONEER FOURTH celebration is from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. July 4 at the Elbert County Museum in Kiowa. Good old-fashioned fun with free tours of the Elbert County Museum, pie eating contest, silent auction, music, food and more. Go to www. elbertcountymuseum.org for all the details.

of all kinds this year. It starts at the Parker Arts, Culture and Events Center at 10 a.m. and travels along Mainstreet before following the Victorian Drive loop. The parade will feature mascots from Denver’s professional sports teams, royalty from Colorado’s pageant circuit,

the Chaparral High School band, plus local kids and service organizations. One-day passes for the carnival are $25 when purchased in advance at www. parkerdaysfestival.com and $30 on site. Mega Passes good for carnival rides all four days cost $60.

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11-Color

Elbert County News 11

June 13, 2013

The Cheyenne Dandies, fresh from Cheyenne, Wyo., kick off the opening ceremonies for the 2013 Elizabeth Stampede. The 16-girl precision riding team delighted attendees with some extra fancy hoof-work prior to the June 7 Xtreme Bulls competition. Photo by Deborah Grigsby

Coalten Crowner, a 5-year-old from Elizabeth, poses with the trophy he won June 8 for staying on his sheep the longest during the Mutton Bustin’ competition. Photo by Chris Rotar

Stampede: A weekend to remember

Summer Camp 2013 `

Week Long Half Day Summer Camps for Ages 5-7 9am–noon with pre-care available at 7:30am

A handful of carnival rides and attractions, like this bungee-jump spider, gave the Elizabeth Stampede’s vendor alley a sense there was something for everyone. The Stampede is a legend in the small rodeo world, having been named best small rodeo in the country for two years running. Photo by Deborah Grigsby

TRANSFORMERS: June 3–7, June 24–28, July 15–19 & August 5–9

Explore the process of metamorphosis and animal transformations! From butterflies, to salamanders, and frogs, campers will engage in hands on experiences as they investigate and even meet creatures that transform.

NATURE’S ARTISTS: June 10–14, July 1–3 & July 22–26 (holiday week, July 1-3, 35% Discount)

Campers will immerse themselves in a world of creative expression through a variety of artistic mediums including paint, sculpture, photography, crafts and more. Through exploration of the museum’s galleries and outdoor nature trail, the little Monets will express their imagination of the animal kingdom through art.

BACKYARD HABITATS: June 17–21, July 8–12 & July 29–August 2

Leaving no stone unturned as a habitat trekker, campers will go on daily adventures and outdoor safaris to investigate and unearth evidence that plants, animals, and habitats are everywhere!

Cost: $130 Member, $150 Non-member

Anthony Thomas came all the way from Australia to compete in the bareback-riding competition during the Elizabeth Stampede on June 8. Photo by Chris Rotar

Register Today! 720.488.3344 For more info visit thewildlifeexperience.org


12

12 Elbert County News

Fawlty Towers Hotel has room for laughs

CURTAIN TIME

British TV farce onstage in Denver By Sonya Ellingboe

‘Colonus’ revisited

Time: 1977; place: Fawlty Towers, a Victorian hotel in Torquay, England, operated by one Basil Fawlty and his wife, Sybil. Four segments of the popular British TV series, written by John Cleese (Monty Python) and Connie Booth, are packaged for an onstage visit with cranky Basil Fawlty and his various guests and staff. Acts are called “Hotel Inspectors,” “The Anniversary,” “Communication Problems” (my favorite) and “Waldorf Salad.” All take place on Colin Roybal’s two-story Victorian set — quite a feat in the small Bug Theatre where Equinox Theatre Company performs. Director Shannon McCarthy manages to move a large cast in, out, up and down with considerable skill, although some scenes are so busy, they are hard to follow. But silliness reigns throughout, so one just rolls with it. Matt Maxwell’s quarrelsome Basil Fawlty manages to be uniformly rude to all his

Modern love and betrayal

“Gospel at Colonus” is presented by Su Teatro and The Source Theatre Company from June 13-30 at Su Teatro Cultural and Performing Arts Center, 721 Santa Fe Drive, Denver. This is a Broadway musical interpretation of Sophocles’ “Oedipus at Colonus,” set to gospel music. Performances: 7:30 p.m. Fridays, Saturdays; 2 p.m. Sundays. Members of the Eulipion Theatre cast from the early 1990s are included, plus Su Teatro favorites. Tickets: $20/$17, 303-2960219.

sellingboe@ourcoloradonews.com

IF YOU GO “A Night at Fawlty Towers” is presented by Equinox Theatre Company through June 15 at the Bug Theatre, 3654 Navajo St., Denver. Performances: 7:30 p.m. Friday, Saturday. Tickets: $22 ($20 advance); www. EquinoxTheatreDenver.com.

Castle Rock

Matt Maxwell (Basil Fawlty) and Natasha Gleichman (assistant Polly Sherman) perform in Equinox Theatre Company’s “A Night at Fawlty Towers.” Photo by Denver MindMedia guests and gets similar treatment from forceful Mrs. Richards (Carole Maschka), who issues orders and doesn’t want to turn on her hearing aid because it will run down the batteries. She doesn’t like her room and thinks she’s been robbed …. Her ocean view is right there, Basil says, “Between the land and the sky!” Questions/misunderstandings about money, identity, food and drink (including screwdrivers and Waldorf salad) and general day-to-day operations give assorted dingbat guests a chance to shine. Comic timing skills are not quite there at all times, but presumably those skills will improve as the show continues its run.

Highlands Ranch

Littleton

It’s hard to maintain the level as written by comic genius Cleese — and keep a consistent British accent going too. Hotel waiter Manuel (Mark Shonsey) is especially funny and Sybil Fawlty has a fine snort with her laugh. Company director Deb Flomberg designed a nice collection of costumes and makes a couple of brief appearances in the cast. This offers a lighthearted evening in a nifty part of Denver — the Highland neighborhood. Circa 1921 Patsy’s is right across the street with old-fashioned Italian food, and several longstanding Denver art galleries (Pirate, Zip, Edge) are on the block — open on Friday nights.

Parker

“Closer” by Patrick Marber plays June 28 to July 21 at Vintage Theatre, 1468 Dayton St., Aurora. Bernie Cardell directs. Olivier Award in 1998 and New York Drama Critics Best Play in 1999. Performances: 7:30 p.m. Fridays, Saturdays; 2:30 p.m. Sundays. Tickets: $25 ($20 advance) 303-856-7830, vintagetheatre.com.

Happy Burger

“Minimum Wage” by Charlie and Jeff La Greca and Sean Altman plays June 21 to August 3 at the Avenue Theater, 417 E. 17th Ave., Denver. Nick Sugar is director. Theater is transformed into Denver’s Happy Burger. Performances: 7:30 p.m. Fridays, Saturdays, plus Thursdays July 18, 25, Aug. 1. Tickets: $23/$26 — or $33.78 including hamburger and fries from Park & Co. next door. Avenuetheater.com.

Parker

Parker

First United Methodist Church 1200 South Street Castle Rock, CO 80104 303.688.3047 www.fumccr.org

Services:

Saturday 5:30pm Sunday 8am, 9:15am, 10:30am Sunday School 9:15am Little Blessings Day Care www.littleblessingspdo.com

Open and Welcoming

Sunday Worship 8:00 am Chapel Service 9:00 & 10:30 am

Sunday School 9:00 & 10:30 am

www.st-andrew-umc.com

Welcome Home!

Weaving Truth and Relevance into Relationships and Life

worship Time 10:30AM sundays

Affiliated with United Church of Religious Science

303-794-2683 Preschool: 303-794-0510

Castle Rock Recreation Center 2301 Woodlands Blvd, Castle Rock

9203 S. University Blvd. Highlands Ranch, 80126

303 798 6387

CENTER FOR SPIRITUAL LIVING Sunday Services 10 a.m.

www.OurCenterforSpiritualLiving.org 720-851-0265

www.parkerbiblechurch.org

303-791-3315

pastor@awlc.org www.awlc.org

A place for you

Sunday Worship

8:45 am & 10:30 am

Parker

Community Church of Religious Science Hilltop United Church Of Christ 10926 E. Democrat Rd.

Sunday

8:30 a.m. 11:00 a.m.

1609 W. Littleton Blvd. (303) 798-1389 • www.fpcl.org

Sunday 9:30am

Joyful Mission Preschool 303-841-3770 7051 East Parker Hills Ct. • Parker, CO 303-841-3739 www.joylutheran-parker.org

Parker, CO 10am Worship Service www.hilltopucc.org 303-841-2808

Sunday services held in the historic Ruth Memorial Chapel at the Parker Mainstreet Center

...19650 E. Mainstreet, Parker 80138

Fellowship & Worship: 9:00 am Sunday School: 10:45 am 5755 Valley Hi Drive Parker, CO 303-941-0668

www.SpiritofHopeLCMC.org

New Thought...Ancient Wisdom Sunday Service

& Children’s Church 10:00 a.m.

Visit our website for details of classes & upcoming events.

303.805.9890

www.P a r k er C C R S.org P.O. Box 2945—Parker CO 80134-2945

Franktown

Connect – Grow – Serve – Love

SErviCES:

Saturday 5:30pm

Pastor David Fisher

of Littleton

Worship Services Sundays at 9:00am

“Loving God - Making A Difference”



Parker evangelical Presbyterian church

9030 Miller road Parker, Co 80138 303-841-2125 www.pepc.org

www.gracepointcc.us



  

4391 E Mainstreet, Parker, Colorado 80134 Church Office – (303) 841-3836

LUTHERAN CHURCH, ELCA

Abiding Word Lutheran Church First Presbyterian Church 8391 S. Burnley Ct., Highlands Ranch

Sunday Worship 10:30  4825 North Crowfoot Valley Rd. Castle Rock • canyonscc.org  303-663-5751



Sunday Worship: 10:45AM & 6PM Bible Study: 9:30AM Children, Young People & Adults

(Next to RTD lot @470 & University)

An Evangelical Presbyterian Church

Joy

Where people are excited about God’s Word.

Open hearts. Open minds. Open doors.

9:00am Spiritual Formation Classes for all Ages 90 east orchard road littleton, co



June 13, 2013

GRACE PRESBYTERIAN Alongside One Another On Life’s Journey

www.gracecolorado.com

Trinity Lutheran Church & School

You are invited to worship with us:

Sundays at 10:00 am

Sunday Worship 8:00 & 10:45 a.m.

Grace is on the NE Corner of Santa Fe Dr. & Highlands Ranch Pkwy. (Across from Murdochs)

Trinity Lutheran School & ELC (Ages 3-5, Grades K-8)

303-798-8485

 303-841-4660 www.tlcas.org 

To advertise your place of worship in this section, call 303-566-4091 or email kearhart@ourcoloradonews.com.


ElbertSPORTS 13-Sports

Elbert County News 13 June 13, 2013

Cardinals win 7-on-7 tourney Elizabeth team undefeated in all-passing football competition By Tom Munds

tmunds@ourcoloradonews.com Elizabeth High School’s summer football activities got off to a good start as the team traveled to Englewood June 1 and won the 7-on-7 championship by defeating Fairview 31-24 in the title game. The 7-on-7 games are an all-passing, touch football competition. No one rushes the passer, but the quarterback has to get the ball away in five seconds or the play is dead and considered a sack. The 16 teams in the Englewood tournament were divided into four-team pools for round-robin play. The teams with the best pool play records were then seeded in a single-elimination championship bracket. Elizabeth was 3-0 in pool play to advance to the playoffs as the No. 2 seed. The Cardinals won two games to get to the finals against Fairview, the No. 1 seed. “It really was a good day for us, as our kids did really well,” Cardinals coach Chris Cline said. “The offense did its job, moved the ball and scored a lot of points. At the same time, the defense also was outstanding, as they made 13 or 14 interceptions. Brody Oliver and Logan Weber really did good jobs for us on both sides of the ball.” Football activities continued the day after the Englewood 7-on-7 tournament, as the Elizabeth team left for the two-week Western State Football Camp in Gunnison on June 2. The state rules changed several years ago, allowing up to two weeks of practice during the summer. The first three days, players are in shorts. Then they put on full pads for full-contact drills and scrimmages. While some teams conducted the camps on their home field, Elizabeth went to the Western State camp. “The camp includes drills and clinics for our players,” Cline said. “Also, our team will have the opportunity to scrimmage the other 11 teams at the camp. We are working

Elizabeth High School football coach Chris Cline listens in as the offense calls a play during the 7-on-7 tournament in Englewood on June 1. The Cardinals were 6-0 as they won the tournament championship. Photo by Tom Munds on rebuilding our offensive and defensive lines. I believe the camp will be a good test for our linemen to see how we match up physically against those other teams.” Soon after they return from Western State, Elizabeth will be playing in the June 19-22 Bronco 7-on-7 tournament. There are 64 teams in preliminary pool play at Denver All City Stadium, with the top finishers from the four-team pools advancing to the finals June 22 at Dove Valley and the overall champion winning an all-expense paid

trip to Cleveland for the NFL 7-on-7 tournament. Elizabeth opens play in the tournament at 10:30 a.m. June 20 in pool play against Parker Lutheran, Chatfield and Fairview. Looking ahead, Cline said Elizabeth should be a good team this year and, if everyone stays healthy, the Cardinals should defend their league title. “We graduated six seniors, four of them starters,” he said. “So we have nine returning starters on defense and eight on of-

fense. Recently, we have had a number of players sidelined with injuries. But we expect we’ll have everyone healthy and ready to go when the season opens.” Regular practice for the fall season begins in mid-August, and Elizabeth opens the football season at home Aug. 30 with a non-league game against Frederick. It is the first of five non-league games. Play against Colorado 7 league opponents begins for the Cardinals Oct. 4 at home against Vista Peak.

Elephant Rock one unforgettable ride Nearly 7,000 cyclists turn out for annual Castle Rock event By Jim Benton

jbenton@ourcoloradonews.com

Tom Walton, a bicyclist from Colorado Springs, cruises to the finish line of the 62-mile ride as part of the 26th annual Elephant Rock Cycling Festival, which started and finished June 2 at the Douglas County Fairgrounds in Castle Rock. Photo by Ryan Boldrey

Dave Pilot claims the timing was perfect for the Subaru Elephant Rock Cycling Festival. Pilot is training for his second-ever Ironman competition, which will be held Sept. 9 in Madison, Wis., and the 49-year-old Denver resident is also grooming himself for the July 13-14 Triple Bypass Ride near Avon, Colo. He was one of close to 7,000 riders to participate in the annual Elephant Rock event, which began May 31 with the Optic Nerve 24 hours of ERock mountain bike race and concluded with several different rides June 2. The rides started and finished at the Douglas County Fairgrounds in Castle Rock. “It was early enough in the season and I will use it for training,” said Pilot. “It was my second long ride of the season so it’s kind of a base builder. The Elephant ride is well situated to train and get some miles in for that ride (Triple Bypass) as well. “It’s a good long distance, it’s rolling hills and challenging for the legs. It’s fairly similar to the course I’ll ride in Wisconsin in September.” Pilot rode the 100-mile course, which included a 38-mile loop through the Black Forest and traverses the high plains between Castle Rock and Colorado Springs. Russ Cupps, a West Metro firefighter who lives in Castle Pines North, participated this

year in the 24 hours of ERock along with nearly 70 relay or solo teams on the 8.2mile Rolling Thunder trail at the Greenland Open Space. “It was a long, tough day,” said Cupps. “We had a really good time. It was tough. Just 24 hours of digging out what’s inside to make it work. “There were eight of us. Each person would do a lap or two and hand off to the next person and go from there. It was a good time. We tried to both sleep and rest. We obviously had laps during the p.m. hours so we rested the best we could. The only thing we were missing was a hammock.” Cupps’ wife Angela and brother Randy got him into bike riding five years ago, and Elephant Rock has become an annual ride. It was a few years ago that Cupps, an eventual kidney donor, noticed the American Transplant Tent and started asking questions. “My question to the gal (Katie Cierchi) was, `You can really donate something and still be alive?’ She said yeah,” he said. “It was her face and everything that kind of put the ball rolling. I looked into it. I asked at work, `Do I have to have two kidneys to work here?’ They’re like, `I don’t know.’ So we checked into the national standards and everything was good to go.” Cupps donated his kidney Sept. 28, 2010, to 22-year-old Justin Smith of Colorado Springs, and last year Cupps and Smith rode together in the 32-mile Elephant Rock ride. “It was the first ride he had ever done and it was neat to see him accomplish something like that,” said Cupps. For results, go to www.24hoursoferock. com/results/.


14-Color

14 Elbert County News

June 13, 2013

Parker indoor gun range underway Owner vows safety will be priority at new facility By Chris Michlewicz

cmichlewicz@ourcolorado news.com Parker’s first indoor gun range is set to open by the end of the year. Work on the 35,000-squarefoot Freedom Arms Shooting Range began May 28 as the mayor and members of town council helped owners Chris and Tracy Kamp break ground near the corner of Twenty Mile Road and Longs Way. Freedom Arms will start out with 13 backstops and add nine more in the future. Roughly 7,000 square feet is reserved for retail space, where firearms, accessories and merchandise will be sold. Features such as a state-of-the-art ventilation system will ensure the circulation of clean air, and a trolley system precludes the need for shooters to walk down range to inspect targets. The backstops are capable of taking a .50-caliber round, however, Chris Kamp says such highpowered weaponry won’t be allowed. Armor-piercing bullets are also prohibited, and ammunition will be checked before customers step onto the range. AR-15s and

From left, the four-member Kamp family breaks ground with Parker Town Council members Josh Martin and Joshua Rivero and Mayor Mike Waid on an indoor gun range near Twenty Mile Road and Longs Way May 28. Courtesy photo AK-47s will be allowed. Chris Kamp says there will be heavy emphasis on safety. A range officer will monitor all activity and a series of surveillance cameras will further keep dangerous behavior in check. Freedom Arms will offer a wide range of training classes for kids and adults, and

new customers will get a free training session and initial instruction from a range officer. Members will receive a free safety check on their weapon upon request. In spite of plans to open across from Railbender skate park, a place that kids and teens frequent, the indoor gun range has

not received any opposition. Chris Kamp, who has lived east of Parker on the Douglas-Elbert county line, says even though the state legislature has enacted new gun control measures, there is strong local support for gun rights. “Douglas County as a whole is a pretty big hunting county and

shooting-enthusiast county, and so is Elbert County,” he said, adding that shooting is one of the fastest-growing sports in the nation. “There is good demand and I have run into nothing but excitement for it.” Sport shooters in Parker will be glad to have an indoor range closer to home. The closest indoor facilities are in Centennial and Castle Rock, and there is an outdoor range at Cherry Creek State Park. Indoor ranges remain open yearround and shooters don’t have to contend with the elements, especially rain and wind. Freedom Arms is being built in a light-industrial area and Kamp says he does not expect any disturbances, noise or otherwise, to affect neighboring businesses. The exterior of the building will also be well-lit to bolster safety. The Kamps plan on having introductory training sessions that will be open to the public once the range opens near the end of the year. Educational outreach will be a big part of Freedom Arms’ mission. “We want to bring awareness to people who don’t know much about (shooting),” Kamp said. “We want to show them that the gun itself is not bad, it’s the people behind the gun.” For more information about Freedom Arms Shooting Range, visit www.freedomarmsshootingrange.com or call 720-441-FASR.

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15-Color

Elbert County News 15

June 13, 2013

y Energy

development of wind, solar, and other innovative energy resources,” he stated in the order. “Rural areas, in particular, will benefit economically from the expansion of renewable resources because the vast majority of renewable resources are located outside of the state’s urban centers.” Some of the jobs Hickenlooper said would be created included construction, manufacturing and mining, as well as new waste-to-energy positions. Republicans had a different view of the bill, however, and state party Chairman

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Ryan Call was one of many to issue a state- legislation will levy billions in costs to rural consumers is not borne out by the facts, he ment, blasting the signing. “It is clear that Gov. Hickenlooper and said. “For society to move forward, its people Sen. (John) Morse (the Democratic Senate president from Colorado Springs) are more must look forward,” said Morse. “This bill concerned about appeasing radical envi- will help stabilize the cost of electricity in ronmentalists and the fringe of their party the long run, create jobs and economic acthan doing what’s right for Colorado,” Call tivity, and limit greenhouse gas emissions. stated. “The law will raise the price of en- These are all good things, and I am incredibly pleased to know we have taken another ergy on everyone.” The governor said he considered vetoing step toward national leadership in the clean The East Central BOCES Member School energy field.” the bill, and would have done so if the Districts keeprate records on each student to use in the instruction andAttempts guidance of to reach representatives of increase, which is capped at 2 percent, was each student. The records contain information about student IREA and his/her foreducacomment were unsuccessful. not compounded. The assertion thatthethis

and addthewell as protecting consumers impacted by e na-the legislation. He said that if issues are not andresolved through stakeholder engagement, cite-there is an agreement in place that changes will be made to the legislation in the next ill besession. clos- “This legislation will expand economic or fa-opportunities across Colorado through the tion, including attendance, achievement, Casaptitude, description, assessment and progress. Parents of students under 18 and door eligible students have the right to review these records. Park. yearStudent records are kept in the school building the student attends. If records are ve to Extra! Extra! not kept in the school the student attends, this will be noted by the person in charge espeof records in the building. The principal click is Have a news or business story idea? We'd love to read all about it. To send us your news and business press releases, please visit ourcoloradonews.com, on the Press Releases tab

ilt in and follow easy instructions to make submissions. the following trades: Asphalt Paving, Conamp crete Paving, Sidewalks, Curb & Gutter, disChain Link Fence, Site Furnishings, Landscape & Irrigation, Playground Equipment, e, to Building Slabs, Manufactured Stone Veneer, Metal Fabrications, Glue Laminated sses. Framing, Casework, Cabinets & Counterwill tops, Cement Board Siding, Roofing, Sheet Metal, Building Insulation, Joint ty. Sealant, Doors & Windows, Skylights, Drywall & Metal Framing, Flooring, Acousg intical Ceilings & Wall Treatments, Painting, that Specialties, Residential Appliances, Food Service Equipment, Window Treatments, e the Bleachers, and Elevator. Bids will be received from pre-qualified firms only for f the Fire Suppression, Mechanical and Elecill be trical trades. misA non-mandatory pre-bid meeting will be held Tuesday, June 18th at 10:00am.

ness much said. t the Misc. Private Legals eople Public Notice

bout NOTICE TO SUBCONTRACTORS - FCI ange,Constructors is now accepting BIDS for Package C for the NEW ELBERT otin-Bid SCHOOL. This bid package includes ASR. the following trades: Asphalt Paving, Con-

crete Paving, Sidewalks, Curb & Gutter, Chain Link Fence, Site Furnishings, Landscape & Irrigation, Playground Equipment, Building Slabs, Manufactured Stone Veneer, Metal Fabrications, Glue Laminated Framing, Casework, Cabinets & Countertops, Cement Board Siding, Roofing, Sheet Metal, Building Insulation, Joint Sealant, Doors & Windows, Skylights, Drywall & Metal Framing, Flooring, Acoustical Ceilings & Wall Treatments, Painting, Specialties, Residential Appliances, Food Service Equipment, Window Treatments, Bleachers, and Elevator. Bids will be received from pre-qualified firms only for Fire Suppression, Mechanical and Electrical trades. A non-mandatory pre-bid meeting will be held Tuesday, June 18th at 10:00am.

The address of the School is 24489 Main Street Elbert CO. 80106. We will meet on site at the FCI jobsite trailer. Bids are due June 25th before 3 PM to FCI Constructors, 4001 N Valley Dr., Longmont, CO 80504. Attention: Terry Hutton, by email: thutton@fciol.com, or by fax: 970-5354867. Please email Terry with any questions. Bid documents will be available June 11th online: www.fciol.com, in the Upcoming Bids section.

Notice to Creditors

Legal Notice No.: 927670 First Publication: June 13, 2013 Last Publication: June 20, 2013 Publisher: The Elbert County News PUBLIC NOTICE

NOTICE TO CREDITORS Estate of Mike Arko, aka Michael Arko, aka Michael J. Arko, Deceased Case Number: 2013 PR 20 All persons having claims against the above-named estate are required to present them to the Personal Representative or to the District Court of Elbert County, Colorado on or before September 30,

GENERAL FUND HEALTH FUND ROAD & BRIDGE FUND SALES & USE TAx PUBLIC TRUSTEE LEA FUND HUMAN SERVICES FUND RETIREMENT FUND CONSERVATION TRUST FUND TOTALS

The address of the School is 24489 Main Street Elbert CO. 80106. We will meet on site at the FCI jobsite trailer. Bids are due June 25th before 3 PM to FCI Constructors, 4001 N Valley Dr., Longmont, CO 80504. Attention: Terry Hutton, by email: thutton@fciol.com, or by fax: 970-5354867. Please email Terry with any questions. Bid documents will be available June 11th online: www.fciol.com, in the Upcoming Bids section.

Misc. Private Legals

Legal Notice No.: 927670 First Publication: June 13, 2013 Last Publication: June 20, 2013 Publisher: The Elbert County News

Government Legals Public Notice NOTICE OF FINAL SETTLEMENT PROJECT #FBR 0704-227 PROJECT ID #18610 In accordance with the notice provisions contained in 38 26 107 C.R.S. 1973 as amended, the DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION, STATE OF COLORADO has established July 4, 2013 as the date of final settlement date with Lawrence Construction Company for Project #FBR 0704-227, Project ID #18610, in Elbert County. Work consists of I-70 frontage road replacement of structure, guardrail, asphalt paving, embankment, and seeding. Claims containing a verified statement of the amounts due and unpaid must be in the form of a written affidavit and must be received by the CONTROLLER, Department of Transportation at 4201 E. Arkansas Avenue, Denver, Colorado, 80222, on or before 5:00 p.m. of the final settlement date above.

Notice to Creditors

Timothy J. Harris, P.E., Chief Engineer, Department of Transportation 2013 or the claims may be forever Departbarred. Effective July 1, 2013, Colorado ment of Transportation will no longer advertise Kelli ArkoNotice of Final Settlements in newspapers and will only post Notice of Personal Representative Final Settlement advertisements on 317 Rushmore Street CDOT’s website Elizabeth, Colorado 80107 (http://www.coloradodot.info/business). 927966 Legal Notice No.: No: 927958 First Publication: 13,2013 2013 First Publication: June May 30, Last Publication: June Last Publication: June 20, 13, 2013 2013 Publisher: The Elbert County News Publisher: Elbert County News

$263,916.34 $9,439.96 $348,474.16 $14,877.83 $364.06 $7,481.66 $64,476.82 $35,337.66 $8,797.19 $753,165.68

Vendor Name

Description

21st Century Equipment AARON SHEA ADVANCED QUALITY AUTO AGATE MUTUAL TELEphone AIRGAS INTERMOUNTAIN AL SERRA Amich & Jenks ARAPAHOE HEATING Svc ARC ELECTRIC ARROWHEAD FENCING Asphalt Specialties Co AT&T AVAYA BABY BEAR HUGS BARRY MITCHELL Best West Tire Distrib. BLACK HILLS ENERGY BORAL AGGREGATES CAROLYN BURGENER CATHERINE LAMBERT CCOM/CHC, LLC CDW GOVERNMENT CENTENNIAL MENTAL HEALTh CENTURYLINK CERTIFIED LABORATORIES CGHSFOA CLEAN DESIGNS INC CO DEPT OF LABOR & EMPLOYMENT COLORADO COMMUNITY CO DEPT OF REVENUE

Operating Expense Mileage Reimbursement Vehicle Maint. phone service Welding Supplies Cover Polygraph Operating Expense Maintenance Maintenance Roadway Construction March Bill Maint. Agreement TANF Contract Reprogram VHF Radios Tire Monthly Service Salt & Squeege Cleaning Contract Reimbursement Drug Screen Office Supplies Expert Testimony Monthly Service Purewash Systems Registration Sanders Diagnostic on Washer Fuel Tank Base and Fees Public Notice Consumer Prot. Fee

AMT 119.90 36.00 923.37 22.61 953.87 6.17 250.00 1,038.26 1,920.00 2,255.00 9,210.83 207.34 430.83 2,884.00 270.00 3,912.02 3,408.55 9,125.60 200.00 53.08 137.50 243.30 350.00 339.46 124.90 275.00 285.00 3,500.00 14.75 86.00

responsible for maintenance of student records in each building.

To review a student’s records, the parent(s) of students under 18 or the eligible student should contact the records custodian. The records will be shown to you as soon as possible and in no case more than three days after the request. If you desire a copy of the educational record, a charge of 10 cents per copy may be charged, unless this fee prohibits your access. The records will be explained to you at your request.

Public Notice NOTICE OF FINAL SETTLEMENT PROJECT #FBR 0704-227 PROJECT ID #18610 In accordance with the notice provisions contained in 38 26 107 C.R.S. 1973 as amended, the DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION, STATE OF COLORADO has established July 4, 2013 as the date of final settlement date with Lawrence Construction Company for Project #FBR 0704-227, Project ID #18610, in Elbert County. Work consists of I-70 frontage road replacement of structure, guardrail, asphalt paving, embankment, and seeding. Claims containing a verified statement of the amounts due and unpaid must be in the form of a written affidavit and must be received by the CONTROLLER, Department of Transportation at 4201 E. Arkansas Avenue, Denver, Colorado, 80222, on or before 5:00 p.m. of the final settlement date above.

Government Legals

Timothy J. Harris, P.E., Chief Engineer, Department of Transportation Effective July 1, 2013, Colorado Department of Transportation will no longer advertise Notice of Final Settlements in newspapers and will only post Notice of Final Settlement advertisements on CDOT’s website (http://www.coloradodot.info/business). Legal Notice No.: 927966 First Publication: June 13, 2013 Last Publication: June 20, 2013 Publisher: The Elbert County News PUBLIC NOTICE SCHOOL DISTRICT RECORDS The East Central BOCES Member School Districts keep records on each student to use in the instruction and guidance of each student. The records contain information about the student and his/her education, including attendance, achievement, aptitude, description, assessment and progress. Parents of students under 18 and eligible students have the right to review these records. Student records are kept in the school building the student attends. If records are not kept in the school the student attends, this will be noted by the person in charge of records in the building. The principal is responsible for maintenance of student records in each building.

PUBLIC NOTICE SCHOOL DISTRICT RECORDS The East Central BOCES Member School Districts keep records on each student to use in the instruction and guidance of each student. The records contain information about the student and his/her education, including attendance, achievement, aptitude, description, assessment and progress. Parents of students under 18 and eligible students have the right to review these records.

Government Legals

Student records are kept in the school building the student attends. If records are not kept in the school the student attends, this will be noted by the person in charge of records in the building. The principal is responsible for maintenance of student records in each building. To review a student’s records, the parent(s) of students under 18 or the eligible student should contact the records custodian. The records will be shown to you as soon as possible and in no case more than three days after the request. If you desire a copy of the educational record, a charge of 10 cents per copy may be charged, unless this fee prohibits your access. The records will be explained to you at your request. Parents of eligible students may question the content of the records. Any other access to student records will only be allowed if written consent is obtained, upon court order or by any legally issued subpoena. Student records are reviewed and inappropriate material removed periodically. Those records not of permanent importance must be destroyed at the parents request after graduation or when the student stops attending permanently. Parents of students with disabilities or eligible students will be notified before any personally identifiable information is removed from a record and destroyed. A record of those persons reviewing the records will be kept by the records custodian and can be reviewed by the parent or eligible student.

Parents of eligible students may question the content of the records. Any other access to student records will only be allowed if written consent is obtained, upon court order or by any legally issued subpoena. Student records are reviewed and inappropriate material removed periodically. Those records not of permanent importance must be destroyed at the parents request after graduation or when the student stops attending permanently. Parents of students with disabilities or eligible students will be notified before any personally identifiable information is removed from a record and destroyed. A record of those persons reviewing the records will be kept by the records custodian and can be reviewed by the parent or eligible student.

Government Legals

A school official may release directory type information to the public. To prevent the public release of such information, a parent or eligible student must file a written objection with the records custodian within ten days after receiving this notice. For more detailed information about records, procedures and policies or to file a complaint, contact the local school district administrator, the East Central BOCES Executive Director or the Special Education Director. Letters may be addressed to: Don Anderson, Executive Director, East Central BOCES, P. O. Box 910, Limon, CO 80828. Unresolved complaints can be appealed using the established appeals process. The East Central BOCES member schools are: Bennett, Strasburg, Byers, Deer Trail, Agate, Woodlin, Arickaree, Limon, Genoa-Hugo, Karval, Kiowa, Kit Carson, Cheyenne Wells, Arriba-Flagler, HiPlains, Stratton, Bethune, Burlington, Idalia, Liberty and Elizabeth. Legal Notice No.: 927968 First Publication: June 13, 2013 Last Publication: June 13, 2013 Publisher: The Elbert County News Public Notice

Government Legals Public Notice Notice of Public Hearing Amendment to zoning regulations Notice is hereby given that on Thursday, 18 July 2013 at 7:00 p m., or as soon as possible thereafter, a Planning Commission Hearing will be conducted and on Wednesday, 21 August 2013 at 9:00 a.m., or as soon as possible thereafter, a Board of County Commissioners’ hearing will be conducted. Hearings will be conducted in the Hearing Room of the Elbert County Commissioners at Kiowa, Colorado or at such other time and place as these hearings may be adjourned. Public hearings will be heard upon an Amendment to the Elbert County Zoning Regulations on file with the Elbert County Community and Development Services, 215 Comanche Street, Kiowa, Colorado 80117, Telephone: 303-621-3136. Any comments must be submitted in writing to Elbert County Community & Development Services, P. O. Box 7, Kiowa, CO 80117 by Monday, August 12, 2013. Reason: Amendment to Zoning Regulations. Project Name and Number: Amendment to Zoning Regulations about XX zoned parcels. Legal Notice No.: 927969 First Publication: June 13, 2013 Last Publication: June 13, 2013 Publisher: The Elbert County News

Notice of Public Hearing Amendment to zoning regulations

When government takes action, it uses local newspapers to notify you. Reading your public notices is the best way to find out what is happening in your community and how it affects you. If you don’t read public notices, you never know what you might miss.

To review a student’s records, the parent(s) of students under 18 or the eligible student should contact the records custodian. The records will be shown to you as soon as possible and in no case more than three days after the request. If you desire a copy of the educational record, a charge of 10 cents per copy may be charged, unless this fee prohibits your access. The records will be explained to you at your request.

A school official may release directory type information to the public. To prevent the public release of such information, a parent or eligible student must file a written objection with the records custodian within ten days after receiving this notice. For more detailed information about records, procedures and policies or to file a complaint, contact the local school district administrator, the East Central BOCES Executive Director or the Special Education Director. Letters may be addressed to: Don Anderson, Executive Director, East Central BOCES, P. O. Box 910, Limon, CO 80828. Unresolved complaints can be appealed using the established appeals process.

Notice is hereby given that on Thursday, 18 July 2013 at 7:00 p m., or as soon as possible thereafter, a Planning Commission Hearing will be conducted and on Wednesday, 21 August 2013 at 9:00 a.m., or as soon as possible thereafter, a Board of County Commissioners’ hearing will be conducted. Hearings will be conducted in the Hearing Room of the Elbert County Commissioners at Kiowa, Colorado or at such other time and place as these hearings may be adjourned. Public hearings will be heard upon an Amendment to the Elbert County Zoning Regulations on file with the Elbert County Community and Development Services, 215 Comanche Street, Kiowa, Colorado 80117, Telephone: 303-621-3136. Any comments must be submitted in writing to Elbert County Community & Development Services, P. O. Box 7, Kiowa, CO 80117 by Monday, August 12, 2013.

Notices are meant to be noticed. Read your public notices and get involved! Government Legals

Parents of eligible students may question the content of the records. Any other access to student records will only be allowed if written consent is obtained, upon court order or by any legally issued subpoena.

The East Central BOCES member schools are: Bennett, Strasburg, Byers, Deer Trail, Agate, Woodlin, Arickaree, Limon, Genoa-Hugo, Karval, Kiowa, Kit Carson, Cheyenne Wells, Arriba-Flagler, HiPlains, Stratton, Bethune, Burlington, Idalia, Liberty and Elizabeth.

Reason: Amendment to Zoning Student records are reviewed and inapRegulations. propriate material removed periodically. Those records not of permanent importProject Name and Number: Amendment ance must be destroyed at the parents reto Zoning Regulations about XX zoned Legal Notice No.: 927968 quest after graduation or when the stuparcels. First Publication: June 13, 2013 dent stops attending permanently. ParLast Publication: June 13, 2013 ents of students with disabilities or eligible Legal Notice No.: 927969 Notice Publisher: The Elbert County News students will be notified before any Public perFirst Publication: June 13, 2013 sonally identifiable information is removed Last Publication: June 13, 2013 ELBERT COUNTY VENDOR PMT LIST APRIL 2013 from a record and destroyed. A record of Publisher: The Elbert County News RICHARD BROWN Planning CommissioN HONEYBEE PUMPING Svc Pump RV Septic Tank 305.00 CO SECRETARY OF STATE Training 20.00 thoseCert persons reviewing the records will ROCK PARTS COMPANY Battery acid HONNEN EQUIPMENT Cap 1,003.36 csu extension Quarterly be kept by thepayment records custodian 3,075.00 and can Ron Turner Planning Commission ILENE ALLISON Gravel/Fill Dirt 1,417.80 COMCAST 307 Pawnee St parent or eligible 326.99 be reviewed by the stuRR DONNELLEY Estimated Postage IREA 307 Pawnee 8,329.17 COMMUNITY MEDIA OFdent. CO Advertising 303.00 RT SERVICES CORP LLC April Trash INTERSTATE BATTERY Batteries 95.95 CONEJOS COUNTY TRSR Dues 400.00 SimplexGrinnell Alarm Testing J&S CONTRACTORS Sply Blades 1,619.50 CORONER ME Computer Program 250.00 A school official may release directory SPRINT Cell Phones JAMES ROBERT WARE Planning Commission 78.00 CORRECTIONAL type information to the public. To prevent STAPLES ADVANTAGE Office Supplies Jerri Spear Mileage 140.00 HEALTHCARE Medical Inmateof Svd 11,146.16a the public release such information, State Office Vital Stats Birth Certificate JOHN DEERE FINANCIAL operating Expense 91,465.34 COUNTY SHERIFF’S OFparent CO Member Duesstudent must file 3,624.86 or eligible a writSTATE WIRE & TERMINAL INC Emory Cloth KANSAS STATE BANK April Payment 2,384.75 CREDIT UNION OF CO ten objection 04-10-2013-001js 5,037.68 with the records custodian STEEL CORNER operating Expense KELLEY MIKE Planning Commission 51.00 CRS OF COLORADO withinFinancial 13,687.00 ten daysServices after receiving this notice. STONE OIL CO INC Fuel/Propane KELLEY SHEILA G. Mileage 50.96 Cummins RKY MountainFor more Bearing Lock Washers 144.00 detailed information about reSTORAGE ONE April Storage KIMBALL MIDWEST Drill Bits Cleaner 115.69 CYNTHIA HIGDON 136.00 cords,Reimbursement procedures and policies or to file a SUE LINK Planning Commission KIOWA CREEK COMM. D-J PETROLEUM Fuel contact the local school 73,355.20 complaint, district administrator, the East Central BOCES SUNRISE ENVIRONMENTAL Shop Rags CHURCH TANF Contract 1,960.00 DAVID HOOS Planning Commission 104.00 Executive or the Special EducaSusan Ludwig TDM Lab Corp Testing 38.00 DEEP ROCK WaterDirector Cooler Lease 8.45 LARRY ROSS Mileage Expense Reimb. 218.68 SUSAN SAINT VINCENT Planning Commission DIGBY PROPERTIES tion Director. April Rent Letters may be addressed 725.00 to: Don Anderson, Executive Director, SYSCO FOOD SERVICES Various Foods E470 Toll Toll Fees 71.10 Layton Truck Equipment Spinner Motor 205.14 East Central BOCES, P. O. Box 910, LiTARCO INDUSTRIES INC Drill Bit Set LEAH TEGLOVIC Reimbursement 41.72 EIDE BAILLY Professional Svcs 7,350.00 CO 80828. Unresolved complaints MARY LOUISE JACOBSON Fair Meal 356.66 DANNY PAUL ARDREY TR Rental Vehicle EL PASO CTY SHERIFFmon, Summons 43.31 can be appealed using the established apTHE LIGHTHOUSE Flash Tube ELBERT CTY ABSTRACT MCCANDLES INTl TRUCKS CO Cartridge 372.60 peals Ooperating process. Expense TLC AUTO GLASS equipment expense MHC KENWORTH operating Expense 718.10 & TITLE 200.00 TLO LLC Security data MICHELLE NAIL Training Meals Reimburse 169.57 ECEA ECEA CONTRIBUTION 4,784.86 The East Central BOCES member TODD PEDERSON Deputy Comp ELBERT COUNTY R&B Operating Expense 1,050.40 MIKE BINGHAM Planning Commission 108.00 schools Bennett, Strasburg, Byers, TOM BESHORE Planning Commission MINES & ASSOCIATES PC Employee Assistant 267.90 ELBERT Cty TREASURER P/Rare: vendors 256,740.53 TOWN OF KIOWA Monthly Service MOUNTAIN VIEW ELECTRIC Agate Shop 538.69 ELBERT CTY SHERIFF Deer Trail, Agate, Woodlin, Arickaree, Limon, Process Genoa-Hugo, CarTOWN OF SIMLA Monthly Service NEAL D. CHRISTENSEN CPA 2013 Bookkeeping Class 180.00 OFFICE Server Karval, Kiowa, Kit19.00 HiTROY McCOY Reimbursements ELIZABETH FIRE DEPT.son, Cheyenne Blodd Draw Wells, Arriba-Flagler, 300.00 Norchem Drug Testing Lab Drug Testing 7.80 Plains, Stratton, Bethune, Burlington, IdTRUE VALUe Batteries PARKER PORT-A-POTTY INC. Elbert Pit 159.00 ENERTIA CONSULTING Operating Expense 6,312.00 alia, Liberty and Elizabeth. TYLER TECHNOLOGIES Labels Direct Thermal ARNOLD AND ASSOCIATES Child Welfare Attrny Fees 7,180.00 EVERETT TATMAN Mthly Contract 1,800.00 PAUL CRISAN Planning Commission 190.00 FAIR POINT COMM March Bill 309.22 ULTRAMAX AMMUNITION Operating Expense LegalIntake NoticePreheater No.: 927968 Flagler Coop. 119.90 PAULA KOCH Planning Commission 200.00 UNIVERSITY PHYSICIANS Review of Records First Publication: June 13, 2013 3,275.00 PHOENIX TECHNOLOGY Enhanced mangaged sVCS 3,200.00 FLATIRONS INC operating Expense Value Added Services Name Plate Holders June 13, 2013 PITNEY BOWES Postage 5,000.00 Force America Distrib Last Publication: Solenoid 361.37 VERIZON WIRELESS Cell Phone Publisher: The Elbert POSTMASTER GENERAL Postage Permit 900.00 FRONTIER BUSINESS Office Supplies County News 186.76 WAGNER EQUIPMENT Filter Assembly POTESTIO BROS FRONTIER COMM. CORP Copier Rental 995.96 WASTE MANAGEMENT Trash Removal WITT BOYS-NAPA 15W 40 Oil G NEIL Labor Posters 399.92 EQUIPMENT Equipment expense 142.14 Wofford Truck POWER MOTIVE CORP Equipment expense 1,186.80 G&K SERVICES Shirts 584.04 operating Expense PRONGHORN COUNTRY ACE Office Supplies 74.14 GLENN A. OHRNS Contract Wages 1,510.00 WRIGLEY ENTERPRISES Business Cards PSI SYSTEMS Building repair 348.49 GRAINGER Light Bulbs 66.60 XEROX CORP Detentions Copier PUREWATER DYNAMICS INC Lease Equipment 50.00 GRANT THAYER Planning Commission 235.00 GREAT WEST LIFE April 2013 Benefits 81,003.12 Quality First Plumbing Trip Charge 35.00 Legal Notice No.: 927967 QUILL CORPORATION Office Supplies 647.53 HALLCREST KENNEL Dog Boarding 252.00 First Publication: June 13, 2013 QWEST Monthly Service 2,509.45 HEADS UP CO YOUTH TANF Contract 6,950.00 Last Publication: June 13, 2013 Reliance Metalcenter Div 15 Expanded Metal Carbon Steel 86.04 HENSLEY BATTERY LLC Deka Batteries 390.85 Publisher: Elbert County News

83.00 5,008.55 93.00 4,936.07 265.84 2,295.00 197.66 866.73 14.00 297.07 288.16 45,279.79 75.00 192.00 121.90 160.00 168.00 2,337.82 318.95 600.00 65.00 300.00 38.94 400.00 230.00 2,755.94 132.07 146.73 195.18 8,237.00 410.80 650.00 54.25 736.57 871.02 630.33 4,527.70 3,033.71 105.00 1,661.31


16-Color

16 Elbert County News

June 13, 2013

Elbert county news 061313  
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