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OCTOBER 11, 2018

CARRYING ON A LEGACY: Lutheran High students finish the works of a late artist P14

75 CENTS

ELBERT COUNTY, COLORADO

A publication of

CANDIDATES SQUARE OFF FOR HOUSE SEAT

Incumbent Lewis, challenger Baird vie for District 64 Q&A with Teri Nilson Baird, Democratic candidate for HD 64

EDITOR’S NOTE: This week, we bring you Q&As with the candidates seeking to represent Elbert County in the state House of Representatives. Find more election coverage inside, online and in next week’s newspaper.

Q&A with Kimmi Lewis, Republican candidate for HD 64 BY TABATHA STEWART SPECIAL TO COLORADO COMMUNITY MEDIA

BY TABATHA STEWART SPECIAL TO COLORADO COMMUNITY MEDIA

Tell us a little about yourself. I have lived in Colorado my whole life (61 years). I grew up on a family ranch and my late husband and I bought it from my family after 17 years of marriage. I am a cow/calf producer which means I raise calves from cows that I take care of year-round as I produce USA beef.

Tell us a little about yourself. I live on a small ranch east of Kiowa, where my husband and I raise llamas. We moved here in 1997, seeking escape from the stress of Washington, D.C. I am retired from the USDA. As a second career, I earned my master of divinity from the Iliff School of Theology in Denver and became a Christian pastor. I am the lead pastor on a team experimenting with a new church start on Saturday evenings at Baird my home congregation, South Broadway Christian Church.

What makes you the best choice for office? Lewis I first got involved in local politics because someone needed to stand up for our rural communities and be a voice against the overreach of federal and local governments. Throughout my first term as state representative these last two years I have had one guiding focus: My responsibility is to represent the

What makes you the best choice for this office? I believe my resume shows me to be well-rounded, with a variety of experiences which relate well to the SEE BAIRD, P16

SEE LEWIS, P17

THE BOTTOM LINE PERIODICAL

“There is a different mentality at airports now that is no different than swap meets and garage sales. Come as you are. Be as rude as you want.” Craig Marshall Smith, columnist | Page 10 INSIDE

CALENDAR: PAGE 7 | VOICES: PAGE 10 | LIFE: PAGE 14

ElbertCountyNews.net

VOLUME 123 | ISSUE 37


2 Elbert County News

October 11, 2018O

Candidates for state board of education, District 4

Why are you seeking this office? I’m seeking a position on the State Board of Education because I believe parents deserve a strong voice in our children’s education. Currently, only one board member has children Krug enrolled in Colorado public schools and a majority have never had a child attend public school. Dedicated to improve choices and outcomes for public school students, including my own kids, I have the skill set to clean up the mess politicians have made of Colorado schools. What makes you the best choice for this office? My incumbent opponent is an insider from a political family who has sat for eight years while Colorado’s public school system fell to the bottom in national rankings. She was appointed to the State Board of Education by the political establishment after being twice rejected by voters.

My opponent represents the status quo and politics as usual. I represent every outsider who would like a return to prioritizing families over party politics and results over agendas. What are the most pressing issues facing K-12 education in Colorado? Funding and the responsible distribution of taxpayer investment into education. Since 2010, Colorado students have increased by 7 percent, but administrative costs have increased by more than 20 percent. It’s unacceptable. The state needs someone like me willing to come down hard on frivolous spending and bloated administrator salaries in privately managed public schools. I will demand taxpayer money make its way into classrooms instead of into the hands of middle management. SEE KRUG, P5

Phone and Internet Discounts Available to CenturyLink Customers The Colorado Public Utilities Commission designated CenturyLink as an Eligible Telecommunications Carrier within its service area for universal service purposes. CenturyLink’s basic local service rates for residential voice lines are $23.50 per month and business services are $35.02 per month. Specific rates will be provided upon request. CenturyLink participates in a government benefit program (Lifeline) to make residential telephone or broadband service more affordable to eligible low-income individuals and families. Eligible customers are those that meet eligibility standards as defined by the FCC and state commissions. Residents who live on federally recognized Tribal Lands may qualify for additional Tribal benefits if they participate in certain additional federal eligibility programs. The Lifeline discount is available for only one telephone or broadband service per household, which can be on either a wireline or wireless service. Broadband speeds must be 18 Mbps download and 2 Mbps upload or faster to qualify. A household is defined for the purposes of the Lifeline program as any individual or group of individuals who live together at the same address and share income and expenses. Lifeline service is not transferable, and only eligible consumers may enroll in the program. Consumers who willfully make false statements in order to obtain Lifeline telephone or broadband service can be punished by fine or imprisonment and can be barred from the program. If you live in a CenturyLink service area, please call 1-855-954-6546 or visit centurylink.com/lifeline with questions or to request an application for the Lifeline program.

Q&A with Debora Scheffel

Party: Republican Profession: Higher-education administrator, professor City of residence: Parker Campaign website: dscheffelforcsboe.com

What are the most pressing issues Why are you seeking this office? facing K-12 education in Colorado? I believe strongly in the power It is important that students of education to change an inand families have a continuum of dividual, our state and nation. options to meet educational needs. The State Board sets standards, One size does not fit all and the chooses the state test, accredits school districts and has essenunique needs of individual students tial oversight of K-12 educarequire education choice. Quality tion and how our teachers are Scheffel education and accountability are trained at universities and other also important to ensure students entities in Colorado. I am therefore have the skills and knowledge to be comseeking this office because I believe in petitive in the workforce and fulfill their the work of the State Board and know potential. Preserving local control allows what an influence it can have on qualdistricts to find local solutions that are ity education. responsive to community needs. What makes you the best choice for this office? I am first and foremost a teacher. I began my career in education as a teacher of special needs students and went on to leadership roles in higher education, training teachers to be successful in the classroom. Because I understand the issues firsthand as an educator, and based on my prior experience as a member of the Colorado State Board of Education, I feel I am the best qualified candidate for the position.

TRAINING The Aurora-South Metro SBDC helps existing and new businesses grow and prosper through workshops and consulting.

If elected, what will your top priority be in January? My top priorities include creating a forum to discuss the role of technology in quality education, and its benefits and limitations; ensure data privacy for our students; enhance the effectiveness of the READ Act to address third-grade reading achievement; and increase the effectiveness of special education policies and practices in Colorado. SEE SCHEFFEL, P5

AT TE NT S M E O U I ON T TR OA H BU RE SI NE A SS ES !

BUSINESS

Q&A with Tim Krug

Party: Democratic Profession: Retired educator and entrepreneur City of residence: Franktown Campaign website: krugforcoloradoschools.org

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Elbert County News 3

October 11, 2018

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October 11, 2018O

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AG race draws sharp line between approaches Brauchler, Weiser offer starkly different views on policy, law BY ELLIS ARNOLD EARNOLD@COLORADOCOMMUNITYMEDIA.COM

One prosecuted the Aurora theater shooter. The other worked as an assistant to Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsberg. One’s the elected district attorney in a south metro district of more than 1 million people. The other worked in President Barack Obama’s Justice Department. And one says his opponent wants Washington Brauchler to dictate to Colorado, while the other says his rival’s background readies him for only 10 percent of the state attorney general’s job. Republican George Brauchler, district attorney for the 18th Judicial District, and Democrat Phil Weiser, a professor Weiser and former dean at the University of Colorado Law School, stand opposite each other not only on political values, but in the approaches they would bring to the Colorado Attorney General’s Office. And amid the starkly polarized governor’s race between Republican state Treasurer Walker Stapleton and Democratic U.S. Rep. Jared Polis, one veteran political analyst says the outcome of the contest for attorney general won’t necessarily be in line with the gubernatorial race. “The preference for governor will not dictate the preference for attorney general,” said Dick Wadhams, political strategist and former chair of the Colorado Republican Party. He added, “I think Colorado voters are very independent-minded.” But another Colorado political analyst, Eric Sondermann, chalked the race up as a proxy fight that hinges on how Republicans and Democrats will fare in general this midterm season. “I think this is going to be less a battle between Brauchler and Weiser,” Sondermann said, “than it will be between the generic Republican and generic Democrat.” High stakes The attorney general is Colorado’s top legal official, known as the “people’s lawyer” who combats consumer scams, defends Colorado’s laws and protects its land, water and air, to name a few duties.

And despite the office’s lack of a role in the lawmaking process, Wadhams says the attorney general is integral in affecting public policy in Colorado. He pointed to current Attorney General Cynthia Coffman, a Republican who has moved to support or oppose laws or rulings even when the governor disagrees with her decision. “In the case of Cynthia Coffman, she actually took on the Obama administration on the Clean Power Plan,” said Wadhams, who argued the federal rule that sought to put limits on power plants would have driven up consumers’ energy costs. He added, “I think Coffman demonstrated the independence of the attorney general and also the impact.” In an era where President Donald Trump draws the ire of many officials in various states, that ability to act could be a key factor in Colorado’s direction. Lawsuits against the president may factor into the race between Brauchler and Weiser, but the race is also “about how you define the job,” Sondermann said. “Brauchler is defining it as you’d expect as a courtroom warrior,” Sondermann said. “Weiser is trying to define the job as more of an advocacy role and standing up to the president.”

Fork in the road Brauchler, a Parker resident, has aimed to paint Weiser, of Denver, as a partisan who aims to “link hands” with other activist attorneys general, he said, arguing Weiser’s approach to regulation would allow Washington to “dictate our existence.” Colorado “has never been just about one thing politically,” Brauchler said. “This election seems like we’re poised to become one thing, and that is extremely progressive. And I don’t think Colorado has seen that — not in my lifetime.” On the other hand, Weiser frames his campaign as a fight for people’s basic rights and business accountability. “You have the right to be free for discrimination,” Weiser said, and “to be protected as a consumer from fraudulent and deceptive behavior. Those rights are protected by our attorney general.” The attorney general “fights for the people of Colorado, and that’s the type of attorney general I’ll be,” Weiser added. But perhaps the largest contrast lies in the candidates’ backgrounds — Brauchler accused Weiser of never having practiced Colorado law, drawing experience from being a professor and dean at the University of Colorado School of Law rather than courtroom experience. SEE ATTORNEY, P9


Elbert County News 5

October 11, 2018

KRUG

why isn’t the State Board of Education listening to its stakeholders?

FROM PAGE 2

If elected, what will your top priority be in January? My top priorities will be to audit the state education budget and reduce standardized testing mandates. Is the state doing everything it can to make sure taxpayer dollars are working efficiently? Why are we limiting instruction time to administer more standardized tests than the federal government mandates? Tens of thousands of students opt out of Colorado’s endless tests, so

SCHEFFEL FROM PAGE 2

What else should voters know about you? I believe every student in Colorado deserves a quality education. Being an educator, I know teachers make

e

What else should voters know about you? I’m a proud father and lucky to be married to the love of my life, my wife Yumiko. I’m an Eagle Scout and Cub Scout leader and enjoy volunteering weekly at church and in my children’s school. I taught English in Japan for more than ten years and owned and operated Krug Kabushikigaisha, a Japanese corporation operating a chain of private English schools and staffing native English speaking teachers in Japanese public schools.

the biggest difference in a student’s education. Our teachers deserve our support and the resources to be successful. Parents are a child’s first teacher and have a central role to play in identifying the best educational opportunities for their child. I will serve on the State Board as an experienced and passionate educator to represent the 4th CD.

Local Focus. More News. ColoradoCommunityMedia ColoradoCommunityMedia.com

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6 Elbert County News

October 11, 2018O

Candidates for 4th Congressional District Q&A with Karen McCormick

Party: Democratic Profession: Veterinarian and small business owner City of residence: Longmont Campaign website: mccormickforcongress.org

CALM AFTER THE STORM

SM

How would choosing you for this office improve the lives of residents of the district? Our large and diverse district needs a problem-solver, not a politician, and solving problems starts with compassion, cooperation and listening to what people actually want: Coloradans throughout our district have urged me to fight Washington corruption, secure affordable healthcare, create a fairer economy and bring good jobs to our state, improve our school system, strengthen our trade deals and protect our Colorado way of life. That’s exactly what I’ll work hard to do in Congress.

dans, I support an immediate halt to the cruel separation of children from their families. My constituents have urged me to support a path to citizenship for DACA recipients and a federal guestworker program to help our district meet our labor needs. Like any complex challenge, we need to seek out evidence-based solutions.

What can be done to improve the nation’s health care system? No American should face bankruptcy or fear losing their insurance due to illness or injury. We can guarantee affordable healthcare to all Americans by using resources wisely, improving What should Congress do to adaccess and transparency, makdress the nation’s opioid epidemic? ing it easier and more affordable Congress should improve for small businesses to provide access to appropriate medical insurance, and encouraging intreatment to help people recover surers and providers to compete. from addiction; create a stronger McCormick I support a public buy-in option nationwide Prescription Drug for the popular and cost-effective Monitoring Program with better Medicare system and harnessing the training for medical professionals, negotiating power of Medicare to and fight the factors that lead to addic- reduce prescription drug costs. tion such as pain, poverty and depression. We also need to hold drug manuWhat are two other issues that demand facturers accountable for misleading attention from Congress? patients. I support ongoing funding to A fair economy: We’re working Medicaid to help people recover, but harder than ever before, but incomes my opponent’s plan to cut Medicaid haven’t kept pace with our productivwould only worsen this crisis. ity or the cost of living. Fair tax reform will help more Americans build What is your position on immigration wealth and hang onto the earnings we reform? work so hard for. We need comprehensive, bipartisan A better school system: We simply immigration reform, and cooperation can’t afford to continue neglecting our in Congress is the only way to achieve schools. I will fight to ensure that our lasting policies we can agree and rely teachers and schools get the resources on. Like the vast majority of Colorathey need.

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Colorado Book Award submissions now accepted STAFF REPORT

Submissions are now open for the Colorado Book Awards for books published in 2018 or November or December 2017. Guidelines and entry forms are available at coloradohumanities. submittable.com/submit. The submission deadline is Jan. 7, 2019. Presented by Colorado Humanities & Center for the Book, the Colorado Book Awards celebrate the accom-

plishments of Colorado’s authors, editors, illustrators and photographers. In their 28th year, the awards are presented in at least 10 categories including anthology/collection, biography, children’s literature, creative nonfiction, fiction, history, nonfiction, pictorial, poetry and young adult literature. To volunteer, complete the application form at coloradohumanities. submittable.com/submit.


Elbert County News 7

October 11, 2018

THINGS TO DO Tale of Molly Brown and La Vivandiere: 7 to 8:30 p.m. Oct. 11 at The Schoolhouse Theatre at Mainstreet, 19650 E Mainstreet, Parker. Ballet Ariel opens its 20th anniversary season of performances with the original ballet, Tale of Molly Brown. Ballet Ariel will also be performing La Vivandiere, a one-act ballet choreographed by the great dance duo Arthur Saint-Léon and Fanny Cerrito with music by prolific Italian composer, Cesare Pugni. Adults $25, Students/Seniors $20, Children $15. Visit http://parkerarts.ticketforce.com. Craft Show: 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 13 at Elizabeth United Methodist Church, 225 West Kiowa Ave., Elizabeth. A variety of crafts from jewelry to salsa, and beyond will be available. We need more crafters. Call Faye Asmus - 303284-9849 or 720-266-8194 or mail registration form to her at 33814 Bluebird Lane, Elizabeth, Co. 80107. Forms available at church office on Tuesdays and Thursdays between 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Or email Mary at mary@sunwestco.com 303-877-8895. Kiowa Shooting Chapter: 2:30 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 13 at Quail Run, 6850 Quail Run Circle, Kiowa. TWAW Kiowa Shooting Chapter will give women of all experience levels the opportunity to be introduced to issues important to women shooters, learn safe gun handling skills, and train together. Participants will be required to pay $10 range fees for non-members and

no charge for members of Quail Run plus the cost of ammunition. Annual Chapter membership dues of $50 offers members local and national discounts, chapter hat and member kit, and is used to cover chapter expenses, insurance and events. First time attendees are not required to join. Send e-mail to TWAWKiowaColorado@gmail.com to reserve your spot. Women interested in learning more can contact Suzanne Freehauf at TWAWKiowaColorado@ gmail.com or visit TWAW Shooting Chapters, Inc. website at www.twawshootingchapters.org Learn About: Feng Shui: 2 to 4 p.m. Oct. 13 at Douglas County Libraries in Parker, 20105 East Mainstreet. Learn some tools of the Feng Shui practice, including Bagua and the Five Elements, to make changes in your environment for health and wellness. Adults. Registration is required at 303-791-7323 or DCL. org. Financial Peace University: 6 p.m. Sunday, Oct. 14 at Joy Lutheran Church, 7051 E. Parker Hills Ct., Parker. Based on Biblically based principles, the class gives you the tools and step-by-step instructions on how to budget today and plan for tomorrow. For more information go to about the class materials and registration go to https://www. financialpeace.com/classes/1068846/ registration SEE CALENDAR, P15

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General Election Ballots Arriving by Mail If you are a registered voter and have not received your ballot at the address associated with your voter registration by October 22, you may obtain a replacement ballot by contacting Douglas County Elections at 303-660-7444. Your ballot must be received by 7 p.m. on November 6, Election Day. A postmark of November 6 is not valid as the received date.

No Douglas County Motor Vehicle / Driver License Services on Election Day - Nov. 6 Douglas County Motor Vehicle offices and the Driver License office in Castle Rock will be closed Election Day, Tuesday, Nov. 6, allowing staff to assist the County’s Election Division with Election Day operations. Online services and self-serve kiosk locations can be found by visiting DouglasDrives.com. Motor Vehicle and Driver License services will be available during normal business hours on Wednesday, Nov. 7.

Online Tax Lien Sale Nov. 1 The annual Douglas County Tax Lien Sale will be an Internet auction via www.zeusauction.com on November 1. Visit www.zeusauction.com for all bidding rules, guidelines and registration information. The statutory interest for the 2018 Tax Lien Sale is 12%. For more information on the Tax Lien Sale visit www. douglas.co.us and search for Tax Lien Sale or call the Treasurer’s Office at 303.660.7455.

Interested in becoming a foster parent or adopting a child? Attend a free information session from 6-7:30 p.m., Monday, November 5 at Southeast Christian Church - Solomon Center, 9650 Jordon Road in Parker. For more information please call 303-636-1KID or register online at www.collaborativefostercare.com

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8 Elbert County News

October 11, 2018O

Get to know the state ballot measures Voters in November will rule on 13 state-level issues BY DAVID GILBERT DGILBERT@COLORADOCOMMUNITYMEDIA.COM

Colorado voters will decide on 13 state-level measures, addressing big issues like education and road funding, oil and gas setbacks, and congressional redistricting. The measures are of three types: numbered amendments begin as citizen initiatives, and would be added to the Colorado Constitution. They cannot be altered without another popular vote. Numbered propositions also begin as citizen initiatives, but if approved become state law, not constitutional amendments. Lettered amendments are created in the state Legislature and referred to voters for approval. Amendment 73: school funding Among the more high-profile measures on this year’s ballot, Amendment 73 aims to create new revenue for public education by instituting a complex graduated income tax increase on individu-

als earning more than $150,000 a year, and increasing the corporate income tax rate from 4.63 percent to 6.0 percent. The measure would also fix residential property tax rates at 7.0 percent, preventing them from falling further due to the Gallagher Amendment. Proponents say the measure would generate $1.6 billion per year for public education in Colorado, which has seen reductions totaling $7.2 billion since 2010. Colorado’s schools suffer from underfunding, proponents say, leading to inadequate special education and mental health counseling, as well as increasing class sizes and other detrimental outcomes. Opponents say tax revenue is increasing without tax rate increases, and the measure does not guarantee improved student performance. Tax increases are burdensome on individuals and businesses, they argue, and the measure’s income tax brackets won’t be adjusted for inflation, thus pushing more earners into the brackets over time. Amendment 74: compensation for property devaluation Though Colorado law already requires government to compensate property owners if their actions totally devalue private property,

such as through eminent domain or by enacting regulations that bar construction, Amendment 74 would allow property owners to petition the state for reimbursement of lost partial value of a property due to new laws or regulations, for example if government limited natural gas development on private property, an owner could sue for reduced mineral rights value. Proponents say the law would help protect real estate, which is the most significant asset many people own. Opponents say the measure could have unintended consequences, and make governments gun-shy about making decisions beneficial to the state’s environmental health. Amendment 75: campaign contributions Seeking to level the playing field in state-level elections, Amendment 75 would allow political donors to increase their campaign contributions to candidates to five times the current limits if one or more of the other candidates in the race contributes $1 million or more of their personal funds to the campaign. Proponents say the measure would reduce the unfair advantages enjoyed by wealthy candidates in political races, and give a better

shot to small-fry candidates seeking to get their message out. Opponents say the measure only increases the money in state politics, thus sending campaign expenditures ever higher. Proposition 109: bonds for highway projects Previously called the “Fix Our Damn Roads” initiative, Proposition 109 directs the state to borrow up to $3.5 billion to address up to 66 different road and bridge projects around the state. The funds would be raised through bond sales with a total repayment of up to $5.2 billion. The money raised would not be enough to cover the total cost of all 66 projects, and project priorities would be determined by the Colorado Department of Transportation and the state Transportation Commission. Proponents say the measure would address Colorado’s neglected road infrastructure, which they say contributes to traffic congestion and reduces the safety of motorists. Opponents say the measure could divert funds that could be used for other state priorities, such as education, health care and other infrastructure maintenance. SEE BALLOT, P11


Elbert County News 9

October 11, 2018

ATTORNEY FROM PAGE 4

“Nobody picks a team captain from someone who’s never played the sport,” Brauchler said. He noted his near quarter-century of experience, including as a plaintiffs’ attorney and military attorney in addition to public prosecutor roles. Weiser’s punch-back is that the attorney general’s office is about far more than courtroom experience, he said. “His background prepares him very well for 10 percent of the job,” Weiser said of Brauchler, claiming less than 10 percent of the position relates to criminal prosecution. “My background prepares me for the other 90 percent.” The office governs a range of issues including consumer-protection cases, regulatory matters and legal advising, all of which “I have done,” Weiser said. On the issues The candidates do agree on some issues, like Colorado’s marijuana law and, to some extent, federal encroachment on state matters. Weiser and Brauchler both say they would defend Colorado’s marijuana-legalization law against potential federal challenges. “I was not a supporter of Amendment 64, but you know who was? Fifty-five percent of Colorado voters,” said Brauchler, adding that he was able to embrace it while trying to protect against negative effects of the illegal pot market. That acceptance is an example of his commitment to the rule of law, Brauchler said, charging that Weiser is more partial to ideology and wants to be akin to an “adjunct legislator.” Weiser maintains that his vision of the office is the role of “protecting the people of Colorado” by bringing cases against irresponsible companies, contesting the federal government when appropriate and supporting regulations. Weiser is for a ban on bump stocks — devices that alter the firing ability of semi-automatic firearms — and greater restrictions on access to military-grade weapons, his website says. On other specifics, Weiser said defending equal rights, women’s access to birth control and the choice to have an abortion, and addressing climate change are among his priorities. The candidates differ on a 2017 Colorado Oil and Gas Conservation Commission case, in which that state office was sued for a refusing to adopt an environmental rule, drawing Coffman to back the office’s position, Braucher said. Weiser opposed Coffman’s move, a stance Brauchler said speaks to his ideology. Weiser questioned those who wouldn’t support certain environmental rules, like Coffman, asking, “If you’re protecting Colorado,

why would you be against (methane regulation)?” Weiser also said the move to end the DACA program — Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals, which gives protected status to people brought to the U.S. illegally as children — is against the law in his view. He’d fight against separating families at the U.S.-Mexico border, he added, a recent Trump administration practice that was later halted. “My motivation is not a political motivation; it’s a human motivation,” Weiser said, arguing it’s in step with the rule of law to push against federal action the attorney general believes is illegal, whether the issue is of water or immigrants’ rights. Brauchler said he hopes Congress comes up with a solution so that immigrants who were brought here illegally as children can stay, but on the issue of sanctuary cities, he said Congress and the Supreme Court have made clear that states have no role in immigration policy. It’s “anathema to the rule of law” to allow cities to oppose federal immigration policy, Brauchler said. What are the odds? Who can pull off the win is an open question between a prosecutor who has cultivated a toughon-crime image, and a professor with less name recognition who has the opportunity to ride a wave of anti-Trump sentiment among Democrats. Wadhams, the Republican strategist, said Weiser’s resume doesn’t come close to Brauchler’s. “What propelled Brauchler to popularity in the GOP was his performance on high-profile cases — the Aurora theater shooting and others,” Wadhams said. Wadhams bets on Brauchler to win because “I think George will be closer to where most Coloradans are on (the) issues,” he said. Sondermann took a different view. “I’d say advantage Weiser, and that has very little to do with Phil Weiser,” Sondermann said, arguing a win would have more to do with Democrats’ potential to have a strong electoral year in general. Wadhams has mentioned voters in Colorado often “split” their ballot, voting for one party for governor but another for attorney general. Sondermann agreed but said that practice of “splitting” shrinks as the country gets more polarized. “It’s not like the Colorado of 20 or 30 years ago,” where more of the electorate did that, Sondermann added. Amid a political climate in which Sondermann has said 2018 could be a “deep-blue year” — and the polarized governor’s race — Wadhams argued the attorneygeneral contest will be its own. “It’s a race Colorado voters look on as a very distinct one,” Wadhams said.

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10 Elbert County News

LOCAL

October 11, 2018O

VOICES

As Bruegel would say, DIA is boorish and depressing

T

his lively essay needs an image to go along with it. Please look up Pieter Bruegel the Elder’s painting “The Fall of the Rebel Angels,” and have it handy when you read the following paragraph about an average day at Denver International Airport on Concourses A, B, and C. Myopia is on the upswing: Text call shove bump. Text call shove bump. Flash dash fling scatter smash. Flash dash fling scatter smash. Text text text text text. Repeat. It was just another day, but it had holiday numbers. Jennifer said, “We need a bigger airport.” None of what an average traveler looks like, does, or goes through is ever covered in an airline commercial. It is Black Friday in flip-flops. Everyone is speeding into a new sunrise, head down, texting or calling, and dressed like it’s the Slobsville bus depot. Not sure when it started to happen.

L

Preface: I am not Yves St. Laurent or Emily Post. I have no interest in fashion and red carpets and who is wearing whom. However, I don’t go to airports looking like Moondoggie. Cole Porter referred to a “glimpse of stocking as someCraig Marshall thing shocking.” Smith He didn’t live long enough to see that anything really goes. A few days ago I read an article about the new, relaxed dress code at public schools in Alameda, California. I am, thankfully, not an Alameda public-school teacher. Midriff-baring shirts are acceptable. So are tank tops with spaghetti straps, micro-miniskirts and short shorts. I can’t see any good coming from this, except the attendance rate overall

QUIET DESPERATION

will be higher than ever. One 14-year-old boy (who is probably thanking his lucky stars) said, “If someone is wearing a short shirt and you can see her stomach, it’s not her fault that she’s distracting other people.” Back to DIA: It’s barefoot in the park at security. Flip-flops come off and all ages can be seen walking on flooring that is hopping mad with particulates. I saw feet and other things that some people probably pay to see. I dodged and Jennifer dodged. People came at us (see Bruegel’s painting) from every direction, head down, intent and oblivious. You might think I’m kidding here, but the place is obnoxious. Jennifer became ill from it. There is a different mentality at airports now that is no different than swap meets and garage sales. Come as you are. Be as rude as you want. And don’t forget your phone. And don’t forget that the man next to the man next to the man wants hear

you yell-tell exactly when you’ll be home. It’s too late. It’s over. We’re bums. We’re selfish, self-absorbed bums, and there is nothing different or special about an airport. An international airport is a 24-hour-a-day miracle of technology and organization and coordination. I see people who belch and cough and blurt, like they’re at home in a faux-wood paneled rec room, wearing unbuttoned pants after a bovine casserole. I know Charles Dickens would love it if he were around. No one wrote about the foibles of human behavior better than he did. Go back to Bruegel: That’s me, the inverted toad, bottom center. Conceded to what is happening all around me. Croak. Craig Marshall Smith is an artist, educator and Highlands Ranch resident. He can be reached at craigmarshallsmith@comcast.net.

Be extraordinary today — in an extra ordinary way

ooking at the title of today’s column may have some of you a little overwhelmed. I mean some of you may be saying to yourselves, “Extraordinary? I am happy to just get through the day.” Wow, “extraordinary,” that is a big word when we look at it through the lens of doing something so extraordinary, so fantastic, so incredible, or so fabulous and where we expect to have a massive impact or outcome in some area of our lives or in the lives of others. What if we broke the word down just a little bit? What if we take some of the pressure off ? What if we agreed that we could all do something just a little extra ordinary each day? What if we could all just do something a little extra ordinary once a week? How would that impact our lives, our relationships, and our work? A big and massive outcome by doing something just a little extra ordinary, just a little different than

we have been doing recently. A little more unique and extra than those around us are doing? Being extraordinary today can happen when we just do something out of the ordinary WINNING and unexpected. WORDS Maybe for ourselves we can find 15 extra minutes of personal time or down time where we can focus on our own mind, body, and spirit. Maybe we can catch a power nap or read a little more Michael Norton of the book we are enjoying so much. We can go for a hike or walk or spend an extra 15 minutes in the gym. If our spirit needs a little attention, we can look to do a little more or extra in our prayer time or quiet time. Be extraordinary today in our relationships. How would our day go if we just did something a little extra

JERRY HEALEY President

A publication of

Phone: 303-566-4100 Web: ElbertCountyNews.net To subscribe call 303-566-4100

MEREDITH THOMPSON Marketing Consultant

hand, pitch in to get the job done? Could we say, “please” and “thank you” just a little bit more, a little more than we used to, and a little more than others might do? Showing appreciation is that little something extra ordinary that will have our customers, co-workers, employers, and employees seeing an extraordinary new attitude and change. So how about you? When you see a word like “extraordinary” does it seem too big or too overwhelming? Does it make more sense when we look at it together as just doing something a little different and extra ordinary? As always, I would love to hear your story at gotonorton@gmail.com, and when we can just do that little something extra in our lives, we can all be extraordinary today. Michael Norton is a resident of Castle Rock, the president of the Zig Ziglar Corporate Training Solutions Team, a strategic consultant and a business and personal coach.

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jhealey@coloradocommunitymedia.com

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Columnist opinions are not necessarily those of the Elbert County News.

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ordinary than what we have been doing lately? What if we spent our mornings together having a cup of coffee and talking for a few minutes instead of rushing around and barely saying goodbye to one another as we escape out the door? How long does it take to send a loving text to our spouses or children? When was the last time you called a friend and just told them how much they meant to you? Opening a car door for our spouse, mom, grandmother, aunt, or girlfriend seems old-fashioned to some, but I can promise you it is something that is a little extra ordinary and when done consistently will send an extraordinary message to the people in our lives. Be extraordinary today at work. How much more work could we accomplish if we arrived just a few minutes earlier than normal? What if we knew there was a task or project that needed to get done and our teammate or associate was a little behind schedule? Could we lend a quick

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Elbert County News 11

October 11, 2018

BALLOT FROM PAGE 8

Proposition 110: sales tax and bonds for transportation Another bill to address Colorado’s roads, Proposition 110 would raise the base state-level sales tax rate from 2.9 percent to 3.52 percent for 20 years to fund transportation projects around the state. The proposition would also authorize the Colorado Department of Transportation to borrow up to $6 billion, with a total repayment cost of up to $9.4 billion, to fund a variety of transportation projects. A Colorado family making $74,000 a year would pay roughly $130 more a year in sales taxes. Proponents say the measure would go a long way toward improving Colorado’s deteriorating highways, and that costs only increase the longer maintenance is deferred while population increases.

Opponents say the state should fund road projects with money it already collects, and that sales tax increases disproportionately impact low-income residents. Proposition 111: reducing payday loan rates Payday loans are big business in Colorado, with 207,000 individuals taking out 414,000 payday loans totaling $166 million in 2016, according to state data. Proposition 111 would limit the annual percentage rate for repayment of the small, short-term loans, lowering the maximum APR to 36 percent down from the current average of 129 percent. Other fees can bring the APR up to roughly 180 percent. Under the proposition, repayment on a $500 loan would be no more than $553, as opposed to the current maximum, which could be as high as $793, not including fees that the proposition would eliminate. Proponents say the measure would protect low-income consumers in financial crisis from predatory lenders, and give them a better

chance to repay loans without becoming trapped in a cycle of debt. Opponents say the measure could have the unintended consequence of eliminating the payday loan business in Colorado altogether, stripping consumers of easy access to quick cash that can help stave off bounced checks or utility shutoffs. Proposition 112: oil and gas setbacks Easily the most contentious issue on Colorado’s ballot this year, Proposition 112 would increase the distance that oil and gas development can be built to 2,500 feet from homes, up from the current limit of 500 feet for homes and 1,000 feet from highoccupancy structures. The measure reflects increasing tensions over the presence of oil and gas development in Colorado, where oil production doubled between 2013 and 2017, according to state data. In 2017, there were 54,000 producing wells in Colorado, an increase of 48 percent from 2007. Oil and gas producers paid nearly $500 million in property taxes

in 2017, and had many other wideranging economic impacts. Current oil and gas sites would be grandfathered in, but the law would render 85 percent of non-federal land in Colorado off-limits to future oil and gas development. Proponents say the measure protects residents from potentially harmful health effects of living near oil and gas development, and protects vulnerable natural environments from pollutants. As both residential and resource development encroach on one another, the measure would allow residents greater certainty about the location of future oil and gas apparatus. Opponents say the measure could have devastating effects on Colorado’s economy, majorly scaling back an industry that provides a wide range of jobs that support other industries. The measure could also significantly reduce tax revenue that supports numerous state and local agencies. SEE BALLOT, P12

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12 Elbert County News

October 11, 2018O

BALLOT FROM PAGE 11

Amendment A: eliminating slavery in the state constitution A revision of a failed 2016 measure, Amendment A would strike a provision in the Colorado Constitution that bans slavery “except as punishment for a crime.” The idea is to ensure that the state constitution unambiguously bans slavery. The 2016 measure failed because of wording that could be construed as banning judicially imposed community service, inmate labor, and probation requiring offenders to maintain employment. While jail inmates in Colorado are not required to work, they face loss of privileges or delayed parole eligibility if they don’t. Proponents say the measure unequivocally confirms Colorado’s commitment to striking from the books outdated language that prolongs the legacy of slavery. Opponents say the measure is merely symbolic and could create legal confusion over offender work requirements. Amendment V: lowering minimum age for state Legislature Colorado’s current minimum age for serving in the state legislature is 25, but Amendment V would lower the minimum to 21. The measure would bring Colorado in line with 43 other states that set the

minimum age for serving in state legislative bodies between 18 and 21. About half of states, however, have higher thresholds for serving in state senates — generally between ages 25 and 30. Proponents say lowering the minimum age encourages young people to participate in the civic process, and allows voters to decide whether a candidate has sufficient maturity to hold office. Opponents say lack of experience and maturity could make young legislators ineffective. Amendment W: simplifying ballot language for judicial retention The Colorado Constitution mandates that while the vast majority of the state’s judges are appointed by the governor, they face regular popular votes to decide if they should retain their seat on the bench. Amendment W would change the way retention votes appear on the ballot. The current ballot language mandates a separate question for each judge up for retention, reading: “Shall justice/ judge … be retained in office?” Under Amendment W, all judges up for retention would be listed under a single banner reading “Shall the following justices/judges be retained in office?” Each judge’s name would appear next to bubbles for yes or no. Proponents say the measure makes the ballot more user-friendly and efficient, and may save printing costs for counties with

October 18 - October 27 DIRECTED BY RANDAL MYLER

numerous judges or those that print in English and Spanish. Opponents say the measure is unnecessary and may give voters the impression they’re voting in a multi-candidate election. Amendment X: industrial hemp definition With Colorado now the nation’s largest producer of industrial hemp — a form of the cannabis plant used in commercial applications, with no psychoactive effect — Amendment X would strike the definition of the crop spelled out by Amendment 64, which legalized recreational use of marijuana, and replace the definition with the one used in federal law. The idea would be to streamline cooperation with federal law in the event that the U.S. Congress adopts pending legislation loosening restrictions on growing industrial hemp. Proponents say striking the state definition reduces any potential conflicts between state and federal law as the regulatory landscape for industrial hemp evolves. Opponents say that the current definition was enacted through the popular initiative process, and changing the wording could weaken voters’ original intent. Amendment Y: Congressional redistricting Colorado is expected to add a new congressional district after the 2020 census, bringing the state’s number of seats in the U.S. House of Representatives to eight, and requiring a redrawing of district lines to carve out the new one. Previous redistricting efforts, which are conducted by the state legislature, have ended up in lengthy court battles. Amendment Y would create a state commission to conduct congressional redistricting. The commission would consist of four Republicans, four Democrats, and four unaffiliated voters. Lobbyists and politicians would be prohibited from participating, and the commission’s

work would be subject to public oversight and commentary. The Supreme Court would rule on the commission’s district maps. Proponents say the measure makes the redistricting process more transparent and limits the role of partisan politics, and establishes clear criteria for establishing new district boundaries. Opponents say the commission’s members are not subject to being voted out like members of the Legislature, and that the presence of unaffiliated members could unintentionally stack the commission with partisan members who simply haven’t declared their allegiance. Amendment Z: legislative redistricting Similar to Amendment Y, Amendment Z would create a new commission to redraw Colorado’s state House and Senate districts after the 2020 census. Currently, Colorado has 35 state senators and 65 state representatives. The state redistricting process is conducted by the Colorado Reapportionment Commission, which consists of 11 members, six of whom can be from the same political party. Amendment Z would create a commission composed of four Republicans, four Democrats and four unaffiliated members. The commission would be subject to the same public oversight as in Amendment Y, and its maps would have to be approved by the state Supreme Court. Proponents say the measure makes the redistricting process more transparent and limits the role of partisan politics, and establishes clear criteria for establishing new district boundaries. Opponents say the commission’s unaffiliated members could unintentionally stack the commission with partisan members who simply haven’t declared their allegiance, and that the redistricting criteria could be applied subjectively.

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Elbert County News 13

October 11, 2018 Presented by

Colorado Community Media in partnership with Douglas County Libraries and Douglas County Mental Health Initiative

Shared Stories:

Time to Talk About Mental Health Mothers and mental health advocates talk about how mental illness affects families, and why — and how — we need to talk about it.

Wednesday, Nov. 14, 2018 | 7-9PM James H LaRue Library 9292 S. Ridgeline Blvd., Highlands Ranch Jeannie Ritter, Keynote Speaker

Former First Lady of Colorado Mental Health Ambassador, Mental Health Center of Denver

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“Making mental health part of our everyday conversation” Jeannie has been a fierce advocate for mental health and wellness issues for more than 10 years, since serving as First Lady of Colorado.

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Stay-at-Home Mom, Social Worker and Small Business Owner Lissa, a Parker mother of two and social worker for 10 years, shares how she successfully managed mental health challenges, including anxiety and postpartum depression.

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14 Elbert County News

The

October 11, 2018O

heart

art within the

Lutheran High students complete unfinished works by the late Henry Esparza

Adam Ballou presents his first painted artwork at an art show Sept. 26 at Grace Lutheran Church, a piece started by the late Henry Esparza, a Denver artist. Though admittedly not much of a painter, Ballou was humbled by the opportunity to finish the artist’s work. PHOTOS BY NICK PUCKETT

BY NICK PUCKETT NPUCKETT@COLORADOCOMMUNITYMEDIA.COM

F

or a few hours on a Wednesday dia. Almost every piece had a small heart shape placed somewhere on afternoon, the fellowship hall the canvas. of Grace Lutheran Church Originally, these pieces may have was converted into a small art looked even more alike. While they gallery. were finished by the budding art stuDozens of people trickled in the dents at Parker Lutheran, each piece Parker church around lunchtime was an unfinished work of the late Sept. 26 to see the work of 19 differDenver artist Henry Esparza. ent students from Lutheran High Henry Esparza died in 2017. His School’s Art Academy. Each piece wife, Sandra, donated his unfinished looked similar in size and style. No pieces to the students as a way to piece was much larger than 18 by carry on his legacy as an artist and 18 inches and typically done using acrylic paint and various mixed meT:4.73” a teacher. Sandra is currently in

hospice for brain cancer. “All of them learned a lot,” said Lutheran High School art teacher Mark Hollenbeck. “Not by anything I taught them, but just by learning about his life.” Each student put their own touch on their pieces. Some added mediums they were used to, or elements that played to their strengths. Others used recurring themes in Henry’s paintings in their own style. One piece depicted the anatomical shape of a heart, a nod to the late artist’s

signature symbol. “I’m blown away by the number of these students that individually picked up on some piece of his legacy,” Sandra said. “I heard people speak using descriptions and words that he would use. Stillness. Beauty. His connection with nature. “He was an artist for the art.” Henry was an abstract artist who used various mediums on each work, including acrylic, varnish, decomSEE ART, P15

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Mark Hollenbeck holds Sandra Esparza’s hand at the art show of completed works from Lutheran High School students, who portrayed their own style on unfinished pieces of her late husband, Henry, a Denver artist and teacher.


Elbert County News 15

October 11, 2018

CALENDAR FROM PAGE 7

Writing Children’s Fantasy with Author Stel Pavlou: 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 18 at Douglas County Libraries in Parker, 20105 East Mainstreet. Award-winning screenwriter and author Stel Pavlou will talk about creating new worlds, characters and stories for young readers, followed by a book sale. Additional writing workshops in the series include: Writing Mystery with Author Cynthia Kuhn, Thursday, October 25, 6:30-8:30 p.m. Writing Teen & Adult Fiction with Author Colleen Oakes, Thursday, November 1, 6:30-8:30 p.m. Adults. The workshops are free, but registration is required at 303-7917323 or DCL.org. Mountain Pine Yuletide Bazaar: 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday, Nov. 10

at the Parker Fieldhouse, 18700 E. Plaza Dr., Parker. Free admission. Anime Nights: Watch and discuss anime, snacks provided. 1st & 3rd Mondays 7-9 p.m. at the Kiowa Library; 2nd & 4th Mondays 7-9 pm at the Elizabeth Library. pplibraries. org. Book Clubs: Sci-Fi/Fantasy book club 2nd & 4th Mondays of the month 5:30-6:30 pm at the Elizabeth Library; Kiowa book club 4th Monday of the month 7-8 pm at the Kiowa Library. Elizabeth book club: Third Tuesday of the month 7-8 pm at the Elizabeth Library; Brown Bag book club 4th Thursday of the month 11 am-1 pm at the Elizabeth Library; Elbert book club last Thursday of the month at the Elbert Library, Diverse & Rowdy book club 2nd Saturday of the month 9:30-10:30 am at the Simla Library. pplibraries.org

ART FROM PAGE 14

posed granite, plaster and sometimes branches of trees. He would create on paper, canvas or wood. His biography on his website, henryesparza. com, says he was an art teacher and an avid baseball fanatic, which the students also incorporated into their pieces honoring him. “It was kind of scary knowing I would be finishing that when I’m not a professional artist yet,” said Eme Tischart. “I wanted to put his ideas

Garden Clubs: Seedy Ladies 4th Monday of the month 1-3 pm at the Elbert Library; Gardeners/Homesteaders 3rd Saturday of the month 11 am-12 pm at the Simla Library. pplibraries.org GED Preparation & Career Online High School: Get started with GED preparation and coaching throughout the process. COHS allows students 19+ to earn a certified high school diploma. Call 303-646-3416 for more details. pplibraries.org Knitting & Crocheting Groups: Simla Witty Knitters Tuesdays 3:305 pm at the Simla Library; Close Knit Crochet Group Wednesdays 2-3 pm at the Kiowa Library; Hats for the Homeless Thursdays 11 am-1 pm at the Elizabeth Library. pplibraries.org Lawyers at the Library: 6 to 8 p.m. 2nd Tuesday of the month at the Elizabeth Library. Free legal clinic for parties who have no attorney.

and put my ideas together so we can both have our ideas together.” Adam Ballou admits to not being much of a painter, let alone having one of his pieces exhibited in an art show. Ballou is a 17-year-old senior at Lutheran High School and considers himself more of a photographer. Ballou’s first canvas piece was on display beside 18 other pieces from his fellow students — a landscape painting depicting the crossover between night and day. “With photography, it’s a lot of being at the right spot at the right time, but you capture it in seconds. This, I’ve been working on this for Sandra Esparza admires the works from Lutheran High School students, who completed unfinished pieces of her late husband, Henry, an Denver artist and teacher. NICK PUCKETT

Volunteer attorneys will answer questions, help fill out forms and explain the process and procedure for the areas of family law, civil litigation, criminal defense, property law, probate law, collections, appeals, landlord-tenant law and civil protection orders. Walk-ins welcome. Everyone will be helped on a first-come, first-served basis. pplibraries.org Movie Night: Popcorn and movie of your choice. Every Friday night 5 to 7 p.m. at the Kiowa Library. pplibraries.org Playing Cards: Go fish, slap jack, black jack you name it. Mondays 1 to 2:30 p.m. at the Elbert Library; Thursdays 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. at the Elizabeth Library. pplibraries.org STEAM Activities: Science/Technology/Engineering/Art/Math fun for kids. Mondays 1:30 to 3 p.m., Wednesdays 4:14 to 5:45 p.m. and

Fridays 4 to 5:15 p.m. at the Simla Library; Wednesdays 4-6 p.m. at the Kiowa Library. pplibraries.org Story Time: Help your little one build literacy skills by interacting with engaging stories, followed by a craft. Kids and adults alike make new friends. Mondays at 2 pm at the Elbert Library; Wednesdays at 10 a.m. at the Elizabeth Library; Wednesdays at 1:30 pm at the Simla Library; Fridays at 11 a.m. at the Kiowa Library. pplibraries.org Trading Card Club: Bring your cards (Pokemon, Yu-Gi-Oh, Magic the Gathering) and have fun. Every Monday 3:30-7 pm at the Kiowa Library. pplibraries.org Editor’s note: Calendar submissions must be received by noon Wednesday for publication the following week. To place a calendar item, go to eventlink.coloradocommunitymedia.com.

of the crowd, growing bigger by the minute, a dozen or so lined one wall of the room, waiting patiently for a chance to speak with Sandra about their pieces. “I never thought I’d ever have art in an art show, so this is a whole new thing for me,” Ballou said. “As a rising artist, to be able to work on a piece of a professional artist … it’s intimidating but it’s also an honor to do that.”

over a month,” Ballou said. “Some art isn’t just a second of shooting and some Photoshop and editing. I really learned to appreciate how long it takes to create art with your hands.” The art display consisted of a mix of student’s works from students with little work in canvas painting. Sculptors and photographers, like Ballou, had the chance to connect with the artist. Before a few students got in front

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16 Elbert County News

October 11, 2018O

BAIRD

MON-TUES-WED October 15, 16 & 17

FROM PAGE 1

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challenges of House District 64. From my 10 years working for the U.S. Senate, I learned legislative process. From my time with the USDA, I learned the rural areas of the state and the challenges of living even farther out than I do now. I was also part of the working group for the National Animal ID Program, as the representative for llamas and alpacas. I have experience working with provision of high-speed internet, and I know the challenges of not being able to get quality health care reasonably close to home. What can the Legislature do to ease the strain of rising housing prices on Colorado residents? Prices here along the Front Range are out of reach for many families. The area has experienced such growth in housing availability and employment opportunities that reins should be applied. Ordinarily, the counties would do this through their planning process. However, that process is political and there is no commonality among the various counties comprising the Denver metro area. The Legislature should step in where counties refuse to put conditions on development. The impact of unrestrained development is particularly hard on infrastructure, such as roads and schools. Peripherally, health care is also affected with so many people gravitating to Denver. Have we enough

medical professionals in the state? Likely we do, but they are concentrated in the cities. What can be done to ensure the state’s transportation system will be able to accommodate continued population growth? It is incumbent upon the counties to mandate smart growth. Not all growth is positive; not all taxes collected come without strings. For instance, the Elbert County commissioners just approved a 900-dwelling plan for a new development on the border with Douglas County off a two-lane county road. Their studies apparently indicated that people would travel to Elizabeth for shopping rather than stopping in Parker on their way home. This isn’t realistic. In the quest for more tax dollars, Elbert County has planned a community whose negative impact will be almost completely on a bordering county. Roads must be done first; this is part of a normal master plan. However, this one is completely backwards. The housing will lead to much more traffic on Hilltop Road than it was ever designed to handle. We need to be able to look ahead and stick to a plan and have developers pay in advance to augment roads. What two issues demand more attention in the upcoming legislative session than they received in the previous one, and why? I am focusing on the needs of House District 64. The district is huge, going west to the Douglas County line and east to Kansas; north, to Washing-

ton County, and south, to the New Mexico/Oklahoma/Kansas border. The issue of growth seen in western Elbert County is completely foreign to the residents of Springfield, who would love to see some growth. However, there are a few needs common throughout the district: broadband internet connectivity and health-care availability. Broadband is no longer a luxury: we need to be connected to the outside world. A cell tower isn’t a sufficient signal to meet the FCC definition of high-speed, especially when it is shared between voice traffic and data traffic. Our outlying communities desperately need local health-care options. My generation is at retirement age: we need more options for health care. Where shall we go when we require more care than we receive in our small towns? If elected, what must you accomplish in order for you to consider your term a success? I would like to pull a working group together to address the issue of outmigration on the eastern plains. There are no longer many jobs in these small towns. As the population ages, younger people are leaving to complete an education and not coming back: the jobs aren’t there. I would like to see a plan developed to give each community access to terrestrial broadband connectivity, and I would like to see it rolled out. I would like to see local two-year colleges focus on the needs of those communities, and educate the population based on the needs in those locations.

Holiday

Craft Show and Mini-Market Admission is free to the public Saturday Nov. 24

10am - 5pm

Sunday Nov. 25

10am - 4pm

Jefferson County Fairgrounds

15200 W. 6th Ave. Golden, CO.

Come shop for unique gifts and special items during the first-ever Colorado Community Media Holiday Craft Show and Mini-Market; With more than 100 exhibitors filling the Jefferson County Fairgrounds, this is the best place to find that special, personal gift for friends and family. The show will feature handmade crafts in all areas from metal and leather, to flowers, baskets, ceramics, and so much more.

Vendors Needed | Interested in selling your handmade crafts??

Contact Event Producer Thelma Grimes at tgrimes@coloradocommunitymedia.com All applications must be approved to participate


Elbert County News 17

October 11, 2018

LEWIS FROM PAGE 1

people of our district, to stand up for the rights of my neighbors and help protect our rural Colorado way of life. I take that responsibility very seriously and have not let my decisions or votes be influenced by lobbyists, special interests, or political insiders. What can the Legislature do to ease the strain of rising housing prices on Colorado residents? I am in full support of any effort that helps ease housing challenges in Colorado through free-market solutions. The real estate crash, and larger financial crisis of 2008, was created in large part by the government interfering with the real estate and loan industries, and we saw how disastrous that ended up being. We must also have tort reform to ensure builders can afford to provide quality housing at the lowest possible costs. What can be done to ensure the state’s transportation system will be able to accommodate continued population growth? The state government already has the ability to deal with both current and future transportation needs but they refuse to accept the responsibility to actually budget accordingly. Every new tax or fee hike proposal comes with the promise of using the

money for roads, yet time and again the money gets diverted to special interests and pet projects while our transportation system continues to suffer. It’s time to hold the state government responsible and demand that they fulfill their constitutional obligation to make our roadways a priority with in our already existing budget. What two issues demand more attention in the upcoming legislative session than they received in the previous one, and why? My focus is always on protecting the water and property rights of Coloradans because I’ve seen how the constant overreach of local and federal government is harmful to our rural businesses and families. I also want to work to expand high-speed internet into rural Colorado. The extension of broadband to our rural communities will not only bring greater business efficiencies and a higher quality of life but will also allow for improving healthcare access. If elected, what must you accomplish in order for you to consider your term a success? I don’t think about that in terms of my own success but in the success of my constituents. If my community and neighbors have more economic freedom and their land and businesses are safer from government infringement, then I will feel my time on the Colorado Legislature will have been successful.

Caring for our Community by

Using Sustainable Printing Practices. • It’s the paper: Biodegradable, renewable, recycled, reusable. • It’s the ink: Soy based inks are used, reused then recycled. • It’s the plate: Process-free plates eliminate VOC’s and reduce water usage. • It’s the press: Using cold-set presses reduces the amount of VOC’s put into the air. • It’s the location: Printed locally reducing shipping & postage costs, while saving gas, emissions & time.

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PLAYING!


18 Elbert County News

October 11, 2018O

CLUBS Editor’s note: Send new listings or changes to hharden@coloradocommunitymedia.com. Deadline is noon Wednesday a week before publication. AA If you want to drink, that’s your business. If you want to stop, that’s ours. More than 1,000 AA meetings are offered in the Denver area every week. If you think you may have a problem with alcohol, come see us. To find a meeting near you, call 303-322-4440, or go to www.daccaa.org. Affordable Colleges Online: guidebook includes a collection of scholarships for women, including due dates and award amounts; insight into the financial aid application process; and other funding opportunities, such as industry-specific scholarships and funding for special groups. Go to http://www.affordablecollegesonline. org/womens-guide-paying-for-college/ Camping Singles: 7 p.m. the first Tuesday of the month. Membership ranges from 40s to 60-plus. Colorado single adults who enjoy camping, fishing, hiking, swimming, biking, sightseeing, photography, the camaraderie of others, and starry nights around the camp fire. We usually camp in designated forest service or state park campgrounds within 2 to 5 hours of Denver. Contact campingsingles@gmail.com Castle Rock Bridge Club: 1 p.m. Mondays and Wednesdays at Plum Creek Golf Club, 331 Players Club Drive, Castle Rock. Friendly, ACBL-sanctioned duplicate games. For assistance in finding a bridge partner, call Georgiana Butler at 303-810-8504. Go to www.castlerockbridge.com.

Chess: 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturdays at the Simla Library. All skill levels and ages welcome. Call 719-541-2573. Douglas-Elbert County Music Teachers’ Association: 9 a.m. every first Thursday at Parker Bible Church, between Jordan and Chambers on Mainstreet. All area music teachers are welcome. Call Lucie Washburn, 303-814-3479. Elbert County Sheriff’s Posse: a nonprofit volunteer organization that is part of the Elbert County Sheriff’s Office. As volunteers we support the Elbert County Sheriff ’s Office, all law enforcement in our county, and the community at large. Go to http://www. elbertcountysheriff.com/posse.html, or contact Dave Peontek at 303-646-5456. Elizabeth American Legion, Post 82: a veteran’s association supporting veterans, their families and the community, meets the first Monday of every month (except when the first Monday is a holiday, in which case the meeting is the second Monday) at the Legion Post Hall at South Banner Street and Elm Street in Elizabeth. Social hour begins at 5:30 and the regular business meeting starts at 6:30. Friday Afternoon Club meets from 5-7 p.m. every Friday and Veterans Coffee Club meets every Wednesday from 8-11 a.m. for social time with other veterans. All Veterans are invited to all meetings, we’d like to see you. Website: aml82.org. Elizabeth Food Bank: 12:30-3 p.m. Friday and 9-11:30 a.m. Saturday at 381 S. Banner in Elizabeth (next door to Elizabeth Presbyterian Church); available to help anyone

who needs food. Other times by appointment. Game Night: 4 p.m. Mondays at the Kiowa Library; call 303-621-2111. Also, 5 p.m. Tuesdays and 5 p.m. Wednesdays at the Elbert Library; call 303-648-3533. Enjoy board, card, and video games for all ages. Go to pplibraries.org. Kiowa Creek Food Pantry: open from 8:30 a.m. to noon Tuesdays in the Fellowship Hall at 231 Cheyenne Street, Kiowa. Distribution for the State of Colorado TEFAP food program. Food is distributed monthly to low-income individuals/families that qualify. We also distribute low-income senior food boxes for the state; those 60 and older may qualify for a monthly supplement. If you are in need of food assistance or know someone who is, we may be able to qualify you for one of these programs. Call the food pantry at 303-621-2376. Knitting Group: 2 p.m. Tuesdays at the Kiowa Library. Knit and chat. All skill levels welcome. Call 303-621-2111 or go to pplibraries.org. Lawyers at the Library: 6-9 p.m. the second Tuesday of every month at the Elizabeth Library, 651 W. Beverly St. Free legal clinic for parties who have no attorney. Volunteer attorneys will answer questions, help fill out forms and explain the process and procedure for the areas of family law, civil litigation, criminal defense, property law, probate law, collections, appeals, landlordtenant law and civil protection orders. Walk-ins welcome. Everyone will be helped on a first-come, first-served basis.

LEGO Master Brickster: 3:45 p.m. Thursdays at the Kiowa Library. Build LEGO stuff together. Call 303-621-2111 or go to pplibraries. org. Mystery Book Club: 9:30 a.m. the first Saturday of each month at the Simla Public Library. The group enjoys talking about a variety of mystery authors and titles. We also periodically host a Colorado author during our meetings. Everyone may join us, and registration is not required. Visit the Simla Branch of the Elbert County Library District at 504 Washington Avenue, call 719-541-2573, or email farabe@elbertcountylibrary.org. Outback Express: public transit service provided by the East Central Council of Local Governments. To ensure a seat is available, 24-hour notice appreciated. Call Kay Campbell, 719- 541-4275, or 800-825-0208 for reservations. Go to eccog.com. Outback Express runs from Simla and Matheson to Colorado Springs on the first and third Monday of each month; from Simla and Matheson to Limon on the fourth Thursday of each month; from Kiowa, Elizabeth and Elbert to Parker or Colorado Springs on the first and third Tuesday of each month; from Elizabeth to Colorado Springs or Parker on the second Tuesday of each month. Good Samaritan Nursing Home Residents may ride the bus on the second Thursday of each month. Overeaters Anonymous: 10-11 a.m. and from 7-8 p.m. Wednesdays in the Sedalia Room at New Hope Presbyterian Church, 2100 Meadows Parkway, Castle Rock.

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RENTALS

Land MOUTAIN PROPERTY 40+AC Surrounded by National Forest covered in mature timber, flowing spring, great hunting, near Colorado Trail $240,000 40+ AC NEXT TO PUBLIC LAND Located in County but close enough to walk to town, water well, owner financing $55,000 PRIME MOUNTAIN PROPERTY 41AC, Big Ponderosa Pines, Aspen Meadow, small creek, access to millions of acres of public land, great horseback riding, hiking and hunting, secluded and tranquil, owner financing $195,000 4 LOTS ON MAJOR HWY 4 Lots located on HWY 285 in the town of Saguache, Prime business location 50'x150' Each includes water and sewer, tap, $89,000

Contact Wilderness Realty & Land LLC 300 8th St Saguache, CO 81149 Call 719 655-2408

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Homes

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Lawn/Garden Services JOE MARINO Personal Landscaping & Garden Service @ $50 an hour. Yard & garden maintenance, preparation, cleanup (weeding, bush trimming, etc). Yearround service. 303-961-1495.

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Advertise your business here Contact Karen at 303-566-4091


October 11, 2018

Plaintiff: ROLLA BOYS, LLC, a Colorado limited liability company, d/b/a TNS Loans v. Defendants: ARAGON CONSTRUCTION SERVICES, LLC, a Colorado limited liability company; d/b/a Aragon Crane Service; d/b/a Aragon Cranes and Trucking; and CHARLES P. ARAGON

Construction Services, LLC is the owner of real property located in Elbert County, Colorado (the “Subject Property”). The legal description of the Subject Property that is the subject of this Combined Notice in accordance with §38-38-101(1)(c), C.R.S. is:

Elbert County News 19

fore, you should read and review all the applicable statutes and laws in order to determine the requisite provisions and procedures which control your rights in the Subject Property. The name, address, business telephone number and Colorado bar registration number of the attorney representing the judgment creditor are as follows: R. Scott Fitzke, 4 Inverness Ct. E., Ste. 100, Englewood, CO 80112, 303.694.2000, Reg. No. 35293.

www.ColoradoCommunityMedia.com/Notices

PUBLIC NOTICES TO THE ABOVE-NAMED DEFENDANTS, YOU ARE NOTIFIED AS FOLLOWS:

This is to notify you that a Sheriff Sale proceeding has been commenced in the office of the undersigned Sheriff pursuant to the Writ of Execution dated May 14, 2018, and C.R.S. §38-38101 et. seq. by Rolla Boys, LLC, the current judgment creditor of a judgment lien, evidence of which was recorded on April 12, 2018, at Reception No. 577003, Book 785, Page 881, in the real property re cords of the Clerk and Recorder’s office, Elbert County, State of Colorado. The foreclosure was initiated due to judgment entered to levy execution on real property located within Elbert County on the Order: Order Following Hearing of February 21, 2018 against Defendants Aragon Construction Services, LLC; d/b/a Aragon Crane Service; d/b/a Aragon Cranes and Trucking; and Charles P. Aragon, entered on February 28, 2018 (the “Judgment”) the transcript of which was recorded on April 12, 2018, at Reception No. 577003, Book 785, Page 881, in the real property records of the Clerk and Recorder’s office, Elbert County, State of Colorado. Defendant Aragon Construction Services, LLC is the owner of real property located in Elbert County, Colorado (the “Subject Property”).

Lot 8, Block 6, Pawnee Hills, Filing No. 1, County of Elbert, State of Colorado Also known as: 1213 Pawnee Parkway, Elizabeth, CO 80107 The judgment amount is $55,918.50.

You may have an interest in the real property being foreclosed that may be affected by this foreclosure, or have certain rights or suffer certain liabilities or loss of your interest in the Subject Property as a result of said foreclosure. You may have the right to cure a default under the above-described Deed of Trust. You may have the right to redeem the real property being foreclosed.

THEREFORE, the undersigned Officer will, at 10 o’clock a.m., on the date of November 29th, 2018, at the Elbert County Sheriff’s office, 751 Ute Avenue, Kiowa, CO 80117, sell the Property at public auction to the highest bidder with certified funds MADE PAYABLE TO: Douglas County District Court Registry. Payment must be submitted to the undersigned Officer as specified by Colorado law to pay the Judgment and certain other sums, all as provided by applicable law, and will deliver to the purchaser a certificate of purchase as provided by law.

Public Notice

NOTICE TO CREDITORS Estate of Rachel J. Damm, also known as Rachel Damm, Deceased Case Number: 18PR30046

All persons having claims against the above named estate are required to present them to the personal representative or to the District Court of Elbert County, Colorado on or before February 4, 2019, or the claims may be forever barred.

Public Notices Sheree 303.566.4088 legals@coloradocommunitymedia.com directed to the office of the undersigned Sheriff LIEN BEING FORECLOSED MAY NOT Personal Representative Summonses/Sheriff SalescallSummonses/Sheriff Summonses/Sheriff Sales Sales Notice To Creditors Sales THE atSummonses/Sheriff (303) 805-6105. BE A FIRST LIEN. Public Notice DISTRICT COURT, DOUGLAS COUNTY, STATE OF COLORADO CIVIL CASE NO. 2017CV130 SHERIFF’S NOTICE OF SALE Plaintiff: ROLLA BOYS, LLC, a Colorado limited liability company, d/b/a TNS Loans v. Defendants: ARAGON CONSTRUCTION SERVICES, LLC, a Colorado limited liability company; d/b/a Aragon Crane Service; d/b/a Aragon Cranes and Trucking; and CHARLES P. ARAGON TO THE ABOVE-NAMED DEFENDANTS, YOU ARE NOTIFIED AS FOLLOWS:

This is to notify you that a Sheriff Sale proceeding has been commenced in the office of the undersigned Sheriff pursuant to the Writ of Execution dated May 14, 2018, and C.R.S. §38-38101 et. seq. by Rolla Boys, LLC, the current judgment creditor of a judgment lien, evidence of which was recorded on April 12, 2018, at Reception No. 577003, Book 785, Page 881, in the real property records of the Clerk and Recorder’s office, Elbert County, State of Colorado. The foreclosure was initiated due to judgment entered to levy execution on real property located within Elbert County on the Order: Order Following Hearing of February 21, 2018 against Defendants Aragon Construction Services, LLC; d/b/a Aragon Crane Service; d/b/a Aragon Cranes and Trucking; and Charles P. Aragon, entered on February 28, 2018 (the “Judgment”) the transcript of which was recorded on April 12, 2018, at Reception No. 577003, Book 785, Page 881, in the real property records of the Clerk and Recorder’s office, Elbert County, State of Colorado. Defendant Aragon Construction Services, LLC is the owner of real property located in Elbert County, Colorado (the “Subject Property”).

The legal description of the Subject Property that is the subject of this Combined Notice in accordance with §38-38-101(1)(c), C.R.S. is: Lot 8, Block 6, Pawnee Hills, Filing No. 1, County of Elbert, State of Colorado Also known as: 1213 Pawnee Parkway, Elizabeth, CO 80107 The judgment amount is $55,918.50. You may have an interest in the real property being foreclosed that may be affected by this foreclosure, or have certain rights or suffer certain liabilities or loss of your interest in the Subject Property as a result of said foreclosure. You may have the right to cure a default under the above-described Deed of Trust. You may have the right to redeem the real property being foreclosed. THE LIEN BEING FORECLOSED MAY NOT BE A FIRST LIEN. In order to be entitled to take advantage of any rights provided for under Colorado law, you must strictly comply and adhere to the provisions of the law. Further, you are advised that the attached Colorado statutes merely set forth the applicable portions of Colorado statutory law relating to curative and redemptive rights; therefore, you should read and review all the applicable statutes and laws in order to determine the requisite provisions and procedures which control your rights in the Subject Property.

In order to be entitled to take advantage of any rights provided for under Colorado law, you must strictly comply and adhere to the provisions of the law. Further, you are advised that the attached Colorado statutes merely set forth the applicable portions of Colorado statutory law relating to curative and redemptive rights; therefore, you should read and review all the applicable statutes and laws in order to determine the requisite provisions and procedures which control your rights in the Subject Property. The name, address, business telephone number and Colorado bar registration number of the attorney representing the judgment creditor are as follows: R. Scott Fitzke, 4 Inverness Ct. E., Ste. 100, Englewood, CO 80112, 303.694.2000, Reg. No. 35293. THEREFORE, the undersigned Officer will, at 10 o’clock a.m., on the date of November 29th, 2018, at the Elbert County Sheriff’s office, 751 Ute Avenue, Kiowa, CO 80117, sell the Property at public auction to the highest bidder with certified funds MADE PAYABLE TO: Douglas County District Court Registry. Payment must be submitted to the undersigned Officer as specified by Colorado law to pay the Judgment and certain other sums, all as provided by applicable law, and will deliver to the purchaser a certificate of purchase as provided by law. All telephone inquiries for information should be directed to the office of the undersigned Sheriff at (303) 805-6105. THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED MAY BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE.

Elbert County Payments

Date: September 5, 2018 Shayne Heap, Sheriff of the County of Elbert State of Colorado By: Sheriff Shayne Heap

All telephone inquiries for information should be

THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED MAY BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Date: September 5, 2018 Shayne Heap, Sheriff of the County of Elbert State of Colorado By: Sheriff Shayne Heap

Legal Notice No.: 24138

624 N. Casa Bella Avenue Dewey, Arizona 86327

Legal Notice No.: 24140 First Publication: October 4, 2018 Last Publication: October 18, 2018 Publisher: The Elbert County News

Name Changes

Legal Notice No.: 24138 First Publication Date: 10/04/2018 Last Publication Date: 11/1/2018 Published in the Elbert County News

PUBLIC NOTICE Public Notice of Petition for Change of Name

Notice To Creditors Public Notice NOTICE TO CREDITORS Estate of Rachel J. Damm, also known as Rachel Damm, Deceased Case Number: 18PR30046 All persons having claims against the above named estate are required to present them to the personal representative or to the District Court of Elbert County, Colorado on or before February 4, 2019, or the claims may be forever barred.

Public notice is given on September 18, 2018, that a Petition for a Change of Name of an adult has been filed with the Elbert County Court. The Petition requests that the name of Michael Peter Kanisch be changed to Michael William Hopkins Case No.: 18 C 62 Jefeen J., By: Clerk of Court / Deputy Clerk Legal Notice No: 24139 First Publication: October 4, 2018 Last Publication: October 18, 2018 Publisher: Elbert County News

James L. Damm Personal Representative 624 N. Casa Bella Avenue Dewey, Arizona 86327 Legal Notice No.: 24140 First Publication: October 4, 2018 Last Publication: October 18, 2018 Publisher: The Elbert County News

Legal Notice No.: 24138 Public Notice First Publication Date: 10/04/2018 Last Publication Date: 11/1/2018 PAYMENTS FOR PUBLICATION SEPTEMBER 2018 The name, address,$395,831.04 business telephone numNews DANIELLE SMILEYPublished in the Elbert County REIMBURSEMENT $96.32 ber and Colorado bar registration number of the $2,357.40 DANS TRASH Utilities $415.52 attorney representing the judgmentDEEP creditor are $285,669.33 ROCK Shop Supplies $11.45 as follows: R. Scott $412,770.28 Fitzke, 4 Inverness Ct. E., INC DJ PETROLEUM Fuel $38,389.47 Ste. 100, Englewood, CO 80112, 303.694.2000, $2,266.18 DOUG CHIMENTI Pedal the Plains $26.60 Reg. No. 35293. $33,745.72 DOUGLAS COUNTY DETENTIONS DIVISION Inmate Housing $3,045.84 $2,200.00 DRIVE TRAIN INDUSTRIES INC Equipment PartS $1,053.29 THEREFORE, the undersigned will, at $167,158.09 Officer EL PASO COUNTY Autopsies $4,200.00 10 o’clock a.m., on the$5,446.65 date of November ELBERT 29th, COUNTY ROAD AND BRIDGE Auto Rep/FUEL $13,025.34 2018, at the Elbert$1,307,444.69 County Sheriff’s office,COUNTY 751 ELBERT TREASURER Postage $197.76 Ute Avenue, Kiowa, CO 80117, sell the PropELBERT COUNTY TREASURER INTRAGOVERNMENTAL You may Name have an interest in the real property erty at public auction to Amount the highest bidder with Vendor Description FUND TRANSER $282,811.00 being foreclosed that may be affected by this certified funds MADE PAYABLE TO: Douglas ELIZABETH CHAIN SAW LLC Maint. $59.30 foreclosure, have certain County District Court Registry. must be ABC LEGALorSERVICES INC rights or suffer cerCivil Process $7.00Payment ELIZABETH FIRE DEPT Blood/Alcohol Analysis $1,270.00 ADVANCED QUALITY Auto Rep & Maint to the undersigned $1,127.50 Officer ENERTIA CONSULTING GR LLC Professional Service $7,300.00 tain liabilities or loss ofAUTO your REPAIR interest in the Subsubmitted as spePAVEMENT LLC foreclosure. You CHIP cified by Colorado law$60,219.41 FAMILY SUPPORT REGISTRY CHILD SUPPORT $10,344.00 jectAFD Property as a MARKING result of said to pay the Judgment and AFFORDABLE FIREto AND SAFETY INC under the Safety Supplies GALLS INC Uniforms $671.95 may have the right cure a default certain other sums, all$1,595.00 as provided by applicAGGREGATE INDUSTRIES WCR INC Capital able outlaylaw, and will deliver $10,059.00 GIRSH & PC Civil Process $15.00 above-described Deed of Trust. You may have to the purchaser a ROTTMAN cerShop Supplies $766.64 by law. GLOBAL EQUIPMENT COMPANY Blding Repairs $1,341.83 theAIRGAS right toINTERMOUNTAIN redeem the real property being foretificate of purchase as provided ALL RENTAL CENTER Capital outlay $166.76 GOODWILL INDUSTRIES OF DENVER OPERATING $463.47 closed. ALL TRUCK AND TRAILER PARTS Equipment Parts $488.41 GRAINGER Equipment Parts $1,552.87 All telephone inquiries for information should be ALWAYS SOLUTIONS Software GREAT WEST LIFE AND ANNUITY Benefits Payable $73,893.62 THE LIENCONNECT BEING FORECLOSED MAY NOT directed to the office of$2,266.18 the undersigned Sheriff AM SIGNAL INC Signs $368.12 H AND M INDUSTRIAL SUPPLY Shop Supplies $283.47 BE A FIRST LIEN. at (303) 805-6105. AMERICAN FIDELITY ASSURANCE HAULIN HASS TIRE RECYCLING Tires Waste Disposal $240.00 COMPANY Benefits Payable $18,384.25 HD SUPPLY SUPPLIES $763.80 In order to be entitled to take advantage of any THIS IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT AUTOprovided CHLOR SYSTEM OF DENVER Maint. AND ANY INFORMATION $169.75 HEATHER HARCOURT IV-E WAIVER $1,000.00 OBTAINED MAY rights for under Colorado law, you BANK OF THE WEST CREDIT CARD $19,885.97 HOME DEPOT CREDIT SERVICE SUPPLIES $1,056.91 BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. must strictly comply and adhere to the proviBARRY MITCHELL Equipment Parts $244.57 HONEYBEE PUMPING SERVICE Operating Expense $310.00 sions of the law. Further, you are advised that CORPmerely set forth CDS ENGINEERING $36,832.85 HONNEN EQUIPMENT COMPANY Equipment Parts $46,025.57 Date: September 5, 2018 theBASELINE attachedENGINEERING Colorado statutes HILL GREENLEAF AND RUSCITTI CONTRACT $220.00 ALLISON Gravel $2,843.21 theBERG applicable portions of Colorado statutory law Shayne Heap, Sheriff of the County ILENE of Elbert BIG R to OFcurative ELIZABETH VOID State of Colorado -$409.99 INDUSTRIAL SAFETY LLC Safety Supplies $130.69 relating and redemptive rights; thereBINOS PIZZA Pedal the Plains $80.00 INTEGRATED ELECTRIC Blding Repairs $8,540.00 fore, you HILLS should read and review all the apBy: Sheriff Shayne Heap$428.19 BLACK ENERGY UTILITIES INTEGRATED VOTING SOLUTIONS INC Postage $7,824.51 plicable statutes and laws in order to determBLUE SKY PROMOTIONS Uniforms $739.20 INTERMOUNTAIN RURAL ELECTRIC ineBLUE the TARP requisite provisions Legal Notice No.: 24138 $12.16 FINANCIAL INC and procedures Shop Supplies ASSOCIATION UTILITIES $9,176.54 which control your rights in the Subject Property. BOBCAT OF THE ROCKIES CulvertsFirst Publication Date: 10/04/2018 $959.99 INTERVENTION CHILD WELFARE $120.00 Last Publication Date: 11/1/2018 BRANDI SNELLING REIMBURSEMENT $24.05 JENNIFER GROTE REIMBURSEMENT $83.08 The name, address, business telephone numCAROLYN BURGENER ContractPublished Services in the Elbert County $450.00NewsJOHN DEERE FINANCIAL Blding Repairs/SUPPLIES $4,439.48 berCDPHE and Colorado bar registration number of the - AIR POLLUTION CONTROL DIVSION Tires $152.90 JOHNSON CONTROLS FIRE ALARM MAINTENANCE $645.00 attorney representing the judgment creditor are CDW GOVERNMENT Equipment $3,734.80 JOHNSON SUMMONS DELIVERY asCENTENNIAL follows: R. Scott Fitzke, 4 Inverness Ct. E., MENTAL HEALTH CENTER INC Medical Services $615.00 SERVICE LLC CHILD SUPPORT $50.00 Ste. 100, Englewood, CO 80112, 303.694.2000, CENTURYLINK Telephone $1,358.92 KIEWIT INFRASTRUCTURE CO Asphalt Repair $114,610.05 Reg. No. 35293. CERTIFIED LABORATORIES Other Fluids $464.38 KIOWA WATER & WASTE WATER AUTHORITY UTILITIES $5,066.08 ChemTox Blood/Alcohol Analysis $76.00 KIOWA WATER & WASTE WATER AUTHORITY Water for Roads $4,385.00 THEREFORE, the undersigned Officer will, Gravel at CHRISTIAN CONSTRUCTION $14,565.18 KRIS JOHNSON REIMBURSEMENT $34.40 10CINTAS o’clock a.m., on the date of November 29th, Uniforms $989.73 LEGAL SHIELD Benefits Payable $747.55 2018, at the Elbert County Sheriff’s office, 751 CLEARSPAN FABRIC STRUCTURES CONTRACT $80,065.00 LENOVO INC Equipment $3,999.80 Ute Avenue, Kiowa, CO 80117, sell the PropCOBITCO Asphalt Repair $308.72 LEWAN & ASSOCIATES, INC. Copier $1,161.68 COLORADO BAR ASSOCIATION Dues $30.00 LEXIS NEXIS MATTHEW BENDER Operating $90.61 erty at public auction to the highest bidder with COLORADO INVESTIGATION LEXISNEXIS RISK SOLUTIONS CHILD SUPPORT $130.00 certified fundsBUREAU MADE OF PAYABLE TO: Douglas CONCJ1522 Operating $38.50 LSOFT TECHNOLOGIES INC NETWORK OPERATING $2,399.00 County District Court Registry. Payment must be COLORADO COMMUNITY Advertising $109.50 LYLE SIGN INC NM 7165 Signs $1,362.08 submitted to the undersigned Officer as speCOLORADO COUNTY TREASURER ASSOC and Dues $440.00 MACDONALD EQUIPMENT CO. INC EQUIPMENT $13,955.00 cified by Colorado law to pay the Judgment COLORADO MARY LOUISE JACOBSON FB Royalty $50.00 certain other DEPARTMENT sums, all as provided by applicOFlaw, PUBLIC CCW CBI $1,412.00 MATT MARTINICH IV-E WAIVER $149.50 able andSAFETY will deliver to the purchaser a cerCOLORADO DEPT as OFprovided HEALTH by law. MAUREEN PELLOWSKI Operating $240.00 tificate of purchase AND ENVIROMENT BOND ISSUANCE COSTS $175.00 MCKINNEY DOOR AND HARDWARE Blding Repairs $304.05 DEPT OF for HEALTH MEDVED COLORADO Equipment Parts $50.28 AllCOLORADO telephone inquiries information should be AND ENVIROMENT VITAL STATISTICS $98.50 METRO DENVER BUSINESS FORMS SUPPLIES $1,222.84 directed to the office of the undersigned Sheriff SOCIAL SERVICES MHC KENWORTH-DENVER Fuel $499.29 at COLORADO (303) 805-6105. DIRECTORS ASSOCIATION DUES $2,078.13 MICRODYNAMICS INSTRUMENTATION LLC Equipment Parts $1,217.00 COLORADO STANDBY TO COLLECT A DEBT Contract Services $1,500.00 MINES & ASSOCIATES PC Other Benefits $304.56 THIS IS AN ATTEMPT COLORADO STATE UNIVERSITY EXTENSION Dues/TRAVEL $410.00 MONTY HANKINS Office Supplies $43.14 AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED MAY MEDIA OF PURPOSE. COLORADO Advertising $277.75 MOUNTAIN STATES EMPLOYERS BECOMMUNITY USED FOR THAT CONSOLIDATED COMMUNICATIONS UTILITIES $311.17 COUNCIL INC Dues $5,600.00 CORRECTIONAL HEALTHCARE Medical Services $20,197.92 MOUNTAIN VIEW ELECTRIC UTILITIES $221.43 Date: September 5, 2018 COUNTY HEALTH POOL Benefits Payable $102,701.96 N2IT PLUMBING Blding Repairs $450.00 Shayne Heap, Sheriff of the County CREATIVE CULTURE INSIGNIA, LLC of Elbert Uniforms $848.70 NATIONAL TIRE WAREHOUSE Tires $1,083.44 State of Colorado DALLA SCHROEDER Equipment $217.05 NICHOLAS KLOTZ CDL Fees $98.00 By: Sheriff Shayne Heap

The legal description of the Subject Property that is the subject in GENERAL FUND of this Combined Notice 010 accordance with §38-38-101(1)(c), C.R.S. is: 015 HEALTH FUND ROAD & BRIDGE FUND 020 LotSALES 8, Block 6, Pawnee & USE FUND Hills, Filing No. 1, 025 County of Elbert, State of Colorado LEAF FUND 040 HUMANS SERVICE FUND 050 Also known as: 1213 Pawnee CAPITAL IMPROVEMENT FUNDParkway, 075 Elizabeth, CO 80107 IMPACT FUND 085 CONSERVATION TRUST FUND 090 The judgment amount is $55,918.50. TOTAL ALL FUNDS

James L. Damm

NORTHERN SAFETY CO INC PARKER PORT-A-POTTY INC. PHOENIX TECHNOLOGY GROUP LLC POTESTIO BROTHERS EQUIPMENT INC POTESTIO BROTHERS EQUIPMENT INC POWER EQUIPMENT COMPANY INC PRAIRIE TIMES PUREWATER DYNAMICS INC QUILL CORPORATION RACHEL LARASEN RANCHLAND NEWS RATTLESNAKE FIRE PROTECTION DISTRICT REGULATORY PERMITS MANAGEMENT INC ROBERT L FAGER & PORTA POT RENTAL ROCK PARTS COMPANY ROYAL B THREADS LLC ROYAL B THREADS LLC ROYAL B THREADS LLC RUNNING CREEK QUICK LUBE OF ELIZABETH RUSH TRUCK CENTER OF COLORADO SAFARI AUTO GLASS SAFEWAY SAM ALBRECHT SHERRY HANSEN SIGNAL GRAPHICS SOUTHWEST MOBILE STORAGE SPRINT STAPLES ADVANTAGE STATE OF COLORADO

Equipment Parts Equipment Rental contract Pool Car Rep Capital outlay Equipment Parts Operating Equipment Rental Office Supplies Dues/SUPPLIES Advertising Water for Roads Gravel Pit Fees Contract Services supplies FB Royalty Pedal the Plains supplies

Auto Rep Equipment Parts supplies VOID REIMBURSEMENT REIMBURSEMENT Office Supplies rent Telephone Office Supplies MOTOR VEHICLE RENEWAL CARD STATE WIRE & TERMINAL INC Equipment Parts STEEL CORNER Capital outlay STEEL HORSE PRODUCTIONS Pedal the Plains STERICYCLE Haz Waste Rem STEWART AND STEVENSON Equipment Repairs STONE OIL CO INC Fuel SUSAN MURPHY REIMBURSEMENT SYSCO FOOD SERVICES Prisoner Meals TAMMY BURTON REIMBURSEMENT TEXAS LIFE INSURANCE COMPANY Benefits Payable THE DANNY PAUL ARDREY ESTATE TRUST Equipment ReNTAL THE LAW OFFICE OF JEFFREY J TIMLIN contract THIN AIR COMMUNICATIONS INC contract TODD PEDERSON Contract Services TOWN OF SIMLA UTILITIES TRUCKHUGGER TARP SYSTEMS Equipment Repairs TSI LEGAL Civil Process UNITED RENTALS (NORTH AMERICA) INC EQUIPMENT UNITED REPROGRAPHIC SUPPLY INC copier UPS Operating URBAN LABORATORIES OPERATING US BANK EQUIPMENT FINANCE Copier VERIZON WIRELESS Telephone WAKEFIELD AND ASSOCIATES INC Civil Process WAXIE SANITARY SUPPLY Office Supplies WEAR PARTS & EQUIPMENT COMPANY INC. EQUIPMENT WESTSIDE TOWING Auto Rep WINWATER Capital outlay WITT BOYS-NAPA Equipment Parts WRIGLEY ENTERPRISES VOCA Expense XEROX CORPORATION Copier Y TIME Contract Services

$188.25 $159.00 $24,237.75 $1,829.86 $68,342.00 $324.84 $672.00 $75.00 $600.94 $59.00 $30.78 $160.00 $1,500.00 $2,130.00 $5,937.47 $70.00 $48.00 $857.50 $614.29 $1,286.30 $314.00 -$500.00 $121.60 $102.49 $164.50 $306.00 $1,211.04 $1,409.66 $1,215.90 $257.49 $1,872.27 $1,250.00 $132.89 $118.32 $8,428.85 $58.61 $3,451.14 $130.08 $1,428.95 $600.00 $14,965.44 $68,658.82 $400.00 $87.16 $522.70 15.00 2,475.30 727.15 22.74 198.00 185.90 7,728.38 30.00 186.70 2,419.33 199.50 1,091.29 650.00 35.00 4,127.42 68.60

Legal Notice No.: 24152 First Publication: October 11, 2018 Last Publication: October 11, 2018 Publisher: Elbert County News

Elbert Legals 10.11.18 * 1


20 Elbert County News

October 11, 2018O

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