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July 12, 2018

ELBERT COUNTY, COLORADO

A publication of

The power is blowin’ in the wind Rush Creek project will provide electricity for 325,000 homes

HOW DO WIND TURBINES WORK? According to the Wind Energy Foundation, people have harnessed the energy of the wind as far back as 5000 B.C., when boats were propelled along the Nile River using only wind, and later, when in the late 19th century windmills came into use to pump water for farms and ranches.

BY TABATHA STEWART SPECIAL TO COLORADO COMMUNITY MEDIA

On the hottest day of the year so far, dozens of Elbert County residents, local and state elected officials and Xcel Energy representatives gathered at the home of Jan and Virgil Kochis in Matheson, to get a peek at the latest of 30 wind turbines that were recently completed on the Kochis property, as part of Xcel’s first major wind farm project: Rush Creek Wind Farm. “This farm has been in our family for more than 100 years,” said Jan Kochis, property owner and chair of the Rocky Mountain Farmers Union Board. “Virgil’s grandparents settled here. This may make it possible for the family farm to stay in the family another 100 years.” When the Rush Creek project is completed and fired up this October, it will provide energy for approximately 325,000 homes in Colorado. While renewable energy is much needed in the state, Kochis said the installation of the turbines on their property — which is east of Simla and west of

While the simple design of a windmill has remained the same over the years, the latest iteration of electricity-generating wind turbines are much larger, generate more electricity, and distribute the electricity much farther than their ancestors. Erecting today’s wind turbines is much more complicated. First, a wind turbine must be installed, which involves erecting three tower sections, totaling a height of about 260 feet. At the top of the tower the hub and nacelle, which house all of the generating components, are placed, with three blades, approximately 177 feet long, attached to the hub. Each foundation requires about 300 yards of concrete and reinforced steel. Electricity is generated within the nacelle when the wind blows, which spins a shaft connected to a generator that creates electricity. The electricity created is transmitted through lines down through the tower to substations, where it is released into the power grid and distributed.

SEE ELECTRICITY, P6

Jan Kochis speaks to community members and state and local officials about her experience having 30 wind turbines installed on her land in Matheson. The turbines are part of Xcel Energy’s Rush Creek Wind Project. TABATHA STEWART

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“I think this is a good first step in reaching out to citizens in a way we haven’t done before.” Sam Albrecht, county manager | Page 2 INSIDE

CALENDAR: PAGE 10 | VOICES: PAGE 12 | LIFE: PAGE 14

ElbertCountyNews.net

VOLUME 123 | ISSUE 24


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July 12, 2018J

Survey cites concerns with growth, commissioners More than 600 owners of property in county respond to outreach BY TABATHA STEWART SPECIAL TO COLORADO COMMUNITY MEDIA

More than 600 residents of Elbert County completed and returned the county’s first Citizen Engagement Survey, which was mailed to 12,000 property owners of record this spring. The survey was designed to identify major topic areas of concern and importance to residents, according to County Manager Sam Albrecht, who presented the findings at the June 27 Board of County Commissioners meeting. Ninety-three percent of respondents said they felt safe living in Elbert County, and 71 percent said they were concerned about growth in the county, and the loss of rural feel and values as the county grows. Respondents said they thought future development should include single-family homes on lots of five to 10 acres to maintain the rural environment. They also expressed concern about crime as the county grows, as well as the issue of building and maintaining roads throughout the

area to accommodate growth. Some feared the county could become overpopulated. The survey, which addressed issues such as growth, crime, water and interactions with county officials, is the first step in opening the lines of communication between the public and county officials. Albrecht ”We hope to see good changes by the time we do next year’s survey,” said Albrecht. The survey provided questions that could be rated by checking the appropriate box, giving Albrecht and the commissioners some hard statistics to work with, but residents were also encouraged to write in any other questions or concerns that were bothering them. “Seventy percent of those who responded said they were satisfied with the interaction they’ve had with county employees,” said Albrecht. Residents were asked their thoughts on Elbert County government and elected officials, and responses were mixed. Twelve percent of respondents believed the county was on the right track for future growth and development, 33 percent indicated they thought the county was on the wrong track, and

40 percent said it depended on the office or department. Forty-eight percent said they were only moderately familiar with the Elbert county government. Distrust of Elbert County commissioners was also addressed in the write-in section. “Some responses indicated that they believed the BOCC doesn’t listen to citizens, they pursue their own interests and only want growth and increased revenue,” said Albrecht. Commissioners listened to the results and harsh criticisms, and said they hoped the survey would provide an opportunity for citizens to become more involved with county issues. When asked how many people usually attended BOCC meetings, Commissioner Danny Willcox gestured to the room, which included eight residents in attendance. “This is about it,” said Willcox. “We usually get the same people, but this is about it for people coming to meetings.” A perceived lack of transparency from county government is one of the reasons the survey was sent out, according to Justin Klassen, director of administration and public information officer for Elbert County. “We’re working on getting some things in place that will let citi-

zens know what’s going on in the county,” said Klassen. “We’re trying to keep our Facebook page updated, and working on making the county website more user-friendly.” Klassen recommends visiting the Elbert County website at www. elbertcounty-co.gov first for information, and urges citizens to read the Elbert County News to keep up to date. The Elbert County public information page on Facebook is also a good source for information, according to Klassen. The county is also working on a new software system that will make BOCC agendas and documents more accessible to residents. Albrecht said they hope to increase the number of responses to next year’s survey, and will utilize more social media, news announcements, listening sessions and faceto-face opportunities for citizens to weigh in. “I think this is a good first step in reaching out to citizens in a way we haven’t done before,” said Albrecht. “The real intent was to start reaching out to citizens, that’s been a priority for these commissioners. The BOCC meets at 9 a.m. the second and fourth Wednesday of each month, and meetings are open to the public. Information about upcoming or past meetings can be found at www.elbertcounty-co.gov.


Elbert County News 3

July 12, 2018

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4 Elbert County News

July 12, 2018J

History grant pays off for Elizabeth Video, written comments grow from effort to preserve town’s past BY TOM MUNDS TMUNDS@COLORADOCOMMUNITYMEDIA.COM

A state historic preservation grant in 2016 funded phase one of a project to research and record the history of the Town of Elizabeth, which is bearing fruit. “History Colorado provided the $21,000 grant so we could look into details about the history of Elizabeth,” said Grace Erickson, town community development director. “We have a lot of town involvement in the process. We asked for volunteers to help us with the research, and a portion of the grant was used to hire professional consultants to conduct some of the research. It took about a year to complete the 100-page study and to make the history video that we have on our website.” She said it was important to have community involvement, so the town held a 2017 open house at town hall and asked residents to come and share their stories and pictures about Elizabeth history. The written information was scanned in and all the comments were preserved.

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The International Order of Odd Fellows Hall at 122 S. MainSt. in Elizabeth was built in 1896 and is now the Wildflower Saddle, Tack and OutdoorEquipment Store. COURTESY PHOTO The town asked for volunteers to assist with the program. Elizabeth resident Suzy Sadak said while she didn’t know much about the history of the town, she decided to volunteer to work on the project.

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“I contacted a few people in town to gather information,” she said. “Actually one of the best interviews I did was with David Wright, an artist who lived in town in the 1970s when Elizabeth was sort of an artist community. I enjoyed helping research the history of our town and I learned a lot about Elizabeth’s past.” The research gathered was compiled into a report and used to make a short video about town history that is on the Elizabeth website at www.townofelizabeth.org/history. html. Elizabeth’s video states that about 1881 the depot at milepost 39.4 on the Denver and New Orleans Railroad was named Elizabeth by then-Gov. John Evans in honor of his sister-in-law Elizabeth. However, the Wikipedia history of the town clarifies that the area that is now Elizabeth was first named Russellville when a sawmill was established by the Weber brothers on Running Creek in 1855, and the name later became Elizabeth about 1881 when Evans named the railroad depot established in the town. The town grew up around the depot, which served the ranchers who came to ship their cattle and farmers who came to ship their crops to markets in Denver and Pueblo. By 1890 there were 300 residents in the community. With the growth of the town, businesses were established to serve the residents as well as farmers and ranchers in the surrounding area of Elbert County. One of the main businesses was the Watts and Wortman General Merchandise store that is shown in one of the historic pictures on the video. In the 1970s, a local newspaper reported there was a family that

lived in Elbert County who owned a carnival. The story stated that in the spring the family brought the carnival midway equipment to the Elizabeth depot and loaded it on a train that took it to towns throughout the state until fall, when the family and their carnival returned to Elbert County for the winter. The town and surrounding area depended on the railroad but the railroad was washed out by the flood of 1935 and never rebuilt. However, while there was less traffic and some people left, the town remained a supply center for ranchers and farmers in the surrounding area. There was a big spike in population after World War II when a missile base was built near Elizabeth. A lot of houses were left empty when the base closed in 1965. About 1970, a number of artists were drawn to Elizabeth. David Wright was among the artists, and in a letter he said the artists came to the town because rent was a lot less expensive than in larger communities like Denver and Castle Rock. He wrote that the artists enjoyed the small town with its dirt streets, and often got together for activities like potluck dinners and sharing music. The town remains a center of businesses serving residents of the community and surrounding area. There is a Safeway supermarket and a Walmart, plus a large number of small businesses, including many that are unique to the town. As of 2018 there were 1,385 people living in Elizabeth. The residents elect a town council and mayor, and a town manager and staff are hired to oversee the day-to-day operations. Elizabeth has a police department and fire department, and the schools are part of the Elizabeth School District.


Elbert County News 5

July 12, 2018

Hey Kids!!

Color this picture and win!

Grab your crayons, colored pencils, markers, paints or paper & paste – whatever you can imagine to decorate your picture. Winners and prizes will be awarded by age group for best coloring and most creative! Prizes are $25 Gift Certificates. Name __________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Address/City/State/Zip ___________________________________________________________________________________________________ Phone ________________________________ Age Group _______________________________________________________________________ Age groups are as follows: 1-3 years, 4-7 years, and 8-11 years. Winners in age group will be determined and prizes will be awarded for the following catagories: Most Creative and Best Colored. Submit your coloring page in person or by mail to the Douglas County Fairgrounds Administration oďŹƒces, located in the events center at 500 Fairgrounds Road, Castle Rock, CO 80104, on or before Friday, July 27, 2018.

Sponsored by the Douglas County Fair & Rodeo & Colorado Community Media.


6 Elbert County News

July 12, 2018J

ELECTRICITY

What is the Rush Creek Wind Farm?

FROM PAGE 1

Limon — will provide much-needed income during a year of above-average temperatures and below-average rainfall, making it a tough year for growing crops. “The new income that these turbines provide will create more certainty for our farming operations by helping balance against the roller-coaster commodity markets and unpredictable weather,” Kochis said during the June 28 event. State Rep. Kimmi Lewis applauded landowners like the Kochises for their willingness to lease their land and drive economic development within the county. ”I’m honored to be on Virgil and Jan’s property today,” said Lewis. “This is true economic development, and I so much endorse that type of growth in rural areas. The day will come when we look out, like today, and see wind turbines. I applaud those landowners who are willing to do that.” Elbert County Commissioner Grant Thayer said each turbine brings in about $4,000 annually in property tax, and provides an alternative to farming in rough years. “It’s another income stream for agriculture people in Colorado,” said Thayer. ”We’ve had strong support, and the locals like it.” Residents had concerns about the extensive amount of work that goes into erecting the turbines, including

BY TABATHA STEWART SPECIAL TO COLORADO COMMUNITY MEDIA

Cattle graze and wander the fields beneath wind turbines on the Kochis farm in Matheson. PHOTOS BY TABATHA STEWART

increased traffic and dust that comes from truck traffic on rural dirt roads. Neighbor Tim Brown said he has held out leasing his farm for wind turbines, but he attended the June 28 tour of the farm, and spoke to the crowd that gathered. “It’s all been pretty good,” Brown said. ”We got along really well as far as the construction and the extra traffic.” Attendees were given a tour of the Kochis property, and got up close and personal with a turbine, which towers approximately 260 feet above the ground. Cattle grazed in the field

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below the turbines, and signs of crops growing in the surrounding field showed that land leased for turbines can still be used for grazing and growing. Xcel project manager Gerry Kelly answered questions about the construction and working of the wind turbines. “The towers are 80 meters tall, with three blades that measure about 54 meters each (about 177 feet),” said Kelly. ”The hub generates the electricity that is transmitted to a substation before being released into the Xcel Energy grid.” Placement of the towers is an important factor when designing a wind farm. According to Kelly the towers are placed a quarter-mile apart, with about 1,000 to 1,200 yards necessary in front and behind each tower. The blades are electronically controlled, and can be manipulated to maximize the wind, as well as be turned off in the event of too much wind. Kelly said it could take years of studying wind patterns before a site is deemed a good fit for a wind farm. Kochis said she knew some people didn’t like the changing landscape that wind farms bring, but she doesn’t mind seeing the turbines outside her window. “I enjoy every day looking out my kitchen window and seeing the majestic wind turbines through my trees,” Kochis said.

The Rush Creek Wind Farm, according to Xcel Energy spokesman Mark Stutz, is the first wind farm that Xcel has owned and operated. Prior to Rush Creek, Xcel bought electricity from independent power producers. When completed, Rush Creek will span parts of Arapahoe, Cheyenne, Elbert, Kit Carson and Lincoln counties, and will include a 600-megawatt wind facility, covering 95,000 acres — nearly 150 square miles. The wind farm will feature 300 turbines, all manufactured by Vestas at the company’s Colorado facilities in Brighton, Pueblo and Windsor. According to Xcel, the project has many economic benefits, including the $1 billion invested in Colorado, as well as hundreds of direct and indirect jobs created. State Sen. Jerry Sonnenberg sang the praises of the project, and the impact it will have on Colorado as well as local counties. “Rush Creek is a terrific project that has employed hundreds during construction and will continue to employ wind technicians, many of which are from our local communities,” Sonnenberg said. “Rather than continuing to export our best local resource, our children, the growing wind industry is providing new opportunities that are allowing more of them to stay local.” Construction of Rush Creek began in the spring of 2017, and Xcel plans to have all turbines tested and ready to fire up in October. For more information about Rush Creek, visit www.xcelenergy. com/company/rates_and_regulations/filings/rush_creek_wind_ project.

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Representatives from Xcel Energy lead a tour of the Rush Creek Wind Farm in Matheson. TABATHA STEWART

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Elbert County News 7

July 12, 2018

Fire restrictions abound in Denver metro area STAFF REPORT

Though state law spells out fire restrictions as falling under Stage 1, 2 or 3, allowable activities can vary widely between counties and municipalities. Here’s a roundup of some current fire restrictions in the Denver metro area. For complete lists, go to coemergency.com/p/fire-bans-danger.html Adams County Prohibited: Fireworks Open fires, except in developed campgrounds Arapahoe County Prohibited:

of torches with open flame in outdoor areas, including public parks, greenbelts and trail systems, without a permit Internal or external combustion engine without a spark-arresting device properly installed, maintained and in effective working order

Fireworks Outdoor fires, including developed campgrounds Charcoal-fueled fires Fires in outdoor wood burning stoves Prescribed burning of fence lines and trash Castle Rock Prohibited: Fireworks Open fires Campfire or stove fires without a permit Smoking unless in an enclosed vehicle or building, a developed recreation site or while stopped in an area at least 3 feet in diameter that is barren or cleared of all flammable material Welding or the operation

Customers can purchase state parks passes at self-service kiosks

Denver County Prohibited: Fireworks Douglas County Prohibited: Fireworks Open burning of any kind SEE FIRES, P19

The RidgeGate calendar of fun starts here.

Yoga in the Park It’s time again for sunset salutations. Join RidgeGate, South Suburban Parks and Recreation and the Lone Tree Recreation Center for free Yoga in the Park classes in Belvedere Park, at the corner of RidgeGate Circle and Belvedere Lane. Please bring your own yoga mat. In case of heavy rain or lightning, class will be cancelled. No need to register—just drop in!

Tuesday, July 31, 6:30-7:30pm Tuesday, August 28, 6:30-7:30pm

Guided Nature Hikes

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Colorado State Parks has rolled out new self-serve kiosks that allow customers to purchase daily and annual state parks passes. The kiosks replace or augment existing systems that require customers to place cash in envelopes when staff members are not available. The machines take credit cards and are more weather-resistant than the envelope system. They are more convenient for customers who do not carry cash and require less employee time to collect payment. “Not a lot of people have exactly seven dollars (for a daily park pass) in their pockets,” Kirk Teklits, parks and wildlife statewide business operations coordinator, said in a news release. “As far as customer service goes, being able to pay by credit card is definitely a desirable service option.” Customers who purchase an annual pass from the kiosk will get a printed receipt that they can then take into a parks and wildlife office to redeem. Teklits said 15 stations are installed at nine parks and more will be coming later this summer. “Most of the kiosks run on solar power, provide multiple sales channels to our customers, and help our staff with money collection and counting,” Teklits said. “It also helps our law enforcement officers quickly determine who has bought a pass and who hasn’t.”

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A sunset rendered blood-red by wildfire smoke cast an eerie glow over the afternoon. Fires in the rest of Colorado spurred many cities to cancel their fireworks displays. DAVID GILBERT

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Each year, RidgeGate teams up with the South Suburban Parks and Recreation District to provide free, guided nature hikes. These hikes are led by professional naturalists who offer insight and education into the natural ecosystems within the open space at RidgeGate. Hikes are free and open to the public—see the full schedule and register at ridgegate.com/events.

Saturday, July 14, 7-8:30pm — Urban Coyotes Friday, July 27, 7:30-9pm — Full Moon Hike Wednesday, August 1, 6-7:30pm — Sunset Bird Watching Friday, August 3, 6-7:30pm — Insects & Spiders Saturday, August 18, 8:30-10am — Monarchs & Milkweed

RidgeGate Summer Beats Concerts AUGUST

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Enjoy these summertime concerts out on the grass with free live music, food trucks and activities for kids. It’s all happening in Prairie Sky Park, just west of the Lone Tree Recreation Center, courtesy of the South Suburban Parks and Recreation District.

Thursday, July 19, 5-8pm — Chris Daniels and the Kings; Hazel Miller

Tunes on the Terrace at the Lone Tree Arts Center RidgeGate is again proud to sponsor Lone Tree Art Center’s Tunes on the Terrace—an outdoor evening concert series that will bring your summer nights to life. Performances range from classic rock to big band jazz, and everything in between. The stars are out this summer! Check out the full schedule and buy tickets at www.lonetreeartscenter.org.

Saturday, July 21, 8-10pm — Mollie O’Brien Trio Friday, July 27, 8-10pm — The Whitney Houston Songbook with Mary Louise Lee

Experience Historic Schweiger Ranch Among RidgeGate’s cultural facilities is the 38-acre historic Schweiger Ranch, located just east of the RidgeGate Parkway and I-25 interchange. The historic restoration of the ranch, led by the nonprofit Schweiger Ranch Foundation, gives us an important glimpse into the settlers’ lives in the late 1800s. Today, Schweiger Ranch is open to the public for self-guided visits and a variety of events throughout the year. Register or learn more about these events online at SchweigerRanch.org.

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Saturday, July 21, 2pm — Guided Tour Sunday, July 22, 7-9pm — Campfire & Storytelling, Legendary Ladies Saturday, August 18, 2pm — Guided Tour Sunday, August 26, 7-8:30pm — Campfire & Storytelling, Buffalo Bill Experience

All events are held within the RidgeGate community, just south of Lincoln Avenue, on both sides of I-25.


8 Elbert County News

July 12, 2018J

Elizabeth Library gets Founding Era grant STAFF REPORT

The Elizabeth Library recently received a Revisiting the Founding Era Grant to host public activities and conversations that explore America’s founding and its enduring themes. As part of the grant, Elizabeth Library received several books that contain works about the founding era, money to help facilitate learning and conversation, and other resources from the Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History and the American Library Association. Using these grant resources, the Elizabeth Library will launch a two-part series on the Founding Era. Events will include: • July 20: “Dissent and National Security in the Founding Era,” hosted by Douglas County School District instructors Brian Fleet (AP Government, US History) and

Jess Van Divier (AP Government, World History). • Sept. 21: “Communication and Persuasion,” hosted by Elbert County Judge Palmer Boyette, and his son Andrew P. Boyette. Revisiting the Founding Era is a three-year national initiative of The Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History, presented in partnership with the American Library Association and the National Constitution Center, with support from the National Endowment for the Humanities. The grant provides 100 public libraries across the country the opportunity to use historical documents to spark public conversations about the Founding Era’s enduring ideas and themes and how they continue to influence our lives today. For more information about Revisiting the Founding Era and participating libraries, visit www. foundingera.org.

The ‘Gap’ project on I-25 won’t significantly affect environment, report says Federal review makes way for construction to start BY JESSICA GIBBS JGIBBS@COLORADOCOMMUNITYMEDIA.COM

The Colorado Department of Transportation and the Federal Highway Administration have signed a “Finding of No Significant Impact,” affirming plans to fix the Gap south of Castle Rock will not significantly affect the environment within the project site. CDOT has worked on a Planning and Environmental Linkages study examining the 34-mile stretch of Interstate 25 between C-470 and Monument for more than a year, according to a news release issued by Douglas County. The Gap spans approximately 18 miles within that area, beginning south of Castle Rock and ending

with Monument. The roadway is notorious for creating a bottleneck, where the interstate shrinks to two lanes in each direction, and unpredictable travel times. CDOT announced in April when it debuted its environmental assessment of the Gap it planned to widen that portion of I-25 by adding one toll lane in each direction. A roughly one-month public comment period followed. That feedback is also available in the FONSI on CDOT’s website, codot.gov. Improvements to the Gap are set to cost $350 million and also include replacing bridges, adding wildlife crossings and widening shoulders for emergency management situations. “Signing the FONSI is significant,” CDOT Executive Director Michael Lewis said in the release. “This is a necessary step before we can break ground on one of the most critical transportation projects in the state.”

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Elbert County News 9

July 12, 2018

The 100th Douglas County Fair & Rodeo is ready to ride! The 2018 Douglas County Fair & Rodeo kicks off July 28 with the Douglas County Fair and Rodeo Parade in downtown Castle Rock at 9:30 a.m. From Aug. 2-5, things will ramp up with Xtreme Bulls, PRCA performances and more. For additional information, a schedule of events, or to purchase tickets online visit www.fairandrodeofun.com or call 720-733-6941.

Backcountry opens new archery range Life-sized models representing animals will be used as targets BY ALEX DEWIND ADEWIND@COLORADOCOMMUNITYMEDIA.COM

To prepare for this year’s hunting season, resident Mark Taylor plans on using a new 3D archery range equipped with realistic, animal-like targets in the Backcountry Wilderness Area. “I’m pretty new to archery but I got into it because my son was interested and a good friend bought a bow about the same time with the intent to hunt,” said Taylor, who has lived in Highlands Ranch for 15 years. “I hunted back east when I was younger but never with a bow.” The Backcountry Wilderness Area is 8,200 acres of land that borders the southern edge of Highlands Ranch and spans south toward Castle Rock. It’s home to 20 miles of natural surface trails, vegetation and wildlife. Owned and maintained by the Highlands Ranch Community Association, the land is used throughout the summer for recreation programs, events and camps. A unique activity offered in the Backcountry is archery, the sport of shooting arrows at a target. Benefits of the sport include increased upper body strength, balance, focus and coordination. One archery range, located at 11950 S. Monarch Blvd., about two miles south of Rock Canyon High School on Monarch Boulevard, offers targets

at 10-yard increments from 10 to 60 yards. Another range, at the Backcountry’s Basecamp, 6005 Ron King Trail, east of Sante Fe Drive, is used for lessons and summer camps. Now open for use is a 3D archery range. Popular among hunters, the form of archery uses life-size models of game as targets. West of the Basecamp, the 3D range is a one-mile loop through grasslands and shrubs with 28 separate shooting stations. Challenging shots at realistic targets including elk, deer, bears, goats, sheep and other predators are set at a variety of distances from 10 to 80 yards. “The 3D range was added because 3D archery is the fastest-growing segment of archery and there are very few ranges along the Front Range,” said Mark Giebel, director of the Backcountry Wilderness Area, adding that the new range can serve more people and hold lessons at the same time. Kevin Lewis, owner of Quick Draw Archery, 12339 Mead Way, and his team will be teaching private lessons, along with weekly and monthly classes. Lewis was introduced to archery when his daughter, a Girl Scout at the time, tried the sport. On top of the physical and mental benefits of promoting body awareness, balance and focus, archery is a good sport for families, Lewis said. He looks forward to testing out the new range. “I think it adds an excellent variety of shooting opportunities,” said Lewis, a Highlands Ranch resident. “It’s convenient, it’s clean, it’s well put together. I think it’s a great addition to the area.”

All Colorado Motor Vehicle Offices closed August 1-5 Plan ahead now! A new statewide computer system will require closure of County Motor Vehicle Offices Aug. 1-5. However, Self Service Motor Vehicle Kiosks will be available for registration renewals during the office closure. For self service kiosk locations please visit www.douglas.co.us and search for Motor Vehicle Kiosks.

All Colorado Driver License Offices closed August 2-3 All State Driver License Offices in Colorado will be closed August 2-3 for the launch of a new statewide computer system. Please plan ahead! For regular hours and locations visit www.douglas.co.us and search for Driver License.

Master Gardener Volunteers are now available Colorado Master Gardener volunteers are available now through Sept. , Mon. through Fri. from 9 a.m. to 12 p.m. and 1:30 to 4:30 p.m., to answer all of your gardening and home horticulture questions! Stop by the office, call 720-733-6935, or email dcmgardenr@gmail.com

STRIVE

TO

Bob Keller visits the 3D range for his fourth time in one week. The Castle Rock resident is excited about the new activity in the Backcountry Wilderness Area, he said, because it will help prepare him for hunting season. ALEX DEWIND

THRIVE

Resource & Service Fair Tuesday, July 31 from 4 - 6 p.m. SE Christian Church 9650 Jordan Rd. in Parker

Douglas County families who are struggling financially can receive back-to-school items and access resources from more than 20 different organizations. Attendees seeking school supplies must preregister with the Foundation for Douglas County Schools. For the preregistration link and more visit www.douglas.co.us and search for Community of Care.

Visit www.douglas.co.us


10 Elbert County News

July 12, 2018J

THINGS TO DO Gear Up! 2 to 4 p.m. Saturday, July 14 Douglas County Libraries in Parker, 20105 East Mainstreet. A celebration of all things bicycle. Games, crafts, cycling trails, clubs, race information, bike safety and more. All ages. Registration required. Call (303) 791-7323 for more information. Mining the Treasures in Newspapers: 1:30 p.m. Saturday, July 14 at the Parker Library, 20105 E. Mainstreet, Conference Room B. Program by Rhonda R. McClure includes genealogical information found in newspapers, various types of newspapers, tips for effective researching, finding the right newspapers. Presented by the Parker Genealogical Society. Go to https:// www.parkergenealogicalsociety. com Improv Survivor: 8 to 9:30 p.m. Friday, July 13 at The Studio at Mainstreet, 19600 Mainstreet, Parker. The Parker Players Present: Improv Survivor! The show where eight improvisers compete for your laughs and applause performing improv comedy games in the style of “Whose Line is it Anyway?” Tickets are $10 when purchased in advance through Eventbrite (www.eventbrite.com), or $15 at the door before show. Cash only. Doors open at 7:30 p.m.

Creating a Healthy Home: 10 a.m. Saturday, July 14 at Parker Natural Grocers by Vitamin Cottage, 11402 South Parker Road, Parker. Did you know there are toxic compounds in your home that can compromise the health of you and your family? Learn the tips and tricks for creating a healthy home. Event is free. Visit www.naturalgrocers.com for more information. Natural Grocers 63rd Anniversary Celebration: 8:30 a.m. to 9 p.m. Thursday, August 16 at Parker Natural Grocers by Vitamin Cottage, 11402 South Parker Road, Parker. Come celebrate the 63rd Anniversary, including free ice cream from 4 - 6, free reusable bags and lots of prizes, samples and give aways. Visit www. naturalgrocers.com for more information. Lessons and Lemonade: 9:30-11 a.m. and 11:15 a.m. to 12:45 p.m. Saturdays at Hobby Lobby, 10901 S. Parker Road, Parker. Parker Artist Guild classes for children in grades 4-8. Upcoming classes: July 14, mixed media Brockisms, with Toni Brock; July 28, parentchild class, small totem poles, with Judy Pendleton; Aug. 11, alcohol ink painting, with Candace French; and Sept. 8, pastels, with Kristin Paulson. All teachers are professional

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artists and members of the Parker Artists Guild. Registration required; go to www. parkerartistsguild.com/classes/youth. Contact judypendleton4@gmail.com.

Movie Night: Popcorn and movie of your choice. Every Friday night 5-7 pm at the Kiowa Library. pplibraries.org

Downtown Walking Tours: 10:30 a.m. the fourth Saturday of the month from June to September. The 45-minute tour begins at The Courtyard on Perry Street, between Third and Fourth streets, and will conclude at the Castle Rock Museum, 420 Elbert St. Contact 303-814-3164 or museum@castlerockhistoricalsociety. org. Bingo: 6-9 p.m. July 2 at the Elbert Mercantile Building. Elbert Women’s Club Meeting/Dinner: 5:30 p.m. July 9 at Dorothy Wuerfele’s Home. Elbert Days: 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. July 14 at the Elbert Mercantile Building. Pancake Breakfast: 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. July 22 at the Elbert Mercantile Building. Anime Nights: Watch and discuss anime, snacks provided. 1st & 3rd Mondays 7-9 p.m. at the Kiowa Library; 2nd & 4th Mondays 7-9 pm at the Elizabeth Library. pplibraries.org. Book Clubs: Sci-Fi/Fantasy book club 2nd & 4th Mondays of the month 5:30-6:30 pm at the Elizabeth Library; Kiowa book club 4th Monday of the month 7-8 pm at the Kiowa Library; Elizabeth book club: 3rd Tuesday of the month 7-8 pm at the Elizabeth Library; Brown Bag book club 4th Thursday of the month 11 am-1 pm at the Elizabeth Library; Elbert book club last Thursday of the month at the Elbert Library, Diverse & Rowdy book club 2nd Saturday of the month 9:30-10:30 am at the Simla Library. pplibraries.org Garden Clubs: All things gardening! Seedy Ladies 4th Monday of the month 1-3 pm at the Elbert Library; Gardeners/ Homesteaders 3rd Saturday of the month 11 am-12 pm at the Simla Library. pplibraries.org GED Preparation & Career Online High School: Get started with GED preparation and coaching throughout the process. COHS allows students 19+ to earn a certified high school diploma. Call 303-646-3416 for more details. pplibraries.org Knitting & Crocheting Groups: Simla Witty Knitters Tuesdays 3:30-5 pm at the Simla Library; Close Knit Crochet Group Wednesdays 2-3 pm at the Kiowa Library; Hats for the Homeless Thursdays 11 am-1 pm at the Elizabeth Library. pplibraries. org Lawyers at the Library: 6-8 pm 2nd Tuesday of the month at the Elizabeth Library. Free legal clinic for parties who have no attorney. Volunteer attorneys will answer questions, help fill out forms and explain the process and procedure for the areas of family law, civil litigation, criminal defense, property law, probate law, collections, appeals, landlord-tenant law and civil protection orders. Walk-ins welcome. Everyone will be helped on a first-come, first-served basis. pplibraries.org

Playing Cards: Go fish, slap jack, black jack you name it. Mondays 1-2:30 pm at the Elbert Library; Thursdays 11 am-1 pm at the Elizabeth Library. pplibraries.org STEAM Activities: Science/Technology/ Engineering/Art/Math fun for kids. Mondays 1:30-3 pm, Wednesdays 4:145:45 pm and Fridays 4-5:15 pm at the Simla Library; Wednesdays 4-6 pm at the Kiowa Library. pplibraries.org Story Time: Help your little one build literacy skills by interacting with engaging stories, followed by a craft. Kids and adults alike make new friends. Mondays at 2 pm at the Elbert Library; Wednesdays at 10 am at the Elizabeth Library; Wednesdays at 1:30 pm at the Simla Library; Fridays at 11 am at the Kiowa Library. pplibraries.org Teen Game Night: Enjoy table top and video games. Mondays 5-6 pm at the Simla Library; Thursdays 6-9 pm at the Kiowa Library; Fridays 3:30-5 pm at the Elizabeth Library. Want pure competitive gaming? Teen Tournament League every Tuesday 6-9 pm at the Kiowa Library. pplibraries.org Trading Card Club: Bring your cards (Pokemon, Yu-Gi-Oh, Magic the Gathering) and have fun. Every Monday 3:30-7 pm at the Kiowa Library. pplibraries.org We Create: Make art and more from old book every Thursday from 4-5 pm at the Simla Library. pplibraries.org Bingo: 6-9 p.m. Aug. 6 at the Elbert Mercantile Building. Elbert Women’s Club Meeting/Snacks: 5:30 p.m. Aug. 14 at the Elbert Mercantile Building. Elizabeth Library Book Sale: gently used books for children and adults for sale in the book sale room at the Elizabeth Library. Stocked by Friends of he Elizabeth Library. All donations from book sales benefit the Elizabeth Library. Outback Express: public transit service provided by the East Central Council of Local Governments; 24-hour notice appreciated. Call Kay Campbell, 719- 5414275, or 800-825-0208 for reservations. Go to www.eccog.com for reservations, information and each month’s schedule. Editor’s note: Calendar submissions must be received by noon Wednesday for publication the following week. To place a calendar item, go to eventlink. coloradocommunitymedia.com.


Elbert County News 11

July 12, 2018

Coffman addresses family separations after border visit Congressman ‘alarmed at alphabet soup’ of agencies involved BY ELLIS ARNOLD EARNOLD@COLORADOCOMMUNITYMEDIA.COM

U.S. Rep. Mike Coffman visited a facility near the U.S.-Mexico border that holds migrant minors on the heels of pushback to policy by President Donald Trump’s administration that resulted in children and families being separated at the border. In recent weeks, separations occurred under the Trump administration’s “zero-tolerance” policy, under which children have been held in separate facilities while parents awaited prosecution for having entered the country illegally. The change began in April, when Attorney General Jeff Sessions announced the policy to prosecute as many border-crossing offenses as possible. But President Donald Trump’s administration reversed course with a June 20 executive order that aims to detain and hold migrant families together, instead of separating children from their families

during the process. Coffman, R-Aurora, recently visited an unaccompanied-minor children (UAC) facility in Tornillo, Texas, with officials from the Department of Health and Human Services, according to a news release. He was also briefed by local leadership from both the U.S. Border Patrol and the Customs and Border Protection (CBP) Office of Field Operations regarding CBP’s operations. Coffman represents Colorado’s 6th Congressional District, which includes Aurora, Centennial, Highlands Ranch, Littleton and parts of Adams County, among other areas. A few days after his trip, he answered some questions about the experience on June 27. What were you most surprised at seeing at the facility you visited? I was alarmed that there is an alphabet soup of federal agencies under the Department of Homeland Security, the Department of Justice and the Department of Human Services in charge of various phases of the process from detaining, separating and caring for these children. I’m deeply concerned that it will be difficult for this fragmented bureaucracy to effectively reunite these families in a timely manner. That’s why

I’m advocating for a single individual, preferably a Marine Corps general, to take charge of pushing these agencies to work together to get these children back with their parents.

there are no separated children held in the DHS/ICE facilities in Colorado. I’m scheduled to visit the ICE detention facility in Aurora (in early July).

What is the process for reunifying the children who have been separated from parents? A federal judge in California has just issued an order that families be reunited within 30 days and that children under 5 be back with their parents within 14 days. When I was in El Paso, Texas, the Department of Human Services, which is responsible for caring for the separated children, assured me that they know where all of the children and their respective parents are currently located. However, I’m still not confident that they have a process in place to reunite these families on a timely basis since they have moved the youngest children, who require child-care providers, all over the U.S.

How is this affecting negotiations on immigration-related bills in Congress? I believe that the president’s advisers determined that by uniformly prosecuting everyone who crossed the U.S.-Mexico border illegally, a deterrent effect would be created to reduce the level of illegal border crossings. However, they miscalculated because of an earlier court decision that does not allow children to remain with their parents for more than 20 days when they are held in detention for purposes of being prosecuted for illegally crossing the border … This created a humanitarian disaster by forcibly separating the children from their parents, that should have been anticipated. I have since called for the firing of Stephen Miller, the president’s key adviser on immigration issues.

Have children or parents who have been separated been taken to the Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) facility in Aurora, or anywhere else in Colorado? The Department of Homeland Security has informed my office that

What is the most important next step for you and for Congress regarding the zero-tolerance policy? I will soon vote for legislation that will provide a way for the families to remain together while held in a detention setting.


12 Elbert County News

LOCAL

July 12, 2018J

VOICES Human-dog relationship status: `It’s uncomplicated’

W

hy does your dog lick your face? You say, “My dog doesn’t lick my face.” Do me a favor, and just play along. Your dog licks your face because it tastes like a ham on rye. How can your face taste like a ham on rye if you’re a vegetarian? It can’t. This isn’t the correct answer. Harry is almost nine months old, and he is still licking my face, especially first thing in the morning. I am undecided about it. It is either a good example of bad parenting, or rather pleasurable. After all, I am a Scorpio. It makes me think about the queen and her corgis. Do any of them wake the queen with their tongues, as it were? I doubt it. My guess is her corgis are trained before she meets them, and she misses out on all of the fun I am having with Harry.

QUIET DESPERATION

Harry licks my face for a number of reasons, according to everything I have read. It’s a sign of affection. Harry is showing his gratitude. For what? He doesn’t live in a home with an Elvis impersonator. He doesn’t live in a home with country music. He doesn’t live in a home with cats. Craig Marshall He’s grateful because he lives in a home. Smith It means we’re friends. He licks me because there are tiny food particles in my skin? Unfortunately, it’s probably true. It relieves stress. Maybe you know someone who bites their nails. Licking is similar.

We stand behind Capital Gazette, journalism

M

y to-do list can feel overwhelming. But it’s not important. Not when journalists are being shot down in the newsroom in the Capital Gazette in Annapolis. My heart breaks for the victims’ families and friends, GUEST and I have to say COLUMN something. Throughout our country’s history, the press and its role have had champions and critics, and this is as it should be. The press was given tremendous responsibility and was a priority of our Founding Jerry Raehal Fathers, who placed it in the First Amendment along with Freedom of Speech and Religion. But times have changed. We have moved into a postmodern world, in which — for many — there is no truth but only the truth that fits their narrative. We create our own thought bubbles through social media and friends. Too many of us are seeking the truth we want to believe as opposed to what is there. I see this happening on all sides of

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the political spectrum. That is the opposite of what real journalists do. We are the mirror, showing the good, bad and the ugly (hopefully without being ugly). When the press is wrong, critics are right to point it out. But the problem is critics now often refer to anything they disagree with as “Fake News,” and then go on to cite some other, notalways-reliable, source. I’ve always advocated that newspapers and the press should not bristle at criticism but accept it and learn from it. We have broad shoulders. We can handle it. But it has gone too far. A line in the Baltimore Sun editorial summed up what I’ve been thinking: “That’s why so many reporters across the nation got a sickening feeling Thursday afternoon — they couldn’t believe something like this had happened, except that they could.” So if you’re not a journalist and reading this, let me tell you what I’ve learned about them in the 15 years in the industry — either on the frontlines as a reporter, in management, or working at the Press Association. SEE RAEHAL, P13

O

Harry doesn’t bite his nails. I wish he would. I have to take him to the vet to get it done, and it’s not cheap. Do it myself ? I don’t think he would sit still long enough. I would end up trimming his nose. Licking releases pleasurable endorphins. His or mine? Some of Harry’s current behavior will be trained out of him, and some of it will end on its own. He’ll grow out of many of the things he is doing now. Truth is, I know I am going to miss some of it. By reason, age, and logic, Harry is my fourth and final dog. He might outlive me. I will never have another puppy of my own in my life. Once or twice a day, he runs a figure-8 around the living room and dining room and it’s a blur. I have no idea how he does it. Around the dining SEE SMITH, P13

Do your part to create the best news of the day

news of the day. ne of my very favorite Now in a very few and isolated ways to stay in touch with cases I have caught people in a people during the peak bad mood or in a very difficult or busy season is a quick challenging time. And when this text. Just a little nudge or reminder that I am thinking of happens, the reply I receive them right at that moment. WINNING is either a quick, “Thank Depending on the day or you, now is not a good WORDS the person, I will either time,” or “Michael, it’s send a thoughtful note, a been a bad day, let’s talk motivational quote, or I will tomorrow.” And I respect ask a quick question. And where they might be and 99 percent of the time, I get understand that a motivaan immediate reply. tional quote or a question One of the questions I asking for the best news often ask in a text is this, of the day could be a little “What’s the best news of the off-putting. But in every day?” In most cases people case, I acknowledge their will respond with some kind Michael Norton response and send a reply of good news or great news, back with something like, something fantastic and sometimes “Understood, sending you love and even so powerful it motivates me support,” or “Understood, let me as I read their response. There are know if I can help with anything.” a few people who may get caught This actually happened last week. off guard and reply with a question Someone replied to my question, back. And it reads something like “What is the best news of the day?” this, “I don’t know, what is the best with this text, “Nothing, it’s been a news of the day?” They anticipated tough 48 hours.” My reply, “Underthat I had some great news of my stood, let me know how I can help.” own that I wanted to share. Their reply, “Well, your offer to help Once I explain what I meant, I is now my best news of the day, typically get a very favorable reply thanks.” even if they have to search for something to be considered the best SEE NORTON, P20

JERRY HEALEY President

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CHRIS ROTAR Managing Editor

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Columnists & Guest Commentaries Columnist opinions are not necessarily those of the Elbert County News. We welcome letters to the editor. Please Include your full name, address and the best number to reach you by telephone. Email letters to letters@coloradocommunitymedia.com Deadline Fri. 5 p.m. for the following week’s paper.

ELBERT COUNTY NEWS (USPS 171-100) A legal newspaper of general circulation in Elizabeth, Colorado, the Elbert County News is published weekly on Thursday by Colorado Community Media, 750 W. Hampden Ave., Suite 225, Englewood, CO 80110. PERIODICALS POSTAGE PAID AT ENGLEWOOD, COLORADO and additional mailing offices. POSTMASTER: Send address change to: 750 W. Hampden Ave., Suite 225, Englewood, CO 80110


Elbert County News 13

July 12, 2018

How pets help keep us healthy as we age

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appiness is a warm puppy. Who doesn’t love the feel of fur between your fingers, or the nicker of a horse when they see you come into the barn? The importance of the human-animal bond has been increasingly recognized and studied in the last 30 years. For those of us who have felt the nuzzle of a cold nose in our hand, or warmth of a cat settled in our lap, we have firsthand experience of the power of an animal’s love. In an increasingly fractured and hectic world, where family can be separated by long distances and busy schedules, pets can help fill an important role in providing companionship and purpose for seniors. Although it seems intuitive that pet ownership would be beneficial, what do we really know about the health benefits of pet ownership? There are many documented health benefits to pet ownership. Several studies have shown that interactions with animals (not necessarily pet ownership) can decrease blood pressure, lower cholesterol, and help treat depression. A very recent study showed that Alzheimer’s patients who interacted with animals had improved cognition. Of course, many studies suggest that people who own dogs get more exercise, although other studies contend that people who are active tend to exercise more with their pets. Although the jury is still out on the effect of pets

SMITH FROM PAGE 12

room table into the living room, behind the couch, and back to the dining room. Lap after lap. And then he comes to an immediate halt and looks up at me with Those Eyes. Sure: I wish he would sit, stay, come when called, relieve himself where directed, and welcome strangers in our home. Maybe that time will come. But these days are wonderful. He is making new discoveries every day, and

RAEHAL FROM PAGE 12

We are not the enemy of the people. Yes, we make mistakes. When we make mistakes — which is about the only job in the world where you cannot hide from them — we publicly correct them. And for most journalists, they rarely need to make corrections, because they’ve been trained in reporting, sourcing, best practices and ethics. More importantly, we care. The coverage journalists provide is not for a paycheck or fame. We do our job — even in harm’s way — to keep our community informed; our forefathers knew that an informed community is needed for our republic to survive. Beyond coverage, many newspapers volunteer time and money.

and exercise, there is no question that interactions with animals improve many measurements of well-being. A few lesser known, but equally important benefits of pet LIVING AND ownership include enAGING WELL hanced self-discipline and self-worth, and more opportunities for meeting people. As one recent AARP article put it, “Pets are natural born ice breakers!” Pet ownership is not without its downside for seniors. Although Kelly Diehl there are many documented benefits, there are some downsides to pet ownership. Veterinary care can be expensive, and, for folks on a fixed income, can be a drain on limited resources. As seniors elect to move into assisted living or other types of housing, they can encounter restrictions on size or type of pet, or whether pets are allowed at all. Many physicians are concerned about the potential for injuries or falls for older pet owners — and sometimes a pet can be injured if stepped or fallen on. Thinking outside the box of traditional pet ownership can provide alternative options. As mentioned above, many studies show that simply interacting with animals on a regular basis can

I get to see that happen. I watch him run his 8s, and I feel younger again myself. He sits near me when I write, waiting impatiently for me to finish so I can walk him, pet him, feed him, read to him, hold him. My disposition leans like Pisa to pessimism about people and The World. My little friend improves my life without knowing it. Or maybe he does? Craig Marshall Smith is an artist, educator and Highlands Ranch resident. He can be reached at craigmarshallsmith@comcast.net.

They. Are. Here. For. The. People. They are the people. If you’re a journalist or someone working at a news organization, I simply want to say thank you. The very fabric of our country depends on what you do. An attack on a newspaper is an attack on our Republic and Constitution. I’m confident that while these are scary times, we will stand tall. We need to look no further than the Capital Gazette in the wake of the tragedy, as reporter Chase Cook tweeted, “We are putting out a damn paper tomorrow.” And they did. We stand united with Capital Gazette, providing coverage in good and bad times, because it’s right for our communities and for our country. Jerry Raehal is the CEO of the Colorado Press Association.

have positive health effects. Volunteering at a shelter or rescue can be a rewarding experience — not only can it give you your animal “fix,” helping out also provides much-needed support to our most vulnerable animals. Many shelters and rescue groups also need volunteers to foster pets for a short time before permanently placing them in a forever home. This can be a great way to get the benefit of having an animal in your home without a long-term commitment. If you travel frequently to visit family members you may find fostering dogs and cats a rewarding experience and one that fits with your lifestyle. You can even foster guinea pigs! Adopting an older pet is another option for people who love pets but worry about a long-term commitment or don’t want the hassles associated with raising a young animal. Many older pets sit unwanted in shelters, but they can make great companions for seniors. A senior

that has had a series of older pets since retiring shared the following, “These animals are so deserving of love and care. I’m happy we can share our golden years together!” Pets can fill an important void in seniors’ lives. They provide unconditional love and companionship, can be a stimulus for exercise and social interaction, and improve our health. It’s a win-win for everyone! Kelly Diehl, DVM MS Dipl. ACVIM, is the senior scientific programs and communications adviser for the Morris Animal Foundation — Bridging Science & Resources to Advance the Health of Animals. For more information, email kdiehl@morrisanimalfoundation.org or visit www.morrisanimalfoundation. org. This column is hosted by the Seniors’ Council of Douglas County. For more information, go online to MyDougCoSeniorLife.com, email DCSeniorLife@ douglas.co.us or call 303-663-7681.

OBITUARIES ROBERTSON

Jon M. Robertson

Jon M. Robertson, 82, of Elizabeth, passed away on June 28, 2018 with family at his side. Loving Husband of 59 years to Jackie. Proud Father of Michael, Ken and Steve (Lynne). Grandfather of 2. For service details, see ponderosavalleyfunerals.com

In Loving Memory Place an Obituary for Your Loved One.

Private 303-566-4100

Obituaries@ColoradoCommunityMedia.com

Funeral Homes Visit: www.memoriams.com


14 Elbert County News

July 12, 2018J

Filming likely to grow in Colorado Climate, incentive program draw storytellers to state BY CLARKE READER CREADER@COLORADOCOMMUNITYMEDIA.COM

Parker resident Michelle Ullman films an episode of her series, “On the Menu with Michelle Ullman,” at Castle Rock’s 212 Pizza. COURTESY OF MICHELLE ULLMAN

AUGUST 2 - 5, 2018

Local Events & 4-H Shows July 28-August 2

FairAndRodeoFun.com

Two Way Crossing Friday, August 3

Presented by Celebrating a Douglas County Tradition

Cody Johnson Face

Sunday, August 5

TICKETED EVENT

Saturday, August 4 Presented by

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When Parker resident Michelle Ullman began preparing for the first season of her television show, “On the Menu with Michelle Ullman,” it was important that she “put our fork where our mouth is.” Which meant filming episode one at La Baguette de Normandy in Parker and doing the rest of the 10-episode season in the Denver metro area. “Supporting local should lead by example and start at home,” Ullman said. “There is a wonderful film/TV community here, some of whom I hope to hire on as we grow into making feature films. Denver is primarily a commercial market. We hope to add some film work here.” Ullman is just one example of a growing group of creatives looking to do more filming in the metro area. Denver native Haylar Garcia recently released his third film, a horror movie titled “Apartment 212,” which was shot in the metro area and in his RiNo studio. The movie was released at the Sie FilmCenter in Denver as well as theaters in Los Angeles, New York, Seattle, Detroit and other major cities. “There are so any great artists in the area that deserve a voice, and so many creative communities that deserve to be employed,” he said. “It just seems like the right thing to do to bring national talent here to be a part of it all.” The Colorado Office of Film, Television and Media works to bring in storytellers of all kinds to the state, including filmmakers, animators, gamers and photographers. The office connects these storytellers to resources they need, like location assistance, crew referrals and inter-governmental cooperation. Perhaps most importantly, the Colorado Office of Film offers an incentive program that provides a 20 percent cash rebate for eligible production costs. The incentive program covers feature films, television pilots, television series, television commercials, music videos, industrials, documentaries, and video game design and creation, as well as other forms of content creation. “Keeping the film incentive active will be a big factor in bringing people to the state,” Ullman said. “Keeping a pool of skilled crew, and talented actors to offer filmmakers here in Denver is also important. The current Colorado incentive is only valid on Colorado residents, so the more we can offer them in crew and talent, the less has to be brought in from out of state.” As anyone who has traveled the state can attest to, the variety of scenery Colorado has to offer is one of the biggest draws for filmmakers, like director William Garrison. He has been working on the pilot for a television series called “Frozen Dead” in

Parker resident Michelle Ullman films the introduction for her new television series, “On the Menu with Michelle Ullman.” All 10 episodes of the show’s first season were filmed in the metro area. COURTESY OF MICHELLE ULLMAN

Nederland, not far from Golden. “Colorado has some great locations and great history. It provides an excellent backdrop for great movie ideas,” he said. “There is a wealth of creative talent in the Denver area. That alone should attract new productions — plus, we also have a lot of sunshine and four full seasons, unlike L.A.” A trip to any of the many small theaters in the metro area demonstrates there’s a wealth acting talent, and that includes all ages. Despite being so young, 10-year-old Payton Maynard, of Arvada, has already worked in several independent films and is one of the leads in “Frozen Dead.” She recently took to the stage for the first time in the role of the Young Queen Elizabeth II in Aurora’s Vintage Theatre’s production of “The Audience.” “There is obviously going to be double the amount of opportunities to work as an actor in other places like Los Angeles or New York, but I have found a good amount of work here,” she said. “You just have to know how to look for it. I have a fantastic agent and manager that are always giving me opportunities, and I have an amazing mother who works hard to make good connections with people in the film industry.” Maynard’s mother Courtney has been keeping an eye on the Denver film scene as she helps out her daughter and is eager to see how the form will grow in the area. “I would love to see bigger directors take advantage of the amazing talent from crew to cast that all call Colorado home,” she said. “Because the Metro area is so condensed there is a large group of actors and crew that all know each other and network together. Having personally worked with a lot of them, I can say that the Denver scene has some dynamite industry professionals.”


Elbert County News 15

July 12, 2018

Arts venue lobby gets dramatic new paint job

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top in to see Town Hall Arts Center’s spiffy redecorated lobby when you’re next in downtown Littleton. Life Scout Jack Rutherford has pretty much grown up around Town Hall where his mother, Leslie Rutherford, is marketing and PR director, so when it came time to propose an Eagle Scout project, he proposed repainting the historic building’s lobby, with volunteer help from more than 30 painters. The dramatic results will add a new spark to the public interaction that inhabits the space day and night. The staff voted on the color scheme, chosen from suggestions by Calla Meek of Bryant Flink Architecture and Design, which is advising the THAC board on possible future uses of the inviting space at 2450 W. Main St. The new season will start in September. Open 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Mondays through Fridays. Pastels show The Mile High National Pastel Exhibition opens July 12 at the PACE Center, 20000 Pikes Peak Ave., Parker, and will be open until Aug. 27 daytimes and during performances. Art lovers may recall the beautiful national exhibit the Pastel Society of Colorado mounted at the Littleton Museum last summer. The juror is Marla Baggetta, who is nationally recognized. New bio Writer Linda Wommack of Littleton has just published a biography: “Ann Bassett, Colorado’s Cattle Queen,” the first book about the fascinating and feisty Colorado cattlewoman, who was fearless about dealing with the cattle barons who wanted to take advantage of her perceived weakness as a woman. (We’ll look forward to reading and writing about it soon!) Art of Nature Pam Roth O’Mara will teach “Art of Nature” for 9- to 13-year-olds, from 10 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. on July 27 at South Platte Park. Observation, reflection, art and writing will fill thumbprint journals. Use colored pencils and newly sharpened powers of observation to record a day with nature. All

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materials included. Contact victorias@ sspr.org. Register at 303-347-5999 or go to ssprd.org/Catalog, click on Nature and go to Children’s Nature.

Highlands Ranch Historical Society “UFOs, Bigfoot and the Paranormal” Sonya Ellingboe will be presented by Jonathan Dover and Stanley Milford Jr. at 7 p.m. on July 16 for the Highlands Ranch Historical Society. The meeting will be held at Southridge Recreation Center at 4800 McArthur Ranch Road. The men were law enforcement officers on the Navajo Reservation and will talk about experiences from 1998 to 2010. Free for current members. A $2 contribution is suggested for non-members. Light refreshments provided. Phamaly “Into the Woods’ is open at the Space Theatre, at Arapahoe Street and Speer Boulevard in the Denver Center for the Performing Arts complex, through Aug. 5. The annual musical production by Phamaly Theatre Company will offer a rehash of favorite fairy tales performed by 28 actors with a variety of disabilities. The musical by Stephen Sondheim follows the Baker and his wife as they hope for a baby and meet other characters such as Little Red Riding Hood, the Wolf, the Witch (of course), Rapunzel, Cinderella, Snow White, Sleeping Beauty, assorted princes, a giant and more. Christy Montour Larson directs. Performances: 7:30 p.m. Thursdays, Fridays, Saturdays and Monday, July 23; 2 p.m. Sundays. ASL interpreter July 23, 29. Sensory friendly performance 7:30 p.m. Thursday, August 2. Tickets: DCPA: 303-893-4100, denvercenter.org. Henry Awards The Colorado Theatre Guild announces that the annual Henry Awards will be given on July 23 at 7 p.m. at Lone Tree Arts Center, 10075 Commons St., Lone Tree. (6 p.m. Cock-

Town Hall’s newly-painted lobby is the result of Jack Rutherford’s Eagle Scout project — and a lot of help from his friends. COURTESY PHOTO tails.) Tickets: $35 CTG members; $40 non-members in advance; $45 at the door. Lonetreeartscenter.org, 720-5091000. All-Colorado Show The 35th Annual All Colorado

Show opens on July 31 at the Depot Art Gallery, 2069 W. Powers Ave., Littleton. The Juror is artist Joan Kresek. This Western Welcome Week event runs through Sept. 9. 303-795-0781, depotartgallery.org.

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16 Elbert County News

July 12, 2018J

Master gardeners give green light to growing Experts share tips for raising plants in Colorado BY DAVID GILBERT DGILBERT@COLORADOCOMMUNITYMEDIA.COM

Anyone who’s tried to grow so much as a tomato in Colorado knows how tricky gardening can be here. Thankfully, gardeners flummoxed by the difficulties of mile-high growing can stop by Littleton’s Hudson Gardens to lean on the expertise of the Master Gardeners of Colorado State University’s County Extension program. A team of dedicated gardeners, trained and certified by the university’s Arapahoe County Extension office, nurtures and maintains Hudson Gardens’ 23 raised vegetable and herb beds, and hosts twice-monthly “Meet the Gardeners” events through the end of September. “We grow the standard

Master Gardener Ashley Cleveland thins carrots in Hudson Gardens’ raised veggie beds. PHOTOS BY DAVID GILBERT

things: tomatoes, peppers, lettuce, beets, carrots, beans and squash,” said Master Gardener Debbie Moody. “We also do some unusual stuff: artichokes, okra and kohlrabi, for instance. All our raised beds are at a height that’s comfortable for people in wheelchairs or who use walkers. We want to demonstrate that all kinds of people can garden at home.” The garden’s produce goes to the food bank at Integrated Family Community Services, Moody said. Master Gardeners undergo a rigorous process to earn their title, said Donna FarleyWade, who also helps maintain the garden. “We don’t give out opinion or our personal observations — none of that folklore stuff you hear a lot,” Farley-Wade said. “We do, however, have lots of evidence-based data to share. Stuff that’s been tested.” The Hudson Garden group’s goal is to connect as many people as possible with

Guests can visit Hudson Gardens twice a month to rub elbows with trained Master Gardeners. the joys of growing their own food, said Master Gardener Ashley Cleveland. “Everyone can garden in some way,” Cleveland said. “Even if you’re in an apartment, you can grow herbs, lettuce, or even just houseplants. Gardening is healing and grounding.”

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Donna Farley-Wade fertilizes peppers in Hudson Gardens’ veggie beds.

WAY TO GROW Here are some tips for home gardeners as summer heats up, from the Colorado State University Arapahoe County Extension Master Gardeners who maintain the veggies and herbs of Hudson Gardens: Make sure to water consistently, preferably in the morning or evening. Fertilize tomatoes every two weeks until the fruits are two inches across, then stop. Prune tomatoes and make sure the plants have sturdy supports to hold the

weight of the fruits. Plant another round of quick-growing crops: carrots, radishes and beets, for example. Start seeds indoors of coldweather plants for fall, like broccoli, Brussels sprouts and cauliflower. Keep an eye out for pests and disease. Reaching out Hudson Gardens, at 6115 S. Santa Fe Drive in Littleton, will host the Master Gardeners from 9:30-11:30 a.m. on July 9 and 23, Aug.

6 and 20, and Sept. 10 and 24. Got tough gardening questions? You can call Arapahoe County’s Master Gardeners from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Monday through Friday, or leave messages after hours, at 303-7301920. The Arapahoe County Extension office also offers classes — and Master Gardener certification — at their office at 6934 S. Lima St., Suite B, in Centennial. Visit arapahoe.extension.colostate.edu for information.


Elbert County News 17

July 12, 2018

Study finds coffee drinkers may live longer

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Lena Aslan, of Elizabeth, was named to the spring 2018 dean’s list at Chadron State College. Kristofer K. Bauer, of Elizabeth, was named to the winter 2018 scholastic honor roll at Oregon State University. Miranda Lynne Brockman, of Elizabeth, graduated in May from the University of Nebraska-Lincoln with a bachelor’s degree in biological systems engineering. Tyler Dean Grant, of Elizabeth,

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Go ahead and have that cup of coffee, maybe even several more. New research shows it may boost chances for a longer life, even for those who down at least eight cups daily. In a study of nearly half-a-million British adults, coffee drinkers had a slightly lower risk of death over 10 years than abstainers. The apparent longevity boost was seen with instant, ground and decaffeinated, results that echo U.S. research. It’s the first large study to suggest a benefit even in people with genetic glitches affecting how their bodies use caffeine. Overall, coffee drinkers were about 10 percent to 15 percent less likely to die than abstainers during a decade of follow-up. Differences by amount of coffee consumed and genetic variations were minimal. The results don’t prove your coffee pot is a fountain of youth nor are they a reason for abstainers to start drinking coffee, said Alice Lichtenstein, a Tufts University nutrition expert who was not involved in the research. But she said the results reinforce previous research and add additional reassurance for coffee drinkers. “It’s hard to believe that something we enjoy so much could be good for us. Or at least not be bad,” Lichtenstein said. The study was published July 2 in the journal JAMA Internal Medicine. It’s not clear exactly how drinking coffee might affect longevity. Lead author Erikka Loftfield, a researcher at the U.S. National Cancer Institute, said coffee contains more than 1,000 chemical compounds including antioxidants, which help protect cells from damage. Other studies have suggested that substances in coffee may reduce inflammation and improve how the

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body uses insulin, which can reduce chances for developing diabetes. Loftfield said efforts to explain the potential longevity benefit are continuing. Adam Taylor, fetching two iced coffees for friends recently in downtown Chicago, said the study results make sense. “Coffee makes you happy, it gives you something to look forward to in the morning,” said Taylor, a sound engineer from Las Vegas. “I try to have just one cup daily,” Taylor said. “Otherwise I get a little hyper.” For the study, researchers invited 9 million British adults to take part; 498,134 women and men aged 40 to 69 agreed. The low participation rate means those involved may have been healthier than the general U.K. population, the researchers said. Participants filled out questionnaires about daily coffee consumption, exercise and other habits, and received physical exams including blood tests. Most were coffee drinkers; 154,000 or almost one-third drank two to three cups daily and 10,000 drank at least eight cups daily. During the next decade, 14,225 participants died, mostly of cancer or heart disease. Caffeine can cause short-term increases in blood pressure, and some smaller studies have suggested that it might be linked with high blood pressure, especially in people with a genetic variation that causes them to metabolize caffeine slowly. But coffee drinkers in the U.K. study didn’t have higher risks than nondrinkers of dying from heart disease and other blood pressurerelated causes. And when all causes of death were combined, even slow caffeine metabolizers had a longevity boost. As in previous studies, coffee drinkers were more likely than abstainers to drink alcohol and smoke, but the researchers took those factors into account, and coffee drinking seemed to cancel them out. The research didn’t include whether participants drank coffee black or with cream and sugar. But Lichtenstein said loading coffee with extra fat and calories isn’t healthy.

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10-year British overview raises intriguing possibilities

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18 Elbert County News

July 12, 2018J

Game’s reach goes beyond beach BY JIM BENTON JBENTON@COLORADOCOMMUNITYMEDIA.COM

Shelly Leuenberger temporarily left her love of playing beach volleyball behind when she moved with her family from California to Colorado. However, the Parker resident is playing volleyball again in the sand in landlocked Colorado after finding The Island, a beach volleyball facility in southeast Denver. “There’s no beaches here,” said Leuenberger. “I’m from Hermosa Beach where beach volleyball is major league. I used to play at the beach all the time. “When I moved here 3 1/2 years ago, I gave up the sport and then I found this place. It’s is a little bit different than at the beach but it makes me feel good that I’m back into it.” Beach volleyball is booming around the Denver area, with sand courts at bars, clubs and parks. The Island, 2233 S.Geneva St., has six indoor sand courts, two outside and plans are to add six more outdoor courts. Tom Davenport is the owner and he also owns The Oasis at 2400 W. Midway Blvd. in

Players can participate in a variety of beach volleyball games at The Island in Denver. RUSS DIX Broomfield. The Oasis has seven indoor and three outdoor beach volleyball courts. There are leagues at both locations with six-on-six competition, four-on-four and the popular two-on-two doubles that is seen on television and at the Olympics. There is no ocean, sea or bay around the sand courts in Colorado and players don’t have to worry about elements like the wind off the shore. “What is different than an actual beach is the sand is fluffier and deeper,” said Leuenberger. “The sand is

more shallow here and that’s the only difference.” Sand in Colorado is sometimes called “jumpers sand” because the sand on the genuine beaches is deeper, which makes in harder to jump. The popularity of beach volleyball is at least partially because of the inclusivity of the sport. “I found is it is a game that lends itself to coed participation,” said Davenport. “You can play with men and women on a court. It’s a relatively level playing field.” And all players are involved.

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“It has a high degree of immediate gratification,” Davenport said. “Every time the ball comes over the net, especially in doubles beach volleyball, you get to touch it, you get to pass it, set it or hit it. Every point, every play, you are involved. “In golf, you get to hit the ball 100 times around the golf course and you can be either a hero or goat. Volleyball has that same addiction component because of the gratification.” There are some unwritten rules involved the culture at The Island. For instance, a guy never blocks a lady. “There is a volleyball etiquette you have to know here because some people don’t follow it and they don’t last long,” said Adam Wiedel, of Castle Rock. “People start getting on their cases.” Wiedel lists several reasons people keep playing beach volleyball. “Some people like the competitiveness and some like the sport, some people like the accomplishment, some like to have the beer and some like to have good friends,” he said. “It is whatever drives them to have fun that keeps them coming back.”

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Elbert County Prohibited: Fireworks Open burning of any kind Outdoor smoking, except smoking within an enclosed vehicle or building, a developed recreation site, or while stopped in an area at least three feet in diameter that is barren or cleared of all flammable materials Model rockets Indoor fireplaces and wood-burning stoves without an approved chimney spark arrestor Recreational motor vehicles without a Forest Service-approved spark arrestor

Gina Engbarth of Centennial plays 20 hours a week. “It is not surprising anymore to play beach volleyball in Colorado,” she said. “Tom (Davenport) has done so much for beach volleyball in Denver. “You can play year round. I don’t know how much more it can grow because there are so many people involved in the sport but, yeah, I think it will continue to grow here in Colorado and across the U.S.” Kris Bredehoft of Englewood is a player and coach. “The sport is definitely big here,” she said. “Girls are solely going for beach scholarships now, where they used to go for hard court. There are a lot of the same principles but it is a hard transition from hard court to beach. “In hard court, players specialize in a position. In beach, you play every position. It makes you more versatile.” Women’s beach volleyball is recognized as an emerging sport by the NCAA with 93 schools, including 54 in Division I, having varsity teams. Colorado Mesa, a Division II school in Grand Junction, is the only college in Colorado to have a team but several other schools are considering adding the sport.

Fire pits Chimineas Burning trash and brush Smoking, except within an enclosed vehicle or building, or while stopped in an area of at least six feet in diameter that is barren or cleared of all combustible material Chainsaws need to have spark arrestor and fire extinguisher and shovel nearby Welding torches restricted Lakewood Prohibited: Fires of any kind, including but not limited to charcoal grills and fire pits Model rockets Smoking, except in an enclosed vehicle or an area six feet in diameter that is barren or cleared of all combustible material

Jefferson County Prohibited: Fireworks Charcoal grills Tiki torches

Parker Prohibited: Fireworks Open burning of any kind Model rockets in city parks

PARKS

Discover cards. Kiosks are now installed at Boyd Lake, Castlewood Canyon, Chatfield, Lory, North Sterling, Highline, James M. Robb — Island Acres and Lake Pueblo state parks. Later this summer, kiosks will be installed at Cherry Creek, Eleven Mile, Golden Gate, Staunton, Steamboat Lake, Cheyenne Mountain and Lathrop.

FROM PAGE 7

Teklits said more than 800 daily passes and 55 annual passes have been sold through the kiosks since the first ones were installed June 13. The kiosks accept Visa, Mastercard and


Elbert County News 19

July 12, 2018

CLUBS Editor’s note: Send new listings or changes to hharden@coloradocommunitymedia.com. Deadline is noon Wednesday a week before publication. AA If you want to drink, that’s your business. If you want to stop, that’s ours. More than 1,000 AA meetings are offered in the Denver area every week. If you think you may have a problem with alcohol, come see us. To find a meeting near you, call 303-3224440, or go to www.daccaa.org. Affordable Colleges Online: guidebook includes a collection of scholarships for women, including due dates and award amounts; insight into the financial aid application process; and other funding opportunities, such as industry-specific scholarships and funding for special groups. Go to http://www.affordablecollegesonline. org/womens-guide-paying-for-college/ Camping Singles: 7 p.m. the first Tuesday of the month. Membership ranges from 40s to 60-plus. Colorado single adults who enjoy camping, fishing, hiking, swimming, biking, sightseeing, photography, the camaraderie of others, and starry nights around the camp fire. We usually camp in designated forest service or state park campgrounds within 2 to 5 hours of Denver. Contact campingsingles@gmail.com Castle Rock Bridge Club: 1 p.m. Mondays and Wednesdays at Plum Creek Golf Club, 331 Players Club Drive, Castle Rock. Friendly, ACBL-sanctioned duplicate games. For assistance in finding a bridge partner, call Georgiana Butler at 303-810-8504. Go to www.castlerockbridge.com. Chess: 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturdays at the Simla Library. All skill levels and ages welcome. Call 719-541-2573. Douglas-Elbert County Music Teachers’ Association: 9 a.m. every first Thursday at Parker Bible Church, between Jordan and Chambers on Mainstreet. All area music teachers are welcome. Call Lucie Washburn, 303-814-3479. Elbert County Sheriff’s Posse: a nonprofit volunteer organization that is part of the Elbert County Sheriff’s Office. As volunteers we support the Elbert County Sheriff’s Office, all law enforcement in our county, and the community at large. Go to http://www. elbertcountysheriff.com/posse.html, or contact Dave Peontek at 303-646-5456. Elizabeth American Legion, Post 82: a veteran’s association supporting veterans, their families and the community, meets the first Monday of every month (except when the first Monday is a holiday, in which case the meeting is the second Monday) at the Legion Post Hall at South Banner Street and Elm Street in Elizabeth. Social hour begins at 5:30 and the regular business meeting starts at 6:30. Friday Afternoon Club meets from 5-7 p.m. every Friday and Veterans Coffee Club meets every Wednesday from 8-11 a.m. for social time with other veterans. All Veterans are invited to all meetings, we’d like to see you. Website: aml82.org. Elizabeth Food Bank: 12:30-3 p.m. Friday and 9-11:30 a.m. Saturday at 381 S. Banner in Elizabeth (next door to Elizabeth Presbyterian Church); available to help anyone who needs food. Other times by

appointment. Game Night: 4 p.m. Mondays at the Kiowa Library; call 303-621-2111. Also, 5 p.m. Tuesdays and 5 p.m. Wednesdays at the Elbert Library; call 303-648-3533. Enjoy board, card, and video games for all ages. Go to pplibraries.org. Kiowa Creek Food Pantry: open from 8:30 a.m. to noon Tuesdays in the Fellowship Hall at 231 Cheyenne Street, Kiowa. Distribution for the State of Colorado TEFAP food program. Food is distributed monthly to low-income individuals/families that qualify. We also distribute low-income senior food boxes for the state; those 60 and older may qualify for a monthly supplement. If you are in need of food assistance or know someone who is, we may be able to qualify you for one of these programs. Call the food pantry at 303-621-2376. Knitting Group: 2 p.m. Tuesdays at the Kiowa Library. Knit and chat. All skill levels welcome. Call 303-621-2111 or go to pplibraries.org. Lawyers at the Library: 6-9 p.m. the second Tuesday of every month at the Elizabeth Library, 651 W. Beverly St. Free legal clinic for parties who have no attorney. Volunteer attorneys will answer questions, help fill out forms and explain the process and procedure for the areas of family law, civil litigation, criminal defense, property law, probate law, collections, appeals, landlordtenant law and civil protection orders. Walk-ins welcome. Everyone will be helped on a first-come, first-served basis.

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LEGO Master Brickster: 3:45 p.m. Thursdays at the Kiowa Library. Build LEGO stuff together. Call 303-621-2111 or go to pplibraries.org. Mystery Book Club: 9:30 a.m. the first Saturday of each month at the Simla Public Library. The group enjoys talking about a variety of mystery authors and titles. We also periodically host a Colorado author during our meetings. Everyone may join us, and registration is not required. Visit the Simla Branch of the Elbert County Library District at 504 Washington Avenue, call 719-541-2573, or email farabe@elbertcountylibrary.org. Outback Express: public transit service provided by the East Central Council of Local Governments. To ensure a seat is available, 24-hour notice appreciated. Call Kay Campbell, 719- 541-4275, or 800-825-0208 for reservations. Go to eccog.com. Outback Express runs from Simla and Matheson to Colorado Springs on the first and third Monday of each month; from Simla and Matheson to Limon on the fourth Thursday of each month; from Kiowa, Elizabeth and Elbert to Parker or Colorado Springs on the first and third Tuesday of each month; from Elizabeth to Colorado Springs or Parker on the second Tuesday of each month. Good Samaritan Nursing Home Residents may ride the bus on the second Thursday of each month. Overeaters Anonymous: 10-11 a.m. and from 7-8 p.m. Wednesdays in the Sedalia Room at New Hope Presbyterian Church, 2100 Meadows Parkway, Castle Rock. SEE CLUBS, P20

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20 Elbert County News

CLUBS FROM PAGE 19

Parker-Franktown-Elizabeth Paper Crafting Club: regular meetings on various weekday evenings and weekends at 7786 Prairie Lake Trail, Parker (in the Pinery). Open to anyone interested in card making and scrapbooking. Contact Alison Collins at 720-212-4788 or find us online at http:// www.meetup.com/Parker-FranktownElizabeth-Paper-Crafting-Club/

Ranchland Republican Women: 7 p.m. third Monday of each month at the Elizabeth Library, 651 Beverly St. Membership is open to Republicans only. Dues are $25 for a full voting member (women only) and $10 for a non-voting member (can be women or men). For a membership application and other information, go to www. RanchlandRepublianWomen.org.

Seniors Meet: 11 a.m. Mondays at the Elizabeth Senior Center, 823 S. Banner St. Bring a dish for potluck on the first Monday of each month. Other Mondays, bring a sack lunch. Bingo, games and socializing. New leadership. Call Agnes at 303-883-7881 or Carol at 303-646-3425.

Simla Open Mic Night: 6:30 p.m. Fridays

July 12, 2018J at the Simla Library. Share poetry, music, dance, comedy or painting (inter alios), or just come and watch.3333

Teen Tuesday: 5 p.m. Tuesdays at the Elbert Library. Play card and video games. Call 303-648-3533 or go to pplibraries.org.

Sky Cliff Center Caregiver Support Group: 10-11:30 a.m. the third Tuesday of each month at 4600 E. Highway 86, Castle Rock. Caregiving for adults can be challenging at times, and you’re not alone. For information, or to let the center know if you’re coming, call 303-814-2863 or email skycliffctr@ skycliff.org. Go to www.skycliff.org

Therapeutic riding: Promise Ranch Therapeutic Riding in Parker offers free therapeutic riding for developmentally disabled adults and children. Scholarship money is available for Douglas County residents to provide 10 therapeutic riding lessons. Call 303-841-5007 or visit www.promiseranchtherapeuticriding.com.

Sky Cliff Center Stroke Support Group: 10 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. the second and last Wednesday of each month at Christlife Community Church, 5451 E. Highway 86, Franktown (lunch provided). Also, 10-11:30 a.m. the third Wednesday of each month at Sky Ridge Medical Center, 10101 Ridge Gate Parkway, Lone Tree. Call Sky Cliff Center at 303-814-2863. Southeast Beekeeping Club meets from 6:30-8:30 p.m. the first Wednesday of every month at the North Pinery Firehouse, Parker. All levels of beekeeping welcome, from no-bees to wanna-bees to tons of bees. Our meeting time is spent solving beekeeping challenges, networking and refreshments. There is no fee for this meeting and a lending library is available. Call Sue Huseby, 970376-5236 or email sebcbeemail@gmail. com. Go to southeastbeekeepingclub.com.

HAVE AN EVENT? To submit a calendar listing, send information to calendar@coloradocommunitymedia. com.

VFW Post 10649: 8:30 a.m. the first Saturday of every month at 24325 Main St., Elbert. Go to http://www.vfwpost10649.org. Contact Alan Beebe at 303-435-2560 for questions. VFW Post 4266: 7 p.m. the third Monday of every month at the Pinery Fire Station, Community Room Lower Level, 8170 N. Hillcrest Way, Parker. Serving veterans of foreign wars in Parker, Castle Pines and Castle Rock areas. Go to www.vfwpost4266.org. P.O. Box 4266, Parker, CO 80134. On Facebook at VFW Post 4266, Parker. Waste Not Wednesdays: 4:15 p.m. Wednesdays, at Simla Library. Kids craft and learn with repurposed stuff. Call 719-541-2573 or go to pplibraries.org.

NORTON FROM PAGE 12

Like a good joke, motivation and inspiration require the right timing and delivery or they can seem off-putting and offensive. Some may find that hard to believe; however, life brings real challenges and trying times, and when we are in one of those seasons of life, what we need is more hope and encouragement instead of motivation and inspiration. They are very much the same; however, certain situations call for one more than the other. Now we need to remember what Zig Ziglar said about motivation, “People often say that motivation doesn’t last. Well neither does bathing, that is why

Widowed Men and Women of America, a nonprofit organization of the state based in Denver, has more than 5o0 members. The group sponsors social events for members to make new friends and have fun with people who have shared life experiences. Members live in the Denver metro area and surrounding communities. Members are encouraged to visit different links to find the best fit for their interests. Contact Dorothy at 303-794-7547 or Les at 303-797-1209, or go to www.widowedamerica.org. What’s up Wednesdays: 4 p.m. Wednesdays at the Elbert Library; 3:30 p.m. Wednesdays at the Kiowa Library. Free STEAM activities for kids and parents. Call 303-648-3533 (Elbert) or 303-621-2111 (Kiowa) or go to pplibraries.org. Women’s Divorce Workshop: 8:30 a.m. to noon the fourth Saturday of each month at Southeast Christian Church, 9650 Jordan Road, Parker. Check in from 8-8:30 a.m. Register online at www.divorceworkshopdenver.com. Legal, financial and social issues of divorce. Volunteer presenters include an attorney, mediator, therapist and wealth manager. Discussion items include co-parenting, child support, family coping, tax consequences, property division, hostile spouses and more. Contact 303-210-2607 or info@divorceworkshopdenver.com.

we recommend it daily.” What a great quote and reminder for anyone needing a little pick me up. And I can share with you that there is no better way to get motivated and stay motivated than by being a source of motivation to others, offering hope and encouragement whenever we can. So how about you? What is your “Best news of the day?” I would love to hear you story at gotonorton@ gmail.com and when we can stay connected and offer our love, support, hope, and encouragement, it really will be a better than good week. Michael Norton is a resident of Castle Rock, the president of the Zig Ziglar Corporate Training Solutions Team, a strategic consultant and a business and personal coach.

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Elbert County News 21

July 12, 2018

HOW TO MAKE A DIFFERENCE

Alzheimer’s Association, Colorado Chapter: Provides care and support to 67,000-plus families dealing with all kinds of dementing illnesses. Need: Walk to End Alzheimer’s committee members. Requirements: Individuals who love to help plan and execute. Our Walk to End Alzheimer’s attracts more than 10,000 people, so planning committee members are essential. Contact: Deb Wells, 303-813-1669 or dwells@ alz.org. Animal Rescue of the Rockies: Provides foster care for death-row shelter dogs and cats throughout Colorado Need: Foster families for animals on lists to be euthanized Contact: www.animalrescueoftherockies.org. Arthritis Foundation, Colorado/Wyoming Chapter: Helps conquer everyday battles through life-changing information and resources, access to care, advancements in sciences and community connections. Need: Walk to Cure Arthritis committee members and general office volunteer support. Requirements: Individuals who love to help plan and execute Walk to Cure Arthritis. We combat arthritis every day, so support from volunteers so that we can serve people is crucial. Contact: Amy Boulas, aboulas@arthritis.org, 720-409-3143. ASSE International Student Exchange Program: Organizes student exchange programs Need: Local host families to provide homes for boys and girls age 15-18 from a variety of

coutries. Contact: Cathy Hintz, 406-488-8325 or 800733-2773 AYUSA: International Youth Exchange Program: Promotes quality exchange programs for high school students from around the world. Need: Host families for international high school students ages 15-18 studying in the Denver area. Requirements: To provide students with a safe home, meals and transportation for 5-10 months. All family types are considered. Must fill out onlilne application and pass background check. Contact: Adrienne Bivens, 720-467-6430 or abivens@ayusa.org. Go to www.ayusa.org. Castle Rock Senior Activity Center: Provides services to local seniors Need: Volunteer drivers to take seniors to appointments, the grocery store, pharmacies and more. Contact: Steph Schroeder, 303-688-9498 Colorado Humane Society: Handles animal abuse and neglect cases Need: Volunteers to care for pregnant cats, dogs and their litters, as well as homes for cats and dogs that require socializing or that are recovering from surgery or injuries. Contact: Teresa Broaddus, 303-961-3925 Court Appointed Special Advocates: Works with abused and neglected children in Arapahoe, Douglas, Elbert and Lincoln counties Need: Advocates for children, to get to know, speak up for and ensure their best interests in court Contact: 303-695-1882 or www.adv4children. org. Douglas/Elbert Task Force: Provides assistance to people in Douglas and Elbert counties who are in serious economic need, at risk of homelessness or in similar crisis. Need: Volunteers to assist in the food bank, client services and the thrift store Treasures on Park Street. Contact: Marion Dahlem, 303-688-1114, ext. 32 SEE VOLUNTEERS, P22

Answers

Solution © 2016 King Features Synd., Inc.

Editor’s note: Send new listings or changes to hharden@coloradocommunitymedia.com. Deadline is noon Wednesday a week before publication. AARP Foundation Tax-Aide: Offers free tax filing help to anyone, especially those 50 and older, who cannot afford a tax preparation service. Need: Volunteers to to help older, lowerincome taxpayers prepare their tax returns. Requirement: All levels of experience are welcome; training and support provided. Contact: 1-888-OUR-AARP (687-2277) or www.aarpfoundation.org/taxaide

THANKS for

PLAYING!


22 Elbert County News

July 12, 2018J

VOLUNTEERS FROM PAGE 21

Dumb Friends League Harmony Equine Center: Cares for homeless horses and other equines. Need: Volunteers to work with horses and other opportunities. Requirements: Must be 16 years old, pass a background check, and be able to commit to at least three hours a week for three months. Other Information: Two-hour orientation provides an overview of the services provided, learn about the volunteer opportunities, take a tour of the center, and talk with staff and volunteers. Contact: 303-751-5772 or go to www. ddfl.org. Elbert County Sheriff’s Posse: Supports the Elbert County Sheriff’s Office and the Office of Emergency Management with detentions support, patrol, administrative duties, event security, emergency services support, and callouts as need arises. Need: With proper training and clearances, volunteers help with patrol, fingerprinting, records keeping, community event security services, disaster response and management (wildfire, tornado, blizzard, flood, disaster relief, etc.). Requirements: Must be 21 years of age or older; retired individuals are great. Must complete a employment application, pass a background check, and complete interviews. After being sworn

in, in the first three months of membership, complete a minimum of 45 hours of orientation and training curriculum. After this 90-day probationary period, members must log a minimum of 10 hours of month and attend monthly training meetings. Persons ages 15-20, may join the Elbert County Sheriffs Explorer POST that is associated with the Posse. Contact: David Peontek at djp1911@ msn.com or 303-646-5456. Go to http://www.elbertcountysheriff.com/ posse.html; print out and complete an employment application and turn it into the Elbert County Sheriff’s Office in Kiowa, “Attn: David Peontek.” Girl Scouts of Colorado: Youth organization for girls Need: Troop leaders, office support, administrative help and more Age requirement: Men and women, 18 and older Contact: www.girlscoutsofcolorado.org, inquiry@gscolorado.org or 1-877-4045708 Hospice at Home Need: Volunteers help patients and their families with respite care, videotaping, massage and other tasks. Home study training is available. Contact 303-698-6404 Hospice of Covenant Care: Nonprofit, faith-based hospice Need: Volunteers to support patients and families Contact: 303-731-8039

Meals on Wheels: Delivers meals to residents in Englewood, southern Jefferson County and western Arapahoe County Need: Drivers to deliver meals; volunteers to help prepare, box and label meals Requirements: Must dedicate one to two hours a week Contact: Phil or Mary at 303-798-7642 (from 8 a.m. to noon Mondays through Fridays) Neighbor Network: Nonprofit that helps older adults stay independent. Serves all of Douglas County Need: Volunteers who can provide transportation, light housekeeping, handyman and companion services to seniors. Requirements: Must be at least 21 years old and have a valid driver’s license and auto insurance. Contact: 303-814-4300, neighbornetwork@douglas.co.us or dcneighbornetwork.org. Parker Senior Center: Provides services to local seniors. Need: Volunteer drivers to take seniors to the center for a hot meal, to appointments, to the grocery store, and more. Contact: Louise West at 303-841-5370. PeopleFirst Hospice: Denver hospice Need: Volunteers to provide companionship to hospice patients and their families. Contact: Rachel Wang at 303-546-7921 Red Cross: Supports the elderly, international causes and social services Need: Volunteers to provide support

Contact: 303-607-4768 or 303-2667855 Sunset Hospice: Provides end-of-life support Need: Volunteer training is from 6-10 p.m. every second and fourth Tuesdays; they also meet from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. every first and third Saturday Contact: Jami Martin at 303-693-2105 The Right Step Inc.: Therapeutic horseback riding program for children and adults with disabilities. Based in Littleton. Need: Volunteers to help with horses before, during and after lessons, as well as to walk alongside clients as they ride to help keep them securely on their horses. Volunteers also needed to help with administrative tasks and fundraising. Requirements: Volunteers who help with lessons must be at least 14 years old and attend a three-hour training session. Contact: volunteercoordinator@ therightstepinc.org or go to www. therightstepinc.org. Volunteers of America, Foster Grandparent Program: Foster grandparents volunteer in early childhood centers and public schools focusing on literacy and numeracy for at-risk children and youth. Need: Seniors on a low, fixed income who enjoy working with children. Volunteers work 15-40 hours a week. Contact: 303-297-0408 or www. voacolorado.org.

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Notices

Elbert County News 23

July 12, 2018

Public Notices Notice To Creditors PUBLIC NOTICE NOTICE TO CREDITORS Estate of Gordon Richard Enright; aka Gordon R. Enright; aka Gordon Enright Deceased Case Number: 18PR30029

All persons having claims against the abovenamed estate are required to present them to the Personal Representative or to the District Court of Elbert County, Colorado on or before December 3, 2018, or the claims may be forever barred. Karen Christine Enright; aka, Karen C. Enright; aka Karen Enright Personal Representative 9988 Indian Trail Peyton, CO 80831 Legal Notice No: 24084 First Publication: July 12, 2018 Last Publication: July 26, 2018 Publisher: Elbert County News

City and County

City and County

Public Notice

Public Notice

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING Economic Development Zone - EDZ Overlay Zoning Map

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING PROPOSED 2017 AMENDED BUDGET FOR THE ELIZABETH FIRE PROTECTION DISTRICT

Notice is hereby given that on Tuesday, July 24, 2018 at 7 P.M., or as soon as possible thereafter, a public hearing will be held before the Planning Commission AND on Wednesday, August 8, 2018, at 1 P.M. or as soon as possible thereafter, a hearing will be held before the Board of County Commissioners, both meetings will be held in the Hearing Room of the Elbert County Commissioners at 215 Comanche Street, Kiowa, Colorado, or at such other times and places as these hearings may be adjourned, concerning a proposed amendment to the Elbert County Zoning Regulations. Further information concerning this proposal is on file with Elbert County Community and Development Services, 215 Comanche Street, Kiowa, Colorado 80117, and may also be obtained by calling 303-621-3185.

Interested electors of the Fire District may file or register any objections thereto at any time prior to the final action on the amended 2017 budget.

Legal Notice No.: 24085 First Publication: July 12, 2018 Last Publication: July 12, 2018 Publisher: The Elbert County News

BY ORDER OF THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS OF THE ELIZABETH FIRE PROTECTION DISTRICT.

To advertise your public notices call 303-566-4100

GIVING POWER TO THE PEOPLE

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In accordance with state law, a proposed amended budget has been submitted to the Board of Directors of the Elizabeth Fire Protection District for fiscal year 2017. A copy of the proposed amended 2017 budget is available for public inspection at the Fire District’s Station #1, 155 W. Kiowa Ave., Elizabeth, Co. 80107. A Public Hearing on the proposed amended 2017 budget will be held at 7:00 p.m. on July 17, 2019, at Station #1, at which time the Fire District Board will take final action on the proposed amended 2017 budget.

To know more, read the public notices in today’s newspaper or go to

By:/s/ Wayne Austgen, Secretary Legal Notice No: 24087 First Publication: July 12, 2018 Last Publication: July 12, 2018 Publisher: Elbert County News

publicnoticecolorado.com Brought to you by your newspaper and the Colorado Press Association

Elbert County Warrants Public Notice Vendor Name

Description

A AND E TIRE INC Auto Rep A PEST CONTROL CO. Blding Repairs AARMS Software Support CONFIDENTIAL COUNTY ADMINISTRATION AIRGAS INTERMOUNTAIN Shop Supplies ALCOCK LAW GROUP Civil Process ALL RENTAL CENTER Equipment Rental ALL TEMPERATURES CONTROLLED INC Blding Repairs ALL TRUCK AND TRAILER PARTS Equipment Parts ALWAYS CONNECT SOLUTIONS Equipment AMERICAN FIDELITY ASSURANCE COMPANY Benefits Payable ARAPAHOE HEATING SERVICE INC HVAC SERVICE CONFIDENTIAL CHILD SUPPORT AUTO CHLOR SYSTEM OF DENVER Maint. Agreement AV TECH ELECTRONICS INC Auto Rep & Maint BANK OF THE WEST CREDIT CARD BARBARA JOHNSON ROYALTY Judge BART GREER REIMBURSEMENT BASELINE ASSOCIATES CONTRACT Baseline operating BEACON 85 CLERK SPECIAL TRAINING BENDER MENDERS INSURANCE REPAIRS BERG HILL GREENLEAF AND RUSCITTI CONTRACT BESTWAY CONCRETE Capital BILLIE MILLS REIMBURSEMENT BLACK HILLS ENERGY UTILITIES BLUE STAR RECYCLERS Operating Expense BRAZOS TECHNOLOGY CORP Grant Expense BUSINESS INK CO Office Supplies CAFCA CHILD WELFARE CARIE CRAIG Civil Process CAROLYN BURGENER CONTRACT CARPET EXCHANGE CHILD WELFARE CENTENNIAL MENTAL HEALTH CENTER INC Medical Services CENTURYLINK UTILITIES CERTIFIED LABORATORIES Other Fluids CONFIDENTIAL COUNTY ADMINISTRATION ChemTox Blood/Alcohol Analysis CHRISTIAN CONSTRUCTION Gravel CINTAS Uniforms COBITCO Asphalt Repair COLORADO BUREAU OF INVESTIGATION CONCJ1522 CHILD WELFARE COLORADO COMMUNITY Advertising COLORADO DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC SAFETY CCW CBI FEE COLORADO DEPT OF HEALTH AND ENVIROMENT Professional Service COLORADO PARTY RENTS Fair Events COLORADO STATE UNIVERSITY EXTENSION Operating/PAYROLL CONSOLIDATED COMMUNICATIONS UTILITIES CORONER ME Office Supplies Corporate Billing LLC Equipment Parts CORRECTIONAL HEALTHCARE Medical Services COTFA FB events COUNTY HEALTH POOL Benefits Payable CTSI Volunteer Insurance Insurance Cummins Rocky Mountain PARTS DANS TRASH UTILITIES DEEP ROCK Shop Supplies DENVER INDUSTRIAL SALES AND SERVICE CO INC Crack Seal DJ PETROLEUM INC Fuel

Amount $4,709.09 $689.00 $175.00 $88.92 $1,538.81 $48.00 $1,092.00 $913.20 $51.82 $1,146.10 $18,278.06 $7,311.55 $539.17 $169.50 $404.15 $19,628.80 $118.60 $395.89 $93,716.83 $140.00 $58.02 $2,781.10 $6,060.00 $7,200.00 $200.80 $1,155.95 $1,030.35 $6,813.56 $70.97 $100.00 $15.00 $500.00 $971.70 $205.00 $244.30 $314.83 $121.60 $25.50 $29,010.45 $1,027.49 $508.06 $79.00 $182.25 $1,596.50 $162.75 $2,425.00 $3,492.74 $307.78 $250.00 $55.70 $20,197.92 $750.00 $104,503.67 $40.60 $65.01 $1,674.52 $11.45 $129.90 $33,427.40

PAYMENTS FOR PUBLICATION JUNE 2018 DOUGLAS COUNTY DETENTIONS DIVISION Inmate Housing Expense $3,698.52 DRIVE TRAIN INDUSTRIES INC Equipment Parts $646.74 EL PASO COUNTY Autopsies $1,400.00 ELBERT COUNTY ROAD AND BRIDGE Auto Rep/FUEL $12,864.46 ELBERT COUNTY TREASURER INTRAGOVERNMENTAL /POSTAGE $270,789.35 ELBERT WATER AND SANITATION Capital $2,109.82 ELIZABETH FIRE DEPT Blood/Alcohol Analysis $300.00 ELIZABETH SCHOOL DISTRICT COLORADO WORKS $17,950.00 ELIZABETH STORAGE CHILD WELFARE $274.00 EMERGENCY VEHICLE SPECIALISTS Other Equipment $2,883.68 ENERTIA CONSULTING GR LLC CDS $33,805.00 FRANKTOWN ANIMAL CLINIC CANINE UNIT $365.41 FRONT RANGE KUBOTA Equipment Parts $623.74 GALLS INC Equipment $672.75 GENERAL SHALE BRICK INC SUPPLIES $3,850.00 GLASER GAS COMPANY Operating $5.44 GRAINGER OPERATING $1,726.16 GREAT WEST LIFE AND ANNUITY Benefits Payable $68,349.99 HAROLD ANDERSON SUPPLIES $1,085.00 HAULIN HASS TIRE RECYCLING TIRE DISPOSAL $669.35 HEATHER HARCOURT IV-E WAIVER $850.00 HES ELEVATOR SERVICES ELEVATOR SERVICE $2,356.90 HOME DEPOT CREDIT SERVICE Blding Repairs $191.56 HONNEN EQUIPMENT COMPANY Equipment Parts $2,425.09 HOUSE OF FLAGS Operating $30.00 INTEGRATED ELECTRIC Blding Repairs $1,182.00 INTERMOUNTAIN RURAL ELECTRIC ASSOCIATION UTILITIES $7,612.18 INTERSTATE BILLING SERVICE INC Equipment Parts $196.58 J&A TRAFFIC PRODUCTS Signs $17,556.00 Jerri Spear REIMBURSEMENT $105.60 JODIE SHERRIER REIMBURSEMENT $131.49 JOHN DEERE FINANCIAL Blding Repair $1,267.05 JOHNSON CONTROLS Contract $1,370.99 JOSHUA BJORK REIMBURSEMENT $40.00 KAUFFMAN SALES AND RENTALS INC CAPITAL/MAINT $10,920.87 KIEWIT INFRASTRUCTURE CO Asphalt Repair $15,595.65 KIOWA FIRE PROTECTION DISTRICT Blood/Alcohol Analysis $300.00 KIOWA WATER & WASTE WATER AUTHORITY UTILITIES $6,462.16 KIRSTEN PETERSON ROYALTY Judge $86.40 KLOPPENBERG EXCAVATING INC REIMBURSEMENT $100.00 KRIS JOHNSON REIMBURSEMENT $228.80 LABORATORY CORPORATION OF AMERICA HOLDINGS CHILD SUPPORT $38.00 LASER TECHNOLOGY Equipment $1,610.00 LEGAL SHIELD Benefits Payable $747.55 LEWAN & ASSOCIATES, INC. Copier $433.37 LEXISNEXIS RISK SOLUTIONS CHILD WELFARE $130.00 LIVE ACTION SAFETY Concealed Handgun Expend. $662.60 Lone Star Silversmith Blade Rodeo $255.00 LYLE SIGN INC NM 7165 Signs $6,960.87 MACDONALD EQUIPMENT CO. INC Asphalt Repair $1,050.00 MATT MARTINICH IV-E WAIVER $540.00 MAUREEN PELLOWSKI Operating $240.00 MCCANDLES INTERNATIONAL TRUCKS OF COLORADO Equipment $237,557.51 MCKINNEY DOOR AND HARDWARE Blding Repairs $153.60 MHC KENWORTH-DENVER EQUIPMENT $1,189.96 MIKE BRASHEAR ROYALTY Judge $101.80 MILLER COHEN PETERSON YOUNG PC Civil Process $15.00 MOUNTAIN VIEW ELECTRIC UTILITIES $414.22 N2IT PLUMBING Blding Repairs $150.00 NATIONAL PRODUCTS INC Equipment Parts $1,816.60

NATIONAL TANK OUTLET NATIONAL TIRE WAREHOUSE PARKER PORT-A-POTTY INC. PHOENIX TECHNOLOGY GROUP LLC POSTMASTER GENERAL POWER MOTIVE CORP PROF TREE & TURF EQUIP PULL TARPS PUREWATER DYNAMICS INC QUILL CORPORATION RHONDA L BRAUN RICHARD WOOD RIXSTINE RECOGNITION RMMI ROBERT L FAGER & PORTA POT RENTAL ROCK PARTS COMPANY ROUTT COUNTY MASTER GARDENERS ROYAL B THREADS LLC RUBIN BROWN LLP RUSH TRUCK CENTER OF COLORADO RYDERS PUBLIC SAFETY SATELLITE SCHMIDT CONSTRUCTION COMPANY SIGNAL GRAPHICS SNAP-ON INDUSTRIAL SOUTHWEST MOBILE STORAGE SPRINT STAPLES ADVANTAGE STATE WIRE & TERMINAL INC STEEL CORNER STEPHANI TURNER STERICYCLE STONE OIL CO INC SYSCO FOOD SERVICES TEXAS LIFE INSURANCE COMPANY THE DANNY PAUL ARDREY ESTATE TRUST THE FENCE POST THE LAW OFFICE OF JEFFREY J TIMLIN THE SIDEWELL COMPANY TODD COMPANIES, INC. TODD PEDERSON TOMAS NEWTON TOWN OF SIMLA TRANSDEV ON DEMAND YCCOS TRUE VALUE HARDWARE ULTRAMAX AMMUNITION UNITED REPROGRAPHIC SUPPLY INC UPS US BANCORP US BANK EQUIPMENT FINANCE VERIZON WIRELESS WAGNER EQUIPMENT CO INC WAKEFIELD AND ASSOCIATES INC WAXIE SANITARY SUPPLY WESTSIDE TOWING WILLIE JACKSON WINWATER XCEL ENERGY XEROX CORPORATION Y TIME

Capital Tires Equipment Rental NETWORK OPERATING Postage EQUIPMENT Equipment Parts TARP Equipment Rental Office Supplies REIMBURSEMENT REIMBURSEMENT FAIR Software Support Equipment Rental Auto Rep Travel SUPPLIES Financial CAPITAL Uniforms Capital Gravel Office Supplies Shop Supplies CHILD WELFARE Telephone Office Supplies Equipment Parts Sand Salt REIMBURSEMENT Haz Waste Rem FUEL Prisoner Meals Benefits Payable Equipment Rental Advertising CONTRACT Mapping Project CONTRACT CONTRACT Civil Process UTILITIES COUNTY ADMINISTRATION Blding Repairs Training Office Supplies Operating LEASE Copier Telephone Equipment Parts Civil Process Office Supplies Auto Rep REIMBURSEMENT CAPITAL UTILITIES Copier CONTRACT

Legal Notice No.: 24086 First Publication: July 12, 2018 Last Publication: July 12, 2018 Publisher: Elbert County News

Page * 1

$12,830.00 $295.88 $318.00 $25,095.97 $682.00 $198,405.17 $7.00 $98.08 $75.00 $483.00 $10.55 $136.00 $2,150.37 $598.50 $195.00 $8,753.25 $325.00 $5,014.00 $36,400.00 $213,692.00 $1,920.05 $24,550.55 $1,133.33 $358.26 $39.13 $306.00 $456.79 $1,988.64 $276.00 $631.10 $130.28 $253.78 $29,768.30 $2,921.26 $1,542.45 $600.00 $650.00 $15,743.10 $3,078.00 $450.00 $500.00 15.00 87.16 381.40 64.79 2,760.00 44.03 25.20 21,211.71 152.10 5,207.12 389.54 7.00 343.32 205.00 60.00 907.24 35.20 3,059.45 77.30


24 Elbert County News

July 12, 2018J

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Elbert County News 0712  
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