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75 CENTS

May 17, 2018

ELBERT COUNTY, COLORADO

A publication of

FEELING THE FORCE: Comic Con gives fans a chance to get their cosplay on P14

Outstanding class graduating from Elizabeth High Achievements will be remembered as 132 seniors move on in life BY JULIE A. TAYLOR SPECIAL TO COLORADO COMMUNITY MEDIA

pole bending and keyhole racing. In each event the rider guides his or her horse through the pattern of obstacles as quickly as possible. The rider with the fastest time wins. Mutton-busting is for riders 7 years old or younger who climb on the back of a sheep released into the arena. The idea is for the rider, who holds on tightly to the animal’s pelt, to stay mounted while the animal tries to dump the rider. The race is either to the end of the course or for a specified time, usually eight seconds. Kiowa resident Trevor Smith, the rough stock coordinator for this year’s community rodeo, is

“Outdoorsy.” “Active.” “Competitive.” “Responsible.” “Ingenious.” “Motivated.” “Like a family.” This is how teachers, administration, younger students and current seniors describe the Elizabeth High School class of 2018. They are a group that shirks stereotypes and cliques, and as numerous peers have said, their last four years will leave a legacy. At 10 a.m. May 26, 132 seniors will commemorate their hard work before moving on to their next phase. Principal Bret Mclendon said the seniors acted like true leaders this year. “This is a class with a lot of potential. There’s a lot of talent that is present in this class, whether academic or artistic or athletic. There’s a lot of potential for great things as long as they put in the effort to achieve it,” McClendon said. Peyton Baldwin, along with many of her classmates, said that cliques are hard to find in her class, and their time outdoors only brings them closer together. “Our class likes to have fun. Go outside and hike,” Peyton said. “It’s a misconception that our generation sits inside and plays video games.” Isa Tebrugge, currently a junior and elected student body president next year, said the class of 2018 motivated and inspired her. “They showed us how to be involved,” she said while serving in one of the two head positions of the Big Help volunteer Day. The other student who served in a head position for Big Help, fellow junior Lexye Wood, returned to school after a hard day of manual labor to find

SEE STAMPEDE, P9

SEE CLASS, P5

Mutton busting is part of the May 20 gymkhana events. FILE PHOTO/RICK GUSTAFSON

Events lead up to Stampede Community rodeo, gymkhana are on tap BY TOM MUNDS TMUNDS@COLORADOCOMMUNITYMEDIA.COM

The Elizabeth Stampede is a couple of weeks away but the community rodeo on May 19 and gymkhana on May 20 traditionally launch the events that are part of the May 31-June 2 Stampede. “The community rodeo and gymkhana have been part of the Stampede for a long time,” Jace Glick, Stampede president, said. “The community rodeo usually attracts quite a few local competitors. The rodeo includes

traditional events as well as what are called ranch rodeo events.” The ranch rodeo is a four-member team competition during which competitors are timed to complete activities like milking a cow and loading a cow into a trailer. “The gymkhana has always been a big event with a lot of entries and we expect it will be a big event this year,” Glick said. “The gymkhana included the usual events like barrel racing and other equestrian events, and we also plan to have muttonbusting.” An equestrian gymkhana is defined as a number of timed speed events that includes, but isn’t limited to, barrel racing,

THE BOTTOM LINE PERIODICAL

“This is the first time in two or three years that I’m not standing up here talking about a quarterback debate.” Emmanuel Sanders | Broncos wide receiver | Page 18 INSIDE

VOICES: PAGE 10 | LIFE: PAGE 14 | CALENDAR: PAGE 6 | SPORTS: PAGE 17

ElbertCountyNews.net

VOLUME 123 | ISSUE 16


2 Elbert County News

May 17, 2018M

Bill on mental health, guns stalls in Legislature BY KATHLEEN FOODY AND JAMES ANDERSON ASSOCIATED PRESS

Douglas County Sheriff Tony Spurlock begged state lawmakers to pass legislation making it easier to confiscate firearms from someone considered a danger to themselves or others — people, he said, like the man who shot and killed a sheriff ’s deputy in Highlands Ranch on New Year’s Eve. A week later, Republicans in the state Senate refused to send the bill to a floor vote, unconvinced by the prominent GOP district attorneys and sheriffs who argued that it would protect officers dealing with people in the midst of mental health crises. The 2018 legislative session came to a close on May 9. The bill did pass the Democrat-led House. Only two Republicans voted for it, foreshadowing claims by senators that the bill didn’t protect gun owners. Despite the proliferation of similar proposals after a gunman killed 17 people at a Florida high school in February and Colorado’s own history of mass shootings, the short-lived debate showed that the battle lines on gun policy in Colorado politics have barely shifted.

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Similar “red flag” laws have been introduced in nearly 30 states since the Parkland, Florida killings, with lawmakers in Florida, Maryland and Vermont passing legislation. The issue simmered in Colorado’s divided Legislature until about a week before the end of the legislative session, when a top Republican in the Democrat-led House and a Democratic colleague unveiled the proposal. Supporters tried to keep the focus on the 29-year-old peace officer shot to death on New Year’s Eve in Highlands Ranch, naming the bill after slain Douglas County Sheriff ’s Deputy Zackari Parrish. Public records show the gunman, Matthew Riehl, threatened officials at the Wyoming law school he attended, threatened lawsuits against family members if they kept him from accessing firearms and was placed under a 72-hour mental health hold in 2014 at a Veterans Affairs psychiatric ward. None of that appears to have disqualified him from buying weapons. Colorado Republicans claimed a red flag law could discourage gun owners from seeking treatment for mental health problems. They said personal spats could lead to requests for an emergency order without giving the gun owner an immediate opportunity to respond. “When it comes to the potential for gun confiscation without proper due process ... I do not think it should be

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any surprise what happens to that bill,” GOP Senate President Kevin Grantham predicted May 7. Under the proposal, family members or law enforcement could have asked a court to issue a “temporary extreme risk protection order” if they believed someone posed a risk to themselves or others, and require them to hand in all firearms to local law enforcement. Another hearing would have been required within seven days of the initial order, and a judge would have decided whether to end or extend an order for 182 days. The gun owner could have asked a judge to reconsider during that 182day period. Supporters argued that process ensured that gun owners’ rights were protected but would help prevent suicide or killings. At an April 30 press conference unveiling the bill, Spurlock said it could have saved Parrish’s life. “What we’re trying to do is save lives,” he said. “And if you get in front

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of this or you interfere with it or you don’t vote for it ... you are not doing your job.” Gun rights debates have consumed Colorado’s Capitol before. Lawmakers approved a ban on high-capacity magazines and added a background check for firearm transfers in 2013, months after the mass shootings in Aurora and at Sandy Hook Elementary School in Connecticut. Gun owners’ groups retaliated by pushing successful recall votes against two Democratic state senators who voted for the gun control bills. The groups again mobilized against the red flag bill, calling Republican co-sponsor Cole Wist, of Centennial, “a mole” in the party’s ranks and warning George Brauchler, a district attorney running for attorney general, to withdraw his support. But Brauchler, who prosecuted the Aurora theater shooter for killing 12 people and injuring 70 others in 2012, called the proposal the most “protective” version of a “red flag” law nationally. By comparison, an Indiana version passed in 2005 lets police confiscate firearms without a warrant and get a judge’s approval afterward, said Brauchler, a Republican whose 18th Judicial District includes Arapahoe, Douglas, Elbert and Lincoln counties. “I’m skeptical of giving the government authority like this, but skepticism is not a justification for inaction,” he said.

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Elbert County News 3

May 17, 2018

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4 Elbert County News

May 17, 2018M

Lawmakers conclude session with pension deal Teachers’ union criticizes measure, which increases employee contributions BY BRIAN EASON AND JAMES ANDERSON ASSOCIATED PRESS

Colorado lawmakers narrowly passed an ambitious plan to rescue the state pension fund from the fiscal brink just minutes before the 2018 legislative session gaveled to a close at midnight May 9. After daylong negotiations, Gov. John Hickenlooper lobbied fellow Democrats to pass the bill at a moment when their support appeared to be wavering. Opposition from the state’s largest teachers union threatened to unravel the deal reached with Senate Republicans. “We have to think long term about the 585,000 people who are benefiting from this,’’ House Majority Leader KC Becker, a Boulder Democrat and one of the bill sponsors, told her caucus before the vote. “If we fail to act in a responsible way and we jeopardize anything about this retirement system, it is on our backs, and it is on our conscience.’’ The pension fund provides re-

tirement benefits to state workers, teachers and a number of other public employees across the state — around 1 in 10 Coloradans, in total — and has huge ramifications for taxpayer spending and public services across the state. The pension sports some of the largest debts of any pension in the country, owing retirees $32 billion to $50 billion in unfunded benefits. The bill now heads to the governor’s desk. It calls for cuts to retirement benefits, and requires public employees and taxpayer-funded government agencies to contribute more of each paycheck into the retirement fund. The state will contribute $225 million annually to help pay off the system’s unfunded debt. The bill increases employee contributions by 2 percentage points. That’s more than House Democrats and public sector unions had wanted, but less than the GOP-led state Senate had previously approved. Retirees will lose cost-of-living raises for two years. After that, annual raises will be cut to 1.5 percent, down from the current 2 percent. The state government and school districts would pay higher contributions than they do today. And future employees would have to work longer to qualify for full benefits: The bill increases the retirement age to 64 for future employees. Currently, state

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workers can retire at 60, while teachers can retire at 58. Sen. Jack Tate, of Centennial, a Republican bill sponsor, said it was critical that the pension measure “have a certain fairness in the retirement age between the public sector and the private sector.” Private-sector retirees can’t draw full benefits from Social Security until 67. State pension recipients in Colorado don’t pay into or receive Social Security benefits. Late May 9, several Democrats called for the bill to be rejected — and suggested instead that the governor call a special session — amid opposition from the Colorado Education Association. House Speaker Crisanta Duran was among more than two dozen Democrats to vote “no.’” The legislation ultimately passed 34-29 in the House and 24-11 in the Senate. Outside the Capitol, the teachers’ union ripped lawmakers for rushing a compromise that few had seen until hours before it passed. “This is bad policy done in haste,’’ said Kerrie Dallman, president of the Colorado Education Association. The deal represents Colorado’s second pension rescue in the last decade. In 2010, lawmakers cut retirement benefits and increased contributions

to stave off a looming insolvency trig- s gered by the Great Recession. The fix o fell short, in part because retirees are l living longer and the pension’s invest- e ments are no longer expected to grow as much as policymakers had previ- r ously projected. i The latest effort includes safeguards w to automatically adjust benefits and contributions as needed to keep the i pension on track to pay off its unfund- s ed debt within 30 years. d The Democrat-led House and Repub- f lican-led Senate have resolved other top priorities of the 120-day session. l In March, lawmakers passed a $28.9 r billion budget that boosts funding B to transportation and schools. This “ week, they finalized a related K-12 f funding bill that increases spending by $461 million in the fiscal year that c begins July 1. r On May 8, lawmakers passed a bill d seeking voter approval to borrow $2.34 billion for transportation projects. The bill sets aside $645 million for roads over the next two years and would ask voters in 2019 permission to issue $2.34 billion in transportation bonds. The state would owe up to $3.25 billion in borrowing costs over 20 years. Lawmakers on May 9 approved a last-minute compromise to reauthorize the seven-member Colorado Civil Rights Commission and the Civil Rights Division until September 2027.


Elbert County News 5

May 17, 2018

CLASS FROM PAGE 1

seniors playing an impromptu game of baseball on the high school’s front lawn instead taking advantage of an early dismissal. As Lexye watched the students running bases, she said, “They do get involved really really well. They do work hard.” Although total scholarship funding has not yet been gathered, many students without scholarships have decided to opt out of the traditional four-year university to avoid debt. “My parents want me to go to college. I want to go to college but it’s really expensive.” said Sebastian Barringer, who graduates this month. “I feel like it’s been getting pretty hard for high-schoolers to go to college.” Barringer dreams of owning a nice car and big house, but feels he can reach his goals without the college degree. He currently runs computer

“They’re definitely go-getters. They’re very creative and energetic and they like to think out of the box. ...To see them graduate in a couple of weeks is going to be emotional for me. These kids really have left a legacy.” Dan Marcus Elizabeth High School audio visual teacher

security for his family’s refuse container business, Little Dumpsters, and wants to pursue computer engineering without the traditional higher education. Others, such as senior Catie Walters, plan to curb tuition costs by attending a community college.

Grads look to future Four graduating seniors at Elizabeth high school shared their thoughts in a Q&A with Colorado Community Media as they prepare for the next stage of life. Kayne Weidenbacher What activities do you do? I play baseball. What profession or career do you want to pursue? Discount Tire for life. I’ve been learning about marketing, sales and much more Weidenbacher at Discount Tire, and I can avoid college tuition debt. What will you miss about your time at EHS? We’re all just like a big family. I’ll miss hanging out on Saturdays, because Saturday is for the boys. Cameron McMillan What activities do you do? I play soccer and baseball. What profession or career do you want to pursue? I plan to attend Colo- McMillan rado State University to pursue a business or marketingrelated degree. What will you miss about your time at EHS? It’s just a lot of fun. (Kayne Wei-

The class of 2018 started clubs and programs, excelled in sports and education, and formed what many students call a family. One senior, Andrew Townsend, rekindled the Young Republicans club that recently ventured to Washington, D.C.

Audio-visual teacher Dan Marcus calls his EZTV seniors the “founding fathers” of the now credited program. Three years ago, current senior Alex Burns rallied 25 friends and asked Marcus to lead a Saturday morning audio-visual club. “A new department would not have existed if not for their groundbreaking work,” Marcus said. “Kids came in to help build the studio. This was a situation where they came, and then we built it.” The group then went through the process of creating formal classes, growing from an initial 28 students to 60 students pre-registered for 2019. “They’re definitely go-getters. They’re very creative and energetic and they like to think out of the box,” Marcus said. “When the motivation comes from within and it’s something they’re passionate about, that’s what drives them.” Marcus, who retires alongside the senior class, said, “To see them graduate in a couple of weeks is going to be emotional for me. These kids really have left a legacy.”

T HE K I C K OFF T O T HE C OLO RA DO CYCLING S EA S O N

denbacher and I) both play baseball almost every day. Peyton Baldwin What activities do you do? I do choir, theater, cross country, track, Flight Crew (a program where older students help new students adjust). I am a National Honor Society Baldwin officer and also teach Sunday school at Summit Church in Centennial. What profession or career do you want to pursue? Why? I plan to attend Evangeline University in Springfield, Mississippi, on scholarship. In the future, I want to move to China to teach or do missions work. Catie Walter What activities do you do? I work at Walmart after school, play on the volleyball team and I am a member of the high school’s Young Republican club. What profession or Walter career do you want to pursue? Hopefully I’ll be a zoologist. I like amphibians, lizards and creepy crawlies that no one else likes. I plan to attend Pikes Peak Community College in the fall because it’s cheaper and closer to home.

HAVE AN EVENT? To submit a calendar listing, send information to calendar@coloradocommunitymedia.com.

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6 Elbert County News

May 17, 2018M

THINGS TO DO Springworks: 6 p.m. and 8 p.m. Friday, May 18 at AerialWorks, 1050 Topeka Way, Unit 1, Castle Rock. Go to www.aerialworkscastlerock.com. Pinnacle Park Grand Opening: 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday, May 19 at 2160 Fox Haven Drive, Castle Rock. Go to www.LiveCrystalValley.com. How to Speak with Teens About Alcohol, Drugs and Mental Health: 5:30-6:50 p.m. Thursday, May 24 at the Parker Library, 20105 E. Mainstreet. Presented by the Douglas County Youth Substance Abuse Coalition, in partnership with All Health, Denver Springs, Douglas County Schools, and others are providing resources and support. Naturalization Ceremony: 1:30-3:30 p.m. Saturday, May 26 at the Parker Library, 20105 E. Mainstreet, Parker. Douglas County Libraries in partnership with United States Citizenship and Immigration Services hosts a naturalization ceremony and celebration for new U.S. citizens. The public is welcome.

more. Go to http://www.naturalgrocers.com

A reception will follow. No registration required; contact 303-791-7323 or DCL.org.

Pancake Breakfast: 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. Sunday, May 27 at the Elbert Mercantile Building. Elbert Woman’s Club event.

Brass Band Festival: 5:30 p.m. May 26 at PACE Center, 20000 E. Pikes Peak Ave., Parker. Five bands and ensembles perform. Go to www.rockymountainbrassworks. org. Apple Cider Vinegar: 10-10:30 a.m. Saturday, May 26 at Natural Grocers by Vitamin Cottage, 11402 S. Parker Road, Parker. Learn how to use apple cider vinegar to support blood sugar regulation, a healthy body weight, heart health and

2018 Memorial Day Commemoration: 11 a.m. Monday, May 28 at the Elbert/Kiowa Cemetery, 24891 N. Elbert Road, Elbert. Join us in honoring the courage, sacrifice and service of those who fought in America’s wars. Hosted by American Legion Post 181, Kiowa-Elbert. Downtown Walking Tours: 10:30 a.m. the fourth Saturday of the month from June

RidgeGate May and June 2018

The RidgeGate calendar of fun starts here.

Yoga in the Park It’s time again for sunset salutations. Join RidgeGate, South Suburban Parks and Recreation and the Lone Tree Recreation Center for free Yoga in the Park classes in Belvedere Park, at the corner of RidgeGate Circle and Belvedere Lane. Please bring your own yoga mat. In case of heavy rain or lightning, class will be cancelled. No need to register—just drop in!

Tuesday, May 29, 6:30-7:30pm Tuesday, June 26, 6:30-7:30pm

Guided Nature Hikes M AY

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Wednesday, June 6th, 7-8:30pm — Sunset Bird Watching Saturday, June 9th, 9-10:30am — Animal Detectives Wednesday, June 20th, 6-7:30pm — Preparing for the Solstice Saturday, June 30th, 8:30-10:30am — Finding the Awe in Nature

RidgeGate Summer Beats Concerts Enjoy these summertime concerts out on the grass with free live music, food trucks and activities for kids. It’s all happening in Prairie Sky Park, just west of the Lone Tree Recreation Center, courtesy of the South Suburban Parks and Recreation District.

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Each year, RidgeGate teams up with the South Suburban Parks and Recreation District to provide free, guided nature hikes. These hikes are led by professional naturalists who offer insight and education into the natural ecosystems within the open space at RidgeGate. Hikes are free and open to the public—see the full schedule and register at ridgegate.com.

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Thursday, June 21, 5-8pm — The Tom Petty Project Thursday, July 19, 5-8pm — Chris Daniels and the Kings; Hazel Miller

Tunes on the Terrace at the Lone Tree Arts Center RidgeGate is again proud to sponsor Lone Tree Art Center’s Tunes on the Terrace—an outdoor evening concert series that will bring your summer nights to life. Performances range from classic rock to big band jazz, and everything in between. The stars are out this summer! Check out the full schedule and buy tickets at www.lonetreeartscenter.org.

Friday, June 8, 8-10pm — Yesterday and Today (Beatles Tribute, Main Stage) Friday, June 22, 8-10pm — H2 Big Band

Experience Historic Schweiger Ranch Among RidgeGate’s cultural facilities is the 38-acre historic Schweiger Ranch, located just east of the RidgeGate Parkway and I-25 interchange. The historic restoration of the ranch, led by the nonprofit Schweiger Ranch Foundation, gives us an important glimpse into the settlers’ lives in the late 1800s. Today, Schweiger Ranch is open to the public for self-guided visits and a variety of events throughout the year. Register or learn more about these events online at SchweigerRanch.org.

A M O R E N AT U R A L A P P R O A C H T O U R B A N I S M.

r i d g e gate.co m

FREE GUIDED TOURS: Sunday, June 24, 2pm Saturday, July 21st, 2pm

All events are held within the RidgeGate community, just south of Lincoln Avenue, on both sides of I-25.

to September. The 45-minute tour begins at The Courtyard on Perry Street, between Third and Fourth streets, and will conclude at the Castle Rock Museum, 420 Elbert St. Contact 303-814-3164 or museum@ castlerockhistoricalsociety.org. Harmony Horse Expo: noon to 5 p.m. Friday, June 1, and 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday, June 2 at Harmony Equine Center, 5540 E. Highway 86, Franktown. Take guided tours of the property, attend horsemanship workshops and training demonstrations, and meet adoptable horses. Go to harmonyequinecenter.org/harmony-horse-expo/ Bingo: 6-9 p.m. Monday, June 4, at the Elbert Mercantile Building. Elbert Woman’s Club event. DCL Presents: Author Karen Kingsbury: 7-10 p.m. Wednesday, June 6 at CU South Denver, 10035 Peoria St., Parker. Go to https://www.eventbrite. com/e/dcl-presents-karen-kingsburytickets-44450655106 or DCL.org/authorsevents. History of Eisenhower-Johnson Memorial Tunnels: 7 p.m. Thursday, June 7 at the Philip S. Miller Library, 100 S. Wilcox St., Castle Rock. 50th anniversary of the first blast to start construction of the tunnels; presented by senior historian Lisa Schoch from CDOT. Go to www.castlerockhistorialsociety.org. Contact 303-814-3164 or museum@castlerockhistorialsociety.org. Trace Adkins Concert: 6-10 p.m. Thursday, June 7 at Parker Days 2018. Adkins’s “Something’s Going On” show kicks off the festival. Information and tickets at www. parkerdaysfestival.com. Parker Days Festival: Friday, June 8 to Sunday, June 10. Parade theme is Hometown Hero, and it begins at 8:45 a.m. Saturday, June 9. Vendors will share information about their businesses, crafts and more. Information: www.parkerdaysfestival.com. Spring High Tea: 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday, June 9 at the Event Center, Elbert County Fairgrounds, Kiowa. Cost is $20 and includes scones, finger sandwiches, desserts and tea. Gluten-free selections available. Hats encouraged but not required. There will be door prizes and a Victorian doll house raffle at the tea. This is a fundraiser to benefit the Elizabeth and Kiowa libraries, sponsored by the Friends of the Elizabeth and Kiowa libraries. A limited number of tickets are available at both libraries now, along with raffle tickets. Call 303-646-3792. Free Legal Clinic: 6-8 p.m. Tuesday, June 12 at the Elizabeth Public Library, 651 W. Beverly St., Elizabeth. Clinic is for parties who have no attorney. Volunteer attorneys will answer questions, help fill out forms and explain the process and procedure for all areas of civil litigation, including family law, property law, probate law, collections, appeals, landlord-tenant law, small claims, veterans’ issues, and civil protection orders. Walk-ins welcome; everyone helped on first-come, first-served basis. Additional 2018 dates are July 10, Aug. 14, Sept. 11, Oct. 9, Nov. 13 and Dec. 11. Elbert Woman’s Club Meeting: 2:30 p.m. Tuesday, June 12 at the Elbert Mercantile Building. SEE CALENDAR, P7


Elbert County News 7

May 17, 2018

CALENDAR FROM PAGE 6

Keto Diet 101: 10-11 a.m. Saturday, June 16 at Natural Grocers by Vitamin Cottage, 11402 S. Parker Road, Parker. Learn about the keto diet and the what, why and how to succeed. Go to http:// www.naturalgrocers.com Bus Tour of Southern Douglas County: June 23. Tour begins at the Castle Rock Museum, heads southwest to Maguireville and over to Cherry Valley, Greenland and Sandstone Ranch. The museum is at 420

Elbert St., Castle Rock. Lunch provided. Purchase tickets at www.castlerockhistoricalsociety.org. Freedom Service Dogs Graduation: 1-3 p.m. Saturday, June 23 at PACE Center, 20000 Pikes Peak Ave., Parker. Celebrate with the trainers and volunteers who helped transform shelter dogs into service and professional therapy dogs. Go to https:// freedomservicedogs.org/ event/summer-graduation-2018/ Lessons and Lemonade: 9:30-11 a.m. and 11:15 a.m. to 12:45 p.m. Saturdays at Hobby Lobby, 10901 S. Parker Road, Parker. Parker Artist Guild classes for children in grades 4-8. Upcoming class June 23, BrockArt with Toni Brock. Registration required; go to www.parkerartistsguild.com/classes/youth. Contact judypendleton4@gmail.com.

Pancake Breakfast: 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. Sunday, June 24 at Elbert Creekside 4-H. Elbert Woman’s Club event. Faces of Freedom Sporting Clays Tournament: 8:30 a.m. to 3 p.m. Friday, June 29 at Kiowa Creek Sporting Club, 46700 E. County Road 30, Bennett. Teams of four; sponsorships available. Benefits Freedom Service Dogs. Go to https:// freedomservicedogs.org/ event/fofdenver/ Elizabeth Library Book Sale: gently used books for children and adults for sale in the

Just add water.

A pile of dirt and mulch, or ingredients for disaster? A simple decision on where you store your landscaping material could have a big impact on water quality. Landscaping materials left in the street travel with rain or sprinkler water directly into the storm drain. When planning your project, consider proper storage to prevent material from coming in contact with stormwater. Contact your local agency to find out how you can safley plan your next landscaping project. Local stormwater agencies are teaming together to bring you this message. We take this so seriously that we posted this ad rather than send you more garbage in the mail. One thing is clear: our creeks, rivers and lakes depend on you.

THIS STORMWATER MESSAGE BROUGHT TO YOU BY

Visit onethingisclear.org to: • Report accidental and illegal dumping to your local agency • Search local volunteer events • Find more helpful tips Storing and covering landscaping materials off the street keeps our waters clean. Colorado Community Media agrees: Please recycle this newspaper responsibly and partner with our communities for a better tomorrow. Ad campaign creative donated by the Castle Rock Water, Stormwater Division.

book sale room at the Elizabeth Library. Stocked by Friends of he Elizabeth Library. All donations from book sales benefit the Elizabeth Library. Outback Express: public transit service provided by the East Central Council of Local Governments; 24-hour notice appreciated. Call Kay Campbell, 719- 541-4275, or 800-825-0208 for reservations. Go to www.eccog.com for reservations, information and each month’s schedule. Editor’s note: Calendar submissions must be received by noon Wednesday for publication the following week. To place a calendar item, go to eventlink.coloradocommunitymedia.com.


8 Elbert County News

May 17, 2018M

Escape room offers thrill-seeking fun Castle Rock’s Epic Escape Game tests players’ problem-solving skills BY JESSICA GIBBS JGIBBS@COLORADOCOMMUNITYMEDIA.COM

Just past 7 p.m. on a recent Friday evening in Castle Rock, a group of six people finds themselves locked in a room. With the click of the door, the three couples fan through the room, opening drawers, looking under tables and piling any object they can grab on a table. They’re surrounded by swords, shields, weathered wood furniture and books written in medieval script. They need a clue, any hint at how to get out. Then on a monitor with a countingdown clock, one pops on screen. The group unanimously pauses from scavenging the chamber and turns to reads the sentence. With that, they’re on their way to escaping. Sitting in a nearby, private room on the sending end of that message was Lucas Wojtalewicz. He is a “clue master” on staff at Epic Escape Game in Castle Rock, just one of the popular escape rooms popping up in Colorado and across the country. Castle Rock resident Langford Jordan and his wife, Carol, opened

Lucas Wojtalewicz, pictured in the wizard hat, leads a group through the introduction to “The Quest,” one of five games available at the Epic Escape Game. PHOTOS BY JESSICA GIBBS Epic Escape Game, 611 N. Wilcox St., last October. It’s one of 11 locations in the country from the Denver-based company. When Langford pitched the idea of opening an escape room, Carol said, she thought it was a far-off, one-day kind of dream. Langford said they should do it within a few months. Despite her surprise, Carol got on board. So he left behind his career in engineering and leadership building, tired of constant travel and time away from family. Escape rooms have grown in popularity over recent years, providing

thrill-seekers an opportunity to step out of reality and into imaginary, high-stakes scenarios where the best chance at survival is a person’s own wit. “I love games, and in my previous jobs I did a ton of leadership, team development,” Langford said. Some customers are merely there for fun, but they also get corporate offices bringing employees in for teambuilding excercises, he said. The Jordans and their staff designed all games available at the Castle Rock escape room. They started with a storyline, designed the sets,

In one of the five games available at Castle Rock’s escape room called The Quest, players can travel to The Middle Realm and battle an evil wizard. gathered props and brought their vision to life through five unique rooms. There’s The Quest, which draws inspiration from The Hobbit and takes players through the Middle Realm to battle an evil wizard. In the Red Planet, participants are space travelers whose ship was struck by a meteor shower. They emergency land on Mars, where the goal is to repair the ship and return home. Or, be stuck on Mars forever. SEE ESCAPE, P12

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Elbert County News 9

May 17, 2018

Education, lifestyle can help prevent strokes

Disorder can be prevented or mitigated in many cases with proper precautions STAFF REPORT

Strokes strike more than 7 million adults in the United States each year. This month, the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association encourage Colorado residents to work to end the fifth-leading cause of death in this country. American Stroke Month is intended to highlight one of the leading causes of serious, long-term disability that is largely preventable and treatable. Normal blood pressure is below 120/80 mm Hg. Nearly half of adults in the United States have high blood pressure, according to recent AHA/ ASA Hypertension Guidelines, which redefines high blood pressure as 130/88 mm Hg. Eating healthfully, being active and, for some stroke survivors, following an aspirin regimen can help prevent another stroke, according to a news release from the American Stroke Association. Education is also key when it comes to treating stroke. Immediate medical care is crucial to access life-saving treatment in many cases. The American Stroke Association’s Together to End Stroke initiative, sponsored nationally by Medtronic, teaches the acronym F.A.S.T. to help people to recognize the most common stroke warning signs and what to do if one occurs: F: Face Drooping. Does one side of

STAMPEDE FROM PAGE 1

gathering the entries for the event. The rough stock events are bareback bronc riding, saddle bronc riding and bull riding. “So far, we have about half-dozen bull riders signed up for the rodeo, about the same for the saddle bronc riding and three bareback riders,” he said. “Most of our entries are local, but I expect we will get some other entries from other areas before the event.” Smith and fellow Kiowa resident Will White are partners in a company that provides bucking horses for rodeos around the state, including the Elizabeth Stampede community rodeo. His company is working with another company to provide the bulls, he said. “We raise our bucking horses from the time they are colts,” he said. “Like racing horses that have the heart to run and run fast, a good bucking horse has the heart to buck and buck hard.” Contrary to what some people be-

the face droop or is it numb? Ask the person to smile. A: Arm Weakness. Is one arm weak or numb? Ask the person to raise both arms. Does one arm drift downward? S: Speech Difficulty. Is speech slurred, are they unable to speak, or are they hard to understand? Ask the person to repeat a simple sentence like, “The sky is blue.” Is the sentence repeated correctly? T: Time to call 911. If the person shows any of these symptoms, even if the symptoms go away, call 911 and get them to the hospital immediately. Stroke facts: • About 795,000 people in the U.S. have a stroke every year, with about three in four being first-time strokes. • Someone in the United States has a stroke every 40 seconds. Every four minutes, someone dies of stroke. • Stroke is the number five cause of death in the U.S., killing more than 140,000 people in 2015. That’s one in every 20 deaths. • Stroke is a leading cause of long-term disability and the leading preventable cause of disability. Stroke, or vascular dementia, is also a leading cause of memory loss. • 80 percent of strokes can be prevented. • What’s good for the heart is good for the brain. The American Heart Association recommends following “Life’s Simple 7” to achieve ideal health: don’t smoke, be physically active, eat a healthy diet, maintain a healthy body weight, and control cholesterol, blood pressure and blood sugar. For more information about stroke or American Stroke Month, follow #StrokeMonth on social media or visit StrokeAssociation.org/strokemonth.

“...Bucking is what these horses do, and they do it very well.” Jace Glick Stampede president

Memorial Day Douglas County offices will be closed Monday, May 28 for Memorial Day. Many county services are available online at www.douglas.co.us

Planning to vote in the June 26 Primary Election? Ballots will be mailed the week of June 4 to registered voters in Douglas County. For more information including answers to frequently asked questions visit www. DouglasVotes.com or call 303-660-7444.

Meadows Parkway Reconstruction May - August Full reconstruction of Meadows Parkway between Prairie Hawk Dr. and U.S. Highway 85 is expected to begin May 29 and last through August. For more information visit http://crgov.com/2797/ Meadows-Parkway-Reconstruction

Are your property taxes paid? June 15 is the final due date to pay your property taxes prior to becoming delinquent. To avoid additional interest charges and receipt of a delinquent notice, please verify your account status by using the Treasurer’s Property Tax Inquiry application at www.douglascotax.com Taxes can be paid online. No charge for e-check payments.

What’s happening with my County government? Our committment to open and transparent government includes online posting of information about all public meetings at which the business of government is conducted. To view agendas for various public meetings, visit www.douglas.co.us and search for Meetings and Agendas.

Online Engagement Tool of the Week lieve, he said, bucking horses are not wild. “The horses are all manageable and some are halter-broken,” White said. “But bucking is what these horses do, and most do it very well. They have the energy and strength so they are ready to explode out into the arena when the gate opens and test their rider’s ability to stay on their backs.” For more information, go to elizabethstampede.com.

Check your voter registration status online, register to vote, update your home address, check your ballot status and more.

Visit www.douglas.co.us


10 Elbert County News

LOCAL

May 17, 2018M

VOICES The funny thing about humor is how often it isn’t funny

QUIET DESPERATION

Craig Marshall Smith

A

n ice cream truck used to appear every day at the parks where I played when I was a kid. Its infectious little tune made my mouth water. I think now it would drive me to distraction. On each side of the truck it said “Good Humor.” I think I have a good sense of humor. Mine is mine, and it’s sculpted, and it’s not universal. Mine is lean, free of meanness and ribaldry. And that excludes me these days from comedy clubs and White House Correspondents’ Dinners. No more stand-up for Craig. I am too old for Michelle Wolf ’s

humor. I was too old for it when I was her age (32). I can’t remember the first time I saw Don Rickles on Carson, but I know I wasn’t crazy about him. He’d pick at every scab, and then wind up by saying it was all just a joke, and he loved everyone. Joan Rivers did the same thing, but she never said it was all just a joke, or that she loved everyone. Maybe you remember celebrity roasts? I thought they were imbecilic. Now they’re so raunchy they only appear on cable. My father never told a joke in his life, but he was the funniest man I knew. He was witty right now, and he didn’t need a writer.

I found out what humor was, or what it was thought to be, when I was in grade school by watching television. These were a few of my choices: Jackie Gleason, Milton Berle and Lucille Ball. For reasons I could explain if this were a comedy dissertation, I rejected all of them. Along came a curiosity named Ernie Kovacs and I brightened somewhat. Kovacs was off-center, and his humor was constructed piece by piece, not thrown at me in a predictable punch. I haven’t watched situation comedies in 40 years. I will admit, however, to an appreciation for

Aging of American populace will have impact on economy

W

e are getting older. This is a fact of life and a world phenomenon. The question for the economy is whether this is a curse or an opportunity. Investors, homeowners and consumers will all be impacted one way or another by the aging population. This in turn affects the FINANCIAL economy and how STRATEGIES businesses adapt to the changing demographics. Most developed nations are facing the economic challenges of an expanding number of citizens over the age of 65. Populations are becoming older on all continents Patricia Kummer and Japan leads the world with the highest percentage of their people, 30 percent, over age 65. It is expected that by 2050, more than 60 countries will have reached that level. ¹ Investors may worry about what happens to the stock market when the number of retirees continues to increase. This can put pressure on pension funds and Social Security. Most fixed income sources have little or no cost of living increases. This may cause retirees to spend down their assets to create income and support long

A publication of

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lives and potential elder care costs. Homeowners have already been affected by the low inventory of singlestory or community housing that provides active living as well as potential care services. Clients have discovered that it is often more expensive to downsize. If you are forced to stay put in your two-story house and bring in help, the supply and demand once again drives up the price of care providers available to meet your needs. This is definitely an age group that is supporting the economy as they pay for more goods and services needed to provide for an aging population. Investors and companies can capitalize on new inventions designed to keep you young, active and healthy. As you age, more services are needed from house painting to lawn services and eventually elder care. It will be fascinating to watch what new innovations will be available on anything from self-driving cars to same-day dentures. There is an opportunity for products that allow you to age in place, such as stair climbers, walk-in tubs and meal delivery. This is in addition to health care facilities and retirement communities that are popping up in every zip code. Consumers demand services and products, which in turn impacts how SEE KUMMER, P11

Barney Fife (portrayed, of course, by Mick Jagger). Fife might have been television’s last genuinely amusing, reoccurring character. Fife looked and sounded like they located him in Mayberry, North Carolina, not in a script room in southern California. My alma mater’s extension school offers a course I briefly considered. It’s called “Beginning Writing for the Half-Hour Spec I.” You “learn how to identify the unique spin shows put on their stories.” You learn how to spin on Wednesdays from 7 to 10 p.m., and SEE SMITH, P11

Yesterday’s achievement is tomorrow’s success

O

ne of the greatest pieces of advice that I ever received came from a great friend and mentor earlier in my life. He actually gave me two pieces of advice wrapped up in one life-changing conversation. The two were so connected that even today I consider WINNING these words of wisdom a tremenWORDS dous part of any success that I have experienced in my life. I have been paying this forward and have passed along this advice to those whom I know, those whom Michael Norton I work with, and those whom I coach and mentor. And now I want to share it with you, too. The first part is to be diligent in keeping a record of each accomplishment, award, or time that I had been recognized in any way. He told me to buy a binder and keep it handy. My mentor had shared this with me immediately after I had been recognized as the Salesperson of the Month for the first time. He told me that even though there would be only one plaque on

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my wall and one certificate in my binder, he was confident that over time I would be filling multiple binders and taking up plenty of wall space too. Twenty-nine years later I am grateful for his confidence in me and for his advice. I say that because I did fill up my binder and other binders with many awards and recognitions, letters of accomplishment, letters and emails provided as a testimonial or reference. Now I am not sharing this with you to brag on myself, I am really bragging on my mentor and the advice and guidance he gave me, because the second part of his advice is where he made all the difference in my life and contributed to my future successes. You see, the second part of the advice is built on the saying that, “Success begets success.” He encouraged me to review my past achievements regularly as a way to continue to believe that I can do great things. The idea was not to get caught up in relying on my past successes, as we know that we are only as good as our last record. And it also wasn’t about someone asking me, “So what have you done for me lately?” No, it’s not about that at all, it’s about you and me, and asking ourselves,

Columnists & Guest Commentaries Columnist opinions are not necessarily those of the Elbert County News. We welcome letters to the editor. Please Include your full name, address and the best number to reach you by telephone. Email letters to letters@coloradocommunitymedia.com Deadline Fri. 5 p.m. for the following week’s paper.

SEE NORTON, P11 ELBERT COUNTY NEWS (USPS 171-100) A legal newspaper of general circulation in Elizabeth, Colorado, the Elbert County News is published weekly on Thursday by Colorado Community Media, 750 W. Hampden Ave., Suite 225, Englewood, CO 80110. PERIODICALS POSTAGE PAID AT ENGLEWOOD, COLORADO and additional mailing offices. POSTMASTER: Send address change to: 750 W. Hampden Ave., Suite 225, Englewood, CO 80110


Elbert County News 11

May 17, 2018

KUMMER FROM PAGE 10

businesses adapt to compete in the areas needed by the current population. We watched the baby boomers impact products and business on everything from Gerber baby food to McDonald’s restaurants as they approached their teenage years. Next it was minivans and mini-mansions. What will this demographic bubble demand in retirement? We are already seeing more crossover vehicle sales for easy access after that hip or knee replacement. The travel industry is pouring big dollars into cruise and riverboat advertising as more people retire and have time to go places. Stores and restaurants offer organic, gluten-free and non-processed foods for those choosing a healthy diet, perhaps in hopes of staving off the aging process. Technology has come to the rescue for home security, texting and typing by voice and tremendous health care advances. You no longer have to go to a sleep study clinic for apnea or even go to the doctor to have your heart monitored. Many healthcare needs can be handled remotely through computerized monitoring devices.

NORTON FROM PAGE 10

“What else is still left inside of me?” Asking ourselves, “What have I done for myself lately?” Throughout my career I have experienced exhilarating wins, and I have suffered crushing losses. And I have been everywhere in between. There have been times when I have forgotten about my book of records and achievements, and instead of looking on my past successes to motivate me, I found myself wrestling in slumps. And then, somewhere deep inside I would hear the voice of my mentor saying, go back and look at your binder. So, I would open it, read a few of them, or more if I was really in a deep slump, and get fired up again about who I am and what I have accomplished in this life personally and professionally. It really doesn’t matter if you are in sales, management, teaching, manufacturing, healthcare, or any other profession or volunteer position. My

SMITH FROM PAGE 10

it’s $570. I can tell you how to spin a situation comedy for free. Come up with some quirky characters who have quirky neighbors and quirky bosses. Be sure one of them says crude things, and one of them is stacked. No matter what anyone says, every third line gets a laugh, provided by a laugh machine. “I went to see my doctor today. I asked him if I needed glasses.”

While many investors may think aging is bad for an economy, it appears that the baby boom generation that grew up with technology and the stock market will continue to surprise us with new advances and financial opportunities. Most analysts agree there may be opportunity in companies that can invent and deliver products and services to meet the growing needs of people potentially spending 40 years in retirement. 1. United Nations: The World’s Ageing Population (English Online). US Census Bureau Patricia Kummer has been a Certified Financial Planner for 31 years and is president of Kummer Financial Strategies LLC, an SEC-registered investment adviser with its physical place of business in the State of Colorado. Registration of an investment adviser does not imply a certain level of skill or training. Please visit www.kummerfinancial.com for more information or refer to the Investment Adviser Public Disclosure website (www.adviserinfo. sec.gov). Any material discussed is meant for informational purposes only and not a substitute for individual advice. Securities offered through MSEC LLC, Member FINRA & SIPC, 5700 W. 112th St., Suite 500, Overland Park, KS 66211. advice and encouragement is this, that you will create your own “Brag Book,” and that you will go back and read it often to help you stay motivated and to help drive your future success and contributions, and achieve your own goals and dreams. And remember, it may only start with one, but success begets success, and just as my mentor had confidence in me, I am confident that you too will fill your binder and your walls with all of your own rewards, awards, and recognitions. So how about you? Do you remember all the good and great things you have done in your life? Or do you need to be reminded of just how fantastic you really are? I would love to hear your story at gotonorton@gmail.com, and when we can remember that yesterday’s achievement is really tomorrow’s success, it really will be a better than good week. Michael Norton is a resident of Castle Rock, the president of the Zig Ziglar Corporate Training Solutions Team, a strategic consultant and a business and personal coach. “What did he say?” “He said, ‘You sure do. This is a bank.’ ” This is where the engineer comes in with a pre-recorded laugh. It’s intended for anyone who doesn’t know if the character was kidding or not. It’s the manipulative equivalent of multiple exclamation marks. Anyone who strings together exclamation marks gets deleted from my will. What do John The Baptist and Winnie The Pooh have in common? The same middle name. But seriously. Craig Marshall Smith is an artist, educator and Highlands Ranch resident. He can be reached at craigmarshallsmith@comcast.net.

ABOUT LETTERS TO THE EDITOR Colorado Community Media welcomes letters to the editor. Please keep in mind the following rules: • Submit your letter in a Word document or in the body of an email. No PDFs, please. • Letters must be limited to 250 words or fewer. • Do not use all caps, italics or bold text. And keep the exclamation points to a minimum! • Keep it polite: Do not resort to name calling or “mud slinging.” • Include a source — and a link to that source — for any information that is not common knowledge. We will not publish information that cannot easily be verified. • Only submit ideas and opinions

that are your own — and in your own words. Colorado Community Media will not publish any letter that is clearly part of a letter-writing campaign. • Submit your letter by 5 p.m. on Friday in order for it to appear in the following week’s newspaper. • Include your full name, address and phone number. We will only publish your name and city or town of residence, but all of the information requested is needed for us to verify you are who you say you are. • Email your letter to letters@coloradocommunitymedia.com Thank you, and we look forward to your letters.

In Loving Memory Place an Obituary for Your Loved One. Private 303-566-4100 Obituaries@ColoradoCommunityMedia.com

Funeral Homes Visit: www.memoriams.com


12 Elbert County News

May 17, 2018M

Colorado AG warns of fake Medicare notices Scam seeks personal information via telephone STAFF REPORT

The distribution of new Medicare cards has prompted predators to try to trick consumers into giving up their money or personal information, according to a news release from Colorado Attorney General Cynthia H. Coffman. Coffman issued a warning in early May to be on the lookout for scammers calling, emailing or texting and claiming to be officials from Medicare. The scammers might threaten to cancel health benefits, or claim to need payment or private information to issue a new Medicare card, the release said. Medicare started issuing new cards to all beneficiaries in April; however,

ESCAPE

FROM PAGE 8

In Dinner at the Manor, guests of a dubious science mogul find themselves locked in a room after visiting his home under the guise of a dinner party invitation. Happy Campers challenges players to escape a bear plundering their campsite who’s trapped them in their

in Colorado, cards will be mailed sometime after June. To better protect consumers’ identities, the cards no longer contain Social Security numbers. Instead, Medicare is assigning unique numbers to each patient for use with doctor visits and medical claims. “Medicare will not call consumers offering to replace their cards, they’ll never seek personal information or charge you to replace a card,” Coffman said in the release. “We want to make sure that consumers protect their private data, don’t give out their Social Security numbers or financial information and don’t fall victim to scammers.” Following is some information to help consumers avoid getting caught up in a Medicare card scam: New cards will be sent directly to consumers’ mailing address. To up-

date address, call Social Security at 800-772-1213 or visit ssa.gov/myaccount. If a consumer receives a phone call, email or text offering to help with this transition, they should ignore the offer. Consumers should never provide or verify any personal information to an unsolicited caller or written request. New cards will be mailed in waves. Cards for Colorado residents are not scheduled to be mailed until after June. It is likely that Colorado beneficiaries will not receive their new cards until late 2018 or early 2019. Once consumers receive their new cards, they should shred and/or thoroughly destroy their old cards. Consumers should provide their new Medicare numbers only to their known doctors, insurers, pharmacists and health-care providers

Anyone with questions about the Medicare card transition can contact AARP Foundation ElderWatch at 303-222-4444 or www.aarp.org/ aarp-foundation/our-work/income/ elderwatch/. AARP Foundation ElderWatch Colorado is a program with the Colorado attorney general and AARP Foundation whose mission is to ensure that no older adults are left to suffer, alone and in silence, at the hands of those who exploit them. The program fights the financial exploitation of older Coloradans through education and outreach, data collection, and the providing of assistance. If you have been victimized by a Medicare card scam, or wish to report suspicious activity, you can file a report online at www.stopfraudcolorado.gov/about-consumer-protection/ report-fraud.

RV — to which they’ve lost the keys. An in the newest game added this March, players of Super Powers strive to rescue super heroes from a radioactive-weapon-wielding villain. “People like creepy, Langford said. Each game is a series of on-theme puzzles and riddles that people must solve to ultimately find their way out. They’re given one hour. Clues cost them five minutes. While games are underway, “clue masters” work from a control room

where they can see and hear the players in each room. When the players get stuck, they can phone into the control room to ask for help. Clue masters can send hints to them in real time. The games vary in difficulty. In the Red Planet, less than 20 percent of people successfully escape. In fact, it’s closer to 14 percent, said manager Lois Comstock. The 19-year-old has worked for the Jordans full-time since they opened the game room. “Usually people get in here with

about 10 minutes left,” Comstock said of the final room in the Red Planet. “If they’re lucky.” If the success rate dips below 10 percent, they adjust a game to make it less challenging, Comstock and Langford said. Overall, Langford said he hopes the escape room is providing creative entertainment for the community. “I thought Castle Rock,” Langford said, “could use something that was fun.”

Yesterday and Today: The Interactive Beatles Experience Friday, June 8 at 8pm, Main Stage H2 Big Band Friday, June 22 at 8pm

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Elbert County News 13

May 17, 2018

Centennial Mental Health Center seeks community partners STAFF REPORT

The opinions of active community members are being sought by Centennial Mental Health Center. Prevention specialists at the mental health center are looking for advice and expertise to help accomplish more to ensure children, family and friends have the access to help they need by forming stakeholder groups. Individuals from all walks of life are encouraged to respond, and the groups are expected to be highly diverse and inclusive. Stakeholder groups will meet bimonthly, starting in June. The mental

health center is prepared to make accommodations so any who wish to be involved can participate. For information, contact Andie La Combe at 970-522-4549 ext. 308. Centennial Mental Health Center provides behavioral health services to individuals in Cheyenne, Elbert, Kit Carson, Lincoln, Logan, Morgan, Phillips, Sedgwick, Washington and Yuma counties. Services include a variety of behavioral health service programs, outpatient therapy, community support programs, crisis intervention, emergency response, substance use disorder treatment, and child, adult and family counseling.

CALM AFTER THE STORM

SM

CLUBS

Camping Singles: 7 p.m. the first Tuesday of the month. Membership ranges from 40s to 60-plus. Colorado single adults who enjoy camping, fishing, hiking, swimming, biking, sightseeing, photography, the camaraderie of others, and starry nights around the camp fire. We usually camp in designated forest service or state park campgrounds within 2 to 5 hours of Denver. Contact campingsingles@gmail.com Castle Rock Bridge Club: 1 p.m. Mondays and Wednesdays at Plum Creek Golf Club, 331 Players Club Drive, Castle Rock. Friendly, ACBL-sanctioned duplicate games. For assistance in finding a bridge partner, call Georgiana Butler at 303-810-8504. Go to www.castlerockbridge.com. Chess: 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturdays at the Simla Library. All skill levels and ages welcome. Call 719-541-2573.

Kiowa Creek Food Pantry: open from 8:30 a.m. to noon Tuesdays in the Fellowship Hall at 231 Cheyenne Street, Kiowa. Distribution for the State of Colorado TEFAP food program. Food is distributed monthly to low-income individuals/families that qualify. We also distribute low-income senior food boxes for the state; those 60 and older may qualify for a monthly supplement. If you are in need of food assistance or know someone who is, we may be able to qualify you for one of these programs. Call the food pantry at 303-621-2376.

LEGO Master Brickster: 3:45 p.m. Thursdays at the Kiowa Library. Build LEGO stuff together. Call 303-621-2111 or go to pplibraries. org. SEE CLUBS, P20

www.JKRoofing.com Serving the greater Denver Metro area and the foothills.

Thank you for voting us

Best of the Best!

do

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Knitting Group: 2 p.m. Tuesdays at the Kiowa Library. Knit and chat. All skill levels welcome. Call 303-621-2111 or go to pplibraries.org.

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Elbert County Sheriff’s Posse: a nonprofit volunteer organization that is part of the Elbert County Sheriff’s Office. As volunteers we support the Elbert County Sheriff’s Office, all law enforcement in our county, and the community at large. Go to http://www.

Game Night: 4 p.m. Mondays at the Kiowa Library; call 303-621-2111. Also, 5 p.m. Tuesdays and 5 p.m. Wednesdays at the Elbert Library; call 303-648-3533. Enjoy board, card, and video games for all ages. Go to pplibraries.org.

C ol

Douglas-Elbert County Music Teachers’ Association: 9 a.m. every first Thursday at Parker Bible Church, between Jordan and Chambers on Mainstreet. All area music teachers are welcome. Call Lucie Washburn, 303-814-3479.

Elizabeth Food Bank: 12:30-3 p.m. Friday and 9-11:30 a.m. Saturday at 381 S. Banner in Elizabeth (next door to Elizabeth Presbyterian Church); available to help anyone who needs food. Other times by appointment.

ia

Affordable Colleges Online: guidebook includes a collection of scholarships for women, including due dates and award amounts; insight into the financial aid application process; and other funding opportunities, such as industry-specific scholarships and funding for special groups. Go to http://www.affordablecollegesonline. org/womens-guide-paying-for-college/

Elizabeth American Legion, Post 82: a veteran’s association supporting veterans, their families and the community, meets the first Monday of every month (except when the first Monday is a holiday, in which case the meeting is the second Monday) at the Legion Post Hall at South Banner Street and Elm Street in Elizabeth. Social hour begins at 5:30 and the regular business meeting starts at 6:30. Friday Afternoon Club meets from 5-7 p.m. every Friday and Veterans Coffee Club meets every Wednesday from 8-11 a.m. for social time with other veterans. All Veterans are invited to all meetings, we’d like to see you. Website: aml82.org.

Call for a FREE INSPECTION!

303-425-7531

ed

AA If you want to drink, that’s your business. If you want to stop, that’s ours. More than 1,000 AA meetings are offered in the Denver area every week. If you think you may have a problem with alcohol, come see us. To find a meeting near you, call 303-322-4440, or go to www.daccaa.org.

elbertcountysheriff.com/posse.html, or contact Dave Peontek at 303-646-5456.

M

Editor’s note: Send new listings or changes to hharden@coloradocommunitymedia.com. Deadline is noon Wednesday a week before publication.

C o m m u nit

y


14 Elbert County News

May 17, 2018M

LOCAL

LIFE

ADVICE FOR COSPLAY

Shopping for issues missing from a collection is one of the most common activities at Denver Comic Con.

A guide for those new to

FILE PHOTO

Advice for the event, cosplaying and collecting BY CLARKE READER CREADER@COLORADOCOMMUNITYMEDIA.COM

For first-timers or the uninitiated in the world of comic conventions, Denver’s annual Comic Con can be an intimidating experience. The sprawling event, which is June 15-17 this year, brings upward of 100,000 nerds, cosplayers and collectors into the Colorado Convention Center for fun, exploration and connection. “There’s a sense of community that comes with these kinds of events, because everyone shares the same passions,” said Tara Hubner, marketing and communications manager with Pop Culture Classroom, which puts on the

Comic Con

con every year. “For a lot of people, this is the only time they get to see some of these people, so it’s like a big family reunion for so many people.” With so much going on at the con, including hundreds of booths, celebrities signing memorabilia and taking photos, and panels with all manners of creatives, it can be easy, especially for first-timers, to feel lost and unsure about what is acceptable and allowed by visitors. Pop culture Classroom set up a section of its website at www.denvercomiccon. com/new-to-the-con/ to answer some basic questions, and we spoke to Hubner and other participants to give advice for those new to the con.

FOR THE COMIC COLLECTORS • Despite all the hoopla over celebrities and special events, Denver Comic Con very much still treasures the comic culture that created this cultural movement. Comic stores and dealers from the metro area and beyond will be selling current and classic books, and many stellar artists and writers will be on hand as well. • Andrew Middleton, a comic expert at Colorado Coins, Cards and Comics in Arvada, has attended the Comic Con numerous times, and said he loves meeting the variety of people who show up to share their love of the form. “There’s not one kind of person who loves comic books anymore,” he said. “My favorite part of

the con is meeting people who you wouldn’t think are into this stuff, but it turns out really love it.” • There are two classes of comic buyers, as Middleton sees it — those who like to read the books and those who want to collect them. Those who want to read them are going to be focused on stories and characters, whereas the collectors are going to be more interested in certain issues and willing to spend more money. Attendees should determine where their interests lie, as that will help guide their shopping. • One of the best things about the con, Middleton said, is meeting the local and regional

artists that most shoppers won’t find online or in stores. Instead, they have the chance to buy them right from the source. • As with most things related to Comic Con, Middleton’s advice is to do research in advance. If a shopper is searching for a particular issue or collectible item, doing some research online will help narrow down the retailers to meet. “Most of these people are experts, so keep in mind the stories or characters you most care about, and they can offer recommendations,” he added. “Some vendors are going to feature the latest books, while others will be looking to highlight the rare stuff.”

• One of the best parts about Comic Con is seeing the truly exceptional cosplay work so many people are capable of creating. There are the expected super heroes and science fiction leads, but there’s always more than a few surprises. Don’t be shy to ask to take a photo with a particular favorite — most are very friendly and willing to pose. • At the Comic Con website, there are guidelines for what cosplayers are and are not allowed to wear and bring in as props. Hubner said cosplayers need to be covered enough that there’s no risk of “wardrobe malfunctions” and said that as a general rule, if a person isn’t sure about a certain prop or outfit, it’s better to leave it at home. • Littleton’s Reinke Brothers Halloween Costume and Superstore is a great place for cosplayers of all skill levels to suit up, especially as it’s one of the few costume stores open year-round. “We have the latest and greatest costumes, parts and pieces to make a great outfit,” said Greg “Shof” Shofner, general manager of the store, located at 5663 S. Prince St. “Comic Con gives us a great boost every year, and we start our ordering in January to make sure we have enough of all the costumes.” Over the years, the store has built up relationships with reputable manufacturers, so all the costumes they sell are properly licensed. • A big key to the success of many cosplay outfits is the makeup and prosthetics, and Reinke has experts in those areas as well to help provide that movie quality look. • As Shofner tells it, the key is to get started working on outfits as soon as possible, in case there need to be last-minute alterations.

BASICS TO KNOW • It’s downtown Denver, so parking is always going to be tricky and potentially expensive, Hubner said. Pop Culture’s recommendation is to park farther away and take a Lyft or Uber, or take the light rail, since there is a stop right at the convention center. That same weekend PrideFest and the Denver BBQ Festival will be happening, so expect downtown to be extra busy. • With attendance last year topping about 115,000 people, attendees should be prepared for lines and waiting at the June 15-17 event. June 16, a Saturday, will be the

busiest day, so Friday or Sunday would be a good day to visit to deal with fewer people. “The schedule for the con will be announced about two weeks out, and we encourage people to take a look at it and get a game plan, so they don’t lose time wandering,” Hubner said. “We advise attendees to wear comfortable shoes, brings snacks and water to help them.” • The vast majority of the artists and authors who will be speaking are available for photos and autographs for free, but when it comes to major celebrities, there’s more to consider. Tickets to those events

can be bought in advance or at the event, but fans should be prepared for lines. According to Hubner, lines for photo ops or autographs can take 30 minutes to an hour. “We recommend people go to the celebrity summit first thing and get a sense of the times when their celebrity will be making an appearance,” she said. “Then get there early if you don’t want to spend a lot of time waiting.” • There are plenty of ATMS around the center, but using them usually requires more waiting in lines, so bring cash if possible. • Consider staying after hours. A fun part

of the con is all the new people that attendees meet, and there are several after-party events available to keep the good times going. • One of the biggest piece of advice Hubner has is to not be intimidated. There will be volunteers spread all over the con who will be more than willing to answer questions and provide guidance. “We’re a very welcoming place, and there’s always someone willing to help,” she said. “We want everyone to have a good time while they’re here.”


Elbert County News 15

May 17, 2018

HOW TO MAKE A DIFFERENCE Editor’s note: Send new listings or changes to hharden@coloradocommunitymedia.com. Deadline is noon Wednesday a week before publication. AARP Foundation Tax-Aide: Offers free tax filing help to anyone, especially those 50 and older, who cannot afford a tax preparation service. Need: Volunteers to to help older, lowerincome taxpayers prepare their tax returns. Requirement: All levels of experience are welcome; training and support provided. Contact: 1-888-OUR-AARP (687-2277) or www.aarpfoundation.org/taxaide Alzheimer’s Association, Colorado Chapter: Provides care and support to 67,000-plus families dealing with all kinds of dementing illnesses. Need: Walk to End Alzheimer’s committee members. Requirements: Individuals who love to help plan and execute. Our Walk to End Alzheimer’s attracts more than 10,000 people, so planning committee members are essential. Contact: Deb Wells, 303-813-1669 or dwells@alz.org. Animal Rescue of the Rockies: Provides foster care for death-row shelter dogs and cats throughout Colorado Need: Foster families for animals on lists to be euthanized Contact: www.animalrescueoftherockies.org. Arthritis Foundation, Colorado/Wyoming Chapter: Helps conquer everyday battles through life-changing information and resources, access to care, advancements in sciences and community connections. Need: Walk to Cure Arthritis committee members and general office volunteer support. Requirements: Individuals who love to help plan and execute Walk to Cure Arthritis. We combat arthritis every day, so support from volunteers so that we can serve people is crucial. Contact: Amy Boulas, aboulas@arthritis.org, 720-409-3143. ASSE International Student Exchange Program: Organizes student exchange programs Need: Local host families to provide homes for boys and girls age 15-18 from a variety of coutries. Contact: Cathy Hintz, 406-488-8325 or 800-733-2773 Athena Project: Dedicated to supporting and expanding women’s artistic contributions in the Denver community Need: Readers/evaluators of scripts, through May 28; scripts chosen will be featured at the Athena Project 2018 festival. Requirement: Internet connection. Ages 17 and older. No experience needed; training provided. Contact: (D. Beck) literarymanager@athenaprojectarts.org AYUSA: International Youth Exchange Program: Promotes quality exchange programs for high school students from around the world. Need: Host families for international high school students ages 15-18 studying in the Denver area. Requirements: To provide students with a safe home, meals and transportation for 5-10 months. All family types are considered. Must fill out onlilne application and pass background check. Contact: Adrienne Bivens, 720-467-6430 or

abivens@ayusa.org. Go to www.ayusa.org. Castle Rock Senior Activity Center: Provides services to local seniors Need: Volunteer drivers to take seniors to appointments, the grocery store, pharmacies and more. Contact: Steph Schroeder, 303-688-9498 Colorado Humane Society: Handles animal abuse and neglect cases Need: Volunteers to care for pregnant cats, dogs and their litters, as well as homes for cats and dogs that require socializing or that are recovering from surgery or injuries. Contact: Teresa Broaddus, 303-961-3925 Court Appointed Special Advocates: Works with abused and neglected children in Arapahoe, Douglas, Elbert and Lincoln counties Need: Advocates for children, to get to know, speak up for and ensure their best interests in court Contact: 303-695-1882 or www.adv4children.org. Douglas/Elbert Task Force: Provides assistance to people in Douglas and Elbert counties who are in serious economic need, at risk of homelessness or in similar crisis. Need: Volunteers to assist in the food bank, client services and the thrift store Treasures on Park Street. Contact: Marion Dahlem, 303-688-1114, ext. 32 Dumb Friends League Harmony Equine Center: Cares for homeless horses and other equines. Need: Volunteers to work with horses and other opportunities. Requirements: Must be 16 years old, pass a background check, and be able to commit to at least three hours a week for three months. Other Information: Two-hour orientation provides an overview of the services provided, learn about the volunteer opportunities, take a tour of the center, and talk with staff and volunteers. Contact: 303-751-5772 or go to www.ddfl.org. Elbert County Sheriff’s Posse: Supports the Elbert County Sheriff’s Office and the Office of Emergency Management with detentions

support, patrol, administrative duties, event security, emergency services support, and call-outs as need arises. Need: With proper training and clearances, volunteers help with patrol, fingerprinting, records keeping, community event security services, disaster response and management (wildfire, tornado, blizzard, flood, disaster relief, etc.). Requirements: Must be 21 years of age or older; retired individuals are great. Must complete a employment application, pass a background check, and complete interviews. After being sworn in, in the first three months of membership, complete a minimum of 45 hours of orientation and training curriculum. After this 90-day probationary period, members must log a minimum of 10 hours of month and attend monthly training meetings. Persons ages 15-20, may join the Elbert County Sheriffs Explorer POST that is associated with the Posse. Contact: David Peontek at djp1911@msn.com or 303-646-5456. Go to http://www.elbertcountysheriff.com/posse.html; print out and complete an employment application and turn it into the Elbert County Sheriff ’s Office in Kiowa, “Attn: David Peontek.” Girl Scouts of Colorado: Youth organization for girls Need: Troop leaders, office support, administrative help and more Age requirement: Men and women, 18 and older Contact: www.girlscoutsofcolorado.org, inquiry@gscolorado.org or 1-877-404-5708 Hospice at Home Need: Volunteers help patients and their families with respite care, videotaping, massage and other tasks. Home study training is available. Contact 303-698-6404 Hospice of Covenant Care: Nonprofit, faithbased hospice Need: Volunteers to support patients and families Contact: 303-731-8039 Meals on Wheels: Delivers meals to residents in Englewood, southern Jefferson County and western Arapahoe County Need: Drivers to deliver meals; volunteers to help prepare, box and label meals

Requirements: Must dedicate one to two hours a week Contact: Phil or Mary at 303-798-7642 (from 8 a.m. to noon Mondays through Fridays) Neighbor Network: Nonprofit that helps older adults stay independent. Serves all of Douglas County Need: Volunteers who can provide transportation, light housekeeping, handyman and companion services to seniors. Requirements: Must be at least 21 years old and have a valid driver’s license and auto insurance. Contact: 303-814-4300, neighbornetwork@ douglas.co.us or dcneighbornetwork.org. Parker Senior Center: Provides services to local seniors. Need: Volunteer drivers to take seniors to the center for a hot meal, to appointments, to the grocery store, and more. Contact: Louise West at 303-841-5370. PeopleFirst Hospice: Denver hospice Need: Volunteers to provide companionship to hospice patients and their families. Contact: Rachel Wang at 303-546-7921 Red Cross: Supports the elderly, international causes and social services Need: Volunteers to provide support Contact: 303-607-4768 or 303-266-7855

Sunset Hospice: Provides end-of-life support Need: Volunteer training is from 6-10 p.m. every second and fourth Tuesdays; they also meet from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. every first and third Saturday Contact: Jami Martin at 303-693-2105 The Right Step Inc.: Therapeutic horseback riding program for children and adults with disabilities. Based in Littleton. Need: Volunteers to help with horses before, during and after lessons, as well as to walk alongside clients as they ride to help keep them securely on their horses. Volunteers also needed to help with administrative tasks and fundraising. Requirements: Volunteers who help with lessons must be at least 14 years old and attend a three-hour training session. Contact: volunteercoordinator@therightstepinc.org or go to www.therightstepinc.org.

INSIDE SALES REP Full time or Part Time Location: Englewood, CO

Colorado Community Media, publisher of 18 community newspapers and websites in Suburban Denver, is looking for a sharp inside sales person who loves sales, enjoys working in a team environment and can handle a large account list of advertisers. We are looking for someone comfortable with print, online and social media advertising, but will fully train the right candidate with equivalent sales experience in other industries. This is a salary plus commission position with a great benefits package.

If you want to join our energized advertising team, please give me a call Erin Addenbrooke, 303-566-4074 or send your resume to eaddenbrooke@coloradocommunitymedia.com Colorado Community Media is an Equal Opportunity Employer


16 Elbert County News

May 17, 2018M

Parker gallery offers intriguing look at fiber art “Autumnal Equinox” by Aurora fiber artist Diana Vander Does hangs just inside the entrance into the gallery at the PACE Center in Parker. It’s included in an exhibit, “Contrast,” by the adventurous Front Range Contemporary Quilters, which runs through June 25. Curator Rose Fredrick comments that SONYA’S this exhibit “offers a chance to see the SAMPLER familiar in a new way.” The juror was Linda Colsh. Vander Does’ brilliant red work begins with a digital image print on fabric. Then it is stitched in a more traditional manner — but not quite! Perhaps inspired by Sonya Ellingboe a Japanese maple tree, it’s part of an adventurous collection of fiber art pieces that includes some clothing and other works that will surprise. Open during business hours at the center and of course, during performances. Allow extra time to look at the gallery and the halls. PACE is at 20000 Pikes Peak Ave., Parker. Stutson book honored The charming children’s book “Blue Corn Soup,” by Littleton’s Caroline Stutson, was, sadly, published posthumously. It just won first place for children’s literature in the Colorado Authors’ League’s annual contest and notice has been received by Al Stutson that it will be distributed to every firstgrader in the state of New Mexico, an especially fitting honor to a devoted storyteller. Available locally. “Wealth By Virtue” by Chad Gordon of Centennial is the CAL’s choice for general non-fiction.

Symphonic music The Arapahoe Philharmonic presents a concert called “Order and Chaos,” featuring works by Brahms and Stravinsky, at 7:30 p.m. May 19 at Englewood High School’s Fisher Auditorium, 3800 S. Logan St., Englewood. Pianist is Jamie Shaak. The Brahms concerto premiered in 1859 with the composer at the keyboard. Stravinsky’s early 20th-century “Rites of Spring” sparked a riot at its premier and is considered perhaps the most influential piece of music of the early 20th century. Conductor Devin Patrick Hughes will talk about the program at 6:45 p.m. Tickets: arapahoe-phil.org or 303-781-1892. Cleo Parker Robinson “Dream Catchers” with the Cleo Parker Robinson Dance Ensemble will be performed at 1:30 p.m. Sunday, May 20 at Lone Tree Arts Center, 10075 Commons St., Lone Tree. Tickets: lonetreeartscenter.org, 720-509-1000. Trail partnership The High Line Conservancy and Denver Botanic Gardens have formed a research and conservancy partnership to survey plant communities along the 71-mile National Landmark High Line Conservancy Trail. Landscaping guidelines will be created true to the historical and native landscape along the High Line Canal, dating back to the 1880s. The trail has five character zones: Wild Canyon, Prairie Retreat, Rolling Foothills, Wooded Village and Urban Refuge. A full assessment of plants has never been made. Images and species lists will be made public when developed. South Suburban The South Suburban Public Art SEE SAMPLER, P19

Answers

THANKS for

PLAYING!

© 2016 King Features Synd., Inc.

Solution


Elbert County News 17

May 17, 2018

Elizabeth girls soccer season comes to close Team loses in first game of playoffs, but had stellar campaign BY TOM MUNDS TMUNDS@COLORADOCOMMUNITYMEDIA.COM

Elizabeth’s 2018 girls soccer team set a school record for wins and made it to the state playoffs for the third straight year, but the season ended in the May 9 first round of the playoffs as the Cardinals lost to Holy Family 5-1. The game was a back-and-forth battle from the opening kickoff to the final buzzer. Both teams pressed the attack and, while shots by the Tigers found the net, several well-placed shots by the Cardinals caromed off the cross bar, sailed just wide of the goal, were turned aside by Holy Family defenders or saved by the Tigers goalie. The Tigers had a 3-0 lead when a Cardinals attack paid off as Summer Hatch got a crossing pass from junior Sara Johnson and put the ball past the goalie, making the score 3-1 at halftime. The Tigers added two more goals, including one on a penalty kick in the second half, to secure the win. The Tigers scored five goals but the play of the Elizabeth defense and goalie Erika Reidmuller unofficially turned aside about 12 shots on goal.

Elizabeth freshman Rachael Melchoir, right, prepares to drive the ball up the field and away from Holy Family defender Laura Klingman during the May 9 first-round state girls soccer tournament game at Holy Family stadium. The Cardinals played well but Holy Family moved to the next round of the playoffs as they won the game, 5-1. TOM MUNDS “I am very proud of our girls and all they accomplished,” Cardinals coach Summer Katzoff said after the game. “Every player gave it her all and you couldn’t ask more than that. We gave it our best but lost to a very good soccer team in a game I feel was closer

than the score.” The coach talked about the season. “This has been a good season for us,” she said. “We finished the year with an 11-4 record, which is the best girls soccer record in school history. It also is the third year we have qualified

for the state playoffs.” She said the team is a mix of players with eight seniors and talented young players filling out the remainder of the 22-player roster. She also said the junior varsity team had a winning record this season. “One of the strengths of our team this year has been the senior leadership,” she said. “We also have a solid defense and a very good goalie, Erika Riedmuller, who leads the league in saves this season. In 16 games she made 259 saves, while only 25 goals have been scored against her.” Riedmuller, a senior, said she loves being the goalie. “It is a hard and sometimes thankless job but it is my favorite position,” she said. “It is great to be able to stop the ball from getting into the net, even though some of the things that I don’t get thanked for can save the game for us some times.” She said she played field positions when she was younger but didn’t like it and started playing goalie when she was about 7. Reidmuller said her soccer career will continue after she graduates this year as she will attend Culvert Stockton College in Canton, Missouri to play goalie for the Wildcats, where she plans to pursue a degree in nursing. “I want to be a nurse because I like to help people,” the senior said. “I also love kids so I hope to become a prenatal nurse.”

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18 Elbert County News

replacement of depletions, in accordance with C.R.S. § 37-90-137(9)(c), resulting from the withdrawal and use in its municipal water supply system of the Upper Dawson aquifer groundwater as may be required pursuant to the determination of groundwater rights in this application. A map showing the location of Applicant's present boundaries and the location of Applicant's wastewater treatment facilities is attached to this application as Figure 1. APPLICATION FOR DETERMINATION OF GROUNDWATER RIGHTS. 3. Name(s) of Well(s) and Permit, Registration or Denial Number(s): Applicant will apply for well permits at such times as it is prepared to drill any well or wells which will withdraw the groundwater which is the subject of this Application. 4. Legal Description of Subject Water Rights: The subject water rights are ground water from the not-nontributary Upper Dawson aquifer, the nontributary Lower Dawson aquifer, the nontributary Denver aquifer, the nontributary Arapahoe aquifer, and the nontributary Laramie-Fox Hills aquifer underlying the following parcels located in Sections 7, 17 and 18, Township 8 South, Range 64 West, and Sections 12 and 13, Township 8 South, Range 65 West of the 6th P.M. (hereinafter collectively the “Subject Property”), for which a determination and decree is sought pursuant to C.R.S. § 3790-137(4) and (6) and § 37-92-302(2)(a) and 305(6): a. Cross Roads Business Park, located in the SE1/4 of Section 7, Township 8 South, Range 64 West of the 6th P.M., as described in Exhibit A hereto. b. Gold Creek Park, located in the NE1/4 of Section 12, Township 8 South, Range 65 West of the 6th P.M. and the NW1/4 of Section 7, Township 8 South, Range 64 West of the 6th P.M., as described in Exhibit B hereto. c. Gold Creek Commons, located in the NE1/4 and W1/2 SE1/4 of Section 12, Township 8 South, Range 65 West of the 6th P.M., as described in Exhibit C hereto. d. Elizabeth Convenience Store, located in the SE1/4 SE1/4 of Section 12, Township 8 South, Range 65 West of the 6th P.M., as described in Exhibit D hereto. e. Destiny Ventures II, located in the SE1/4 NE1/4 of Section 13, Township 8 South, Range 65 West of the 6th P.M., as described in Exhibit E hereto. f. Big R Tract, located in the NE1/4 of Section 13, Township 8 South, Range 65 West of the 6th P.M., as described in Exhibit F hereto. g. Whistling Pines Subdivision, located in the NE1/4 NE1/4 of Section 13, Township 8 South, Range 65 West of the 6th P.M., as described in Exhibit G hereto. h. Evans Minor Development, located in the S1/2 of Section 7, Township 8 South, Range 64 West of the 6th P.M., as described in Exhibit H hereto. i. Elizabeth Street, located in the NE1/4 of Section 13, Township 8 South, Range 65 West of the 6th P.M., as described in Exhibit I hereto. j. 120-Foot R.O.W., located in the SW1/4 of Section 7, Township 8 South, Range 64 West of the 6th P.M., as described in Exhibit J hereto. k. Ritoro Parcel, located in the S1/2 of Section 13, Township 8 South, Range 65 West of the 6th P.M., as described in Exhibit K hereto, including any amounts previously decreed in Case No. 2007CW244, Water Division 1. l. Klouser Parcel, located in the NE1/4 of Section 18, Township 8 South, Range 64 West of the 6th P.M., as described in Exhibit L hereto. m. Tall Pines, located in the NW1/4 of Section 17, Township 8 South, Range 64 West of the 6th P.M., as described in Exhibit M hereto. n. Nielson, located in the S1/2 S1/2, S1/2 NE1/4 SE1/4 and S1/2 NW1/4 SE1/2 of Section 13, Township 8 South, Range 65 West of the 6th P.M., as described in Exhibit N hereto. o. 737 Pine Ridge, located in the NE1/4 of Section 13, Township 8 South, Range 65 West of the 6th P.M., as described in Exhibit O hereto. p. Ritoro Parkway, located in the N1/2 of Section 13, Township 8 South, Range 65 West of the 6th P.M., as described in Exhibit P hereto. q. 590 Elm Street, located in the NE1/4 of Section 13, Township 8 South, Range 65 West of the 6th P.M., as described in Exhibit Q hereto. A general location map of the Subject Property is attached hereto as Exhibit R, hereby incorporated herein. 5. Sources of Water Rights: The source of the groundwater to be withdrawn from the subject aquifers is nontributary and not-nontributary groundwater as described in C.R.S. §§ 37-90-103(10.5) and 37-90103(10.7). 6. Estimated Amounts and Rates of Withdrawal: a. Wells will withdraw the subject amounts of groundwater at rates of flow necessary to efficiently withdraw the entire decreed amounts. Applicant will withdraw the subject ground water through wells to be located at any location on the Subject Property or on property adjacent thereto with the consent of the owner(s) thereof. Applicant waives any 600 foot spacing rule as described in C.R.S. § 37-90137(2), for wells of Applicant located on the Subject Property. The estimated average annual amounts of withdrawal available from the subject aquifers, indicated below, are based upon the Denver Basin Rules, 2 C.C.R. 402-6. Applicant estimates that the following annual amounts are representative of the aquifers underlying the Subject Property:

Arapahoe: 184.87 Laramie-Fox Hills: 165.26 Totals: 594.95

Public Notices Name Changes PUBLIC NOTICE Public Notice of Petition for Change of Name Public notice is given on April 13, 2018, that a Petition for a Change of Name of an adult has been filed with the Elbert County Court. The Petition requests that the name of Sonia Melissa Williams be changed to Sonia Fait Kiva Case No.: 18 C 19 By: Jafeen Jenkins Clerk of Court / Deputy Clerk Legal Notice No: 24058 First Publication: May 17, 2018 Last Publication: May 31, 2018 Publisher: Elbert County News

Notice To Creditors PUBLIC NOTICE NOTICE TO CREDITORS Estate of William Raymond Wheeler, aka William R. Wheeler, Deceased Case Number: 2018 PR 30014 All persons having claims against the abovenamed estate are required to present them to the Personal Representative or to the District Court of Elbert County, Colorado on or before September 17, 2018, or the claims may be forever barred. James M. Hubbard, II Attorney for the Personal Representative 8400 E. Prentice Ave., Suite 1040 Greenwood Village, Colorado 80111 Legal Notice No: 24057 First Publication: May 17, 2018 Last Publication: May 31, 2018 Publisher: Elbert County News

Misc. Private Legals Public Notice DISTRICT COURT, WATER DIVISION 1, COLORADO APRIL 2018 WATER RESUME PUBLICATION TO: ALL PERSONS INTERESTED IN WATER APPLICATIONS IN WATER DIV. 1

Pursuant to C.R.S. 37-92-302, you are notified that the following is a resume of all water right applications and certain amendments filed in the Office of the Water Clerk during the month of APRIL 2018 for each County affected.

18CW3073 THE TOWN OF ELIZABETH, P.O. Box 159, Elizabeth, Colorado 80107, Telephone: (303) 646-4166. Harvey W. Curtis, Esq., 8310 South Valley Highway, #230, Englewood, Colorado 80112, Telephone: (303) 292-1144. APPLICATION FOR DETERMINATION OF RIGHTS TO NONTRIBUTARY AND/OR NOT NONTRIBUTARY GROUNDWATER IN THE UPPER DAWSON, LOWER DAWSON, DENVER, ARAPAHOE, AND LARAMIE-FOX HILLS AQUIFERS IN THE DENVER BASIN AND FOR A PLAN OF AUGMENTATION in ELBERT COUNTY. 2. Description of Applicant and Application: Applicant provides municipal water and wastewater services to land located within and without its boundaries as the same may exist from time to time. Wastewater is treated at Applicant's wastewater treatment facilities which discharge to Gold Creek at an outfall located in the NE quarter of Section 12, Township 8 South, Range 65 West, 6th P.M., Elbert County, Colorado. By this application, Applicant seeks (1) a determination of rights to groundwater in the nontributary and/or not nontributary groundwater in the Upper Dawson, Lower Dawson, Denver, Arapahoe, and Laramie-Fox Hills aquifers in the Denver basin; and (2) approval of a plan for augmentation providing for replacement of depletions, in accordance with C.R.S. § 37-90-137(9)(c), resulting from the withdrawal and use in its municipal water supply system of the Upper Dawson aquifer groundwater as may be required pursuant to the determination of groundwater rights in this application. A map showing the location of Applicant's present boundaries and the location of Applicant's wastewater treatment facilities is attached to this application as Figure 1. APPLICATION FOR DETERMINATION OF GROUNDWATER RIGHTS. 3. Name(s) of Well(s) and Permit, Registration or Denial Number(s): Applicant will apply for well permits at such times as it is prepared to drill any well or wells which will withdraw the groundwater which is the subject of this Application. 4. Legal Description of Subject Water Rights: The subject water rights are ground water from the not-nontributary Upper Dawson aquifer, the nontributary Lower Dawson aquifer, the nontributary Denver aquifer, the nontributary Arapahoe aquifer, and the nontributary Laramie-Fox Hills aquifer underlying the following parcels located in Sections 7, 17 and 18, Township 8 South, Range 64 West, and Sections 12 and 13, Township 8 South, Range 65

Misc. Private Legals

Annual Appropriation, acre-feet Aquifer Not-nontributary Upper Dawson: 127.95 Totals: 127.95 Aquifer Nontributary Lower Dawson: 84.10 Denver: 160.71 Arapahoe: 184.87 Laramie-Fox Hills: 165.26 Totals: 594.95 The specific aquifer characteristics for each of the parcels in paragraph 4 are set forth in Exhibit S hereto. The average annual amounts available for withdrawal from the subject aquifers will depend on the hydrogeology and the legal entitlement of Applicant, and Applicant claims all groundwater underlying the Subject Property in the above-described aquifers. b. Applicant requests that in the event the Court determines that any water underlying the parcels identified in paragraph 4 hereof is legally unavailable to Applicant at this time because such water is within the cylinder of appropriation of one or more pre Senate Bill 213 wells and such cylinder is later reduced, or has been reduced subsequent to entry of a decree herein, that the amount of water available to Applicant hereunder be increased correspondingly under the retained jurisdiction of this Court. 7. Well Fields: Applicant requests that this Court determine that Applicant has the right to withdraw all of the legally available groundwater in the Upper Dawson,

Notices

The specific aquifer characteristics for each of the parcels in paragraph 4 are set forth in Exhibit S hereto. The average annual amounts available for withdrawal from the subject aquifers will depend on the hydrogeology and the legal entitlement of Applicant, and Applicant claims all groundwater underlying the Subject Property in the above-described aquifers. b. Applicant requests that in the event the Court determines that any water underlying the parcels identified in paragraph 4 hereof is legally unavailable to Applicant at this time because such water is within the cylinder of appropriation of one or more pre Senate Bill 213 wells and such cylinder is later reduced, or has been reduced subsequent to entry of a decree herein, that the amount of water available to Applicant hereunder be increased correspondingly under the retained jurisdiction of this Court. 7. Well Fields: Applicant requests that this Court determine that Applicant has the right to withdraw all of the legally available groundwater in the Upper Dawson, Lower Dawson, Denver, Arapahoe and LaramieFox Hills aquifers underlying the Subject Property through wells which may be located anywhere on the Subject Property or on property adjacent thereto with consent of the owner(s) thereof, which wells will comprise Applicant’s well field. As wells are constructed, well permit applications will be filed in accordance with C.R.S. § 37-90-137(10). 8. Proposed Use: The water contained in the Upper Dawson, Lower Dawson, Denver, Arapahoe, and Laramie-Fox Hills Aquifers that is the subject of this Application will be used, reused, successively used and otherwise disposed of for all existing and future beneficial purposes, including municipal, domestic, industrial, commercial, fire protection, irrigation, stockwatering, recreation, fish and wildlife preservation and propagation and all other beneficial uses. Said water will be produced for immediate application to beneficial use, for storage and subsequent application to beneficial use, for exchange purposes, for replacement of depletions, for relinquishment pursuant to C.R.S. § 37-90-137(9)(b), and for all other augmentation purposes including taking credit for all return flows resulting from the use of said water as augmentation for or as an offset against any out of priority tributary and/or not nontributary groundwater depletion. Applicant claims the rights set forth in this paragraph for itself, its successors, assigns, lessees, and contractors pursuant to C.R.S. §§ 37-82-101 and 37-82106(2). 9. Jurisdiction: The Water Court has jurisdiction over the subject matter of this application pursuant to C.R.S. §§ 37-92-302(2), and 3790-137(6). 10. Remarks: 10.a. Pursuant to C.R.S. § 37-92-302(2)(c), Applicant has either the actual or deemed consent of the owners of the Subject Property to withdraw and use the unappropriated ground water contained in the Upper Dawson, Lower Dawson, Denver, Arapahoe, and Laramie-Fox Hills aquifers underlying the Subject Property. 10.b. The annual withdrawal of the amount of groundwater applied for herein, subject to the terms and conditions proposed herein, will not result in material injury to any vested or decreed conditional water right. The wells completed into the Lower Dawson, Denver, Arapahoe and Laramie-Fox Hills Aquifers will not, within 100 years, deplete the flow of a natural stream, including a natural stream as defined in C.R.S. §§ 37-82-101(2) and 37-92-102(1)(b) at an annual rate greater than one-tenth of one percent of the annual rate of withdrawal. Depletions caused by wells completed into the Upper Dawson Aquifer will be augmented in accordance with the augmentation plan requested herein in accordance with C.R.S. § 37-90-137(9)(c). 10.c. Applicant claims the right to withdraw more than the average annual amounts estimated in paragraph 6, above, pursuant to Rule 8A of the Statewide Rules, C.C.R. 402-7, through a well field, pursuant to Rule 14 of said Statewide Rules, with the wells in the well field to be alternate points of diversion for one another. 10.d. Although Applicant has estimated the amounts of water available for withdrawal from the subject aquifers based on estimates of relative values for specific yield and saturated thickness, Applicant requests the right to revise the estimates upward or downward, based on better or revised data, without the necessity of amending this application or republishing the same. 10.e. The Applicant also seeks the right to construct additional and/or replacement wells for the withdrawal of the subject ground water, as necessary, in order to maintain production levels from the aquifers, without publishing additional notice or filing any additional pleading with the Court. As such additional wells and/or replacement wells are planned, applications for well permits shall be filed in accordance with C.R.S. § 37-90-137(10). 10.f. Applicant requests the Court order that a failure to construct any well described herein within the period of time specified in any well permit therefor not be deemed to extinguish the underlying right to groundwater. 10.g. Prior to the entry of a Decree herein, Applicant will supplement this Application with evidence that the State Engineer has issued or failed to issue, within four months of the filing of this Application in Water Court, a determination of facts concerning the groundwater underlying the Subject Property. 10.h. Applicant requests that the Court retain jurisdiction to provide for the adjustment of the amounts of groundwater which are available for withdrawal by Applicant from the Upper Dawson, Lower Dawson, Denver, Arapahoe, and Laramie-Fox Hills Aquifers underlying the Subject Property based on actual local Aquifer characteristics, and to authorize Applicant to invoke the Court’s retained jurisdiction for said purpose at any time after such data becomes available. APPLICATION FOR PLAN OF AUGMENTATION. 11. Structures to Be Augmented: Upper Dawson aquifer wells to be constructed pursuant to the determination of groundwater rights requested herein. The estimated average annual amount available for withdrawal from the Upper Dawson aquifer pursuant to this application is 127.95 acre-feet per year. 12. Water Rights To Be Used For Augmentation: The water rights to be used for augmentation hereunder are not nontributary Upper Dawson, and nontributary Lower Dawson, Denver, Arapahoe and Laramie-Fox Hills aquifer groundwater rights, and reusable return flows from each, described as follows: 12.a. Case No. 90CW102: Decree entered December 19, 1990, District Court, Water Division No. 1: Not nontributary

Misc. Private Legals

jurisdiction to provide for the adjustment of the depletion.12.g.(3) Case No. 99CW118: All existamounts of groundwater which are available for ing and future beneficial purposes, including muwithdrawal by Applicant from the Upper nicipal, domestic, industrial, commercial, fire Dawson, Lower Dawson, Denver, Arapahoe, protection, irrigation, stockwatering, recreation, and Laramie-Fox Hills Aquifers underlying the fish and wildlife preservation and propagation, Subject Property based on actual local Aquifer and all other beneficial purposes, for immediate characteristics, and to authorize Applicant to inapplication to said uses, for storage and subvoke the Court’s retained jurisdiction for said sequent application to said uses, for exchange purpose at any time after such data becomes purposes, for replacement of depletions, for reavailable. APPLICATION FOR PLAN OF AUGlinquishment pursuant to. C.R.S. § 37-90MENTATION. 11. Structures to Be Augmented: 137(9)(b), and for all other augmentation purUpper Dawson aquifer wells to be constructed poses, including taking credit for all return flows pursuant to the determination of groundwater resulting from the use of said water as augmentrights requested herein. The estimated average ation for or as offset against any out-of-priority annual amount available for withdrawal from the tributary groundwater depletion. 12.g.(4) Case Totoadvertise yourNo. public notices call 303-566-4100 Upper Dawson aquifer pursuant this applica81CW122: Domestic, municipal within the tion is 127.95 acre-feet per year. 12. Water corporate water supply service area, and indusRights To Be Used For Augmentation: The watrial. 12.g.(5) Case No. 81CW123: Domestic, ter rights to be used for augmentation hereunmunicipal within the corporate water supply serder are not nontributary Upper Dawson, and vice area, and industrial. 12.g.(6) Uses for the nontributary Lower Dawson, Denver, Arapahoe groundwater applied for in this Application as uland Laramie-Fox Hills aquifer groundwater timately decreed herein. 12.h. Applicant also rerights, and reusable return flows from each, dequests the right to use for augmentation water scribed as follows: 12.a. Case No. 90CW102: available to Applicant from any other source legally available for augmentation which can be Decree entered December 19, 1990, District provided in the amount, at the time, and at the Court, Water Division No. 1: Not nontributary location required for augmentation. 12.i. Use of Upper Dawson and nontributary Lower Dawson, groundwater under the decrees listed in ParaDenver, Arapahoe and Laramie-Fox Hills aquifer graphs 12.a., 12.b., 12.c., 12.d., and 12.e., groundwater. The average annual amounts above, for augmentation purposes in this case available for withdrawal under the decree in shall comply with the respective terms and conCase No. 90CW102 are as follows: Source/Avditions in each said decree. 13. Statement of erage Annual Withdrawal: Upper Dawson (not plan for augmentation, covering all applicable nontributary): 3.92 acre-feet, Lower Dawson matters under C.R.S. §§ 37-92-103(9), 302(1), (nontributary): 3.10 acre-feet, Denver (nontribu(2) and 305(8). Give full details of plan, includtary): 5.55 acre-feet, Arapahoe (nontributary): ing a description of all water rights to be estab5.24 acre-feet, Laramie-Fox Hills (nontributary): lished or changed by the plan: 13.a. Applicant is 4.77 acre-feet. The above amounts are subject the owner of the above-described ground water to adjustment in accordance with the retained and ground water rights, wells and well rights. jurisdiction provisions of the decree, to conform Applicant provides municipal water and to actual local aquifer characteristics as dewastewater services to approximately 834 acres scribed by analyses of data obtained when the of land located within its boundaries which are wells are constructed or test holes are drilled. shown on the map attached to the application as 12.b. Case No. 94CW210: Decree entered FebExhibit A. By this application, applicant seeks ruary 15, 1996, District Court, Water Division approval of a plan for augmentation providing for No. 1: Not nontributary Upper Dawson and nonreplacement of depletions resulting from withtributary Lower Dawson, Denver, Arapahoe and drawals from Upper Dawson aquifer wells deLaramie-Fox Hills aquifer groundwater. The avscribed in paragraph 11 above. 13.b. Applicant erage annual amounts available for withdrawal under the decree in Case No. 94CW210 are as proposes to make the required replacements to follows: Source/Average Annual Withdrawal: Running Creek from the sources described in Upper Dawson (not nontributary): 35.5 acre-feet, paragraph 12 above by one or a combination of Lower Dawson (nontributary): 59.6 acre-feet, the following methods: 13.c.(1) Release to Gold Denver (nontributary): 131.0 acre-feet, ArCreek of sewered return flows available to apapahoe (nontributary): 127.4 acre-feet, Laramieplicant at the outfall of applicant’s wastewater Fox Hills (nontributary): 112.0 acre-feet. The treatment facility described above. Such return flows may include return flows from ground waabove amounts are subject to adjustment in acter withdrawn from the sources listed above in cordance with the retained jurisdiction proviparagraph 12. The amount of such sewered resions of the decree, to conform to actual local turn flows available for use for augmentation aquifer characteristics as described by analyses hereunder shall be determined according to the of data obtained when the wells are constructed methodology in paragraph 10.A. of the augmentor test holes are drilled. 12.c. Case No. ation plan decree entered on June 28, 2007 in 99CW118: Decree entered November 30, 2000, Case No. 96CW108, attached hereto as Exhibit District Court, Water Division No. 1: Not nontribT and hereby incorporated. 13.c.(2) Credit for utary Upper Dawson and nontributary Lower lawn and turf irrigation return flows from groundDawson, Denver, Arapahoe and Laramie-Fox water withdrawn from the sources in paragraph Hills aquifer groundwater. The average annual 12, above. The amount of the irrigation return amounts available for withdrawal under the deflows shall be determined pursuant to in paracree in Case No. 99CW118 are as follows: graph 10.B. of the augmentation plan decree in Source/Average Annual Withdr awal: Upper Case No. 96CW108, Exhibit T hereto. 13.c.(3) Dawson (not nontributary): 27.8 acre-feet, Lower Direct release to Running Creek or its tributarDawson (nontributary): 21.0 acre-feet, Denver ies of ground water withdrawn by applicant from (nontributary): 39.7 acre-feet, Arapahoe (nonthe Upper Dawson, Lower Dawson, Denver, Artributary): 39.6 acre-feet, Laramie-Fox Hills apahoe and Laramie-Fox Hills aquifers from the (nontributary): 32.5 acre-feet. The above sources listed in paragraph 12, above. 13.c.(4) amounts are subject to adjustment in accordRelease to Running Creek or its tributaries of ance with the retained jurisdiction provisions of water available to applicant from any other the decree, to conform to actual local aquifer source legally available for augmentation. 13.d. characteristics as described by analyses of data Reserve for Augmentation Required after Cesobtained when the wells are constructed or test sation of Withdrawals: Applicant shall maintain holes are drilled. 12.d. Case No. 81CW122: decree entered February 7, 1985, District Court, in reserve at all times an amount of groundwaWater Division No. 1: Nontributary Arapahoe ter in the nontributary Laramie-Fox Hills aquifer aquifer groundwater. The amount available for underlying the land within its boundaries equal withdrawal under the decree in Case No. to 102% of the amount of the post-pumping aug81CW122 is 0.33 c.f.s. (150 g.p.m.) limited to mentation obligation then incurred for 150 acre-feet annually. 12.e. Case No. Applicant's Upper Dawson wells and remaining 81CW123: decree entered February 5, 1985. unpaid. If, at any time, the amount of such nontributary Laramie-Fox Hills groundwater in reDistrict Court, Water Division No. 1: Nontribuserve falls below 102% of the amount of the tary Lower Dawson aquifer groundwater. The then-incurred and unpaid post-pumping augamount available for withdrawal under the dementation obligation for such Upper Dawson cree in Case No. 81CW123 is 0.22 c.f.s. (100 wells, Applicant shall permanently cease withg.p.m.) limited to 50 acre-feet annually. 12.f. Not drawals from the Upper Dawson aquifer through non-tributary Upper Dawson aquifer groundwaApplicant's Upper Dawson wells, or shall ter and nontributary Lower Dawson, Denver, Arprovide an alternative source of augmentation apahoe and Laramie-Fox Hills aquifer groundwater sufficient to satisfy its then-incurred postwater decreed pursuant to this Application. 12.g. pumping and unpaid augmentation obligation Decreed uses: 12.g.(1) Case No. 90CW102: hereunder. The amount of Applicant's nontribuMunicipal, domestic, industrial, agricultural, tary Laramie-Fox Hills groundwater required to commercial, irrigation, stockwatering, recreationbe held in reserve to satisfy its then post-pumpal, fish and wildlife, fire protection and exing augmentation obligations shall be determchange. The waters will be withdrawn for immeined annually and shall be the cumulative diate application to beneficial use, for storage amount of groundwater withdrawn from the Upand subsequent application to beneficial use, for per Dawson aquifer in all previous calendar exchange purposes, for sale, exchange or reyears through Applicant's Upper Dawson wells placement of depletions resulting from the use less the cumulative amount of augmentation waof water from other sources and for all other augmentation purposes. 12.g.(2) Case No. ter provided to the stream system in all previous 94CW210: All existing and future beneficial purcalendar years pursuant to the decree entered poses, including municipal, domestic, industrial, herein. WHEREFORE, Applicant prays that the commercial, fire protection, irrigation, stockwacourt enter a Decree: 1. Granting the applicatering, recreation, fish and wildlife preservation tion herein and awarding the water rights and propagation, and all other beneficial purclaimed herein as final water rights, except as to poses, for immediate application to said uses, those issues for which jurisdiction of the Court for storage and subsequent application to said will be specifically retained in accordance with uses, for exchange purposes, for replacement of the statutes. 2. Specifically determining that: a. depletions, for relinquishment pursuant to Applicant has complied with C.R.S. § 37-90C.R.S. § 37-90-137(9)(b), and for all other aug137(4), and water is legally available for withmentation purposes, including taking credit for drawal by the water rights requested herein, but all return flows resulting from the use of said wathat jurisdiction may be retained with respect to ter as augmentation for or as offset against any the average annual amounts of withdrawal speout-of-priority tributary groundwater cified herein to provide for the adjustment of depletion.12.g.(3) Case No. 99CW118: All existsuch amounts to conform to actual local aquifer ing and future beneficial purposes, including mucharacteristics from adequate information obnicipal, domestic, industrial, commercial, fire tained from wells or test holes drilled on or near protection, irrigation, stockwatering, recreation, Applicant's property, pursuant to C.R.S. § 37fish and wildlife preservation and propagation, 92-305(11), and Denver Basin Rule 9; b. The and all other beneficial purposes, for immediate groundwater in the Upper Dawson aquifer is notapplication to said uses, for storage and subnontributary ground water, which will be withsequent application to said uses, for exchange drawn pursuant to the plan of augmentation repurposes, for replacement of depletions, for requested in this case; c. The groundwater in the linquishment pursuant to. C.R.S. § 37-90Lower Dawson, Denver, Arapahoe, and Laram137(9)(b), and for all other augmentation purie-Fox Hills aquifers is nontributary ground waposes, including taking credit for all return flows ter; d. Vested or conditionally decreed water resulting from the use of said water as augmentrights of others will not be materially injured by ation for or as offset against any out-of-priority the withdrawals of groundwater and plan for tributary groundwater depletion. 12.g.(4) Case augmentation requested herein; e. No findings No. 81CW122: Domestic, municipal within the of reasonable diligence are required to maintain corporate water supply service area, and industhe groundwater rights; and f. The water rights trial. 12.g.(5) Case No. 81CW123: Domestic, adjudicated in this case are vested property municipal within the corporate water supply serrights. Further, Applicant prays that this court vice area, and industrial. 12.g.(6) Uses for the grant such other relief as it deems proper in the groundwater applied for in this Application as ulpremises. Additional Information. Number of timately decreed herein. 12.h. Applicant also repages of Application: 143 pages, including 129 quests the right to use for augmentation water pages of exhibits. available to Applicant from any other source legally available for augmentation which can be WATER RIGHTS CLAIMED OR HERETOprovided in the amount, at the time, and at the FORE ADJUDICATED THE WATER RIGHTS

May 17, 2018M

Misc. Private Legals

Misc. Private Legals

Elbert * 1


Elbert County News 19

scribed in paragraph 11 above. 13.b. Applicant proposes to make the required replacements to Running Creek from the sources described in paragraph 12 above by one or a combination of the following methods: 13.c.(1) Release to Gold Creek of sewered return flows available to applicant at the outfall of applicant’s wastewater treatment facility described above. Such return flows may include return flows from ground water withdrawn from the sources listed above in paragraph 12. The amount of such sewered return flows available for use for augmentation hereunder shall be determined according to the methodology in paragraph 10.A. of the augmentand DaeSean Hamilton of Penn State. what his thought process is. We’re goBY ARNIE STAPLETON Keenum was named the starter by ation plan decree entered on June 28, 2007 in Sanders, who also played at SMU, ing to complete this ball. We’re going ASSOCIATED PRESSas Exhibit general manager John Elway, who Case No. 96CW108, attached hereto T and hereby incorporated. 13.c.(2) Credit for worked out with Sutton over the winto keep the ball moving. I’m liking also traded Trevor Siemian, who had lawn and turf irrigation return flows from groundwater withdrawn from the sources in paragraph ter and was delighted when the Bronwhat I’m seeing from him so far.” When Emmanuel Sanders returned beaten Paxton Lynch for the starting 12, above. The amount of the irrigation return cos picked him in the second round. Sanders and Demaryius Thomas quarterback job each of the past two fromshall vacation to start the flows be determined pursuant to inDenver paragraph 10.B. of offseason the augmentation plan decree in At 6-4 and 218 pounds, he’s built like were loath last season to complain summers, to Minnesota. Broncos’ training program, Case No. 96CW108, Exhibit T hereto. 13.c.(3) Thomas. about it, but they were clearly affected After the recent draft, Elway reiterhe went straight theor team store and Direct release to Running to Creek its tributaries of ground water withdrawn by applicant from “D.T. is big,’’ Sanders said, but by the turnstile at quarterback as the ated two things about Lynch, whom loved he saw. the Upperwhat Dawson, Lower Dawson, Denver, Arapahoe and Laramie-Fox Hills aquiferswere from theNo. 4 Sutton “looks like he belongs in the Broncos churned through Siemian, he traded up to draft in the first round Hanging off the racks sources listed in paragraph 12, above. 13.c.(4) NBA. Working out with him, he has Lynch and Brock Osweiler during a out of Memphis two years ago: Case jerseys. ReleaseKeenum to Running Creek or its tributaries of water available to applicant from any other amazing feet. He’s very fluid for being 5-11 season. • He still believes he’ll figure things For the first time since Peyton Mansource legally available for augmentation. 13.d. Reserve for Augmentation Required after Ces-Bowl 50, so big. I’m looking forward to getting “You can sit back and say we’re out and become a starting NFL quarning’s retirement after Super sation of Withdrawals: Applicant shall maintain him in here and just working. Hopeall professional football players and terback. the Broncos entered their offseason in reserve at all times an amount of groundwater in the nontributary Laramie-Fox Hills of aquifer fully he can come up with some big you’ve got to deal with that situation, • He’ll have to beat out Chad Kelly training program certain who will underlying the land within its boundaries equal plays for us this year.’’ but at the same time, obviously you this offseason to win the backup job. be102% under after signing Keenum to of the center amount of the post-pumping augmentation obligation then incurred for At 6-1 and 205 pounds, Hamilton is can’t gain the same chemistry,’’ SandIf he doesn’t, it would mark the to a two-year, $36 million deal and Applicant's Upper Dawson wells and remaining Public Notice unpaid. If, at any time, the the amount of such noncloser to Sanders’ size — 5-11, 180 — ers said. third straight summer that Lynch has declaring him starter. tributary Laramie-Fox Hills groundwater in reDISTRICT COURT, WATER DIVISION 1, have the same mindbut still bigger. “You don’t failed to beat out a seventh-rounder “I falls appreciate sure,’’of Sanders serve below 102%it, of for the amount the COLORADO then-incurred andisunpaid post-pumping aug-two “I’m going to teach those guys set. You have to talk to two different for a job. said. “This the first time in APRIL 2018 WATER RESUME PUBLICATION mentation obligation for such Upper Dawson TO: ALL PERSONSquarterbacks. INTERESTED When you’re going into Sanders, who said he’s healthy after or three years that I’m not everything that I know,” Sanders said. wells, Applicant shall permanently ceasestanding withIN WATER APPLICATIONS IN WATER DIV. 1 drawals from the Upper Dawson aquifer through individual routes, you have to go to one “That’s my job.” being bothered by an ankle injury up here talking about a quarterback Applicant's Upper Dawson wells, or shall to C.R.S. 37-92-302, you are notified provide an alternative source of augmentation guyofand then almost all of last season, Pursuant is athebig fan of debate. I remember when I got out Sanders, who is 31 years old and will that following is a resume all water rightgo with the next guy. You water sufficient to satisfy its then-incurred postapplications and certain amendments filed in the don’t really gain that chemistry. You’re make $8.25 million this season, said decision here, went out to the team store and I Keenum and of the Broncos’ pumpingIand unpaid augmentation obligation Office of the Water Clerk during the month of hereunder. TheKeenum amount of Applicant's notaffected. maximizing the opportunity. to declare him the starterAPRIL right away . County saw Case jerseysnontribu. I was like, he’s not concerned that the rookies 2018 for each tary Laramie-Fox Hills groundwater required to be held in reserve its then post-pump“Now we’re maximizing the oppor“He’s a leader,’’ Sanders18CW3061, said, adding `Thank God,toIsatisfy don’t have to deal with will eventually unseat him. Elisabeth M. L. Kime Living ing augmentation obligations shall be determTrust, 7611 Parker Road, Parker, CO 80138 tunity , and hopefully it pays off.” that “98 percent” of his passes soE.far thatannually again.’ “That’s going to happen sooner or ined and shall be the cumulative (James J. Petrock, Petrock & Fendel, 700 amount of groundwater withdrawn from the UpThe Broncos also added some talhave been on target. “He’s confident later,’’ Sanders said. “... All I can do is “Case is our guy . We can go from 17th Street, #1800, Denver, CO 80202), APper Dawson aquifer in all previous calendar PLICATION FOR UNDERGROUND WATERwide receiving depth, ent into their in himself. He’s one of those guys that there. We Applicant's can work our butts off, try make plays every single day and show years through Upper Dawson wells RIGHTS FROM NOT NONTRIBUTARY less the cumulative amount of augmentation wareplacing free agent departures Cody when he steps into the huddle, to gain chemistry andintry to put up that if I become expendable here, just SOURCEhe’s AND FOR APPROVAL OF PLAN ter provided to the stream system all previous FOR AUGMENTATION, IN THE NOT NONcalendar years pursuant to the decree entered Latimer and Bennie Fowler III with that leader. points.” show some other team, hey, look, I still TRIBUTARY UPPER DAWSON AQUIFER, herein. WHEREFORE, Applicant prays that the DOUGLAS COUNTY. 40 draft acres located the picksin Courtland Sutton of SMU “You don’t have to second-guess On thea Decree: day he1. signed his contract, got it. I still got the juice.’’ court enter Granting the applicaN1/2NE1/4 of Section 34, T9S, R65W of the 6th tion herein and awarding the water rights P.M., Elbert County, as described and shown on claimed herein as final water rights, except as to Attachment A hereto ("Subject Property"). those issues for which jurisdiction of the Court Source of Water Rights: Not nontributary as dewill be specifically retained in accordance with scribed in Sections 37-90-103(10.7), C.R.S. the statutes. 2. Specifically determining that: a. Amount: 2 acre-feet per year of Upper Dawson Applicant has complied with C.R.S. § 37-90and the science of happiness. Expect available. Curator Brenda LaBier will selects public art for the district and being aquifer groundwater part of the annual 137(4), and water is legally available for withamountContact excluded in Case speak No. 04CW157 use on June 2. Through unexpected art experiences in public at 1forp.m. oversees temporary exhibits. drawal by the water rights requested herein, but through exempt wells on 35 or more acre tracts that jurisdiction may be retained with respect to spaces. Nomadic art gallery Black June 30. 303-797-1779. Lynne Wachter, lynnew@ssprd.org. of land. Proposed Use: Domestic, including inthe average annual amounts of withdrawal spehouse, irrigation, livestock watering, and augcified Cube offers artistic direction. ProFROMherein PAGE 16to provide for the adjustment of mentation purposes. Groundwater to be augsuch amounts to conform to actual local aquifer of Upper Dawson duced by the Denver Theatre District, Happy City Denver Curtis Center for the Arts mented: 2 acre-feet per year characteristics from adequate information obaquifer groundwater as requested herein. Water tained from wells or test holes drilled on or near it will offer installations and experi“Happy City Denver: Art for the Longtime Greenwood Village resiCommittee has an opening and rights for augmentation: Return flows from the Applicant's property, pursuant to C.R.S. § 37of not nontributary Upper Dawsonwill aquifer People” bring 10 artists’ perspecdent and artist Joellyn T.use Duesberry is invites from those who want ences in public spaces May 18 through 92-305(11),inquiries and Denver Basin Rule 9; b. The and return flows from or direct discharge of 2 groundwater in the Upper Dawson aquifer is nottivesLower on happiness and community showing her work from the mid-1970s to serve on this nine-member June 30. A publication, “Ear to Ear” acre-feet per year of nontributary Dawson nontributary ground water, which will be with-commitaquifer ground water as decreed in Case No. drawnApplicants pursuant to the plan of augmentation re- South wellness. to 2015 at Curtis Center for the Arts, will be distributed. A panel discustee. must live in the 04CW157. Statement of plan for augmentation: quested in this case; c. The groundwater in the The Upper Dawson aquifer groundwater The titlewillisbeinspired by British Artist sion, “Happiness Unpacked,” will be 2349 E. Orchard Road, Greenwood Suburban ParksArapahoe, and Recreation Lower Dawson, Denver, and Laram- Disused to serve two residential lots on the Subject ie-Fox aquifers is nontributary groundfrom waPublic Notice Semple, Village. A book, “Elevated Perspective: held on May 31 at Union Station. For trict.Hills The committee meets 8:30 Property through individualStuart wells (1 acre-foot per related to Canadian ter; d. Vested or conditionally decreed water well) for in house in writer one residence (0.35 Montgomery’s book, rights others on will not materiallyTuesday injured by of DISTRICTThe Charles Paintings of Joellyn Duesberry ,”use information, go to happycitydenver. to 10ofa.m. thebefourth COURT, WATER DIVISION 1, acre-feet per year), irrigation of 10,000 squarethe withdrawals of groundwater and plan for COLORADO feet of home lawn and garden and trees (0.6 “Happy City ,” which questions the and a 32-minute PBS documentary , com. Bottom line: better mental each month. This is a three-year term, augmentation requested herein; e. No findings APRIL 2018 WATER RESUME PUBLICATION acre-feet per year), and stockwatering of four of reasonable diligence are required toCommittee maintain intersection between urban design “Dialogue With the Artist,” will be health… beginning mid-summer. TO: ALL PERSONS INTERESTED large domestic animals (0.05 acre-feet). Sewage the groundwater rights; and f. The water rights IN WATER APPLICATIONS IN WATER DIV. 1 treatment for inhouse use will be provided by adjudicated in this case are vested property non-evaporative septic system. Return flows asrights. Further, Applicant prays that this court Pursuant to C.R.S. 37-92-302, you are notified sociated with in-house use will be approximgrant such other relief as it deems proper in the that the following is a resume of all water right ately 90% of water used for that purpose and repremises. Additional Information. Number of applications and certain amendments filed in the turn flow associated with irrigation use will be pages of Application: 143 pages, including 129 Office of the Water Clerk during the month of 15% of water used for that purpose. During pages of exhibits. APRIL 2018 for each County affected. pumping Applicant will replace actual depletions to the affected stream system pursuant to SecPublic Notice Public Notice WATER RIGHTS CLAIMED OR HERETO18CW3061, Elisabeth M. L. Kime Living tion 37-90-137(9)(c.5), C.R.S. Depletions occur FORE ADJUDICATED THE WATER RIGHTS Trust, 7611 E. Parker Road, Parker, CO 80138 to the Cherry Creek stream system. Return Records Destruction: Policies CHILD FIND CLAIMED BY THESE APPLICATIONS MAY (James J. Petrock, Petrock & Fendel, 700 flows accrue to the South Platte River stream and Procedures AFFECT IN PRIORITY ANY WITHIN THIS DI17th Street, #1800, Denver, CO 80202), APsystem via Cherry Creek and those return flows (Recommended by the Colorado Elizabeth School District would like to locate all VISION AND OWNERS OF AFFECTED PLICATION FOR UNDERGROUND WATER are sufficient to replace actual depletions while Department of Education) 0 through 21 year olds, who may have a RIGHTS MUST APPEAR TO OBJECT WITHIN RIGHTS FROM NOT NONTRIBUTARY the subject groundwater is being pumped. Apdisability. THE TIME PROVIDED BY STATUTE OR BE SOURCE AND FOR APPROVAL OF PLAN plicant will reserve an equal amount of nontribuDue to the increasing volume of special educaFOREVER BARRED. FOR AUGMENTATION, IN THE NOT NONtary Lower Dawson aquifer groundwater to meet tion records, school districts spend a significant The Colorado Department of Education mainTRIBUTARY UPPER DAWSON AQUIFER, post pumping augmentation requirements. Furamount of time and money maintaining those retains a comprehensive child identification sysYOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that any party DOUGLAS COUNTY. 40 acres located in the ther, Applicant prays that this Court grant the cords. Consequently, a systematic procedure for tem consistent with Part B of IDEA and ensures who wishes to oppose an application, or an N1/2NE1/4 of Section 34, T9S, R65W of the 6th application and for such other relief as seems the retention and disposition of inactive special that each Local Education Agency (LEA), in colamended application, may file with the Water P.M., Elbert County, as described and shown on education student records is necessary. laboration with a variety of community reproper in the premises. (6 pages). Clerk, P. O. Box 2038, Greeley, CO 80632, a Attachment A hereto ("Subject Property"). sources, assumes the leadership role in estabverified Statement of Opposition, setting forth Source of Water Rights: Not nontributary as deThe Family Education Rights and Privacy Act lishing and maintaining a process in their comWATER RIGHTS CLAIMED OR HERETOfacts as to why the application should not be scribed in Sections 37-90-103(10.7), C.R.S. munity for the purpose of locating, identifying (FERPA) is a federal privacy protection act that FORE ADJUDICATED THE WATER RIGHTS granted, or why it should be granted only in part Amount: 2 acre-feet per year of Upper Dawson and evaluating all children, birth to 21 years, protects student education records. FERPA CLAIMED BY THESE APPLICATIONS MAY or on certain conditions. Such Statement of Opaquifer groundwater being part of the annual AFFECT IN PRIORITY ANY WITHIN THIS DIwho may have a disability and may be eligible defines education records as all records that position must be filed by the last day of JUNE amount excluded in Case No. 04CW157 for use VISION AND OWNERS OF AFFECTED for services and supports under Part C or speschool or educational agencies maintain about a 2018 (forms available on www.courts.state.co.us through exempt wells on 35 or more acre tracts RIGHTS MUST APPEAR TO OBJECT WITHIN cial education services under Part B of IDEA. student. FERPA applies to public schools and or in the Clerk’s office) and must be filed as an of land. Proposed Use: Domestic, including inTHE TIME PROVIDED BY STATUTE OR BE state or local education agencies that receive Original and include $158.00 filing fee. A copy of house, irrigation, livestock watering, and augFOREVER BARRED. federal education funds. Ages 0 through 5 year-old concerns should be each Statement of Opposition must also be mentation purposes. Groundwater to be augdirected to Amber Graham, Early Childhood served upon the Applicant or Applicant’s Attormented: 2 acre-feet per year of Upper Dawson YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that any party It is the policy of Elizabeth School District that Coordinator at 303-646-6716. ney and an affidavit or certificate of such seraquifer groundwater as requested herein. Water who wishes to oppose an application, or an the contents of special education files shall be vice of mailing shall be filed with the Water rights for augmentation: Return flows from the amended application, may file with the Water All 5 through 21 year-old concerns should be kept for a minimum of five years after all special Clerk. use of not nontributary Upper Dawson aquifer Clerk, P. O. Box 2038, Greeley, CO 80632, a directed to Kim Morrison, Special Education education and related services for a student and return flows from or direct discharge of 2 verified Statement of Opposition, setting forth Director at 303-646-1844 have ended. Upon exiting from special educaLegal Notice No: 24055 acre-feet per year of nontributary Lower Dawson facts as to why the application should not be tion services, the student and parent/guardian First Publication: May 17, 2018 aquifer ground water as decreed in Case No. granted, or why it should be granted only in part Services for infants and toddlers are voluntary. shall be informed that records will be destroyed First Publication: May 17, 2018 04CW157. Statement of plan for augmentation: or on certain conditions. Such Statement of Opafter five consecutive years of in-active status. Publisher: Elbert County News The Upper Dawson aquifer groundwater will be position must be filed by the last day of JUNE Prior to the destruction of in-active records, efReferences: IDEA, Part C, Section 303.320-323 used to serve two residential lots on the Subject 2018 (forms available on www.courts.state.co.us forts to notify the parent/guardian or student 18 IDEA, Part B, Section 300.125 Public Notice Property through individual wells (1 acre-foot per or in the Clerk’s office) and must be filed as an years old or older shall be made and through ECEA CCR 301-8 2220-R-4.01-4.04(4) well) for in house use in one residence (0.35 Original and include $158.00 filing fee. A copy of public notice in a local newspaper and on the DISTRICT COURT, WATER DIVISION 1, acre-feet per year), irrigation of 10,000 squareeach Statement of Opposition must also be district website. Absent a request, the records Legal Notice No.: 24060 COLORADO feet of home lawn and garden and trees (0.6 served upon the Applicant or Applicant’s Attorshall be destroyed in conformance with C.R.S. First Publication: May 17, 2018 APRIL 2018 WATER RESUME PUBLICATION acre-feet per year), and stockwatering of four ney and an affidavit or certificate of such ser§24-80-101, et seq., and federal law. No record Last Publication: May 24, 2018 TO: ALL PERSONS INTERESTED large domestic animals (0.05 acre-feet). Sewage vice of mailing shall be filed with the Water Publisher: The Elbert County News shall be destroyed as long as it pertains to any IN WATER APPLICATIONS IN WATER DIV. 1 treatment for inhouse use will be provided by Clerk. pending legal case, claim, action or audit. non-evaporative septic system. Return flows asPursuant to C.R.S. 37-92-302, you are notified sociated with in-house use will be approximLegal Notice No: 24056 Legal Notice No.: 24059 that the following is a resume of all water right ately 90% of water used for that purpose and reFirst Publication: May 17, 2018 First Publication: May 17, 2018 applications and certain amendments filed in the turn flow associated with irrigation use will be First Publication: May 17, 2018 Last Publication: May 24, 2018 Office of the Water Clerk during the month of 15% of water used for that purpose. During Publisher: The Elbert County News Publisher: Elbert County News APRIL 2018 for each County affected. pumping Applicant will replace actual depletions to the affected stream system pursuant to Sec18CW3061, Elisabeth M. L. Kime Living tion 37-90-137(9)(c.5), C.R.S. Depletions occur Trust, 7611 E. Parker Road, Parker, CO 80138 to the Cherry Creek stream system. Return (James J. Petrock, Petrock & Fendel, 700 flows accrue to the South Platte River stream

May 17, 2018

Broncos wide receiver energized by offseason moves

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Misc. Private Legals

Misc. Private Legals

Misc. Private Legals

City and County

City and County

Elbert * 2


20 Elbert County News

May 17, 2018M

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Lawyers at the Library: 6-9 p.m. the second Tuesday of every month at the Elizabeth Library, 651 W. Beverly St. Free legal clinic for parties who have no attorney. Volunteer attorneys will answer questions, help fill out forms and explain the process and procedure for the areas of family law, civil litigation, criminal defense, property law, probate law, collections, appeals, landlordtenant law and civil protection orders. Walk-ins welcome. Everyone will be helped on a first-come, first-served basis. Mystery Book Club: 9:30 a.m. the first Saturday of each month at the Simla Public Library. The group enjoys talking about a variety of mystery authors and titles. We also periodically host a Colorado author during our meetings. Everyone may join us, and registration is not required. Visit the Simla Branch of the Elbert County Library District at 504 Washington Avenue, call 719-541-2573, or email farabe@elbertcountylibrary.org. Outback Express: public transit service provided by the East Central Council of Local Governments. To ensure a seat is available, 24-hour notice appreciated. Call Kay Campbell, 719- 541-4275, or 800-825-0208 for reservations. Go to eccog.com. Outback Express runs from Simla and Matheson to Colorado Springs on the first and third Monday of each month; from Simla and Matheson to Limon on the fourth Thursday of each month; from Kiowa, Elizabeth and Elbert to Parker or Colorado Springs on the first and third Tuesday of each month; from

Elizabeth to Colorado Springs or Parker on the second Tuesday of each month. Good Samaritan Nursing Home Residents may ride the bus on the second Thursday of each month. Overeaters Anonymous: 10-11 a.m. and from 7-8 p.m. Wednesdays in the Sedalia Room at New Hope Presbyterian Church, 2100 Meadows Parkway, Castle Rock. Parker-Franktown-Elizabeth Paper Crafting Club: regular meetings on various weekday evenings and weekends at 7786 Prairie Lake Trail, Parker (in the Pinery). Open to anyone interested in card making and scrapbooking. Contact Alison Collins at 720-212-4788 or find us online at http:// www.meetup.com/Parker-FranktownElizabeth-Paper-Crafting-Club/ Ranchland Republican Women: 7 p.m. third Monday of each month at the Elizabeth Library, 651 Beverly St. Membership is open to Republicans only. Dues are $25 for a full voting member (women only) and $10 for a non-voting member (can be women or men). For a membership application and other information, go to www.RanchlandRepublianWomen.org. Seniors Meet: 11 a.m. Mondays at the Elizabeth Senior Center, 823 S. Banner St. Bring a dish for potluck on the first Monday of each month. Other Mondays, bring a sack lunch. Bingo, games and socializing. New leadership. Call Agnes at 303-883-7881 or Carol at 303-646-3425. Simla Open Mic Night: 6:30 p.m. Fridays at the Simla Library. Share poetry, music, dance, comedy or painting (inter alios), or just come and watch.3333

Sky Cliff Center Caregiver Support Group: 10-11:30 a.m. the third Tuesday of each month at 4600 E. Highway 86, Castle Rock. Caregiving for adults can be challenging at times, and you’re not alone. For information, or to let the center know if you’re coming, call 303-814-2863 or email skycliffctr@ skycliff.org. Go to www.skycliff.org Sky Cliff Center Stroke Support Group: 10 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. the second and last Wednesday of each month at Christlife Community Church, 5451 E. Highway 86, Franktown (lunch provided). Also, 10-11:30 a.m. the third Wednesday of each month at Sky Ridge Medical Center, 10101 Ridge Gate Parkway, Lone Tree. Call Sky Cliff Center at 303-814-2863. Southeast Beekeeping Club meets from 6:30-8:30 p.m. the first Wednesday of every month at the North Pinery Firehouse, Parker. All levels of beekeeping welcome, from no-bees to wanna-bees to tons of bees. Our meeting time is spent solving beekeeping challenges, networking and refreshments. There is no fee for this meeting and a lending library is available. Call Linda Larsen at 303-776-3039 or email sebcbeemail@gmail.com. Teen Tuesday: 5 p.m. Tuesdays at the Elbert Library. Play card and video games. Call 303-648-3533 or go to pplibraries.org. Therapeutic riding: Promise Ranch Therapeutic Riding in Parker offers free therapeutic riding for developmentally disabled adults and children. Scholarship money is available for Douglas County residents to provide 10 therapeutic riding lessons. Call 303-841-5007 or visit www.promiseranchtherapeuticriding.com.

Elbert County News 0517  
Elbert County News 0517