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75 CENTS

March 14, 2019

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ELBERT COUNTY, COLORADO

A publication of

Heads shaved for charity

Canine cookies for a cause

Elizabeth High School hosts fundraiser for cancer research BY TOM MUNDS TMUNDS@COLORADOCOMMUNITYMEDIA.COM

Hair fell to the floor by the pound Feb. 28 during the Brave the Shave and Be the Hope event at Elizabeth High School. This is the fourth year the Cardinals have hosted the head-shaving event to raise money for St. Baldrick’s Foundation. The St. Baldrick’s Foundation funds more childhood cancer research grants than any organization except the federal government. Dani Varela, event organize, said that after her granddaughter Cheyenne was diagnosed with cancer three years ago, she wanted to do something to help all children with cancer.” She said when she learned about the St. Baldrick’s Foundation and what they do, she decided to try to raise funds for the foundation. She announced the event and said the support by teachers, students and members of the community was awesome and is awesome again this year. She too got her hair shaved. It apparently wasn’t her initial plan but when the hat was passed and more than $500 was raised, she took her place on stage and had her head

For special-needs students, ASPIRE program offers boost in learning life skills BY TABATHA STEWART SPECIAL TO COLORADO COMMUNITY MEDIA

this year,” Varela said. “We had 38 volunteers last year and this year we had 40 heads shaved. However, last year we raised about $5,000 and this year when all the donations and pledges are turned in we expect we will raise more than that this year.”

Coloradans love their canine companions. Many people spare no expense when it comes to the well-being, and sometimes spoiling, of beloved fur babies. Now, thanks to the students in the ASPIRE program through Elizabeth School District, Elbert County canine owners can get healthy, delicious doggie treats made locally from highquality, healthy ingredients. The ASPIRE program is the school district’s Adult Students Preparing for Independence, Responsibility and Employment transition program that helps special-needs students ages 18 to 21 learn life and social skills. Students in the program started baking dog cookies several months ago,

SEE SHAVED, P5

SEE ASPIRE, P6

Karl Zander smiles as the volunteer shaves away his hair and his beard during the event to raise money for the St. Baldrick Foundation’s research that seeks a cure for pediatric cancer. Zander, an Elizabeth High School math teacher, said his students may not recognize him without the beard he has sported for two years. TOM MUNDS shaved again this year. Students, faculty and community members filled most of the seats in the auditorium Feb. 28 for the headshaving event. They cheered and applauded for the 40 volunteers who stepped on the stage of the auditorium and took a seat as volunteers used clippers to send their hair to the floor. “We had a good turnout again

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2 Elbert County News

March 14, 2019M

Plan to focus oil rules on safety creates divide Bill advances after marathon hearing in state Senate BY DAN ELLIOTT ASSOCIATED PRESS

Supporters of a plan to overhaul Colorado’s oil and gas regulations told lawmakers that the measure is a flexible, commonsense approach to dealing with frequent conflicts over health and safety.

Opponents said it goes too far and could lead to a virtual ban on drilling in some areas. On March 5, a state Senate committee held the first hearing on legislation backed by majority Democrats that would dramatically change the way Colorado oversees the industry. Senate Bill 19-181 would change the state’s top priority from promoting oil and gas to protecting human health and safety and would give local governments authority over the location of new wells, a power now held by state regulators. Oil and gas drilling sparks fre-

quent political and court battles in Colorado, particularly in the fast-growing communities north of Denver, which overlap the rich Wattenberg oil and gas field. The hearing before the Senate Transportation and Energy Committee — which approved the bill 4-3 — was the first of several before the sweeping measure gets final votes in both chambers. Opponents of the bill, including oil and gas field workers, and supporters held separate rallies before the hearing. The hearing continued late into the night with hundreds of people

signed up to testify either in person at the statehouse or via video link from a half-dozen sites around the t state. a Senate Majority Leader Stephen t Fenberg, one of the measure’s spon- m sors, told the committee that the proposal would set out a new mission h for the Colorado Oil and Gas Conser- w vation Commission, which regulates o the industry, to protect people and the environment first, not promote t g energy production. SEE OIL, P3

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Elbert County News 3

March 14, 2019

OIL FROM PAGE 2

Jeff Robbins, acting director of the commission, said the agency already has some authority to protect health and safety but that the measure would do more. “I think this legislation amplifies health and safety over and above where it is now,” he said. Tracee Bentley, executive director of the Colorado Petroleum Council, told the committee that the measure goes too far. “It all but guarantees the industry could not operate in certain jurisdictions,” she said. It would send a message that “Colorado is closed for business.’’ Weld County Commissioner Barbara Kirkmeyer, whose county is in the heart of the Wattenberg field, accused Democratic lawmakers of ignoring officials in energyproducing regions when they wrote the proposal. She said the last time Colorado significantly tightened oil and gas rules a decade ago, drilling in Weld County slowed to a crawl, property values plunged and thousands of jobs disappeared, both in oil and gas and in industries such as restaurants that depended on energy workers. Democratic Sen. Mike Foote, a

committee member, responded that a deep national recession caused the job losses, not regulation. Erin Martinez, who survived a 2017 house explosion blamed on a leaking natural gas line, spoke in support of one provision in the measure that would require the state to publicly post the location of pipelines. The blast killed her husband, Mark Martinez, and brother Joseph Irwin and destroyed the Martinez’s home in Firestone. Investigators said the gas came from a pipeline that was severed nearby. If the couple had known the location of the line, they never would have bought the house, Erin Martinez said. The far-reaching measure also would reorganize the Oil and Gas Conservation Commission, reducing the number of industry representatives and adding commissioners with expertise in environmental protection and public health. It would rewrite the rules for “forced pooling,” a process that allows an energy company to extract oil and gas owned by multiple parties — even those who object — and then distribute the profits among them. Now, regulators can approve forced pooling requested by one party. The new legislation would require more than half the mineral owners to agree before regulators issue a force pooling order.

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March 14, 2019M

Nominate a special teenager for a DC Youth Initiative Award Do you know a special Douglas County teenager, 13-19 years old, who has overcome adversity and created positive change in their lives, and the lives of others? Nominations for the 2019 Douglas County Youth Initiative Awards are being accepted through March 31. For more information or to complete the online nomination form visit www.douglas.co.us and search for Youth Awards.

Need help with home heating costs? Eligible low income households in Douglas County may apply for energy assistance through the Low Income Energy Assistance Program (LEAP) beginning Nov. 1. For more information, or an application, please visit www.douglas.co.us and search for LEAP or email LEAPHELP@discovermygoodwill.org

Funds available to serve at-risk Veterans Emergency assistance is available to veterans struggling with housing (mortgage and rent payments), transportation, employment, healthcare or other emergency needs. To apply for the veterans assistance funds visit www.douglasveterans.org or call 303-

663.6200.

Snow removal questions? Visit www.douglas.co.us and search for Snow to view information on snow and ice removal in unincorporated Douglas County.

Help keep your neighborhood safe Creating a neighborhood watch can reduce crime in your community. For more information visit www.dcsheriff. net and search for Neighborhood Watch.

Questions about road projects in your area? Roads are a necessity and they have to be maintained. Here’s where you’ll find everything you need to know about them all. Visit www.douglas.co.us and search for Maintenance / Repair Projects to find out what’s going on in your neighborhood.

Property Tax Inquiry View your parcel details for current and prior year payment history, and obtain current year tax amounts. For more information visit www.douglas.co.us/treasurer or www.douglascotax.com

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Elizabeth FBLA team places first in LifeSmarts contest STAFF REPORT

Three Elizabeth High School students placed first in the LifeSmarts category of the January FBLA competition. Seniors Ashley Gerczynski, Amy Freisner, and Savana Charlton make up the LifeSmarts team, which will compete in contests through May. If the team places first at each competition, it will qualify for the national conference in June in San Antonio. The LifeSmarts event consists of three tests that cover consumer and personal finance topics.

Elizabeth High School seniors Ashley Gerczynski, Amy Freisner and Savana Charlton are members of the school’s FBLA LifeSmarts team, which finished in first place through the first round at the spring competition. COURTESY PHOTO


Elbert County News 5

March 14, 2019

SHAVED

MON-TUES-WED March 18, 19, 20

FROM PAGE 1

Cancer survivor Shelby Martyniak spoke to the audience at the beginning event. “I was diagnosed with cancer seven years ago,” she said. “I am receiving treatment but I still have cancer in my lung and my back. The tumors are there but they don’t grow. I try to remain positive. Some days are bad and some days are good, so I just live day to day.” Elizabeth student Taryn Mitchell was one of the volunteers who had her head shaved. “This is the second year I have had my head shaved,” she said. “I did this to show support for my cousin who had cancer a while back and to my support for all cancer victims. “ She smiled and said her shaved head feels like the prickly surface of a tennis ball. “We put a team together we call Rock the Bald,” she said. “We have eight team members, one senior and seven freshmen. Together we raised about $2,000.” Sara Mosher and her two sons Alexander, 7, and Ryker, 5, got their heads shaved. “My mother was a cancer victim and, when they came out with the St. Baldrick’s Foundation project, I felt I should do all I can to support research to find a cure for cancer,” she said. Her son Alexander, a 7-year-old, said his shaved head felt awesome.

Taryn Mitchell gets her head shaved during the Brave the Shave and Be the Hope event Feb. 28 at Elizabeth High School. The annual event raises money to support the St. Baldrick Foundation’s research seeking a cure for pediatric cancer. Mitchell was among 40 students, teachers and community members who had their heads shaved during the event. TOM MUNDS “I got my head shaved because I don’t want to see people die from cancer,” he said. “My head feels funny and I am glad they gave me a nice hat to keep my head warm now that I don’t have hair.” The head shaving was one of two events, as that evening it was time for Hunter Legacy Basketball. The event is held in memory of two Cardinal students, Hunter Neeley and Kayla Ackerman, who both died of cancer in 2014. It was designed as a fun event, but of course everyone tried to score

points for his or her team. Teams rotated taking the court and played a four-minute quarter with a running clock. Paul Benkendorf, a school board member, was a member of a team, as was area resident Dennis Bohler. Cody Steinke, Elizabeth High School graduate, organized a team he called Then and Now that was made up of current and former Cardinal students. “I am glad we can do this,” he said. “It is for a good cause and I think it is fun for all of us who are playing tonight.”

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March 14, 2019M

ASPIRE FROM PAGE 1

and selling them at school. The treats have become so popular that students have had to increase production to keep up with demand. “My dog loves the cookies,” said Melissa Hoelting, communications director for Elizabeth School District. “The kids put a lot of thought into them, and they’ve become very popular.” According to Becky Seidl, the long-term substitute teacher for the ASPIRE program at Frontier High School, the cookie venture has taught students several life skills. “The students have learned how to follow a recipe, which includes measuring, and they also package all of the cookies themselves,” said Seidl. “They are learning about business, as we use money we earn to buy more ingredients. They are learning about

business, and interacting with the community.” Students made their first batches of cookies in October, and sent samples home with teachers, parents, other students, custodians and school-board members. They asked for feedback via a written survey, and most of the responses were positive. “For the most part, they loved them. The only thing is that some of the cookies were too big for smaller dogs, so we decided to make two different sizes,” said Seidl. “The students learned that constructive criticism can be helpful in life.” Cookies can be purchased at Frontier High, Running Creek Elementary and Elizabeth High School, as well as Gymnastics Etc., and at the Elbert County Marketplace each month. The ASPIRE group is also working with other interested businesses who would like to sell their treats. Students will use any money left over after buying ingredients to pay for field trips.

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Students Gemini Reed and Jacob Clement roll and cut home-made dog cookies, which the ASPIRE program sells. The cookies are gaining popularity and students have had to increase production. COURTESY OF ELIZABETH SCHOOL DISTRICT

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Elbert County News 7

March 14, 2019

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8 Elbert County News

LOCAL

March 14, 2019M

VOICES

Battling at backgammon — that’s just how we roll

I

t is one man against one woman, without handicap or charity or concession. There is strategy and there is luck. There is grit and there is determination. Words are said in the heat of competition that alarm the dachshund. It is backgammon. It is one of the oldest board games in the world, going back 5,000 years. It is face-to-face fun with a friend, a stranger, or a loved one. Or even a computer. Like chess, backgammon has been researched by computer scientists. You can play backgammon against a robot. Our set-up is a neat leather case that opens to reveal 24 triangles (points). Each player has 15 pieces (checkers) that resemble after-dinner candies, in two colors. Ours are chocolate and caramel. The pieces are moved according to the roll of two dice. We got the board out in October, and have played 133 games since.

W

The lead has gone back and forth. Jennifer is currently up by three, 68-65. Many of the games have come down to the final roll. I play more recklessly than she does. I like to put QUIET myself in harm’s DESPERATION way, just to see if I can recover. Why not? If doubles are rolled, very good things happen. (There are exceptions.) What is the probability of rolling doubles? I looked it up: Craig Marshall “There are six ways we can roll doubles, Smith or a probability of 6/36, or 1/6 on any roll of fair dice. So you have a 16.7% probability of rolling doubles with two fair, sixsided dice” (stayorswitch.com). We have our backgammon chairs and drinks and music. I try to distract her with ornate

instruction and encouragement are contributing factors to our success. However, at the end of the day the person who must execute against the strategy and the plan is you. There have been people in your life that have proven themselves to be a difference WINNING maker in helping you become who WORDS you are today. The key word in there is “helping,” but it’s you who is the real difference maker when it comes to the achievement of success and the realization of your goals and dreams. Michael Norton This is awesome news. This is wonderful news. This is incredible news. Wouldn’t you agree? I mean you are the one who is ultimately in control of your own destiny. For some of you this is empowering and inspiring. For others, it could be terrifying. For some of you this could

JERRY HEALEY President

Phone: 303-566-4100 Web: ElbertCountyNews.net To subscribe call 303-566-4100

Craig Marshall Smith is an artist, educator and Highlands Ranch resident. He can be reached at craigmarshallsmith@comcast.net.

be powerfully liberating and just the push you needed. For others, Dr. Denis Waitley’s philosophy of, “If it’s to be, it’s up to me,” can quickly go from feeling motivation to rationalizing excuses. And if that excuse alarm starts to sound, just remember Dr. Waitley’s quote, “If it’s to be, it’s up to me,” and stop those excuses as quickly as possible. You know what the excuses sound like don’t you? “I am too busy.” “I don’t have time for this.” “This is too hard.” “I am only doing this for someone else.” “I just have to wait until I finish this other project.” “I will start after the next holiday.” “I don’t have the skills.” “I can’t do this by myself.” And so many others. The list of excuses is long, but the belief in yourself could be endless. The simple truth of success and to success is you. I am a huge advocate of personal and professional development programs, I am a firm believer in the power of friends and advisors who provide insights and encourage-

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ment. I completely and absolutely support the idea of having coaches and mentors. I am a veracious reader, and someone who constantly listens to audio programs as I pursue my own continuous improvement. But even with all of these awesome people and tools available to me, ultimately it is up to me to make the decision to apply what I have heard or read. I am the own who has to execute in order to succeed. So how about you? Do you see yourself as your own secret to success? Or do you need a little reminder that you are the one in control of your own success? As always I would love to hear your story of success at gotonorton@gmail. com and when we can stop making excuses and start owning our own success, it really will be a better than good week. Michael Norton is a resident of Castle Rock, the president of the Zig Ziglar Corporate Training Solutions Team, strategic consultant, business and personal coach.

Columnists & Guest Commentaries

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Columnist opinions are not necessarily those of the Elbert County News.

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watching intently. I am better at bocce than she is. Trounces are not unusual. Winning is fun, but it’s expected. When I got out the backgammon case, I thought there would be more of the same. I soon found out otherwise. Having a very worthy opponent makes a win even more satisfying. Having a very worthy opponent whom I love to be around makes it even better. If this kindles or rekindles an interest, and you haven’t an opponent, you can find one online at cardgames.io. His name is Bill, and he plays by the book. He isn’t very pretty, and I can’t distract him. I prefer a flesh and blood opponent, and hearing her pathetic bleats of exasperation when I roll boxcars.

Understanding the simple truth of success

hy do we struggle with achieving success when there really is no secret to success? Is it because we have overcomplicated the thought or definition of success? Or is it because we really just don’t know what success truly means to us? So here is the simple and uncomplicated truth of success: it’s you. Plain and simple, you are the secret to your own success. Certainly there are others who have helped us along the way. We may have read some awesome books with incredible insights that have illuminated the path and provided direction. Many of us have attended motivational or instructional seminars and training sessions that have inspired us and given us more to think about when it comes to success. And many of us have even hired our own personal coach or business adviser to help us achieve the successes that we seek. People, books, seminars, training, coaches and other forms of

A publication of

stories, but it rarely works. She is, after all, the product of fine German engineering, and remains focused (unfortunately). I do not want to lose and neither does she. While it is fun to play, it is much more fun to win. I have had the game since the late 1970s, and played a lot of backgammon through the 1980s. But the case has been in the basement for decades, until mid-October when I asked, “Do you know how to play?” She said, “Yes.” However, she had a few phony Ohio rules that had to go, but only after I obtained notarized exclusions from the International Association. Jennifer is a stickler. We both have had winning streaks, and I always attribute mine to karma, and specifically to a life of kindness and generosity. I attribute hers to luck. Nothing more. When the weather is better, we play bocce on a high school lawn, with Harry staked nearby and

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ELBERT COUNTY NEWS (USPS 171-100) A legal newspaper of general circulation in Elizabeth, Colorado, the Elbert County News is published weekly on Thursday by Colorado Community Media, 750 W. Hampden Ave., Suite 225, Englewood, CO 80110. PERIODICALS POSTAGE PAID AT ENGLEWOOD, COLORADO and additional mailing offices. POSTMASTER: Send address change to: 750 W. Hampden Ave., Suite 225, Englewood, CO 80110


Elbert County News 9

March 14, 2019

THINGS TO DO My Yard! Lawn & Landscape Ideas & Tips: 10 to 11 a.m. Thursday, March 14 at Douglas County Libraries in Castle Pines, 360 Village Square Lane. Learn about the trees, shrubs and perennials that thrive in full to partial shade. Presented by Castle Pines North Parks & Open Space Manager Craig Miller. Adults. The event is free, but registration is required at 303-791-7323 or DCL.org.

Castle Rock Historical Society and Museum’s Monthly Presentation: 6:45 to 8 p.m. Thursday, March 14 at Philip S. Miller Library, 100 S. Wilcox St., Castle Rock. Come hear stories of the old courthouse fire, the first church in town, the wild times at the Keystone Hotel and many more fun stories. Refreshments will be served at 6:45pm with the presentation beginning at 7:00pm at the Philip S. Miller Library 100 S. Wilcox St. Castle Rock, CO 80104. For more information check out our website at castlerockhistoricalsociety.org or contact the Castle Rock Museum at 303814-3164, museum@castlerockhistoricalsociety.org.

Lenten Fish Fry: 4 to 6:30 pm. Fridays, March 15, 22, 29 and April 5, 12 in the Brownstein Hall at Ave Maria Church, 9056 E. Parker Rd., Parker. The Knights of Columbus are having a fish fry every Friday night in Lent except Good Friday. We serve delicious fried fish, baked fish or nuggets with cole slaw, fried or baked potato, mac and cheese, and dinner rolls. Ice tea, lemonade and coffee are free. Prices: Family, $29.00, over 12 years, $10.00, 5 - 12 years, $5.00, and kids under 5 are y FREE! Homemade desserts are $.50 to $1.00. Take-out / drive-thru are available. Come and enjoy a delicious fish dinner in Brownstein Hall at Ave Maria Church. Call Len Bertagnolli at 720-468-2630 for more information. Live Smart: Online Safety: 2 to 3 p.m. 2 to 3 p.m. Saturday, March 16 at Douglas County Libraries in Parker, 20105 East

Mainstreet. Get important information about cyber-security and protecting yourself from identity theft, online hacks, and scams. Presented by Metropolitan State University of Denver Computer Science Professor Dr. Steven Beaty. Adults. The event is free, but registration is required at 303-791-7323 or DCL.org. Prov or No Prov: 8 to 9:30 p.m. Saturday, March 16 at The Studio at Mainstreet, 19600 Mainstreet, Parker. Doors open at 7:30pm at The Studio at Mainstreet. The Bar is Open! Now serving booze! It offers many fine dining restaurants within walking distance for you to enjoy before the show.Tickets are $10 in advance through Eventbrite: Or $15 cash at the door day of show (if tickets are still available). Visit eventbrite.com/e/theparker-players-present-prov-or-no-provtickets-54262148547 for tickets. Lifetree Cafe--”Angels: Are They Reaching Out to You?”: 6 to 7 p.m. Sunday, March 17 at Castle Rock Adventist Hospital, Ridgeline Conference Room, 2350 Meadows Blvd., Castle Rock. A group discussion featuring a video interview of a man who became lost as night fell in the Rockies on a hunting trip and encountered someone whose presence he could not explain. ALL are welcome to a free meeting with good people who show respect to one another an hear our opinions with honor. Coffee and snacks on us. For more information, contact Roy Koerner 303-814-0142 roykoerner@msn.com. Art & Music Video Camp: 9 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. each day, Monday, March 18 through Friday, March 22 at Douglas County Libraries in Parker, 20105 East Mainstreet. Each morning, campers will create pop art based on the art of famous artists like Warhol, Lichtenstein and Stella, to name a few! Inspiration will come from food, music, products and comics, and many mediums will be explored. Each afternoon campers will work together to star in and create an ageappropriate group music video. A professionally edited final product will be posted online for all to see! Ages 7-11. Please pack a nutfree lunch each day; daily snacks will be provided. Register at DCL. org or call 303791-7323 for more information. Superhero Movie Making & LEGO Camp: 9 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. each day, Monday, March 18 through Friday, March 22 at Douglas County Libraries in Castle Rock, Philip S. Miller, 100 S. Wilcox St. Each action-packed morning, kids will write, act, direct and collaborate as a group to create a live-action superheroes vs. villains mini movie. A professionally edited final movie will be posted online for all to see! Each afternoon, kids will design and build LEGO superhero vehicles and hideouts, then use their ingenuity and imaginations to save a city from the forces of conflict. Ages 7-11. Please pack a nut-free lunch each day; daily snacks will be provided. Register at DCL.org or call

303-791-7323 for more information. Lifelong Learning: Cruise the World!: 10 to noon Wednesday, March 20 at Douglas County Libraries in Castle Rock, Philip S. Miller, 100 S. Wilcox St., Castle Rock. Get expert tips and advice for cruising to tropical beach locales, Europe’s rivers, and adventure destinations. Adults. Registration is required at 303-791-7323 or DCL.org. 40th Anniversary Celebration: 10:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. April 28 at Joy Lutheran Church, 7051 E. Parker Hills Court, Parker. Joyful Mission Preschool is the one of the longest running Christian Preschools in Parker and will be celebrating their 40thAnniversary on Sunday, April 28th following the JLC 9:30 church service. This event, which will be held at Joy Lutheran Church, offers something fun for everyone; music, games, bounce houses, and face painting! While the kids are playing games you will have the opportunity to participate in our drawing and silent auction which is loaded with lots of goodies you won’t

want to miss. You’ll be able to see how our preschool has grown, see our vision for the future and enjoy lunch on us! Joy Lutheran Church is located at 7051 E Parker Hills Ct in Parker. Learn more at: joyfulmissionpreschool.org. Graduation Gallop 5K: 9 a.m. Saturday, May 11 at Sagewood Middle School, 4725 Fox Sparrow Rd., Parker. The Graduation Gallop 5K is a collaboration between all SIX PHS Feeder Schools: Mountain View, Northeast, Legacy Point, Franktown, Sagewood and Ponderosa. It is a chance for families from each school, as well as the community, to meet and run together. Go to graduationgallop.enmotive.com/ events/register/2019-mountain-viewpresents-the-graduation-gallop-5k to register. Editor’s note: Calendar submissions must be received by noon Wednesday for publication the following week. To place a calendar item, go to eventlink.coloradocommunitymedia.com.

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10 Elbert County News

March 14, 2019M

Making time for March Madness Basketball fans and non-fans alike come together for one of the biggest sporting events of the year BY NICK PUCKETT NPUCKETT@COLORADOCOMMUNITYMEDIA.COM

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Doug Pruitt’s glass of a dark micobrew, sweating as it rested on a coaster at the Library Co., a bar in Castle Rock, was still half full. Arms crossed, eyes gazing upward at one of the four TVs behind the bar, Pruitt intently watched a college basketball game between Kansas and Oklahoma. He had no rooting interest. He was studying, more or less. And looking for a distraction. “I better get used to this,” Pruitt said, as he smiled and took another sip of beer. Pruitt is not a big basketball fan. But he fills out a bracket every March and will follow the games for the satisfaction of earning bragging rights over his brother. This year, Pruitt said, he won’t hardly be away from the TV. On March 20, one day before the tip-off of the first round of the NCAA Men’s Basketball Tournament, Pruitt is scheduled to get a vasectomy. He and his wife, Tasha, talked about it for months. Pruitt decided if he was going to couch-ridden for the better part of a week, he might as well do it while there’s something worth watching. “I honestly would probably be watching these games if I was sitting at work,” he said. “At least this way I don’t feel bad about it.” During the first two days of the first round of March Madness on March 21 and 22, Pruitt plans to watch as many games as possible. The 2019 broadcasting schedule has yet to be released, but last year, games ran nonstop on four different stations — CBS, TNT, TBS and TruTV — from 10 a.m. to 11:30 p.m. Pruitt isn’t alone in his dedication to watching the games. In workplaces across the country, one of the most noticeable divots in worker productivity comes during the two-week stretch in March. Distractions at work Low worker productivity during the tournament two years ago contributed to about $6.3 billion in corporate losses nationwide, according to a 2018 report from WalletHub.com, a personal finance website, Darrin Duber-Smith, a sports marketing expert at Metropolitan State University of Denver, said the massive draw to the tournament can be attributed to a number of factors. For the most part, he said, it comes down to fans’ affinity for the sport and how they identify with universities playing in the tournament. “Every school has a basketball program. They might not have football or lacrosse, but basketball is something

BY THE NUMBERS

$1.06

billion — The amount of total revenue generated by the NCAA from the Division I, II and III championship tournaments and National Invitational Tournament. (NCAA.com)

1 9.2 $10.1

quintillion — The odds of filling out a perfect NCAA Tournament bracket. (WalletHub.com)

IN

billion — The amount of money illegally wagered on brackets and March Madness games in 2017. (WalletHub. com)

$19.6 70

billion — The amount paid by CBS/Turner Broadcasting for the 2011-2032 TV rights. (WalletHub.com) million — The number of brackets filled out in 2017. (American Gaming Association)

that is ubiquitous,” Duber-Smith said. “It’s a culturally significant event. It happens every year and at the same time every year, and if you’re not into it, you’re going to be touched by it in some way.” Between the men’s and women’s Division I tournaments and tournaments at other levels of competition, there will be hundreds of games played during March Madness. “You have something for literally everybody,” Duber-Smith said. Peter Craig, of Parker, a University of Kansas alumnus, said during March Madness he wears two hats: one as a raving Jayhawks fan, hoping his alma mater wins it all every year, and one as a fan of the bracket. “It’s close, but I’d say my team is bigger than my bracket,” Craig said. “Every year, I always hope for a perfect bracket — everyone does — but in the end it’s just exciting to have that possibility. That’s why we love to watch sports anyway.” More than 97 million people tuned in to watch the 2018 NCAA Tournament from the First Four to the Final Four rounds, according to NCAA. com. The American Gaming Association, a casino gaming interest group, estimated more than 40 million people participated and filled out a total of 70 million brackets in 2018. The madness that surrounds March reaches beyond the actual games. There’s the game within the game — bracket pools and gambling. DuberSmith called it a “gambling orgy.” But also, Duber-Smith said, the underdog mentality is something the casual fan can relate to, while the more invested fan will watch either supporting their bracket or their alma mater. “Casual fans come in because it’s the idea of America loves an underdog, and there’s always lots of underdogs in the tournament,” DuberSmith said. “I don’t think there’s

AL SERMENO PHOTOGRAPHY / SHUTTERSTOCK.COM

ALL ABOUT TIMING Dog Pruitt, of Castle Rock, isn’t unique in the planning of his elected surgery. Urologists performed 30 percent more vasectomies during the first week of the NCAA Tournament than they had during an average week, according to a 2017 study from Athena Health. This year, Colorado Urology Associates will be awarding a free vasectomy to one man at the group’s Lone Tree office. Entries are accepted through noon March 15. “Men tell us that they time the procedure so they can recover on the couch and enjoy a few days of nonstop college basketball action,” Dr. Jessica Harness said. “So we thought, ‘Why not help one man this season with a free procedure?’” anything more American than that.”

The underdog mentality While usually not rooting for the underdog, Craig said he would be lying if he said he wasn’t excited by the upsets March Madness brings. “The best part is we never know where the madness will come from,” he said. Last year, the No. 16-seed University of Maryland-Baltimore County beat top-seeded University of Virginia as the first No. 16 seed to do so. Everyone was a UMBC fan after that, Craig said. Dr. Travis Heath is a clinical psychologist at Metro State who has worked with and consulted in sports. He said the drive to see the underdog win is something that is within everybody. “Most of us are underdogs,” Heath said. “When you see some of those stories, we can relate to that.” According to WalletHub.com, 90 percent of workers say participating in a bracket pool at work builds camaraderie. Laura Roth, of Castle Rock, said it brings her family and neighbors together. “The kids can fill out a bracket,” Roth said, “the adults do — everyone can do this one thing.”


Elbert County News 11

March 14, 2019

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12 Elbert County News

March 14, 2019M

Presents

SUMMER CAMP PAGES

Woodward Copper celebrating 10 years of overnight camps in Copper Mountain STAFF REPORT COLORADO COMMUNITY MEDIA

It’s a summer camp with snow, professionals, fun and a lot of memories as Woodward Copper prepares to celebrate its 10th anniversary this summer. The Cooper Mountain camp, one of the only ones in the state to have actual snow, provides campers with top-notch instruction and fun for all skill levels. “Fortunately, our altitude allows us to offer this unique summer camp for kids,” said Taylor Prather, the public relations manager for Copper Mountain Resorts. “This camp is a great opporutnity for those kids that live and breathe snowboarding and skiing. And, we go well beyond the snow sports. We offer the great summer programs that includes skate boarding, cheerleading and a lot of programs that really cover all interest areas.” With more than 1,000 campers a year, Prather said the 2019 camp is shaping up to be one of the best on record. Running between June and August for children from age 7 and up, there are plenty of professionals on tap to join the camp’s top-notch coaches. Some of those celebrities include: • Professinal snowboard Taylor Bingaman on June 2. • Olympian Chris Corning will be

presents

at the resort on June 9 through June 15. Corning has a bronze medal in snowboarding. Prather said Corning is special to the program given he was once a camper himself. • Professional skateboard David Reyes will be at the resort starting June 16. • Professional skier Lupe Hagearty is slated to join week 7 of the camp on July 14 The 2019 Summer Camp lineup continues between June and August, teaching children age 7 and up a variety of skills, including skateboarding, BMX, scooter, ski and snowboard. The weeklong, overnight camps are intended to set goals, fine tune skills and meet new people. Known for its indoor and outdoor training facilities, Woodward Copper’s high-alpine location allows for year-round skiing and snowboarding on real Colorado snow. Campers will learn from certified coaches and have exclusive access to The Barn, skate parks, bike parks and Pipeline Park, a massive summer snow terrain park featuring a triple jump line, endless boxes and rail features. Past pros that have visited Woodward Copper camps include Olympic and X-Games medalists Red Gerard, Sage Kotsenburg, Nick Goepper, Bobby Brown, Will

SUMMER 2019

ATHENA PROJECT CAMPS Week-long camps for girls 6th–10th grade in playwriting, fashion design and improv. AthenaProjectArts.org

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Wesson and Banks Gilberti. A typical day at Woodward Copper summer camp includes morning

and evening sessions in The Barn. Campers also have access to a range of recreational activities, including skate tours, create-a-skate, the Rocky Mountain Alpine Coaster, the Woodward WreckTangle and more. To book a Woodward Copper Summer Camp, visit campwoodward.com/copper. Woodward Copper Summer Camps kick off June 2, and offers week-long programming until August 10.

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Elbert County News 13

March 14, 2019

SUMMER CAMP LISTINGS

AeroCamp The camp is all about learning to fly and a beginning of a career in aviation and aerospace through hands-on activities and learning experiences. The camp is for teens between the ages of 13 and 15. The camp is located at 13000 E. Control Tower Rd. in Englewood. For more information, visit the website at aspenflyingclub. com/aerocamp. Arvada Center The Arvada Center will offer summer camps for ages 3-18 this summer. Let your child explore their creativity in exciting classes from the center’s most popular teachers. The Arvada Center also offers extended stay and lunch bunch sessions for busy, working parents. The center’s summer programs include day camps in ceramics, dance, digital arts, drama, music, visual arts and art start. For more information, visit the Arvada Center website at arvadcenter. org/education/summer-camps.

Camp Invention With multiple locations throughout the Denver Metro Area, Camp invention adds creativity and fun where children transform their imaginations into epic creations. Children between the grades of kindergarten and sixth grade will be able to code robots and use collaboration and creative problem solving during hands-on, STEM activities. For camp information, visit the website at

www.invent.org/camp or call 800-968-4332.

Coding for kids Coding with kids offers a variety of STEM summer camps for children of all skill levels from ages 5 to 17. Curriculum drives engagement and learning outcomes, while small class sizes ensure plenty of personalized attention. Camps are in game development, Minecraft Modding, and robotics & electronics. Check out the website for a complete list of camps, locations, and schedule. Camps are available in Arvada, Aurora, Centennial, Denver, Evergreen, Golden, Littleton, Longmont, Louisville, Morrisson, Parker, Thornton, and Westminster. Visit www. codingwithkids.com. Colorado Mountain Club Summer Adventure Courses Looking to inspire future mountaineers, make your summer special by exploring Colorado. Day camps include climbing camps and overnight teen trips. The camps are for ages 9-18, located at 710 St. in Golden. For more camp information, visit the website www.cmc.org/summeradventures. Denver Zoo Safari Camp This summer, campers will puzzle out some of the planet’s most exciting challenges. How can you ensure each animal gets what it needs? What role will you play once you’ve uncovered

Chatfield Stables

the secret connections that hold our world together? Campers connect with animals through Zoo exploration, up-close animal experiences, engineering challenges, nature play and special camp-only Zoo opportunities. For information on the 2019 summer program, visit the Denver Zoo website at https://www.denverzoo.org/ summer-safari/.

Dinosaur Ridge summer camps Dinosaur Ridge Camps are an unforgettable adventure. The program keeps kids moving and discovering in the incredible setting of our National Natural Landmark. These experiences are designed to foster excitement and wonder for science, art and the outdoors while engaging in hands-on educational curriculum. Small group sizes give every camper the opportunity to play, explore and expand their knowledge. Each camp offers exploration of the Dinosaur Ridge fossil sites, hands-on science projects, as well as expert guest presenters in the fields of paleontology, geology, art, earth science, survival skills and local plants and animals. Learn more about the summer program by visiting the website at dinoridge.org/tours-programs/ fodr-camps/.

hands on experiences. Under the supervision of a nurturing and trained staff encourages personal growth within each child. Each camp hosts a different age group to aid in age appropriate planning. All camps offer a safe environment overseen by Colorado State Licensing and adhere to strict staff to camper ratios. Camp programs include arts and education, sports and more. Learn more about HRCA camps that take place any time your children are on a school break. Visit the website at https://hrcaonline. org/classes-camps-activities/camps/camp-hrca. iD Tech Camps and Academies iD Tech is a summer STEM program for ages 7-17, held at multiple locations. With worldclass instructors and innovative courses in coding, game development, robotics, and design, iD Tech programs instill in-demand skills that embolden students to shape the future. Find out if there is a camp near you, visit the website at https://www.idtech.com/tech-camps. Lakewood LEGO and Engineering Camps Build robots and learn computer engineering. Camps are available for both boys and girls. Learn more about the program for children between ages 5 and 14 at Lakewood.org/camps.

Highlands Ranch Recreation Center Camp HRCA is a fun-filled, exciting summer camp with weekly themes. Campers build friendships through memorable field trips and

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14 Elbert County News

March 14, 2019M

CAMP FROM PREVIOUS PAGE Lakewood Teen Adventure Camp In this camp, teens will get to explore attractions, take field trips and attend sporting events, go rock climbing, swimming and more. The camp is for teens ages 12-15. The camp is held at 2200 S. Kipling St in Lakewood. For information, visit the website at Lakewood.org/camps. Lone Tree Hub Summer camps The Lone Tree Hub summer camp programs will offer a variety of programs, including super heroes & villains movie camp, princess power mini-movie camp, Youth Tuber Camp, Scary Movie Mini-Movie Camp. The Lone Tree Hub is located 8827 Lone Tree Pkwy. For more information on the upcoming camps, visit talktothecamera.com/the-lone-tree-hub-camps.html. Parker Arts Education Parker Arts summer break programs are right around the corner. This year, the Parker center will offer a variety of day camps in art, cooking, music, dance, theater, multi-media, robotics and science. Prior to the first day of camp, parents must fill out the required paperwork. For more information on this year’s camps, visit the website at http://parkerarts.org/2122/SummerBreak-Camps. Pedalheads Bike Camps The learn-to-ride bike program is best known for helping kids ages 2 through 12 get off train-

ing wheels and safely ride on the road. The 2019 program includes a progression of six instructional levels for you to choose from, half-day camps, seven-hour all-day camps, private lessons, and before and after care options. Camp locations include Hampden South, Wellshire, Cherry Creek, Stapleton and Highlands Ranch. For more camp information, visit the website at www.pedalheads.com. Spree Summer outdoor program Looking for a way to get your kids outside and active this summer while you are at work? Don’t want them to stop learning just because it’s summer? Then SPREE is s great choice. With 10 unique weeks of camp at two a variety of locations. Each week has a unique theme tied to The South Platte River and our urban waterways. Activities, games, and crafts are tied to the theme and allow campers to engage with and learn about their environment while having fun. The camp is for children 6 years and older. Day camps run Monday through Friday between 8 a.m. and 6 p.m. For more information, visit the website at www.thegreenwayfoundation. org/summer-camps.html. Super Heroes & Villains Movie Magic Camp KAPOW! BANG! ZOINK! Kids create their own live action movie. Students write, act, direct & collaborate in this action-packed camp. Students will have a blast and see their

imagination come to life on the big screen, at the end-of-season red carpet screening. Moviemaking teaches social communication skills like eye contact, story-telling, teamwork, and active listening. It also teaches technical skills that are critically important in today’s technology-based society. The camp will be held between June 10 and June 14 for ages 6-12. For more information, visit the website at https://talktothecamera. com/the-highlands-center-summer-camps.html. There is a 20 percent discount for early birds signing up before April 15. Tigar Gymnastics & Cheer Beth Deasy, owner and operator of TIGAR, believes that the greatest wish we can have for children is that they become adults who love who they are and what they do. Helping to develop such self-knowledge and passion for life in young children requires a delicate balance of nurturing and education. To this end, our TIGAR

facility and staff have been positioned to offer children an organized, structured, and highly supervised venue for parent-accompanied or non-parent-accompanied physical recreation in a dedicated, professional, and safe environment. Find out about TIGAR summer programs in Wheat Ridge by visiting the website at tigargymnastics.com. YMCA Summer Camp programs Each year YMCA offers a variety of summer camp programs. YMCA locations in the Denver Metro area include Adams County, Arvada, Aurora, Broomfield, Denver, Glendale, Golden, Lakewood, Littleton and Wheat Ridge. For information on the YMCA summer programs, visit the website at https://www.denverymca.org/camps/ day-camp.

SUMMER CAMP 2019 Woodward is a lot of things. It’s where athletes of all ages come to up their game. To learn new skills. To be around like-minded people who become instant, lifelong friends. It’s where kids come to be free, to create, to explore their potential, and ultimately be the best version of themselves. So it’s more than a camp. Woodward is an experience. And it’s one that will last forever.

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March 14, 2019

Elbert County News 15


16 Elbert County News

March 14, 2019M

5 things (BPT) - Looking for a cure for the winter blues? Start making plans for the summer. Having something fun to look forward to - such as days off and family trips - can make those dreary days more bearable. One thing you’ll want to add to your summer planning list is finding a great summer camp or two for your kids. Even before leaves start appearing on the trees, many organizations begin announcing dates and enrollment for summer camp sessions. Get a jump start on the process with this guide to choosing an enriching summer activity, where your child will also have a blast. First, know the best places to look: You may not be aware of the number of great summer day camps taking place around your community. Start with college campuses, parks and recreation departments, local school districts and churches. Be sure to tune in to nonprofits, like performing arts centers, museums and your local animal shelter or zoo. Finally, ask the other adults in your child’s life for the inside scoop. The art teacher, soccer coach and scout leader may be in the know about the best camps in town. Look for the immersive experience: When you think about it, “camp” is an odd word choice. But look at what sleep-away camp means to kids, and it makes sense. Yes, it’s fun to sleep in a cabin and spend all day sailing, swimming and climbing. What’s key is that these kids are immersed in a new reality that’s different from the usual home

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parents should know before choosing a summer camp

and school routines. So when a local organization bills an activity a “camp,” they promise an experience that lets your kid jump in and become a part of something. When choosing the right camp, look for that quality. Is there a clear theme or topic? Will kids be active and involved? Or is the “camp” just made up of a series of talks led by adults? Make sure your child is on board: Consider your child’s interests and how camp can make them stronger. Your play-acting child with a flair for drama will probably thrive and bloom at theater camp. However, if camp is a strategy to help them improve at something they struggle with, make sure the program is designed for these kids, or you’re setting them up for a session of misery. After all, you wouldn’t send your sportsloathing child to, say, a high-intensity wrestling camp to make them more athletic. Don’t forget the fun factor: What makes camp truly memorable is having fun, so make sure the camp you’re looking at takes fun seriously. For example, Blake Furlow, CEO of Bricks 4 Kidz, says kids keep coming back to their camps partly because these sessions bring building with LEGO Bricks to the next level of fun and exciting. But watching their enjoyment unfold during the camp is also massively rewarding. “See-

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ing the kids light up, get excited and make new connections during a Bricks 4 Kidz class is a heart-warming experience,” Furlow says. Consider longevity: When looking at various programs, a good question to ask is how long the camp has been around. New summer camp themes and programs can sound exciting and fresh, but it takes a few rounds to work out the kinks with any new organization. Choosing wellestablished programs with experienced leaders is one way to ensure that your child will get that worthwhile and fun experience with a new activity. If you’re looking for a camp experience from a trusted provider that fosters learning in STEM subjects, look for a Bricks 4 Kidz franchise in your community. Bricks 4 Kidz is celebrating its 10th anniversary of providing fun and enrichment for kids in schools and communities across the United States and beyond! At these camps, kids get to use LEGO Bricks along with specialized LEGO Technic pieces like gears, axles and electric motors to build unique and exciting models to help kids explore engineering and architecture - while having a blast doing it. To discover camps taking place in your area, visit Bricks4Kidz.com.

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Elbert County News 19

March 14, 2019

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PUBLIC NOTICES Public Notice

DISTRICT COURT, WATER DIVISION 1, COLORADO FEBRUARY 2019 WATER RESUME PUBLICATION

Public Notice

TO: ALL PERSONS INTERESTED IN WATER APPLICATIONS IN WATER DIV. 1

Public Notice

DISTRICT COURT, WATER DIVISION 1, COLORADO FEBRUARY 2019 WATER RESUME PUBLICATION TO: ALL PERSONS INTERESTED IN WATER APPLICATIONS IN WATER DIV. 1

(2nd notice) Pursuant to C.R.S. 37-92-302, you are notified Public Notices call Sheree 303.566.4088 legals@coloradocommunitymedia.com PUBLIC NOTICE AS TO FURTHER Pursuant to C.R.S. 37-92-302, you are notified that the following is a resume of all water right

Bids and Settlements LEGAL NOTICE INVITATION FOR BIDS:

Independence Water and Sanitation District (IWSD) is requesting sealed Bids for the “Arapahoe Well Pump”. All Bids are to be delivered to MSK Consulting, LLC (MSK) via e-mail at dave@mskwater.com by 1:00 p.m. local time on March 28, 2019. Bids received after that date and time will not be considered. E-mailed Bids must use the subject “IWSD Arapahoe Well Pump Bid”. Bid packages will be available on or after 12:00 p.m. on March 14, 2019 and can be obtained by emailing MSK at dave@mskwater.com, and questions regarding the Bid can also be directed to the same e-mail address. Legal Notice No.: 24252 First Publication: March 14, 2019 Last Publication: March 14, 2019 Publisher: The Elbert County News

Misc. Private Legals PUBLIC NOTICE CHILD FIND East Central BOCES and/or its member districts would like to locate all 0 through 21 year olds, who may have a disability.

The Colorado Department of Education maintains a comprehensive child identification system consistent with Part B of IDEA and ensures that each Local Education Agency (LEA), in collaboration with a variety of community resources, assumes the leadership role in establishing and maintaining a process in their community for the purpose of locating, identifying and evaluating all children, birth to 21 years, who may have a disability and may be eligible for services and supports under Part C or special education services under Part B of IDEA. Ages 0 through 5 year-old concerns should be directed to the following: • Cheyenne County (Cheyenne Wells and Kit Carson Schools) • Lincoln County (Genoa-Hugo School) • Yuma County (Idalia & Liberty Schools) • Kit Carson County (Bethune, Stratton, Arriba-Flagler & Hi-Plains Schools) • Arapahoe County (Byers, Deer Trail, Strasburg & Bennett Schools) • Washington County (Arickaree & Woodlin Schools) • Adams County (Bennett, Strasburg, Byers and Deer Trail Schools) • Lincoln County (Limon & Karval Schools) • Elbert County (Agate & Kiowa Schools) • Kit Carson County (Burlington Schools)

Please contact: Stacey Schillig, Child Find Coordinator - (719) 775-2342, ext. 133 All 5 through 21 year-old concerns should be directed to the local school district administrator, special education teacher, East Central BOCES (719) 775-2342, ext. 101. Services for infants and toddlers are voluntary.

The East Central BOCES member schools are: Bennett, Strasburg, Byers, Deer Trail, Agate, Woodlin, Arickaree, Limon, Genoa-Hugo, Karval, Kiowa, Kit Carson, Cheyenne Wells, ArribaFlagler, Hi-Plains, Stratton, Bethune, Burlington, Liberty, and Idalia. References: IDEA, Part C, Section 303.320-323 IDEA, Part B, Section 300.125 ECEA CCR 301-8 2220-R-4.01-4.04(4) East Central BOCES Comprehensive Plan Section III Process of Identifying Legal Notice No.: 24248 First Publication: March 7, 2019 Last Publication: March 14, 2019 Publisher: The Elbert County News Public Notice (2nd notice) PUBLIC NOTICE AS TO FURTHER CONSIDERATION OF A FRANCHISE GRANT TO BLACK HILLS COLORADO GAS, INC. D/B/A BLACK HILLS ENERGY TO WHOM IT MAY CONCERN:

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that at the regular meeting of the Board of Trustees of the Town of Elizabeth, County of Elbert, State of Colorado, to be held on March 26, at the hour of 7:00 p.m. at its usual place of meeting in the Town of

CONSIDERATION OF A FRANCHISE GRANT TO BLACK HILLS COLORADO GAS, INC. D/B/A BLACK HILLS ENERGY TO WHOM IT MAY CONCERN:

Private NOTICE Misc. IS HEREBY GIVENLegals that at the regular

meeting of the Board of Trustees of the Town of Elizabeth, County of Elbert, State of Colorado, to be held on March 26, at the hour of 7:00 p.m. at its usual place of meeting in the Town of Elizabeth, the Board of Trustees will further consider adoption and passage of an ordinance granting a franchise by the Town of Elizabeth, Black Hills Colorado Gas, Inc. d/b/a Black Hills Energy, its successors and assigns, to locate, build, construct, acquire, purchase, extend, maintain and operate into, within and through the present and future corporate limits of the Town of Elizabeth, Elbert County, Colorado, a plant or plants, and works for the purchase, manufacture, transmission and distribution of gas, either natural, artificial, or mixed, and to furnish, sell and distribute said gas to the Town of Elizabeth and the inhabitants thereof, for heating, cooking or other purposes by means of pipes, mains, or otherwise, over, under, along, across and through any and all streets, other public ways and places in said Town of Elizabeth, fixing the terms and conditions thereof and repealing Ordinance No. 03-20. Legal Notice No.: 24249 First Publication: March 7, 2019 Last Publication: March 14, 2019 Publisher: The Elbert County News Public Notice DISTRICT COURT, WATER DIVISION 1, COLORADO FEBRUARY 2019 WATER RESUME PUBLICATION TO: ALL PERSONS INTERESTED IN WATER APPLICATIONS IN WATER DIV. 1 Pursuant to C.R.S. 37-92-302, you are notified that the following is a resume of all water right applications and certain amendments filed in the Office of the Water Clerk during the month of FEBRUARY 2019 for each County affected. 19CW10 KYLE AND PAM RADEMACHER, 37263 Quail Dr., Elizabeth, CO 80107. 303808-2774. APPLICATION FOR UNDERGROUND WATER RIGHTS IN THE DENVER BASIN AQUIFERS UNDERLYING APPLICANT’S PROPERTY IN ELBERT COUNTY. Applicant seeks to adjudicate the well, permit 171970, and to adjudicate the non tributary and not nontributary Denver Basin groundwater underlying a 6.2 acre tract of land lying in the SW1/4 SW1/4 S25 T7S R65W of the 6th PM, including the Dawson, Denver, Arapahoe and Laramie Fox Hills aquifers. WATER RIGHTS CLAIMED OR HERETOFORE ADJUDICATED THE WATER RIGHTS CLAIMED BY THESE APPLICATIONS MAY AFFECT IN PRIORITY ANY WITHIN THIS DIVISION AND OWNERS OF AFFECTED RIGHTS MUST APPEAR TO OBJECT WITHIN THE TIME PROVIDED BY STATUTE OR BE FOREVER BARRED. YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that any party who wishes to oppose an application, or an amended application, may file with the Water Clerk, P. O. Box 2038, Greeley, CO 80632, a verified Statement of Opposition, setting forth facts as to why the application should not be granted, or why it should be granted only in part or on certain conditions. Such Statement of Opposition must be filed by the last day of APRIL 2019 (forms available on www.courts.state.co.us or in the Clerk’s office) and must be filed as an Original and include $192.00 filing fee. A copy of each Statement of Opposition must also be served upon the Applicant or Applicant’s Attorney and an affidavit or certificate of such service of mailing shall be filed with the Water Clerk. Legal Notice No.: 24253 First Publication: March 14, 2019 Last Publication: March 14, 2019 Publisher: The Elbert County News Public Notice DISTRICT COURT, WATER DIVISION 1, COLORADO FEBRUARY 2019 WATER RESUME PUBLICATION TO: ALL PERSONS INTERESTED IN WATER APPLICATIONS IN WATER DIV. 1 Pursuant to C.R.S. 37-92-302, you are notified that the following is a resume of all water right applications and certain amendments filed in the Office of the Water Clerk during the month of FEBRUARY 2019 for each County affected. 19CW3027, James Sarich, 32220 County Road 17-21, Elizabeth, CO 80107 (James J. Petrock, Petrock Fendel Poznanovic, P.C., 700 17th Street, #1800, Denver, CO 80202), APPLICATION FOR UNDERGROUND WATER RIGHTS FROM NONTRIBUTARY AND NOT

applications and certain amendments filed in the Office of the Water Clerk during the month of FEBRUARY 2019 for each County affected.

19CW3027, James Sarich, 32220 County Road 17-21, Elizabeth, CO 80107 (James J. Petrock, Petrock Fendel Poznanovic, P.C., 700 17th Street, #1800, Denver, CO 80202), APPLICATION FOR UNDERGROUND WATER RIGHTS FROM NONTRIBUTARY AND NOT NONTRIBUTARY SOURCES AND FOR APPROVAL OF PLAN FOR AUGMENTATION, IN THE NONTRIBUTARY LOWER DAWSON, DENVER, ARAPAHOE AND LARAMIE-FOX HILLS AND THE NOT NONTRIBUTARY UPPER DAWSON AQUIFERS, ELBERT COUNTY. 40 acres being the SE1/4SE1/4 of Section 20, T8S, R64W of the 6th P.M., Elbert County, as shown on Attachment A hereto (Subject Property). Source of Water Rights: The Upper Dawson aquifer is not nontributary as described in Sections 37-90-103(10.7), C.R.S., and the Lower Dawson, Denver, Arapahoe and LaramieFox Hills aquifers are nontributary as described in Section 37-90-103(10.5), C.R.S. Estimated Amounts: Upper Dawson: 11 acre-feet, Lower Dawson: 8 acre-feet, Denver: 16 acre-feet, Arapahoe: 13 acre-feet, Laramie-Fox Hills: 13 acre-feet. Proposed Use: Domestic, commercial, irrigation, livestock watering, fire protection, and augmentation purposes, including storage, both on and off the Subject Property. Groundwater to be augmented: 2 acre-feet per year for 300 years of Upper Dawson aquifer groundwater requested herein. Water rights for augmentation: Return flows from the use of not nontributary and nontributary groundwater and direct discharge of nontributary ground water. Statement of plan for augmentation: The Upper Dawson aquifer groundwater will be used through two wells (1 acre-foot per well), including an existing well Permit No. 43705, for in house use (0.4 acre-feet), irrigation of 8500 square-feet of lawn, garden, and trees (0.5 acre-feet), and stockwatering of up to 8 large domestic animals (0.1 acre-feet). Applicant reserves the right to amend these amounts and values without amending the application or republishing the same. Sewage treatment for in house use will be provided by non-evaporative septic systems and return flow from in house and irrigation use will be approximately 90% and 15% of that use, respectively. During pumping Applicant will replace actual depletions to the affected stream system pursuant to Section 37-90-137(9)(c.5), C.R.S. Depletions occur to the Running Creek stream system and return flows accrue to the South Platte River via Running Creek and those return flows are sufficient to replace actual depletions while the subject groundwater is being pumped. Applicant will reserve an equal amount of nontributary groundwater underlying the Subject Property to meet post pumping augmentation requirements. Further, Applicant prays that this Court grant the application and for such other relief as seems proper in the premises.(5 pages).

Misc. Private Legals

WATER RIGHTS CLAIMED OR HERETOFORE ADJUDICATED THE WATER RIGHTS CLAIMED BY THESE APPLICATIONS MAY AFFECT IN PRIORITY ANY WITHIN THIS DIVISION AND OWNERS OF AFFECTED RIGHTS MUST APPEAR TO OBJECT WITHIN THE TIME PROVIDED BY STATUTE OR BE FOREVER BARRED. YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that any party who wishes to oppose an application, or an amended application, may file with the Water Clerk, P. O. Box 2038, Greeley, CO 80632, a verified Statement of Opposition, setting forth facts as to why the application should not be granted, or why it should be granted only in part or on certain conditions. Such Statement of Opposition must be filed by the last day of APRIL 2019 (forms available on www.courts.state.co.us or in the Clerk’s office) and must be filed as an Original and include $192.00 filing fee. A copy of each Statement of Opposition must also be served upon the Applicant or Applicant’s Attorney and an affidavit or certificate of such service of mailing shall be filed with the Water Clerk. Legal Notice No.: 24254 First Publication: March 14, 2019 Last Publication: March 14, 2019 Publisher: The Elbert County News Public Notice DISTRICT COURT, WATER DIVISION 1, COLORADO FEBRUARY 2019 WATER RESUME PUBLICATION TO: ALL PERSONS INTERESTED IN WATER APPLICATIONS IN WATER DIV. 1

that the following is a resume of all water right applications and certain amendments filed in the Office of the Water Clerk during the month of FEBRUARY 2019 for each County affected.

Misc. Private Legals 19CW3028, James Forgath, 27400 County

Road 5, Elizabeth, CO 80107 (James J. Petrock, Petrock Fendel Poznanovic, P.C., 700 17th Street, #1800, Denver, CO 80202), APPLICATION FOR UNDERGROUND WATER RIGHTS FROM NONTRIBUTARY AND NOT NONTRIBUTARY SOURCES AND FOR APPROVAL OF PLAN FOR AUGMENTATION, IN THE NONTRIBUTARY LOWER DAWSON, DENVER, ARAPAHOE AND LARAMIE-FOX HILLS AND THE NOT NONTRIBUTARY UPPER DAWSON AQUIFERS, ELBERT COUN TY. 40.5 acres located in the SW1/4SW1/4 and the NW1/4SW1/4 of Section 14, T9S, R65W of the 6th P.M., Elbert County, as described and shown on Attachment A hereto ("Subject Property"). 40.5 acres located in the SW1/4SW1/4 and the NW1/4SW1/4 of Section 14, T9S, R65W of the 6th P.M., Elbert County, as described and shown on Attachment A hereto ("Subject Property"). Source of Water Rights: The Upper Dawson aquifer is not nontributary as described in Sections 37-90-103(10.7), C.R.S., and the Lower Dawson, Denver, Arapahoe and LaramieFox Hills aquifers are nontributary as described in Section 37-90-103(10.5), C.R.S. Estimated Amounts: Upper Dawson: 14 acre-feet, Lower Dawson: 10 acre-feet, Denver: 16 acre-feet, Arapahoe: 15 acre-feet, Laramie-Fox Hills: 11 acre-feet. Proposed Use: Domestic, commercial, irrigation, livestock watering, fire protection, and augmentation purposes, including storage, both on and off the Subject Property. Groundwater to be augmented: 3 acre-feet per year for 300 years of Upper Dawson aquifer groundwater as requested herein. Water rights for augmentation: Return flows from the use of not nontributary and nontributary groundwater and direct discharge of nontributary ground water. Statement of plan for augmentation: The Upper Dawson aquifer water will be used through individual wells to serve up to 4 residential lots at rates of flow not to exceed 15 gpm, including existing well (Permit No. 152954). Each well will withdraw 0.75 acre-feet annually for inhouse use (0.4 acre-feet), irrigation of 5000 square-feet of lawn, garden, and trees (0.3 acre-feet), stockwatering of up to 4 large domestic animals (0.05 acre-feet). Applicant reserves the right to amend these amounts and values without amending the application or republishing the same. Sewage treatment for in house use will be provided by non-evaporative septic systems and return flow from in house and irrigation use will be approximately 90% and 15% of that use, respectively. During pumping Applicant will replace actual depletions to the affected stream system pursuant to Section 37-90-137(9)(c.5), C.R.S. Depletions occur to the Running Creek stream system. Return flows accrue to the South Platte River via Running Creek and those return flows are sufficient to replace actual depletions while the subject groundwater is being pumped. Applicant will reserve an equal amount of nontributary groundwater underlying the Subject Property to meet post pumping augmentation requirements. Further, Applicant prays that this Court grant the application and for such other relief as seems proper in the premises.(6 pages).

PUBLIC NOTICE

Notice ToCREDITORS Creditors NOTICE TO

Estate of Leroy Edward Thomas, Deceased Case Number: 2019 PR 30004

All persons having claims against the abovenamed estate are required to present them to the Personal Representative or to the District Court of Elbert County, Colorado on or before August 2, 2019, or the claims may be forever barred. Date: February 27, 2019 /s/ James T. Anest James T. Anest #16727 Personal Representative 11020 S. Pikes Peak Drive, No. 210 Parker, Colorado 80138 jta@parkerlawyers.com 303-841-9525 Legal Notice No: 24250 First Publication: March 7, 2019 Last Publication: March 21, 2019 Publisher: Elbert County News

No matter what you’re looking for... You‘ll Find It In The Classifieds

WATER RIGHTS CLAIMED OR HERETOFORE ADJUDICATED THE WATER RIGHTS CLAIMED BY THESE APPLICATIONS MAY AFFECT IN PRIORITY ANY WITHIN THIS DIVISION AND OWNERS OF AFFECTED RIGHTS MUST APPEAR TO OBJECT WITHIN THE TIME PROVIDED BY STATUTE OR BE FOREVER BARRED. YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that any party who wishes to oppose an application, or an amended application, may file with the Water Clerk, P. O. Box 2038, Greeley, CO 80632, a verified Statement of Opposition, setting forth facts as to why the application should not be granted, or why it should be granted only in part or on certain conditions. Such Statement of Opposition must be filed by the last day of APRIL 2019 (forms available on www.courts.state.co.us or in the Clerk’s office) and must be filed as an Original and include $192.00 filing fee. A copy of each Statement of Opposition must also be served upon the Applicant or Applicant’s Attorney and an affidavit or certificate of such service of mailing shall be filed with the Water Clerk. Legal Notice No.: 24255 First Publication: March 14, 2019 Last Publication: March 14, 2019 Publisher: The Elbert County News

Pursuant to C.R.S. 37-92-302, you are notified that the following is a resume of all water right applications and certain amendments filed in the Office of the Water Clerk during the month of FEBRUARY 2019 for each County affected.

Notice To Creditors

19CW3028, James Forgath, 27400 County Road 5, Elizabeth, CO 80107 (James J. Petrock, Petrock Fendel Poznanovic, P.C., 700 17th Street, #1800, Denver, CO 80202), APPLICATION FOR UNDERGROUND WATER

NOTICE TO CREDITORS Estate of Leroy Edward Thomas, Deceased Case Number: 2019 PR 30004

PUBLIC NOTICE

All persons having claims against the above-

Elbert 3.14.19* 1


20 Elbert County News

March 14, 2019M Elbert County Salaries

Public Notice ELBERT COUNTY GOVERNMENT Bi-Annual Salary Publication per C.R.S. 30-25-111 Gross Salary Paid 1/1/2018 - 12/31/2018 The countywide average percentage of salary paid in addition to regular wages as fringe benefits during calendar year 2018 was 20.19%. Fund | 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10

Department Name |

Employee Title | Gross Salary Paid 1/1/2018 - 12/31/2018

Administration Administrative Assistant 880 Administration County Manager 99,750 Administration Director of Administration 104,444 Assessor’s Office Assessment Technician 40,000 Assessor’s Office Assessment Technician 35,833 Assessor’s Office Assessment Technician 3,758 Assessor’s Office Assessment Technician 37,083 Assessor’s Office Assessment Technician 37,917 Assessor’s Office Assessment Technician 3,739 Assessor’s Office Chief Data Analyst 72,500 Assessor’s Office County Assessor 49,700 Assessor’s Office Deputy Assessor 48,999 Assessor’s Office GIS Analyst 25,691 Attorney’s Office County Attorney 89,583 Board of County Commissioners Commissioner 64,610 Board of County Commissioners Commissioner 64,610 Board of County Commissioners Commissioner 64,610 Building Department Building Department Administrator 56,234 Building Department Building Inspector 50,292 Building Department Chief Building Official 64,159 Clerk and Recorder Administrative Assistant 42,454 Clerk and Recorder Administrative Assistant 18,282 Clerk and Recorder County Clerk and Recorder 49,700 Clerk and Recorder Deputy Clerk and Recorder 48,672 Clerk and Recorder Motor Vehicle Specialist 48,573 Clerk and Recorder Motor Vehicle Specialist 39,530 Clerk and Recorder Motor Vehicle Specialist 36,065 Clerk and Recorder Motor Vehicle Specialist 41,285 Clerk and Recorder Motor Vehicle Specialist 21,198 Clerk and Recorder Motor Vehicle Supervisor 46,857 Community Development Services Administrative Assistant 41,348 Community Development Services Administrative Assistant 12,998 Community Development Services Director 6,553 Community Development Services Director 31,758 Coroner’s Office Coroner 22,100 Coroner’s Office Deputy Coroner 20,000 CSU Extension Office CSU Support Staff 42,256 CSU Extension Office CSU Support Staff 733 CSU Extension Office CSU Support Staff 1,200 CSU Extension Office CSU Support Staff 39,536 Elections Elections Manager 51,497 Facilities Facilities Manager 58,778 Facilities Janitor 7,452 Facilities Maintenance Technician 52,499 Facilities Maintenance Technician 40,369 Fairgrounds Maintenance Technician 38,081 Finance Finance Manager 10,833 Finance Finance Specialist 46,601 Human Resources Human Resources Specialist 55,406 Information Technology (IT) IT Director 75,000 Office of Emergency Management Director 52,000 Sheriff’s Office Administrative Assistant 44,329 Sheriff’s Office Administrative Assistant 40,481 Sheriff’s Office Administrative Assistant 54,198 Sheriff’s Office Administrative Assistant 10,682 Sheriff’s Office Detentions Cook 30,000 Sheriff’s Office Detentions Corporal 56,636 Sheriff’s Office Detentions Deputy 32,331

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Sheriff’s Office Sheriff’s Office Sheriff’s Office Sheriff’s Office Sheriff’s Office Sheriff’s Office Sheriff’s Office Sheriff’s Office Sheriff’s Office Sheriff’s Office Sheriff’s Office Sheriff’s Office Sheriff’s Office Sheriff’s Office Sheriff’s Office Sheriff’s Office Sheriff’s Office Sheriff’s Office Sheriff’s Office Sheriff’s Office Sheriff’s Office Sheriff’s Office Sheriff’s Office Sheriff’s Office Sheriff’s Office Sheriff’s Office Sheriff’s Office Sheriff’s Office Sheriff’s Office Sheriff’s Office Sheriff’s Office Sheriff’s Office Sheriff’s Office Sheriff’s Office Sheriff’s Office Sheriff’s Office Sheriff’s Office Sheriff’s Office Sheriff’s Office Sheriff’s Office Sheriff’s Office Sheriff’s Office Sheriff’s Office Sheriff’s Office Sheriff’s Office Surveyor Treasurer’s Office Treasurer’s Office Treasurer’s Office Treasurer’s Office Public Health Public Health Public Health Public Health Public Health Road and Bridge Road and Bridge Road and Bridge Road and Bridge Road and Bridge Road and Bridge Road and Bridge Road and Bridge Road and Bridge Road and Bridge Road and Bridge Road and Bridge Road and Bridge Road and Bridge Road and Bridge

Detentions Deputy 47,250 Detentions Deputy 42,288 Detentions Deputy 55,375 Detentions Deputy 42,432 Detentions Deputy 44,494 Detentions Deputy 2,635 Detentions Deputy 15,603 Detentions Lieutenant 69,222 Detentions Sergeant 64,707 Detentions Sergeant 62,300 Detentions Specialist 37,012 Detentions Specialist 40,428 Detentions Specialist 8,822 Executive Assistant 51,998 Investigations Deputy 50,931 Investigations Deputy 51,105 Investigations Deputy 50,542 Investigations Lieutenant 69,398 Investigations Sergeant 58,909 Patrol Deputy 3,388 Patrol Deputy 19,880 Patrol Deputy 49,239 Patrol Deputy 52,470 Patrol Deputy 54,395 Patrol Deputy 57,277 Patrol Deputy 26,016 Patrol Deputy 38,042 Patrol Deputy 42,390 Patrol Deputy 21,952 Patrol Deputy 52,270 Patrol Deputy 11,715 Patrol Deputy 51,725 Patrol Deputy 43,107 Patrol Deputy 49,193 Patrol Lieutenant 69,985 Patrol Lieutenant 69,338 Patrol Sergeant 64,928 Patrol Sergeant 59,916 Patrol Sergeant 3,902 Professional Standards 50,643 Sheriff 66,600 Undersheriff 70,204 Victims Advocate 37,621 Victims Advocate 4,976 Victims Advocate Coordinator 57,898 County Surveyor 2,200 Administrative Assistant 8,902 Administrative Assistant 41,465 County Treasurer 40,709 Deputy Treasurer 53,372 Administrative Assistant 33,274 Environmental Health Specialist 7,251 Environmental Health Specialist 43,875 Health Administrator 31,833 Health Administrator 22,015 Administrative Assistant 29,321 Administrative Assistant 33,741 Administrative Assistant 55,917 Construction Crew 2,907 Construction Crew 1,368 Construction Crew 36,599 Crew Lead 41,217 Director 92,250 Driveway Inspector 41,118 Fleet Manager 50,814 Foreman 56,297 Foreman 52,306 Foreman 56,059 Foreman 55,793 Mechanic 43,024

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Road and Bridge Road and Bridge Road and Bridge Road and Bridge Road and Bridge Road and Bridge Road and Bridge Road and Bridge Road and Bridge Road and Bridge Road and Bridge Road and Bridge Road and Bridge Road and Bridge Road and Bridge Road and Bridge Road and Bridge Road and Bridge Road and Bridge Road and Bridge Road and Bridge Road and Bridge Road and Bridge Road and Bridge Road and Bridge Road and Bridge Road and Bridge Road and Bridge Road and Bridge Road and Bridge Road and Bridge Road and Bridge Road and Bridge Road and Bridge Road and Bridge Road and Bridge Road and Bridge Road and Bridge Road and Bridge Road and Bridge Road and Bridge Road and Bridge Road and Bridge Public Trustee Sheriff’s Office Sheriff’s Office Human Services Human Services Human Services Human Services Human Services Human Services Human Services Human Services Human Services Human Services Human Services Human Services Human Services Human Services Human Services Human Services Human Services Human Services Human Services

Mechanic 15,530 Mechanic 40,979 Mechanic 11,740 Mechanic 43,628 Patrol Sergeant 59,639 Road Grader Operator 44,510 Road Grader Operator 39,825 Road Grader Operator 43,654 Road Grader Operator 46,654 Road Grader Operator 42,763 Road Grader Operator 54,730 Road Grader Operator 39,993 Road Grader Operator 40,855 Road Grader Operator 41,734 Road Grader Operator 18,415 Road Grader Operator 41,536 Road Grader Operator 44,429 Road Grader Operator 16,789 Road Grader Operator 42,174 Road Grader Operator 45,460 Road Grader Operator 40,026 Road Grader Operator 47,270 Road Grader Operator 42,450 Road Grader Operator 2,550 Road Grader Operator 44,074 Road Grader Operator/Trainer 45,051 Road Grader Trainer/Operator 45,632 Sign Technician 35,098 Superintendent 64,042 Truck Driver 41,213 Truck Driver 17,854 Truck Driver 39,116 Truck Driver 44,132 Truck Driver 36,604 Truck Driver 42,053 Truck Driver 41,239 Truck Driver 38,732 Truck Driver 44,578 Truck Driver 36,637 Truck Driver 39,683 Truck Driver 47,670 Truck Driver 47,327 Truck Driver 20,183 Public Trustee 12,500 Patrol Deputy 21,338 Patrol Deputy 21,491 Administrative Assistant 37,789 Assistance Programs Manager 57,645 Caseworker 4,927 Caseworker 29,534 Caseworker 39,918 Caseworker 44,491 Caseworker 46,752 Caseworker 31,733 Caseworker 27,568 Caseworker Supervisor 60,331 Child Support Specialist 43,443 Child Welfare Supervisor 63,120 Director 95,033 Finance Manager 57,338 Income Maintenance Technician 39,931 Income Maintenance Technician 31,107 Income Maintenance Technician 35,718 Protective Services Manager 71,726 Supervisor 52,115

Get Involved! Legal Notice No.: 24251 First Publication: March 14, 2019 Last Publication: March 14, 2019 Publisher: The Elbert County News

Facts do not cease to exist because they are ignored. - Aldous Huxley

Every day, the government makes decisions that can affect your life. Whether they are decisions on zoning, taxes, new businesses or myriad other issues, governments play a big role in your life. Governments have relied on

Notices are meant to be noticed. Read your public notices and get involved!

newspapers like this one to publish public notices since the birth of the nation. Local newspapers remain the most trusted source of public notice information. This newspaper publishes the information you need to stay involved in your community.

Elbert 3.14.19* 2

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