Page 1

FREE

May 17, 2018

DENVER Since 1926

DENVER, COLORADO

A publication of

FEELING THE FORCE: Comic Con gives fans a chance to get their cosplay on P8

Lawmakers conclude session with pension deal Teachers’ union criticizes measure, which increases employee contributions BY BRIAN EASON AND JAMES ANDERSON ASSOCIATED PRESS

There are possible few explanations. Trespassing means someone was present where they weren’t allowed, including private land — such as vacant lots — and certain restricted public areas. Denver’s population has grown significantly in the last few years, but the DU report shows that the increase in trespassing warnings has largely gone to homeless people. In 2017, nearly 60 percent of all trespassing citations went to people experiencing homelessness, an increase from about 54 percent in 2014.

Colorado lawmakers narrowly passed an ambitious plan to rescue the state pension fund from the fiscal brink just minutes before the 2018 legislative session gaveled to a close at midnight May 9. After daylong negotiations, Gov. John Hickenlooper lobbied fellow Democrats to pass the bill at a moment when their support appeared to be wavering. Opposition from the state’s largest teachers union threatened to unravel the deal reached with Senate Republicans. “We have to think long term about the 585,000 people who are benefiting from this,’’ House Majority Leader KC Becker, a Boulder Democrat and one of the bill sponsors, told her caucus before the vote. “If we fail to act in a responsible way and we jeopardize anything about this retirement system, it is on our backs, and it is on our conscience.’’ The pension fund provides retirement benefits to state workers, teachers and a number of other public employees across the state — around 1 in 10 Coloradans, in total — and has huge ramifications for taxpayer spending and public services across the state. The pension sports some of the largest debts of any pension in the country, owing retirees $32 billion to $50 billion in unfunded benefits. The bill now heads to the governor’s desk. It calls for cuts to retirement benefits, and requires public employees and taxpayer-funded government agencies to contribute more of each paycheck into the retirement fund. The state will contribute $225 million annually to help pay off the system’s unfunded debt. The bill increases employee contributions by 2 percentage points. That’s more than House Democrats and public sector unions had wanted, but less than the GOP-led state Senate had previously approved.

SEE HOMELESS, P7

SEE PENSION, P7

Terese Howard walks in Denver on a freezing night in December 2016 to check in on people camping in the blizzard. KEVIN J. BEATY/DENVERITE

Trespassing citations rise for homeless Advocates say enforcement of the laws ‘pushing away unwanted people’ BY ANDREW KENNEY AKENNEY@DENVERITE.COM

Denver’s police officers are rarely arresting homeless people under the city’s “camping ban” — but the city is increasingly using another law that forces people to move along, according to a new report from the University of Denver.

In 2013, police reported that they had issued 1,349 citations for trespassing to people experiencing homelessness. By 2017, that figure had grown to 1,765. The numbers show that police are enforcing trespassing laws more often in order to push away unwanted people, according to Ray Lyall, a member of Denver Homeless Out Loud. “That’s an easier ticket to give. They just pass around trespass tickets,” he told Denverite. But city staff say that police officers have little choice in the matter, and they pointed out that arrests under other homelessrelated laws have stayed largely stable.

THE BOTTOM LINE PERIODICAL

“This is the first time in two or three years that I’m not standing up here talking about a quarterback debate.” Emmanuel Sanders | Broncos wide receiver | Page 11 INSIDE

VOICES: PAGE 6 | LIFE: PAGE 8 | CALENDAR: PAGE 4 | SPORTS: PAGE 11 VOLUME 91 | ISSUE 28


2 Denver Herald

May 17, 2018

Brands of names are spreading — even if they don’t quite fit RiNO, Sloan’s Lake, LoDo are popping up beyond their borders BY ANDREW KENNEY AKENNEY@DENVERITE.COM

In Denver, the names of development zones like River North have become brands — and those brands are spreading. Take the River North district, or RiNo, the name adopted for a section of northeast Denver in the 2000s. It may seem like an ambiguous concept — an Instagram hashtag full of people posing in front of murals, maybe — but it actually is a defined area. The district’s boundaries stretch along Brighton Boulevard, from Park Avenue up to Interstate 70. Its area overlaps with Five Points, Cole, Curtis Park and other historically black neighborhoods in Denver, inspiring plenty of debate. Despite the objections, the name is all but cemented, and it’s even popping up beyond the district’s boundaries. The RiNo Veterinary Hospital is set to open nine blocks from the edge of the art district, in the Whittier neighborhood. It already has its very first Yelp review: “This is typical gentrifier behavior. Move into a neighborhood with a historically significant name and rename it to seem trendy.”

“The problem we have with the name Highlands, LOHI, SLO-HI or whatever new name developers come up with is that it divides us up in order to market and sell the area as something new.” Justine Sandoval Longtime Denver resident The hospital’s ownership didn’t immediately return a call for comment. It’s a pattern we’ve noticed in a few places. Businesses, one way or another, end up with the names of trendier neighborhoods, even if the map doesn’t agree. There’s also Sloans Lake CrossFit, which is not just in a different neighborhood but in a different city altogether — Arvada, some 4 miles from its namesake. They apparently get the question often enough that they’ve explained it on their website. The business was supposed to be at Sheridan and Colfax — still not the Sloan Lake neighborhood, but a lot closer — before they lost the building at the last minute. River North Brewery has a similar story: The beer-maker was one of the first to embrace the River North name back in 2011 and 2012. “To be

RED ROCKS CONCERTS THE WORLD’S GREATEST PINK FLOYD SHOW

Denverite is an online local news source for everything you need to know about Denver in 5 minutes. Visit denverite.com/subscribe for more.

Realtor ushers in boating season with annual photo contest

June 7

July 25

QUEEN’s Greatest Hits

THE #1 B EATLES SS HOW WORLD THE #1 BEATLES HOW ININ THE THE WORLD

"

named after one of the hottest brewery neighborhoods in the world, if you ask me, was a bit of good foresight on (co-founder Matt Hess’),” said vicepresident Patrick Annesty. But the company lost its taproom’s spot in RiNo proper and moved out of the area. By then, it was pretty much stuck with the name. It even has embraced the misnomer, establishing a “River Norther Society” for its fans. Still, it can be a bit confusing for customers to square the address with the name. “Sometimes you can see them putting two and two together,” Annesty said. Fortunately for him, the company is set to move back to RiNo with a new taproom at the northeast corner of 34th and Blake this year. Sometimes, things get even wackier. Brighton Boulevard is home to a dog kennel called City Bark Lodo. They could legitimately claim the RiNo title, and yet they go for Lower Downtown, the area around Union Station. It’s most likely because the kennel has been there since 2005, before the RiNo name took hold, according to archived versions of its website. (They haven’t replied to my request for comment.)

I’m also kind of amused by the SloHi bike chain. Their first location is SloHi Bike Highlands. They get some accuracy points — they really are right near the border line of Sloan Lake and West Highland. It’s their second location, though, that cracks me up: SloHi City Park. That’s three different neighborhoods in one name! Although, in fairness, it’s at least in City Park. But it can be painful, too. The frustrated Yelp review I mentioned earlier is part of a wider backlash to the rebranding of Denver. River North, for example, is not actually a neighborhood. It is a district — an area where property and business owners contribute extra tax dollars to fund the RiNo Art District, which pays for marketing and even infrastructure for the neighborhood. The district also overlaps with numerous actual neighborhoods, primarily Five Points. Much of its acreage is in former industrial areas, but it does include several blocks of historic buildings that are associated with the place-name of Curtis Park. For longtime residents, that kind of renaming can feel like an insult — an implication that new, wealthier residents are remaking something to be their own. “The problem we have with the name Highlands, LOHI, SLO-HI or whatever new name developers come up with is that it divides us up in order to market and sell the area as something new,” Justine Sandoval wrote for Denverite last year.

1964 The The Tribute Tribute

"

August 24

September 27

1-888-9-AXS-TIX

Calendar submissions will be accepted until Nov. 1 STAFF REPORT

Steve Travers, waterfront specialist and broker associate at Kentwood Real Estate, kicks off the boating season season with a community photo contest. Community members are encouraged to take pictures for submission to his calendar contest for 2019. “The 13 winners will receive a $50 gift certificate for Mastercraft Colorado Boat Shop and will be featured in the calendar, which gets sent to all my lakefront clients,” Travers said in a news release. “I am always looking for ways to bring people together that have a passion for lake living and water sports as I do.” The deadline to submit a photo is

Nov. 1, which is also when boating season ends. Five Denver lakes are open for boating from April 1 to Nov. 1: Sloan’s Lake (motor and non-motorized) Rocky Mountain Lake (non-motorized) Berkeley Lake (non-motorized) Smith Lake at Washington Park (non-motorized) Ferril Lake at City Park (non-motorized) The Front Range also has three large recreational lakes operated by Colorado Parks and Wildlife. “It’s a fun way to engage people,” Travers said in the release. “I am looking forward to seeing you all around the lakes this summer.” Travers distributes free annual calendars to property owners. The 2018 calendar can be picked up at Travers’ office, 4949 S Niagara St., Suite 400, Denver, CO 80237. It features pictures of last year’s winners.


Denver Herald 3

May 17, 2018

`Seal of Biliteracy’ is growing trend for graduates from DPS

Denver Pops Orchestra seeks musicians for next season STAFF REPORT

INSURANCE PREFERRED CLAIM EXPERTS MANUFACTURER PREFERRED

www.JKRoofing.com Serving the greater Denver Metro area and the foothills.

Thank you for voting us or

Best of the Best!

C ol

do

a

Denver Pops Orchestra is looking for musicians for the 2018-19 season. Vacancies include concertmaster (paid position), tuba, French horn, bass clarinet, percussion and section strings. Musicians who play other instruments are welcome to audition; the orchestra is happy to add musicians to the substitute list. Denver Pops is a volunteer organization that performs a variety of popular music, including Broadway and movie arrangements, dance and big

band tunes, and light classical pieces. Rehearsals are Wednesday evenings, and the season runs from late August to mid-May, with six to seven performances per season. For auditions, musicians are expected to perform two excerpts of tje applicant’s choosing — a classical excerpt and a pops or jazz excerpt and sight reading. Auditions take place the evening of May 30 at 975 S. Balsam Court, Lakewood. Go to www.denverpopsorchestra.org for information and to schedule an audition.

SM

ia

Nearly twice as many Denver students are on track to graduate with a “seal of biliteracy” this year as last year. The seal signifies they are fluent in English and at least one other language. Thus far, 893 high school seniors have earned a seal, and there is a possibility even more could do so by the end of the school year, according to district spokeswoman Alex Renteria. That’s an increase from the 490 students who earned a seal last year, and more than four times as many as the number who earned a seal the first year it was possible in 2016. The seals are a recognition that being bilingual is an asset. In a district where 37 percent of the 92,600 students are English language learners, district officials have said the seals are also a celebration of the skills students bring with them to the classroom. The seal of biliteracy was cited by a national group of Latino school administrators in naming Denver Superintendent Tom Boasberg the 2018 Hispanic-Serving School District Superintendent of the Year. But the seal has also been controversial. Because Colorado is a local control state, decisions about adopting seals of biliteracy rest in districts’ hands. Denver Public Schools was one of the first to offer it in Colorado, and Denver officials advocated for a state law passed last year that sets a path for other districts to do the same. This week, the district celebrated students who earned the seal at a ceremony. Theresa Nguyen is one of 27 students recognized for being fluent in English and two other languages.

CALM AFTER THE STORM

Call for a FREE INSPECTION!

303-425-7531

ed

BY MELANIE ASMAR CHALKBEAT.ORG

Nguyen, an 18-year-old senior at John F. Kennedy High School, is tri-literate in English, Spanish and Vietnamese, her first language. Growing up, Nguyen said she often acted as a translator for her parents. But when her mother was hospitalized three years ago, Nguyen said she wasn’t allowed to do so because medical translators must be at least 18 years old, and she was only 15. Instead, she said her mother had to have conversations about her medical care through a translator over the phone. “That took away the empathy factor,” Nguyen said. It’s one reason she wants to eventually work in the surgery department at a hospital serving vulnerable patients. “Being able to communicate to patients in their native tongue, I think that’s what empathy really is.” Nguyen will be the first in her family to attend college when she goes to the University of Colorado-Denver this fall. She said she thinks having the seal of tri-literacy on her resume helped land her the scholarships that will make college possible for her. To earn a seal from Denver Public Schools, students must either have a 3.0 grade-point average in their high school English classes, pass a collegelevel English class or earn a high enough score in English on an ACT, SAT, Advanced Placement or International Baccalaureate test. To show proficiency in a second or third language, students can either earn high enough scores on certain nationally recognized tests or, if no test is available for a particular language, submit a speaking and writing portfolio that demonstrates their literacy in that language. In addition to the high school seniors who earned a seal this year, 253 juniors have already met the requirements to earn one when they graduate, Renteria said. Students earned seals this year in 20 different languages. The top three were Spanish, French and Vietnamese. The others included Arabic, Norwegian and Swahili.

M

Recognition shows importance of being fluent in more than one language

C o m m u nit

y


4 Denver Herald

May 17, 2018

THINGS to DO THEATER

Finzi and Wilberg: 7:30-10 p.m. Friday, May 18 at Saint John’s Episcopal Cathedral, 1350 N. Washington St., Denver. Go to www. StMartinsChamberChoir.org.

“A Hymn to the Goddess: An Egyptian Tale”: May 18 to June 17 at the BiTSY Stage, 1137 S. Huron St., Denver. Show times at 7:30 p.m. Fridays, and 11 a.m. and 1 p.m. Saturdays and Sundays. Additional shows at 7:30 p.m. May 23-24. Admission is free; donations are accepted. Reservations required. Contact www.bitsystage.com.

Colorado Wind Ensemble: Stars and Sea: 7:30-9:30 p.m. Saturday, May 19 at King Center, 855 Lawrence Way, Denver. Go to http://www.coloradowindensemble.org/ event/stars-and-sea/

Little Shop of Horrors: May 25 to Jun 16 at The Bug Theatre, 3654 Navajo St., Denver. Presented by Equinox Theatre Company. Performances at 7:30 p.m. Fridays and Saturdays. Parking is free. Go to www. EquinoxTheatreDenver.com.

Creatures and Critters: 7:30 p.m. Saturday, May 19 at Augustana Lutheran Church, 5000 E. Alameda Ave., Denver. Concert of the Colorado Women’s and Men’s Chorale. Call 303-388-4962 or go to www.AugustanaArts.org.

Agnes of God: May 30 to July 8 at Vintage Theatre, 1468 Dayton St., Aurora. Summoned to a convent, Dr. Martha Livingstone is charged with assessing the sanity of a novice nun accused of murdering her newborn. Who killed the infant and who fathered the tiny victim? Livingstone’s questions force all three women to re-examine the meaning of faith and the power of love leading to a dramatic, compelling climax. Tickets at vintagetheatre.org or 303-856-7830. Superior Donuts: playing through June 9 at The John Hand Theater, Colorado Free University, 7653 E. 1st Place, Denver. Show times are 7:30 p.m. Friday and Saturday, and 2 p.m. Sunday. Go to www.FirehouseTheaterCompany.com. The Dinner Detective: 6-9 p.m. Saturdays through July 7 at Embassy Suites Denver Downtown, 1420 Stout St., Denver. Large interactive murder-mystery comedy dinner show; tickets include four-course plated dinner. Some shows sold out. Go to www. thedinnerdetective.com.

MUSIC

Remembrance and Redemption: Howells,

ART

Low Sensory Morning: 8:3010 a.m. Saturday, May 19 at Denver Art Museum, 100 W. 14th Avenue Parkway. For those who prefer a quiet, less sensory-stimulating environment. Space is limited. Go to https://denverartmuseum. org/calendar/low-sensory-morningmay-19-2018. Basic Sewing for Adults: 9:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Saturday, May 19 at Anythink Perl Mack, 7611 Hilltop Circle, Denver. Contact 303-405-3576 or go to anythinklibraries. org. Registration required. Untitled Final Friday: Birdy: 6-10 p.m. Friday, May 25 at the Denver Art Museum, 100 W. 14th Avenue Parkway, Denver. Late night program features workshops, performances and tours. Go to https://denverartmuseum. org/calendar/untitled-birdy. Art at Anythink: 10-11:45 a.m. Saturday, May 26 at Anythink Perl Mack, 7611 Hilltop Circle, Denver. Contact 303-405-3576 or go to anythinklibraries.org.Basic art and design class taught by local artist Sally Gould. Registration required.

“Escape/Run, Hide, Fight”: on display through May 31 at 2400 Curtis St., Denver. An exhibition with resident artist Erika Diamond and students from McLain High School. Go to platteforum.org. Spring Art Show and Sale: open through June 20 at Apex Community Recreation Center, 6842 Wadsworth Blvd. Arvada Fine Arts Guild annual show features more than 180 pieces of artwork. Awards presentation from 1-3 p.m. May 12. Go to https://janaguild.fineartstudioonline.com/

READING/WRITING

What a Character: 1:30 p.m. Sunday, May 20 at Denver Woman’s Press Club, 1325 Logan St., Denver. Hear from Arvada writers Susanne Young and Kathleen Duhamel, and Denver novelist Bonnie McCune. Contact kathleenduhamel@gmail.com. Denver Veterans Writing Workshop: 2:30 p.m. Sunday, May 20 at the Denver Public Library Central Branch, 10 W. 14th Avenue Parkway. To sign up, or for more information, go to https://coloradohumanities.submittable.com/submit/89122/denver-veteranswar-stories. Contact Jason Arment at Jason@coloradohumanities.org or call/text 619-663-5247. Go to www.coloradohumanities.org.

FOOD/COOKING

Perl Mack Snacks: Pancakes: 5-6 p.m. Thursday. May 24 at Anythink Perl Mack, 7611 Hilltop Circle, Denver. Contact 303405-3576 or go to anythinklibraries.org. For tweens and teens. Registration required. Ice Cream in a Bag: 4 p.m. Wednesday, May 30 at Anythink Perl Mack, 7611 Hilltop Circle, Denver. Contact 303-405-3576 or go to anythinklibraries.org. All ages.

EVENTS

Mutts & Models Canine Fashion Show: 6 p.m. Saturday, May 19 at EXDO Event Center, 1399 35th St., Denver. Benefit for PetAid Colorado. Theme is “Yappy Days” and guests are encouraged to wear their best biker gear, letterman jacket, Mary Janes or 50s-era cocktail attire. Go to www. petaidcolorado.org/mutts-models Denver Modern Home Tour: 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday, May 19. Visit with architects, designers and home builders and see their residential modern work. Locations in Columbine Valley, Hilltop, Curtis Park, Sloan Lake, and the Regis University area. A map is available on the event page. Go to www. denvermodernhometour.com. This Little Light: 2 p.m. and 7 p.m. Saturday, May 19 at St. Thomas Episcopal Church, 2201 Dexter, Denver. Presented by Old World Singers. Go to http://oneworldsingers.org Rotary District 5450 Conference: 10 a.m. to 10 p.m. Saturday, May 19 and 8-11 a.m. Sunday, May 20 at Hyatt Denver Tech Center, 7800 E. Tufts Ave., Denver. Celebration of the work Rotary has done in the community and across the world. Find out more at rotary5450.org. Volkswagens on the Green Car Show: 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. May 20 at Clement Park. Live music, a swap meet, vendors, food and lots of cars. Go to www.vwotg.com. Kristallnacht Torah: 11 a.m. Sunday, May 20 at Chabad Jewish Center of South Metro Denver, 9950 Lone Tree Parkway, Lone Tree. The Torah was rescued from one of the 1,400 synagogues that were set ablaze on the night of Nov. 9, 1938. Go to www.DenverJewishCenter.com or call 303-792-7222. Carnival Games: 3-4 p.m. Saturday, May 26 at Anythink Perl Mack, 7611 Hilltop Circle, Denver. Contact 303-405-3576 or go to anythinklibraries.org. All ages. Colorado Remembers Military Heroes: 8:30 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday, May 26 at Colorado Freedom Memorial, 756 Telluride St., Aurora. Info: https://www.auroragov. org/cms/one.aspx?pageId=2037810

INSIDE SALES REP Full time or Part Time Location: Englewood, CO

Colorado Community Media, publisher of 18 community newspapers and websites in Suburban Denver, is looking for a sharp inside sales person who loves sales, enjoys working in a team environment and can handle a large account list of advertisers. We are looking for someone comfortable with print, online and social media advertising, but will fully train the right candidate with equivalent sales experience in other industries. This is a salary plus commission position with a great benefits package.

If you want to join our energized advertising team, please give me a call Erin Addenbrooke, 303-566-4074 or send your resume to eaddenbrooke@coloradocommunitymedia.com Colorado Community Media is an Equal Opportunity Employer

HEALTH

Denver Heart and Stroke Walk: 8 a.m. to noon Saturday, June 2 at Mile High Stadium, 1701 Bryant St., Denver. 5K walk, 5K timed race, yoga on the end zone, kids zone, Healthy for Good expo and more. Go to http://www2.heart.org/site/TR?fr_ id=3322&pg=entry Vitality Walk: 8-11 a.m. Sunday, June 3 at Washington Park, Denver. Raise money and awareness of Parkinson’s disease and the Parkinson Association of the Rockies. Go to http://www.ParkinsonRockies.org/ VitalityWalk Editor’s note: Calendar submissions must be received by noon Wednesday for publication the following week. To place a calendar item, go to eventlink.coloradocommunitymedia.com.


Denver Herald 5

May 17, 2018

Bill on mental health, guns stalls in Legislature Sheriff, DA support emergency measure, but GOP lawmakers pull plug BY KATHLEEN FOODY AND JAMES ANDERSON ASSOCIATED PRESS

Douglas County Sheriff Tony Spurlock begged state lawmakers to pass legislation making it easier to confiscate firearms from someone considered a danger to themselves or others — people, he said, like the man who shot and killed a sheriff ’s deputy in Highlands Ranch on New Year’s Eve. A week later, Republicans in the state Senate refused to send the bill to a floor vote, unconvinced by the prominent GOP district attorneys and sheriffs who argued that it would protect officers dealing with people in the midst of mental health crises. The 2018 legislative session came to a close on May 9. The bill did pass the Democrat-led House. Only two Republicans voted for it, foreshadowing claims by senators that the bill didn’t protect gun owners. Despite the proliferation of similar proposals after a gunman killed 17 people at a Florida high school in February and Colorado’s own history of mass shootings, the short-lived debate showed that the battle lines on gun policy in Colorado politics have barely shifted. Similar “red flag” laws have been introduced in nearly 30 states since the Parkland, Florida killings, with lawmakers in Florida, Maryland and Vermont passing legislation. The issue simmered in Colorado’s divided Legislature until about a

“I’m skeptical of giving the government authority like this, but skepticism is not a justification for inaction.” George Brauchler District Attorney

week before the end of the legislative session, when a top Republican in the Democrat-led House and a Democratic colleague unveiled the proposal. Supporters tried to keep the focus on the 29-year-old peace officer shot to death on New Year’s Eve in Highlands Ranch, naming the bill after slain Douglas County Sheriff ’s Deputy Zackari Parrish. Public records show the gunman, Matthew Riehl, threatened officials at the Wyoming law school he attended, threatened lawsuits against family members if they kept him from accessing firearms and was placed under a 72-hour mental health hold in 2014 at a Veterans Affairs psychiatric ward. None of that appears to have disqualified him from buying weapons. Colorado Republicans claimed a red flag law could discourage gun owners from seeking treatment for mental health problems. They said personal spats could lead to requests for an emergency order without giving the gun owner an immediate opportunity to respond.

“When it comes to the potential for gun confiscation without proper due process ... I do not think it should be any surprise what happens to that bill,” GOP Senate President Kevin Grantham predicted May 7. Under the proposal, family members or law enforcement could have asked a court to issue a “temporary extreme risk protection order” if they believed someone posed a risk to themselves or others, and require them to hand in all firearms to local law enforcement. Another hearing would have been required within seven days of the initial order, and a judge would have decided whether to end or extend an order for 182 days. The gun owner could have asked a judge to reconsider during that 182day period. Supporters argued that process ensured that gun owners’ rights were protected but would help prevent suicide or killings. At an April 30 press conference unveiling the bill, Spurlock said it could have saved Parrish’s life. “What we’re trying to do is save lives,” he said. “And if you get in front

Colorado AG warns of fake Medicare notices

Scam seeks personal information via telephone STAFF REPORT

The distribution of new Medicare cards has prompted predators to try to trick consumers into giving up their money or personal information, according to a news release from Colorado Attorney General Cynthia H. Coffman. Coffman issued a warning in early May to be on the lookout for scammers calling, emailing or texting and claiming to be officials from Medicare. The scammers might threaten to cancel health benefits, or claim to need payment or private information to issue a new Medicare card, the release said. Medicare started issuing new cards to all beneficiaries in April; however, in Colorado, cards will be mailed sometime after June. To better protect consumers’ identities, the cards no longer contain Social Security numbers. Instead, Medicare is assigning unique numbers to each patient for

use with doctor visits and medical claims. “Medicare will not call consumers offering to replace their cards, they’ll never seek personal information or charge you to replace a card,” Coffman said in the release. “We want to make sure that consumers protect their private data, don’t give out their Social Security numbers or financial information and don’t fall victim to scammers.” Following is some information to help consumers avoid getting caught up in a Medicare card scam: New cards will be sent directly to consumers’ mailing address. To update address, call Social Security at 800-7721213 or visit ssa.gov/myaccount. If a consumer receives a phone call, email or text offering to help with this transition, they should ignore the offer. Consumers should never provide or verify any personal information to an unsolicited caller or written request. New cards will be mailed in waves. Cards for Colorado residents are not scheduled to be mailed until after June. It is likely that Colorado beneficiaries will not receive their new

cards until late 2018 or early 2019. Once consumers receive their new cards, they should shred and/or thoroughly destroy their old cards. Consumers should provide their new Medicare numbers only to their known doctors, insurers, pharmacists and health-care providers Anyone with questions about the Medicare card transition can contact AARP Foundation ElderWatch at 303-222-4444 or www.aarp.org/ aarp-foundation/our-work/income/ elderwatch/. AARP Foundation ElderWatch Colorado is a program with the Colorado attorney general and AARP Foundation whose mission is to ensure that no older adults are left to suffer, alone and in silence, at the hands of those who exploit them. The program fights the financial exploitation of older Coloradans through education and outreach, data collection, and the providing of assistance. If you have been victimized by a Medicare card scam, or wish to report suspicious activity, you can file a report online at www.stopfraudcolorado.gov/about-consumer-protection/ report-fraud.

of this or you interfere with it or you don’t vote for it ... you are not doing your job.” Gun rights debates have consumed Colorado’s Capitol before. Lawmakers approved a ban on high-capacity magazines and added a background check for firearm transfers in 2013, months after the mass shootings in Aurora and at Sandy Hook Elementary School in Connecticut. Gun owners’ groups retaliated by pushing successful recall votes against two Democratic state senators who voted for the gun control bills. The groups again mobilized against the red flag bill, calling Republican co-sponsor Cole Wist, of Centennial, “a mole” in the party’s ranks and warning George Brauchler, a district attorney running for attorney general, to withdraw his support. But Brauchler, who prosecuted the Aurora theater shooter for killing 12 people and injuring 70 others in 2012, called the proposal the most “protective” version of a “red flag” law nationally. By comparison, an Indiana version passed in 2005 lets police confiscate firearms without a warrant and get a judge’s approval afterward, said Brauchler, a Republican whose 18th Judicial District includes Arapahoe, Douglas, Elbert and Lincoln counties. “I’m skeptical of giving the government authority like this, but skepticism is not a justification for inaction,” he said.

ELECTRIC BICYCLE

SALE

CLIP & BRING THIS COUPON TO

SAVE $100 TO $700

on select models of our new electric bikes TAKE A FREE DEMO RIDE New & Used Electric Bikes We Also Rent eBikes Brand New 2018 Electric bikes on sale from $999

BEST electric bikes USA Best Price - Best Selection Best Service - Best Rentals - Best Brands 1919 Federal Blvd., Denver, CO 80204 www.BESTebikesUSA.com • 720-746-9958


6 Denver Herald

LOCAL

May 17, 2018

VOICES The funny thing about humor is how often it isn’t funny

A

n ice cream truck used to appear every day at the parks where I played when I was a kid. Its infectious little tune made my mouth water. I think now it would drive me to distraction. On each side of the QUIET truck it said “Good Humor.” DESPERATION I think I have a good sense of humor. Mine is mine, and it’s sculpted, and it’s not universal. Mine is lean, free of meanness and ribaldry. And that excludes me these days from comedy clubs and Craig Marshall White House Correspondents’ Dinners. Smith No more stand-up for Craig. I am too old for Michelle Wolf ’s humor. I was too old for it when I was her age (32). I can’t remember the first time I saw

Don Rickles on Carson, but I know I wasn’t crazy about him. He’d pick at every scab, and then wind up by saying it was all just a joke, and he loved everyone. Joan Rivers did the same thing, but she never said it was all just a joke, or that she loved everyone. Maybe you remember celebrity roasts? I thought they were imbecilic. Now they’re so raunchy they only appear on cable. My father never told a joke in his life, but he was the funniest man I knew. He was witty right now, and he didn’t need a writer. I found out what humor was, or what it was thought to be, when I was in grade school by watching television. These were a few of my choices: Jackie Gleason, Milton Berle and Lucille Ball. For reasons I could explain if this were a comedy dissertation, I rejected all of them. Along came a curiosity named Ernie Kovacs and I brightened somewhat. Kovacs was off-center, and his hu-

mor was constructed piece by piece, not thrown at me in a predictable punch. I haven’t watched situation comedies in 40 years. I will admit, however, to an appreciation for Barney Fife (portrayed, of course, by Mick Jagger). Fife might have been television’s last genuinely amusing, reoccurring character. Fife looked and sounded like they located him in Mayberry, North Carolina, not in a script room in southern California. My alma mater’s extension school offers a course I briefly considered. It’s called “Beginning Writing for the Half-Hour Spec I.” You “learn how to identify the unique spin shows put on their stories.” You learn how to spin on Wednesdays from 7 to 10 p.m., and it’s $570. I can tell you how to spin a situation comedy for free. Come up with some quirky characters who have quirky neighbors and quirky bosses. Be sure one of them

says crude things, and one of them is stacked. No matter what anyone says, every third line gets a laugh, provided by a laugh machine. “I went to see my doctor today. I asked him if I needed glasses.” “What did he say?” “He said, `You sure do. This is a bank.’ ” This is where the engineer comes in with a pre-recorded laugh. It’s intended for anyone who doesn’t know if the character was kidding or not. It’s the manipulative equivalent of multiple exclamation marks. Anyone who strings together exclamation marks gets deleted from my will. What do John The Baptist and Winnie The Pooh have in common? The same middle name. But seriously.

Craig Marshall Smith is an artist, educator and Highlands Ranch resident. He can be reached at craigmarshallsmith@comcast.net.

Yesterday’s achievement is tomorrow’s success

O

ne of the greatest pieces of advice that I ever received came from a great friend and mentor earlier in my life. He actually gave me two pieces of advice wrapped up in one life-changing conversation. The two were so connected that even today I consider these WINNING words of wisdom a WORDS tremendous part of any success that I have experienced in my life. I have been paying this forward and have passed along this advice to those whom I know, those whom I work with, and those whom I Michael Norton coach and mentor. And now I want to share it with you, too. The first part is to be diligent in keeping a record of each accomplishment, award, or time that I had been recognized in any way. He told me to buy a binder and keep it handy. My mentor had shared this with me

DENVER Since 1926

immediately after I had been recognized as the Salesperson of the Month for the first time. He told me that even though there would be only one plaque on my wall and one certificate in my binder, he was confident that over time I would be filling multiple binders and taking up plenty of wall space too. Twenty-nine years later I am grateful for his confidence in me and for his advice. I say that because I did fill up my binder and other binders with many awards and recognitions, letters of accomplishment, letters and emails provided as a testimonial or reference. Now I am not sharing this with you to brag on myself, I am really bragging on my mentor and the advice and guidance he gave me, because the second part of his advice is where he made all the difference in my life and contributed to my future successes. You see, the second part of the advice is built on the saying that, “Success begets success.” He encouraged me to review my past achievements regularly as a way to continue to believe that I can do great things. The idea was not to get caught up in

JERRY HEALEY President

ERIN ADDENBROOKE Majors/Classified Manager

ANN MACARI HEALEY Executive Editor

MEREDITH THOMPSON Marketing Consultant

ahealey@coloradocommunitymedia.com

mthompson@coloradocommunitymedia.com

CHRIS ROTAR Managing Editor

AUDREY BROOKS Business Manager

jhealey@coloradocommunitymedia.com D D

II

S S

P P

A A

A publication of

A publication of

1624 Market St., Suite 202, Denver, CO 80202 Mailing Address: 750 W. Hampden Ave., Suite 225 Englewood, CO 80110 Phone: 303-566-4100 To subscribe call 303-566-4100

T T

C C

H H

relying on my past successes, as we know that we are only as good as our last record. And it also wasn’t about someone asking me, “So what have you done for me lately?” No, it’s not about that at all, it’s about you and me, and asking ourselves, “What else is still left inside of me?” Asking ourselves, “What have I done for myself lately?” Throughout my career I have experienced exhilarating wins, and I have suffered crushing losses. And I have been everywhere in between. There have been times when I have forgotten about my book of records and achievements, and instead of looking on my past successes to motivate me, I found myself wrestling in slumps. And then, somewhere deep inside I would hear the voice of my mentor saying, go back and look at your binder. So, I would open it, read a few of them, or more if I was really in a deep slump, and get fired up again about who I am and what I have accomplished in this life personally and professionally. It really doesn’t matter if you are in sales, management, teaching, manufacturing, healthcare, or any other

crotar@coloradocommunitymedia.com

eaddenbrooke@coloradocommunitymedia.com

abrooks@coloradocommunitymedia.com

ERIN FRANKS Production Manager

efranks@coloradocommunitymedia.com

LINDSAY NICOLETTI Operations/ Circulation Manager

lnicoletti@coloradocommunitymedia.com

profession or volunteer position. My advice and encouragement is this, that you will create your own “Brag Book,” and that you will go back and read it often to help you stay motivated and to help drive your future success and contributions, and achieve your own goals and dreams. And remember, it may only start with one, but success begets success, and just as my mentor had confidence in me, I am confident that you too will fill your binder and your walls with all of your own rewards, awards, and recognitions. So how about you? Do you remember all the good and great things you have done in your life? Or do you need to be reminded of just how fantastic you really are? I would love to hear your story at gotonorton@gmail.com, and when we can remember that yesterday’s achievement is really tomorrow’s success, it really will be a better than good week. Michael Norton is a resident of Castle Rock, the president of the Zig Ziglar Corporate Training Solutions Team, a strategic consultant and a business and personal coach.

Columnists & Guest Commentaries Columnist opinions are not necessarily those of the Herald-Dispatch. We welcome letters to the editor. Please Include your full name, address and the best number to reach you by telephone. Email letters to letters@coloradocommunitymedia.com Deadline Fri. 5 p.m. for the following week’s paper.

Denver Herald-Dispatch (ISSN 1542-5797)(USPS 241-760) A legal newspaper of general circulation in Denver, Colorado, the Herald-Dispatch is published weekly on Thursday by Colorado Community Media, 1624 Market St., Suite 202, Denver, CO 80202. PERIODICALS POSTAGE PAID AT DENVER, COLORADO and additional mailing offices. POSTMASTER: Send address change to: 750 W. Hampden Ave., Suite 225, Englewood, CO 80110


Denver Herald 7

May 17, 2018

PENSION FROM PAGE 1

Pets and their owners enjoyed costume contests and more at the Furry Scurry.

COURTESY PHOTO

Furry Scurry supports homeless pets and horses Dumb Friends League event brings in $875,000 STAFF REPORT

Two- and four-legged friends helped raise $875,000 (and counting) for services to help homeless pets and horses at the Dumb Friends League Furry Scurry. An estimated 10,000 people and 5,000 dogs attended the 25th annual event May 5 in Washington Park, where they

enjoyed dog contests and demos, met adoptable pets and shopped for pet-friendly goods and services at the Flea-less Market. “We are grateful to be a part of such a compassionate community,” Apryl Steele, Dumb Friends League president and CEO, said in a news release. “The work we do wouldn’t be possible without their continued support of our mission, programs and services that help pets and horses in need.” The Dumb Friends League takes in an average of 60

HOMELESS FROM PAGE 1

Police often give warnings before resorting to a ticket or arrest, but some recipients say it’s pointless to comply. “They gave me several warnings. I needed a place to sleep,” Lyall said. It’s also possible that the increase in trespassing is related to an increase in homelessness. Numbers on homelessness are notoriously unreliable, but an annual survey finds that chronic homelessness has grown steadily here in the 2010s. City spokespeople said that police were simply responding to property owner requests. “If a person is trespassing and a property owner calls it in, Denver has a duty to enforce the violation. We cannot selectively enforce this based on whether the person is experiencing homelessness or is housed,” said Sonny Jackson and Julie Smith, spokespeople for the Denver Police Department and Denver Human Services, in a joint statement.

homeless animals every day, more than 22,000 last year, the release said. Money raised at the Furry Scurry helps provide medical care to sick and injured animals, behavior training that allows pets to be adopted more quickly and investigations of animal neglect and mistreatment, and supports the league’s overall mission to end pet homelessness and animal suffering. Furry Scurry donations are being accepted through June 5. For information, go to furryscurry.org or call 303751-5772.

They did not immediately respond to a question about why the trespassing figures are increasing, but they pointed out that arrests under other homeless-related laws have declined or stayed stable in the last few years. The 16th Street Mall and Colfax Avenue both saw high concentrations of enforcement. Sandra, who declined to give her last name, said that she and others had moved out of Denver to avoid police and parks rangers, fleeing instead to a vacant patch of woods beyond the county line. “We were able to camp right outside the Denver border with Adams County. I was there for two or three months,” she said. Others are going to Federal Heights, Englewood and other suburbs, according to Amanda Lyall, a resident of Denver’s tiny-home village. The net effect, according to professor Nantiya Ruan, who oversaw the DU research project, is that people are moving into less-safe places. “They get pushed off of well-lit, well-trafficked, policed areas to places that are more uninhabitable, that are

Retirees will lose cost-of-living raises for two years. After that, annual raises will be cut to 1.5 percent, down from the current 2 percent. The state government and school districts would pay higher contributions than they do today. And future employees would have to work longer to qualify for full benefits: The bill increases the retirement age to 64 for future employees. Currently, state workers can retire at 60, while teachers can retire at 58. Sen. Jack Tate, of Centennial, a Republican bill sponsor, said it was critical that the pension measure “have a certain fairness in the retirement age between the public sector and the private sector.” Private-sector retirees can’t draw full benefits from Social Security until 67. State pension recipients in Colorado don’t pay into or receive Social Security benefits. Late May 9, several Democrats called for the bill to be rejected — and suggested instead that the governor call a special session — amid opposition from the Colorado Education Association. House Speaker Crisanta Duran was among more than two dozen Democrats to vote “no.’” The legislation ultimately passed 34-29 in the House and 24-11 in the Senate. Outside the Capitol, the teachers’ union ripped lawmakers for rushing a compromise that few had seen until hours before it passed. “This is bad policy done in haste,’’ said Kerrie Dallman,

more dangerous, that don’t have good light — especially if you’re an individual or a woman,” she said. “They get pushed out of the business districts.” Jason Flores-Williams is an attorney leading a class-action lawsuit against Denver on behalf of homeless plaintiffs. The trespassing statistics strengthen his argument, he said, that the city has “a class of homeless people, and the city has targeted them to move out of the city.” While the laws seem OK on their face, they’re being applied “in a disproportionate way,” he said. What does this mean for the camping ban? One of Mayor Michael Hancock’s first major actions in office was to implement a “camping ban,” which forbids people from using blankets, tents, tarps and other cover when they’re sleeping on public property in Denver. But the new law is rarely enforced to its fullest. The DU data shows that police only cited five people under the camping ban in 2017. Instead, officers take a lighter touch. Police reported nearly 5,000

president of the Colorado Education Association. The deal represents Colorado’s second pension rescue in the last decade. In 2010, lawmakers cut retirement benefits and increased contributions to stave off a looming insolvency triggered by the Great Recession. The fix fell short, in part because retirees are living longer and the pension’s investments are no longer expected to grow as much as policymakers had previously projected. The latest effort includes safeguards to automatically adjust benefits and contributions as needed to keep the pension on track to pay off its unfunded debt within 30 years. The Democrat-led House and Republican-led Senate have resolved other top priorities of the 120-day session. In March, lawmakers passed a $28.9 billion budget that boosts funding to transportation and schools. This week, they finalized a related K-12 funding bill that increases spending by $461 million in the fiscal year that begins July 1. On May 8, lawmakers passed a bill seeking voter approval to borrow $2.34 billion for transportation projects. The bill sets aside $645 million for roads over the next two years and would ask voters in 2019 permission to issue $2.34 billion in transportation bonds. The state would owe up to $3.25 billion in borrowing costs over 20 years. Lawmakers on May 9 approved a last-minute compromise to reauthorize the seven-member Colorado Civil Rights Commission and the Civil Rights Division until September 2027.

instances where they warned or contacted someone about “unauthorized camping” in 2017. Those numbers include instances where officers were offering food and shelter, according to city staff, but the DU paper claims that they often are meant to move people along. Meanwhile, the city is pushing to expand its homelessness services, including through its investment of more than $4.5 million to buy property for a new shelter in northeastern Denver, plus $3 million more to replace the roof, update HVAC equipment and outifit bathrooms at the facility. “Denver’s multi-faceted approach to addressing homelessness is making a difference in the lives of our residents. We have housed thousands of people, have helped thousands more avoid the loss of their home through eviction support, have increased the number of shelter beds and have improved the quality of services,” Smith and Jackson wrote. Denverite is an online local news source for everything you need to know about Denver in 5 minutes. Visit denverite.com/subscribe for more.


8 Denver Herald

LOCAL

May 17, 2018

LIFE ADVICE FOR COSPLAY

Shopping for issues missing from a collection is one of the most common activities at Denver Comic Con. FILE PHOTO

A guide for those new to

Comic Con

Advice for the event, cosplaying and collecting BY CLARKE READER CREADER@COLORADOCOMMUNITYMEDIA.COM

For first-timers or the uninitiated in the world of comic conventions, Denver’s annual Comic Con can be an intimidating experience. The sprawling event, which is June 15-17 this year, brings upward of 100,000 nerds, cosplayers and collectors into the Colorado Convention Center for fun, exploration and connection. “There’s a sense of community that comes with these kinds of events, because everyone shares the same passions,” said Tara Hubner, marketing and communications manager with Pop Culture Classroom, which puts on the con every year. “For a lot of people, this is the only time they get to see some of these people, so it’s like a big SEE COMIC, P9

• One of the best parts about Comic Con is seeing the truly exceptional cosplay work so many people are capable of creating. There are the expected super heroes and science fiction leads, but there’s always more than a few surprises. Don’t be shy to ask to take a photo with a particular favorite — most are very friendly and willing to pose. • At the Comic Con website, there are guidelines for what cosplayers are and are not allowed to wear and bring in as props. Hubner said cosplayers need to be covered enough that there’s no risk of “wardrobe malfunctions” and said that as a general rule, if a person isn’t sure about a certain prop or outfit, it’s better to leave it at home. • Littleton’s Reinke Brothers Halloween Costume and Superstore is a great place for cosplayers of all skill levels to suit up, especially as it’s one of the few costume stores open year-round. “We have the latest and greatest costumes, parts and pieces to make a great outfit,” said Greg “Shof” Shofner, general manager of the store, located at 5663 S. Prince St. “Comic Con gives us a great boost every year, and we start our ordering in January to make sure we have enough of all the costumes.” Over the years, the store has built up relationships with reputable manufacturers, so all the costumes they sell are properly licensed. • A big key to the success of many cosplay outfits is the makeup and prosthetics, and Reinke has experts in those areas as well to help provide that movie quality look. • As Shofner tells it, the key is to get started working on outfits as soon as possible, in case there need to be last-minute alterations.

BASICS TO KNOW

• It’s downtown Denver, so parking is always going to be tricky and potentially expensive, Hubner said. Pop Culture’s recommendation is to park farther away and take a Lyft or Uber, or take the light rail, since there is a stop right at the convention center. That same weekend PrideFest and the Denver BBQ Festival will be happening, so expect downtown to be extra busy. • With attendance last year topping about 115,000 people, attendees should be prepared for lines and waiting at the June 15-17 event. June 16, a Saturday, will be the busiest day, so Friday or Sunday would be a good day to visit to deal with fewer people. “The schedule for the con will be announced about two weeks out, and we

encourage people to take a look at it and get a game plan, so they don’t lose time wandering,” Hubner said. “We advise attendees to wear comfortable shoes, brings snacks and water to help them.” • The vast majority of the artists and authors who will be speaking are available for photos and autographs for free, but when it comes to major celebrities, there’s more to consider. Tickets to those events can be bought in advance or at the event, but fans should be prepared for lines. According to Hubner, lines for photo ops or autographs can take 30 minutes to an hour. “We recommend people go to the celebrity summit first thing and get a sense of the times when their celebrity will be making an appearance,” she said.

“Then get there early if you don’t want to spend a lot of time waiting.” • There are plenty of ATMS around the center, but using them usually requires more waiting in lines, so bring cash if possible. • Consider staying after hours. A fun part of the con is all the new people that attendees meet, and there are several after-party events available to keep the good times going. • One of the biggest piece of advice Hubner has is to not be intimidated. There will be volunteers spread all over the con who will be more than willing to answer questions and provide guidance. “We’re a very welcoming place, and there’s always someone willing to help,” she said. “We want everyone to have a good time

Young actress isn’t just going through a stage

N

ot many people are lucky enough to know what they do with their lives by the time they reach important milestones like graduating from high school. So, I’m not sure if there’s a name for how lucky 10-year-old Arvadan Payton Maynard is — she’s known she wanted to act since she was 2 years old. “When I was 2, my mom started noticCOMING ing I was really good ATTRACTIONS at memorizing stuff, and could do it quickly,” she said. “That was kind of the start, and by the time I was 6, we started looking for an agency.” In the ensuing years Maynard has worked in several independent films Clarke Reader and was recently cast as one of the leads in a new mystery and science fiction TV series called “Frozen Dead” about cryogenics that is filming in Nederland. And she recently took to the stage for the first time in the role of the Young Queen Elizabeth II in Aurora’s Vintage Theatre’s production of “The Audience.” “What I like about the theater is you can react to the audience and they can react to you. When you’re doing film or TV, you don’t get that connection,” she said. “It’s been my favorite acting experience yet. I think it has so much potential to make me grow as actress and person.” As someone who has been acting locally for so much of her life, Maynard has seen more film and TV opportunities become available in the metro area, but still not as many as places like Los Angeles and New York City. “Last summer got to be an extra in a feature film called ‘Unmarked,’ and now this TV series,” she said. “We’ll be continuing work on it through the summer and will start shopping it around in August. I do have a five-year commitment if it gets picked up.” As to what Maynard’s future holds, in addition to acting she loves dance, so she wants to continue her studies in the fields of dance, drama and acting, and may even consider teaching at the Doral Academy in Westminster — the school she currently attends. “When I get on the stage, I get to leave the past behind and make a new future for myself,” she said. “I want the chance to inspire other kids to do what they love and be what they want to be.”

SEE READER, P9


Denver Herald 9

May 17, 2018

ROAD kicks off summer COMIC CarFit schedule FROM PAGE 8

STAFF REPORT

An educational program that offers older adults the opportunity to check how well their personal vehicles fit them returns again this summer. CarFit events bring trained technicians to work with drivers to make small adjustments to basic things such as proper settings for their side mirrors and seat positioning. These adjustments can make a big difference in a driver’s comfort and help them project them and those around them. CarFit is offered by Reaching Older Adult Drivers (ROAD) and a number of partners in the Denver metro area. It was created by the American Society on Aging and developed in collaboration with AAA, AARP and the American Occupational Therapy Association. The 20-minute checkups are free, and registration is preferred. CarFit appointments are offered: May 23, 10 a.m. to 12:30 p.m., Thornton Active Adult Center, 9471 Dorothy Blvd., Thornton; June 20, 9-11 a.m., Cook Park Recreation Center, 7100 Cherry Creek Drive South, Denver; June 22, 2-4 p.m., Aurora Center for Active Adults, 30 Del Mar Circle, Aurora; June 28, 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.,

Heather Gardens, 2888 S. Heather Gardens Way, Aurora; July 10, 10:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m., AAA Colorado-Southglenn, 7400 S. University Blvd., Centennial; July 18, 9-11 a.m., Cook Park Recreation Center, 7100 Cherry Creek Drive South, Denver; Aug. 15, 9-11 a.m., Cook Park Recreation Center, 7100 Cherry Creek Drive South, Denver; Sept. 10, 10:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m., AAA Colorado-Southglenn, 7400 S. University Blvd., Centennial; Sept. 14, 2-4 p.m. Aurora Center for Active Adults, 30 Del Mar Circle, Aurora. ROAD was formed in response to research indicating that aging drivers will drive more and longer than any generation in history, according to a news release. It is funded by the National Highway Safety Administration and administered by the Colorado Department of Transportation. Older drivers are often the safest drivers in that they are more likely to wear seat belts and less likely to speed or drive while intoxicate, the release says. However, older drivers are more likely to be killed or seriously injured when a crash does occur because of the greater fragility of their aging bodies.

READER FROM PAGE 8

Town Hall Arts announces new season Anticipation is one of the great pleasures in life if properly appreciated, and fans of theater and live music now have a several months of anticipation ahead of them with the announcement of Littleton’s Town Hall Arts Center 37th season. The 2018-2019 season offers up five musicals and a play — “American Idiot” runs from Sept. 7 through Oct. 7, “A Christmas Carol: The Musical” from Nov. 9 through Dec. 23, “Casa Valentina” from Jan. 11 through Feb. 3, “Dames at Sea” from Feb. 15 through March 17, “The World Goes ‘Round” from March 29 through April 28, and the season closes with “Sister Act,” which runs from May 17 to June 16. For music lovers, the new season starts with the Littleton Jazz Festival at 6:30 p.m. on Friday, Aug. 17, followed by Lannie Garrett’s “Swing Sets” running at 7:30 p.m. Oct. 11, 12, 13 and 2 p.m. on the 14th. The next performance is The Patsy Decline show, running at 7:30 p.m. on Oct. 18, 19, 20 and 2 p.m. on Oct. 21, followed by Buckstein’s performance at 7 p.m. on

family reunion for so many people.” With so much going on at the con, including hundreds of booths, celebrities signing memorabilia and taking photos, and panels with all manners of creatives, it can be easy, especially for firsttimers, to feel lost and unsure about what is acceptable and allowed by visitors. Pop culture Classroom set up a section of its website at www.denvercomiccon.com/ new-to-the-con/ to answer some basic questions, and we spoke to Hubner and other participants to give advice for those new to the con.

Cosplayers dressed as the cast of Marvel’s Guardians of the Galaxy at last year’s Denver Comic Con.

FILE PHOTO

FOR THE COMIC COLLECTORS • Despite all the hoopla over celebrities and special events, Denver Comic Con very much still treasures the comic culture that created this cultural movement. Comic stores and dealers from the metro area and beyond will be selling current and classic books, and many stellar artists and writers will be on hand as well. • Andrew Middleton, a comic expert at Colorado Coins, Cards and Comics in Arvada, has attended the Comic Con numerous times, and said he loves meeting the variety of people who show up to share their love of the form. “There’s not one kind of person who loves comic books anymore,” he said. “My favorite part

Jan. 13. The 17th Avenue Allstars Sunday, featuring the National Acappella Champions, is at 7 p.m. on Feb. 24, and The Nacho Men will be stopping by at 7 p.m. on March 3. Soul legend Hazel Miller is stopping by the center at 7 p.m. on April 7, followed by the Colorado Children’s Chorale at 7 p.m. on April 28. The season ends with the Deranged Divas at 7 p.m. on June 9. Season tickets are available now, and single tickets go on sale on July 24. For tickets and information on all the shows, visit www.TownHallArtsCenter.org. A different kind of school band concert Littleton’s School of Rock specifically caters to those looking to master the vital rock components — guitar, bass, drums, piano and vocals — and take their talents to stages in Denver and beyond. School of Rock students will get the chance to live the life of a bar band at Moe’s Original BBQ, 3295 S. Broadway, at noon on Saturday, May 18, with their performance of The Doors vs. Jefferson Airplane. A pair of 1960s psychedelic rock titans, both bands made an enormous impact on musicians of the time and those still following in their footsteps 50 years later. Audiences will have the opportunity

of the con is meeting people who you wouldn’t think are into this stuff, but it turns out really love it.” • There are two classes of comic buyers, as Middleton sees it — those who like to read the books and those who want to collect them. Those who want to read them are going to be focused on stories and characters, whereas the collectors are going to be more interested in certain issues and willing to spend more money. Attendees should determine where their interests lie, as that will help guide their shopping. • One of the best things about the con, Middleton said, is meeting

to decide which band is the better as students perform some of both bands’ best. For information and tickets, visit moesdenver.com/englewood-bbq-restaurant-sports-bar/events. Jazz to start the summer at Five Points One of the great things about jazz is the diversity of musicians and styles that fit comfortably inside this dynamic and vital genre. One of the best examples of this in the metro area is the annual Five Points Jazz Festival, which will be held at 11 a.m. on Saturday, May 19 and go to 1:30 a.m. on Sunday, May 20. The free, family-friendly festival features more than 45 bands playing on 10 stages on Welton Street, between 26th and 29th streets. Musicians will be performing all kinds of subgenres, from jazz and bop to swing and funk. Other activities include an art and food marketplace, a musicians’ jam session, film screenings, and a family zone featuring yoga, face painting, a giant slide, jumpy castle and more. This year’s grand marshals are Wende Harston and Jim “Daddio” Walker. For more information and complete schedule. visit www.ArtsandVenues. com/FivePointsJazz.

the local and regional artists that most shoppers won’t find online or in stores. Instead, they have the chance to buy them right from the source. • As with most things related to Comic Con, Middleton’s advice is to do research in advance. If a shopper is searching for a particular issue or collectible item, doing some research online will help narrow down the retailers to meet. “Most of these people are experts, so keep in mind the stories or characters you most care about, and they can offer recommendations,” he added. “Some vendors are going to feature the latest books, while others will be looking to highlight the rare stuff.”

Clarke’s Concert of the Week — Japandroids at the Ogden Last year, Vancouver’s Japandroids reaffirmed their status as one of the purest rock bands working in modern music with their third album, “Near to the Wild Heart of Life.” I saw them on their first tour in years that March and they completely blew me away. Which means I can objectively say that nobody should miss Japandroids as they stop by the Ogden Theatre, 935 E. Colfax Avenue, at 8 p.m. on Tuesday, May 22. Not only will the show feature Japandroids but indie rock legends Wolf Parade. The group made some of the early 2000’s catchiest rock records and went on indefinite hiatus in 2011. The group returned in January of last year and released a great album called “Cry Cry Cry” in October. Together, Japandroids and Wolf Parade make up one of the best bills of the year, so tickets should be purchased posthaste. Visit www.ogdentheatre.com/events/detail/348589 for tickets and more. Clarke Reader’s column on culture appears on a weekly basis. A community editor with Colorado Community Media, he can be reached creader@ coloradocommunitymedia.com.


10 Denver Herald

May 17, 2018

Education, lifestyle can help prevent strokes Disorder can be prevented or mitigated in many cases with proper precautions STAFF REPORT

Strokes strike more than 7 million adults in the United States each year. This month, the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association encourage Colorado residents to work to end the fifth-leading cause of death in this country. American Stroke Month is intended to highlight one of the leading causes of serious, long-term disability that is largely preventable and treatable. Normal blood pressure is below 120/80 mm Hg. Nearly half of adults in the United States have high blood pressure, according to recent AHA/ ASA Hypertension Guidelines, which redefines high blood pressure as 130/88 mm Hg. Eating healthfully, being active and, for some stroke survivors, following an aspirin regimen can help prevent another stroke, according to a news release from the American Stroke Association. Education is also key when it comes to treating stroke. Immediate medical care is crucial to access life-saving treatment in many cases. The American Stroke Association’s Together to End Stroke initiative, sponsored nationally by Medtronic, teaches the acronym F.A.S.T. to help people to recognize the most common stroke warning signs and what to do if one occurs: F: Face Drooping. Does one side of

the face droop or is it numb? Ask the person to smile. A: Arm Weakness. Is one arm weak or numb? Ask the person to raise both arms. Does one arm drift downward? S: Speech Difficulty. Is speech slurred, are they unable to speak, or are they hard to understand? Ask the person to repeat a simple sentence like, “The sky is blue.” Is the sentence repeated correctly? T: Time to call 911. If the person shows any of these symptoms, even if the symptoms go away, call 911 and get them to the hospital immediately. Stroke facts: • About 795,000 people in the U.S. have a stroke every year, with about three in four being first-time strokes. • Someone in the United States has a stroke every 40 seconds. Every four minutes, someone dies of stroke. • Stroke is the number five cause of death in the U.S., killing more than 140,000 people in 2015. That’s one in every 20 deaths. • Stroke is a leading cause of long-term disability and the leading preventable cause of disability. Stroke, or vascular dementia, is also a leading cause of memory loss. • 80 percent of strokes can be prevented. • What’s good for the heart is good for the brain. The American Heart Association recommends following “Life’s Simple 7” to achieve ideal health: don’t smoke, be physically active, eat a healthy diet, maintain a healthy body weight, and control cholesterol, blood pressure and blood sugar. For more information about stroke or American Stroke Month, follow #StrokeMonth on social media or visit StrokeAssociation.org/strokemonth.

Answers

THANKS for

PLAYING!

© 2016 King Features Synd., Inc.

Solution


Denver Herald 11

May 17, 2018

Broncos wide receiver energized by offseason moves Emmanuel Sanders happy team is not facing quarterback controversy BY ARNIE STAPLETON ASSOCIATED PRESS

When Emmanuel Sanders returned from vacation to start the Denver Broncos’ offseason training program, he went straight to the team store and loved what he saw. Hanging off the racks were No. 4 Case Keenum jerseys. For the first time since Peyton Manning’s retirement after Super Bowl 50, the Broncos entered their offseason training program certain of who will be under center after signing Keenum to a two-year, $36 million deal and declaring him the starter. “I appreciate it, for sure,’’ Sanders said. “This is the first time in two or three years that I’m not standing up here talking about a quarterback debate. I remember when I got out here, I went out to the team store and I saw Case Keenum jerseys . I was like, `Thank God, I don’t have to deal with that again.’ “Case is our guy. We can go from there. We can work our butts off, try to gain chemistry and try to put up points.” On the day he signed his contract, Keenum was named the starter by

general manager John Elway, who also traded Trevor Siemian, who had beaten Paxton Lynch for the starting quarterback job each of the past two summers, to Minnesota. After the recent draft, Elway reiterated two things about Lynch, whom he traded up to draft in the first round out of Memphis two years ago: • He still believes he’ll figure things out and become a starting NFL quarterback. • He’ll have to beat out Chad Kelly this offseason to win the backup job. If he doesn’t, it would mark the third straight summer that Lynch has failed to beat out a seventh-rounder for a job. Sanders, who said he’s healthy after being bothered by an ankle injury almost all of last season, is a big fan of Keenum and of the Broncos’ decision to declare him the starter right away. “He’s a leader,’’ Sanders said, adding that “98 percent” of his passes so far have been on target. “He’s confident in himself. He’s one of those guys that when he steps into the huddle, he’s that leader. “You don’t have to second-guess what his thought process is. We’re going to complete this ball. We’re going to keep the ball moving. I’m liking what I’m seeing from him so far.” Sanders and Demaryius Thomas were loath last season to complain about it, but they were clearly affected by the turnstile at quarterback as the Broncos churned through Siemian,

“Case is our guy. We can go from there. We can work our butts off, try to gain chemistry and try to put up points.” Emmanuel Sanders Broncos wide receiver

Lynch and Brock Osweiler during a 5-11 season. “You can sit back and say we’re all professional football players and you’ve got to deal with that situation, but at the same time, obviously you can’t gain the same chemistry,’’ Sanders said. “You don’t have the same mindset. You have to talk to two different quarterbacks. When you’re going into individual routes, you have to go to one guy and then go with the next guy. You don’t really gain that chemistry. You’re not maximizing the opportunity. “Now we’re maximizing the oppor-

tunity, and hopefully it pays off.” The Broncos also added some talent into their wide receiving depth, replacing free agent departures Cody Latimer and Bennie Fowler III with draft picks Courtland Sutton of SMU and DaeSean Hamilton of Penn State. Sanders, who also played at SMU, worked out with Sutton over the winter and was delighted when the Broncos picked him in the second round. At 6-4 and 218 pounds, he’s built like Thomas. “D.T. is big,’’ Sanders said, but Sutton “looks like he belongs in the NBA. Working out with him, he has amazing feet. He’s very fluid for being so big. I’m looking forward to getting him in here and just working. Hopefully he can come up with some big plays for us this year.’’ At 6-1 and 205 pounds, Hamilton is closer to Sanders’ size — 5-11, 180 — but still bigger. “I’m going to teach those guys everything that I know,” Sanders said. “That’s my job.” Sanders, who is 31 years old and will make $8.25 million this season, said he’s not concerned that the rookies will eventually unseat him. “That’s going to happen sooner or later,’’ Sanders said. “... All I can do is make plays every single day and show that if I become expendable here, just show some other team, hey, look, I still got it. I still got the juice.’’

Classifieds

Classifieds Help Wanted

Carpet/Flooring

REWARDING WORK AND SOLID PAY FOR SKILLED TRADESPEOPLE AT RK. RK is hiring for sheetmetal, electricians, plumbers, pipefitters, ironworkers and welders. RK offers competitive wages and excellent benefits. 303.785.6827 | RKJobs@rkmi.com | rkmi.com/careers Please Recycle this Publication when Finished

Advertise: 303-566-4100

Fence Services

Landscaping/Nurseries

D & D FENCING

Commercial & Residential All types of cedar, chain link, iron, and vinyl fences. Install and repair. Serving all areas. Low Prices. FREE Estimates. BBB Call For SPRING SPECIAL

720-434-7822 or 303-296-0303

Handyman

ATM Concepts And Design Landscaping and Lawn Maintenance Full Service | Fall Clean ups Water Features available Sod, Roto Tilling, Gutter Clean Large item removal and haul off

720-602-2607 15% OFF mentioning this ad

Handyman Service

Advertise your business here ForContact Local NewsKaren Anytime at 303-566-4091 of the Day Visit OurColoradoNews.com

Tile, Plumbing, Finish Projects, Miscellaneous Repairs Small Jobs OK

303-345-4046 We are community.

Plumbing

DIRTY JOBS Done Dirt Cheap! Drain Cleaning & All Plumbing Repairs

720-308-6696 www.askdirtyjobs.com Commercial & Residential 30 Years Experience Phone for free Quote


Notices ing heir.

12 Denver Herald

Public Notices Public Notice

Notice To Creditors Public Notice NOTICE TO CREDITORS Estate of BRENDA MARY REVZIN, aka BRENDA M. REVZIN, aka BRENDA REVZIN, Deceased Case Number: 2018 PR 30499 All persons having claims against the abovenamed estate are required to present them to the Personal Representative or to Probate Court, Denver County, Colorado on or before September 4, 2018, or the claims may be forever barred. Paul R. Danborn (24528) Frie, Arndt & Danborn PC 7400 Wadsworth Blvd., #201 Arvada, Colorado 80003 303/420-1234 Attorney for Personal Representative Alvin M. Revzin 111 N. Emerson Street, #522 Denver, Colorado 80218 Personal Representative Legal Notice No.: 8488 First Publication: May 3, 2018 Last Publication: May 17, 2018 Publisher: The Denver Herald-Dispatch Public Notice NOTICE TO CREDITORS Estate of Judith Jeanne Williams, a/k/a Judith J. Williams, a/k/a Judith Williams, a/k/a Judith Jeanne Key, a/k/a Judith J. Key, a/k/a Judith Key, a/k/a Judith Jeanne Yager, a/k/a Judith J. Yager, a/k/a Judith Yager, a/k/a Judith Jeanne Mathews, a/k/a Judith J. Mathews, and Judith Mathews, Deceased. Case Number : 2018PR30253

All persons having claims against the abovenamed estate are required to present them to the Personal Representative or to the Denver Probate Court of the City and County of Denver, Colorado on or before September 3, 2018, or the claims may be forever barred. Eric M. Yager, Personal Representative 1600 Monaco Parkway Denver, CO 80220 Legal Notice No.: 8490 First Publication: May 3, 2018 Last Publication: May 17, 2018 Publisher: The Denver Herald-Dispatch Public Notice NOTICE TO CREDITORS Estate of Freemond L. Seney, Deceased Case Number: 2018PR30522 All persons having claims against the abovenamed estate are required to present them to the Personal Representative or to the Denver Probate Court of the City and County of Denver, Colorado on or before September 3, 2018, or the claims may be forever barred. Roxane I. Apple, Co-Personal Representative Renee Seney James, Co-Personal Representative c/o Goddard & Hawkins, PC 1444 Blake St. Denver, CO 80202 Legal Notice No.: 8493 First Publication: May 3, 2018 Last Publication: May 17, 2018 Publisher: The Denver Herald-Dispatch Public Notice NOTICE TO CREDITORS Estate of CONRAD G. JOSTES, a/k/a CONRAD GILES JOSTES, and CONRAD JOSTES, Deceased Case Number: 2018PR30517

All persons having claims against the abovenamed estate are required to present them to the Personal Representative or to Denver Probate Court of the City and County of Denver, Colorado on or before September 4, 2018, or the claims may be forever barred. Karen Hansen Personal Representative 7043 South Flower Court Littleton, Colorado 80128 Legal Notice No.: 8494 First Publication: May 3, 2018 Last Publication: May 17, 2018 Publisher: The Denver Herald-Dispatch Public Notice NOTICE TO CREDITORS Estate of JOSEPHINE A. FISCHER, a/k/a JOSEPHINE ANNE FISCHER and JOSEPHINE FISCHER, Deceased Case Number: 2018PR30417 All persons having claims against the abovenamed estate are required to present them to

NOTICE TO CREDITORS Estate of JOSEPHINE A. FISCHER, a/k/a JOSEPHINE ANNE FISCHER and JOSEPHINE FISCHER, Deceased Case Number: 2018PR30417

Notice To Creditors

All persons having claims against the abovenamed estate are required to present them to the Personal Representative or to Denver Probate Court of the City and County of Denver, Colorado on or before September 11, 2018, or the claims may be forever barred. M. Kent Olsen Personal Representative 650 South Cherry Street, Suite 525 Denver, CO 80246 Legal Notice No.: 8496 First Publication: May 10, 2018 Last Publication: May 24, 2018 Publisher: The Denver Herald-Dispatch Public Notice NOTICE TO CREDITORS Estate of MARY LEE PITTMAN, also known as MARY L. PITTMAN, Deceased Case Number: 2018 PR 30548 All persons having claims against the abovenamed estate are required to present them to the Personal Representative or to the Denver Probate Court of the City and County of Denver, Colorado on or before September 11, 2018, or the claims may be forever barred. Clyte D. Pittman, Jr., Personal Representative 8128 Spikegrass Court Castle Pines, CO 80108 Legal Notice No.: 8499 First Publication: May 10, 2018 Last Publication: May 24, 2018 Publisher: The Denver Herald-Dispatch Public Notice NOTICE TO CREDITORS Estate of Delores Williams, a/k/a Delores E. Williams, Deceased Case Number: 2018 PR 30243 All persons having claims against the abovenamed estate are required to present them to the Personal Representative or to Denver Probate Court, Denver County, Colorado on or before September 17, 2018 , or the claims may be forever barred. Christine Lee Rusch Personal Representative 16110 W. 58th Drive Golden, CO 80403 Legal Notice No.: 8507 First Publication: May 17, 2018 Last Publication: May 31, 2018 Publisher: The Denver Herald-Dispatch PUBLIC NOTICE NOTICE TO CREDITORS Estate of Sandra M. Parsons, aka Sandee Parsons, aka Sandra McCarthy-Parsons, aka Sandee M. Parsons, aka Sandra Parsons-Ersery, aka Sandra Parsons, Deceased Case Number: 18 PR 0153 All persons having claims against the abovenamed estate are required to present them to the Personal Representative or to the Denver Probate Court of the City and County of Denver, Colorado on or before September 4, 2018, or the claims may be forever barred. Lonnie L. Jones Personal Representative 7290 W. David Drive Littleton, Colorado 80128 Legal Notice No: 8489 First Publication: May 3, 2018 Last Publication: May 17, 2018 Publisher: The Denver Herald-Dispatch PUBLIC NOTICE NOTICE TO CREDITORS Estate of Maeve Margaret Drake, aka Maeve Maguire Drake, aka Maeve Drake, Deceased Case Number: 2018 PR 30519 All persons having claims against the abovenamed estate are required to present them to the Personal Representative or to the Denver Probate Court of the City and County of Denver, Colorado on or before September 10, 2018, or the claims may be forever barred. Margaret D. Acton Personal Representative c/o Steven R. Hutchins, Esq. Hutchins & Associates LLC 1999 Broadway, Suite 1400 Denver, Colorado 80202 Legal Notice No: 8497 First Publication: May 10, 2018 Last Publication: May 24, 2018 Publisher: The Denver Herald-Dispatch

Notice To Creditors PUBLIC NOTICE NOTICE TO CREDITORS Estate of Patrick Heard Crowley, a/k/a Patrick H. Crowley, a/k/a Patrick Crowley, a/k/a P.H. Crowley, Deceased Case Number: 2018PR30520 All persons having claims against the abovenamed estate are required to present them to the Personal Representative or to the Denver Probate Court of the City and County of Denver, Colorado on or before September 12, 2018, or the claims may be forever barred. Melissa M. Crowley Personal Representative 1000 S. Josephine Denver, CO 80209 Legal Notice No: 8498 First Publication: May 10, 2018 Last Publication: May 24, 2018 Publisher: The Denver Herald-Dispatch Public Notice NOTICE TO CREDITORS Estate of Kathleen C. Kluhsman, a/k/a Kathleen Carol Khulsman and Kathleen Kluhsman, Deceased Case Number: 2018PR30525 All persons having claims against the abovenamed estate are required to present them to the Personal Representative or to Denver Probate Court of the City and County of Denver, Colorado on or before September 17, 2018, or the claims may be forever barred. Ian P. Kluhsman, Personal Representative 3707 South Mission Parkway Aurora, CO 80013 Legal Notice No: 8505 First Publication: May 17, 2018 Last Publication: May 31, 2018 Publisher: Denver Herald Dispatch

Misc. Private Legals Public Notice STATE OF MAINE SUPERIOR COURT CUMBERLAND, ss. CIVIL ACTION DOCKET NO. RE-17-147 NOTICE OF SERVICE BY PUBLICATION COMPARK, LLC, Plaintiff, v. THOMAS FLETCHER OXNARD, et al. Defendants, and TRANSMAINE, ADRIENNE-JANE, INC., and PEOPLE’S UNITED BANK, Parties-in-Interest. ATTENTION SANDRA L. JOHNSON: Plaintiff filed the above-captioned action in the Maine Superior Court for Cumberland County. The Cumberland County Superior Court holds its sessions at 205 Newbury Street, Portland, Maine and its mailing address is 205 Newbury Street, Portland, ME 04101. 1. Plaintiff’s Complaint asserts quiet title and declaratory judgment counts with respect to property described as Passageway No. 3 in a deed dated August 12, 1822, and recorded by the Cumberland County Registry of Deeds at Book 93, Page 281. Plaintiff claims title in fee simple absolute to this property. 2. Defendant Sandra L. Johnson is among a group of known living heirs to the last recorded property owners, Mary Oxnard, Daniel Fox, Charles Fox, John Fox, George Fox, Thomas Chadwick, Rebecca Chadwick, John Potter and/or Caroline Potter. The physical location of Defendant Sandra L. Johnson cannot be ascertained by Plaintiff despite reasonable efforts to locate last-known addresses for each known living heir. 3. Defendant is directed to appear, plead, answer, or otherwise move, with respect to the Complaint filed in this action within twenty (20) days of publication of this Order. Defendant(s) must file an original Answer or response with the Superior Court by mailing it to the Clerk of the Cumberland County Superior Court, 205 Newbury Street, Portland, ME 04101. 4. Defendant or its attorney shall serve an Answer or response to the Complaint by delivering a copy of it in person or by mail to Plaintiff’s attorney, James Monteleone, Esq. Bernstein, Shur, P.O. Box 9729, Portland, Maine 04104.

3. Defendant is directed to appear, plead, answer, or otherwise move, with respect to the Complaint filed in this action within twenty (20) days of publication of this Order. Defendant(s) must file an original Answer or response with the Superior Court by mailing it to the Clerk of the Cumberland County Superior Court, 205 Newbury Street, Portland, ME 04101.

ATED IN THE STATE OF COLORADO, COUNTY OF DENVER, CITY OF DENVER, AND IS DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: LOT 2, HERRS SUBDIVISION OF LOTS 1-2 AND 4 IN BLOCK 44 OF SECOND FILING OF A PORTION OF HIGHLAND PARK.

May 17, 2018

Commonly known as: 3635 Julian Street, Denver, CO 80211.

The sale will be held at: 3635 Julian Street, Denver, CO 80211. 4. Defendant or its attorney shall serve an AnThe Secretary of Housing and Urban Developswer or response to the Complaint by delivering ment will bid the lesser amount of the loan bala copy of it in person or by mail to Plaintiff’s atance or the appraised value obtained by the torney, James Monteleone, Esq. Bernstein, prior to call sale.303-566-4100 To advertise yourSecretary public notices Shur, P.O. Box 9729, Portland, Maine 04104.

5. Defendant’s failure to appear in this action by the deadline specified above will result in the entry of default against Defendant and, thereafter, without more, may result in the Order of Default Judgment against Defendant.

Misc. Private Legals

6. This Notice is published pursuant to an Amended Order on Alternate Service dated as of April 4, 2018, /s/ Lance Walker, Justice, Cumberland County Superior Court. Legal Notice No.: 8491 First Publication: May 3, 2018 Last Publication: May 17, 2018 Publisher: The Denver Herald-Dispatch Public Notice Tow Pros, LLC located at 3330 South Quivas Street, Sheridan, Colorado 80110 has the following abandoned vehicles available for purchase. Phone No.: (303) 548-7624 1) 2004 Chevrolet Impala, Last Eight of Vin: 49146319 2) 2002 Honda Accord, Last Eight of Vin: 2A040297 3) 1999 Honda Accord, Last Eight of Vin: XA085044 4) 2000 Lexus RX300, Last Eight of Vin: Y0066513 5) 1997 Ford F-150 Pick-Up, Last Eight of Vin: VKC04606 6) 2001 Ford Ranger Pick-Up, Last Eight of Vin: 1PA85355 7) 2007 Toyota Corolla, Last Eight of Vin: 7Z934985 8) 2001 Nissan Xterra, Last Eight of Vin: 1C591849 9) 2002 Acura MDX, Last Eight of Vin: 2H525633 10) 1998 Toyota 4-Runner, Last Eight of Vin: W0081675 2006 Scion TC, Last Eight of Vin: 60072266 Legal Notice No.: 8506 First Publication: May 17, 2018 Last Publication: May 17, 2018 Publisher: Denver Herald Dispatch Public Notice NOTICE OF DEFAULT AND FORECLOSURE SALE WHEREAS, on February, 2009, a certain Deed of Trust was executed by Josephine Serna, as Grantor, in favor of Bank of America, N.A. as Beneficiary, and the Public Trustee of Denver County, Colorado as Trustee, and was recorded on March 2, 2009 at Reception Number 2009025969 in the office of the Clerk and Recorder of the County of Denver, Colorado; and WHEREAS, the Deed of Trust was insured by the United States Secretary of Housing and Urban Development (the Secretary) pursuant to the National Housing Act for the purpose of providing single family housing; and WHEREAS, the beneficial interest of the Deed of Trust is now owned by the Secretary, pursuant to an assignment recorded on September 9, 2013 at Reception Number 2013132666 in the office of the Clerk and Recorder of the County of Denver Colorado. WHEREAS, a default has been made in the covenants and conditions of the Deed of Trust in that Paragraph 9 (a) (i) has been violated; and WHEREAS, the entire amount delinquent is $237,165.86 as of March 30, 2018; and WHEREAS, by virtue of this default, the Secretary has declared the entire amount of the indebtedness secured by the Deed of Trust to be immediately due and payable; NOW THEREFORE, pursuant to the powers vested in me by the Single Family Mortgage Foreclosure Act of 1994, 12 U.S.C. 3751 et seq., by 24 CFR part 27, subpart B, and by the Secretary’s designation of me as Foreclosure Commissioner, recorded on July 19, 2017 at Reception No. 2017094067, notice is hereby given that on June 1, 2018 at 12:00 p.m. local time, all real and personal property at or used in connection with the following described premises (“Property”) will be sold at public auction to the highest bidder: THE LAND DESCRIBED HEREIN IS SITUATED IN THE STATE OF COLORADO, COUNTY OF DENVER, CITY OF DENVER, AND IS DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: LOT 2, HERRS SUBDIVISION OF LOTS 1-2 AND 4 IN BLOCK 44 OF SECOND FILING OF A PORTION OF HIGHLAND PARK. Commonly known as: 3635 Julian Street, Denver, CO 80211. The sale will be held at: 3635 Julian Street, Denver, CO 80211. The Secretary of Housing and Urban Development will bid the lesser amount of the loan balance or the appraised value obtained by the Secretary prior to sale.

5. Defendant’s failure to appear in this action by the deadline specified above will result in the entry of default against Defendant and, thereafter, without more, may result in the Order of Default Judgment against Defendant.

There will be no proration of taxes, rents or other income or liabilities, except that the purchaser will pay, at or before closing, his prorated share of any real estate taxes that have been paid by the Secretary to the date of the foreclosure sale.

6. This Notice is published pursuant to an Amended Order on Alternate Service dated as of April 4, 2018, /s/ Lance Walker, Justice, Cum-

When making their bids, all bidders except the Secretary must submit a deposit totaling 10% of

There will be no proration of taxes, rents or other income or liabilities, except that the purchaser will pay, at or before closing, his prorated share of any real estate taxes that have been paid by the Secretary to the date of the foreclosure sale.

Misc. Private Legals

When making their bids, all bidders except the Secretary must submit a deposit totaling 10% of the Secretary’s bid in the form of a certified check or cashier’s check made out to the Secretary of HUD. A deposit need not be accompany each oral bid. If the successful bid is oral, a deposit of 10% of the Secretary’s bid must be presented before the bidding is closed. The deposit is nonrefundable. The remainder of the purchase price must be delivered within 30 days of the sale or at such other time as the Secretary may determine for good cause shown, time being of the essence. This amount, like the bid deposits, must be delivered in the form of a certified or cashier’s check. If the Secretary is the highest bidder, he need not pay the bid amount in cash. The successful bidder will pay all conveying fees, all real estate and other taxes that are due on or after the delivery date of the remainder of the payment and all other costs associated with the transfer of title. At the conclusion of the sale, the deposits of the unsuccessful bidders will be returned to them. The Secretary may grant an extension of time within which to deliver the remainder of the payment. All extension will be for 15-day increments for a fee of $500.00, paid in advance. The extension fee shall be in the form of certified or cashier’s check made payable to the Secretary of HUD. If the high bidder closes the sale prior to the expiration of any extension period, the unused portion of the extension fee shall be applied toward the amount due.

If the high bidder is unable to close the sale within the required period, or within any extensions of time granted by the Secretary, the high bidder may be required to forfeit the cash deposit, or at the election of the foreclosure commissioner after consultation with the HUD representative, will be liable to HUD for any costs incurred as a result of such failure. The Commissioner may, at the direction of the HUD representative, offer the property to the second highest bidder for an amount equal to the highest price offered by that bidder.

There is no right of redemption, or right of possession based upon a right of redemption, in the mortgagor or others subsequent to a foreclosure completed pursuant to the Act. Therefore, the Foreclosure Commissioner will issue a Deed to the purchaser(s) upon receipt of the entire purchase price in accordance with the terms of the sale as provided herein, HUD does not guarantee that the property will be vacant.

The scheduled foreclosure sale shall be cancelled or adjourned if it is established, by documented written application of the mortgagor to the Foreclosure Commissioner no less than three (3) days before the date of sale, or otherwise, that the default or defaults upon which the foreclosure is based did not exist at the time of service of this notice of default and foreclosure sale, or all amounts due under the mortgage agreement are tendered to the Foreclosure Commissioner, in the form of a certified cashier’s check payable to the Secretary of HUD, before the public auction of the property is completed.

The amount that must be paid if the mortgage is to be reinstated prior to the scheduled sale is $237,165.86 as of March 30, 2018, plus all other amounts that would be due under the mortgage agreement if payments under the deed of trust had not been accelerated, advertising costs and postage expenses incurred in giving notice, mileage by the most reasonable road distance for posting notices and for the Foreclosure Commissioner’s attendance at the sale, reasonable and customary costs incurred for title and lien record searches, the necessary out of pocket costs incurred by the Foreclosure Commissioner, and all other costs incurred in connection with the foreclosure prior to reinstatement.

Tender of payment by certified or cashier’s check or application for cancellation of the foreclosure sale shall be submitted to the address of the Foreclosure Commissioner provided below. Dated: April 25, 2018 Foreclosure Commissioner Deanne R. Stodden 1430 Wynkoop Street, Suite 300 Denver, CO 80202 Telephone: (303) 623-1800 Email: dstodden@messner.com Legal Notice No.: 8492 First Publication: May 3, 2018 Last Publication: May 17, 2018 Publisher: The Denver Herald-Dispatch

We are community.

Your Community Connector to Boundless Rewards

Denver Herald * 1

Denver Herald Dispatch 0517  
Denver Herald Dispatch 0517