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Tri-Lakes

Tribune

Tri-Lakes Region, Monument, Gleneagle, Black Forest and Northern El Paso County • Volume 9, Issue 43

October 24, 2012

Free

A Colorado Community Media Publication

ourtrilakesnews.com

Trustee position open

Trustee resigns, new board member to be appointed in November By Lisa Collacott

lcollacott@ourcoloradonews.com

On the edge of Halloween, there are several safe events going on in the Tri-Lakes area for the little ones to trick-or-treat and fill those pumpkins and pillow cases with candy. Photos by Rob Carrigan

Spooky fun for the ghouls, goblins A list of Halloween activities in the Tri-Lakes area By Lisa Collacott

lcollacott@ourcoloradonews.com

L

ittle ghosts, superheroes and princesses will be hitting the streets on Halloween, some a few nights before, in search of all sorts of goodies. There are several safe events going on in the Tri-Lakes area for the little ones to trick-or-treat and fill those pumpkins and pillow cases with candy. Adults shouldn’t feel left out of the fun. They may be too old to go trick-ortreating but there are activities for them as well. Here is a complete list of events.

Safe Trick-or-Treat Once again the Historic Monument Merchants Association will be hosting the Safe Trick-or-Treat in downtown Monument on Oct. 31. From 4:00-6:00 p.m. kids can follow the Pumpkin Patch Trail that will lead them to merchants who will be passing out candy. As kids make their way through downtown in their costumes the Monument Police Department will be patrolling the streets.

Tri-Lakes YMCA On Oct. 26 the Tri-Lakes YMCA will host a trunk-or-treat in the parking lot. From 6:00-8:00 p.m. kids can fill their candy bags as they go from car to car. The YMCA will also offer an opportunity to learn the ”Thriller” dance from

5:30-7:00 p.m. and there will be a showing of ”It’s the Great Pumpkin Charlie Brown.” And what event wouldn’t be complete without a haunted house. The event is free and open to the public.

Creepy Crawl 5K The Tri-Lakes YMCA is also hosting it’s annual Creepy Crawl. At 9:00 a.m. on Oct. 27 runners and walkers will take to the Santa Fe Trail in Palmer Lake to particpate in the 5K. Registration is $23 and proceeds go to the YMCA’s Community Support Campaign. Runners and walkers are encouraged to wear costumes as long as they can see and they aren’t too long to trip over. Prizes will be given for the best costumes. To register go to www.ppymca.org. Also that morning there will be a One Mile Kids Run on the Santa Fe Trail beginning at 10:00 a.m. Participation in the kids run is free but registration is required.

Halloween Spooktacular Pinz Bowling Center will host a Halloween Spooktacular starting at 8:00 p.m. Oct. 27. The night’ activities will include a concert on the lanes, a midnight costume contest, drink specials for those 21 and over, games, prizes and a Shock Top pumpkin carving competition. The night’s event is for anyone 16-years and up. Tickets are $10 after Oct. 20. VIP tick-

ets are available for $25 and includes a pig roast and a reserved table. Tickets are limited and available at www.pinzbowling.com.

Trick-or-Treat Street The senior class at Discovery Canyon Campus on Northgate Boulevard will host a safe Halloween event open to the community from 5:30-8:30 Oct. 27 in the commons. There will be plenty of candy, a carnival and a haunted theater. The event is free but donations will be accepted. Proceeds to benefit the senior class.

Palmer Lake Volunteer Fire Department Members of the fire department will pass out candy in front of the fire station from 4:30 until dark on Oct. 31. They will be out on the streets with their fire trucks to make sure the kids stay safe.

Fall Festival 2012 The La Foret Conference and Retreat Center in Black Forest will once again host a fall festival. From 5:00-8:00 p.m. kids can trickor-treat, play games and talk a walk on the haunted trail. The event is free to the public. Food and hay rides are available for a small charge.

More candy The Tribune and Take Charge Physical Therapy will keep their doors open late to pass out candy to kids in the community. Candy will be handed out from 4:006:00 p.m. Oct. 31 at 325 Second Street, suites O and R.

The Monument board of trustees has a vacancy. Trustee Rick Squires has submitted his resignation. During the Oct. 15 board meeting Mayor Travis Easton said he had received Squires letter of resignation. Squires resigned because of his commitment to other obligations and felt that the board of trustees could be more effective if he resigned. Squires was serving his second term which was due to end in 2014. Anyone interested in applying for the vacant board position can go online to www.townofmonument.net. Applications can also be obtained at town hall located at 645 Beacon Lite Road. Applications and resumes must be turned into town hall by Oct. 26. The new board member will be appointed at the Nov. 5 board of trustees meeting.

Superintendent’s contract renewed Board approves contract for another school year By Lisa Collacott

lcollacott@ourcoloradonews.com

The Lewis-Palmer School District 38 board of education approved the superintendent’s contract for another year. Superintendent John Borman’s contract for the 2013-2014 school year was approved unanimously at the Oct. Borman 18 board meeting. “John has done a phenomenal job last year and going into this year,” D-38 school board Vice-President Mark Pfoff said. John Magerko the newest member to the school board said he had the highest regard for Borman. “We’ve had some challenging times in the district and I just know that a year ago we made a really smart choice,” President Jeff Ferguson added. Borman was named superintendent by the school board in February of 2011. He was given a two year contract effective July 1, 2011.

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2 The Tribune

October 24, 2012

Ballots mailed for general election Special to The Tribune The first wave of mail-in ballots for the 2012 Presidential Election was mailed Oct. 15 by the El Paso County Clerk & Recorder’s Election Department. Ballots were mailed to the 202,948 voters of El Paso County who requested a mail-in ballot. This is a 35 percent increase from four years ago when the county mailed just over 151,000 mail-in ballots for the entire election time period.

It is not too late to apply for a mail-in ballot if a voter still wishes to request one. The deadline to apply is Oct. 30. Voters can sign up for a mail-in ballot by one of three options. To update voter registration or request a mail-in ballot go online to www.GoVoteColorado.com. Visit any of the four Clerk & Recorder’s Office locations. The main office is located at the Citizens Service Center at 1675 West Garden of the Gods Road, Suite 2202. The North Branch is located at 8830

New 24-hour ballot drop box Special to The Tribune The El Paso County Clerk & Recorder has installed a new 24-hour ballot drop box at its Citizens Service Center Main Office. This ballot drop box is the first of its kind in El Paso County. Now voters can simply drive through and drop off the ballot without ever getting out of their car. The ballot drop box is open 24 hours a day, seven days a week. “I am excited to provide voters another way to quickly and easily drop off their ballot. This ballot drop box is a way for voters to ensure that we receive their ballot during the hours

North Union Boulevard at Research Parkway and Union Boulevard. Centennial Hall is located in downtown Colorado Springs at 200 South Cascade in the lower level and the Southeast Branch is at 5650 Industrial Place at Powers Boulevard and Airport Road. All offices are open 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. Mon. - Fri. The North Branch Office is also open 8:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m. on Saturday. The Colorado voter registration form or mail-in ballot applications can be downloaded from the website and sub-

mitted to the Clerk & Recorder’s Office by mail, fax, scan or by email. The fax number is 719-520-7327 and the email is elections@elpasoco.com. If mailing send to Election Department at P.O. Box 2007 Colorado Springs, CO 80901 Voters should see their ballot in their mailbox within a few days. If a voter does not receive a ballot and believes they should be on the mail-in ballot list they may verify their voter record at www.GoVoteColorado.com or contact the Clerk’s Election Department at 719-575-VOTE (8683).

County offers video on how to mark a ballot

that work for them,” EPC Clerk and Recorder Wayne Williams said in a statement. Allowing for a 24-hour unmanned ballot drop-off location was provided due to a change in the Colorado Secretary of State rules that now allow for external unmanned drop-off locations as long as they are secured according to the guidance provided by the Secretary of State Rules and under 24-hour video surveillance. The ballot drop-off is located in the front roundabout of the Citizens Service Center Office at 1675 West Garden of the Gods Road. There are directional signs to help voters locate the ballot drop box.

Special to The Tribune In an effort to ensure that every voter’s ballot is cast with the intent of the voter, the El Paso County Clerk and Recorder’s Office would like to encourage citizens to watch the video “How to Mark a Ballot”. This video was created to

show voters how to correctly mark their ballot. Many of the common errors that are seen in the counting process are highlighted in the video. The Clerk and Recorder’s Office encourages all citizens to take a moment and watch this helpful short video. In the last general election the Clerk and Recorder’s Office had to duplicate over 6,000

ballots before they were able to be cast. They have mailed over 203,000 mail-in ballots and felt it was important that they help voters mark their ballot correctly. The video is available on YouTube at http://youtu.be/ UwtsJZ4G-vQ. The county’s YouTubeChannel is www.youtube.com/ clerkepc.

INSIDE THE TRIBUNE THIS WEEK Food Play: D-38 elementary students get lesson in nutrition through a theatrical performance. Page 4

Sports: Discovery Canyon catches first victory at state. Page 10

Bomb Squad. One high school forensics class learned what it’s like to be a part of the bomb squad. Page 16

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The Tribune 3

October 24, 2012

PPACG launches website for seniors

Senior citizens now have a place to go d f for information t

y

1By Lisa Collacott rlcollacott@ourcoloradonews.com

d n More senior citizens are turning to-wards the Internet seeking information rabout medical treatments, products, sertvices and other important information. Baby boomers are accessing the web for this type of information. According to research from the PEW Internet and American Life Project nearly half of seniors go online. As of April 2012 adults 65 and over are using the Internet or sending email. The Pikes Peak Area of Council of Governments was hearing feedback from seniors that they were having trouble finding reliable information on the Internet. This was of concern to the PPACG so they decided to do something about that. On Oct. 17 they launched a model program called the Network of Care for Seniors and Adults with Disabilities. Colorado is one of four states to pilot this program. The Network of Care website gives seniors access to local services for Alzheimer’s, caregiver support, housing and transportation. They can find articles in the healthcare library; obtain Rx assistance, find support groups and have access to a database of more than 21,000 products. Seniors can even store important information in the personal health record folders. The user can even change the language on the website. “They’ve made every attempt to make it as easy as possible,” Guy Dutra-Silveira, director of PPACG’s aging program, said. “It’s user friendly.”

A senior citizen maneuvers the Internet to search for information. The PPACG has launched the Network of Care for Seniors and Adults with Disabilities website so that they have a reliable place to go for information. Courtesy photo Dallas Jamison, senior policy and communications advisor for PPACG, said the web can be overwhelming to seniors but the information that Network Care provides is credible and customized to the Pikes Peak Region. The information is regularly verified. PPACG hosted a launch party for the website on Oct. 17 with a complete

Suspicious incident in Gleneagle Individuals beating on front door at 2 a.m. By Lisa Collacott

lcollacott@ourcoloradonews.com The El Paso County Sheriff’s Office received a report of a suspicious incident that occurred in the early morning hours of Oct. 14. A Gleneagle resident, in the 200 block of Sedona Drive, called the sheriff’s office shortly after 2:00 a.m. to report that his neighbor, a woman, had called him and said there were two males banging on her front door. The man turned on his front lights and the two males proceed to hide on the side of the house. The woman called her neighbor back and told him the two males were walking towards his house. The man saw them walking down the street, shone his flashlight on them and they took off running. Lt. Jeff Kramer, spokesperson for EPSO, said units were dispatched to the area and deputies searched the area but could not find the two individuals. The woman described the men as skinny, 5 foot 10 inches tall and they were both wearing hooded jackets that covered their head and faces. Kramer said anytime an incident like this occurs people should not answer their doors. He said it is best to call the sheriff’s office immediately at 719-390-5555 or they should call 9-1-1 if someone is trying to break in. He said dispatch will keep the caller on the phone to give instructions. Kramer said the sheriff’s office is not seeing a rash of these types of incidents in the Gleneagle area recently.

OCT. 31

hands-on demonstration. Jamison several seniors were in attendance. “We’ve gotten such great feedback from people,” Jamison said. “It’s truly an amazing service,” DutraSilveira added. Dutra-Silveira is hoping the website is a success with local seniors. Boulder went live with the website

three years ago and Denver started in one year ago. Boulder receives approximately four million hits a quarter on their Network of Care site. To access the website go to http://pikespeak.co.networkofcare. org/aging/

THINGS TO DO

RECIPE CONTEST. The Villa Palmer Lake announces its first Italian cuisine recipe contest. If you have an Italian recipe that includes fall vegetables, incorporates the idea of fall harvest or is simply the best Italian comfort food you can think of, then this recipe contest is made to order. Recipes must be submitted by Oct. 31. All entrants should include their full name, e-mail address, telephone contact information (day and evening) and mailing address as a part of their entry. A photo of each submitted recipe is welcome, although not required. Recipe entries should be submitted to kerri@thevillapalmerlake.com.  If entrants do not have access to the Internet, they can print their recipe along with their personal information and mail to: The Villa Palmer Lake, PO Box 163, Palmer Lake, CO 80133. Mail-in entries must be postmarked by Oct. 25, and received by Oct. 31 to be considered. Multiple winners may be selected depending on the number and variety of recipes entered. Visit http://www.thevillapalmerlake.com/about/recipecontest for details.  NOV. 1 CRAFT SHOW. The 48th annual Black Forest Arts & Crafts Guild Fall Show & Sale is from 9 a.m. to 8 p.m. Nov. 1-3 and from 10 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. Nov. 4 at the Black Forest Community Center. More than 80 artisan and culinary members will sell handmade Christmas ornaments, decorations, jewelry, ceramics, soaps and candles, baby items, jams and jellies, baked goods and much more. Admission is free. Only guild members are allowed to sell. A portion of all sale proceeds will benefit the Black Forest Arts & Crafts Guild Scholarship Fund and the Black Forest community. Due to fire regulations, no strollers are allowed. The facility is wheel chair accessible. Visit our website for information at www.BFACG.org. NOV. 1-30 DRIVER SAFETY. AARP is offering a free drivers safety classroom course from Nov. 1-30 to veterans. The class is open to all veterans regardless of age who serve or have served in the U.S. Army, Navy, Air Force, Marines, National Guard/Reserves or Coast Guard. Their spouses, widows/ widowers and children may also take the free class. The AARP driver safety course is the nation’s first and largest course for drivers ages 50 and older. Classes are available all over Colorado. To register, call 303-764-5995 or go online at www.aarp.org/drive.

NOV. 15-17

MUSICAL. LEWIS-PALMER High School presents “Legally Blonde the Musical” at 7 p.m. Nov. 15-17 and 2 p.m. Nov. 17 at 1300 Higby Road, Monument. Tickets are on sale at www.ShowTix4U.com beginning Nov. 5. Cost is $10 adults, $6 students and senior citizens. Contact Karen Kennedy at 719-488-4720. OCT. 27 WITCHY WHISKERS. Happy Cats Haven and students from Paul Mitchell School in Colorado Springs are partnering for Witchy Whiskers, an event from 3-8 p.m. Oct. 27 to help with Halloween makeup. A limited number of sessions are available; makeup will be done by appointment only. Call 719-635-5000. Proceeds will benefit Happy Cats Haven. Visit http://www.happycatshaven.org to learn more. NOV. 4 ANNIVERSARY CELEBRATION. Happy Cats Haven celebrates its one-year anniversary from 2-5 p.m. Nov. 4 at Old Colorado City History Center, 1 S. 24th St. Admission is free, but donations are accepted. RSVP at 719-635-5000. Visit http://www.happycatshaven.org. NOV. 7 MEDICAL MARIJUANA discussion. Non-Practicing and Part-Time Nurses’ Association present “Medical and Legal Aspects of Medical Marijuana” from 6:30-9 p.m. Nov. 7 at Immanuel Lutheran Church, 846 E. Pikes Peak Ave., across from the old St. Francis Hospital, Colorado Springs. The speakers will be Jim VanDiest and Susan VanDiest, RN.    NOV. 8 CHILEAN MINERS’ Rescue. In August 2010, a gold and copper mine in Chile collapsed, trapping 33 miners 2,300 feet underground for 69 days. A team of experts from NASA and the Chilean Navy designed and built capsules (also called pods) that were 1.7 feet wide and 12.7 feet tall and named them Fenix (or Phoenix). One pod was lowered into a borehole to extract the miners. This pod became the iconic symbol of this daring and successful rescue mission. After a world tour, the original rescue pod was reproduced for permanent international display, and in 2012, the Chilean Tourist Board selected the Western Museum of Mining & Industry to receive and exhibit this impressive, full scale replica weighing 1,800 pounds. At 6 p.m. Nov. 8, the museum will commemorate this addition to our

collection of historically significant mining equipment with an exhibit opening celebration. Whether you followed the story in the news or are an avid mining and engineering fan, come to see this amazing mine rescue device and learn more about the dramatic Chilean mine rescue story that had the whole world holding its breath. Following the opening, stay for the Heritage Lecture on Historic Cold War Uranium Production and its Health Effects on Workers with guest speaker Ron Elmlinger. Our space is limited for this free community event, so please reserve your spot today by calling 719-488-0880, or by email at rsvp@wmmi.org.  COLD WAR lecture. During the Cold War period of our nation’s history, an arsenal of nuclear weapons and atomic fuel was produced. Many workers, who believed they were patriots contributing to this national security effort as uranium miners, became ill due to exposure to radiation and toxins. During this time Ron Elmlinger, RN/MS, served in the United States Navy for 23 years advancing from electronics technician, to engineer, and then strategic nuclear weapons officer on submarines. After retirement, he finished his studies to become a registered nurse and specialized in providing medical care to cold war workers. In 2008, Ron founded the nonprofit Cold War Patriots, organization that assists all energy employees who have become ill from working near radiologic and toxic substances. As part of the Western Museum of Mining & Industry’s continuing Heritage Lecture Series, at 6:30 p.m. Nov. 8, Ron will review this history, the illnesses it caused,  and what his organization does to help workers from this Cold War period. Join us for this important educational presentation. Call 719-488-0880 or email us at RSVP@wmmi.org to secure your spot. NOV. 24 GOLD ASSAY Process. Gold does not come out of the ground ready to wear. Join us at the Western Museum of Mining & Industry at 10 a.m. and 1 p.m. Nov. 24 to discover how ore is processed to extract gold. Hands-on learners of all ages will crush and classify ore as they learn the basics of gold ore assaying, determining the value of gold in the rock. This fast moving, interactive assay demonstration will overview the math, mechanics and chemistry of this exciting process along with modern day techniques. Customary admission applies ($8 adults, $7 AAA/military, $6 seniors/students, $4 children 3-12), and reservations are requested. Call 719-488-0880 or email RSVP@wmmi.org.


4 The Tribune

October 24, 2012

The coach, pictured right, shows Johnny, left, and the students at Bear Creek Elementary School the first ingredient on a label of a soft drink. During the production of FoodPlay students are encouraged to eat healthier, exercise and read food labels. Photo by Lisa Collacott

D-38 students juggle healthy eating Play encourages eating healthier and taking part in exercise By Lisa Collacott

l c o l l a c o t t @ o u rc o l o radonews.com Lewis-Palmer School District 38 students re-

cently got a lesson in juggling food by balancing their diets and eating healthier. FoodPlay, a live nutrition theater show, recently paid a visit to Bear

Creek and Palmer Lake Elementary Schools to teach the students about eating a balanced diet of fresh fruits and vegetables, whole grains, protein and milk instead of foods that contain a lot of sugar, salt and that are processed. The one hour interactive play features Johnny,

an aspiring juggler, and his coach from the National Junior Juggling Team. Johnny likes to eat junk food but with the help of his coach he learns how to eat a good diet and regularly exercise to stay healthy The juggling coach told the students at Bear Creek that they need to eat `Go’ foods such as fruits and vegetables to keep their

bodies healthy not `Whoa’ foods that are processed, filled with sugar and salt. She also reminded them to eat breakfast, lunch and dinner. When the coach encourages Johnny to drink 100 percent juice, milk or water instead of the soda that he prefers to drink she tells the students, “Did you know the average kid drinks 600 cans of soda a year?”

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During the play the coach encouraged students to read the labels before they eat or drink anything and to watch out for sneaky sugars like high fructose corn syrup. During the performance the actors got the students on their feet and got them dancing. Katie Dubois, nutrition services supervisor, hopes the play will encourage the students to eat better and make healthy choices. “I hope this will help them to eat more from the offering bar,” Dubois said. The schools in the district 38 have an offering bar filled with vegetables, fruits and beans that students can choose from. FoodPlay was founded in 1982 by nutritionist Barbara Storper. Based in Massachusetts the FoodPlay production travels across the country and has reached four million children. They have received numerous national awards including an Emmy award. According to a USDA sponsored evaluation approximately 75 percent of students who have seen the play have increased eating fruits and vegetables, eat breakfast regularly, cut back on soda and sweets and have become physically active. For more information on the production, free snack recipes and tips visit http://www.foodplay. com/.


The Tribune 5

October 24, 2012

Monument’s first police officer retires

Kevin Swenson dedicated 34 years to the department

By Lisa Collacott

lcollacott@ourcoloradonews.com

He may be saying good-bye to the job but not to the town he’s served for more than three decades. For 34 years Kevin Swenson has patrolled the streets of Monument. In fact he was the very first police officer hired by the Monument Police Department. But due to some serious health problems Swenson made the choice to turn in his badge. “I miss it already,” Swenson said. Swenson’s troubles began last December 14 when he went into the hospital with a ruptured gallbladder. Complications arose and he soon became septic and then three pancreatic pseudocysts formed on top of that. He had to have surgery to remove the cysts but because of them Swenson has developed diabetes. He doesn’t remember a lot of his stay in the hospital because he was in an induced coma. “They had to resuscitate him twice during surgery,” Swenson’s wife Claudia said. Claudia Swenson said there were times their family didn’t think he was going to make it but he pulled through and was able to leave the hospital June 23. Now almost a year after it all began Swenson is still trying to heal and learn to live with diabetes. He is anxious to get back to working on boat motors and ride his Harley Davidson, two of his hobbies. In an interview he reflected on his years with the Monument Police Department. The town was much smaller back when Swenson started with the departe ment in January of 1978. Swenson was working as an emergency medical techs nician in Colorado Springs. He rememk bers being called out to accident scenes h and thought there might have been something more preventive he could have done so he made the decision to -

Monument Police Chief Jake Shirk, right, reads a letter in honor of Kevin Swenson. Swenson is retiring from the department after 34 years. Photos by Lisa Collacott become a police officer. The towns of Monument and Palmer Lake at that time were combined as the Tri-Lakes Police but were in the process of becoming their own departments. Swenson tested with Monument, Colorado Springs Police Department and the El Paso County Sheriff’s Office and was quickly hired with Monument. He was badge number one and worked under former Police Chief Al Karn. “That first year I made $500 a month,” Swenson added. Well liked, well respected Everyone knew Swenson and he made it a point to get to know everyone. He was well respected by the citizens of Monument. Claudia Swenson said he had a big influence on a lot of young people. Swenson recalls the time when a teen barricaded himself in his home and the only officer he would talk to was Swenson. With tears in his eyes Swenson said that very same teen looked him up 10 years later and had gotten married and had a brand new baby who he wanted Swenson to meet. He knew he had made a difference in the teen’s life. “He was always a hands-on police of-

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Kevin Swenson, pictured with his wife Claudia, is retiring after 34 years with the Monument Police Department. He

s was the first officer hired by the department. Health issues had him hospitalized for more than six months. y THE TRIBUNE

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ficer,” Claudia Swenson said, adding that people have come up to her to say that her husband saved their lives or the lives of their loved ones. “When we had a benefit for him in February people came up and said he taught (their) kids how to swim,” Claudia Swenson said. Swenson had served in the United States Air Force during the Vietnam War. It was the Air Force that brought him to Colorado from California. He was sta-

tioned at the United States Air Force Academy where he taught swim lessons after work. He was also a lifeguard at Monument Lake back when the lake had a small campground. Now Swenson is starting a new chapter in his life. His four-year-old grandson is very happy to have his grandpa home and the two of them are working on putting a model train together. During the Oct. 15 Monument board of trustees meeting Swenson was honored for his years of service. He received a shadow box containing his badge, patch and other items as a gift. As he fought back tears Shirk said Swenson always had a kind word to say. “He has been a great friend to all and well like by the citizens he has so selflessly served. Kevin’s dedication to the police department was unwavering and he could always be counted on to serve in whatever capacity he was asked to fill. Officer Kevin Swenson has a kind heart and would be willing to give the shirt off his back to help someone in need,” Shirk said. Swenson said he has seen a lot of changes over the years including switching from revolvers to automatic weapons, using a stop watch to catch speeders before they had radar detectors and using pen and paper before the police cruisers were equipped with computers. “There’s a lot of old stuff I saw and a lot of new stuff came in and the town’s better for it. I’m glad I worked here for the past 34 years,” Swenson said.


6 The Tribune

October 24, 2012

OPINIONS / YOURS AND OURS

Maggie, other ghosts in the building F

For years, Oscar Lampman took care of the dead in Cripple Creek. And it is a wonder more ghost don’t hover around 300 E. Bennett, the one-time base of operation of the basement undertaker. Legend says it was here, in his funeral parlor, where Pearl DeVere’s sister, coming to collect Pearl’s body, noted the dyed auburn hair and found out her sister was no dressmaker but, instead, employed as madame at the Old Homestead brothel. The high-minded sister turned tail and caught the first train back East. “Cripple Creek can bury its own dead,” editorialized The Cripple Creek Times then. Indeed, and let he [or she] who is without sin, cast the first stone. It was here that gold mining magnate Sam Strong’s body lay, with much of his hard head blown away from a shotgun blast. Countless other bodies, their owners whom suffered the violent deaths of violent times, underwent embalming in the lower level of the building. Also for years, the Manhattan Barber Shop, with eight porcelain tubs for baths, occupied the first floor, and you would think some of the hanger-on, hang-around crowd would hang at such a popular place - even in an afterlife. But oddly enough, a comforting ghost apparently haunts the premises of the old Fairley Bros. &; Lampman Building. A lilted voice, singing high in the scales and steeped in the accent of the Emerald Isle, a faint wisp of rose-scented perfume, the clackety-clack of old manu-

al typewriter, are offered as evidence of the presence of “Maggie.” Stories of Maggie have swirled at least since the 1960s. Noted Western artist Charles Frizzell, who ran an art gallery in the building then, and Katherine Hartz, who had the Sarsaparilla Saloon in the building beginning in 1968 and eventually purchased it, both related stories for Chas S. Clifton’s 1983 book, “Ghost Tales of Cripple Creek.” “That was during the good old hippie days and a lot of people coming through town would be looking for a place to ‘crash’ for the night,” Frizzell is quoted in Clifton’s book. But when the Frizzell’s allowed visitors to stay in unused portions of the upper two floors, ghostly commotion centered in what used to be a ballroom on the third floor usually quickly drove away “crashers” before a second night. “At times, Frizzell says, mysterious blue lights danced down to the second floor, the living quarters. He and his wife tried to stop them by shutting the twin doors on the staircase, but someone else seemed to want that door open,” wrote

Clifton. He quotes Frizzell: “We would tie them shut with a twisted coat hanger because we could not lock them. We could go downstairs in the gallery and know there was no one upstairs, but we’d come back and find the hangers untied and the doors open.” Hartz had an even more finite visit from Maggie. Also from Clifton’s book quoting Katherine Hartz: “I was walking down the hall on the second floor. As I walked I heard sounds like someone was upstairs with high heels on, walking above me. I realized that in order to do so, whoever it was had to be walking through the walls upstairs.” According to the account, when she investigated, she encountered a woman in her late 20s or early 30s, tall, goodlooking brunette, with her hair in a “Gibson Girl” roll, wearing a white shirtwaist, ankle-length dark brown print skirt and high-heeled boots. Later, in the 1970s, having trouble with small unexpected electric bills and reports form police and nearby shop owners of late night lighting of the upstairs rooms, the Hartz expected to find evidence of squatters but found instead, the building locked and undisturbed with electricity turned off at the fuse box. But even after the advent of gaming and the building’s conversion to Colorado Grande Casino, the sightings have continued. “Some have reported that singing and

Some like it hot, really hot I just returned from a weekend soaking in one of the many hot springs that are located around the state of Colorado. Colorado is home to many hot springs and it’s the perfect way to enjoy a little stay-cation, even if it’s only for the weekend. Hot springs pools can be found all over the world but it’s nice when they are just a few hours away. My husband and I bid on a gift certificate for a one night stay at a resort in Pagosa Springs during a silent auction. It was definitely worth it. We had access to 23 soaking pools 24 hours a day. The only regret we had was not reserving an extra night. Summer is now gone so there’s no more camping and rafting trips, trips to the amusement parks or picnics in

the mountains. Soon fall will give away to winter and it will be ski and snowboard season so what else is there to do but visit a hot springs. One can find hot springs all over the state. People frequent Glenwood Springs, Buena Vista, Nathrop, Ouray, Steamboat Springs and Penrose to soak. I just wish there was one in the Tri-Lakes area. Palmer Lake and Monument would be the perfect

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place for hot springs but if there hasn’t been one found now I doubt there will ever be. The Native Americans most likely would have discovered them. Palmer Lake has ice caves so having a hot springs would be the perfect touch. And just think of the tourists that it would bring to the area. People soak in a hot springs for the therapeutic benefits they receive from the minerals in the water. Some of the benefits it is supposed to provide can include relieving symptoms of arthritis, normalizing heart rhythms, reducing high blood pressure, eliminating body toxins, boosting the immune system, preventing fatigue, and promoting wound healing and increasing resistance to stress and disease. People have boasted of the miraculous benefits of the water. However, long exposure to the waters can cause dizziness, nausea and fainting. The water in a hot springs pool comes from geothermal groundwater from the earth’s crust. Temperatures can vary but are usually above 98 degrees Fahrenheit. The pool we soaked in was 103 degrees Fahrenheit. That seems really hot and it is but when the temperature outside was not quite 40 degrees it felt really good. One pool was 110 degrees. Too hot for me but some people were soaking in it. Hot springs near volcanic areas tend to be near the boiling point and aren’t safe to get in. Most of the hot springs in the United States are found west of Kansas although there are a few in Arkansas, Georgia, Florida, Illinois, New York, North Carolina, Virginia and Texas. So the next time you want to plan a weekend get-a-way with the family or just a romantic weekend for two consider visiting the hot springs resorts in the state.

dancing is sometimes heard emanating from the old ballroom, as well as the sounds of Maggie’s lilting soprano voice heard singing an Irish accented concerti-w na,” reports “Legends of America News- b letter” owner and editor Kathy Weiser. P “At the casino, security guards have often reported seeing s Maggie along with a gentleman friend f playing the slot machines after hours. She has also been caught on tape by the a security cameras. However, after being viewed and stowed away, the tapes mysa teriously vanished,” reports Weiser. Today, a café named in honor of Mag- W gie resides in the building along with the s casino. Over the many years, tenants in the a building in addition to those previously mentioned - included The Central Drug O Store on the northwest corner of the first floor. The upstairs on the second o floor was occupied mostly by professionb als with five attorneys and four doctors leasing space in 1902 and 1903. b “On the third floor, B.P.O.E. 316 - a very influential organization in the city t - had their meeting hall [the location of the ballroom]. The Elks were pleased to d lease this space, but they were looking b for a permanent home. r They found this in 1911 when the Elks purchased The Gold Mining Exchange Building,” according to “Cripple Creek: City of Influence,” a 1994 book by Brian Levine. Perhaps Maggie, and other ghostly friends never noticed the party had relocated.

Collecting everything Anyone who has visited me at my Pikes Peak Courier View office knows that I collect bumper stickers; I haven’t worked out of The Tribune office in Monument long enough to have much of a collection there, yet. Actually, I collect a lot of things. In fact, my sister tells people she collects cookie jars and Depression Glass and I collect everything else. That’s a bit of an exaggeration but certainly not too far off the mark. Anyway the door to my office was pasted with 11 year’s worth of bumper stickers, everything from an “Adopt a Bat” sticker from Carlsbad Caverns (or as my son Carl says “Carl’s-not-bad Caverns”) to two different “Divide, Colorado: Center of the Known Universe” stickers. At last count, there were 58 stickers of all sizes and shapes on that glass door, providing a bit of privacy during closed-door interviews and topics of conversation for visitors. Soon, however, we will be moving our offices into new digs upstairs in the same building and I had a dilemma. Do I scrape all those stickers off, discard them and move on? Do I put them in a scrap book or turn them into a collage? Do I ask to keep the door or offer to buy it and hang it somewhere as art? I went with scraping them off and moving on. You’ll likely see most of them next summer at a yard sale near you. Of course, I’m not getting rid of all them. There are a few favorites that I will keep, such as my J.R.R. Tolkien quote: “Not all who wander are lost.” I love the irony because unless you’re the

heir of Elendil and the future King of Gondor, chances are if you’re wandering, you’re lost. One thing, though, you won’t see them on my car. One might ask why I collect bumper stickers or anything else for that matter. Good question; I’ll try to come up with an answer. Coin and comics collector Jim Halperin lists 10 reasons in his article, “Why Do We Collect Things?” He list includes knowledge and learning, relaxation and stress reduction, social interaction with fellow collectors and others, recognition by same; the desire to control, possess and bring order to a small (or even a massive) part of the world; nostalgia and/or a connection to history and accumulation and diversification of wealth. Of his 10 items only one or possibly two fit me: personal pleasure and, maybe, nostalgia. As for the other reasons, I don’t know anyone in the collecting world that I care to have recognize me and one must have wealth to accumulate it, n’est-ce pas? (I don’t speak French, I just like writing that.) Whatever the reason I collect things, I’m in good company. Like Jane Seymore, I also collect teapots (she probably has a lot more than my measly 60 or so) and like Tom Hanks, who collects old typewriters, I collect antique office gadgets. At least (mostly) I don’t keep either of these collections at work.


The Tribune 7

October 24, 2012

Finishing up the M&PP’s first year

During the summer of 1890, the weather in Manitou was extremely hot, but the work on the Manitou & Pike’s Peak Railway was quite pleasant. A month later the weather turned, a snow storm found the workers a mile from the summit. The upper work crews broke camp and scattered. A group of visiting railway passenger agents was treated to a trip up as far as Windy Point. The view, above the clouds, with snow on the ground raised considerable enthusiasm among the group. The rails reached the summit on Oct. 26. A month later, after finishing work on the line, the last construction crews broke camp. It was decided to wait for spring before attempting to get passengers to the summit. During the winter, some work was done at Manitou and in the canyon, but it was not until April that work resumed, seriously. A single train went up with workers

to start clearing the track of snow. A special train with H.S. Cable, superintendent of the line, and friends went up as far as Windy Point, where snow still blocked the line. In late May a train load of planks were taken up to be placed on the ties along the center rails. A week later a single train a day was planned to start taking passengers to Half Way House, which opened at that time. The track to the summit was still buried in snow, but crews hiked to the top in preparation for the arrival of the first train. The weather station needed work to make it ready for visitors. It had not been used in quite a while, but was in reasonably good

condition. It was decided to keep the formal opening of the line as casual as possible, with perhaps a more formal dedication train later. The train thought to be the first up to the summit had to stop near Windy Point. Soon several times a day trains were taking passengers to the summit. The schedule required a bit of adjusting to the demands of the mountain as well as customers. A mid-day train was proving to be quite unpopular, as it did not provide enough time for leisurely passengers! The four hour trip worked best in the morning, but not every potential passenger could get on the train. The hotels in Manitou were quite happy to see the number of passengers who reserved rooms! The Iron Springs Hotel, just across the street from the station was the most convenient. Hotels the railway planned to construct were never built. The summit house was managed by Weir and Rupp.

Plans for adding rooms for visitors wishing to stay overnight were made. After three weeks of work, accommodations for fifteen people were finished. A lunch counter would be ready to offer short-order breakfasts and lunch. Suppers would be available for overnight guests. J.G. Hiestand would even have space to sell his Manitou and railway photographs. Water was brought up from a spring near Windy Point. Occasional problems happened, as crews worked to learn how to operate their equipment, Faults in the track occasionally were found, but the safety of the system was completely assured. Once the equipment was in operation, certain problems were found, and corrected. More locomotives were ordered of a slightly different design, and the first three would eventually see total rebuilds. By the first big snowfall at the end of 1891’s season, the railroad was in full operation, with a bright outlook for the next summer.

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8 The Tribune

October 24, 2012

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Stranger Danger- Colorado Springs Police need the public’s help in identifying the truck in the above picture. A man in a similar color truck approached a young boy as he walked through the parking lot. CSPD said the truck in the picture may or may not be the truck in question and would like to identify the owner. Photo by Courtesy photo

Man tries to lure boy in TCA parking lot A man in a truck asked a student to help him find his puppy By Lisa Collacott

lcollacott@ourcoloradonews.com A 9-year-old boy was approached by a man in the parking lot of The Classical Academy on Oct. 19 and now Colorado Springs Police are searching for the individual.

Police say that as the boy walked through the parking lot of the school, located at 975 Stout Road, a middle-aged man in a brownrusty truck, possibly a Ford, asked the boy if he could help him find his puppy. The boy walked away from the truck and continued on to where

his mother was waiting for him in the parking lot. The boy told his mother who took him home and called police. Police said the man never exited the truck or made physical contact with the boy. A truck similar in color was captured on the school’s security camera. Police said the truck in the picture may not be the same truck but would like the owner of the truck to contact them at 719-444-7000.

Artists with a mission comes to TLCA Missionaries with a gift in the arts will be in Palmer Lake for one night By Lisa Collacott

lcollacott@ourcoloradonews.com For the first time ever missionaries will share their stories through music, visual art and videos at the Tri-Lakes Center for the Arts. TLCA in collaboration with the Little Log Church in Palmer Lake and the Church at Woodmoor will co-sponsor Artists and Missions. For one night only the community can see the art work of Marianne Millar, photography by Jennifer Bullock and hear the sounds of Karen Lafferty. Artists and Missions is presented by Youth with a Mission Santa Fe along with Corazon de Dios de Honduras. Lafferty is a well-known Chris-

tian musician and is best known for composing the song “Seek Ye First.” It was during a tour of Europe that Lafferty felt a calling to use her music in the mission field. She eventually joined YWAM Holland and founded Musicians for Missions. She now directs YWAM Santa Fe. Millar has a passion for the visual arts and studied art training at the University of California, Davis. Over the years she has focused her paintings on Native Americans and Southwestern landscapes. Millar developed a love and passion to minister God’s love to the Native Americans. She joined YWAM in 2006 and went to Antigua, Guatemala where she ministered to children and the Mayan Indians. She eventually joined YWAM Santa Fe where she blends her artistic talent with ministry. Bullock is a full-time missionary in Honduras where she started

Corazon, a ministry that educates Hondurans in nutrition and hygiene. She felt called to missions as a young girl and received missions training from YWAM. Bullock’s photos and videos tell the stories of those she has ministered to over the years. “As we share our own journeys as full-time missionaries through music, visual art, videos and stories we seek to inspire vision for the use of various art forms in the life of the local church, foreign missions and outreach to the lost,” Lafferty said in a statement. Artists and Missions will take place at 7 p.m. Oct. 28 at TLCA. There is no charge however an offering will be taken that will benefit YWAM’s work in Honduras. TLCA executive director Dr. Michael Maddox said the center and churches are very excited to bring this program to the community.

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10 The Tribune

October 24, 2012

Tri-LakesSPORTS

OUT OF BOUNDS

BY THE NUMBERS The Palmer Ridge boys soccer team’s seed in the upcoming Class 4A state playoffs. The Bears (13-1-1) host No. 32 Wheat Ridge (5-73) on Thursday in a firstround game.

1

The seed earned by The Classical Academy boys s o c c e r team’s seed in the 3A state playoffs. The Titans (14-1) host No. 32 Lake County (7-7) in a firstround game on Friday.

1

The number of sets the LewisPalmer volleyball team has lost since 6-foot-6 senior middle blocker Claire Felix became eligible on Sept. 27. The Rangers have won 21 of 22 sets in that span – seven consecutive matches.

1

Difference in the number of goals scored by the Palmer Ridge field hockey team this season versus the number of goals allowed. The Bears rank second in goals scored with 52; and third with only 12 goals allowed.

40

THEY SAID IT ““If you would have asked me at the beginning of the season, I didn’t think it would be possible for our girls to go to state. But they really came together and they’re running very well right now.” Discovery Canyon cross country coach Chris Miner

Thunder gets first victory Discovery Canyon knocks off Silver Creek in round one By Danny Summers

sports@ourcoloradonews.com The bar is now set even higher for the Discovery Canyon softball team. That’s because the Thunder won its first-ever state softball playoff game. The monumental victory came on Oct. 19 in the first-round of the Class 4A championship tournament at the Aurora Sports Complex. The 8th-seeded Thunder defeated No. 9 Silver Creek, 6-4, as it scored three runs in the first and two in the second to take control of the game. Discovery Canyon’s post-season run ended with a quarterfinals loss to No. 1 seed Pueblo East, 4-0. “We have nothing to hang our heads about,” said Discovery Canyon coach Tanya Ramsay. “We were run-ruled by Pueblo East early in the year. This is a great improvement for us.” Discovery Canyon (19-5) has advanced to the state tournament three of the last four seasons since becoming a varsity program. Not bad for a school that started its program just six years ago. “Our end of the year home is the Aurora Sports Complex,” Ramsay said with a smile. “I think this will become a tradition.” The Thunder came out roaring against Silver Creek, rapping five hits against right-hander McKenna Kostelecky. Discovery Canyon sophomore McKenzie Surface and sophomore Destiny lackey had RBI singles during the barrage. The Thunder added two more runs in the second inning RBI singles by Surface and senior Taryn Arcarese to build a 5-1 lead. Silver Creek made the game interesting in the top of the third when Kostelecky belted a two-run homer. Thunder senior right-hander Kacee Schroeder was lifted after walking the leadoff batter in the top of the fourth and replaced by Surface. Surface retired 12 of the next 13 Silver Creek hitters before allowing a pair of two-out hits in the seventh. Discovery Canyon scored its final run on an RBI single by Kaydee Valliere in the bottom of the sixth. “Silver Creek is a scrappy team; a comeback team,” Ramsay said. The Thunder had its hands full with Pueblo East junior right-hander Katie Orona, who entered the game with a 0.54 ERA. She allowed just three hits and walked none while striking out 10. Senior McKenzie Peters had a double for the Thunder, while seniors Shelby Hetzel and Shyloh Grover had back-to-back

Discovery Canyon’s McKenzie Peters makes an out Oct. 19 during the team’s victory against Silver Creek. Photo by Courtney Kuhlen | ckuhlen@ourcoloradonews.com

singles to begin the sixth, but were stranded when Orona set down the next three Thunder hitters. “(Orona) is one of the top pitchers in the state,” Ramsay said. Surface started and went the distance against Pueblo East. She struck out five and walked three while allowing nine hits. “McKenzie Surface hasn’t even come close to reaching her full potential,” Ramsay said. “She’s young. I’m excited to watch her the next two years. We’re glad to have her.” The Thunder won the Pikes Peak Athletic Conference this season after posting a 7-0 league record. But Ramsay loses six senior starters (seven in all) to graduation. “Every year you lose great players, but you try to develop good ones to come up behind them,” Ramsay said. “Our younger players had phenomenal role models.”

Bears season comes to end at state Palmer Ridge falls in first round to No. 2 Niwot By Danny Summers

sports@ourcoloradonews.com Palmer Ridge concluded its best season on the softball diamond with its first ever trip to the state playoffs. The Bears went 16-7 this season, including a second-place finish in the Class 4A Pikes Peak Athletic Conference. Their season ended on Oct. 19 with a firstround loss to No. 2 seed Niwot, 7-0, at the Aurora Sports Complex. “Us getting to state makes a statement,” said Palmer Ridge coach randy Gillette. “We have a quality program. The girls picked up a lot this year about what it takes to be a champion. They worked hard. We know what it takes to get to state and I think we’ll be heading back there again. “State is not the big mystery that you think it is. There are 16 good teams, and we’re one of them.” The Bears were the No. 15 seed and faced with the difficult task of facing Niwot senior right-hander Nicki Blue. Blue dominated bears hitters with a consistent 62 to 65 mph fastball that seemed to change direction at her calling. Blue struck out 14 and did not walk a batter while facing just one over the minimum. “She was brining it pretty good,” Gillette said of Blue. “We were trying to

just don’t ever see that down here.” Blue, who has committed to the University of South Carolina, averaged more than two strikeouts per inning this season, while allowing less than a walk a game. Her ERA entering the game against Palmer Ridge was a minuscule 0.29. The Bears’ only hit came off the bat of junior Libby Acker - a fifth-inning double with two strikes that split the gap in rightcenter field and rolled to the fence. Blue responded by retiring the final nine Bears batters. “Everybody else was kind of struggling at the plate,” Gillette said. “We were all trying to make adjustments to her speed.” Bears senior right-hander Katie Smith had the daunting task of trying to keep pace with Blue. Smith went the distance, allowing 10 hits, while striking out one and walking three. She allowed just two earned runs, however, as the Bears committed three errors behind her. “Smith did a phenomenal job for us,” Gillette said. “From an off-speed perspective she was tough for (Niwot) to deal with.” The future looks bright for the Bears. Smith is the only senior on the squad. A four-year starter, Smith was 7-3 this season and batted a solid .338 while splitting her time between pitcher and shortstop. “We’re going to miss her next year,” Gillette said. There are only three juniors among the Bears usual starting nine or 10 players - outfielder Acker (.413), first baseman

Palmer Ridge’s pitcher Katie Smith delivers a pitch during the Bears’ first-round game against Niwot at the Class 4A softball tournament. Photo by Photo by Jonathan Maness

er/outfielder/third baseman Taylor Klee (.441); five sophomores - second baseman/outfielder Jennifer Slaughter (.442), catcher/third baseman/outfielder Jennifer Tarwater (.408), shortstop/pitcher Madysen Kearns (9-4, .400), left-handed second baseman and leadoff hitter Ciara Richardson (.442), and outfielder Emma McGuire (.100); and one freshman - outfielder Julia Schroeder (.294).


The Tribune 11

October 24, 2012

Area will be well represented at state Locals could dominate cross country finals By Danny Summers

sports@ourcoloradonews.com COLORADO SPRINGS - The Tri-Lakes area will be represented in full force at this Saturday’s state cross country meet at Norris-Penrose Events Center. The four boys teams from The Classical Academy, Palmer Ridge, Lewis-Palmer and Discovery Canyon qualified for the 4A meet, which begins at 10:30 a.m. on the rugged course. Three of the four girls teams made it, with the exception of Lewis-Palmer. Race time for the girls is 12:30 p.m. “If you would have asked me at the beginning of the season, I didn’t think it would be possible for our girls to go to state,” said Discovery Canyon coach Chris Miner. “But they really came together and they’re running very well right now.” Both Thunder teams have advanced to state each of the last four years. All four area schools were at the Region 2 meet at Fountain-Fort Carson High School. The Classical Academy won the girls race with 37 points, followed by Air Academy (48), Palmer Ridge (71), Discovery Canyon (105) and Vista Ridge (129). The top five teams in each regional race advanced to the state meet. “I think our region is one of the strongest regionals,” Miner said. TCA is the prohibitive favorite to win state on the girls side. The Titans’ seven runners finished in the top 15 at the regional: Junior Lauren Hamilton (3rd, 18 minutes, 55 seconds), senior Megan Brunette (5th), sophomore Maddie Mullen (7th), sophomore Hannah Williams (10th), senior Brittany Droogsma (12th), sophomore Megan Percy (14th) and junior Brianne Hoglin (15th). Palmer Ridge junior Ali Deitsch finished second

QUICK HITS TITANS STAY UNBEATEN

Jantzen Ryals, Andrew Register and the rest of The Classical Academy football keep rolling along. The Titans improved to 8-0 - their best start in school history - with a dominating 48-14 victory over . Sierra on Oct. 19. Ryals, a junior, completed 10 of 15 passes for 232 yards and two touchdowns. Ryals also ran for a two touchdowns. Junior wide receiver r Joey Trese had another remarkable game, hauling in h four passes for 152 yards and a pair of touchdowns. Register, also a junior, rushed for 96 yards and a s touchdown on 15 carries. The Titans (8-0, 3-0 Class 3A Southern League) travel to Pueblo County (4-4, 1-2) on Friday. -

THUNDER ROLLS ON IN FOOTBALL

Discovery Canyon improved to 7-1 overall, 3-0 in the 3A South Central League, with a 48-0 victory over Mitchell on Oct. 19. The score was 42-0 at halftime as officials used a running clock in the second half. Junior running back Ben Gilson had a pair of touchdowns, while junior fullback Adrian Mack rushed for a game-high 85 yards on seven carries, including a 54-yard touchdown. Mack also caught a 58yard touchdown pass. Junior quarterback Alex Wirtjes had his best statistical game of the season, completing 4 of 6 passes for 166 yards and two touchdowns.

LEWIS-PLAMER EVENS ITS RECORD ON GRIDIRON The Rangers improved to 4-4 overall, 2-1 in the 3A South Central League, with a 53-25 victory over Wasson on Oct. 19. Senior quarterback Nate Conner completed 7 of 13 passes for 127 yards and a touchdown. He also rushed for 102 yards and two touchdowns on 14 carries. Senior slot receiver Sean Grundman had a monster game, accounting for 81 yards rushing, 72 yards receiving and 174 yards in kickoff returns. BEARS LOSE TO MESA RIDGE IN FOOTBALL The Palmer Ridge football team lost to Mesa Ridge, 49-21, in a 4A Foothills game on Oct. 19. The Bears (1-7, 1-4) trailed just 21-14 at halftime. But mesa Ridge (6-2, 4-1) scored 13 unanswered points in the third quarter to take control.

Palmer Ridge’s Eric Hamer will be among the local contingent at state this weekend. Photo by Photo supplied. (18:18), but that was well back of Air Academy freshman Katie Rainsberger (17:40). Rounding out Palmer Ridge’s state team are senior Heather Gentry (11th), freshman Kaitlin Ramsey (16th),

freshman Hannah Capek (21st), freshman Audree Furst (24th), senior Courtney Campbell (28th) and junior Braede Wilcox (33rd). Discovery Canyon’s top runner was sophomore Arianna Ross (6th, 19:12). The other Thunder runners who followed her were freshman Beth DeLaurell (20th), sophomore Rylee McCone (22nd), sophomore Courtney McCann (31st), senior Kaylee Nolan (32nd), senior Moriah Nelson (34th) and freshman Sydney Hosey (38th). Palmer Ridge won the boys race with 37 points, followed by TCA (53), Air Academy (66), Lewis-Palmer (97) and Discovery Canyon (108). “The boys did an absolutely great job; now we have to start our taper,” said long-time Lewis-Palmer coach Suzanne Kuehl. “The state course will be hard. Lots of hills. There won’t be any personal bests on that course.” Four of Kuehl’s runners did achieve personal bests at regionals - senior Nate Rykerd (13th), junior Christopher Ecklund (27th), junior Ian McInroe (37th) and sophomore Austin Bach (43rd). The other three Rangers to advance are senior Jarrett Eller (6th), senior Spencer Shuman (19th) and sophomore Hunter Shuman (58th). Palmer Ridge’s strong showing was highlighted by four of its runners finishing in the top nine - sophomore Eric Hamer (2nd), senior Nate Mills (4th), senior Jordan Deitsch (7th) and junior Zack Blehm (9th). Rounding out the Bears are junior Tommy Herebic (15th), and sophomores Tommy Zarkovacki (28th) and Quinn Tirpak (29th). TCA junior Conner Wilburn won the regional with a sparkling time of 16:10. The rest of the Titans consist of junior Ben Hook (10th), senior Jordan Bost (11th), sophomore Everett Johnson (14th), and juniors Chandler Ryd (17th), Collin Eaton (23rd) and Sam Purvis (26th). Discovery Canyon senior Jacob Huisingh set a personal best and shattered the school record by more than a minute with his eighth-place finish of 16:51. Thunder runners joining him are junior Jericho Simmons (16th), senior Nicholas Lehmann (20th), sophomore Andrew Wireman (31st), junior Ben Miera (38th), senior Josh Cunniff (41st) and junior Matthew Beck (42nd).

Bears roar back to semifinals Deeds goal lifts Palmer Ridge past Denver East By Danny Summers

sports@ourcoloradonews.com MONUMENT - Casey Deeds took advantage of an opening and the Palmer Ridge High School field hockey team is back in the state semifinals. Deeds’ goal from 15 yards came on an assist from junior Jessica Berg with 2:10 remaining in the first half. It proved to the only one the Bears would need in the quarterfinals playoff game with Denver East (8-7-1) at Don Breese Stadium. “Just take a shot towards goal and hope it goes in,” said the UC-Davis-bound Deeds. The third-seeded Bears (14-2) are in the semifinals for the second consecutive year. They will face No. 7 St. Mary’s Academy (5-9-2) today at All-City Stadium in Denver. St. Mary’s Academy was a surprise 1-0 winner over No. 2 Kent Denver (11-2-2) - the defending state champion. Palmer Ridge defeated St. Mary’s Academy twice this season by scores of 3-2 and 5-2. Bears senior captain Haley Chytka said the Bears will try to not get overconfident against St. Mary’s Academy. “That was our problem the last couple of years,” she said. “They probably want it more. We just have to want it more than they do. We have to pick it up and not get cocky, because that was our problem last year.” Palmer Ridge coach Paul Lewis is impressed with his team’s level of play. “Our girls have been playing solid hockey all year round,” he said. “It’s a matter of continuing what we’re doing and getting those balls to bounce the right way and get our goals. Defensively, were strong enough to hold anybody.” Denver East proved to be a formidable foe. The Bears defeated the Angels 3-0 on Sept. 21. “I was hoping we’d get our three goals (today) that we’re trying average, but Denver East played a great de-

Palmer Ridge junior Daelynn Demello. Photo by Photo by Danny Summers

fensive game,” Lewis said. “They really packed in their `D’ and made it really difficult for us. We got multiple corners after corners. But their defense did a great job of keeping us from getting that final shot.” The game was primarily played in Denver East’s end of the field as the Bears used a stingy defense led by Chytka and sophomore Courtney Daly. “Our defense was getting really nervous because we saw that we really had to pick it up if the offense wasn’t going to get it in,” Chytka said. “We didn’t have the cushion of goals that we usually have. Hopefully our next game we get more goals in.” Added Daly: “It was really challenging. Denver East really brought their game up and showed us they were a strong team. It was difficult. But being together we were able to push through.” Deeds (12 goals, 19 assists) and Berg (state-leading 20 goals) were double-teamed most of the day and had few opportunities to get off clean shots. “I kind of expected it,” Berg said. “I say `Just bring it on. We’ll see how it goes.’ It gave us a chance to get other players goals this time,” Deeds said the close score caused the Bears to work even more efficiently. “It put pressure on the whole team to work better and move the ball up the field and keep the ball out of the net,” she said. “If you’re only up 1-0 anything can happen.” If the Bear win today, they advance to the state finals Oct. 29, also at All-City Stadium.

THE IRV & JOE SHOW M–F 1p–3p

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Irv Brown and Joe Williams are the longest-running sports talk tandem in the history of Denver radio. For more than 28 years, Irv Brown and Joe Williams have teamed to bring sports talk to fans in Denver. That tradition continues on Mile High Sports Radio.


12 The Tribune

October 24, 2012

CLUBS IN YOUR COMMUNITY

EL PASO COUNTY ARRESTS The following list of arrests is provided by area law enforcement agencies. An arrest is not an indication of guilt or innocence and there might be several people with the same name living in the county.

Oct. 12 Officers responded to a report of a theft in the 800 block of Beacon Lite Road. They do have persons of interest but no arrests have been made.

Oct. 13

Monument Police Department Oct. 5 A sergeant took a report of a theft of a purse in the 600 block of Colo. 105.

Oct. 7 An officer took a report of a hit-and-run trafic accident that occured in the 300 block of Colo. 105.

Oct. 8 An officer responded to the 1400 block of Cipriani Loop where an abandoned vehicle was parked in the intersection of Cipriani Loop and Veterinary View. After several attempts to contact information for the owner the vehicle was towed. A home owner in the 2000 block of Bobcat Valley Court reported that the outside garage door was opened by someone other than the resident. An officer responded to a report of a theft in the 16100 block of Old Forest Point.

Oct. 9 Officers observed a suspicious vehicle parked in front of 66 N. Jefferson Street. One adult male was located inside. An officer responded to the 1000 block of West Baptist Road on the report of a forgery. A case was taken and is being investigated. An officer arrived at the 500 block of Colo. 105 on the report of a traffic accident involving two vehicles with no injuries. A summons was issued.

Oct. 10 Officers responded to the 600 block of Colo. 105 in response to a vehicle that was found after being reported stolen on Oct. 9. No none suspects.

Oct. 11 An officer took a theft report that occured Oct. 9 in the area of 16000 block of Old Forest Point.

An officer made a traffic stop of a vehicle near Jackson Creek Parkway and Baptist Road and arrested the driver on charges of suspicion of driving under the influence of alcohol. An officer responded to a report of harassment in the 16200 block of Jackson Creek Parkway. A sergeant responded to a non-injury traffic crash in the 17500 block of Jackson Creek Parkway

Oct. 14 An officer was dispatched to a non-injury traffic accident near Jackson Creek Parkway and Baptist Road. Officers responded to a report of a cold criminal mischief in the 16000 block of Jackson Creek Parkway. Officer met the victim at the Monument Police Department. Officers observed a suspicious vehicle parked on Colo. 105 and Washington Street.

Oct. 15 An officer responded to the 200 block of Colo. 105 on the report of a fraudulant prescription. A case report was taken.

Oct. 16 An officer conducted a citizen conduct in the 400 block of Colo. 105. During the course of the citizen contact the officer discovered the citizen was in possession of marijuana and drug paraphernalia. A summons was issued.

Oct. 17 Officer assists the El Paso County Sheriff’s Office. An officer investigated found property that was received by the Monument Police Department and connected the property to a burglary that occured in the 17900 block of New London Road. Officers responded to a report of a cold criminal mischief in the 15600 block of Agate Creek Drive.

EDITOR’S NOTE: To add or update your club listing, e-mail calendar@ourcoloradonews.com, attn: Tribune. PROFESSIONAL FRONT RANGE Business Group meets from 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. on the first and third Tuesdays of every month at Bella Panini in Palmer Lake. TRI-LAKES BUSINESS Networking International meets from 8-9:30 a.m. every Wednesday at the Mozaic Inn in Palmer Lake. Call Elizabeth Bryson at 719-481-0600 or e-mail ebryson@ farmersagent.com. TRI-LAKES CHAMBER Business After Hours meets at 5:30 p.m. on the third Tuesday of each month at various locations. Free to members; $10 for non-members. Call 719 481-3282 or go to www.trilakeschamber.com. TRI-LAKES CHAMBER Business Networking Group meets at 7:30 a.m. the first and third Thursday at Willow Tree Cafe, 140 2nd St., Monument. New members welcome. If District 38 is delayed or cancelled, their will be no meeting. Yearly membership dues are $20. Call 719 4813282 or go to www.trilakeschamber.com. TRI-LAKES NETWORKING Team meets for dinner at 6:30 p.m. the second Tuesday of each month at the Inn at Palmer Divide. TNT is business women building relationships in a social setting. Visit www.trilakesnetworkingteam. com or call Janine Robertson at 719-266-0246 or e-mail janine@coloradorobertsons.com. WOODMOOR BUSINESS Group Meeting is the second Monday of every month from 6:30-8 p.m. at the Woodmoor Barn, 1691 Woodmoor Dr. We are Woodmoor residents offering products and services to the community. New members welcome. For more information, call Bobbi Doyle at 719-331-3003 or go to www.woodmoorbusinessgroup.com. RECREATION AMATEUR RADIO Operators, W0TLM (Tri-Lakes Monument Fire Radio Association), meets the

third Monday of each month at 6:30 p.m. at the Tri-Lakes Monutemnt Fire Protection District Station 1, 18650 Hwy 105. All Amateur Radio Operators are welcome. Call Joyce Witte at 4880859 for more information. ADULT RECREATIONAL and intermediate pick up volleyball is at Lewis-Palmer Middle School every Monday from 7-9 p.m. Call Claudia at 719313-6662 for details. BINGO BY the Tri-Lakes American Legion Post 9-11 is conducted from 7 to 9 p.m. every Saturday at the Post home, Depot Restaurant in Palmer lake. Proceeds are dedicated to Scholarship and community support activities of the Post. At least 70 percent of the game sales are awarded in prizes, and free food drawings are conducted. Doors open at 6 p.m. and all are invited for the fun, food, and prizes. See www.americanlegiontrilakespost911.com/bingo.htm for more information. BIG RED Saturday Market. Fresh vegetables and fruit, bakery items, local honey, crafts, jewelry, pet stuff and more are for sale from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. every Saturday at the Big Red Saturday market at Second and Jefferson streets in Monument. The money benefits Lewis-Palmer community schools. FRIENDS OF Monument Preserve is a nonprofit organization that works to keep trails rideable and hikeable in the Monument Preserve Area. Meetings are at 7 p.m. every third Wednesday at the Monument Fire Center. Trail work is done at 6 p.m. the second Tuesday in the summer months. Contact info@fomp.org or Chris at 719-488-9850. GLENEAGLE GOLF Club has implemented a Community Advisory Committee. Their mission is to help establish a stronger relationship between the club and the community. They are looking for representatives from all home owners associations. The committee meets the fourth Wednesday of the month at 6:30PM at Gleneagle Golf Club. If you can join, give Rick Ebelo a call at the club at 488-0900. Clubs continues on Page 16

WorshipGuide Maranatha Bible Fellowship A Home Church Spirtual Growth Meaningful Relationships Solid Biblical Teaching A New Testament early church format that is changing lives 495-7527

SUNDAY

Worship: 8am, 9:30am, 10:45am Education: 9:30am

Crossroads Chapel, SBC 840 North Gate Blvd. Bible Study 9am 10:15am Celebrating HIM in Worship

Little Log Church Following Christ, Fishing For Men

Sunday Bible Class ... 8:30 Sunday Worship... 10:00 Monthly Youth Activities

The “New� MHC - Where Grace and Truth Abound

July 9-13: Vacation Bible School

238 Third Street Monument, CO 80132 719.481.3902 www.mcpcusa.org

Woodmoor Drive at Deer Creek Road

Worship Services 8:30 a.m., 10:00 a.m., and 11:30 a.m.

Opportunities to connect Opportunities to connect for your whole family your whole family 1750 Deer Creek Road 1750 Deer Creek Road80132 Monument, CO. Monument, CO. 80132 (719)481-3600 (719)481-3600 www.trilakeschapel.org www.trilakeschapel.org

Upper Glenway and High Street Palmer Lake, CO 481-2409 www.littlelogchurch.net

Lutheran Church

Connecting People to God and Others

Pastor: Dr. D. L. Mitchell Child care provided

   

Traditional worship  service   10a.m.-Nursery   Sunday available



  

     



675 Baptist Road Colorado Springs, CO 719.481.2255

SUNDAYS 10 AM Bear Creek Elem School 1330 Creekside Dr. 487-7700 www.forestridgechurch.org

495-3200

www.trilakeschurch.org

Sunday: Bible Classes 9:15am Worship Service 10:30am Pastor Tom Clemmons USAFA ‘86, SWBTS ‘94 Preaching for the Glory of God Mon: Youth Group 6:30pm Tues: Prayer Meeting 6:30pm Wed: AWANA 6:30pm

We Welcome You! 8:45 a.m. Adult Bible Class 9:30 a.m. Fellowship Coffee 10:00 a.m. SUMMER WORSHIP Children’s Sunday School 11:15 a.m. Youth Sunday School 6:30 p.m. Youth Group

  

Wednesday AWANA 6:15pm

Sunday Bible Classes ‌ 9:30 a.m. Morning Worship ‌ 10:30 a.m. Evening Worship ‌ 5:00 p.m. Wednesday Night Classes ‌ 7:00 p.m.

18725 Monument Hill Rd. 481-2156 www.monumenthillchurch.org

Monument Community Presbyterian Church

Call for more information

6pm evening Adult Bible Study

20450 Beacon Lite Road • 488-9613

Monument Hill Church, SBC

481-0141

Sunday Worship: 8:30, 9:45 & 11:00 am Sunday School: 9:45 am

Worship Services Sun: amam Sun: 8:3010:00 & 10:15

Worship Service at 9:30 a.m. Lewis Palmer High School Higby Road & Jackson Creek Parkway

Times effective Sept. 12, 2010 - May 2011

Pastor David Dyer Lutheran Church Missouri Synod

www.northword.org

True Direction from God’s Word

8:00 AM - Classic Worship 9:30 & 10:45 AM - Modern Worship 9:30 & 10:45 AM - Childrens’ programs & Adult Studies

Children • Youth Ministries

15280 Jessie Drive • 481-9929 www.journeychapel.org

WorshipGuide Share your good news with everyone in The Tribune’s

To advertise in this section please call toll free (866) 945-2537 or email kearhart@OurColoradoNews.com


October 24, 2012

Public Notice Notice of Names of Unclaimed Refunds The following is a list of unclaimed refunds of consumer security deposits. Information concerning the property may be obtained by any person possessing an interest in property by addressing an inquiry to Mountain View Electric Association, PO Box 1600, Limon, CO 80828, (719) 775-2861 or 800-388-9881.

Misc. Private Legals Public Notice STATE OF WYOMING IN THE DISTRICT COURT 0f SEVENTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT Natrona County Civil Action Case Number: 94911 Bernadette J. Cady, Plaintiff Vs. Persephanie and Chris Tremblay Defendant SUMMONS To the above named Defendant: Print Defendant’s Name: Persephanie E. Tremblay and Chris Tremblay Home Address: 116 Greeley Blvd. Palmer Lake Co., P.O. Box 271, 80133 Phone: Unknown Employer Name and Address: Unknown YOU ARE HEREBY SUMMONED and required to file with the Clerk and serve upon the Plaintiff or Plaintiff’s attorney if s/he has one, an Answer to the Petition for Visitation which is herewith served upon you, within 20 days after service of this Summons upon you, exclusive of the day of service. (If service upon you is made outside the state of Wyoming, you are required to file and serve your answer to the Petition for Visitation within 30 days after service of this Summons upon you, exclusive of the day of service.) If you fail to do so, judgement by default will be taken against you for relief demanded in the Petition for Visitation. Dated 22nd Day of August, 2012 Clerk of District Court By: Deputy Clerk Bernadette J. Cady Plaintiff’s Name 467 Holmes St. P.O. Box 1301 Evansville, Wyo. 82636 307-333-4647, Cell 307-315-5202 Legal Notice No.: 932385 First Publication: October 3, 2012 Last Publication: October 24, 2012 Publisher: The Tri-Lakes Tribune

Government Legals Public Notice Department of the Treasury -Internal Revenue Service Public Auction Sale Under the authority in Internal Revenue Code Section 6331, the property described below has been seized for nonpayment of the internal revenue taxes due from Lawrence M. Birk and Jean A. Birk. The property will be sold at public auction as provided by Internal Revenue Code Section 6335 and related regulations. Date of Sale: Wednesday, November 28, 2012 Time of Sale: 11 a.m.: Registration: 10:30 a.m. Place of Sale: 2864 South Circle Drive, IRS Office; Colorado Springs, Colorado Title Offered: Only the right, title, and interest of Lawrence M. Birk and Jean A. Birk in and to the property will be offered for sale. If requested, the Internal Revenue Service will furnish information about possible encumbrances, which may be useful in determining the value of the interest being sold. (See "Nature of Title" for further details.) Description of Property: Parcel No. R0040908/ Alt apn 10810020020. "That part of the Elmer Lode, Mineral Survey No. 10810, Bordeaux Lode, Mineral Survey No. 10810, Ulva Lode, Mineral Survey No. 10810 and Deed Rabbit Lode, Mineral Survey No. 10810, lying South of Hosea P, Mineral Survey No. 10045, all as defined and limited by the patents thereof, Teller County, Colorado. Together with and sharing those instruments as described in deed recorded at Reception No. 494829 and 494828. Property may be inspected at: From Downtown Cripple Creek, take County Road 1 west approx. 1 mile, then turn on Private Road. Payment Terms: Deferred payment as follows: Twenty (20) percent down of highest winning bid due date of auction. Remaining eighty (80) percent due 30 days after auction date. Form of Payment: All payments must be by cash, certified check, cashier's or treasurer's check or by a United States Postal, bank, express, or telegraph money order. Make check or money order payable to the United States Treasury.

The Colorado Unclaimed Property Act requires that any abandoned property escheat to the State if it remains unclaimed by the owner for more than one year. Mountain View Electric Association directs all unclaimed property to the Colorado Energy Assistance Foundation.

Government Legals

ANTHEM HOMES BALLAS, NORM BARIL, RYAN BARRETTE, NANETTE S BERDUGO, JULIANA BERGER, LAURA BERO, COLIN R BOLEJACK, CALEB BOOKER, CHONG B BROWN, REBECCA BROWN, SHENEQUA BURGE, JASON E CAMPBELL, RICHARD CARABALLO, LOU CARLTON, DARLA COCKRELL, JAMES R COLLINS, WILLIE CONCRETE FENCE OF COLO INC CONTOUR HOMES LLC COOK, JOSHUA COWART, TOMMY E DENNINGTON, BERNIE DUFRESNE, LESILEE L EARLEY, SONIA ECKART, CHARLOTTE ECKSTROM, CHARIS ESPARZA, FIDEL C FAIR, PAUL FRANK, JACOB GONZALEZ, DANIEL GOSSETT, TIM HACKLER, TYLER R HAMILTON, DEFOREST A HARDT, JONATHON HARRISON, JOSHUA R HASENBALG, NICHOLAS HEAVEN SCENT LLC HICKS, PAULA HIGGINS, JAMES P HUTMACHER, ALPHIE JENNESS, PAUL JOHN LAING HOMES KEYS, STEVEN E KRON, FLORENCE LANGNESS, JULIE LARSON, JANICE R LOINES, DANA C MASSEY, KIM MCCOOL, CAMILLE MCMILLIAN, ANDREW MERCADO, LUIS METTS, CHRISTOPHER J MICHALSKI, NICHOLAS L MITCHELL, COURTNEY MITCHELL, CURTIS MONTANEZ, BELINDA MOODY, DUANE NUSS, JEFF OVERMYER, MICHAEL OVERSTREET, JEFFERY PEMBERTON, KATIE REMAX ACCORD ROBERTS, SCOTT RUIZ, RICO RUTH, JUDY SAINT AUBYN HOMES LLC SANFORD, JOHN M SANTOS, VINCENT SCHOOT, MICHAEL SELF, HEATHER SIMMONS, PATRICK K SMEDBERG, ROLFE SMITA MERCHANT INC SMITH, DUSTY STEELE, TRACY D TAYLOR, MICHAEL A TOOMBS, BILLYE TOWNSEND, WILLIAM WARD, JAMES WESTIN-JORDACHE, SUMMER CHERIE WHITE, KEITH YEAGER, BRIAN Legal Notice No.: 932010 First Publication: October 24, 2012 Last Publication: October 31, 2012 Publisher: The Tribune Public Notice NOTICE AS TO PROPOSED 2013 BUDGET WOODMOOR WATER AND SANITATION DISTRICT NO. 1 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that a proposed budget will be submitted to the WOODMOOR WATER AND SANITATION DISTRICT NO. 1 for the year of 2013. A copy of such budget has been filed in the office of Woodmoor Water & Sanitation District No. 1, 1845 Woodmoor Drive, Monument, Colorado, where same is open for public inspection. Such budget will be considered during a public hearing to be held at 1:00 P.M. during a regular meeting of the Woodmoor Water and Sanitation District No. 1 on Thursday, November 8, 2012. The meeting will be held at 1845 Woodmoor Drive, Monument, Colorado. Any interested elector within Woodmoor Water and Sanitation District No. 1 may inspect the proposed budget and file or register any objections at any time prior to the final adoption of the 2013 budget. BY ORDER OF THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS: WOODMOOR WATER AND SANITATION DISTRICT NO. 1 By: /s/ Norton, Smith & Keane A Professional Corporation Legal Notice No.: 932011 First Publication: October 24, 2012 Last Publication: October 24, 2012 Publisher: The Tri-Lakes Tribune

Name: D. Gimpleson Title: PALS Territory Manager Date: 09-27-2012

Public Notice

Address for information about the sale: Steven Massel, Appraiser 24000 Avila Road, Mall Stop 5905; Laguna Niguel, CA 92677 Email: steven.r.massel@irs.gov.

THE BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS COUNTY OF EL PASO, STATE OF COLORADO

Phone: 213-220-5987 Legal Notice No. 932013 First Publication: October 24, 2012 Last Publication: October 24, 2012 Publisher: The Tribune Public Notice Notice of Names of Unclaimed Refunds The following is a list of unclaimed refunds of consumer security deposits. Information concerning the property may be obtained by any person possessing an interest in property by addressing an inquiry to Mountain View Electric Association, PO Box 1600, Limon, CO 80828, (719) 775-2861 or 800-388-9881. The Colorado Unclaimed Property Act requires that any abandoned property escheat to the State if it remains unclaimed by the owner for more than one year. Mountain View Electric Association directs all unclaimed property to the Colorado Energy Assistance Foundation.

Resolution No. 12-309

Resolution to approve and authorize a ballot question for the November 2012 General Election for the purposes of proposing an increase to the existing countywide sales tax and use tax rate to address critical and emergent needs of the El Paso County Sheriff’s Office as more particularly described within the proposed Resolution. WHEREAS, C.R.S. § 29-2-101, et seq., authorizes the County to levy an increase in the countywide sales and use tax rate upon the approval of the majority of the qualified registered electors of the County voting on such proposal at an election conducted and held according to Colorado law; and WHEREAS, El Paso County Sheriff Terry Maketa (“Sheriff”) is the chief law enforcement officer for El Paso County, with statutorily mandated duties on behalf of all El Paso County residents regardless of municipal boundaries, including emergency response to public safety, wild land firefighting, responding to calls for service and staffing the Jail in a safe and secure

Resolution to approve and authorize a ballot question for the November 2012 General Election for the purposes of proposing an increase to the existing countywide sales tax and use tax rate to address critical and emergent needs of the El Paso County Sheriff’s Office as more particularly described within the proposed Resolution. WHEREAS, C.R.S. § 29-2-101, et seq., authorizes the County to levy an increase in the countywide sales and use tax rate upon the approval of the majority of the qualified registered electors of the County voting on such proposal at an election conducted and held according to Colorado law; and WHEREAS, El Paso County Sheriff Terry Maketa (“Sheriff”) is the chief law enforcement officer for El Paso County, with statutorily mandated duties on behalf of all El Paso County residents regardless of municipal boundaries, including emergency response to public safety, wild land firefighting, responding to calls for service and staffing the Jail in a safe and secure manner; and

Government Legals

WHEREAS, as exhibited by exceptional historical performance of its ongoing statutory obligations the El Paso County Sheriff’s Office is an integral component in the provision of public safety services to the citizens of El Paso County, Colorado; and WHEREAS, Sheriff Terry Maketa has initiated and conducted an extensive review of critical needs of the El Paso County Sheriff’s Office, which has identified serious deficiencies in operations staffing and funding highlighted by the destruction of the Waldo Canyon Fire; and WHEREAS, as a result of this extensive review, Sheriff Terry Maketa has requested the Board of County Commissioners of the County of El Paso, State of Colorado (hereinafter “County” or “Board”), to certify to the eligible electors of the County a ballot issue proposing an increase in the countywide sales and use tax rate in order to address the insufficiencies which are critical to public safety and emergency preparedness; and WHEREAS, addressing the critical public safety and emergency preparedness needs identified by the Sheriff is necessary to preserve the Sheriff’s ability to protect the public and effectively respond to crises in the community by improving the ability of the Sheriff, and his deputies to respond to emergent situations, enforce the laws, and safely incarcerate convicted criminals; and WHEREAS, Sheriff Terry Maketa has recommended a sales and use tax increase to the Board, as recent events such as the Waldo Canyon Fire have highlighted crucial deficits in personnel and support, and that the voters of El Paso County prefer a sales and use tax increase over a property tax increase as the means to pay for needed public improvements; and WHEREAS, the Board, in order to address these immediate critical needs, finds that it is in the best interests of the present and future residents of the County to certify a ballot issue to the eligible electors of the County at the November 2012 General Election requesting approval of an increase in the countywide sales and use tax rate of twenty-three hundredths of one cent ($.0023), subject to the terms of this Proposal and Resolution, hereinafter referred to as this Resolution or as this Proposal. NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED by the Board of County Commissioners of El Paso County, State of Colorado: PART ONE: GENERAL PROVISIONS 1. Purpose of this Resolution: The purpose of this Resolution is, upon the approval of a majority of the eligible electors voting on such Proposal at the November 2012 General Election, to enact, and, therefore, levy and impose an increase in the countywide sales tax rate of twentythree one hundredths of one cent ($.0023) upon the sale at retail of tangible personal property and the furnishing of certain services in the County (“the sales tax”), and to enact, and therefore, levy and impose an increase in the countywide use tax rate of twenty-three one hundredths of one cent ($.0023) only for the privilege of using or consuming in the County any construction and building materials purchased at retail, and for the privilege of storing, using or consuming in the County any motor and other vehicles purchased at retail on which registration is required (“the use tax”), all of the foregoing being in accordance with the provisions of Article 2 of Title 29, C.R.S. 2. Effective Date of Sales and Use Tax Rate Increase: If approved by a majority of the eligible electors voting thereon at the November 2012 General Election, the sales and use tax rate increase proposed in this Resolution and in the ballot issue shall become effective on January 1, 2013 and continue through December 31, 2020, after which date (effective January 1, 2021) the countywide sales and use tax rate increase shall be reduced by of twenty-three one hundredths of one cent ($.0023) by operation of law, and without the need for any action by the County. 3. Statutory Definitions Incorporated/Specific Definition of Countywide: The definitions of the words contained herein shall be as set forth in C.R.S. §§ 39-26-102, 3926-201, and 39-26-701, which definitions are incorporated by reference into this Resolution as if fully set forth herein. The term, “countywide”, as used in this Resolution includes all incorporated areas (i.e., municipalities, including, but not limited to, all statutory cities and towns and all home rule cities and towns) and unincorporated areas within El Paso County, Colorado. PART TWO: SPECIFIC PROVISIONS PERTAINING TO THE SALES TAX 4. Property and Services Taxed: Upon approval in the November 2012 General Election, there shall be enacted and, therefore, levied and imposed, an increase in the existing countywide sales tax rate of twenty-three one hundredths of one cent ($.0023) upon the gross receipts from the taxable sales of all tangible personal property at retail and the furnishing of certain services as provided in C.R.S. § 29-2-105(1)(d), excluding from taxation certain transactions as set forth in Paragraph 6, below, and providing certain exemptions from taxation as set forth in Paragraph 7, below, and which sales tax rate increase shall commence on January 1, 2013 and continue through December 31, 2020, after which date (effective January 1, 2021) said sales tax rate increase shall be reduced by twenty-three one hundredths of one cent ($.0023) by operation of law, and without the need for any action by the County. The sale of tangible personal property and services taxable shall be the same as the sale of tangible personal property and services taxable pursuant to C.R.S. § 39-26-104, 2012 including, but not limited to mobile telecommunications service pursuant to C.R.S. § 39-26-104(1)(c)(I), excluding from taxation certain transactions as set forth in Paragraph 6, below, and providing certain exemptions from taxation as set forth in Paragraph 7, below. 5. Adoption of State Rules and Regulations/County Rules and Regulations: The collection of the revenues generated by the sales tax rate increase shall be in accordance with schedules set forth in the

29-2-105(1)(d), excluding from taxation certain transactions as set forth in Paragraph 6, below, and providing certain exemptions from taxation as set forth in Paragraph 7, below, and which sales tax rate increase shall commence on January 1, 2013 and continue through December 31, 2020, after which date (effective January 1, 2021) said sales tax rate increase shall be reduced by twenty-three one hundredths of one cent ($.0023) by operation of law, and without the need for any action by the County. The sale of tangible personal property and services taxable shall be the same as the sale of tangible personal property and services taxable pursuant to C.R.S. § 39-26-104, 2012 including, but not limited to mobile telecommunications service pursuant to C.R.S. § 39-26-104(1)(c)(I), excluding from taxation certain transactions as set forth in Paragraph 6, below, and providing certain exemptions from taxation as set forth in Paragraph 7, below.

C.R.S. § 39-26-709(1) IV, the sales of pesticides as set forth in C.R.S. § 39-26716(2)(e), the sales of wood from salvaged trees killed or infested in Colorado by Mountain Pine Beetles, as set forth in C.R.S. § 39-26-723, and the sales of components used in the production of alternating current electricity from renewable energy sources, including, but not limited to wind, as set forth in C.R,S. § 3926-724.

Government Legals

Government Legals

5. Adoption of State Rules and Regulations/County Rules and Regulations: The collection of the revenues generated by the sales tax rate increase shall be in accordance with schedules set forth in the rules and regulations of the Colorado Department of Revenue, and/or in accordance with any rules and regulations as may be enacted by separate resolution of the Board, and any such County imposed rules and regulations shall be enacted and implemented in accordance with Colorado law as it currently exists or as it may be amended from time to time. 6. Exclusions from Sales Tax: The sales tax rate increase shall not apply to the following: a. The amount of any sales or use tax levied and imposed by Article 26 of Title 39, C.R.S. b. The sale of construction and building materials, as such term is used in C.R.S. § 29-2-109, and as such term is defined in Paragraph 16, below, if such materials are picked up by the purchaser and if the purchaser of such materials presents to the retailer a building permit or other documentation acceptable to the County evidencing that the County’s use tax has been paid or is required to be paid. c. The sale of tangible personal property at retail or the furnishing of services if the transaction was previously subjected to a sales or use tax lawfully imposed on the purchaser or user by another statutory or home rule county equal to or in excess of that sought to be imposed by the County. A credit shall be granted against the sales tax rate increase imposed by the County with respect to such transaction equal in amount to the lawfully imposed sales or use tax previously paid by the purchaser or user to the previous statutory or home rule county. The amount of the credit shall not exceed the sales tax imposed pursuant to the County’s sales tax rate increase. The following provision shall apply in defining the applicability of its higher rate to the sales tax ordinance or resolution of any statutory or home rule city, town, city and county, or county which provides a higher rate of taxation on prepared food or food for immediate consumption than its general rate of taxation: prepared food or food for immediate consumption shall exclude any food for domestic home consumption. d. The sale of food purchased with food stamps. For purposes of this provision, the term, “food”, shall have the same meaning as provided in C.R.S. § 39-26102(4.5)(a), citing to 7 U.S.C. 2012 (k) and (l) as such section existed as of October 1, 1987 or as amended. e. The sale of food purchased with funds provided by the special supplemental food program for women, infants, and children, pursuant to 42 U.S.C. sec. 1786. For the purposes of this provision, the term, “food”, shall have the same meaning as “supplemental foods” provided in 42 U.S.C. 1786, as such section existed on October 1, 1987 or as amended through August 2012. f. The sale or purchase of gasoline and diesel fuel as statutory counties in Colorado have no authority of whatsoever kind or nature to levy and impose a sales tax upon these commodities. 7. Exemptions from Sales Tax: There shall be exempt from the sales tax rate increase the sale of all of the tangible personal property and services which are exempt under Part 7 of Article 26 of Title 39, C.R.S., which exemptions are incorporated by reference into this Resolution as if fully set forth herein, expressly including the exemption for sales of food as defined and as set forth in C.R.S. § 39-26102(4.5), and as exempted from state sales tax pursuant to C.R.S. § 39-26707(1)(e), the exemption for sales and purchases of electricity, coal, wood, gas, including natural, manufactured and liquefied petroleum gas, fuel oil or coke, sold to occupants of residences as set forth in C.R.S. § 39-26-715(1)(a)(II), (fuels used in providing residential light, heat and power), the exemption for sales and purchases of machinery or machine tools in excess of five-hundred dollars, as set forth in C.R.S. § 39-26-709(1)(a)(II), and the exemption for components used in the production of alternating current electricity from a renewable energy source, as set forth in C.R.S. § 39-26-724. 8. Exclusion from Exemptions to Sales Tax; Inclusions to Sales Tax: Notwithstanding any provision as set forth in Paragraph 7, above, this Resolution does not exempt or exclude from taxation, and therefore, includes within the sales tax rate increase, pursuant to C.R.S. § 29-2105(1)(d)(I), the following: vending machine sales of food as set forth in C.R.S. § 39-26-714(2), all occasional sales by a charitable organization as set forth in C.R.S. § 39-26-718(1)(b), except allowing the exemption as set forth in Paragraph 7, above, concerning sales by an association or organization of parents and teachers of public school students that is a charitable organization as set forth in C.R.S. § 39-26-718(1)(c), the sales and purchases of farm equipment and farm equipment under lease or contract as set forth in C.R.S. §§ 39-26-716(2)(b) and (2)(c), the sales of low-emitting motor vehicles, power sources, or parts used for converting power sources as set forth in C.R.S. § 39-26-719(1), the purchase of machinery or machine tools as set forth in C.R.S. § 39-26-709(1) IV, the sales of pesticides as set forth in C.R.S. § 39-26716(2)(e), the sales of wood from salvaged trees killed or infested in Colorado by Mountain Pine Beetles, as set forth in C.R.S. § 39-26-723, and the sales of components used in the production of alternating current electricity from renewable energy sources, including, but not limited to wind, as set forth in C.R,S. § 3926-724. 9. Nonresident Exemption: Pursuant to C.R.S. § 29-2-105(1)(e), all sales of personal property on which a specific ownership tax has been paid or is payable shall be exempt from the sales tax rate increase when such sales meet both of the following conditions: a. The purchaser is a nonresident of or has his principal place of business outside of the County; and b. Such personal property is registered or required to be registered outside the limits of the County under the laws of the State of Colorado. 10. Exemption for Construction Materials

9. Nonresident Exemption: Pursuant to C.R.S. § 29-2-105(1)(e), all sales of personal property on which a specific ownership tax has been paid or is payable shall be exempt from the sales tax rate increase when such sales meet both of the following conditions: a. The purchaser is a nonresident of or has his principal place of business outside of the County; and b. Such personal property is registered or required to be registered outside the limits of the County under the laws of the State of Colorado. 10. Exemption for Construction Materials Subject to Use Tax: The value of construction and building materials on which the use tax rate increase in Paragraph 16, below, has previously been collected by the County shall be exempt from the sales tax rate increase if the materials are delivered by the retailer or his agent to a site within the limits of the County. 11. Place of Sale: All retail sales are consummated at the place of business of the retailer, unless the tangible personal property sold is delivered by the retailer or his agent to a destination outside the limits of the County or to a common carrier for delivery to a destination outside the limits of the County. The gross receipts from such sales shall include delivery charges, when such charges are subject to the sales and use tax of the State of Colorado, imposed by Article 26 of Title 39, C.R.S., regardless of the place to which delivery is made. If a retailer has no permanent place of business in the County, or has more than one place of business, the place at which the retail sales are consummated for the purpose of the sales tax rate increase shall be determined by the provisions of Article 26 of Title 39, C.R.S., and by the rules and regulations promulgated by the Department of Revenue of the State of Colorado, and/or in accordance with any rules and regulations as may be enacted by separate resolution of the Board. 12. Sales Tax License: Any person or entity engaging in the business of selling tangible personal property at retail or furnishing certain services as herein set forth shall annually obtain and hold a state license as required by C.R.S. § 39-26-103, or, if required by any rule or regulation enacted by separate resolution of the County, and in accordance with Colorado law as it currently exists or as it may be from time to time amended, to annually obtain and hold a County sales tax license. 13. Vendor Fee: The Board may authorize every retailer to withhold from the monthly sales tax collections to be remitted an amount up to three and one-third percent (3 1/3%) of the monthly sales tax collections as a fee, which fee shall be known as the vendor fee. By separate resolution, the Board at any time, may increase, decrease or eliminate all or part of the vendor fee. Unless otherwise amended by a subsequent resolution, the Board hereby determines that the resumption of the vendor fee shall not be authorized at this time; therefore, the vendor fee rate shall remain at its current rate of zero percent (0%). To the extent the Board reinstates all or part of the vendor fee, any retailer delinquent in remitting said sales tax shall forfeit such vendor fee associated with any delinquent remittance unless good cause is shown for the delinquent remittance. 14. Collection, Administration and Enforcement: a. The collection, administration and enforcement of the sales tax rate increase shall be performed by the Executive Director of the Colorado Department of Revenue in the same manner as the collection, administration and enforcement of the Colorado state sales tax or, if authorized by Colorado law and by subsequent Board resolution, the collection, administration and enforcement of the sales tax rate increase may be collected, administered and enforced by rules and regulations promulgated by the Board and in accordance with Colorado law as it currently exists or as it may be amended from time to time. The provisions of Article 26 of Title 39, C.R.S., and C.R.S. § 29-2-106, and all rules and regulations promulgated by the Executive Director of the Department of Revenue pursuant thereto, are incorporated by reference into this Resolution as if fully set forth herein, and shall govern the collection, administration, and enforcement of the sales tax rate increase, unless otherwise amended or modified as set forth herein. b. Pursuant to C.R.S. § 29-2-106, the Board shall, as soon as practicable after the results of the November 2012 General Election, and on or before any statutory deadline, request the Executive Director of the Colorado Department of Revenue to administer, collect and distribute the revenues from the sales tax rate increase. The Board, at the time of making such request, shall provide the following documents to the Executive Director of the Department of Revenue at least forty-five (45) days prior to January 1, 2013: i. A copy of this Resolution, certified by the County Clerk and Recorder; and ii. Affidavits of publication of this Resolution, as provided herein; and iii. An abstract of Election Results, certified as to the approval of the sales tax rate increase by a majority of the eligible electors of El Paso County voting thereon, or, if not timely available, such other documentation demonstrating approval of the ballot issue set forth on attached Exhibit A. c. In the event that the Executive Director of the Colorado Department of Revenue fails or refuses to collect the revenues from the sales tax rate increase, the Board shall be authorized to provide for the collection, administration or enforcement of the revenues from such sales tax rate increase to the extent permitted by law, or it shall be authorized to amend this Resolution to comply with the requirements of the Colorado Department of Revenue. PART THREE: SPECIFIC PROVISIONS PERTAINING TO THE USE TAX 15. Property Taxed: Upon approval at the November 2012 General Election, there shall be enacted, and, therefore, levied and imposed, and there shall be collected and paid, an increase in the existing countywide use tax rate of twenty three hundredths of one cent ($.0023) only for the privilege of using or consuming in El Paso County any construction and building materials purchased at retail and for the privilege of storing, using or consuming in the County any motor and other vehicles purchased at retail on which registration is required, which use tax rate increase shall commence on January 1, 2013, and continue through December 31, 2020, after which date (effective January 1, 2021) said use tax rate shall be reduced by of twenty three hundredths of one cent ($.0023) by operation of law, and

shall be authorized to provide for the collection, administration or enforcement of the revenues from such sales tax rate increase to the extent permitted by law, or it shall be authorized to amend this Resolution to comply with the requirements of the Colorado Department of Revenue.

The Tribune 13

PART THREE: SPECIFIC PROVISIONS PERTAINING TO THE USE TAX

15. Property Taxed: Upon approval at the November 2012 General Election, there shall be enacted, and, therefore, levied and imposed, and there shall be collected and paid, an increase in the existing countywide use tax rate of twenty three hundredths of one cent ($.0023) only for the privilege of using or consuming in El Paso County any construction and building materials purchased at retail and for the privilege of storing, using or consuming in the County any motor and other vehicles purchased at retail on which registration is required, which use tax rate increase shall commence on January 1, 2013, and continue through December 31, 2020, after which date (effective January 1, 2021) said use tax rate shall be reduced by of twenty three hundredths of one cent ($.0023) by operation of law, and without the need for any action by the County. In addition to the foregoing, the property subject to the use tax rate increase shall include the following:

Government Legals

a. The storage and use of wood from salvaged trees killed or infested in Colorado by Mountain Pine Beetles, notwithstanding the exemption from State of Colorado use tax set forth in C.R.S. § 39-26723.

16. Definition: The term "construction and building materials" shall mean any tangible personal property that is stored, used or consumed in the County, and that is intended to become part of, attached to, or a component of any building, structure, road or appurtenance in the County. The term “construction and building materials” shall not include parts or materials utilized in the fabrication, construction, assembly or installation of passenger tramways, as defined in C.R.S. § 25-5-702(4), by any ski area operator, as defined in C.R.S. § 33-44-103(7), or any person fabricating constructing, assembling, or installing a passenger tramway for a ski area operator.

17. Property Excluded from the Use Tax: The property subject to the use tax rate increase shall not include the following:

a. The storage, use or consumption of any tangible personal property the sale of which is subject to a retail sales tax levied and imposed by the County; and

b. The storage, use or consumption of any tangible personal property purchased for resale in the County, either in its original form or as an ingredient of a manufactured or compounded product, in the regular course of a business; and

c. The storage, use, or consumption of tangible personal property brought into the County by a nonresident thereof for his own storage, use, or consumption while temporarily within the County; however, this exemption does not apply to the storage, use, or consumption of tangible personal property brought into this state by a nonresident to be used in the conduct of a business in this state; and

d. The storage, use, or consumption of tangible personal property by the United States government or the State of Colorado, or its institutions, or its political subdivisions in their governmental capacities only or by religious or charitable corporations in the conduct of their regular religious or charitable functions; and

e. The storage, use, or consumption of tangible personal property by a person engaged in the business of manufacturing or compounding for sale, profit, or use any article, substance, or commodity, which tangible personal property enters into the processing of or becomes an ingredient or component part of the product or service which is manufactured, compounded, or furnished and the container, label, or the furnished shipping case thereof; and

f. The storage, use, or consumption of any article of tangible personal property the sale or use of which has already been subjected to a sales or use tax of another statutory or home rule county equal to or in excess of that levied and imposed by the County. The credit shall be granted against the use tax rate increase with respect to a person's storage, use, or consumption in the County of tangible personal property purchased by him or her in the previous statutory or home rule county. The amount of the credit shall be equal to the tax paid by him or her by reason of the imposition of a sales or use tax of a previous statutory or home rule county on his or her purchase or use of the property. The amount of the credit shall not exceed the use tax rate increase levied and imposed by this Resolution; and

g. The storage, use, or consumption of tangible personal property and household effects acquired outside of the County and brought into it by a nonresident acquiring residency; and

h. The storage or use of a motor vehicle if the owner is or was, at the time of purchase, a nonresident of the County and he or she purchased the vehicle outside of the County for use outside the County and actually so used it for a substantial and primary purpose for which it was acquired and he or she registered, titled, and licensed said motor vehicle outside of the County; and

i. The storage, use, or consumption of any construction and building materials and motor and other vehicles on which registration is required if a written contract for the purchase thereof was entered into prior to the effective date of the use tax rate increase; and

j. The storage, use, or consumption of any construction and building materials required or made necessary in the performance of any construction contract bid, let, or entered into at any time prior to the effective date of this Resolution; and k. The sale or purchase of gasoline and diesel fuels as statutory counties in Colorado have no authority of whatsoever kind or nature to impose a use tax upon these commodities.

18. Exemptions from Use Tax: There shall be exempt from the use tax rate increase the sale of all of the tangible personal property and services which are exempt under Part 7 of Article 26 of Title 39, C.R.S., which exemptions are incorporated by reference into this Resolution as if fully set forth herein, expressly including the exemption for sales of food as defined and as set forth in C.R.S. § 39-26102(4.5), and as exempted from state sales tax pursuant to C.R.S. § 39-26707(1)(e), the exemption for sales and purchases of electricity, coal, wood, gas, including natural, manufactured and liquefied petroleum gas, fuel oil or coke, sold to occupants of residences as set forth in C.R.S. § 39-26-715(1)(a)(II), (fuels used in providing residential light, heat and power), the exemption for sales and purchases of machinery or machine tools in excess of five-hundred dollars, as set forth in C.R.S. § 39-26-709(1)(a)(II), and the exemption for components used in the production of alternating current electricity from a renewable energy source, as set forth in C.R.S. § 39-26-724.


article, substance, or commodity, which tangible personal property enters into the processing of or becomes an ingredient or component part of the product or service which is manufactured, compounded, or furnished and the container, label, or the furnished shipping case thereof; and

14 The Tribune

crease the sale of all of the tangible personal property and services which are exempt under Part 7 of Article 26 of Title 39, C.R.S., which exemptions are incorporated by reference into this Resolution as if fully set forth herein, expressly including the exemption for sales of food as defined and as set forth in C.R.S. § 39-26102(4.5), and as exempted from state sales tax pursuant to C.R.S. § 39-26707(1)(e), the exemption for sales and purchases of electricity, coal, wood, gas, including natural, manufactured and liquefied petroleum gas, fuel oil or coke, sold to occupants of residences as set forth in C.R.S. § 39-26-715(1)(a)(II), (fuels used in providing residential light, heat and power), the exemption for sales and purchases of machinery or machine tools in excess of five-hundred dollars, as set forth in C.R.S. § 39-26-709(1)(a)(II), and the exemption for components used in the production of alternating current electricity from a renewable energy source, as set forth in C.R.S. § 39-26-724.

permit applicant who utilizes the alternative procedure provided above shall maintain and preserve detailed purchase and receipt records which shall be subject to inspection and audit by employees of the Board, and any unpaid taxes due shall be subject to collection. The collection and administration of the use tax rate increase shall be performed at the direction of the Board in substantially the same manner as the collection, administration and enforcement of the use tax of the state of Colorado.

More than just wine and roses

f. The storage, use, or consumption of any article of tangible personal property the sale or use of which has already been subjected to a sales or use tax of another statutory or home rule county equal to or in excess of that levied and imposed by the County. The credit shall be granted against the use tax rate increase with respect to a person's storage, use, or consumption in the County of tangible personal property purchased by him or her in the previous statutory or home rule county. The amount of the credit shall be equal to the tax paid by him or her by reason of the imposition of a sales or use tax of a previous statutory or home rule county on his or her purchase or use of the property. The amount of the credit shall not exceed the use tax rate increase levied and imposed by this Resolution; and

PART FOUR: USE OF TAX REVENUES RESULTING FROM INCREASE IN THE SALES AND USE TAX RATE AND PARTIAL REDUCTION BY SUNSET OF THE SALES TAX AND USE TAX RATE INCREASE 21. Public Safety Critical Needs: Effective January 1, 2013 and continuing through December 31, 2020, the County shall expend all revenue generated from this sales and use tax increase for the purposes, listed on attached Exhibit A, and for no other purposes.

The Tri-Lakes Women’s Club gets ready for annual event By Lisa Collacott

‘Without donations we wouldn’t be able to give back to the community.’

19. Motor and other Vehicle Use Tax Collection: The use tax rate increase shall be to every motor and other 21.1 LAW ENFORCEMENT NEEDS vehicle purchased at retail on which regisg. The storage, use, or consumption of • HIRING, EMPLOYING, TRAINING AND tration is required by the laws of the State tangible personal property and household EQUIPPING ADDITIONAL PATROL of Colorado, and no registration shall be effects acquired outside of the County and DEPUTIES, INVESTIGATORS AND CImade of any motor or other vehicle for brought into it by a nonresident acquiring An event that offers goodwhich wine and VILIAN SUPPORT STAFF registration is required and no certiresidency; and • CONDUCTING FIRE AND CRIMINAL ficate of title shall be issued for such good company is definitely an event INVESTIGATIONS vehicle or for a mobile home by the Colorh. The storage or use of a motor vehicle if • REPLACING OBSOLETE AND FAILado Department of Revenue or its authorworth attending, especially if it’s benefitthe owner is or was, at the time of purING COMMUNICATION EQUIPMENT ized agent until any tax due upon the storchase, a nonresident of the County and he • PURCHASING AMMUNITION, FUEL age, use, or consumption thereof has ting community. or she the purchased the vehicle outside of AND OTHER OPERATIONAL SUPPLIES been paid. The use tax rate increase shall the County for use outside the County and Theso Tri-Lakes Women’s will once AND EQUIPMENT be collected by the County Clerk and Reactually used it for a substantial and Club corder, as the authorized agent of the Colprimary purpose for which it was acquired again their titled, annual tasting of Revenue. The pro- 21.2 CRIMINAL JUSTICE NEEDS orado Department and he or host she registered, and li- wine • HIRING, EMPLOYING, TRAINING AND ceeds of the use tax rate increase shall be censed said motor vehicle outside of the event. EQUIPPING ADDITIONAL DETENTION paid to the County periodically in accordCounty; and DEPUTIES, CIVILIAN SUPPORT STAFF ance with an agreement entered into by The event is one of two major fundAND COURT TRANSPORT PERSONNEL and between the County and the Colori. The storage, use, or consumption of any • CONDUCTING CRIMINAL EXTRADIado Department of Revenue concerning construction andthe building materials andproceeds raisers for TLWC with going TION use tax collection. motor and other vehicles on which regis• REPLACING AGING VIDEO SURVEILtration required if a written contract for backisto the Tri-Lakes community. The Wine Seller andAND Serranos Coffee. SiLANCE VIDEO VISITATION SYS20. Construction and Building Materials the purchase thereof was entered into priTEMS AT THE COUNTY JAIL Use Tax Collection: Collection of revenor toWine the effective date of the use tax rate lent Auction items are donated by local and Roses & More will take place • PURCHASING OPERATIONAL EQUIPues generated by the use tax rate inincrease; and AND SUPPLIES crease on constructionmerchants and building ma-andMENT members of the TLWC. Oct. 27 at The Pinery at Black Forest. • ADDRESSING ADDITIONAL SECURterials shall be administered at the direcj. The storage, use, or consumption of any ITY, SAFETY, OPERATIONS MAINtion of the Board. The use tax resulting “Everything is donated. WithoutAND donaThere are more reasons to attend this construction and building materials reTENANCE COSTS AT THE COUNTY from the use tax rate increase may be quired or made necessary in the performJAIL paid by estimate through the payment of tions we wouldn’t be able to give back to year. ance of any construction contract bid, let, the tax at the time permits are issued for or entered into at any time prior to the efthe community,” Alaine Nolt, co-chair of There willResolution; be more moreandlocal 21.3 EMERGENCY RESPONSE NEEDS construction. As an alternatfective date of this and wine, building • HIRING, EMPLOYING, TRAINING AND ive to the estimate procedure provided Wine and Roses & More. on-site chefs, a ofraffle de-of the use tax resulting EQUIPPING ADDITIONAL EMERGENCY above, payment k. The sale or purchase gasolineof anda specially PLANNING AND OPERATIONS STAFF from the use tax rate increase may be diesel fuels as statutory counties in ColorThis year the 10thEMERGENCY signed jewelry piece by Purple annual wine AND FUNDING REmade byMounthe filing by any applicant for a marks ado have no authority of whatsoever kind SPONSES building permit of an affidavit stating that or nature to impose and a use tax upon these tain Jewelry a commemorative wine • CONSTRUCTING AN EMERGENCY the applicant intends to tasting purchase allevent. buildcommodities. VEHICLE RESPONSE CENing and construction materials necessary main SERVICES fundraiser for TLWC for stem. TER for the project described inThe the building 18. Exemptions from Use Tax: There • PURCHASING A WILDLAND FIRE permit application from a licensed retailer shallAttendees be exempt from can the use tax rate inmany years was the Pine Forest Antiques participate located in live and TRUCK AND ADDITIONAL FIRE AND within the County. Every building crease the sale of all of the tangible perEMERGENCY SERVICES EQUIPMENT permit applicant who utilizes the alternatsonal property and services which are ex& Garden Show and Sale. In 2003 they silent auctions, sample foodive from resprocedure provided above shall mainempt under Part 7 of Article 26 of Title 39, 22. Sunset of Sales and Use Tax Rate Intain and preserve detailed purchase and C.R.S., which exemptions are incorporhad received $30,000 in grant requests. taurants in the Tri-Lakes and Colorado crease: On January 1, 2020, the twenty receipt records which shall be subject to ated by reference into this Resolution as if three one hundredth of one cent ($.0023) inspection and audit by employees of the Figuring the antique show would net Springs areas and have their wine, spirits fully set forth herein, expressly including sales and use tax rate increase shall terBoard, and any unpaid taxes due shall be the exemption for sales of food as defined minate by operation of law, and without subject to collection. The collection and approximately $20,000 the TLWC needed and poured by celebrity servers. and asbeer set forth in C.R.S. § 39-26the need for any action by the County. administration of the use tax rate increase 102(4.5), and as exempted from state at least $10,000 more so member and Celebrity local disc at the direction of the shall be performed sales tax pursuant servers to C.R.S. § include 39-2623. Distribution of Proceeds of Sales and Board in substantially the same manner 707(1)(e), the exemption for sales and co-chair of Wine and Roses & More jockeys, television anchors, andadministration and en- Use Tax Rate Increase: In order to Jan carry as food the collection, purchases of electricity, coal, wood, gas, out the purposes expressed in Paraforcement of the use tax of the state of including natural, manufactured and liqueVaughn suggested a wine tasting magazine editors, mayors and business graphshosting 20, above, and pursuant to C.R.S. Colorado. fied petroleum gas, fuel oil or coke, sold to § 29-2-104(2), the County shall retain all occupants of residences as set forth in bring in more money. and political leaders. revenue generated by this sales and use PART FOUR: USE OFto TAX REVENUES C.R.S. § 39-26-715(1)(a)(II), (fuels used in tax increase for the sole and exclusive use RESULTING FROM INCREASE IN THE providing residential light, heat and The first Wine and Roses fundraiser All beverages have been arranged by for the purposes described in Paragraph SALES AND USE TAX RATE AND PARpower), the exemption for sales and pur20. TIAL REDUCTION BY SUNSET OF THE chases of machinery or machine tools in SALES TAX AND USE TAX RATE INexcess of five-hundred dollars, as set forth 24. Exclusive Use of Proceeds of Sales CREASE in C.R.S. § 39-26-709(1)(a)(II), and the and Use Tax Rate Increase: The proexemption for components used in the ceeds of this sales and use tax rate in21. Public Safety Critical Needs: Effectproduction of alternating current electricity crease shall only be used for the purive January 1, 2013 and continuing from a renewable energy source, as set poses expressed in Paragraph 20, above, through December 31, 2020, the County forth in C.R.S. § 39-26-724. and for no other purposes. shall expend all revenue generated from this sales and use tax increase for the pur19. Motor and other Vehicle Use Tax Col25. No Conflict with Sales and Use Tax poses, listed on attached Exhibit A, and lection: The use tax rate increase shall be That May be Levied By Certain Governfor no other purposes. applicable to every motor and other mental Entities: With the adoption of Senvehicle purchased at retail on which regisate Bill 08-128 by the 2008 Colorado Gen21.1 LAW ENFORCEMENT NEEDS tration is required by the laws of the State eral Assembly that repealed in its entirety • HIRING, EMPLOYING, TRAINING AND of Colorado, and no registration shall be Section 29-2-108, C.R.S., the County’s inEQUIPPING ADDITIONAL PATROL made of any motor or other vehicle for crease in its sales and use tax rate does DEPUTIES, INVESTIGATORS AND CIwhich registration is required and no certinot interfere with or render ineffective or VILIAN SUPPORT STAFF ficate of title shall be issued for such unenforceable the sales and use tax rates • CONDUCTING FIRE AND CRIMINAL vehicle or for a mobile home by the Colorimposed by the State of Colorado and by INVESTIGATIONS ado Department of Revenue or its authorany municipality, multi-jurisdiction entity or • REPLACING OBSOLETE AND FAILized agent until any tax due upon the storagency located within the County. ING COMMUNICATION EQUIPMENT age, use, or consumption thereof has • PURCHASING AMMUNITION, FUEL been paid. The use tax rate increase shall 26. Maintenance of Effort: In addition to AND OTHER OPERATIONAL SUPPLIES be collected by the County Clerk and Rethe amounts provided to the Sheriff’s OfAND EQUIPMENT corder, as the authorized agent of the Colfice from this sales and use tax increase, orado Department of Revenue. The proeffective January 1, 2013, and for each 21.2 CRIMINAL JUSTICE NEEDS ceeds of the use tax rate increase shall be fiscal year thereafter, the County shall ap• HIRING, EMPLOYING, TRAINING AND paid to the County periodically in accordpropriate for the Sheriff’s office not less EQUIPPING ADDITIONAL DETENTION ance with an agreement entered into by than the ongoing amounts appropriated DEPUTIES, CIVILIAN SUPPORT STAFF and between the County and the Colorfor the Sheriff’s office statutorily manAND COURT TRANSPORT PERSONNEL ado Department of Revenue concerning dated services in the unrestricted general • CONDUCTING CRIMINAL EXTRADIuse tax collection. fund budget as stated in the County’s TION 2012 Original Adopted Budget, provided • REPLACING AGING VIDEO SURVEIL20. Construction and Building Materials that the total unrestricted general fund for LANCE AND VIDEO VISITATION SYSUse Tax Collection: Collection of reventhe year is not less than the total unrestricTEMS AT THE COUNTY JAIL ues generated by the use tax rate inted general fund in the County’s 2012 Ori• PURCHASING OPERATIONAL EQUIPcrease on construction and building maginal Adopted Budget MENT AND SUPPLIES terials shall be administered at the direc• ADDRESSING ADDITIONAL SECURtion of the Board. The use tax resulting 27. Citizen’s Advisory Committee to ReITY, SAFETY, OPERATIONS AND MAINfrom the use tax rate increase may be view All Revenue and Expenditures: An TENANCE COSTS AT THE COUNTY paid by estimate through the payment of advisory committee comprised of citizens JAIL the tax at the time permits are issued for appointed by the Board of County Combuilding and construction. As an alternatmissioners shall review revenue from this 21.3 EMERGENCY RESPONSE NEEDS ive to the estimate procedure provided sales and use tax increase and expendit• HIRING, EMPLOYING, TRAINING AND above, payment of the use tax resulting ures on an annual basis and make a pubEQUIPPING ADDITIONAL EMERGENCY from the use tax rate increase may be lic report to the Board of County CommisPLANNING AND OPERATIONS STAFF made by the filing by any applicant for a sioners during a regular meeting. AND FUNDING EMERGENCY REbuilding permit of an affidavit stating that SPONSES the applicant intends to purchase all buildPART FIVE: ELECTION REQUIRE• CONSTRUCTING AN EMERGENCY ing and construction materials necessary MENTS SERVICES VEHICLE RESPONSE CENfor the project described in the building TER permit application from a licensed retailer 28. Submission to Electors: Pursuant to • PURCHASING A WILDLAND FIRE located within the County. Every building C.R.S § 29-2-104(3), this sales and use TRUCK AND ADDITIONAL FIRE AND permit applicant who utilizes the alternattax rate increase Proposal as set forth in EMERGENCY SERVICES EQUIPMENT ive procedure provided above shall mainthis Resolution shall be referred to the elitain and preserve detailed purchase and gible electors of El Paso County at the 22. Sunset of Sales and Use Tax Rate Inreceipt records which shall be subject to General Election to be held Tuesday, crease: On January 1, 2020, the twenty inspection and audit by employees of the November 6, 2012, and being referred to three one hundredth of one cent ($.0023) Board, and any unpaid taxes due shall be herein as the November 2012 General sales and use tax rate increase shall tersubject to collection. The collection and Election. The ballot issue to be submitted minate by operation of law, and without administration of the use tax rate increase to the eligible electors shall be substanthe need for any action by the County. shall be performed at the direction of the tially as set forth on attached Exhibit A, Board in substantially the same manner which Exhibit A is incorporated by refer23. Distribution of Proceeds of Sales and as the collection, administration and enence into this Resolution as if fully set Use Tax Rate Increase: In order to carry forcement of the use tax of the state of forth herein. out the purposes expressed in ParaColorado. graphs 20, above, and pursuant to C.R.S. 29. Publication of Resolution: The County § 29-2-104(2), the County shall retain all PART FOUR: USE OF TAX REVENUES Clerk and Recorder is hereby authorized revenue generated by this sales and use RESULTING FROM INCREASE IN THE and directed to publish the text of this protax increase for the sole and exclusive use SALES AND USE TAX RATE AND PARposal for sales tax and use tax increase for the purposes described in Paragraph TIAL REDUCTION BY SUNSET OF THE four separate times, a week apart, in the 20. SALES TAX AND USE TAX RATE INofficial newspaper of the county and each CREASE city and incorporated town within the 24. Exclusive Use of Proceeds of Sales county. and Use Tax Rate Increase: The pro21. Public Safety Critical Needs: Effectceeds of this sales and use tax rate inive January 1, 2013 and continuing 30. Conduct of Election: The election crease shall only be used for the purthrough December 31, 2020, the County shall be held, conducted and the results poses expressed in Paragraph 20, above, shall expend all revenue generated from thereof shall he determined, so far as and for no other purposes. this sales and use tax increase for the purpracticable, in conformity with the proviposes, listed on attached Exhibit A, and sions of the Colorado Uniform Election 25. No Conflict with Sales and Use Tax for no other purposes. Code of 1992 as set forth in Articles 1 That May be Levied By Certain Governthrough 13, inclusive, of Title 1, C.R.S. mental Entities: With the adoption of Sen21.1 LAW ENFORCEMENT NEEDS ate Bill 08-128 by the 2008 Colorado Gen• HIRING, EMPLOYING, TRAINING AND 31. Ballot Title: For purposes of C.R.S. § eral Assembly that repealed in its entirety EQUIPPING ADDITIONAL PATROL 1-11-203.5, the ballot title for the ballot isSection 29-2-108, C.R.S., the County’s inDEPUTIES, INVESTIGATORS AND CIsue contained on Exhibit A attached to crease in its sales and use tax rate does VILIANNotice SUPPORT STAFF Public this Resolution is hereby determined to be not interfere with or render ineffective or • CONDUCTING FIRE AND CRIMINAL NOTICE IS FURTHER thattax a resoDated: 12, 2012. the textOctober of the ballot issue itself set forth unenforceable the salesGIVEN and use rates INVESTIGATIONS lution to amend 2012 budget forand the by NOTICE AS TO PROPOSED on attached Exhibit A. imposed by the the State of Colorado • REPLACING OBSOLETE BUDGET AND FAILAuthority may alsomulti-jurisdiction be considered at the or BAPTIST ROAD RURAL AND NOTICE CONCERNING BUDGET any municipality, entity ING COMMUNICATION EQUIPMENT 32. Authority to Effectuate Resolution: agency located within the County. above-referenced meeting of the Board of AMENDMENT • PURCHASING AMMUNITION, FUEL The officers, employees and agents of the AND OTHER OPERATIONAL SUPPLIES Directors of the Authority. A copy of the TRANSPORTATION AUTHORITY County are hereby authorized and direc26. Maintenance of Effort: to AND EQUIPMENT proposed budget and a copy In of addition the resoluNOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the ted to take all action necessary or approthe amounts provided to the Sheriff’s Oftion to amend the 2012 are availBy: /s/ to Denise Denslow proposed budget for the ensuing year of priate effectuate the provisions of this fice from this sales andbudget use tax increase, 21.2 CRIMINAL JUSTICE NEEDS able for public inspection at the of Manager of the Authority with Colorado has been submitted to the Baptist Resolution in accordance effective January 1, 2013, andoffices for each •2013 HIRING, EMPLOYING, TRAINING AND CliftonLarsonAllen LLP, 8390 E. Crescent Road Rural Transportation law. fiscal year thereafter, the County shall apEQUIPPING ADDITIONALAuthority DETENTION propriate theGreenwood Sheriff’s office not less Pkwy., Ste.for 500, Village, Legal Notice No.: 932012 (“Authority”). CIVILIAN Such proposed budget will DEPUTIES, SUPPORT STAFF PARTPublication: SIX: MISCELLANEOUS than the ongoing amounts appropriated AND COURT TRANSPORT PERSONNEL Colorado. Any interested elector within First October 24, 2012 be considered at a regular meeting of the for the Sheriff’s statutorily •Board CONDUCTING CRIMINAL EXTRADIthe Authority may, office at any time prior tomanfinal Last Publication: October 24, 2012 of Directors of the Authority to be 33. Effective Date-Applicability: Upon apdated services in the unrestricted general TION adoption of the budget or final adoption of Publisher: The Tribune held at 2:30 p.m. on Friday, November 9, proval at the November 2012 General fund budget as stated in the County’s • REPLACING AGING VIDEO SURVEILthe resolution amend the 2012 provided budget, 2012, at AND Monument Town Hall, 645 BeaElection, this Proposal shall become ef2012 OriginaltoAdopted Budget, LANCE VIDEO VISITATION SYScon LiteAT Road, file orthe register any objections thereto. fective and in force immediately, subject to that total unrestricted general fund for TEMS THEMonument, COUNTY Colorado. JAIL the terms and conditions as set forth in the year is not less than the total unrestricapplicable lcollacott@ourcoloradonews.com

Alaine Nolt

Government Legals

Government Legals

Government Legals

Government Legals

Government Legals

Government Legals

EMERGENCY SERVICES EQUIPMENT 22. Sunset of Sales and Use Tax Rate Increase: On January 1, 2020, the twenty three one hundredth of one cent ($.0023) sales and use tax rate increase shall terminate by operation of law, and without the need for any action by the County. 23. Distribution of Proceeds of Sales and Use Tax Rate Increase: In order to carry out the purposes expressed in Paragraphs 20, above, and pursuant to C.R.S. § 29-2-104(2), the County shall retain all revenue generated by this sales and use tax increase for the sole and exclusive use for the purposes described in Paragraph 20. 24. Exclusive Use of Proceeds of Sales and Use Tax Rate Increase: The proceeds of this sales and use tax rate increase shall only be used for the purposes expressed in Paragraph 20, above, and for no other purposes. 25. No Conflict with Sales and Use Tax That May be Levied By Certain Governmental Entities: With the adoption of Senate Bill 08-128 by the 2008 Colorado General Assembly that repealed in its entirety Section 29-2-108, C.R.S., the County’s increase in its sales and use tax rate does not interfere with or render ineffective or unenforceable the sales and use tax rates imposed by the State of Colorado and by any municipality, multi-jurisdiction entity or agency located within the County. 26. Maintenance of Effort: In addition to the amounts provided to the Sheriff’s Office from this sales and use tax increase, effective January 1, 2013, and for each fiscal year thereafter, the County shall appropriate for the Sheriff’s office not less than the ongoing amounts appropriated for the Sheriff’s office statutorily mandated services in the unrestricted general fund budget as stated in the County’s 2012 Original Adopted Budget, provided that the total unrestricted general fund for the year is not less than the total unrestricted general fund in the County’s 2012 Original Adopted Budget

tax rate increase Proposal as set forth in this Resolution shall be referred to the eligible electors of El Paso County at the General Election to be held Tuesday, November 6, 2012, and being referred to herein as the November 2012 General Election. The ballot issue to be submitted to the eligible electors shall be substantially as set forth on attached Exhibit A, which Exhibit A is incorporated by reference into this Resolution as if fully set forth herein.

this Resolution may be amended by resolution of the Board, and such amendments need not be submitted to the qualified registered electors of the County for their approval, except that Paragraphs 20, 21, 22, 23, 26, 27, and 28 (however, Paragraph 28 may be partially amended as provided for in said Paragraph 28), above, may not be amended without submission of the appropriate ballot issue or question to the eligible electors of the County and in accordance with Colorado law.

29. Publication of Resolution: The County Clerk and Recorder is hereby authorized and directed to publish the text of this proposal for sales tax and use tax increase four separate times, a week apart, in the official newspaper of the county and each city and incorporated town within the county.

36. Severability: If any section, paragraph, clause or provision of this Resolution shall be adjudged to be invalid or unenforceable, the invalidity or unenforceability of such section, paragraph, clause or provision shall not affect any of the remaining sections, paragraphs, clauses or provisions of this Resolution. It is the intention of the Board that the various parts of this Resolution are severable.

30. Conduct of Election: The election shall be held, conducted and the results thereof shall he determined, so far as practicable, in conformity with the provisions of the Colorado Uniform Election Code of 1992 as set forth in Articles 1 through 13, inclusive, of Title 1, C.R.S. 31. Ballot Title: For purposes of C.R.S. § 1-11-203.5, the ballot title for the ballot issue contained on Exhibit A attached to this Resolution is hereby determined to be the text of the ballot issue itself set forth on attached Exhibit A. 32. Authority to Effectuate Resolution: The officers, employees and agents of the County are hereby authorized and directed to take all action necessary or appropriate to effectuate the provisions of this Resolution in accordance with Colorado law.

October 24, 2012

37. Section Headings: Section headings are for convenience only, and shall not express or imply or have any bearing upon the interpretation of the specific section in question.

DONE AND SIGNED this 9th day of October, 2012, at Colorado Springs, Colorado.

BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS ATTEST: OF EL PASO COUNTY, COLORADO By: s/ Wayne W. Williams County Clerk and Recorder By: s/ Amy Lathen Amy Lathen, Chair EXHIBIT A – BALLOT LANGUAGE

SHALL EL PASO COUNTY TAXES BE INCREASED BY APPROXIMATELY $17 MILLION ANNUALLY TO DIRECTLY FUND THE URGENT PUBLIC SAFETY 33. Effective Date-Applicability: Upon apNEEDS IDENTIFIED BY EL PASO proval at the November 2012 General COUNTY SHERIFF TERRY MAKETA, Election, this Proposal shall become efTHE CHIEF LAW ENFORCEMENT OFFIfective and in force immediately, subject to CIAL SERVING ALL RESIDENTS OF the terms and conditions as set forth in THE CITIES, TOWNS AND UNINCORthis Resolution, and shall remain effective PORATED AREAS WITHIN THE BOUNDunless otherwise repealed according to ARIES OF EL PASO COUNTY, AS CRITColorado law; provided, however, that the ICAL TOgrantees PERFORMING HIS STATprovisions of this Resolution calling2011-2012 the 27. Citizen’s Advisory Committeebefore to Retook place a week the antique The were the UTORY OBLIGATIONS TO ALL EL PASO election on the ballot issue set forth on Exview All Revenue and Expenditures: An BY INCREAShibit A shall take effectPalmer immediately upon advisory committee comprised citizens show and brought inof$7,000. Lake COUNTY Police RESIDENTS, Department, the ING THE COUNTY'S SALES AND USE the passage of this Resolution by the appointed by the Board of County ComAnother onerevenue took from place Palmer Lake Volunteer Fire Department, TAX RATE BY TWENTY-THREE HUNBoard.months missioners shall review this a few DREDTHS OF ONE CENT ($0.0023) PER sales and use tax increase and expenditlater and have been held in October ever Tri-Lakes Center for the Arts, DOLLAR PURSUANT TOTri-Lakes PART 1 OF ures on an annual basis and make a pub34. Statutory References: All statutory ARTICLE 2 OF TITLE 29, COLORADO lic report to the Board of County Commiscitations in this Resolution shall be consince. Community Tri-Lakes Health REVISED STATUTES; WHICH NEEDS sioners during a regular meeting. strued to refer to the Colorado Revised Pre-School, ARE SPECIFICALLY IDENTIFIED IN THE Statutes, 2012 referred to above as The antique show takes place every Advocacy Partnership, Palmer Lake AREAS OF LAW ENFORCEMENT, PART FIVE: ELECTION REQUIREC.R.S., and as the same may be from CRIMINAL JUSTICE AND EMERGENCY MENTS time to time amended. spring. Fireworks Committee, Tri-Lakes Cares, RESPONSE, WITH ALL REVENUES GENERATED TO BEMusic RESTRICTED TO 28. Submission to Electors: to 35. otherwise re“The more we doPursuant the more weAmendments: are able Unless Tri-Lakes YMCA, Tri-Lakes AssoTHE FOLLOWING AND USED FOR NO C.R.S § 29-2-104(3), this sales and use quired by Colorado law, the provisions of OTHER PURPOSE: tax rate increase Proposal as set forth in this Resolution may be ciation, amended by resolto give,” Nolt said. Monument Academy and eight this Resolution shall be referred to the eliution of the Board, and such amendments 1. LAW ENFORCEMENT NEEDS gible“Every electors of El Paso County at the need increase not be submitted D-38 to the qualified reyear our net proceeds programs. • HIRING, EMPLOYING, TRAINING AND General Election to be held Tuesday, gistered electors of the County for their EQUIPPING ADDITIONAL November 2012, and being referred to approval, except that Paragraphs 20, 21, to give 6, back,” Vaughn added. Wine and Roses & More will takePATROL place DEPUTIES, INVESTIGATORS AND CIherein as the November 2012 General 22, 23, 26, 27, and 28 (however, ParaVILIAN STAFFPinery at Election. ballot issue be submitted may be partially amended as TheThe TLWC hastobeen givinggraph back28to the from 6-9 p.m. Oct. SUPPORT 27 at The • CONDUCTING FIRE AND CRIMINAL to the eligible electors shall be substanprovided for in said Paragraph 28), above, community for more than years and without Blacksubmission Forest. Tickets are $65 and can be INVESTIGATIONS tially as set forth on attached Exhibit A, 30 may not be amended • REPLACING OBSOLETE AND FAILwhich Exhibit A is incorporated by referof the appropriate ballot issue or question have given more than $700,000. They at www.TLWC.net, SerING COMMUNICATION EQUIPMENT ence into this Resolution as if fully set to the eligible electors purchased of the County andonline • PURCHASING AMMUNITION, FUEL forth herein. in accordance with Colorado law. grant approximately $50,000 each year ranos Coffee, The and the TriAND Wine OTHER Seller OPERATIONAL SUPPLIES AND EQUIPMENT 29. Publication of Resolution: The County 36. Severability: If any section, paragraph, to within the Lewis-Palmer Lakes Chamber of Commerce and The Clerknonprofits and Recorder is hereby authorized clause or provision of this Resolution shall CRIMINAL JUSTICE NEEDS and directed to publish the text of this probe adjudged to be invalid or unenforceSchool District Tribune. of 2. • HIRING, EMPLOYING, TRAINING AND posal for sales tax and 38 use boundaries. tax increase able, the invalidity or unenforceability such section, paragraph, clause or proviEQUIPPING ADDITIONAL DETENTION four separate times, a week apart, in the sion shall not affect any of the remaining DEPUTIES, CIVILIAN SUPPORT STAFF official newspaper of the county and each sections, paragraphs, clauses or proviAND COURT TRANSPORT PERSONNEL city and incorporated town within the sions of this Resolution. It is the intention • CONDUCTING CRIMINAL EXTRADIcounty. of the Board that the various parts of this TION Resolution are severable. • REPLACING AGING VIDEO SURVEIL30. Conduct of Election: The election shall be held, conducted and the results LANCE AND VIDEO VISITATION SYSthereof shall he determined, so far as 37. Section Headings: Section headings TEMS AT THE COUNTY JAIL practicable, in conformity with the proviare for convenience only, and shall not ex• PURCHASING OPERATIONAL EQUIPsions of the Colorado Uniform Election MENT AND SUPPLIES press or imply or have any bearing upon Code of 1992 as set forth in Articles 1 • ADDRESSING ADDITIONAL SECURthe interpretation of the specific section in through 13, inclusive, of Title 1, C.R.S. ITY, SAFETY, OPERATIONS AND MAINquestion. TENANCE COSTS AT THE COUNTY 31. Ballot Title: For purposes of C.R.S. § JAIL DONE AND SIGNED this 9th day of Octo1-11-203.5, the ballot title for the ballot isber, 2012, at Colorado Springs, Colorado. sue contained on Exhibit A attached to 3. EMERGENCY RESPONSE NEEDS this Resolution is hereby determined to be • HIRING, EMPLOYING, TRAINING AND BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS the text of the ballot issue itself set forth EQUIPPING ADDITIONAL EMERGENCY ATTEST: OF EL PASO COUNTY, COLon attached Exhibit A. ORADO PLANNING AND OPERATIONS STAFF AND FUNDING EMERGENCY RE32. Authority to Effectuate Resolution: By: s/ Wayne W. Williams SPONSES The officers, employees and agents of the County Clerk and Recorder • CONSTRUCTING AN EMERGENCY County are hereby authorized and direcBy: s/ Amy Lathen SERVICES VEHICLE RESPONSE CENted to take all action necessary or approAmy Lathen, Chair TER priate to effectuate the provisions of this • PURCHASING A WILDLAND FIRE Resolution in accordance with Colorado EXHIBIT A – BALLOT LANGUAGE TRUCK AND ADDITIONAL FIRE AND law. EMERGENCY SERVICES EQUIPMENT SHALL EL PASO COUNTY TAXES BE PART SIX: MISCELLANEOUS INCREASED BY APPROXIMATELY $17 WITH THE SHERIFF REQUIRED TO REMILLION ANNUALLY TO DIRECTLY PORT ANNUALLY TO THE CITIZENS OF 33. Effective Date-Applicability: Upon apFUND THE URGENT PUBLIC SAFETY EL PASO COUNTY ALL REVENUES proval at the November 2012 General NEEDS IDENTIFIED BY EL PASO AND EXPENDITURES RESULTING Election, this Proposal shall become efCOUNTY SHERIFF TERRY MAKETA, FROM SUCH TAX INCREASE; AND A fective and in force immediately, subject to THE CHIEF LAW ENFORCEMENT OFFICITIZENS’ ADVISORY COMMITTEE TO the terms and conditions as set forth in CIAL SERVING ALL RESIDENTS OF REVIEW ALL REVENUES AND EXthis Resolution, and shall remain effective THE CITIES, TOWNS AND UNINCORPENDITURES RESULTING FROM SUCH unless otherwise repealed according to PORATED AREAS WITHIN THE BOUNDTAX INCREASE; WITH ALL REVENUES Colorado law; provided, however, that the ARIES OF EL PASO COUNTY, AS CRITGENERATED AND THE EARNINGS ON provisions of this Resolution calling the ICAL TO PERFORMING HIS STATSUCH REVENUE TO BE COLLECTED election on the ballot issue set forth on ExUTORY OBLIGATIONS TO ALL EL PASO AND SPENT EACH YEAR WITHOUT hibit A shall take effect immediately upon COUNTY RESIDENTS, BY INCREASLIMITATION BY THE REVENUE AND the passage of this Resolution by the ING THE COUNTY'S SALES AND USE SPENDING LIMITS OF, AND WITHOUT Board. TAX RATE BY TWENTY-THREE HUNAFFECTING THE COUNTY'S ABILITY DREDTHS OF ONE CENT ($0.0023) PER TO COLLECT AND SPEND OTHER REV34. Statutory References: All statutory DOLLAR PURSUANT TO PART 1 OF ENUES OR FUNDS UNDER, ARTICLE X, citations in this Resolution shall be conARTICLE 2 OF TITLE 29, COLORADO SECTION 20 OF THE COLORADO CONstrued to refer to the Colorado Revised REVISED STATUTES; WHICH NEEDS STITUTION; WITH SUCH SALES AND Statutes, 2012 referred to above as ARE SPECIFICALLY IDENTIFIED IN THE USE TAX INCREASE BEING COLLECC.R.S., and as the same may be from AREAS OF LAW ENFORCEMENT, TED, ADMINISTERED AND ENFORCED time to time amended. CRIMINAL JUSTICE AND EMERGENCY PURSUANT TO EL PASO COUNTY RESPONSE, WITH ALL REVENUES BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSION35. Amendments: Unless otherwise reGENERATED TO BE RESTRICTED TO ERS RESOLUTION NO. 12-309; WITH quired by Colorado law, the provisions of THE FOLLOWING AND USED FOR NO SALES OF GROCERY FOOD ITEMS, this Resolution may be amended by resolOTHER PURPOSE: PRESCRIPTION MEDICATIONS, FUELD ution of the Board, and such amendments FOR RESIDENTIAL UTILITIES AND need not be submitted to the qualified re1. LAW ENFORCEMENT NEEDS OTHER GOODS AND SERVICES IDENgistered electors of the County for their • HIRING, EMPLOYING, TRAINING AND TIFIED IN RESOLUTION NO. 12-309 BEapproval, except that Paragraphs 20, 21, EQUIPPING ADDITIONAL PATROL ING EXEMPT FROM SUCH SALES AND 22, 23, 26, 27, and 28 (however, ParaDEPUTIES, INVESTIGATORS AND CIUSE TAX INCREASE; WITH THE UNgraph 28 may be partially amended as VILIAN SUPPORT STAFF DERSTANDING THAT THE SHERIFF provided for in said Paragraph 28), above, • CONDUCTING FIRE AND CRIMINAL CAN AT ANY TIME RECOMMEND TO may not be amended without submission INVESTIGATIONS THE BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISof the appropriate ballot issue or question • REPLACING OBSOLETE AND FAILSIONERS A REDUCTION OR ELIMINAto the eligible electors of the County and ING COMMUNICATION EQUIPMENT TION OF SUCH SALES AND USE TAX in accordance with Colorado law. • PURCHASING AMMUNITION, FUEL INCREASE; AND WITH AN EIGHT-YEAR AND OTHER OPERATIONAL SUPPLIES SUNSET PROVISION, SUCH SALES 36. Severability: If any section, paragraph, AND EQUIPMENT AND USE TAX INCREASE TERMINATclause or provision of this Resolution shall ING WITHOUT THE NEED FOR FURbe adjudged to be invalid or unenforce2. CRIMINAL JUSTICE NEEDS THER ACTION ON JANUARY 1, 2021? able, the invalidity or unenforceability of • HIRING, EMPLOYING, TRAINING AND such section, paragraph, clause or proviEQUIPPING ADDITIONAL DETENTION Legal Notice No.: 932008 sion shall not affect any of the remaining DEPUTIES, CIVILIAN SUPPORT STAFF First Publication: October 17, 2012 sections, paragraphs, clauses or proviAND COURT TRANSPORT PERSONNEL Last Publication: November 7, 2012 sions of this Resolution. It is the intention • CONDUCTING CRIMINAL EXTRADIPublisher: The Tribune of the Board that the various parts of this TION Resolution are severable. • REPLACING AGING VIDEO SURVEILLANCE AND VIDEO VISITATION SYS37. Section Headings: Section headings TEMS AT THE COUNTY JAIL are for convenience only, and shall not ex• PURCHASING OPERATIONAL EQUIPpress or imply or have any bearing upon MENT AND SUPPLIES the interpretation of the specific section in • ADDRESSING ADDITIONAL SECURquestion. ITY, SAFETY, OPERATIONS AND MAINTENANCE COSTS AT THE COUNTY DONE AND SIGNED this 9th day of OctoJAIL ber, 2012, at Colorado Springs, Colorado. 3. EMERGENCY RESPONSE NEEDS BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS • HIRING, EMPLOYING, TRAINING AND ATTEST: OF EL PASO COUNTY, COLEQUIPPING ADDITIONAL EMERGENCY ORADO PLANNING AND OPERATIONS STAFF AND FUNDING EMERGENCY REBy: s/ Wayne W. Williams SPONSES County Clerk and Recorder • CONSTRUCTING AN EMERGENCY By: s/ Amy Lathen SERVICES VEHICLE RESPONSE CENAmy Lathen, Chair TER Every A day,WILDLAND the government • PURCHASING FIRE newspapers like this one to publish makes that can affect EXHIBIT A – BALLOT LANGUAGE TRUCK ANDdecisions ADDITIONAL FIREyour AND public notices since the birth of the EMERGENCY SERVICES life. Whether they are EQUIPMENT decisions on nation. Local newspapers remain SHALL EL PASO COUNTY TAXES BE zoning, taxes, new businesses INCREASED BY APPROXIMATELY $17 WITH THE SHERIFF REQUIRED TO or RE- the most trusted source of public MILLION ANNUALLY TO DIRECTLY PORT myriad ANNUALLY THE governments CITIZENS OF notice information. This newspaper otherTO issues, FUND THE URGENT PUBLIC SAFETY EL PASO COUNTY ALL REVENUES play a big role in your life. publishes the information you need NEEDS IDENTIFIED BY EL PASO AND EXPENDITURES RESULTING Governments have relied on A to stay involved in your community. COUNTY SHERIFF TERRY MAKETA, FROM SUCH TAX INCREASE; AND THE CHIEF LAW ENFORCEMENT OFFICITIZENS’ ADVISORY COMMITTEE TO - Aldous Huxley CIAL SERVING ALL RESIDENTS OF REVIEW ALL REVENUES AND EXPART SIX: MISCELLANEOUS

Wine and Roses & More will take place Oct. 27 at the Pinery. The annual wine tasting fundraiser will feature celebrity servers and local on-site chefs. At last year’s event former Palmer Lake Mayor John Cressman, pictured in tan blazer, helped pour wine. File photo by Lisa Collacott

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October 24, 2012 HAVE AN EVENT?

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Mary Carew, an educator with the Pikes Peak Chapter of the Colorado Archaeological Society, demonstrates rock art at a recent meeting of the Monument Homemakers Club. Photos by Norma Engelberg

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Pikes Peak Chapter part of Colorado Archaeology Society

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Licensed full-time insurance agent During Lithics demonstration, Bob Kilgore, a member of the Pikes Peak Chapter of the Colorado Archaeological Society, shows how paleolithic peoples used river rocks to create stone hammers and axes. then destroy them. These sites belong to all of us and once they’re gone, they’re gone. We can’t replace them.” The chapter also has members who act as educators using the society’s trunk kits. “They’re actually suitcases,” Lee said. “Our members use them to teach aspects of archaeology at schools and local clubs and organizations. We love seeing children’s faces light up when they `get’ something.” Demonstrations include: Lithics (making and using stone tools),

prehistoric and historic archaeology, ceramics, stone art, lab work, corn grinding and dig box (planning digs and documenting finds.) “Archaeology is an amalgam of many scientific disciplines,” Lee said. “You have to know something about biology, geology, physics and geography, for example, to make sense of what you find.” For more information about the chapter, membership and upcoming activities, visit www.coloradospringsarchaeology.org.

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Where can people with an interest in archaeology go to rub shoulders with professional archaeologists? They can become members of the Pikes Peak Chapter of the Colorado Archaeological Society, that’s where. The group that includes both avocational and professional archaeologists meets at 7 p.m. on the third Tuesday of each month at Colorado Springs Fire Station #19, 2490 Research Parkway. Members come from all over the region from Castle Rock to Canon City and from the Eastern Plains to Florissant. “We’re a wonderful group,” said chapter President Laurie Lee. “We go on field trips, we offer 13 classes a year with the assistant state archaeologist and we plan other activities throughout the year.” The Pikes Peak chapter will be celebrating its 30th year in January. The state society was founded in 1935. Besides being able to talk to others with the same interests, membership benefits include

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lectures by leaders in archaeology, paleontology and history; field trips to archaeological sites, not just in Colorado but also in surrounding states, opportunities for archaeological education though the Program for Avocational Archaeological Certification, educating youth sessions, the monthly chapter newsletter, the state society’s quarterly newsletter and the opportunity to attend the state society’s annual meetings. “The PAAC classes are on weekends and are open to anyone from about age 15 and up,” Lee said. “You do not have to be a member of the society to take the classes.” The classes were started by the Colorado Archaeology Society and the Colorado Office of Archaeology in 1978 for avocational and professional archaeologists. “Because of the PAAC classes members have been invited out to the (Comanche National) Grasslands several times,” Lee said. “In 1999, we went to Vogel Canyon to help archaeologists restore Native American pictographs that had been vandalized. I don’t know why people make all the effort to get to some of these places and

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October 24, 2012

PRHS students have a blast in forensics class Students sat in on a presentation from the bomb squad By Lisa Collacott

lcollacott@ourcoloradonews.com While most of the students at Palmer Ridge High School were learning about math, social studies and literature, a select few were learning what goes on with the Colorado Springs Police Bomb Squad. Students in Kait Cumsille’s forensic science class were privileged to have guest speaker and regional explosive unit coordinator Bill Betts give a presentation to their class. Betts talked to students about what goes into being a bomb technician, what types of calls they get called to and the amount of training that is required for them. He told students that their job is to dispose of explosives and render the area safe. They receive a lot of calls about grenades and other military items. “Part of our job is not to only understand explosives but to understand electronics,” Betts said. He told students that there is a lot of math and chemistry involved in the job. The bomb squad consists of seven bomb technicians from the Colorado Springs Police Department and two from the El Paso County Sheriff’s Office. They respond to five different counties and work closely with other agencies like the DEA, ATF and TSA. Betts showed students video of explosives detonating and reminded them how dangerous explosives can be and that making a bomb or other type of explosive is a felony. “Please don’t play with stuff like this,” Betts said. Students also got to see the inside of the bomb

‘Part of our job is not to only understand explosives but to understand electronics.’ Bill Betts, regional explosive unit coordinator

Junior Taylor Klee receives assistance from Officer Bill Betts and Palmer Ridge High School science teacher Kait Cumsille as she gets into the bomb suit worn by bomb technicians. Betts, the regional explosive unit coordinator for the Colorado Springs Police Department, spoke to Cumsille’s forensic science class about what the bomb squad does. Bottom, Officer Betts puts the bomb suit helmet on Klee. Photos by Lisa Collacott squad vehicle and get a look at the robot that goes into check if a device is explosive. One student even got to try on the 85 pound bomb suit that the bomb squad technicians wear. “They don’t take this stuff lightly. They are serious about this,” senior Ryan Brown said after the presentation was done. “We learned that this stuff is really expensive,” senior Terrance Packard added. This is the second year that the forensic science class has been offered. Students learn about evidence, solve a crime, analyze fabrics and will be taking a field trip to the Criminal Justice Center to see the county crime lab.

CLUBS IN YOUR COMMUNITY Clubs continued from Page 12

safe and nurturing environment. Call 719-597-8603.

THE VAILE Museum, 66 Lower Glenway, is open from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturdays year-round and from 1-4 p.m. Wednesdays from June through August. Groups by appointment are accepted. Call 719-559-0837.

GLENEAGLE SERTOMA Club luncheon meeting is every Wednesday at 11:45 a.m., at Liberty Heights, 12105 Ambassador Drive, Colorado Springs, 80921. Call Sherry Edwards at 488-1044 or Bill Nance at 488-2312 or visit www.sertoma. org.

SERVICES FREE GENTLY used clothing is available the second Saturday of every month from 1-3 p.m. at Tri-Lakes Church of Christ, the intersection of County Line Road and Beacon Lite, 20450 Beacon Lite, in Monument. For more information, call 719-495-4137. Look for the sign on the corner. SHARE COLORADO, a nonprofit organization, is a monthly food distributor that offers grocery packages at half the retail price to everyone. Call 800-375-4452 or visit www. sharecolorado.com. SOCIAL THE BLACK Forest AARP Chapter meets for a luncheon the second Wednesday of each month at the Black Forest Lutheran Church. Call 719-596-6787 or 719-495-2443. THE CENTURIAN Daylight Lodge No 195 A.F and A.M meets at 7 p.m. the fourth Tuesday of each month. Eastern Star meets 7:30 p.m. the first and third Tuesdays. Both groups meet at 18275 Furrow Road. Call 719-488-9329. COALITION OF Tri-Lakes Communities. Call John Heiser at 719-488-9031 or go to www.CoalitionTLC.org. COLORADO MOUNTED Rangers Troop “I” is looking for volunteers. The troop meets at 7 p.m. the first Friday of the month at the Pikes Peak National Bank, in the upstairs conference room. The bank address is 2401 W. Colorado Ave, on the corner of Colorado Ave and 24th Street. The entrance is a single unmarked door on Colorado Avenue between the bank and the bicycle store. Free parking is available in the bank employee parking lot on the south side of the bank’s drive-up facility. Visit http://itroop.coloradoranger.org or e-mail Info@coloradoranger.org. GIRL SCOUTING offers opportunities for girls ages 5-17 to make friends, learn new skills and challenge themselves in a

THE PALMER Lake Art Group meets on the second Saturday of the month at the group’s Vaile Hill Gallery, 118 Hillside Road. Call 719-488-8101 for information. PALMER DIVIDE Quiltmakers meets at 7 p.m. the first Thursday of each month at The Church at Woodmoor. Contact Carolyn at 719-488-9791 or hockcf@aol.com.

HISTORY BUFFS meets at Monument Library from 1-3 p.m. the first Wednesday of every month.

THE PIKES Peak Branch of the National League of American Pen Women offers information by calling 719-532-0021.

KIWANIS CLUB of Monument Hill, a service club dedicated to providing assistance to those less fortunate in the Tri-Lakes community, meets 8 a.m. Saturdays at The Inn at Palmer Divide, 443 Colo. 105. Join us for breakfast, great fellowship and informative programs, and come be a part of the opportunity to give back to your community. Visit http:// monumenthillkiwanis.org; call 719-4871098; e-mail info@ monumenthillkiwanis.org

PIKES PEAK Women’s Connection meets the second Thursday of the month for a luncheon at the Clarion Hotel Downtown, 314 W. Bijou St., Colorado Springs. Social time begins at 11:30 a.m., with luncheon and program from noon to 1:30 p.m. Free preschool childcare is available with a reservation; $16 inclusive. Call 719-495-8304 for reservations or information. All women are welcome.

LEGACY SERTOMA dinner meetings are the first and third Thursdays monthly, 6:30 p.m., The Inn at Palmer Divide, 443 Hwy 105, Palmer Lake. New members and visitors welcome. Call Ed Kinney, 481-2750. MOMS IN Touch prayer groups meet, by school, throughout the school district for one hour each week to support the children, their teachers, the schools and administration through prayer. Call Judy Ehrlich at 719-481-1668. THE MONUMENT Homemakers Club meets the first Thursday of every month at the Tri-Lakes Fire Department Administrative Building, 166 Second Street, Monument. Arrive at 11:30 a.m. to prepare for a noon potluck, program, and business meeting, which ends around 1:30 p.m. Newcomers are welcome. Call Irene Walters, Co-President, at 719-481-1188 for Jean Sanger, Co-President, at 719-5929311 for reservations. MOUNT HERMAN 4-H Club meets at 7 p.m. on the third Thursday of each month at Grace Best Elementary. There are no meetings in June, July and August. Anyone interested in pursuing animal projects, archery, cooking, sewing, model rocketry, woodworking or just about any hobby is welcome. A new member meeting is the third Thursday in October. Call Chris Bailey at 719-481-1579.

ROTARY CLUB of Colorado Springs InterQuest meets at 4:45 p.m. Thursdays at Liberty Heights Retirement Center, 12105 Ambassador Drive in Colorado Springs. Call Scott Allen at 719-590-7460. SILENT SPRINGS Social Group is a social group for hard of hearing and deaf adults. Sign language users are welcome. Dining out at local restaurants, potlucks and community activities are available on an ongoing basis. Call 719-4879009 or e-mail silentspringscos@hotmail.com. TOASTMASTERS FACC Masters Club meets at noon Thursdays at Lockheed Martin, 9975 Federal Drive. Visit http:// faccmasters.freetoasthost.us or call Kirby at 719-481-3738. TRI-LAKES AMERICAN Legion Post 9-11 meets at 6:30 p.m. the first Tuesday of each month at the Depot Restaurant on Colo. 105 in Palmer Lake. Contact Ed at 719481-2750. TRI-LAKES BARBERSHOP Chapter meets Mondays. Call Phil Zara at 719-481-3197. TRI-LAKES CROP Club meets on the third Saturday of the month. Call Angela at 719-481-9735. TRI-LAKES CRUISERS Car Club meets at 7 p.m. the first Wednesday of each month at the Tri-Lakes-Monument Fire Station on South Colo. 105. Open to all vehicle makes and

models. Call Dale at 488-2852. TRI-LAKES FRIENDS of the Libraries meets from 10 a.m. to noon the second Monday of each month from September through June at Monument Library. THE TRI-LAKES Lions Club meets the first Thursday of every month at Monument Hill Country Club. The social is at 6:30 p.m. and the meeting is at 7 p.m. The International Association of Lions Clubs is the largest service club in the world with over 1.35 million members. The Lions are known as the “Knights of the Blind.” By conducting vision screenings, equipping hospitals and clinics, distributing medicine and raising awareness of eye disease, Lions work toward their mission of providing vision for all. Lions clubs are groups of community minded men and women who are interested in helping serve their communities. For information about the new Tri-Lakes Lions Club, contact the club’s president, Dave Prejean, at 719-492-8274. More information is available at lionsclubs.org. TRI-LAKES NONDENOMINATIONAL Men’s Gathering meets at 6:30 a.m. Wednesdays at the Pinecrest Lodge in Palmer Lake. Continental breakfast is included. Call Basil Marotta at 719-487-9500. TRI-LAKES PARENTS of Multiples Club meets at 6:30 p.m. the third Monday of each month at the Little Log Church in Palmer Lake. Child care is provided for a minimal fee. New members and visitors are welcome. E-mail tlpoms@yahoo. com or call 719-488-6785. TRI-LAKES VFW Post No. 7829 meets at 7 p.m. the third Tuesday of the month at The Depot. New members are welcome. Call Alicia Gatti at 719-481-8668. TRI-LAKES WOMEN’S Club membership is open to all women living in School District 38. Luncheon meetings with programs are September through May. The Tri-Lakes Women’s Club sponsors the Wine and Roses event in October and the annual Pine Forest Antiques Show and Sale in April. Proceeds from these fundraisers benefit local nonprofit groups. Visit www.tlwc.net, or contact Judy Crusius at crusii@aol.com or 719-481-1994 or Barb Dienes at bdienes@ msn.com or 719-487-7392.

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Tri-Lakes Tribune published by Colorado Community Media