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Tribune TRI LAKES 1.9.13

Tri-Lakes

January 9, 2013

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A Colorado Community Media Publication

ourtrilakesnews.com

Tri-Lakes Region, Monument, Gleneagle, Black Forest and Northern El Paso County • Volume 10, Issue 2

New Year, new rules The minimum wage increased by 14 cents for Colorado By Lisa Collacott

lcollacott@ourcoloradonews.com

Children feed carrots to Nugget and Chism after learning all about the burros during Winter Break with the Burros on Dec. 28. Photos by Lisa Collacott

Spending winter break with a burro Kids learned all about the mining museum’s resident burros By Lisa Collacott

lcollacott@ourcoloradonews. com

D

uring winter break children at some point or another get cabin fever and spending an hour or two at the Western Museum of Mining and Industry is always a nice break. On Dec. 28 children went to the museum to learn all about the resident burros and meet the newest member to the museum during Winter Break with the Burros. Despite the 19 degree temperatures plenty of kids came out to the museum where they learned all about the burros from the wranglers. They learned that each burro weighs approximately 500-600 pounds and they can carry 25

Jan. 1 marked a new year but it also marked an increase in minimum wage for Colorado and several other states. Workers making minimum wage will see an increase of 14 cents an hour to $7.78. Those who receive tips in addition to their hourly wage will see an increase to $4.76 an hour. The increase is all part of a state constitutional amendment that was approved in 2006 by voters. The amendment states that the wage increase will be raised to keep up with inflation. Other states are also seeing an increase in minimum wage and include Arizona, Florida, Missouri, Montana, Vermont, Washington, Rhode Island, Oregon and Ohio. The federal minimum wage increase remains unchanged at $7.25 an hour. Some workers may be seeing a wage increase and because the fiscal cliff was narrowly avoided most Americans won’t have to pay higher income tax rates. However everyone who receives a paycheck will still pay more in federal taxes. There is a two percent increase on the social security payroll tax. The payroll tax will be raised back to 6.2 percent after having been temporarily reduced in 2011 to 4.2 percent to help stimulate the economy. The payroll tax was not part of the deal Congress passed. According to data from the Tax Policy Center, run by the Urban Institute and Brookings Institution, a person making $50,000 - $75,000 will pay $822 more in the payroll tax increase. Those who make more than $450,000 will see an income tax rate increase of 39.6 percent. There will also be a tax increase on estate tax and capital gains and dividends.

Local taxes

El Paso County residents will also see a tax increase but not out of their paychecks. Voters passed a public safety tax in November. As of Jan. 1 citizens will now pay twentythree hundredths ($0.0023) of one cent per Wranglers Tricia Pillar, right, and Heather Pillar explain all about the burros to children and their families as they spend an hour during dollar on items they purchase. winter break with the burros. Families went into the mining museum for some hot chocolate after being out in the cold. The sales tax excludes grocery items and prescriptions. The sales tax will help fund percent of their body weight. hears in a circle. They also had the newest burro, Chism. Chism critical needs of the sheriff’s office. The kids found out where the opportunity to feed the bur- arrived at the museum on Nov. 7 Voters also approved the extension of the the burros sleep, how to care for ros. and will be a companion to long- sales and use tax for the Pikes Peak Rural their hooves and that a burro Children were introduced to time resident burro Nugget. Transportation Authority capital program. Burros have called the muThe current tax sunsets on Dec. 31, 2014 seum home since 1970. and the extension will begin Jan. 1, 2015 and After learning all about the sunset in 2024. burros families enjoyed hot Voters will continue to pay the 0.55 perchocolate inside the warm mu- cent (fifty-five one hundredths of one penny seum. per dollar).

Left, Brad Poulson, the Western Museum of Mining and Industry’s program and communications coordinator, asks Nugget what two plus two is. The burro answers by picking up his leg and tapping the ground four times with his hoof. Children learned all about the burros during Winter Break with the Burros on Dec. 28.

Printed on recycled newsprint. Please recycle this copy.

Most Americans won’t see an increase on their federal withholding but everyone will see a two percent increase on the Social Security payroll tax. For those making minimum wage there will be an increase in Colorado and several other states. File photo


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2 The Tribune

January 9, 2013

Redistricting changes state legislative map Not easy to see who represents whom By Norma Engelberg

nengelberg@ourcoloradonews.com The elections are over but there is still some confusion about who will represent whom in the Colorado General Assembly when the 2013 legislative session starts on Jan. 9. The U.S. Congressional district map was affected by redistricting after the 2010 U.S. Census but there was little change in Congressional District 5 where Doug Lamborn remains the representative. However, redistricting has made big changes in the state senate and house

district maps. For example, state Senate District 2 used to cover all of southeastern Colorado starting at Fremont County and was represented by Sen. Kevin Grantham (Senate District 2-R). Grantham still represents Fremont County but his district has moved north to include all of El Paso County outside of urban Colorado Springs, Teller, Park and Clear Creek counties. The district he used to represent is now District 35. People who live in northwest and north-central El Paso County, including Palmer Lake, Monument, U.S. Air Force Academy and Black Forest are still represented by Sen. Kent Lambert (Senate District 9-R) and people in southern Douglas County, including Larkspur, are still rep-

Reward money increases for missing 13-year-old Reward money has grown to $20,000 for information leading to Dylan Redwine’s whearbouts By Lisa Collacott

lcollacott@ourcoloradonews.com The reward for missing Dylan Redwine, a Lewis-Palmer Middle School student, has increased. The Durango Herald has reported that the reward for any information about Redwine’s whereabouts has increased to $20,000. The reward money has come from do-

Redwine

nations, a benefit dinner and silent auction, the Durango La Plata County Crime Stoppers and an anonymous donor according to the newspaper. The 13-year-old went missing No. 19 after visiting his father in Vallecito for the Thanksgiving break. Redwine moved to Monument

this summer. If anyone has any information leading to the whereabouts of Redwine is asked to call the Durango La Plata Crime Stoppers at 970-247-1112 or the National Center for Missing and Exploited Children at 1-800843-5678.

resented by Sen. Mark Scheffel (Senate District 4-R). The state house of representatives has also seen changes with redistricting. People living in Palmer Lake, on the Air Force Academy, Cascade, Chipita Park, Green Mountain Falls and other areas in El Paso County near the Teller County line are in House District 20 and are represented by Republican Bob Gardner. New House District 19, which includes most of Monument, Woodmoor, Black Forest, Peyton, Hanover and points east to the Elbert and Lincoln county lines, is represented by Republican Amy Stephens. House District 18, which includes Manitou Springs and the western edge of Colorado Springs, is represented by Democrat Pete Lee.

Quiet New Year’s Eve for Tri-Lakes No arrests in Monument or Palmer Lake By Lisa Collacott

lcollacott@ourcoloradonews.com New Year’s Eve was a relatively quiet one in the Tri-Lakes area for law enforcement. The Monument Police Department had several calls for service but made no arrests and no one was charged with driving under the influence. Lt. Steve Burk, public information officer for the Monument Police Department said in the past there have been times when the

holiday has been quiet and other times it’s been a typical New Year’s Eve and they have been busy. This year happened to be a quiet one. Palmer Lake rang in the New Year quietly as well. Lt. Jason Vanderpool of the Palmer Lake Police Department said their department didn’t even have any calls for service. “It was very uneventful for us,” Vanderpool said. The El Paso County Sheriff’s Office reported several traffic stops on the police blotter and responded to a call for reckless endangerment and someone shooting a gun in the air in unincorporated El Paso County.

Suspects arrested in holiday vandalism Fire set to holiday decorations, three juveniles charged By Lisa Collacott

lcollacott@ourcoloradonews.com

Would you like to become an ELEMENTARY SCHOOL TEACHER?

All of Teller County is now in new House District 39 along with rural parts of Douglas County, including Larkspur and Westcreek. Republican Polly Lawrence won the new seat in the Nov. 6 election. People living in Park, Chaffee, Fremont and Custer counties are living in House District 60 and are represented by Republican James Wilson. Once the 2013 legislative session is underway, constituents will be able to contact all state representatives and senators through directories at www.leg.state. co.us. As of the time of this writing, the state website had not been updated with new district information but redistricting maps and information are available at http://www.colorado.gov/cs/Satellite/ CGA-ReDistrict/CBON/1251581769173.

Three juveniles have been arrested for setting fire to holiday decorations and damaging mailboxes in Woodmoor and Kings Deer. The El Paso County Sheriff’s Office received reports from multiple residents on the morning of Dec. 30 that their outdoor holiday decorations had been burned and some had significant damage done to their mailboxes as well. Deputies and arson in-

vestigators went to the residents to investigate and confirmed fires had been set. Lt. Jeff Kramer said vandals had hit at least eight different locations on North Sherwood Glen, South Sherwood Glen, Royal Archers Lane, White Fawn Drive and Winding Hills Way. He said several hundred dollars’ worth of damage was done to the decorations and mailboxes but no structures were damaged. After an investigation the sheriff’s office identified three suspects. The three juveniles were each charged with Second Degree Arson which is a Class 4 felony and Criminal Mischief which is a Class 1 misdemeanor. They were released to the custody of their parents.

INSIDE THE TRIBUNE THIS WEEK State representation. Who represents you at the state legislature? Page 4

Do you already have a Bachelor’s Degree? The UNC Elementary Education MAT with Teacher Licensure program begins May 2013 and is offered in Denver and Colorado Springs. Earn your teaching license in one year and finish your Education Master of Arts in Teaching: Elementary Education degree with 2 more courses.

INFORMATION MEETINGS – 6-7 PM COLORADO SPRINGS—Thursday, January 24 UNC Colorado Springs Center 12320 Oracle Blvd, Colorado Springs, CO 80921 DENVER—Thursday, January 31 UNC Denver Center at Lowry 1059 Alton Way, Denver, 80230 (1 Blk. S. of 11th Ave and Yosemite St)

WMMI director. New mining museum director has big plans. Page 5

TLCA Mural. North wall of Tri-Lakes Center for the Arts gets a new look. Page 8

Referee. Local NCAA football official gets the important call. Page 10

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January 9, 2013

pI-25 widening set to begin in March

The Tribune 3

new rts of and ence on. mont ouse pub-

Kiewit/Parson-Brinkerhoff awarded project, will have north and southbound third lanes operational by end of December

s unconena-By Lisa Collacott tate.lcollacott@ourcoloradonews.com

state The long awaited widening of Interstate new25 will soon take place making travel along ctinga stretch of the interstate less congested. e at Work is scheduled to begin in March to lite/widen 11 miles of the interstate to three 73. lanes in both directions from Woodmen Road to just south of the Colo. 105 exit in Monument. The team of Kiewit and Parson-Brinkerhoff has been awarded the job by the Colorado Department of Transportation. Parson-Brinkerhoff is responsible for the design while Kiewit has the task of building. Bob Wilson, spokesperson for CDOT, said the project is expected to be complete by the end of the year. “People are really looking forward to it,”

Wilson said. The project is expected to cost $66.4 million. Funding for the project will come from several sources. CDOT is expected to fund at least $50.4 million which includes $7.9 million from the Pikes Peak Area Council of Governments and $16 million is coming from federal money. The 10-month long project isn’t expected to cause too many traffic delays. “We don’t anticipate any major traffic tie-ups,” Wilson said. “The work will be done in the median and any lane closures will be done during off-peak hours.” Wilson also added that the off-ramps at Briargate Boulevard and Interquest Parkway won’t need to be re-done because when they were completed it was with the notion that the interstate would be widened in the future.

Daddy Daughter Day at AFA Special to The Tribune and Courier

It’s Daddy Daughter Day in Clune Arena at the U.S. Air Force Academy. The academy’s women’s basketball team will be hosting University of Nevada, Las Vegas at 1 p.m. on Jan. 12 in Clune Arena. All Dads and Daughter are invited to vesti-come out to the game for a free pre-game dance lesson taught by Artistry In Motion. hit at North Glen, and dred o the trucThe following list of arrests is provided s of- by area law enforcement agencies. An arthree rest is not an indication of guilt or innocond cence and there might be several people y and with the same name living in the county. isdestody Monument Police Department

m

Participants will then perform the new routine during halftime of the game. The lesson starts at 12:15pm before the game. Tickets are only $2 for Dads, and daughters get in FREE. There will also be a full team autograph session after the game. For information, please visit us online at www.goairforcefalcons.com or by calling the Air Force Academy ticket office at 4721895. Go Falcons!

EL PASO COUNTY ARRESTS

Dec. 21 An officer responded to the 100 block of Bandit Creek Drive on the report of two suspicious males in the area, resulting in vandalism. Both suspects were apprehended. Officers responded to the Verizon Store in the 15000 block of Jackson Creek Pkwy in response to a cold burglary. No suspects. An officer was dispatched to a non injury traffic accident located on Venison Creek Drivee. An officer responded to the 17000 block of Knollwood Drive on report of a fraud.

Dec. 22 An officer was dispatched to the 16000 block of Jackson Creek Parkway in reference to a theft in progress. One suspect was arrested. An officer responded to the 15200 block of Struthers Road on the report of a vandalized pickup truck. A rear window was broken, the truck was entered but nothing appeared to be stolen. There is no suspect information. An individual was arrested after she had crashed her vehicle into a residential property located in the 100 block of Walters Creek Drive and was found to be under the influence of alcohol. An officer responded to the 500 block of Whistler Creek Court and Pasada Way on the report of a vandalized Volkswagen Bug. A driver side window was broken and the vehicle was not entered. There is no suspect information.

Dec. 23 An officer responded to the 300 block of Talus Road on the report of vandalism that just occurred. One suspect was arrested.

Dec. 26 Officers responded to a call of domestic

violence in the 300 block of North Jefferson Street where one male was arrested and jailed on charges of harassment and assault.

Dec. 27 An officer responded to the 500 block of Colo. 105 on the report of a cold theft. An officer took a report of a burglary and theft from a storage unit located at the 400 block of Beacon Lite Road. An officer responded to the 2200 block of Blizzard Valley Drive to take a report of a hit and run non-injury accident with damage to personal property.

Dec. 28 An officer was dispatched to the 400 block of Colo. 105 in reference to juveniles loitering. The incident ended as a medical issue and the involved subjects were evaluated by medical personnel.

Dec. 30 An officer responded to the 2200 block of Blizzard Valley Trail on report of a cold criminal mischief.

Jan. 1 An officer responded to the 17100 block of Snowwood Drive to investigate an apparent suicide. An officer was dispatched to the 600 block of Colo. 105 in reference to a hit and run.

Dec. 2 Officers responded to a burglary in the 300 block of Saber Creek Drive. The suspect was a white male in his mid twenties, 5 feet 7 inches, 190 pounds, blonde hair and blue eyes. He fled the scene westbound on Saber Creek in a older model blue sedan. No arrests have been made.

Dec. 3 Officers responded to a report of an individual in cardiac arrest at the 2600 block of Creek Valley Circle. One male was pronounced dead at the scene. An officer was dispatched to the 17000 block of Jackson Creek Parkway in reference to a hit and run.

The north and south bound lanes are pictured from the Baptist Road overpass. In March work will begin to widen the interstate to three lanes in both direction from Woodmen Road to just south of the Colo. 105 exit in Monument. Work is expected to last until the end of December and cause minimal traffic delays. Photo by Lisa Collacott


4

4 The Tribune

January 9, 2013

Top 10 public health news for county to assess the county’s “health” using indicators that align with the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment’s 10 Winnable Battles.

Special to The Tribune Public Health Accreditation

El Paso County Public Health applied to the Public Health Accreditation Board and was notified the application was accepted. EPC Public Health anticipates being among the first local public health agencies in the nation to earn the distinction of accreditation.

Pertussis (Whooping Cough) Outbreak

Reported cases of Pertussis (whooping cough) are on the rise in Colorado. As of Dec. 27 the county had 73 confirmed cases of Pertussis. In September EPC Public Health partnered with the Pikes Peak Flu & Immunization Coalition to offer free Tdap vaccinations among child care providers to help prevent the spread of disease and protect the most vulnerable, young infants. Public Health urges people, especially those who care for infants and toddlers, to get vaccinated. Efforts to educate people about the importance of vaccination are ongoing.

Release of the El Paso County Health Indicators Report

EPC Public Health has released its first Health Indicators Report for El Paso County, providing a comprehensive look at the overall health status of the community. EPC Public Health collected and analyzed data

THE TRIBUNE (USPS 418-960)

OFFICE: 1200 E. Highway 24, Woodland Park, CO 80863 PHONE: 719-687-3006 A legal newspaper of general circulation in El Paso County, Colorado, The Tribune is published weekly on Wednesday by Colorado Community Media, 1200 E. Highway 24, Woodland Park, CO 80863. PERIODICALS POSTAGE PAID AT WOODLAND PARK, COLORADO. POSTMASTER: Send address change to: 9137 S. Ridgeline Blvd., Suite 210, Highlands Ranch, CO 80129 DEADLINES: Display advertising: Thurs.11 a.m. Legal advertising: Thurs. 11 a.m. Classified advertising: Mon. 12 p.m.

Obesity Prevention Efforts, Healthy Community Collaborative

To begin steps towards addressing one of the concerning health trends found in the Health Indicators 2012 Report, the marked rise in obesity, Public Health convened with the Healthy Community Collaborative. Over the next several years the collaborative will focus community efforts and resources using evidence-based practices to increase healthy eating and active living to stop the upward trend of overweight and obesity in adults and children.

Smoking Cessation and Tobacco Education Prevention Partnership grant

The Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment awarded a grant of $620,000 to the Tobacco Education and Prevention Partnership. The grant began Oct. 1 and will go through June 30, 2013. The main goal is to increase smoking cessation. In 2013 an education campaign will launch to promote the Colorado QuitLine (1-800-QUIT-NOW), a free resource with researched-based information and a support team of coaches to help people stop smoking.

Reinstatement of Pools and Spas program

After a 4-year absence, EPC swimming

pools and spas started having regular inspections again in April when EPC Public Health’s Board of Health reinstated its public swimming pool and spa education and inspection program. Proper pool and spa maintenance can help prevent gastrointestinal and respiratory diseases that may be spread through improperly maintained pool water. The program will increase education and outreach to the community and to stakeholders in the pool/spa industry.

Clean Air, Reinstatement of the Air Quality Control Program

The Air Quality Control program was reinstated July 1 by EPC Public Health’s Board of Health. This program issues open burn and construction activity permits and responds to air quality complaints from residents of the county. This includes the cities and towns of Colorado Springs, Manitou Springs, Calhan, Fountain, Green Mountain Falls, Monument, Palmer Lake and Ramah.

Waldo Canyon Wildfire Response

EPC Public Health served as a liaison to the emergency operations centers at both the city and county, assisting in evacuations of long-term care and nursing facilities, support to shelters, activation of the Medical Reserve Corps and to assist with re-entry to the burn area for residents during the Waldo Canyon Wildfire emergency. Health education and information was provided to residents through the agency’s

West Nile Virus

As of Dec. 11 48 states have reported West Nile virus infections in people, birds or mosquitoes. A total of 5,387 cases of West Nile virus in people, including 234 deaths, have been reported to CDC. One EPC resident was hospitalized with the virus in September. The cases reported in 2012 is the highest number of West Nile virus disease cases reported to CDC through the second week in December since 2003. Public Health continues to stress prevention methods.

Women, Infants and Children

Public Health lost federal funds totaling $298,654 for the WIC Program, forcing the closure of two of its WIC centers in Colorado Springs in May. Clients and staff of the two locations relocated to Public Health’s main offices at 1675 West Garden of the Gods Road on the second floor of the Citizens Service Center. The Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for WIC provides vouchers for nutritious foods to supplement the diet of pregnant women, new mothers, infants and children under the age of 5 years, who both meet the income guidelines and qualify as “nutritionally at risk.” Public Health has an estimated 16,300 total WIC clients.

Volunteer wanted for highway commission By Special to The Tribune and Courier El Paso County Office of Communications

The El Paso County Board of Commissioners is seeking a community-minded citizen volunteer to serve as a District 5 member on the Highway Advisory Commission. District 5 includes most of the city of Colorado Springs. Applications for the open position are due by Jan. 25. The Highway Advisory Com-

mission considers highway and road needs throughout the county and assists with establishing the construction priorities and corresponding budget for the county’s annual transportation project plan. It consists of nine regular members and three associate members appointed by the Board of County Commissioners. Regular members serve for three-year terms and associate members for one-year terms. The volunteer application is located at www.elpasoco.com and can be accessed by clicking on the

Little Church Little Log Log Church Following Christ, Bible Church Fishing For Men Bible Hour... 8:30 Sunday Bible Class ... 8:30

Sunday Worship... Worship… 10:00 Sunday 10:00 Youth Wednesday... 6-8 p.m. Monthly Youth Activities

SUNDAY

Worship: 8am, 9:30am, 10:45am Education: 9:30am

Callfor for more more information infomation Call Upper Glenway and High Street Palmer Lake, CO 481-2409 www.littlelogchurch.net

Monument Hill Church, SBC

18725 Monument Hill Rd. 481-2156 www.monumenthillchurch.org Sunday: Bible Classes 9:15am Worship Service 10:30am Pastor Tom Clemmons USAFA ‘86, SWBTS ‘94 Preaching for the Glory of God Mon: Youth Group 6:30pm Tues: Prayer Meeting 6:30pm Wed: AWANA 6:30pm The “New” MHC - Where Grace and Truth Abound

481-0141

www.northword.org

20450 Beacon Lite Road • 488-9613

Sunday Bible Classes … 9:30 a.m. Morning Worship … 10:30 a.m. Evening Worship … 5:00 p.m. Wednesday Night Classes … 7:00 p.m.

www.trilakeschurch.org

True Direction from God’s Word Worship Service at 9:30 a.m. Lewis Palmer High School Higby Road & Jackson Creek Parkway

840 North Gate Blvd.

6pm evening Adult Bible Study Wednesday AWANA 6:15pm 495-3200 Pastor: Dr. D. L. Mitchell

INTERESTED IN VOLUNTEERING

Send completed applications and letter of interest and/or résumés to: Board of County Commissioners, Attn: Frances St. Germain, County Administration Manager, 200 S. Cascade Ave., Colorado Springs, CO 80903-2208.

• Applications may also be faxed to 719-5206397 or emailed to webmaster@elpasoco. com. • For more information, call 719-520-6436. For more information, call 719520-6436.

Monument Community Presbyterian Church

Family of Christ Lutheran Church

We Welcome You! 9:15 a.m.

10:30 a.m. 11:00 a.m.

Worship with Praise Team Adult Bible Class Children’s Sunday School Fellowship Coffee Youth Sunday School Worship with Chancel Choir Adult Bible Class Children’s Sunday School

238 Third Street Monument, CO 80132 719.481.3902 www.mcpcusa.org

675 Baptist Road Colorado Springs, CO 719.481.2255

8:00 AM - Classic Worship 9:30 & 10:45 AM - Modern Worship 9:30 & 10:45 AM - Childrens’ programs & Adult Studies Times effective Sept. 12, 2010 - May 2011

Pastor David Dyer Lutheran Church Missouri Synod

Maranatha Bible Fellowship A Home Church Spirtual Growth Meaningful Relationships Solid Biblical Teaching A New Testament early church format that is changing lives 495-7527

Connecting People to God and Others

Worship Services

8:30 a.m., Woodmoor 10:00 Drive a.m., and 11:30 a.m. at Deer Creek Road

Bible Study 9am 10:15am Celebrating HIM in Worship

“Volunteer Boards” link. Applicants are asked to reference the board and position they wish to represent and include a mailing address and daytime phone number. Send completed applications and letter of interest and/or résumés to: Board of County Commissioners, Attn: Frances St. Germain, County Administration Manager, 200 S. Cascade Ave., Colorado Springs, CO 80903-2208. Applications may also be faxed to 719-520-6397 or emailed to webmaster@elpasoco.com.

Woodmoor Drive at Deer Creek Road

Crossroads Chapel, SBC

Child care provided

website, interviews with local media and social media about air quality concerns related to smoke, ash, and heat during the fire.

The Church at Woodmoor

Traditional Ecumenicalworship worship service service Sunday 10a.m.-Nursery 10a.m.-Nursery available Sunday available

www.thechurchatwoodmoor.com

18125 Furrow Road P.O. Box 330 Monument 80132

488-3200

SUNDAYS 10 AM Bear Creek Elem School 1330 Creekside Dr. 487-7700 www.forestridgechurch.org

Woodmoor Drive at Deer Creek Road

Worship Services

8:30 a.m., 10:00 a.m., and 11:30 a.m. Worship Services 8:30 a.m., 10:00 a.m., and 11:30 a.m.

Opportunities to connect for Opportunities connect for your wholeto family Opportunities to connect for your whole family your whole family 1750 Deer Creek Road 1750 Deer Creek Road Monument, CO. 80132 1750 Deer Creek Road80132 Monument, CO. (719)481-3600 Monument, CO. 80132 www.trilakeschapel.org (719)481-3600 (719)481-3600 www.trilakeschapel.org www.trilakeschapel.org

Sunday Worship: 8:30, 9:45 & 11:00 am Sunday School: 9:45 am

To advertise your place of worship in this section, call 303-566-4091 or email kearhart@ourcoloradonews.com


5-COLOR

January 9, 2013

The Tribune 5

The Western Museum of Mining & Industry has a new director, Richard A, Sauers, center. He is flanked at left by museum manager Dave Futey and program and communications coordinator Brad Poulson and at right history interpreter Christine Nestlerode and volunteer Tom Sayers. Photo by Norma Engelberg

New director has big plans Changes coming to Western Museum of Mining & Industry By Norma Engelberg

nengelberg@ourcoloradonews.com Museums and archives have been a way of life for Richard Sauers for more than 30 years, after earning a doctorate in American history from Penn State. He plans to make the Western Museum of Mining & Industry his life now that he is its new director. He was hired in August after a nationwide search and started Oct. 1. He, his wife and their five dogs, three Jack Russell terriers and two Shelties, were living in Sunbury, Pa. just a few miles from Lewisburg where he was born. “My wife and I had the idyllic thought of just coming out here and finding a house to rent,” he said. “After several weeks of searching we called a Realtor and said `find us a home.’ I lived in a motel until we moved into our new home out in Peyton on Oct. 25. We’re happy to be here; I’m not going to miss Pennsylvania’s weather.” Between moving and fixing fences to keep the dogs corralled, Sauers was learning about the museum. “I knew the general history of mining in the West but I didn’t have the technical details,” he said. “The first thing I did was ask the staff what was working, what wasn’t and if they had ideas for making it better. This is the best staff and volunteers I have ever worked with and the museum directors are enthusiastic, dedicated and ready to roll up their sleeves and get to work.” One of the first things Sauers has been working on is a multi-year museum master plan. “The big thing right now is that the museum owns about 20 acres out behind Voyager (Parkway),” he said. “That’s where our collection building is and our climate-controlled archives where the Winfield Scott Stratton papers are kept; it’s a fabulous collection.” However, it’s a collection that will have to be moved when the city brings Powers Boulevard through the 20 acres and out to the Interstate. “We need to sell off that property and go through the collection,” Sauers said. “We need to decide what we need and what we don’t and deaccession some of the pieces. We want to build a new building here for

the equipment collection and a separate library building.” He also hopes to restore the old Reynolds farm house that sits at the entrance to the property for use as a community meeting place and there are plans for better signage and walking trails along Smith Creek, which runs through the property. Local Boy Scout troops are already helping clean up the forested areas of the property. “This spring we’re going to pour new concrete pads and bring out some of the big equipment from the collection building,” Sauers said. “And we’ll be installing some new interactive outdoor exhibits. … There’s a lot to do and never a dull moment.” All of these plans will take time and money and Sauers also has some ideas about that. For example, he is hoping more people will join the museum, become sponsors and volunteer for everything from guiding tours and cleaning equipment to researching and archiving. Sauers has written 30 books on the War of the Rebellion (American Civil War), including his latest, “The Fishing Creek Confederacy: A Story of Civil War Draft Resistance,” coauthored by Peter Tomasak. For information about joining the museum or volunteering, visit http://www. wmmi.org or call 719-488-0880. Coming up at the Western Museum of Mining & Industry: Geology Tells Rock’n Good Stories!-10 a.m.- 3 p.m. Jan. 12; Steven Veatch, and his team of young Earth Science Scholars from the Colorado Springs Mineralogical Society will show how crystals are formed, do some mineral identification, and compare participants’ measurements to a mammoth. The event will also feature volunteers from the Denver Museum of Nature & Science, Gold Prospectors of Colorado and Pilot Mining Co. Admission is $8 for adults, $6 for seniors and students, and $4 for children. Publish! History and Science Writing for Teachers and Learners of all Ages: 9 a.m.-1 p.m. Feb. 23. Veatch will teach a workshop that will include identifying and developing story ideas, the difference between a subject and a story, outlining and structuring stories, strategies for opening leads and making transitions, and much more. Course fee is $20 for adults and $10 for students age 21 and younger. A writers kit with additional resources on CD is available for $5.

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6-OPINION

6 The Tribune

January 9, 2013

OPINIONS / YOURS AND OURS

Broncos, politics and The Man When I was much younger — let’s say, for illustrative purposes, in one of the last two years of high school — I often had some sort of scheme or small-time con working. Usually, it was minor, with no real victims (except perhaps myself and a few of my accomplices) and was perpetrated only as a method to, and within the intention of, specifically sticking it to The Man. Born of such a scheme was a trip to Denver one spring, paid for (at least in part) by your hard-earned tax dollars. Forgive me, as I don’t remember all the specific details, but here are the generalities of the story. Despite my philosophical aversion to pork-barrel politics, or perhaps to illustrate a point, I discovered that certain amounts of potential funding was available under the guise of `career exploration’ and `opportunity development’ funds for students of my particular age. I applied, and subsequently was approved for a grant from Southwest Board of Co-operative Services (B.O.C.S.) to go and visit the Broncos off-season training facilities in Denver. Understand, of course, that no one in the right mind would picture my career path on a trajectory to becoming a professional foot-

ball player. However, quite cleverly I believe, I deflected potential nay saying and outright dismissal of my plan by choosing the potential vocation of sports medicine and `professional trainer’ for a shadow program. B.O.C.S. generously sprung several hundred dollars for a trip up to the city so that I could explore the opportunity and the possibility that I might one day choose a career in sports medicine. Originally, with the initial award of the grant, two other students from Mancos, Mark and John Ott, were also to go to the training facility with me. But a last-minute schedule conflict prevented them from attending, and for a time, I thought the gig was up for me as well. But because the money had already been

allocated and a genuine interest in doing right for the good, young students, soon to be cast out in the cold, cruel world, it was suggested that I ask a couple of friends, perhaps from good old DHS, Home of the Bears, to join me on my journey. I obliged of course, choosing Scott Weinmaster and James Biard to accompany me instead. It was at precisely at that point, the journey veered dangerously away from an “educational experience” and more towards a fearful and loathsome junket to the capitol city with a fist full of taxpayer’s dollars. We borrowed a car belonging, I think to James’ mom or his grandfather, but naturally Scott and I would not, under any circumstances, allow James to drive. To do so would have been suicide. Seven or eight hours on icy roads with the Commodores and Foghat alternately blaring out “Slow Ride” and “Just to be Close” as we lumbered over Wolf Creek, through the San Luis Valley, up the gun barrel and into the city. When in Denver, we stayed at Weinmaster’s house, but only briefly. We had things to do and people to see. I remember something about Figaro’s Pizza, and there may have been beer involved, though I hope not at the

taxpayer’s expense. We did, in the interest of education, make it to our prescribed appointment at the Broncos training facility. It being the off season, there was not a lot of the big names hanging out but it was fun for us backwards country hicks to get to see grid stars like Rob Lytle, Randy Gradishar, Joe Rizzo and Roland Hooks (Hooks was from the Buffalo Bills, as the professional training facilities were open to other teams through reciprocal agreements) in their various stages of repair. I remember thinking, that Rizzo had tree trunks for legs, but Lytle (at 6’1”, 196 pounds) seemed to be almost a regular-sized cat. Lytle spent seven seasons with the Broncos and scored their only touchdown in Super Bowl XII -- Back in the days of Red Miller. Rizzo and Gradishar also played in Super Bowl XII as part of the Orange Crush Defense. Gradishar was with the Broncos for 10 seasons and still sells cars for Phil Long dealerships in Colorado. Just so you know, in the true spirit of politics, that trip was over 30 years ago and you taxpayers are never getting your money back. My version, I guess, of sticking it to The Man.

Americans are saving too much labor Home sweet home, if you’re careful For the gadget-happy among us, the 21st century is a great time to be alive. Of course, if we’re not careful all these gadgets will be the death of us. We already don’t have to move from our couches to turn on the TV or change the channel and with remotes we can turn on lights in distant parts of our homes. With computers we can turn them on and off from a motel room in the next state. We seem to have an obsession for “laborsaving devices” but saving all that labor is taking its toll on our health, our budgets and our environment. Here is just one example, laundering clothes. Let’s just consider modern washers and dryers with all their bells and whistles as really big gadgets. I can still remember washing clothes in a wringer wash machine, which was probably a lot more labor saving than the washboard and tubs my grandmother and great-grandmother used. Wash day was Saturday when Mom could count on having me around to help. My brothers didn’t do laundry; Dad said laundry was “women’s work.” (He did apologize for that several years later. Gee, thanks Dad!) Until I was in my early teens, Mom didn’t let me anywhere near the dangerous wringers but I was intimately familiar with clotheslines. In our ringer-washer days we had just enough clothes, along with one or two extra outfits for special occasions, and bedding to last the week between washings. If you’ve ever read the Laura Ingalls Wilder “Little House” books you know that Laura had only one or two weekday dresses and the same number of Sunday-go-to-meeting dresses. When we bought the automatic washer

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and dryer, the number of our outfits proliferated. Now my closets are full to bursting and, of course, I still have nothing to wear. Having so many outfits means I have to work harder to pay for them and I do laundry more often; there’s no such thing as wearing the same blouse twice even if I didn’t spill anything on it (a rare occasion indeed and something to write home about). More clothes means growing more cotton, shearing more sheep, drilling for more oil, more spinning, weaving and sewing and using more power, more water, more chemicals and more transportation. Now that laundering clothing has become easier, we’re not lugging baskets full of wet, heavy clothes out to the clotheslines. We’re saving time and labor but we’ve lost one more of the many activities our bodies think of as “exercise.” Every time we embrace a new labor-saving device or gadget we’re just making it that much easier for our bodies to get fatter. And we’re spending more money at the gym and on diets to counteract our notso-active lifestyles. Maybe we should think about that the next time we’re looking the next new laborsaving device and remember the difference between what we need and what we want.

Colorado Community Media Phone 719-687-3006 • Fax 303-719-687-3009

Columnists and guest commentaries The Tribune features a limited number of regular columnists, found on these pages and elsewhere in the paper, depending on the typical subject the columnist covers. Their opinions are not necessarily those of The Tribune. Want your own chance to bring an issue to our readers’ attention, to highlight something great in our community, or just to make people laugh? Why not write a letter of 300 words or fewer. After all, The Tribune is your paper.

WE’RE IN THIS TOGETHER Our team of professional reporters, photographers and editors are out in the community to bring you the news each week, but we can’t do it alone. Send your news tips, your own photographs, event information, letters, commentaries... If it happens, it’s news to us. Please share by contacting us at news@ourcoloradonews.com., and we will take it from there.

We are all familiar with how many injuries occur as the result of car accidents or participation in sports but few people realize how many injuries actually occur at home. I learned the hard way unfortunately. I’ve always been very cautious of accidents that can occur at home especially with the neurological issues I deal with and I’ve had my share of falls because of it, even hitting my head. But accidents do happen. That’s why they are called accidents. Each year an estimated 5 to 10 million Americans suffer from injuries that happened at home. I spent my New Year’s Eve at home nursing an injury that happened at home the day before. It was late in the afternoon and I was walking down the stairs. I was about five steps from the bottom when I slipped. I tried to stop myself but proceeded in hitting my rib cage on the newel post at the end of the staircase and landed on the floor. It hurt so bad I was crying and trying to catch my breath at the same time. I knew I either bruised my rib or cracked it. Many years ago I cracked my rib coughing so I knew the pain. I didn’t think it warranted a trip to the emergency room but I was in so much pain later that night I got a mere two hours of sleep sitting up in a recliner. I did go to the urgent care the next day and learned thankfully that it was only bruised. But some people aren’t so lucky when they get injured at home. According to the National Center for Disease Control in 1998 more than 10 million people were injured at home severely enough to go to the emergency room. The National Safety Council reports that 54,500 fatalities occurred in

homes in 2008 as the result of injuries. Some of the common injuries that occur at home happen as a result of cooking, using a lawn mower, ladder, candles and gardening and believe it or not many come from using the Nintendo Wii video game. A lot of the injuries from the Wii occur when using the remote control and result in being hit in the head with the remote. Falls are the leading cause of injury related to death in people of all ages according to the CDC. Scalds, contact burns and electrical and chemical burns C are frequent causes of nonfatal, non-fire from injuries. The top 10 fatal injuries that occur 69th at home are from falls, poisonings, fires, sufW focation and choking, drowning, firearms, vene cuts and piercings, gas leaks, being struck by work an object and electrocution. in ne Approximately 95 percent of scalds occur that in children five and younger and at least 75 Af Americans die daily from accidental poiDem soning. So the moral of the story is be very cham careful when taking those Christmas lights to go off the house, try not to slip on the ice on the John driveway, wear gloves while gardening to Bo prevent spider bites, install carbon monox- new ide detectors and be careful when descend- D-De ing down the stairs! High

M

This wouldn’t work today! As another postal increase comes into view, how about this? Postal Improvement Week. In May back in the 1920s there was actually such a week. It started on May 1. The postal service was the only business of its kind in the country. Today with the likes of FedEx and UPS spreading out all over the world and even Internet, there is a ton of competition, but not in 1920. Postal Improvement Week sought suggestions as to ways to improve mail delivery and handling. In addition they had suggestions for us, that you might find funny. Spell out the name and address of the person you are sending the mail to, try not using abbreviations was another. Even if your letter is not leaving town, do not use the term “city” for the address. (By some error it might get into a bag of mail leaving town!) Spell out your own address in the upper left corner, not on the back? Did you remember to put a stamp on it? Now these may seem pretty simple, and they teach them in school. Back a hundred years ago it was not all that clear. At that time mail boxes and delivery were new ideas. What few bits of mail that were actually delivered, rather than picked up at the post office, needed a good clear identification. There were a few rural routes, usually on main roads only; the delivery points were hardly like today’s boxes. The carrier might have known that a certain bucket, box or even an old boot on a fence

post was for the mail. Handmade boxes and even a few metal ones were also pretty nice. For some deliveries the carrier actually went to the customer’s house. Regular mail deliveries for everyone did not really get going until after World War I. Someone living out in the country might get into town once a month, hoping they didn’t have mail that had to be answered right now. In towns the house-to-house routes also started a bit before that. The “approved” mail box dates from about World War II. In the old newspapers there were regular lists of letters waiting for people. Summer tourists would do this too. Since we did not have radio, it was easy to look in the paper every day to see if the post office had mail for you! In some of the old papers, the list of names on letters waiting at the post office is huge! Mel McFarland, artist, author, retired teacher and railroader, is a Colorado Springs native who has a strong interest in the events of this area’s past.

John over fer, D W come Nam first, voted It Colo sligh 924,0


7-COLOR

January 9, 2013

The Tribune 7

Showing, telling Palmer Divide history Palmer Lake Historical Society plans potluck, membership drive By Norma Engelberg

nengelberg@ourcoloradonews.com It’s January and time for the Palmer Lake Historical Society’s annual Potluck and Membership Drive. At 6:30 p.m. Jan. 17 all interested community members are invited to the Palmer Lake Town Hall. The society will provide the baked ham, coffee and tea. There is no admission but visitors are asked to bring a dish to share. This is a great opportunity to learn more about this nonprofit historical society dedicated to preserving Palmer Divide history. It’s also a great opportunity to share local history with neighbors and friends. A special part of this event is “Show and Tell” in which participants share personal items from

Palmer Divide’s past. The Palmer Lake Historical Society was founded in 1956 for the express purpose of publishing “Palmer Lake, A Historical Narrative” by Marion Savage Sabin. The manuscript details the founding of Palmer Lake and surrounding towns. Of course, since its founding by Marian McIntyre-McDonough, the society has gone on to bigger things including the building of a library and museum, creating a memorial honoring World War II Congressional Medal of Honor winner William J. Crawford and helped revive the Rocky Mountain Chautauqua. According to its website, www.palmerdividehistory.org, “the Palmer Lake Historical Society promotes, preserves, and protects the history of the Palmer Divide area of Colorado; and sponsors, maintains, and is responsible for the activities and commitments of the Lucretia Vaile Museum,” which is located below the Palmer Lake Public Library, a branch of the Pikes Peak Library District. Membership dues are $10 per individual or $15 per family for a one-year membership. Donations to the Palmer Lake Historical Society and the Lucretia Vaile Museum are tax deductible.

Library kicks off 9th adult reading program Reading for prizes from Pikes Peak Library District By Special to The Tribune Pikes Peak Library District

Pikes Peak Library District’s annual adult reading program kicks off on Jan. 14. This year’s theme is “Winter Wonderland” and the program is open to anyone age 18 and older with a PPLD library card. Winter Wonderland runs through March 11 and adults can read any eight books of their choice. Books on CD, audiobook players, eBooks, and eAudiobooks count, too! To register, bring your library card to any of the district’s library branches and sign up at the information desk. You can also sign up online at www.

ppld.org beginning Jan. 14. Reading logs will be available at all libraries, but feel free to keep track of the books you’ve read using any method you choose. After you read your first four books, visit your nearest library to pick up your first prize. If you read four books by Feb. 18, you will be entered in the Mid-Program prize drawing. If you read eight books by March 11, you will be entered in the Grand Prize Drawing. The program has great prizes this year: Prize after reading 4 books (no substitutions): Rocky Mountain Chocolate Factory chocolate bar/coupon, Winter Wonderland book bag and H&R Block coupon. Mid-Program Prize Drawing: Chick-fil-A gift boxes and Wendy’s T-

shirt/free value meal coupons. Prize after reading 8 books (no substitutions): Ninth annual Adult Reading Program mug, Wendy’s coupon and Louie’s Pizza coupon. Community Library Prize Drawings: Plato’s Closet gift card and Fine Arts Center Theatre tickets for “Other Desert Cities.” Grand Prize Drawing: Kindle Fire tablet. And don’t miss the 2013 Adult Reading Program Kick-off Party, “Winter Wonderland Tales,” 1-3 p.m. Jan. 11 at East Library, 5550 N. Union Blvd. in Colorado Springs. You will be able to sign up for the program and get your materials, as well as enjoy entertainment and refreshments! For more information, please email us at arp@ppld.org. All are welcome. We hope to see you there!

Every artifact and personal item, such as these old-fashioned pieces of office equipment, has its story and the Palmer Lake Historical Society is encouraging community members to bring personal items with a history in the Palmer Divide for Show and Tell at its annual Potluck Dinner and Membership Drive at 6:30 p.m. Jan. 17 at the Palmer Lake Town Hall. Photo by Norma Engelberg

HAVE A STORY IDEA? Email your ideas to Tri-Lakes Community Editor Lisa Collacott at lcollacott@ourcoloradonews.com or call her at 719-687-3006.

Welcome to the Community Call me today for your welcome information package Tri-Lakes, Gleneagle & Black Forest Welcoming Barbara Oakley 719-488-2119

Much to accomplish for legislators this session Coloradans are less than a week from the first regular session of the 69th General Assembly. When our state lawmakers convene Jan. 9 in Denver, they will go to work in a Capitol with some new faces in new places and a balance of power that has shifted to the left. After the November election, Democrats gained control of both chambers of the state Legislature, to go with a Democratic governor in John Hickenlooper. Both the House and Senate have new leadership. Mark Ferrandino, D-Denver, replaces Frank McNulty, RHighlands Ranch, as House speaker. John Morse, D-El Paso County, takes over for term-limited Brandon Shaffer, D-Longmont, as Senate president. With the Democrats’ new power comes a new and great responsibility. Namely, to think of their constituents first, even those who may not have voted for them. It is important to note that of Colorado’s active voters, Republicans slightly outnumber Democrats — 924,076 to 891,004, as of Dec. 1. The

OUR VIEW

ranks of active unaffiliated voters only slightly trails the Dems’ numbers. Given that, it would be wise for lawmakers to vigorously work toward bipartisan solutions that the people of this state will embrace. But will that happen? At a recent gathering with reporters and editors from many of the state’s media outlets, Morse said the voters’ decision to empower his party means the “middle class is coming back.” House Minority Leader Mark Waller, R-El Paso County, quickly took exception to what he apparently felt was a jab at the GOP. “We do care about the middle class and bipartisan solutions,” Waller said. While that’s a fairly typical exchange across party lines, let’s hope it wasn’t a sign of bickering to come.

Instead, let’s hope they are both right, that both parties will show commitment to the middle class and a focus on bipartisan problem-solving. With a passel of weighty issues awaiting them, lawmakers will be best served by proceeding with a spirit of cooperation. In the coming months, state legislators could be faced with decisions on: • Setting standards for marijuana use and driving. • Deciding whether to repeal the death penalty. • Stricter gun-control measures. • Civil unions, an issue that appeared headed for passage in 2012 before last-minute maneuvering prevented a vote. • Increased school safety measures. These are among issues important to Coloradans, and we hope legislators will devote the effort and thought needed to come up with commonsense solutions. Voters have put their faith in our lawmakers, and they need to take that responsibility seriously.

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Rector Law Firm 131 S Weber Colorado Springs, CO 80903

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Art classes for all ages and skill levels

BEMIS SCHOOL OF ART Register now for Winter/Spring classes and workshops | csfineartscenter.org

719.475.2444 | 818 Pelham Pl., Colorado Springs, CO 80903 Bemis activities sponsored by El Pomar Foundation, Macy’s Foundation, Pikes Peak Community Foundation, Fund for the Arts, Kirkpatrick Family Fund, Rocky Mountain PBS, John G. Duncan Charitable Trust, H. Chase Stone Trust, Sheila Fortune Foundation, and Members of the Fine Arts Center


8 The Tribune January 9, 2013

Tri-LakesLIFE 8-LIFE-COLOR

Artist Michael Noel Wallace stands on a ladder as he outlines three giant columbine flowers on the north wall of the Tri-Lakes Center for the Arts. The first stage of the mural was completed on Jan. 3. The mural should be complete by April.

Giant masterpiece to be displayed at TLCA Mural will be located on north wall and will be completed by April

‘I always wanted to turn that wall into a giant masterpiece. Everyone has

By Lisa Collacott

said it will make TLCA a

lcollacott@ourcoloradonews.com

T

he north side of the Tri-Lakes Center for the Arts is getting a longawaited facelift and by springtime residents and visitors will have a beautiful painting to look at. World renowned artist Michael Noel Wallace is painting a mural on the north wall and hopes to have it complete by April. The mural will be completed in three phases. The first phase, which began Dec. 31 and was completed by Jan. 3, involved Wallace outlining the piece which will be three giant columbine flowers. Wallace said he and Dr. Michael Maddox, executive director of the TLCA, decided on the columbine because not only is it the state flower but Palmer Lake is the founding place for the flower. “The hope is that people will come and take their picture in front of the building,” Wallace said. “I always wanted to turn that wall into a giant masterpiece,” Maddox said. “Everyone has said it will make TLCA a landmark.” Maddox approached Wallace a few months ago and after talking with him agreed on a price that was within the TLCA’s budget. Maddox is hoping it will attract people to the town.

landmark.’ Dr. Michael Maddox, executive director of TLCA

Three columbine flowers will make up the mural that will be displayed on the north wall of the Tri-Lakes Center for the Arts. Michael Noel Wallace is pictured as he works on the first phase of the mural. He will begin phase two Feb. 7. Courtesy photos “We’re trying to do what we can to benefit the town of Palmer Lake,” Maddox added. Wallace has painted murals in such places as San Francisco, Puerta Vallarta, Victor and the spa building in Manitou Springs.

He studied art at the Lorenzo de’ Medici School in Florence, Italy adding that it was an incredible experience for a boy who grew up on a milk farm in Elbert County. Wallace’s mom was an art teacher and when he was six years old she gave him

some crayons and told him to draw a picture on the walls of his bedroom. He’s been creating murals ever since. “I dreamed of painting and travelling around the world,” Wallace said. He’s a popular artist in Puerta Vallarta where he created Catrina figures for Los Muertes Brewing. His work can also be found on the walls of the Teatro Limon. How Wallace came to paint the Catrina figures and his inspiration for the paintings can be read at http://losmuertosbrewing.com/beer-blog/. Wallace plans to start the second phase of the TLCA from Feb. 7-10. He welcomes anyone who wants to watch him work. He will be painting the background and shading the petals of the columbine flowers with lavender, blue and cream colors. Phase three will involve touching up the masterpiece.


9

The El Paso County Fair Grounds is hosting a nature photography workshop, “The Art of Seeing” from 9:00 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. on Jan. 19. Photography is an art form that can be learned. This nature photography workshop will help train your eyes to spot the lighting, composition and content for

spectacular photos. Join us as we sharpen our skills in the art of exploring, isolating and organizing photos. We will hike through El Paso County’s beautiful Paint Mines Interpretive Park capturing images of the unique rock formations which made even more memorable by the variety of colors, subtle tones and intricate shadows that make the Paint Mines an unforgettable family outing.

After the hike we will return to the classroom for a demonstration of ways to make good photos even better. This photo workshop is suitable for older children and adults. Meet at Swink Hall on the El Paso County Fairgrounds in Calhan promptly at 9:00 a.m. Cost is $6 per person and reservations are required. Call 719-520-7880 for more information and to reserve your spot for this informative photo workshop.

CLUBS IN YOUR COMMUNITY EDITOR’S NOTE: To add or update your club listing, e-mail calendar@ourcoloradonews.com, attn: Tribune. PROFESSIONAL FRONT RANGE Business Group meets

from 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. on the first and third Tuesdays of every month at Bella Panini in Palmer Lake.

TRI-LAKES BUSINESS Networking International meets from 8-9:30 a.m. every Wednesday at the Mozaic Inn in Palmer Lake. Call Elizabeth Bryson at 719-481-0600 or e-mail ebryson@ farmersagent.com. TRI-LAKES CHAMBER Business

After Hours meets at 5:30 p.m. on the third Tuesday of each month at various locations. Free to members; $10 for non-members. Call 719 481-3282 or go to www.trilakeschamber.com.

TRI-LAKES CHAMBER Business

Networking Group meets at 7:30 a.m. the first and third Thursday at Willow Tree Cafe, 140 2nd St., Monument. New members welcome. If District 38 is delayed or cancelled, their will be no meeting. Yearly membership dues are $20. Call 719 481-3282 or go to www. trilakeschamber.com.

TRI-LAKES NETWORKING Team meets for dinner at 6:30 p.m. the second Tuesday of each month at the Inn at Palmer Divide. TNT is business women building relationships in a social setting. Visit www.trilakesnetworkingteam.com or call Janine Robertson at 719-2660246 or e-mail janine@coloradorobertsons.com. WOODMOOR BUSINESS Group Meet-

ing is the second Monday of every month from 6:30-8 p.m. at the Woodmoor Barn, 1691 Woodmoor Dr. We are Woodmoor residents offering products and services to the community. New members welcome. For more information, call Bobbi Doyle at 719-331-3003 or go to www. woodmoorbusinessgroup.com.

RECREATION AMATEUR RADIO Operators, W0TLM

(Tri-Lakes Monument Fire Radio Association), meets the third Monday of each month at 6:30 p.m. at the Tri-Lakes Monutemnt Fire Protection District Station 1, 18650 Hwy 105. All Amateur Radio Operators are welcome. Call Joyce Witte

at 488-0859 for more information.

ADULT RECREATIONAL and intermediate pick up volleyball is at Lewis-Palmer Middle School every Monday from 7-9 p.m. Call Claudia at 719-313-6662 for details. BINGO BY the Tri-Lakes American Legion Post 9-11 is conducted from 7 to 9 p.m. every Saturday at the Post home, Depot Restaurant in Palmer lake. Proceeds are dedicated to Scholarship and community support activities of the Post. At least 70 percent of the game sales are awarded in prizes, and free food drawings are conducted. Doors open at 6 p.m. and all are invited for the fun, food, and prizes. See www.americanlegiontrilakespost911.com/bingo.htm for more information. BIG RED Saturday Market. Fresh

vegetables and fruit, bakery items, local honey, crafts, jewelry, pet stuff and more are for sale from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. every Saturday at the Big Red Saturday market at Second and Jefferson streets in Monument. The money benefits Lewis-Palmer community schools.

FRIENDS OF Monument Preserve is a nonprofit organization that works to keep trails rideable and hikeable in the Monument Preserve Area. Meetings are at 7 p.m. every third Wednesday at the Monument Fire Center. Trail work is done at 6 p.m. the second Tuesday in the summer months. Contact info@fomp.org or Chris at 719-488-9850. GLENEAGLE GOLF Club has implemented a Community Advisory Committee. Their mission is to help establish a stronger relationship between the club and the community. They are looking for representatives from all home owners associations. The committee meets the fourth Wednesday of the month at 6:30PM at Gleneagle Golf Club. If you can join, give Rick Ebelo a call at the club at 488-0900. THE VAILE Museum, 66 Lower

Glenway, is open from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturdays year-round and from 1-4 p.m. Wednesdays from June through August. Groups by appointment are accepted. Call 719-559-0837.

SERVICES FREE GENTLY used clothing is avail-

Self-Pay, Affordable

Physical Therapy Services • Sports Medicine and Orthopedic Training & Rehabilitation

able the second Saturday of every month from 1-3 p.m. at Tri-Lakes Church of Christ, the intersection of County Line Road and Beacon Lite, 20450 Beacon Lite, in Monument. For more information, call 719-495-4137. Look for the sign on the corner.

SHARE COLORADO, a nonprofit organization, is a monthly food distributor that offers grocery packages at half the retail price to everyone. Call 800-3754452 or visit www.sharecolorado.com. SOCIAL THE BLACK Forest AARP Chapter meets for a luncheon the second Wednesday of each month at the Black Forest Lutheran Church. Call 719-596-6787 or 719-495-2443. THE CENTURIAN Daylight Lodge No

195 A.F and A.M meets at 7 p.m. the fourth Tuesday of each month. Eastern Star meets 7:30 p.m. the first and third Tuesdays. Both groups meet at 18275 Furrow Road. Call 719-488-9329.

COALITION OF Tri-Lakes Communities. Call John Heiser at 719-488-9031 or go to www.CoalitionTLC.org. COLORADO MOUNTED Rangers Troop “I” is looking for volunteers. The troop meets at 7 p.m. the first Friday of the month at the Pikes Peak National Bank, in the upstairs conference room. The bank address is 2401 W. Colorado Ave, on the corner of Colorado Ave and 24th Street. The entrance is a single unmarked door on Colorado Avenue between the bank and the bicycle store. Free parking is available in the bank employee parking lot on the south side of the bank’s drive-up facility. Visit http://itroop. coloradoranger.org or e-mail Info@ coloradoranger.org. GIRL SCOUTING offers opportunities for girls ages 5-17 to make friends, learn new skills and challenge themselves in a safe and nurturing environment. Call 719-597-8603. GLENEAGLE SERTOMA Club luncheon

meeting is every Wednesday at 11:45 a.m., at Liberty Heights, 12105 Ambassador Drive, Colorado Springs, 80921. Call Sherry Edwards at 488-1044 or Bill Nance at 488-2312 or visit www. sertoma.org.

HISTORY BUFFS meets at Monument

Library from 1-3 p.m. the first Wednesday of every month.

KIWANIS CLUB of Monument Hill, a service club dedicated to providing assistance to those less fortunate in the Tri-Lakes community, meets 8 a.m. Saturdays at The Inn at Palmer Divide, 443 Colo. 105. Join us for breakfast, great fellowship and informative programs, and come be a part of the opportunity to give back to your community. Visit http://monumenthillkiwanis.org; call 719-4871098; e-mail info@monumenthillkiwanis.org LEGACY SERTOMA dinner meetings are at 6:30 p.m. the second and fourth Thursdays monthly at Monument Country Club. New members and visitors welcome. Call Ed Kinney, 481-2750. MOMS IN Touch prayer groups meet,

by school, throughout the school district for one hour each week to support the children, their teachers, the schools and administration through prayer. Call Judy Ehrlich at 719-481-1668.

THE MONUMENT Homemakers Club meets the first Thursday of every month at the Tri-Lakes Fire Department Administrative Building, 166 Second Street, Monument. Arrive at 11:30 a.m. to prepare for a noon potluck, program, and business meeting, which ends around 1:30 p.m. Newcomers are welcome. Call Irene Walters, Co-President, at 719-4811188 for Jean Sanger, Co-President, at 719-592-9311 for reservations. MOUNT HERMAN 4-H Club meets at 7 p.m. on the third Thursday of each month at Grace Best Elementary. There are no meetings in June, July and August. Anyone interested in pursuing animal projects, archery, cooking, sewing, model rocketry, woodworking or just about any hobby is welcome. A new member meeting is the third Thursday in October. Call Chris Bailey at 719-481-1579. THE PALMER Lake Art Group meets

on the second Saturday of the month at the group’s Vaile Hill Gallery, 118 Hillside Road. Call 719-488-8101 for information.

PALMER DIVIDE Quiltmakers meets at 7 p.m. the first Thursday of each month at The Church at Woodmoor. Contact Carolyn at 719-488-9791 or hockcf@ aol.com.

Mountain View Electric Association awards 14 Scholarships to graduating high school seniors.

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Taking seriously the award of Most Promising Middle School Thespian, Aaron captured the hearts of audiences at CSS his freshmen year and was applauded as the Rookie Actor of the Year. Theatre is not all Aaron takes seriously; he is also a serious scholar! Hanging out on the High Honor Roll is seriously cool. Aaron rides the CSS bus from Monument in order to get his academic day started. He appreciates his teachers’ mentorship, especially Dr. Young, his advisor, who teaches math and economics. Aaron enrolled in Dr. Young’s Experience Centered Seminar, a threeweek academic term, in which he studied marine biology off the Florida coast last spring and earned his certification in SCUBA. As a CSS Ambassador, Greeter, and class treasurer, Aaron is finding many ways to lead confidently and make a difference in our community and the world.

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Misc. Services

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Schedule of Open Houses

Service Directory

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Careers

Fairgrounds host photography workshop at Paint Mines

The Tribune 9

Farm & Agriculture

January 9, 2013

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10 The Tribune January 9, 2013

10-SPORTS

Tri-LakesSPORTS

Campbell gets the call for championship game Local line judge works Notre Dame-Alabama title tilt By Danny Summers

sports@ourcoloradonews.com COLORADO SPRINGS - The Bat Phone finally rang in Randy Campbell’s home. The long-time NCAA football official got “the call” last month that he had long been waiting for. The voice on the other end informed Campbell that he had been selected to work the Jan. 7 BCS National Championship game between Notre Dame and Alabama. “The chances of working the national championship game are extremely slim,” said Campbell, a resident of Fox Run. “A lot of things have to fall into place.” Campbell worked as the line judge for the game, which was held at 76,100-seat Sun Life Stadium in Miami. He flew to south Florida on Jan. 5, where he took part in a series of pregame meetings with the other six game officials (and on alternate). There are hundreds of officials who work Division I games. But the likelihood of working the BCS National Championship game means that several pieces have to fall into place. The game is rotated among conference officials. The Pac 12 was assigned to work this year’s game. Officials are graded on their weekly performance. Campbell

had the highest rating among line judges in the Pac 12. Officials also can’t work the game if their alma mater is playing in it, and they can’t work the game if one of their conference teams (in this case the Pac 12) is playing in the game. “It’s an honor,” said Campbell, who was accompanied by his wife, Janet, on the trip to Florida. “When you think about what this game means and everything that goes into it, it’s really a chance of a lifetime.” Campbell’s distinguished officiating career includes seven previous Bowl games, including the Liberty Bowl in 2011. He conceded there was extra excitement surrounding this year’s BCS National Championship game, but he didn’t approach it any differently than he would have a regular season matchup between two lower level Pac 12 teams. “The field is still 100 yards long and there are two 10-yard end zones,” Campbell said. “I don’t get nervous before a game. That’s mean’s you’re not prepared. You have to go out and do your job.” Three other Colorado Springs area officials are also worked Bowl games this season. Greg Burks refereed at the Gator Bowl on Jan. 1; umpire Tim Schroeder worked the Heart of Dallas Bowl on Jan. 1; and Nick Lave was at the Liberty Bowl December 31 in Memphis. “One of my goals is to work the national championship game,” Burks said. “I’m happy for Randy. It’s a real honor and he

Fox Run resident Randy Campbell was the line judge in Monday night’s National Championship game between Notre Dame and Alabama. Photo by Danny Summers deserves it.” Campbell also is a Division I women’s college basketball official. He works three conferences. He was in Las Vegas for a week in December working a tournament at Thomas and Mack Arena. Because he is rated on his performance, Campbell has to pass a rules test and physical fitness test every year. He is evaluated throughout each season and has to main-

tain good ratings to have his year-to-year contract renewed, or to work a bowl game. Campbell watches a lot of game film, but not for the purpose studying teams he is going to officiate. “We watch our performance as a crew,” he said. “We usually do 10 hours of film review each week before we go onto our next game. You try to worry about the things you do control, not the things you can’t control.”

Brothers keep wrestling, coaching all in family By Danny Summers

sports@ourcoloradonews.com MONUMENT - You won’t hear Palmer Ridge assistant wrestling coach Aaron Sieracki talk a whole lot about his accomplishments on the mat. His resume speaks for itself. Sieracki’s older brother, Keith, is the head wrestling coach for Woodland Park and has a resume that might even outshine his brother’s. So when the two get together to talk over the finer points of the sport, anyone within ear shot should shut up and listen. “Keith has a lot better credentials,” Aaron said. “He won’t talk about himself much, but he loves the sport. He does everything he can to give back.” Keith Sieracki, 41, is one of the most decorated American Greco-Roman wrestlers never to compete for an Olympic team. He qualified for two of them - 2000 Sydney and 2004 Athens - but he was removed from his perch each time due to appeals and technicalities. “At one time I would say he had one of the best straight lifts in the world,” Aaron said. The Sieracki brothers have been in Colorado Springs since 1997. It is only within the last two years that they have gotten involved at the high school level. Keith, after retiring from the Army World Class Training program, became an assistant coach at Woodland Park for the 2011-2012 campaign. He got the head job last spring when Bill Barron left to take a similar position in New York. Aaron, 37, “retired” from the Army World Class Training program in July 2012. He was looking to stay busy and keep in shape, so he joined up with former wrestling buddy Paul Gagich, who had been named the Bears’ head coach.

Woodland Park High School head wrestling coach Keith Sieracki, left, and his brother Palmer Ridge High School assistant wrestling coach Aaron Sieracki both support youth activities away from the high-school mats with Sieracki’s Mat Masters Wrestling for children ages 4-18. Photo by Danny Summers “Now that my brother’s retired, he getting excited about coaching,” said Keith, who is married and resides in Woodland Park with his wife, Heather, and three children. “Those kids up there at Palmer Ridge are going to learn a lot.” The Sierackis bring a wealth of experience to the table. They were each state champions in high school in Wisconsin (Aaron was a three-time state champ) and they each competed at the highest level in the world. Keith joined the Army World Class Athletes Program at Fort Carson in 1991 after serving in the Gulf War. His accomplishments include winning the U.S Olympic Team Trials in 2000 and 2004, finishing second in 1996 and third in 2008; sixtime Armed Forces champion; four-time U.S. national champion. Keith retired from wrestling in 2009. Two years after that he retired from the army

as a Sergeant First Class after a nearly 21year career that included a tour of duty in Afghanistan. “My dad wanted me to get out of our little town in Wisconsin and experience life,” Keith said. “I certainly did that.” Aaron took a little bit different route. He wrestled for Lindenwood University (St. Charles, Mo.). He left school after a couple of years and joined the air force. He went through basic training and was stationed at Peterson Air Force Base while he trained with the Air Force World Class Athlete program and was a member of Team USA based out of the Olympic Training Center. Aaron retired as an E4 after nine years and worked as a civilian for a year. Bored, he joined the Army and became a member of the Army World Class Athlete Program. He stayed in the army for seven years and got out as an E6. He came off active duty on Dec. 1. Aaron came as close as a person can to making the 2012 London Games when he finished second at the U.S. Olympic Team Trials in April. He lost 2-1 to 22-year-old Ben Provisor in their 163-pound Greco-Roman match. “It’s tough,” said Aaron, who also finished second at the 2008 Olympic Trials. “For a while there it didn’t matter what I was doing, it popped it into my head. “I can definitely say I gave it everything I had. I have no regrets.” So who would win if the Sieracki brothers wrestled off? “We’ll give Aaron the upper hand,” Keith said with a smile. “He wrestled up until July. “Actually, we always had a different mentality when it came to wrestling each other. We figured there were enough people in the United States and enough people in the world to where we didn’t need to wrestle each other. Instead, we always just gave each other a pat on the back.” The brothers did square off - sort of - in

November when Palmer Ridge traveled to Woodland Park for a dual meet. The Bears came out on top, 46-37. “There’s always going to be a competitive spirit between me and my brother and Paul (Gagich),” Keith said. “Last year they beat us pretty bad, so for us to be this close to them this year, and down a couple of wrestlers, was pretty good. I would like to see those guys at the end of the season.” After a year as an assistant, Keith is settling into his role as the main guy. The Woodland Park team has shown a lot of improvement. Keith believes as many as five of his wrestlers could advance to the Class 4A state tournament in February. Just one Panther made it to state in 2012. While Aaron is publically “retired,” he still hasn’t hung up his singlet and put away his shoes. There’s a chance he could dust them off in the coming years. “I had a lot of issues with my back,” Aaron said. “After that heals I’ll reevaluate things.” A few years ago, Keith opened Sieracki’s Mat Masters Wrestling. It was based in south Colorado Springs. But when Aaron retired from competitive wrestling, Keith revamped the business and set up locations in Woodland Park (at the high school) and Monument (Palmer Ridge). The brothers work together to support each location. The club is open to kids ages 4 to 18 and is dedicated to developing elite wrestling champions with strong values, discipline and character. The Sierackis focus on, but are not limited to the wrestling styles of Greco Roman/freestyle and folk style wrestling. You can visit the website at www.sierackismmwrestling.com. “I’m working on making state champions and a state championship team,” Keith said. “I don’t ever want to yell in the corner. I just want to sit back and watch it all come together.”

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January 9, 2013

DISTRICT COURT, EL PASO COUNTY, STATE OF COLORADO Court Address: 270 South Tejon Colorado Springs, CO 80901 Court Phone: 7194487700 PLAINTIFF: HIGH FOREST RANCH HOMEOWNERS ASSOCIATION v. DEFENDANTS: ABERDEEN INVESTMENTS, INC.; TODD PROPERTIES, INC.; RICHARD A.M. TODD; and THOMAS S. MOWLE AS THE PUBLIC TRUSTEE OF EL PASO COUNTY, COLORADO Attorney: Brianna L. Schaefer Firm: HindmanSanchez P.C. Address: 5610 Ward Road, Suite 300 Arvada, Colorado 80002-1310 Phone Number: 303.432.8999 Fax Number: 303.432.0999 E-mail: bschaefer@hindmansanchez.com Atty. Reg. No.: 34078 Our File No.: 3243.006

Misc. Private Legals Public Notice DISTRICT COURT, EL PASO COUNTY, STATE OF COLORADO Court Address: 270 South Tejon Colorado Springs, CO 80901 Court Phone: 7194487700 PLAINTIFF: HIGH FOREST RANCH HOMEOWNERS ASSOCIATION v. DEFENDANTS: ABERDEEN INVESTMENTS, INC.; TODD PROPERTIES, INC.; RICHARD A.M. TODD; and THOMAS S. MOWLE AS THE PUBLIC TRUSTEE OF EL PASO COUNTY, COLORADO

Case No.: 2012CV4023 Div: 3

Misc. Private Legals

SUMMONS

THE PEOPLE OF THE STATE OF COLORADO TO THE ABOVE-NAMED DEFENDANTS: You are hereby summoned and required to appear and defend against the claims of Plaintiff, as set forth in the Complaint filed with the Court in this action, by filing with the Clerk of this Court an Answer or other response. You are required to file your Answer or other response within twenty-one (21) days after service upon you if within the State of Colorado, or within thirty-five (35) days after service upon you if outside the State of Colorado or if served by publication pursuant to C.R.C.P. 4(g). If served by publication, service shall be complete on the day of the last publication. A copy of the Complaint may be obtained from the Clerk of the Court.

ORADO TO THE ABOVE-NAMED DEFENDANTS:

DONALA WATER AND SANITATION DISTRICT

You are hereby summoned and required to appear and defend against the claims of Plaintiff, as set forth in the Complaint filed with the Court in this action, by filing with the Clerk of this Court an Answer or other response. You are required to file your Answer or other response within twenty-one (21) days after service upon you if within the State of Colorado, or within thirty-five (35) days after service upon you if outside the State of Colorado or if served by publication pursuant to C.R.C.P. 4(g). If served by publication, service shall be complete on the day of the last publication. A copy of the Complaint may be obtained from the Clerk of the Court.

NOTICE OF FILING OF PETITION FOR EXCLUSION OF PROPERTY FROM DONALA WATER AND SANITATION DISTRICT AND HEARING ON PETITION. Pursuant to CRS 32-1-501 et.seq. Notice is hereby given that a petition for exclusion of property from Donala Water and Sanitation District was filed on December 11, 2012.

11-COLOR

If you fail to file your Answer or other response to the Complaint in writing within the time required, judgment by default may be rendered against you by the Court for the relief demanded in the Complaint without further notice.

Misc. Private Legals

This is an action affecting the real property described in the Complaint and is a proceeding in rem as well as a proceeding in personam. Dated this 10th day of August, 2012. Respectfully submitted, HINDMANSANCHEZ P.C.

Name of Petitioners: Randy Scholl and Margaret E. Scholl Address of Petitioners: 12254 Woodmont Drive, Colorado Springs, CO 80921 Description of area proposed for exclusion: As set forth on Exhibit A below. Place of hearing: Donala Water and Sanitation District Offices, 15850 Holbein Drive Colorado Springs CO 80921

Government Legals Public Notice DONALA WATER AND SANITATION DISTRICT

Original signature of Brianna L. Schaefer is on file with the law offices of HindmanSanchez P.C. pursuant to C.R.C.P. 121, §1-26(7). /s/ Brianna L. Schaefer Brianna L. Schaefer, No. 34078 Loura K. Sanchez, No. 21050

NOTICE OF FILING OF PETITION FOR EXCLUSION OF PROPERTY FROM DONALA WATER AND SANITATION DISTRICT AND HEARING ON PETITION. Pursuant to CRS 32-1-501 et.seq. Notice is hereby given that a petition for exclusion of property from Donala Water and Sanitation District was filed on December 11, 2012.

Date of hearing: January 17, 2013 Time of hearing: 1:30 pm ALL PERSONS INTERESTED IN THE PROPOSED EXCLUSION SHALL APPEAR AT THE DESIGNATED TIME AND PLACE AND SHOW CAUSE IN WRITING WHY THE PETITION SHOULD NOT BE GRANTED. FAILURE OF ANY PERSON IN THE EXISTING DISTRICT TO FILE WRITTEN OBJECTION SHALL BE TAKEN AS ASSENT TO EXCLUSION OF THE AREA DESCRIBED IN THIS NOTICE. The Board of Directors may continue the hearing to a subsequent meeting date. Dana Duthie General Manager Dated:

Government Legals

Exhibit A

A tract of land in the Southeast quarter of Section 20 and Southwest quarter of Section 21, Township 11 South, Range 66 West, 6th P.M. in El Paso County, ColorAttorney: Brianna L. Schaefer ado, more particularly described as folAddress of Plaintiff: Firm: HindmanSanchez P.C. lows: Beginning at the Southeast corner of High Forest Ranch Homeowners AssociAddress: 5610 Ward Road, Suite 300 said Section 20; thence S 88°10’10”W, an ation Arvada, Colorado 80002-1310 assumed bearing to which all others are c/o Z&R Property Management Phone Number: 303.432.8999 related, along the South line of said SecIf you fail to file your Answer or other re6015 Lehman Drive, Suite 205 Fax Number: 303.432.0999 tion 20, a distance of 1517.97 feet to a sponse to the Complaint in writing within Colorado Springs, CO 80918 E-mail: bschaefer@hindmansanchez.com point; thence N 0°52’14” E a distance of the time required, judgment by default Atty. Reg. No.: 34078 1288.45 feet to a point on the South line may be rendered against you by the Court Legal Notice No.: 932031 Date of hearing: January 17, 2013 Our File No.: 3243.006 of a tract of land recorded in the records of for the relief demanded in the Complaint First Publication: December 12, 2012 Time of hearing: 1:30 pm El Paso County in Plat Book 3825 at Page without further notice. Last Publication: January 9, 2012 ALL PERSONS INTERESTED IN THE Case No.: 2012CV4023 988; thence N 87°53’42” E along the Publisher: The Tribune PROPOSED EXCLUSION SHALL APDiv: 3 South line of said tract a distance of This is an action affecting the real propPEAR AT THE DESIGNATED TIME AND 1013.40 feet to a point which is also the erty described in the Complaint and is a PLACE AND SHOW CAUSE IN WRITSUMMONS Southeast corner of said tract; thence N proceeding in rem as well as a proceedING WHY THE PETITION SHOULD NOT ing in personam. 0°45’06” W a distance of 1349.19 feet to a THE PEOPLE OF THE STATE OF COLBE GRANTED. point on the North line of the Southeast ORADO TO THE ABOVE-NAMED DEFAILURE OF ANY PERSON IN THE EXPublic Notice Dated this 10th day of August, 2012. quarter of said Section 20, which point is FENDANTS: ISTING DISTRICT TO FILE WRITTEN Respectfully submitted, also the Northeast corner of said tract and OBJECTION SHALL BE TAKEN AS ASHINDMANSANCHEZ P.C. the center of the right-of-way of Higby Notice of a Change in the Rates of You are hereby summoned and required SENT TO EXCLUSION OF THE AREA Road; thence N 88°00’41” E along the MOUNTAIN VIEW ELECTRIC ASSOCIATION, INC. to appear and defend against the claims DESCRIBED IN THIS NOTICE. Original signature of Brianna L. Schaefer North line of said Southeast quarter a disof Plaintiff, as set forth in the Complaint The Board of Directors may continue the is on file with the law offices of 1655 Hind-5th Street, P.O. Box 1600, Limon, CO 80828 tance of 472.00 feet to the East quarter filed with the Court in this action, by filing hearing to a subsequent meeting date. manSanchez P.C. pursuant to C.R.C.P. corner of Section 20, which point is also with the Clerk of this Court an Answer or Dana Duthie 121, §1-26(7). the West quarter corner of Section 21 and Date of Publication: January 2, 2013 other response. You are required to file General Manager the center of the right-of-way of Higby your Answer or other response within Dated: /s/ Brianna L. Schaefer Road; thence N 88°46’41” E along the 20, 2012, View Electric Association, Inc. Board of Directors authorized a rate increase of 1.44% for rates listed belowNorth to become twenty-oneOn (21)November days after service uponthe Mountain Brianna L. Schaefer, No. 34078 line of theeffective Southweston quarter of said you if withinbills the State of Colorado, or withExhibit A K. Sanchez, No. 21050 Section 21the a distance of 907.18 feet to a calculated after March 1,Loura 2013. Residential Rate 16.01 consumers will see a decrease in their energy charges as specified below. In addition, grid access in thirty-five (35) days after service upon point; thence S 01°13’19” E charge will increase by $10.00ATTORNEYS per month. FOR Therefore, a residential consumer who has zero (0) kilowatt hour consumption will see a $10.00 increase in their monthly bill. a distance of you if outside the State of Colorado or if A tract of land in the Southeast quarter of PLAINTIFF HIGH 880.77 feet to a point; thence N 88°46’41” Residential consumers 900 to 6400 HOMEOWNERS kilowatt hours per bill. Residential consumers who than 6400 kilowatt served by publication pursuant who to use 20 and Southwest quarter of Sec-use more FOREST RANCH AS- month will see nominal decreases in their Section E parallel with the right-of-way of Higby C.R.C.P. 4(g). served by publication, Township 11 South, Range 66 SOCIATION RoadAssociation a distance of office 1729.48atfeet to a point hoursIf per month will see slight increases based upon consumption. For more information you can visit tion our 21, website at www.mvea.coop or either th service shall be complete on the day of West, 6th P.M. in El Paso County, Coloron the East line of the Southwest quarter 1655 5 Street in Limon CO and 11140 East Woodmen Road in Falcon CO or call 800-388-9881. the last publication. A copy of the Comado, more particularly described as folAddress of Plaintiff: of said Section 21 which point is also the plaint may be obtained from the Clerk of lows: Beginning at the Southeast corner of High Forest Ranch Homeowners Associcenter of the right-of-way of Roller Coastthe Court. said Section 20; thence SNew 88°10’10”W, ation er Road; thence S 01°01’31” E along the Rate Present Rate Rate an Change assumed bearing to which all others are c/o Z&R Property Management East line of said Southwest quarter a disIf you fail to file your Answer or other rerelated, along the South line of said Sec6015 Lehman Drive, Suite 205 tance of 1767.06 feet to the South quarter Rate 16.01 sponse to Residential the Complaint in writing within tion 20, a distance of 1517.97 feet to a Colorado Springs, CO 80918 corner of said Section 21; thence S Grid Access per Month $ 19.95 $ E a 29.95 $ W along 10.00the South line of said the time required, judgment by default point; thence N 0°52’14” distance of 88°52’31” may be rendered against you by Court per 1288.45 feet to a point $on the South line Legal Southwest quarter a distance of 2616.91 First 1500 kWh perthemonth, kWhNotice No.: 932031 $ 0.11678 0.10565 ($ 0.01113) for the relief demanded in the Complaint of a tract of land recorded in the records of First Publication: December 12, 2012 feet to the point of beginning. Overnotice. 1500 kWh per month, per kWh $ 0.09664 $ 0.09800 $ 0.00136 without further El Paso County in Plat Book 3825 at Page Last Publication: January 9, 2012 Minimum Monthly Charge $ 19.95 $ $ 10.00 988; thence N 87°53’42” E29.95 along the Publisher: The Tribune Legal Notice No.: 932038 This is an action affecting the real propSouth line of said tract a distance of First Publication: January 9, 2013 erty described in the Complaint and is a 1013.40 feet to a point which is also the Last Publication: January 9, 2013 Residential Time of Day Service Rate 16.05 proceeding in rem as well as a proceedSoutheast corner of said tract; thence N Publisher: The Tribune Grid Access per Month $ 26.00 37.06 $ 11.06 ing in personam. 0°45’06” W a distance of$ 1349.19 feet to a point on the North line$of 0.12433 the Southeast kWh used between the hours of 5:30 am and 12:00 pm per kWh-now 7 am-11 pm Mon-Sat $ 0.10216 $ 0.02217 Dated this 10th of August, 2012. quarter of said Section $20,0.09285 which point is KWhday used between the hours of 12:00 pm and 4:30 pm per kWh-now 11 pm-7 am Mon-Sat $ 0.05108 $ 0.04177 Respectfully submitted, also the Northeast corner of said tract and kWh usedP.C. between the hours of 4:30 pm and 10:30 pm per kWh - obsolete $ 0.20434 n/aHigby n/a HINDMANSANCHEZ the center of the right-of-way of kWh used between the hours of 10:30 pm and 5:30 am per kWh - obsolete $ 0.05108 n/a the n/a Road; thence N 88°00’41” E along Original signature of Brianna Schaefer North quarter a diskWh used duringL.the 24 hour period beginning at 12 am on Sunday per kWh n/a line of said Southeast $ 0.09285 $ 0.09285 is on file with the law offices of Hindtance of 472.00 feet to the East quarter Minimum monthly $ 26.00 $ point 37.06 $ 11.06 manSanchez P.C. pursuant to charge C.R.C.P.per meter corner of Section 20, which is also 121, §1-26(7). the West quarter corner of Section 21 and the center of the right-of-way of Higby Irrigation Rates 17.30 & 17.31 /s/ Brianna L. Schaefer Road; thence N 88°46’41” E along the Charge per horsepower per month $ 2.87 $ 2.87 NONE Brianna L. Schaefer, No. 34078 North line of the Southwest quarter of said EnergyNo. charge $ 0.09469 $ 907.18 0.09799 $ 0.00330 Loura K. Sanchez, 21050 per kWh Section 21 a distance of feet to a point; thence S 01°13’19” distance of Minimum annual charge per horsepower $ 34.44 $ E a34.44 NONE ATTORNEYSbut FOR PLAINTIFF HIGH 880.77 feet to a point; thence N 88°46’41” in no event less than $ 172.20 $ 172.20 NONE FOREST RANCH HOMEOWNERS ASE parallel with the right-of-way of Higby SOCIATION Road a distance of 1729.48 feet to a point Small Power Rate 18.40 on the East line of the Southwest quarter Address of Grid Plaintiff: of said Section 21 which is also the Access per Month $ 20.00 $ point29.95 $ 9.95 High Forest Ranch Homeowners Associcenter of the right-of-way of Roller CoastFirst 1500 kWh per month per kWh $ 0.12177 $ 0.10877 ($ 0.01300) ation er Road; thence S 01°01’31” E along the Over 1500 kWh per month per kWh $ 0.11611 $ 0.10311 ($ 0.01300) c/o Z&R Property Management East line of said Southwest quarter a dis6015 Lehman Drive, Suite 205 tance of 1767.06 feet to the South quarter Colorado Springs, CO 80918 corner of said Section 21; thence S Municipal Water Pumping Rate 18.45 88°52’31” W along the South line of said Grid $ 27.75 $ 58.95 $ 31.20 Legal Notice No.:Access 932031 per Month Southwest quarter a distance of 2616.91 First Publication: December 12,month 2012 per kWh feet to the point of beginning. kWh charge per $ 0.08110 $ 0.07991 ($ 0.00119) Last Publication: January 9, 2012Charge per month per kVA Member Demand n/a $ 3.35 $ 3.35 Publisher: The Tribune Legal Notice No.: 932038 MVEA Demand Charge per month per kVA - obsolete $ 10.30 n/a First Publication: January 9, 2013n/a Last Publication: January 9, 2013 Publisher: The Tribune Large Power Transmission Voltage Rate 18.50 ATTORNEYS FOR PLAINTIFF HIGH FOREST RANCH HOMEOWNERS ASSOCIATION

Member Demand Charge � per kW of billing demand - obsolete MVEA Demand Charge � per kW of billing demand - obsolete Energy Charge � per kWh of Energy - obsolete Seasonal Average Demand Rate per kW month of Average Demand � Winter Seasonal Average Demand Rate per kW month of Average Demand � Spring Seasonal Average Demand Rate per kW month of Average Demand � Summer Seasonal Average Demand Rate per kW month of Average Demand � Fall Time of Day Energy Rate On-Peak per month per kWh Time of Day Energy Rate Off-Peak per month per kWh

Name of Petitioners: Randy Scholl and Margaret E. Scholl Address of Petitioners: 12254 Woodmont Drive, Colorado Springs, CO 80921 Description of area proposed for exclusion: As set forth on Exhibit A below. Place of hearing: Donala Water and Sanitation District Offices, 15850 Holbein Drive Colorado Springs CO 80921

$ 2.05 $ 22.38 $ 0.02895

$ $ $ $ $ $

n/a n/a n/a 34.13 31.17 38.90 31.17 0.04514 0.01129

$ $ $ $ $ $

FAILURE OF ANY PERSON IN THE EXISTING DISTRICT TO FILE WRITTEN OBJECTION SHALL BE TAKEN AS ASSENT TO EXCLUSION OF THE AREA DESCRIBED IN THIS NOTICE. The Board of Directors may continue the hearing to a subsequent meeting date. Dana Duthie General Manager Dated:

The Tribune 11

Exhibit A A tract of land in the Southeast quarter of Section 20 and Southwest quarter of Section 21, Township 11 South, Range 66 West, 6th P.M. in El Paso County, Colorado, more particularly described as follows: Beginning at the Southeast corner of said Section 20; thence S 88°10’10”W, an assumed bearing to which all others are related, along the South line of said Section 20, a distance of 1517.97 feet to a point; thence N 0°52’14” E a distance of 1288.45 feet to a point on the South line of a tract of land recorded in the records of El Paso County in Plat Book 3825 at Page 988; thence N 87°53’42” E along the South line of said tract a distance of 1013.40 feet to a point which is also the Southeast corner of said tract; thence N 0°45’06” W a distance of 1349.19 feet to a point on the North line of the Southeast quarter of said Section 20, which point is also the Northeast corner of said tract and the center of the right-of-way of Higby Road; thence N 88°00’41” E along the North line of said Southeast quarter a distance of 472.00 feet to the East quarter corner of Section 20, which point is also the West quarter corner of Section 21 and the center of the right-of-way of Higby Road; thence N 88°46’41” E along the North line of the Southwest quarter of said Section 21 a distance of 907.18 feet to a point; thence S 01°13’19” E a distance of 880.77 feet to a point; thence N 88°46’41” E parallel with the right-of-way of Higby Road a distance of 1729.48 feet to a point on the East line of the Southwest quarter of said Section 21 which point is also the center of the right-of-way of Roller Coaster Road; thence S 01°01’31” E along the East line of said Southwest quarter a distance of 1767.06 feet to the South quarter corner of said Section 21; thence S 88°52’31” W along the South line of said Southwest quarter a distance of 2616.91 feet to the point of beginning.

Government Legals

“Trust Us!”

Legal Notice No.: 932038 First Publication: January 9, 2013 Last Publication: January 9, 2013 Publisher: The Tribune

Without public notices, the government wouldn’t have to say anything else.

Public notices are a community’s window into the government. From zoning regulations to local budgets, governments have used local newspapers to inform citizens of its actions as an essential part of your right to know. You know where to look, when to look and what to look for to be involved as a citizen. Local newspapers provide you with the information you need to get involved.

Notices are meant to be noticed. Read your public notices and get involved!

Have you seen how Classifieds can work for you?

n/a n/a n/a 34.13 31.17 38.90 31.17 0.04514 0.01129

Large Power Rate 18.60 Grid Access per Month kWh charges per month per kWh Member Demand Charge per month per kVA

$ 27.75 $ 0.04211 $ 19.32

$ 58.95 $ 0.07250 $ 7.35

$ 31.20 $ 0.03039 ($ 11.97)

Large Power Primary Metering Rate 18.61 Grid Access per Month kWh charges per month per kWh Member Demand Charge per month per kVA

$ 27.75 $ 0.04168 $ 18.75

$ 58.95 $ 0.07378 $ 7.28

$ 31.20 $ 0.03210 ($ 11.47)

Large Power Load Management Rate 18.62 Grid Access per Month kWh charges per month per kWh Member Demand Charge per month per kVA MVEA Demand Charge per month per kVA - obsolete

$ 27.75 $ 0.03730 $ 11.05 $ 11.05

$ 58.95 $ 0.07250 $ 7.35 n/a

$ 31.20 $ 0.03520 ($ 3.70) n/a

Large Power Load Mgmt Primary Metering Rate 18.63 Grid Access per Month kWh charges per month per kWh Member Demand Charge per month per kVA MVEA Demand Charge per month per kVA - obsolete

$ 27.75 $ 0.03613 $ 10.72 $ 10.72

$ 58.95 $ 0.07378 $ 7.28 n/a

$ 31.20 $ 0.03765 ($ 3.44) n/a

General Power Rate 18.64 Grid Access per Month kWh charges per month per kWh Member Demand Charge per month per kVA

$ 27.75 $ 0.10363 $ 6.71

$ 58.95 $ 0.07250 $ 7.35

$ 31.20 ($ 0.03113) $ 0.64

Sales for Resale - Wholesale Energy Primary Metering Rate 20.66 Grid Access per month kWh charges per month per kWh Member Demand Charge per month per kVA

n/a $ 0.04086 $ 22.12

$ 58.95 $ 0.07378 $ 7.28

$ 58.95 $ 0.03292 ($ 14.84)

All Street Lighting & Security Lighting Rate Components will increase by 4.0% th

Anyone who desires to comment on the proposed rate change will file a written response with the Association at 1655 5 Street, P O Box 1600, Limon, Colorado 80828, no later than twenty (20) days from the date of this notice. The Association may hold a hearing to determine whether the proposed change will be authorized. Anyone who desires to receive notice of hearing, if any, will make written request therefore to the Association, at the above address, no later than twenty (20) days from the date of this notice. MOUNTAIN VIEW ELECTRIC ASSOCIATION, INC. JIM C. HERRON, Chief Executive Officer Legal Notice No.: 932039 * First Publication: January 9, 2013 * Last Publication: January 9, 2013 * Publisher: The Tribune

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