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Pikes Peak 5-22-13

Teller County, Colorado • Volume 52, Issue 21

May 22, 2013

75 cents

A Colorado Community Media Publication

ourtellercountynews.com

Up and down Tax valuations give pause to all By Pat Hill

phill@ourcoloradonews.com Every two years, notices of valuation cause some to yell, others to rejoice. As some homeowners complain about an increase in value by as much as $50,000, others have the opposite worry. In Woodland Park, in general, values declined by 3 percent, said Betty Clark-Wine, Teller County’s assessor. “That means that some values are going down, some going up,” she said. In this cycle, residential property is valued on data collected from July 1, 2008 to June 30, 2012. “We had only 1,466 sales of residential in four years, properties of all sizes and shapes,” Clark-Wine said. On the other hand, using the market approach, the assessor incorporated five years of data to evaluate sales of vacant land from July 1, 2007 to June 30, 2012. “We had so few sales, people weren’t building or buying, so we only had 561 sales of vacant land in five years,” she said. “They were parcels of all sizes in the entire county.” On qualified commercial properties, the assessor’s office based valuations on 35 sales in those five years. Properties used as offices are valued differently from those used as retail shops, she said. For commercial vacant land, only six qualified properties were sold in the same five-year period. “The market was such that there weren’t a lot of sales, as there had been in the past,” Clark-Wine said. “The state mandates that we have to have a minimum number of qualified sales in a class of property.”

Betty Clark-Wine, Teller County Assessor, explains the system behind property valuations and why some went up and some went down. Photo by Pat Hill

For assessment purposes, the numbers around the county varied. For instance, in the southwest quadrant, 30 percent of residential sales were foreclosures while in the southeast quadrant, which includes Cripple Creek and Victor, there were few sales and a decline in the selling prices, ClarkWine said. In the northwest part, some homeowners had an increase in property values. “In that area, some properties sold as many as three times in the same time period,” she said. “We could see prices coming up as properties were being improved.” On the other hand, subdivisions in

Woodland Park, for instance, with older and smaller homes experienced a decline in value while other subdivisions moved up the valuation scale, she said.

Variables in valuations

With variables in valuations, Clark-Wine urges homeowners to either appeal or come in and discuss options. “About a year ago, we looked at statistics and found that there were in excess of 5,000 properties that had not been personally inspected in five years or more,” she said. “These are properties that may not have sold. We usually go and look at a property when it sells.”

With a new software program, some residential properties changed from being classified as “badly worn” on the outside to “fair condition,” which would have caused the home to go up in value. “Most likely, in years past, they were undervalued,” ClarkWine said. In the cleanup process, some properties in Woodland Park went down in value by as much as 36 percent while others increased by up to 40 percent. “If they’re over-valued we can fix that on appeal; if under-valued, we had to keep them that way for two years,” she said. Valuations continues on Page 8

Things looking up, kind of, for water district By Pat Hill

phill@ourcoloradonews. com Caught in a vicious circle and a downpour of bad tidings, the Florissant Water & Sanitation District is treading water. Put on notice last week by the Department of Local Affairs, the board agreed to temporarily dissolve the district. “We don’t have any record that the district has held, or canceled, an election since 2004,” said Jarrod Biggs, research analyst with DOLA. The second nail was the board’s failure to comply with audit mandates for 2011 and 2012. “A third issue is the enforcement order,” Biggs said. In a meeting May 14 with Biggs and Clay Brown, DOLA’s regional manager, in addition to engineers from

Colorado’s public health department, the board heard possible solutions along with the bad news. The hurdles were high, however. Cited in 2010 with an enforcement order, the five-member board failed to submit the appropriate discharge-monitoring reports, or DMRs. “Some DMRs were turned in but there is still some question because they’re not meeting the necessity of enforcement orders,” said Bret Icenogle, engineer with the state’s water-quality control division. “You need to think about that in terms of how you can get your sampling done.” But it’s the audits that present the biggest threat to the district, not only the cost but also the snafu around an unelected board. “Arguably, this board can’t

Cathy Valdez, board member of the Florissant Water & Sanitation District, listens to engineers from the state’s public health department. The news is not good. Photo by Pat Hill sign anything with any legal standing,” Biggs said. To date, the audit bills have not been paid, due to

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a misunderstanding about the charge. According to the accountant, Charlotte Plush, the board was told the bill from the auditors would be $4,500 but was instead $9,400. Ideas to pay the bill included trying to get a bank loan or extending the payment period. On the issue of the legality, the board could be sanctioned in 30 days if appointed by Teller County commissioners. “Obviously, this board is trying to con-

duct the business of providing water; there is a lot of funding available and we want to try and work this district through,” Biggs said. “It’s a familiar refrain and, in rural Colorado, it’s a problem to get people to sit on the board. We have places where there are two board members, some with one.” On a positive note, Brown, the regional manager, highlighted glimmers of hope, of sun amid the

clouds. “We’re kind of flying sidewise; we’ll make it work somehow,” he said. “You guys are service providers; if you weren’t sitting here, who’s going to provide the water and sewer? Just keep it going, we’ll work the technical details out.” For a volunteer board, working with an annual budget of less than $100,000 to serve 94 customers, the state’s intercession is considered a good thing, not a judgment call, for the members as well as the accountants. “I’m glad you all are here to help us out,” Plush said. A day after the meeting, the board hired an engineering consultant, Adam Sommers, with plans to hire a full-time operator for the water system. In a district besieged by problems, brown water, regular broken water mains, and, last week, a sinkhole caused by the leakage of 80,000 gallons of water, along with a series of complaints, there were no residents at the meeting that evening. District board members are Ginger Bruvold, Cathy Valdez, Calvin Steele, Conrad Swift and Harold Clare.


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2 Pikes Peak Courier View

May 22, 2013

Graduation coverage delayed by holiday Photos of 2013 WP and CC-V grads will be in June 5 paper By Norma Engelberg

nengelberg@ourcoloradonews. com This year’s Cripple Creek-Victor High School and Woodland Park High School graduations are taking place so close to Memorial Day that the Courier View will not be able to publish photos of these events until the June 5 newspaper. The following is a short preview the 2013 graduations.

Kelsey Siebel is the Woodland Park High School Class of 2013 Salutatorian. Photo by Norma Engelberg

Cripple Creek-Victor High School

Twenty-three seniors will walk down the aisle between family members and well-wishers in the Cripple Creek-Victor High School Gym on May 25. The class Valedictorians are Darien Carrillo and Haley Hute and the Salutatorian is Darren Caddy. So far, students have earned a total of $114,590 in scholarships. The scholarship-totals for both CC-V and WPHS are likely to change as the schools receive more information. Hute, Carillo and Caddy are also the school’s top scholarship winners. Hute has earned $41,390 and will be attending the University of Wyoming, Caddy has earned $31, 250 in scholarships and will be attending Colorado School of Mines and Carrillo has earned $10,250 and will be at-

CC-V Narrow Gauge stays on track Special to the Courier The Cripple Creek & Victor Narrow Gauge Railroad has been one of the primary tourist attractions in Cripple Creek since 1967 and about 40,000 visitors each season take its historic train ride through the gold mining district of Cripple Creek and Victor on the old right-of-way of the Midland Terminal Railroad. The trip has traditionally started at the head of Bennett Avenue in Cripple Creek and traveled to the ghost town of Anaconda, however the recent expansion of the open pit gold mine between Cripple Creek and Victor has re-

quired the overall trip to be changed. As a result of the change in the trip the train will no longer be required to backup to complete the traditional 4-mile roundtrip back to Cripple Creek from Anaconda. The railroad owners have used a change in the route to create a turnaround at the World Fair Claim, which was a highly productive mining claim during one of the greatest Gold Rush in American history. Trains will continue leave their 1894 station about every 40 minutes and stop at the end of the line at Echo Valley, which overlooks the shelf road, ghost towns of

Mound City and Berry and has one of the best views in Colorado. Jim Birmingham, the railroad’s general manager, is optimistic about the change in route and the ability to provide a way to turn the train around. “We are excited about the upcoming year and the opportunity to provide our customers with a new experience,” he said. When asked about the reduction in the length of the trip as a result of the mine expansion, Mr. Birmingham noted, “We are thankful that we did not lose some of the best features of our ride. We have people from all over the

RELATIONSHIPS RIGOR OPPORTUNITY

world that love to hear the train echo through Echo Valley and learn about the history of the area. Even though our length was reduced we believe that our trip will continue to provide a great experience for our customers and look forward to new opportunities to grow our business.” Many people in the region are pleased to hear that the Cripple Creek and Victor Narrow Gauge Railroad will continue to provide a great family attraction in our area despite the changes to their trip. The railroad will begin operating this season on May 25. Learn more at www. CrippleCreekRailroad.com

tending Pikes Peak Community College. Most of the students who earned scholarship money took part in Senior Seminar taught by counselors Jennifer Johnston and Alisha Strupp and English teacher Loyd Mowery. Senior Seminar is an independent study program just for seniors.

Woodland Park High School

With 187 seniors graduating, Woodland Park High School is expecting a packed house at the Pikes Peak Center on May 24. The class Valedictorian is Anjolenna Lutz, who recently was named a Daniels Fund scholarship winner. The Salutatorian is Kelsey Siebel. The class has earned more than $1.36 million in scholarships with 26 students winning 71 awards.

The Cripple Creek & Victor Narrow Gauge Railroad will be rumbling down its tracks from Cripple Creek to Anaconda again this year starting May 25. The Cripple Creek & Victor Gold Mining Co. expansion has forced the railroad company to change part of its route but also created an opportunity to construct a turnaround at one of the area’s most scenic views. Courtesy photo

or call 719-689-2640. Cripple Creek get ready to hear the sound of the

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Pikes Peak Courier View 3

May 22, 2013

y re-2 kids shine at WP council meeting

unity

Gateway, Columbine students make guest appearances

who took ht by and cher ar isBy Norma Engelberg gramnengelberg@ourcoloradonews.com

It was school night at the Woodland Park City Council meeting. On May 16, students duat-from Woodland Park RE-2 School District hoolelementary schools received recognition ouseand awards from Woodland Park Mayor onDave Turley. First, school district Superintendent Jed An-Bowman talked about the “Elevate Your wasEducation” art contest, which was coordiolar-nated by the Woodland Park Art Alliance, orianthe Woodland Park Education Foundation hasand the school district. llion “Illustrating `Elevate Your Education’ dentswas the only parameter,” he said. “The students could create a poster or make 3-D art that could be photographed.” There were about 100 entries and the top three winners at the grade-school, middle school and high school each received cash prizes. Some of the posters were framed and hung in the school administration board room. “We wanted something more permanent so we made some of them into lightpole banners you can see if you drive down Panther Way,” Bowman said. “One of the posters will be hung here in council chambers and another one is in the City Hall foyer. We’ll change them out every month and n its we have enough to keep the city in posters for about two years.” he He added that the district plans to have com- similar contests every two to three years so ruct a that more students can participate. Next on the agenda were the winners of the Columbine Elementary School Science Fair. Turley acted as one of the judges for this event and was so impressed with the oughquality of the students’ projects that he inthisvited the winners to bring their projects to the city council meeting. “Sometimes the mayor has a good idea,” he said. “I want to thank these students and their parents. Good parenting is so important for our community.” The science fair winners were called to the front of the room where Turley congratulated them and gave each of them a Woodland Park commemorative pin. Finally, one student from each grade level at Gateway Elementary School who won the Bear Aware Drawing Contest, which was sponsored by the school district and Keep Woodland Park Beautiful, were called to the front to receive their certificates and pins. “The city doesn’t have problem bears,”

Columbine Elementary School science fair winners show off their science projects at the May 16 Woodland Park City Council meeting. Woodland Park Mayor Dave Turley was one of the science fair judges and invited the winners to the meeting. Photos by Norma Engelberg Turley said. “We have problem humans. Our behaviors, like putting our trash out the night before pick up, cause problems for the bears and put them at risk.” City Planner Lisa Parnell, who heads up Keep Woodland Park Beautiful, explained how the contest worked and called the names of each winner. Coloring contest entries can be seen downstairs at the Woodland Park Public Library and the winning posters can be seen at www.keepwoodlandparkbeautiful.org. The entire council meeting can be seen on the city’s YouTube channel at www.citywoodlandpark.org.

Gateway Elementary School students recently took part in a Bear Aware Coloring Contest sponsored by the school and Keep Woodland Park Beautiful. The winners in each grade level, kindergarten through fifth-grade receive certificates and a Woodland Park commemorative pin from Mayor Dave Turley at the May 16 Woodland Park City Council meeting.

correction The movie “Deadly Dose” will not be shown May 23 at the Woodland Park library. The Courier regrets the announcement, which was an error on page 6 of the May 15 edition of the newspaper.

Send uS your newS Colorado Community Media welcomes event listings and other submissions. Please note our submissions emails. events and club listings calendar@ourcoloradonews.com School notes schoolnotes@ourcoloradonews.com Military briefs militarynotes@ourcoloradonews.com General press releases Submit through our website obituaries obituaries@ourcoloradonews.com Letters to the editor editor@ourcoloradonews.com news tips news@ourcoloradonews.com Fax information to 719-687-3009 Mail to P.O. Box 340, Woodland Park, CO 80866

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4

4 Pikes Peak Courier View

May 22, 2013

Cripple Creek-Victor shuttle service starts Special to the Courier

Teller County Resource Group pikes peak courier view

(USPS 654-460)

OFFICE: 1200 E. Highway 24, Woodland Park, CO 80863 PhOnE: 719-687-3006 A legal newspaper of general circulation in Teller County, Colorado, the Pikes Peak Courier View is published weekly on Wednesday by Colorado Community Media, 1200 E. Highway 24, Woodland Park, CO 80863. PERIODICALS POSTAGE PAID AT WOODLAND PARK, COLORADO. POSTMASTER: Send address change to: 9137 S. Ridgeline Blvd., Suite 210, Highlands Ranch, CO 80129 DEADLInES: Display advertising: Thurs. 11 a.m. Legal advertising: Thurs. 11 a.m. Classified advertising: Mon. 12 p.m.

Erin Patterson gets ready to board Gold Camp Connector shuttle in front of the Aspen Mine Center. The new connector provides inexpensive and often free round trip transportation between Cripple Creek and Victor four times a day. Photo by Suzanne Core

Creating a shuttle service between Cripple Creek and Victor has been sole priority for the Teller County Resource Group’s Transportation Local Coordinating Committee since it was formed more than a year ago and for several other groups long before that. Their hard work and perseverance has finally paid off with the start of the Gold Camp Connector shuttle service on May 13. The Cripple Creek pick-up and drop-off location is the Aspen Mine Center, 166 E. Bennett Ave. Departure times are 6:15 and 11:15 a.m. and 2:15 and 5:15 p.m. Victor pick-up and drop-off location is the 3rd Street Plaza. Departure times are 6:30 and 11:30 a.m. and 2:30 and 5:30 p.m.

The cost: $1 per round trip for citizens; 25 cents per round trip for unaccompanied children not attending a school event; free for children going to and from school or school events, for children accompanied by an adult, for seniors age 60 and older and for handicapped individuals. Veldean Petri of Community of Caring was one of the shuttle service’s first riders. She states in an email: “I had the opportunity to ride the `Gold Camp Connector’ this morning. (The) friendly driver, Marian, cheerfully explained all the details of riding the shuttle to Cripple Creek and back home again. The drive over to Cripple Creek was panoramic and breathtaking! Hope you can ride the `Gold Camp Connector’ shuttle soon and spread the word how enjoyable and user-friendly the service is!”

WP set to take steps on marijuana Tables resolutions on pending annexations By Norma Engelberg

nengelberg@ourcoloradonews.com Since Nov. 6 when voters across Colorado and Teller County approved Amendment 64, legalizing the recreational use of marijuana by adults, local and county governments have exhibited a variety of responses. Many created moratoria prohibiting the commercial aspects of recreational marijuana until the state legislature could come up with some rules. That was the route Woodland Park City Council took. A few, including Cripple Creek, Victor and Teller County, prohibited these aspects outright. Because Amendment 64 became part of the Colorado Constitution, none of them could ban the growing and using of recreational marijuana by individuals. As Woodland Park City Attorney Erin Smith explained to council on May 16, local governments can only deal with the commercial side of recreational marijuana. The ordinance she crafted for the city, which was introduced at the meeting, would prohibit the operation of marijuana cultivation, manufacturing and testing facilities retail marijuana stores, marijuana membership clubs and growing marijuana outdoors by individuals. The amendment allows local governments to opt-out of the commercial aspects of recreational marijuana by passing ordinances or resolutions or, if they decide against prohibition, they can create rules regulating marijuana busi-

Michelle Perkins, left, Dave Perkins and Renee Bunting were named to the Keep Woodland Park Beautiful committee at the May 16 Woodland Park City Council meeting. They each received a trash grabber tool to help them in their efforts to keep the city beautiful. Photo by Norma Engelberg nesses. Mayor Pro Tem Eric Smith expressed concerns about governments curtailing the will of the people who voted to allow the recreational use of marijuana and that regulating rather than prohibiting commercial marijuana facilities means the city will be able to bring in revenue from business permits, fees and taxes. The second reading for this ordinance was set for the council’s June 6 meeting. If it fails, the city will have until October to create rules and regulations. Council tabled two resolutions that are steps in an annexation process requested by Donald and Beth McCarl and Karl Hirshbeck, property owners in the Southwest Valley subdivision. They want to sell their properties to Jay Baker, owner of Teller

County Waste, but the sale is contingent on getting the properties annexed by the city. The two resolutions were tabled to the June 6 meeting to give the planning department and Baker time to gather information to answer questions and comments about the annexation from concerned citizens. Finally, Councilmember Terry Harrison will complete nine consecutive years on council in June and will resign as required by the city charter at the June 27 meeting. The city will have 30 days to appoint his replacement but advertising for the position can’t start until after he resigns. Meetings in June and July were rearranged because of the July 4 holiday; otherwise Harrison’s last meeting would be on June 20. The only July meeting will be on July 18.

LET US CELEBRATE WITH YOU Have a wedding, anniversary, engagement, birth and special occasion coming up? Share it! Colorado Community Media invites you to place an announcement to share your news. Go to ourcoloradonews.com/celebrations for package and pricing information. Deadline is 10 a.m. Tuesdays the week preceding the announcement.


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Pikes Peak Courier View 5

May 22, 2013

s Railroad mural to

enhance Midland Depot

p for p for t atchilol orBy Pat Hill com-phill@ourcoloradonews.com s age pped In a serendipitous exchange, the mural tracing the route of the unityMidland Railroad from Colorado uttleSprings to Newcastle will now es inhang in the baggage-claim area of unitythe Midland Depot at Divide. nec- For the past eight years, the ndlymural has graced the wall in the inedconference room at Benchmark uttleMortgage in Woodland Park. omeWith the company’s move from pplethe Midland Junction at the Loan eath-Center to the Remax building, the Goldmural is the source of good luck andfor the nonprofit organization e anddedicated to refurbishing the old Midland depot. Railroad gurus Mel McFarland and Dave Martinek are taking the lead on the project. Roxanne Ross of Woodland Park designed the mural on a

a

canvas with a leather-like background; Beaumont paid $3,000 for the work in 2004. “When I commissioned the piece I always thought it should go to the Midland Depot project,” said Ed Beaumont, real estate broker with Benchmark Mortgage.

The mural by Roxanne Ross is a pictorial account of the route of the Midland Railroad from Colorado Springs to Newcastle in the glory days of the railroad. Commissioned by Ed Beaumont for the Benchmark Mortgage office in 2004, the mural will now hang in the refurbished Midland Depot, as a donation by Beaumont. Pictured from left, Mel McFarland, with the nonprofit Midland Depot at Divide, Erin Colton, with Benchmark, Dave Martinek, Midland Depot project, and Beaumont. Photo by Pat Hill

CLUBS IN YOUR COMMUNITY EDITOR’S NOTE: To add or update your club listing, e-mail calendar@ourcoloradonews.com, attn: Courier View.

helps local businesses through cooperative marketing, professional education and trusted relationships. Call Gail Wingerd at 719-686-1076 or send e-mail to gail@woodlandparkprinter. com or Mike Hazelwood at 719-473-5008

POLITICAL TELLER COUNTY’S Democrats In 2013, Teller County’s

Democratic Party is hosting education programs and community activities. Members and interested citizens are invited to participate. For more information about the TellerDems’ 2013 schedule, contact Ellen Haase, 719-687.1813.

TELLER COUNTY Republicans meets at 7 p.m. the second

TRANSPORTATION’S LOCAL Coordinating Council of Teller County meets at 9 a.m. on the third Monday of each month at the Aspen Mine Center in Cripple Creek. This meeting is open to the public and all are welcome to attend. PROFESSIONAL

Thursdays at Denny’s Restaurant in Woodland Park. TNT is a local businesses owners networking group working to pass leads and help each others’ businesses grow. Join us to learn more or call Vickie at 719-748-1274.

EVERY THURSDAY all year the Florissant Grange Hall (The Old School House) is open from 6-9 pm for the Jammers Music and Pot Luck. This is a happening place to be on Thursday evenings. Sometimes we have more musicians than people and sometimes we have more people than the hall can hold, but no matter what, we have fun and great music and fabulous food. All musicians are welcome to join in the jam session and if you are not a musician, come for the social evening out. Call 719-748-0358. The center offers Paramount and Nautilus equipment and free weights. Schedule a personalized fitness orientation and have an individual workout program designed for your fitness needs. Individuals ages 16 and older are welcome to become fitness members. Minors require signed parental permission. Corporate memberships are available. Call 719-689-3514.

FRONT RANGE Fencing Club. Learn to fence class for children and adults. Meets at Discovery Canyon Campus. Visit http:// frontrangefencing.tripod.com/ Advanced competitive lessons available too. HEALTHIER LIVING Colorado, Chronic Disease Self-Management Classes Are you tired of being sick and tired? Teller County Public Health and Community Partnership Family Resource Center offer six-week classes to help you with the challenges of living with an ongoing health condition. Participants learn skills to cope with fatigue, frustration, pain and stress of chronic disease, as well as effective action plans and problem solving. Call Teller County Public Health at 719-687-6416 or visit www. cpteller.org or www.tellercountypublichealth.org for informa-

mberKARDS NETWORKING Group meets from 8-9:30 a.m. com-Wednesdays at Hungry Bear, 111 E. Midland Ave., Woodland utivePark. Help build your business by building community. Call Kim JuneFrancis at 719-232-0142 for information. uiredTELLER BUSINESS Builders meets at 7 a.m. Mondays at the theHungry Bear, 111 E. Midland Ave., in Woodland Park. The group city point dvercan’t igns. Bud•BudLight•Coors•CoorsLight July MillerLight•MGD ause thereting SPRAYING & SERVICES™ The be on

719-687-4256 Mon - Sat 9 am - 10 pm & Sun 10 am - 6 pm

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Saturday of every month at the Community Center, Lake George. Meetings begin at 10 a.m. until May, when it changes to 9 a.m. to accommodate a field trip in conjunction with the regular meeting. There is always a program or field trip.

LEARN GUITAR from a guitar player, singer and entertainer,

Cari Dell. Call 719-748-0358.

MOTHER BEAR Self-Defense is offering Krav Maga classes from 9-10:30 a.m. Saturdays at the Corner Dance Studio in Woodland Park. Contact Wendy at 719-323-7949 for information. THE MOUNTAIN Top Cycling club holds monthly meetings for

bicyclist of all types and skill levels. The club meets at different locations on the first Tuesday of the month. Membership fee is $25 for individual and $40 for family. We have guest speakers, presentations and door prizes. The meeting is from 7-8 p.m. Social time at 6:30 p.m. Visit www.mountaintopcyclingclub. com or write us Mountain Top Cycling Club P.O.Box 843 Woodland Park CO 80866. For more information, call Debbie at

WOODLAND PARK CLINIC William W. Storms, MD Board Certified Allergy/Immunology

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THE LAKE George Gem and Mineral Club meets the second

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THE LAKE George Gem and Mineral Club Youth Program for Earth Science Education, Peblepups, meets from 6-6:45 p.m. the third Tuesday of each month at the Lake George Community Center on Hwy 24 on the east side of Lake George. The program is free to students age 8-18. Each session discusses a separate aspect of Earth science or mineral collecting. Warm weather will allow field trips on weekends. Further information from Steve Veatch 719-748-5010 or John Rakowski 719-748-3861 or at LGGMClub.org.

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Woodland Park Community Church and at 6:30 p.m. Tuesdays at Lake George Bible Church. The class includes Japanese karate and jujitsu, Okinawan weapons, padded sparring and Judo throws. Self-defense is also taught. The program is Bible-based. Black belt instruction. KP has been in the Ute Pass area for more than 16 years. Low rates. Ages 5 through adult. Two free lessons. For more information call Ken at 719-687-1436. KP is nonprofit and non-denominational.

THE TELLER Networking Team meet from 7:45-8:45 a.m.

GET IN shape with a parks and recreation fitness membership.

APPLY SPIRITUAL laws as taught by the Ascended Masters for the achievement of personal and global freedom, love, sale peace and abundance. Free study group meets every Saturday g the in Woodland Park. For information, contact Barbara Royal at y the 719-687-6823 or Angels911@peakinter.net. tions ne 6DIVIDE CHAMBER of Commerce. Contact president Lisa Lee plan-at 719-686-7587 for meeting dates and times. Baker COMPUTER CLASSES. The Woodland Park Public Library ation offers computer basics, Internet basics, Microsoft Word, Excel, and PowerPoint, and Digital Photo Management classes. Some anclasses have prerequisites, and registration is required for all. rned Call 719-687-9281, ext. 106 to register.

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Tuesday of each month at the Pikes Peak Community Center in Divide next to the Conoco. Come and help set the course for conservative thinking and direction in Teller County, Colorado, and the nation. Additional information at http://www.tellergop.org.

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719-687-2489.

UTE PASS Historical Society offers free public tours of History Park from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. the second Saturday of the month from May through September. The tours start at the Museum Center, 231 E. Henrietta Ave., next to the Woodland Park Public Library. A historic walking tour of Woodland Park meets at 10:30 a.m. Contact UPHS at 719-686-7512 or e mail uphs@ peakinter.net. UTE PASS Historical Society Gift Shop is open from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Wednesdays through Saturdays in the Museum Center building at History Park, 231 E. Henrietta, next to the Woodland Park Library. Call 719-686-7512 for information or to schedule a group tour. TAI CHI is offered for free at 9 a.m. Mondays at the Florissant Public Library. Call Pam Powers, 719-748-3378 or Judy Ross, 719-686-9122. TAI CHI is offered every Wednesday at Florissant/Four Mile Fire Department. Call Meridel Gatterman, 719-689-5861. TAI CHI is offered from 9:30-10:30 a.m. Thursdays at the Woodland Park Senior Center. Call Rip Blaisdel, 719-686-1408. TAI CHI is offered from 5:30-6:30 p.m. Thursdays at the Woodland Park Library, in the downstairs resource room. Call Cheryl Koc, 719-687-2633 or Judy Ross at 719-686-9122. TAI CHI is offered from 9-10 a.m. Fridays at the Woodland Park Library, in the downstairs community room. Call Penny Brandt, 719-687-1848 or Judy Ross at 719-686-9122. TAI CHI, Sun Style 73 Forms, is offered from 10-11 a.m. Fridays at the Woodland Park Library, in the downstairs community room. Call Cheryl Koc, 719-687-2633. THE TELLER County 4-H Shooting Sports Club meets the first Sunday of each month at the Pikes Peak Community Club (PPCC) in Divide at 4 p.m. 4-H projects/disciplines covered by the club: .22 and Air Rifle, Archery, Shotgun, and Air Pistol. For more information about the club meetings or project/discipline practices, please call 719-235-7473. Clubs continues on Page XX

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6-Opinion

6 Pikes Peak Courier View

May 22, 2013

OPINIONS / YOURS AND OURS

Tobin arrived early, tracked way to history A legend in Colorado’s history on several fronts, Tobin left his own tracks. His father Irish, and his mother a Delaware Indian, Tobin, and his half brother Charles Autobees, arrived in Colorado as early as 1837 with Ceran St. Vrain and worked as trapper and scout for St. Vrain and his partners, the Bent brothers, at Bent’s Fort, as well as Taos, New Mexico. “Tom Tobin was a picturesque figure. He rode a black horse and wore a black hat, shirt, trousers and boots. He kept two loaded revolvers in his gun belt, one on each side. Although illiterate, Tobin actively supported the local school system and eventually became president of the school board,” wrote Ken Jesson in “Colorado Gunsmoke.” Tobin also garnered a reputation for being able to “track a grasshopper through the sagebrush” and was skilled with a rifle, pistol and knife. He counted among his good friends, the likes of Kit Carson, “Uncle Dick” Wooton, Ceran St. Vrain and Charley Bent. It was his tracking ability that got him the job that was to make him famous as a bounty hunter. Jose Filipe Nerio Espinosa and his brother Vivian Espinosa began their murderous rampage in San Luis Valley and

had extended it over Ute Pass and into Dead Man’s Canyon near Fountain. One of the Espinosas was killed but Vivian and a younger cousin carried on. Basically, they declared war on all Anglos and by their own reporting, had killed 22 people in Colorado, mostly miners in the California Gulch area from Fairplay to Red Hill, in South Park. In an interview from Oct. 10, 1946, Kit Carson III, the grandson of Kit Carson and Tom Tobin, and the proprietor of Kit Carson’s Trading Post in Sanford, Colorado, told the following tale of the end of the Espinosa’s reign of terror. “Colonel (Sam) Tappin considered Grandpa Tobin the best tracker in the country, had him brought in and asked to catch

the Espinosas, the reward was not mentioned. Grandpa was told “kill them for humanity’s sake,” nothing said about any reward.” Tobin tracked them to a draw near LaVeta Pass. “The Espinosa’s had been working their way from Colorado Springs going south killing anyone they came in contact with.” By noticing a bunch of crows circling, Tobin identified the murderous villians’ campsite. “He found them busy making a meal,” related Kit Carson, III. “The older Espinosa was squatting in front of the fire, while the younger one was hobbling the horses. Grandpa waited till the younger one came near the campfire, not wanting anyone to get away in the heat of battle. Hiding behind a rock, Grandpa sighted in on the older man and shot him, he fell face first into the fire, grandpa loaded a charge and spit a bare ball into the old Hawkin rifle and killed the younger Espinosa.” Tobin finished off the elder outlaw with his knife and took the Espinosa’s heads in a gunny sack to prove the job was done. “When arriving at Ft. Garland, the Colo-

nel, some of his officers, and their wives had been out riding, an announcement was made that grandpa was there to see the Colonel. He was brought into a large room where the officers and wives were relaxing after their ride. The Colonel asked, `Any Luck, Tom?’ Grandpa said, “So-so,” and he held the gunnysack upside down rolling the heads out onto the floor, ladies were screaming, the officers and Colonel even looked a little green.” Interestingly enough, Tom Tobin’s son, also Thomas Tobin, was the first state correctional officer killed in the line of duty. On June 26, 1899, Officer Thomas Tobin was stationed at Bridge Seven, a few miles below Florence, during the search for escapee Charles Nichols. Nichols was serving a life sentence for the murder of the marshal of Victor. “In the darkness, one of the sheriff’s posse shot Tobin in the center of his chest, thinking the man on the bridge was the escapee. Tobin was brought back to Canon City in a railroad car; he died a few days later on July 4, 1899,” according to information from the Colorado Department of Corrections.

Certain things shouldn’t ever be forgotten May is National Historic Preservation Month and Colorado Archaeology and Historic Preservation Month. As the saying on The History Channel goes, history is made every day but bits and pieces and sometimes entire chunks of it are lost every day, too. This often happens because people don’t see the intrinsic value of items they take for granted until they’re gone. For example, one of my first jobs out of high school was working the concession stand at the 8th Street Drive-in Theater in Colorado Springs. At that time there were drive-in theaters all over the region; besides the 8th Street, there were the Starlight, Vista Vu, Arcadia, Sky Vu and Falcon driveins. Of the 64 drive-ins that used to exist in Colorado, seven are still open, including the Mesa Drive-In in Pueblo. My employers also owned the Chief and Peak theaters in

downtown Colorado Springs. During the two years I worked in the outdoor theaters, the Arcadia was badly damaged by fire and the Chief Theater was torn down. We did, however, get to tour the great old building for a glimpse of its cinema and stage history before demolition. Too bad it’s gone. The drive-ins had a lot of stories to tell.

The Ruxton Ave. Railway and the Taggarts In June, 1893 the city of Manitou Springs approved the construction of a new electric railway from Manitou up Ruxton Avenue to the Iron Springs. In February, 1895 the city council renewed the franchise for building the street railway up Ruxton and make improvements to the street at the same time. John C. Beye of Kenosha, Wis., arrived in early March to make a final survey of the proposed railway. Ties and rails have been ordered. The standard-gauge ties would come from near Divide. Forty pound steel was going to be used. Three open cars had been ordered. The building of the line was now assured, but demands for the improvement of Ruxton Avenue remained on the list of demands. The path would become a forty foot wide street, with fewer sharp turns and dips. A large crew of men was expected in a few days. The ties and rails were arriving and the grade would be ready to see these laid within a week. The photographers J.G. Hiestand and R.D. Weir purchased from the Iron Springs company right next to the route of the street railway a three-acre spot that included access to Little Chief spring. A crew had started putting in track from near the Rio Grande depot westward. Another crew worked from the cog station down Ruxton. Work on the line started, and a rumor went out that it would actually be used by the cog road to reach the Rio Grande’s Manitou Station. The charter for the line included exceptions to any use by steam vehicles. William Frizzell was superintendent of the line’s construction and Ben Taggart was in charge of the track laying team. Taggart was, without a doubt, the finest selection for the job. In addition to this line he was experienced in difficult jobs, like the cog.

Twice in the two years I worked at the 8th Street someone lobbed a teargas grenade over the fence and we were also robbed at gun-point a couple of times. There was this one patron who regularly rode his horse in on Saturday nights to watch the movies; I think he hung the speaker from his saddle horn. One time, lightning struck the sound system three hours before show time and the entire staff was called in to repair 500 damaged speakers. We finished just in time for the Disney triple feature and the arrival of about 1,000 kids. At the Sky Vu Drive In, a young man climbed to the top of the screen and threatened to jump. A friend of mine climbed up and talked him out of it but then neither one of them could get down without help from the fire department.

Pikes Peak Courier View 1200 E. Highway 24, Woodland Park, CO 80863

GERARD HEALEY President ROB CARRIGAN Editor and Publisher SCOTT GILBERT Assistant Editor ERIN ADDENBROOKE Classifieds Mgr., National Sales Mgr. AUDREY BROOKS Business Manager He also worked for the Colorado Midland in Ute Pass at Cascade. In May, 1895 the first car went all the way up to Iron Springs, testing the track. Starting the next Sunday the trains started running regularly, every 15 minutes. The work on the Manitou Electric Railway & Casino and the Manitou & Pikes Peak Railway included a well-known family, the Taggarts. The family had come from Ohio for work. The family was employed at first by the Colorado Midland, and served on the track maintenance or “section” crew in Ute Pass at Cascade. Ben Taggart worked at Florissant after returning to the Midland. John B. continued to work for the cog road, and in the summer lived at Windy Point. His son Brough J was born there in 1895, and worked his whole life for the company. His son John E. followed along, becoming engineer and shop foreman. The Manitou line up Ruxton used three cars over the years. They were called “Dinkys” since there were smaller than the Colorado Springs cars. It was abandoned and taken up in the spring of 1935, lasting longer than the Colorado Springs line. Mel McFarland, artist, author, retired teacher and railroader, is a Colorado Springs native who has a strong interest in the events of this area’s past.

SCOTT ANDREWS Creative Services Manager JOANNE HORST Sales Executive SANDRA ARELLANO Circulation Director We welcome event listings and other submissions. News and Business Press Releases Please visit ourcoloradonews.com, click on the Press Releases tab and follow easy instructions to make submissions. Calendar calendar@ourcoloradonews.com Military Notes militarynotes@ourcoloradonews.com School accomplishments, honor roll and dean’s list schoolnotes@ourcoloradonews.com Sports sports@ourcoloradonews.com Obituaries obituaries@ourcoloradonews.com To Subscribe call 303-566-4100

We had “ramp guards,” usually Colorado College exchange students from Finland, Sweden and Great Britain, to watch out for people during the movies and a security company that would visit the drive-ins at random times after hours. Each security guard kept a log in which he (they were always men in those days) entered the times and places he visited as he made his rounds. One log stated that the driver had visited the Arcadia at 2 a.m. and “all was quiet.” He failed to mention the massive fire and the three fire engines that were on the scene at 2 a.m. Let’s make it a point to show our kids a part of American history before it disappears by taking them to the drive-in this summer and give some thought to all the other ways we can share our history with our kids.

Colorado Community Media Phone 719-687-3006 • Fax 303-719-687-3009

Columnists and guest commentaries The Pikes Peak Courier View features a limited number of regular columnists, found on these pages and elsewhere in the paper, depending on the typical subject the columnist covers. Their opinions are not necessarily those of the Pikes Peak Courier View. Want your own chance to bring an issue to our readers’ attention, to highlight something great in our community, or just to make people laugh? Why not write a letter of 300 words or fewer. Include your full name, address and the best number to reach you by telephone.

Email your letter to letters@ourcoloradonews.com

WE’RE IN THIS TOGETHER Our team of professional reporters, photographers and editors are out in the community to bring you the news each week, but we can’t do it alone. Send your news tips, your own photographs, event information, letters, commentaries... If it happens, it’s news to us. Please share by contacting us at ne ws@ourcoloradonews.com, and we will take it from there. After all, the Courier View is your paper.

WE WANT TO HEAR FROM YOU If you would like to share your opinion, go to www.ourcoloradonews.com or write a letter to the editor. Include your name, full address and the best telephone number to contact you. Please send letters to rcarrigan@ourcoloradonews.com.


7

Pikes Peak Courier View 7

May 22, 2013

Tissue harvesting threatens lives According to the American Free Press, there is a sordid industry harvesting tendons, ligaments, knees, skin, veins and eyes from deceased organ donors and grieving poor people who have just lost a loved one. A Newsday editorial labeled the practice international “body wrangling.” Unlike the well-regulated nonprofit organ donor system, there is lax regulation and oversight of the $1 billion a year human-tissue industry. With America leading the way as the biggest supplier and consumer of harvested body tissue in the world, the price of human body parts is all about supply and demand and it’s a seller’s market. Ground-level body wranglers in the United States can get as much as $10,000 for each corpse they secure through their contacts at hospitals, mortuaries and morgues. Sharing in the pie are funeral homes acting as middlemen in the procurement of bodies and hospitals, which get paid for the use of “tissue recovery rooms.” Interestingly, Federal law forbids the buying and selling of body parts but allows companies to charge “reasonable fees” for procuring and supplying tissue. This is an industry unlike any other where a hodgepodge of over 2,000 nonprofit and for-profit players compete vigorously for bodies. The FDA, the government organi-

zation charged with overseeing the tissue-transplant industry, is woefully under-funded and lacks the manpower to inspect the plethora of businesses. There are absolutely no regulations as to who can go into the body parts business; in fact, you could start one in your garage tomorrow. If that’s not bad enough, legitimate tissue suppliers put thousands of Americans at risk every day. A 3-month investigation by The Associated Press found problems ranging from inadequate testing for potentially deadly germs to lack of a unified system for tracking tissues as they travel from donor to recipient. That’s no news to Brian Lykin’s parents, who were told by their son’s doctor not to worry, as he prepared to use cartilage from a cadaver to fix their son’s knee in a routine elective surgery. A million people a year have operations using tissue from donated dead bodies, they were told.

The nation’s largest tissue company had supplied the cartilage and the physician assured them it had been disinfected and was perfectly safe. Not true. Four days after surgery, the healthy 23-year-old Minnesotan died from a raging infection. It turns out that the corpse had sat un-refrigerated for 19 hours and then was inadequately sterilized. Isolated incident? Perhaps not. Ken Alesescu died in his San Luis Obispo, California home - a victim of a fungus-infested heart valve. Alan Minvielle from Santa Cruz, California almost lost a leg to gangrene from a bad tendon and Bonny Gonyer of Chippewa Falls, Wisconsin suffers chronic pain and walks with a limp due to tainted tissue. The industry’s deadly face is further complicated by the fact that doctors know little about the origins of the tissue they use leaving it up to the hospital to buy it - like they do surgical gloves and bed pans - based on price and availability. Cord Prettyman is a certified Master Personal Trainer and the owner of Absolute Workout Fitness and Post-Rehab Studio in Woodland Park. He can be reached at 687-7437 or cordprettyman@msn.com.

Session over, where do we go now? The Colorado General Assembly’s 2013 session came to a close last week without the extra-innings drama of the previous year. No doubt, much was accomplished over the past four months by the Democrat-controlled Legislature, including approval of some high-profile pieces of legislation. Civil unions? Check. (Unlike last year, there would be no last-minute theatrics over a bill approving these.) Numerous gun-control measures? Check. Overhaul of Colorado’s election rules? Check. Mass frustration by Senate and House Republicans? Check. A statement released by the Colorado Republican Party the day after the session’s end called it “the most divisive and partisan in the state’s history.” We’re not sure where to rank the session on the all-time list, but it certainly was both very divisive and very partisan.

our vIew It also was very predictable. November’s elections ensured one-party control in Colorado. With a House, Senate and governor united, little could stand in the way of getting bills passed, controversial or not — a single vote from the other party or not. And while the session was not without some solid examples of bipartisan legislation, Democrats were prolific with their newfound power. “You may not agree with everything we’re doing, but you can’t say we’re not doing anything,” Democratic Rep. Dominick Moreno told Colorado Community Media legislative reporter Vic Vela in April. We’re not using this space to call

out the Democratic Party. Republicans likely would also have taken full advantage of such a position. Democrats worked together and accomplished what they felt was right. But one-party control in a state that is about as purple as it gets has us wondering if Colorado’s residents were best served by this past legislative session. On the state’s active voting rolls as of May 1 there were 915,793 Republicans, 875,926 Democrats and 862,050 unaffiliated voters. That’s not far from one-third each. Those figures make it tough to believe that either party’s platform can adequately represent the constituency as a whole. Clearly, consensus is elusive in Colorado, but if nothing else, the 2013 session was a test of the tastes of the hundreds of thousands of unaffiliated voters. Theirs is the critique that will matter most when they speak at the polls in 2014.

HIstory

The Victor Lowell Thomas Museum want to know this woman’s story. This photo was taken in the Cripple Creek-Victor area sometime between the late 1890s and the early 1900s. The photo is labeled UN97-11 in the museum archives and anyone with information about her should contact the museum through www.victorcolorado.com. Courtesy photo Victor Lowell Thomas Museum

Marshall Edward Young June 25, 1944 ~ May 13, 2013

Marshall Edward Young, Jr., 68, passed away peacefully in his home on May 13, 2013 in Westcliffe, Colorado. Son of Jean (Morgan) and Marshall Edward Young, Sr., he was born June 25, 1944 in St Louis, Missouri. Marshall owned Strong Motor Company-Antique autos, parts and restoration. He was a college graduate, an accomplished musician, carpenter and jewelry artist. He loved the Colorado mountains, his beloved animals both domestic and wild. Freedom from the status quo and his do no harm approach to life will live on in the many lives he touched. Marshall Young is survived by his daughter,

Nichole B. Young of Knoxville, TN; friend and past wife, Dawn Wells (Yakes) of Louisville, KY; sister, Susan Young of Orlando, FL; extended family and many special friends. He is also survived by his closest friend, John Decker and wife Vicky of Westcliffe, CO, to whom the family wishes to extend a special blessing of gratitude and thanks. At his request, no formal services will be held. As he wished his ashes will be spread in the Sangre De Cristos that overlook Westcliffe, CO. In lieu of flowers please make a donation in his name to your local humane society. Online condolences at w w w.holt family f uneralhomes.com

Benjamin David Corbitt Oct. 7, 1985 ~ May 16, 2013

Benjamin D. Corbitt, 27, passed from this life into the arms of his Savior on Thursday, May 16, 2013, at his home in Woodland Park. Ben was born in Visalia, CA and moved to Colorado with his family in 1995. He is survived by his parents David & Cheri Corbitt; his brother Nathaniel; and his grandparents Howard & Betty Clark, Ray & Lisa Corbitt, and John & Judith Nino. Ben graduated from Woodland Park High School in 2004. He was trained as an EMT and a Veterinary Assistant. He had also served as a volunteer firefighter/EMT with the Northeast Teller County Fire District. Ben had a great love for

life, and a genuine care and compassion for others. He loved working with animals, and was employed with the Animal Medical Center of Woodland Park at the time of his passing. He was an active member of his church in Colorado Springs, The Master’s House. We will celebrate Ben’s life at his Home-Going Service Monday, May 20th, at 1:00pm at The Master’s House, 124 N. Delaware Dr., Colorado Springs, CO 80909. A Viewing will be held Sunday, May 19th between 6-8pm, also at The Master’s House. Flowers are welcome, or in lieu of flowers, donations can be made in Ben’s name to the Colorado Wolf and Wildlife Center (wolfeducation.org).


8-Color

8 Pikes Peak Courier View

May 22, 2013

Storms cut short school field day Snow, thunderstorm cause double delays By Norma Engelberg

nengelberg@ourcoloradonews. com

Competitive events at the Woodland Park Fifth-Grade Field Day on May 14 included girls and boys broad jump, 50- and 100-meter runs, baseball throwing, ball kicking and other activities. A thunder storm shut down the day before most of the activities were completed.

Because they will all be going to Woodland Park Middle School next year, fifth-graders from Columbine, Gateway and Summit elementary schools get together every spring for a little bonding and some friendly field-day competition. This year’s field day didn’t go off as planned even after two tries. The field day was originally planned for May 10 but a May 9 snowstorm left the field at Woodland Park High School covered in snow and the event was postponed to May 14. Students arrived for the event

and got off to a good start but by about 11 a.m. thunderclouds rolled in. When thunder rumbled too close to the school, all the students immediately left the field, leaving everything behind, and waited for a change in the weather in the school’s auxiliary gym. “We never did get to go back out because of lightning strikes and rain,” stated Columbine physical education teacher Julie Cutting in an email the following day. “We certainly had a lot of disappointed students. It was tricky getting them on buses and retrieving all their stuff on the field. We had great leadership thanks toCharm Brian Gustafson, Eric Owen, JasonPark a Holmes, myself, Sue Wright andhome all the fifth-grade teachers.” Jeff an She added that there won’t be a makes third try to have the field day because of end-of-the-school-yearand ha chocol commitments.

Mueller beckons photographers By Pat Hill

phill@ourcoloradonews.com A challenge as well as an opportunity, the Photo-Out contest at Mueller State Park calls all camera bugs to come and click. With exposure to 5,000 acres of Colorado natural beauty, the contest begins with a majestic palette. Mountains, streams, trees, campground, flowers or people, photographers can pick the subject as well as the location within the park. “We want people to get outside, get to know the park and see how beautiful it is,” said volunteer Barbara Berger. In the age of social media, the rangers will post the photos on the Mueller website

as well as its Facebook page for an updated method of showing off the park. Lenore Hotchkiss, professional photographer and former hiking guide at the park, will judge the contest. Exclusive to Mueller, the contest is divided into three time periods, May 1 to June 30, July 1 to Aug. 31 and Sept. 1 to Oct. 30. Contestants are divided into two age groups, younger than 17 and 17 and older. Contestants are asked to submit up to three high-resolution photos no larger than 2 MB to photosMuellerSP@gmail.com. Winners will be notified by email within 2 weeks after the end of each period. “It’s a fun way to share the fun things they’ve seen and done while they’re here,” said park ranger Chelsea Murray.

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Mueller State Park hosts a photography contest for two age groups. The photos must be taken within the 5,000-acre park and allow a range of subjects. From left, John Geerdes, park ranger, Lenore Hotchkiss, contest judge, Chelsea Murray, park ranger, Jack and Barb Berger, park volunteers. Photo by Pat Hill

(719) 686-0250 www.peakinter.net

In a mish-mash of properties, the assessor’s job is complicated by differences, some severe. “Teller County is not a cookiecutter community. If you had a subdivision of typical homes they would all be within a certain range of each other,” Clark-Wine said. “We have old next to new, very big next to very small and large acreage next to small acreage.” A newer home among older properties may not be valued correctly, she said. “Sometime an older smaller home will pull the value down in appraisal terms. Or if you have a small home in an area with large

homes, it won’t value correctly,” she said.

Appeals

“Appeals are not an adversarial process; it’s not your coming in to fight the assessor. We’re here to discover; are there things we don’t know, is there something about the condition, its attributes, its style, things we don’t know about, such as inside the house?” she said. For information about comparable sales, Clark-Wine urges property owners to look at the assessor’s part of the county’s website at co.teller.co.us.com. Select properties of similar characteristics. “If you have a problem or a question, please come see us,” Clark-Wine said. Property owners have through June 3 to appeal to the assessor’s office.


9

Pikes Peak Courier View 9

May 22, 2013

y

BUSINESS BUZZ

but ouds

too stufield, hind, n the iliary

back rikes mbine Julie wing f disricky d refield. ks toCharmee and Gary Andrews brought their candy business, Andrews Candies, to Woodland asonPark and opened for business May 9. Gary Andrews’ parents started the business in their andhome 58 years ago in Arkadelphia, Ark. Today, the Andrews family, which includes their sons,

Jeff and Brett, offer a variety of nut brittle, each hand-made at the shop. As well, the family

be a makes peanut and pecan patties. The Andrews feature their candies at shows across the nation y be-yearand have a significant mail-order business. Along the way, Charmee became famous for her

chocolate fudge and was featured in Southern Living magazine.

Diane Beaumont, owner of Benchmark Mortgage, is settling in to the company’s new offices in the back side of the Remax building at 300 Sunny Glen Court in Woodland Park. With the sale of Benchmark’s former location, Midland Junction at the Loan Center, Benchmark has found a new home. For information, call 687-2112. Photos by Pat Hill

The Business Buzz features news about the economic scene, promotions, acquisitions and expansions. Contact Pat Hill at phill@ourcoloradonews.com or 687-3006. Thirteen regional companies and 17 unemployed dislocated

this grant, found employment. The Cellar Door in Woodland Park hosts the Rocky Mountain Region Ferrari Club from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. May 26. Ferrari members will gather at the shop for wine, food and music. For a $5 donation, the mem-

workers have been approved for technical training funds through a $270,000 grant awarded to the Pikes Peak Workforce Center and the Colorado Department of Labor and Employment. To date, seven of the 17 unemployed workers, who received training through

bers will pose for a photo with the visitor. The funds will go to “Cruisin’ Above the Clouds,” who will donate the proceeds to a local children’s charity. The Frank Gundy Agency, Inc., an American Family Insur-

ance agency in Woodland Park, has been recognized for providng outstanding customer experience under the American Star Excellence in Customer Experience Certification. The agency has qualified for the award since its inception.

CLUBS IN YOUR COMMUNITY Clubs continued from Page 5

THURSDAY NIGHT Beginners Book Study meets from 7-8

p.m. Thursdays at Woodland Park Community Church. Email gclark25@live.com for information.

WALKING TOURS. The Cripple Creek District Museum

offers free walking tours at 2 p.m. each Sunday. Tours last approximately 45 minutes. Meet in front of the Colorado Trading & Transfer Company building at the museum, 500 E. Bennett Ave., for an extensive look at the history of downtown Cripple Creek. cre No reservations are required. Comfortable shoes, bottled water Mur- and jackets are advised. Tours may be postponed or canceled due to inclement weather. Call 719-689-2634, visit www. cripple-creek.org or email CCDMuseum@aol.com.

YOGA CLASSES are offered at 9 a.m. Tuesdays and Thursdays, with a senior class offered at 10:30 a.m. Tuesdays, at the Florissant Grange No. 420 (the old schoolhouse), 2009 County Road 31. Call Debbie at 719-748-3678 for information. YOGA CLASSES are offered in Woodland Park. All levels are

welcome. Contact Michelle Truscelli at 719-505-5011 or check out www.shakti3yoga.com for information.

SOCIAL A COURSE in Miracles classes meets at 6:30 p.m. Tuesdays in Woodland Park. Call 719-286-8421 or e-mail lynnzina@aol.com for information. ABOVE THE Clouds Cruisers meet the first Friday of the month

at 6:30 p.m. at 1120 West Bowman Ave., Woodland Park. For information contact Marsh at 719-687-1058.

AMERICAN LEGION Post 1980 Woodland Park meets at 7 p.m. the fourth Tuesday of each month at Grange Hall on Hwy 67, about three miles north of the US-24/Hwy-67 junction in Woodland Park. Visit http://post1980.org. AMERICAN LEGION Post 171 meets at 7 p.m. at the Post Building, 400 East Carr Ave. in Cripple Creek. ART RECEPTION Today is planned for the second Friday of the month and will feature a different artist at Park State Bank in Woodland Park. BILL HARPER, as seen on the Grand Ole Opry, performs 4-7 p.m. every Saturday at Oney’s Restaurant in Florissant. Enjoy old country classic music in a family friendly atmosphere. THE BOOK Club at Woodland Park Public Library meets at 6:30 p.m. on the first Tuesday of each month in the quiet reading room at the Woodland Park Public Library. Call 719-687-9281, ext. 103.

monthly meeting the first Friday of the month at 7 p.m. at the Pikes Peak National Bank, in the upstairs conference room, 2401 W. Colorado Ave, on the corner of Colorado Ave and 24th Street. Free parking is available for the meeting in the bank employee parking lot on the south side of the bank’s drive-up facility. Visit http://itroop.coloradoranger.org or e-mail Info@ coloradoranger.org.

CRIPPLE CREEK Friendship Club meets from 1-3 p.m. at the Henry C. “June” Hack Arena in City Park. The club is free and offers an opportunity to meet with acquaintances and make new friends. DOLL LOVERS of Teller County are invited to meetings at 10:30 a.m. the first Thursday of every month at the Village at Skyline. It’s free. A variety of programs include the study of antiques, and vintage and modern dolls. Everyone older than age 12 is welcome. Call Nancy at 719-390-8098. FLORISSANT GRANGE No. 420 meets at 7 p.m. the second Monday of each month. The grange continues to offer the Florissant Jammers every Thursday for a potluck dinner at 6 p.m. followed by the music of the great Jammers until 9 p.m. All are welcome to come to the Grange. Call 719-748-0358.  THE FLORISSANT Library Book Club welcomes all book read-

ers to its group. It meets at 10:30 a.m. the third Wednesday of the month. Call 719-748-3939.

GOLD CAMP Victorian Society is dedicated to the preservation of the history of Cripple Creek and the surrounding area. The Society plays a role in Cripple Creek’s historic events, celebrations, and festivals, including Donkey Derby Days, the Gold Camp Christmas, the Mt. Pisgah Speaks cemetery tour, the Salute To American Veterans, and many others. The Gold Camp Victorian Society also supports events in other communities in Teller County. The Society also sponsors a Victorian ball as well as a Victorian tea each year, both of which are open to members and non-members alike. Gold Camp Victorian Society members can be seen dressed in period attire welcoming visitors to Cripple Creek on Saturday afternoons during the summer months. The Society also includes the “Smokin’s Guns” club which presents historically-based skits and other entertainment during local events and festivals. The Gold Camp Victorian Society meets on the fourth Sunday of each month at 2 p.m. in the Centennial Building in Cripple Creek. Persons interested in participating as members of the Gold Camp Victorian Society are encouraged to call 689-0907 for more information. HELP U Club meets the third Thursday of every month. Pot

luck at noon and meeting at 1 p.m. We help people and other nonprofits in Teller County and the Lake George area of Park County. Meetings are at the Lake George Community Center. Information: Joan 719-689-2486 or Help U Club, 1054 High Chateau Road, Florissant, CO 80816.

COLORADO MOUNTED Rangers Troop “B” is looking for civic minded people who wish to volunteer and contribute to their community. We primarily serve Teller and Park counties, and assist other troops throughout the state. Troop B meets at 6 p.m. the first Thursday of each month at the Highland Bible Church, 800 Research Drive, Woodland Park. We are an all-volunteer organization that is recognized as an auxiliary law enforcement agency by the state of Colorado. We assist law enforcement agencies, forest service, and search and rescue organizations. Experience is not necessary, just a willingness to contribute to your community. To volunteer, or for more information, contact us through www.coloradoranger.org.

a.m. Wednesdays at Mangia Magnia. Call 719-687-5534. Kiwanis is a global organization of volunteers dedicated to changing the world, one child and one community at a time.

COLORADO MOUNTED Rangers Troop “I” is looking for responsible and dedicated volunteers who want to make a difference serving their community. You are invited to our

THE LADIES of the Veterans of Foreign Wars meets at noon, the second Tuesday of each month at the Woodland Park Public Library. Call 719-687-9157.

JOIN US to knit, crochet or craft every Monday 11 a.m. to 1

p.m. Bring your projects. Meet new and old friends. Instructions are provided for free. Meeting are at Cripple Creek Coffee at Aspen Mine Center.

KIWANIS CLUB of Ute Pass/Woodland Park meets at 6:45

LAKE GEORGE Fire Protection District Auxiliary meetings are at 6 p.m. the first Tuesday of the month at Station No. 1 at the corner of Hwy. 24 and County Road 90.

onsite. Volunteers who don’t want to sew can still serve as cutters and pressers. This is a nondenominational group. Call 719-687-6828.

THE LAKE George Gem and Mineral Club meets the second Saturday of every month at 10 a.m. at the Lake George Community Center. Mineral topics will be discussed but no field trips until spring. Call 719-748-3861.

QUILTERS ABOVE the Clouds is a quilting guild for all levels. The guild meets from 1-5 p.m. the fourth Friday of the month at Mountain View United Methodist Church in Woodland Park to share quilting experiences and exchange ideas. The group also participates in projects to benefit charity organizations.

MODA U meets at 1 p.m. at Nuts ‘n Bolts Needleworks, 200 S. Chestnut, Woodland Park. Quilters from novice to professional share their craft and get all the latest info about fabrics and notions. Call 719-687-2272. THE MOUNTAIN Artists meets from 9-10:30 a.m. the second Saturday of each month at the Ute Pass Cultural Center in Woodland Park. Call 719-687-1374 or visit www.TheMountainArtists.com. The nonprofit group was established to promote, encourage and support the making and showing of visual arts in Teller County-Ute Pass area. MOPS, MOTHERS of Preschoolers in Woodland Park meets the firtst and third Tuesday of the month September through May from 8:45-11:30 a.m. All mothers of children pre-birth through kindergarten are invited to join. Meetings include guest speakers, social time, and creative activities. Childcare is included! Register anytime online at www.utepassmops.org or call 719-686-8745. THE TIMBERLINE Artists meet at 10 a.m. every Wednesday of each month, upstairs at the Aspen Mine Senior Center in Cripple Creek. Everyone is welcome. Bring your favorite craft or art medium and join a dedicated group. PIKES PEAK Community Club meets starting at 6:30 p.m. with a potluck supper the second Thursday of each month at the Pikes Peak Community Center in Divide. Supper is followed by a business meeting. The public is welcome to attend. PIKES PEAK Lions Club meets at 6:30 p.m. the second and fourth Thursday in Woodland Park. Call 719-684-3081. The Pikes Peak Lions Club is part of Lions Club International, which is the largest worldwide service organization in the world. Our annual fundraiser is the annual Donkey Basketball Tournament. Our fundraisers and service projects provide support for our local community through work projects ranging from testing preschool age kids eyes for eye disease to sponsoring special needs kids to our local Lions Camp in Woodland Park. PIKES PEAK Plein Air Painters is a nationally recognized group of regional artists that meet Wednesdays to share the creative experience of painting out on location. New artists are welcome. Call 303-647-1085 or 719-930-7940, or e-mail shanikastudio@aol.com. PIKES PEAK Rotary meets at 7 a.m. Fridays at the Woodland Park Library, south entrance. Call 719-686-7855. Rotary is a worldwide organization working on projects ranging from polio eradication internationally to bell ringing for the Salvation Army locally. Call 719-687-0418. QUILT MINISTRIES meets between the hours of 9:30 a.m. and 4 p.m. the third Thursday of each month at Ute Pass Cultural Center to make quilts for families that have been burned out of their homes or are in need for some other reason. The quilts are simple, machine pieced and hand-tied and are excellent projects for both new and more experienced quilters. No sewing skills necessary. Participants are encouraged to bring their own sewing machines but machines also will be available

RAMPART ROCK `n’ Jazz Retro Jammers (RJs) singers rehearse Saturday afternoons in Woodland Park. Rock, soul, jazz, blues; soprano, alto, tenor, and bass vocalists welcome in addition to keyboard or instrumental accompanists. Call 6868228 for directions or visit www.rampartrocknjazz.com. SENIORS LEAGUE. The Seniors League at Pinz Bowling Center offers a seniors league at noon Tuesdays. The league is open and willing to take any new members who are 55 and older. The league requires no weekly commitment; bowlers may show up any week they like, without obligation to be there the next. They also get a senior discount price, playing three games (including shoe rental) all for less than $5. SECOND SUNDAY Scribes is for writers, wannabe writers and all those who love the written word. Sponsored by the Cripple Creek Park and Recreation Department the group meets at 2 p.m. the second Sunday of the month at the Bennett Avenue Park and Rec center. Call 719-689-3514. THE SNOWFLAKE Chapter No. 153 Order of the Eastern Star meets at 7:30 p.m. at 205 Park St. in Woodland Park. Call 719-687-9800. TELLER COUNTY Knitters meet from 10 a.m. to noon every Saturday at Community Partnership offices in Divide, located above McGinty’s Wood Oven Pub, turn north on Highway 5 and park in the lot onnorth side of building). Yarn fans of all skills and types are welcome for a chance to share projects and conversation. For more details check Teller Knitters on ravelry.com. THE TELLER County Sport Horse Club meets at 6:30 p.m. on the third Wednesday of each month. Call Grace at 719-6618497 for more information. TELLER COUNTY Search and Rescue is an all-volunteer, nonprofit organization whose mission is to locate and rescue lost and missing people in Teller County and the surrounding area. Our general membership meetings are at 7 p.m. the first Monday of every month at the Woodland Park Library, downstairs meeting room. Although we are not accepting new members at this time, the public is invited to our meetings. We are available to give hiking safety presentations to schools, churches or local organizations and we do accept donations. For further information, please contact Janet Bennett at 719-306-0826. THOMAS V. Kelly VFW Post 6051 meets at at 7 p.m. the first Wednesday of each month at Veterans Hall, 27637 Hwy 67, Woodland Park, CO 80863, the old Woodland Park Grange Hall where Eric V. Dickson American Legion Post #1980 meets. THE UTE Pass Historical Society board of directors meets at 5:30 p.m. the second Monday of each month at the Museum Center, 231 E. Henrietta Ave., next to the library. All patrons and members of the public are invited. Call 719-686-7512 for information. UTE PASS Masonic Lodge 188 meets at 7:30 p.m. the third Tuesday of the month. Call 719-687-9453. Clubs continues on Page 14


Pikes PeakLIFE 10-Life-Color

10 Pikes Peak Courier View May 22, 2013

Sotomayor finds

another

source

Creative bond extends to storyteller’s Earth

Francisco Sotomayor creates his art in a wondrous Teller County setting. Photos by Pat Hill

By Pat Hill

phill@ourcoloradonews.com

I

Francisco Sotomayor has added to his artistic skills with quartz carvings.

n a creative bond with the Earth, Francisco Sotomayor finds inspiration as well as narrative in rocks and minerals, using his hands as storyteller. In two dramatic pieces, with chrysocolla as battleground, Sotomayor weaves a tale of struggle between hero and villain, between scorpion and spider. “The big scorpion looks like he’s got the victory; he’s made a contact point where he’s penetrating the claw of the other,” he said. “The smaller one has a hapless face for being attacked while the other scorpion is more aggressive. I can slant the eyes and do things to make the one look more aggressive.” Following the narrative, at one point on the “stage” of crysocolla, things don’t look good for the spider. “As you can see, the scorpion has the leg of the spider in his claw,” Sotomayor said. “You’ll pity the spider because you’ll know he’s the meal of

the scorpion.” However, as sculptor develops the story he changes the apparent victor to the underdog, for a kind of hurrah end to the story. As the mineral is commander, Sotomayor marches to its dictates, honing his craft with diamond saws, grinders and chisels. “The chrysocolla is all carved underwater,” he said. In another twist on fine-tuning the intricacies of indigenous stones, Sotomayor goes to the interior of quartz crystals. “How do you carve on the inside of a crystal, make curves and bends?” he said, rhetorically. Holding the crystal in a bucket of water, Sotomayor guides his tools from a tiny opening on the base of the quartz. “The abrasiveness of the diamond bit chewing away on the inside creates that frosting effect,” he said. As the narrator-sculptor, Sotomayor is driven by curiosity. “It was just a challenge because I was carving outside on the quartz at first,” he said.

In a kind of familial weave, Sotomayor’s wife, Mindy, recently discovered her own innate artistic skill, carving business-card holders from a variety of minerals, amazonite among them. “She’s found her niche,” he said. Known around the region as well as the nation for his marble sculptures “Pas de Deux” and the “American Woman,” Sotomayor has discovered another source for his artistry. Ten years after creating the “Woman,” Sotomayor continues to show the piece, which he and his family transport in a sealed glass case. Last year, Sotomayor and his creation were written up in the New York Times, the Wall Street Journal and the Italian Tribune as well as local papers along the Eastern Seaboard. His latest venture on the “Woman” is to hire an agent to market the piece in Changsa, China, where 97 percent of the world’s minerals are buried underground. To date, the sculptor has autographed 35,000 pieces from the sculpture.


11-Color

Pikes Peak Courier View 11

May 22, 2013

Riggle talks about hospital By Pat Hill

phill@ourcoloradonews.com The voice of Pikes Peak Regional Hospital, Eric Riggle is getting acquainted, figuring out where everything is and what goes where. Director of marketing and public relations for the hospital, Riggle takes over as the staff gears up to celebrate the sixth anniversary of a place that began with a few people who believed in a dream. “That was part of the appeal for me, a newer hospital in a small community,” he said. “The team here has done great outreach and involved in so many different things.” As the new marketer for the hospital, Riggle is focused on enhancing customer loyalty. “We want to make sure people know what services are available and can access those services. That’s a whole team effort.” For Riggle, increasing awareness and building relationships are vital to maintaining the hospital’s ties to the community. “From my perspective, in this five-year period, the team has worked very hard to

make those happen.” Lurking over the hospital as well as the public-relations director is the upcoming health-care law and the accompanying changes. “We’re all following what’s mandated, whether by the Affordable Care Act, Medicare or Medicaid,” he said. “We’re going to make the best of whatever opportunities are there.” With his varied background in speaking to the public, Riggle, who was raised in Arvada, began his career at Coors brewery in Golden. Several years later, he joined the world headquarters of Coca-Cola in Atlanta, Ga. “As director of media relations I worked on the 100th birthday at Coca-Cola, came just as the celebration was getting underway,” he said. “It was perfect timing from my standpoint.” From Coca-Cola back to beer, Riggle helped establish a distributorship in Albany, Ga., where the customers included Miller/Coors. Riggle and his wife, Anita, have two children, Jason, who will be a senior at Woodland Park High School, and Gretchen, who will be in the ninth-grade.

THINGS TO DO MAY2 3 DEADLY DOSE. The leading cause of accidental death in the

United States is prescription drug overdose. Come to the Woodland Park Public Library at 6:30 p.m. May 23 for this important potentially life-saving free program. Pikes Peak Regional Hospital, Teller County Public Health, Teller County Sheriff ’s Office and Woodland Park Police Department join in discussing the changing face of victims of overdose. Colorado has the second-worst rate of pain pill abuse and misuse according to a federal report boosting the urgency of various state efforts to curb rampant overuse of the pills. Call 687-9281 ext. 132 for more information.

PICNIC-N-PLANES. CONGRATULATIONS to the Air Force Academy’s graduating class of 2013. The Western Museum of Mining and Industry is the perfect place to watch the amazing aerial acrobatics of the U.S. Air Force Thunderbirds as they fly over for the Air Force Academy’s graduation. Bring and enjoy a picnic lunch by our spring fed ponds and flowering meadow as you experience the mighty Thunderbirds soar over you. The event is from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. May 23. A $5 donation is encouraged. MAY 24-27 TEA TIME. The Queen’s Parlour Tea Room inside the Miramont Castle Museum is doing a soft opening to kick off the season with a special Light Victorian Tea and Crème Tea from 11 a.m to 3 p.m. May 24-27. By advance credit card reservation only. For information and to make reservations, call 719-685-1011 or 719-884-4109.

tion. Deadline for applications is May. For information, contact CCCA, PO Box 472, Fairplay, CO 80440-0472, or Jim Campbell at 719-689-2047.

JUNE 1 PET SHOT clinic. Four Mile Emergency Services will host a pet shot clinic and bake sale from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. June 1 at Four Mile Fire Station 1. Both large and small animals welcome. Most shots cost $15. Exams also available for $15. Cash, checks and Visa accepted. First come first served. All animals must be on a leash, in a kennel or trailer. Delicious baked goods and coffee available for purchase. For additional information call Jane at 719-689-2503 or Lynne at 719-294-7108 or visit www. fourmilees.com. JUNE 14 RELAY FOR Life. The American Cancer Society Relay for Life celebration is at 7 p.m. June 14 at CSCS. Visit http://www.tellerrelay.com/ or call Stacy at 650-0505. JUNE 19 BIKE RODEO. The fourth annual Teller County Free Kids Bike Rodeo is from 10 a.m. to noon June 19 at the Meadow Wood Sports Complex. The bike rodeo is open to any child who can pedal and will include bicycle skill challenges, safety games, giveaways and more. Bring a bike and helmet. The event is co-sponsored by Teller County Chiropractic and Parks and Recreation. Prize giveaway is at 11:45 a.m. (must be present to win). THROUGH JUNE 21; JULY 19-20

BALANCE CLASS. Matter of Balance is an eight-week series of classes for those 60 and older who have fears/concerns about falling and need to improve their balance. The class is offered from 2-4 p.m. Tuesdays from April 9 to May 28 at Woodland Fitness Center. A wide variety of issues and habits affecting balance and fall prevention are addressed. The program is free, paid for through a YMCA grant. Call Rebecca at 719-963-0988 to sign up and for more information.

QUILT ENTRIES. Firehouse Quilts is looking for quilt entries for its eighth annual quilt show to support its mission of helping children in crisis in Colorado. Early bird entries submitted by May 17 are taken at a discounted entry fee ($15). Otherwise, the fee is $18 per item, and the final deadline is June 21. This year’s show has a special theme, Patriotic, along with 13 other categories. The show is from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. July 19-20 at the Douglas County Events Center in Castle Rock. All forms and instructions are available at www.firehousequilts.org; click on the Quilt Show link at the top.

MAY 29 TO JUNE 2

JULY 4

REVIVAL. 4 Mile Community Church will have its old fashioned revival at 6:30 p.m. May 29 to June 2. Special singing nightly. Need a ride? Call 719-748-3037.

CEMETERY CRAWL. The Ute Pass Historical Society presents its second annual Woodland Park Cemetery Crawl on July 4. Take a walk and meet some of the old pioneers who are resting in the Woodland Park Cemetery, 650 Short St. Tours start every 15 minutes from 1 to 3 pm. Tickets cost $5, and are available at the Ute Pass Historical Society Gift Shop, 231 E. Henrietta Ave., Woodland Park, or at the gate. Call 719-686-7512 or e mail uphs@peakinter.net for information.

THROUGH MAY 28

MAY 31 UPCOMING CONCERTS. Crystola Roadhouse presents several upcoming concerts. Big Bill Morganfield performs April 13. Buddy Whittington performs May 31. All concerts start at 7:30 p.m. Visit Crystola Roadhouse www.myspace.com/crystolaroadhouse. THROUGH MAY ART EXHIBIT. The Ute Pass Historical Society, in conjunction with the Pikes Peak Regional Medical Center Foundation, presents “Alverta Burns: Angel of the Hills,” an exhibit featuring vintage photographs, medical artifacts and clothing from the lifetime of one of our area’s most respected residents of the last century. Alverta’s story and many of the everyday objects from her nursing profession are featured in the display, including her medicine bag and nurse’s uniform (courtesy of the Burns family of Woodland Park). The exhibit runs through May in the Pikes Peak Regional Hospital lobby. Contact Karla Schweitzer at 719-686-7512 or via email at uphs@peakinter.net. SCHOLARSHIP. CENTRAL Colorado Cattlemen’s Association

is giving its annual scholarship to any graduating senior from Park or Teller counties who will go to college and major in agriculture. All high school counselors will have an applica-

THROUGH AUGUST ART EXHIBIT. Some of the works of late local artist Nadine Kent Drummond were on exhibit in Woodland Park last summer. Now an expanded exhibit is on display through August in the Western Art History floor at the Denver Public Library, 10 W. 14th Ave. Parkway.

ONGOING NEW EXHIBIT. The Pikes Peak International Hill Climb Association “Over The Hill Gang” display is now complete. We invite you to see the amazing time line of photos from the 1920s to present day, in addition to memorabilia from the second oldest race in the world. ONGOING EXHIBIT. The Ute Pass Historical Society presents Scenic Views from the Colorado Midland Railway. The exhibit is on the second floor of the Woodland Park Public Library adjacent to the Colorado Room. The library is at 218 E. Midland Ave., Woodland Park. Call 686-7512.

Eric Riggle is the new director of marketing and public relations at Pikes Peak Regional Hospital. Photo by Pat Hill

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12-Color

12 Pikes Peak Courier View

May 22, 2013

Lake George welcomes new principal Pat Lewis retiring at end of school year By Norma Engelberg

nengelberg@ourcoloradonews.com Lake George Charter School didn’t have to look far to find a new principal to replace Pat Lewis, who is retiring at the end of this school year. Lewis has been the school’s principal for five years. Her replacement is the charter school’s fifth-grade teacher Bill Fredenburg. Lewis was a counselor at Harrison District 2 schools in Colorado Springs and before that she taught art. She earned her bachelor’s degree at Iowa State and has two master’s degrees from Kansas State. Her counseling degree and her administrators’ certificate came from the University of Colorado, Colorado Springs. “My husband (Steve) and I plan to travel,” she said. “We want to go somewhere it doesn’t snow.” Fredenburg has 16 years of experience as principal at an elementary school in Missouri. Teaching at Lake George, starting two and a half years ago, is his third career. After retiring from the school in Missouri, he opened his own cabinetmaking business and then returned to teaching. He taught

a combined fifth and sixth grade class last year. He is also the special education coordinator. “I’m going to like the interaction with all of the kids and all of the teachers,” he said. “I’ll get to meet more of the parents.” He added that he doesn’t see a need to do anything different when he takes over as principal. “I think the school is headed in a good direction,” he said. “We’ve seen fabulous changes since we built the new school (in 2012),” Lewis said. “It’s 10 times easier for kids to get around, which means more teaching time.” The school’s enrollment has doubled in the five years Lewis has been principal. “We have about 126 students,” she said. “Next year we’ll probably be at capacity and will have to start a waitlist. Parents are attracted to our smaller class sizes.” While most of the state’s preliminary Transitional Colorado Assessment Program scores for third-grade readers are flat this year, 94 percent of Lake George Charter School’s third-graders scored proficient or advanced in reading. “Keep an eye on the rest of our scores when they are released this fall,” Lewis said. “Our kids did great.” Suzanne Steinke, who teaches a fifthand sixth-grade class this year, will teach only fifth-grade next year. The school will be hiring a new fifth/

Lake George Charter School fifth-grade teacher Bill Fredenburg will become the new principal when current Principal Pat Lewis retires at the end of this school year. Photo by Norma Engelberg program that goes through eighth-grade. For more information, visit www.lakegeorgecharterschool.org.

sixth-grade teacher. The school teaches kindergarten through seventh-grade and has an online

It’s all about animals at bill-signing USFS fuel wood Protection act, focus on shelter pets become law By Vic Vela

vvela@ourcoloradonews.com Dogs had their day in Denver on May 13, as Gov. John Hickenlooper signed two pieces of legislation that led to some serious tail-wagging from our four-legged friends. The governor — who brought his dog Sky to a bill-signing at the Denver Animal Shelter — put his signature on a bill aimed at protecting dogs whenever police are called to their owners’ homes, and another that designates dogs — and cats — that are adopted from animal shelters as the state pets. “These pets become a huge part of people’s lives,” Hickenlooper said. Each bill received support from Democrats and Republicans in the General Assembly this legislative session. “This is a bipartisan day for dogs,” said Sen. David Balmer, RCentennial, who was flanked by Democratic lawmakers, Sen. Lucia Guzman and Rep. Lois Court, both of Denver. The three co-sponsored Senate Bill 226, known as the “Dog Protection Act.” The bill requires law

enforcement agencies to put in place training, and to adopt policies and procedures that officers would be required to adhere to whenever they respond to homes where there are dogs. The measure allows dog owners the opportunity to put their pets outside or into another room whenever police come to the home for calls involving non-violent situations. The bill calls for the creation of a volunteer task force that will outline officer training guidelines. The bill was the result of recent headline-grabbing stories involving officer-related dog shootings around the state. Erie resident Brittany Moore’s German Shepard, Ava, was 4 years old when it was shot to death by a police officer there two years ago. “We’ll always miss her and she’ll always be in our hearts,” Moore said afterward. “But I think this was a huge deal, this bill. I think it’s going to help a lot of situations,” The bill received unanimous support from both legislative chambers this session. The same cannot be said about Senate Bill 201, which designates cats and dogs that have been adopted from state animal shelters and rescues as the state pets. The bill received criticism from

animal breeder and retail groups, who felt that the legislation created a perception that it’s better to obtain pets from shelters and rescues, than from other places where pets can be adopted or purchased. At times, legislative committee hearing testimony, and debate inside the House and Senate, resulted in lengthy discussions. Democratic Sen. Andy Kerr of Lakewood, a bill sponsor, who brought his young son and his dog to the event, joked about the contentious nature of the legislation. Just before Kerr was about to speak, playful dogs behind the podium got their leashes tangled up, which caused the Colorado state flag to tip over. “Next time somebody brings me a bill and says this is a nice, easy little bill ...” quipped Kerr. “It’s kind of like taking your 3-year-old son and your dog to a bill-signing, and then trying to catch the Colorado flag at the same time.” Rep. Brittany Pettersen, DLakewood, also a sponsor of Senate Bill 201, said the challenges that surrounded the legislation were worth it, in the end. “These are our most vulnerable animals, who need homes,” she said. “And it’s about bringing awareness and the importance of adopting animals.”

Spring is here and it’s time to

Special to The Tribune and Courier U.S. Forest Service/Pike National Forest

U.S. Forest Service-Pike National Forest, Pikes Peak Ranger District is selling fuel-wood permits for $15 per cord with a threecord minimum. Cash or check only, no credit cards are accepted.

Four units are available: north of Divide, north of Woodland Park off Rampart Range Road, Mt. Herman Road near Monument and north of Woodland Park near the Red Rocks Campground. For further information call the Pikes Peak Ranger District office at 719-636-1602, or access the District’s webpage at http:// www.fs.fed.us/r2/psicc/pp.

SEND US YOUR NEWS Colorado Community Media welcomes event listings and other submissions. Please note our submissions emails. Events and club listings calendar@ourcoloradonews.com School notes schoolnotes@ ourcoloradonews.com Military briefs militarynotes@ourcoloradonews.com

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Pikes PeakSPORTS 13-Sports-Color

Pikes Peak Courier View 13 May 22, 2013

rade. akeg-

Woodland Park senior Gabby Ruddick finished second in the Class 4A girls high jump competition at last weekend’s state track meet in Lakewood. File photos by Danny Summers

Woodland Park athletes enjoy successful state track meet Ruddick finishes second in the high jump, while Erickson claims fourth in the discus By Danny Summers

jdsummers30@gmail.com LAKEWOOD – For the second time in three years, Gabby Ruddick finished second in the high jump at the Class 4A state track and field meet. The Woodland Park High School senior leaped 5 feet, 3 inches at Jefferson County Stadium in Lakewood on May 16, finishing two inches behind Pueblo South’s Angelique Urenda. “I was happy to do what I could do,” Ruddick said. “I gave it my all.” Ruddick was joined by three other Woodland Park athletes at the state meet. Senior Hannah Erickson took home a fourth-place medal in the discus, and was 16th in the shot put. Her brother, Hayden, a sophomore, finished ninth in the shot put, while senior Cody Westfall was 17th in the discus. Representing Cripple Creek-Victor was junior Katie Tapia, who was 15th in the 2A long jump. “We finished about where we thought we would,” Woodland Park coach Ron Payton said of his team. “I’m pleased. I’m disappointed we didn’t have 10 or 15 kids at state, but we had a great year.” Ruddick and Hannah Erickson scored 13 points – the same number as the Coronado girls team that won the Metro League meet two weeks ago. “We thought that was great,” Payton said. “Coronado had all those distance runners and we were able to match what they did.” Ruddick competed in two events at the state meet. She also raced in the 100 meter hurdles, but failed to qualify for the finals out of her heat. “A couple of the other girls caught her in the end,” Payton said. “She ran a fast time. She ran a good race. It just didn’t turn out the way we hoped it would have.” In the high jump, Ruddick and Urenda were tied at 5-3, when the bar was raised to 5-5. Ruddick barely missed on each of her

‘We finished about where we thought we would. I’m pleased. I’m disappointed we didn’t have 10 or 15 kids at state, but we had a great year.’ Ron Payton, Woodland Park coach three attempts, clipping the bar with a foot as she went over. Urenda also clipped the bar with her foot, but it stayed in place for the victory. “I had a pretty good season; I think I did pretty well,” Ruddick said. “The competition was just real tough.” Hannah Erickson threw the shot put 3411 ¾ -- well back of the leaders. But when it came time for her to compete in the discus (her best event), she was pumped. Her throw of 128-3 was almost three feet ahead ofb fifth-place finisher Mariah Walker of Sand Creek. “Hannah will never throw the shot put in college,” Payton said. “She’ll do the discus, javelin, hammer and weight throw. She’ll be very successful.” Hayden Erickson’s shot put toss of 49-10 ½ landed him on the podium where he received his first state medal. “That was awesome,” Payton said. “We’re really looking forward to the future.” Tapia competed in the long jump on Friday. She jumped 14-8, well below her season best of more than 16 feet. Lyons senior Nola Basey won the event with a leap of 17-7 ½. Tapia finished fifth in state as a freshman and fourth last year as a sophomore with a career-best leap of 17-3 ¼.

Cripple Creek-Victor junior Katie Tapia finished in 15th place in the Class 2A girls long jump at last weekend’s state track meet.


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14 Pikes Peak Courier View

May 22, 2013

Baseball Season Comes to an End for Pioneers By Danny Summers

jdsummers30@gmail.com The Cripple Creek-Victor baseball team wrapped up its season last month. The Pioneers ended the campaign with a 0-12 record. “The kids tried real hard,” said Pioneers coach Scott Davies. “They held their heads high and they showed great sportsmanship.” The Pioneers scored just nine runs all season, while allowing 193. Davies had just 10 players on the varsity roster. But by season’s end the number of eligible players was below the allowable limit to field a team, forcing the Pioneers to forfeit their final three games. Among the factors Davies was facing was the lack of overall experience of the players. “A lot of the kids are just starting out and we have to spend a lot of timen on the basics, Davies said. “We’re working with the city to try and get a feeder program so by the time they get to high school we can work on their strengths and weaknesses.” The team’s top player was sophomore Cody Rice, who was named the Pioneers’ offensive player of the year. He batted over .300 and played a solid third base and shortstop. Other top players included sophomore Zion Dickerson, and juniors Toby Wuellner and Scott Cain.

WINSTEAD STEPS DOWN

Former Woodland Park baseball and

softball coach Chris Winstead has decided to leave the coaching ranks to spend more time with his family. Winstead, who coached at Woodland Park through the 2011 baseball season, was most recently the head coach at Rampart in Colorado Springs. He guided the Rams to the baseball playoffs the last two seasons. Winstead said he plans on returning to his native Oklahoma to be closer to his dad and Down syndrome brother. His daughter has been accepted to nursing school there. Winstead, 49, is a graduate of the University of Oklahoma. He coached Woodland Park for seven seasons, leading the Panthers baseball team to the postseason four times.

STATE GAMES CYCLISTS TO RACE UP PIKES PEAK

For the first time in Rocky Mountain State Games history, cycling athletes will now get the chance to climb to the summit of Pikes Peak – America’s Mountain – on Sunday, July 21, the first of two weekends of the event this year. The competition will begin at 6 a.m. The course is 20 kilometers (12.4 miles) the same distance the automobiles use for the world renowned Pikes Peak International Hill Climb. The race and ride is a fully supported cycling event that provides a limited number of cyclists (maximum of 1,500) the chance to tackle one of the most challenging climbs in the world. Riders will negotiate over 154 turns and climb over 4,700 feet on their way to America’s Mountain summit.

This summer the Pikes Peak Cycling Hill Climb takes place the day after the Mount Evans Hill Climb. Evans and Pikes Peak are the two highest paved roads in the U.S and for those cyclists that attempt to climb both of these 14,000 feet mountains on the same weekend it will take courage and heart! There will be special awards to those who brave and accomplish this amazing feat. Athlete Registration is now open on line at: www.rockymountainstategames.org

DUMAS RETURNS

The two fastest auto drivers in the history of the Pikes Peak International Hill Climb will square off directly against each other in the prestigious Unlimited Division during the 91st edition of the Race To The Clouds on June 30. Last year, French racing star Romain Dumas shocked the crowd of over 6,000 on the hill when he turned in a blistering time of 9 minutes 46.181 seconds in the Pikes Peak Open Division. He drove a Porsche 911 GT3R on the way to Rookie of the Year honors during the first edition of the race on a fully-paved course. That shattered the old mark of 9:51.278 set by the legendary Nobuhiro “Monster” Tajima in 2011, the first driver ever to break the ten-minute mark. But Dumas’ record did not stand long. Decorated Pikes Peak veteran Rhys Millen roared off the start line in the Time Attack Division and reached the 14,110-foot sum-

mit in his 2003 Hyundai Genesis Coupe in a breathtaking 9:46.164 – a mere .017 seconds better than Dumas. Dumas announced last week that he will be back again with fire in his eyes and a goal of the prize in the Unlimited Division. This time he will be behind the wheel of a Norma prototype, where he will meet both Millen, driving an all-new, ultra-lightweight, purpose-built race car using major power train components from Hyundai’s production-based Lambda engine family with 900 horsepower. Also racing in the division will be ninetime WRC World Rally Championship winner Sebastien Loeb of France, driving a Peugeot 208 T16 Pikes Peak. The 13-entry Unlimited Division also includes the likes of three-time Pikes Peak Open champion Dave Carapetyan, JeanPhilippe Dayraut of France (3rd in Unlimited in 2011), Cody Loveland, Denver’s Spencer Steele (the 2012 Open Wheel Division winner and three-time champion in that division), and Doug Siddens (last year’s winner in the Exhibition Powersport Division). Nine-time Unlimited champion Tajima will stick again in the Electric Auto Division after his entry in that field was cut short by an onboard fire last year. Dumas won the 2010 24 Hours of Le Mans, and Loeb was second in the famous endurance race in 2006 and was named French Sportsman of the Year in 2007 and 2009, making both drivers famous around the world.

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Woodland Park Parks & Recreation offers the following programs and sports. Sign up at least a week prior to session starting. Classes may be cancelled due to lack of participants. Call 719-687-5225, stop by our office at 204 W. South Ave or visit www.citywoodlandpark.org.

Aug. 2, with play from 8-10 a.m. Tuesdays. Mixed doubles, doubles, mixed/men’s/ladies, same division; pickle balls provided. 1st place receives shirts and 2nd place receives an individual plaque. League meeting is at 7 p.m. June 6 at the Woodland Park Library, upstairs. Minimum teams: 4.

May 31

June 15, July 13, Aug. 10, Sept. 21

British soccer camp. Challenger has developed a camp program that offers players a much broader soccer skills experience. Camp coaches are selected and trained in the UK. They are professional, outgoing, have a cool “British” accent and a genuine interest in helping each participant develop their skills and provide them with a very memorable and positive experience. Boys and girls 3-16 years old. Register online at www.challengersports.com; register by May 31 to receive a free soccer jersey. Camp dates: July 15-19.

June 1

Dog training. Led by Alice Roszczewski, family dog training is offered from 9-10 a.m. Saturdays. Session dates are June 1, 8, 15, 22, 29, July 6. Classes are at the CSCSWP branch gym. Learn commands such as loose leash walking, focus, wait, come stay, sit, down, leave it and more. Cost $150 per session (6 classes).

June 10 to Aug. 2

Adult tennis. An adult tennis league open to all skill levels. Contact the Parks and Recreation Office to place your name on the free agent list if you do not have a partner. Prior to registering, participants are to do a self skill rating. Players must be at least 18 years of age during the league to be eligible to participate. Player fee: $35 one league/$30 second league. League meeting is at 6 p.m. June 6 at the Woodland Park Library, upstairs. League format: 10 games. Season runs from June 10 to Aug. 2. Tennis balls provided; 1st place receives shirts and 2nd place receives individual plaque. Visit our website for self skill rating information. Ladies doubles, men’s doubles and mixed doubles.

June 11 to Aug. 2

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Pickle ball league. Call your friends, family and co-workers and get ready to have some fun by playing in the adult pickle ball league. If you would like to play, but do not have a partner, contact the Parks and Recreation Office to place your name on a free agent list. Players must be at least 18 years of age during the league to be eligible to participate. League format: 10 games held at the Meadow Wood Sports Complex Tennis Courts. Season runs from June 11 to

Garden club. Join the “Gardeners with Altitude” garden club, part of the largest gardening organization in the world. Learn about different aspects of gardening participate in tours of green houses and gardens and be part of a civic project to enhance our community. This club is lead by Trudie Layton and is on Saturdays from 10-11 a.m. in the Parks and Recreation Classroom. Class is held once a month; June 15, July 13, Aug. 10 and Sept. 21. Cost is $20.

Ongoing

Punch card. You can purchase a 10-class punch card for $70 and participate in any of the fitness classes. Lean to swim. Connie Knowles leads American Red Cross swimming lessons for ages 6 months to 18 years. Classes are Mondays starting April 1. Guppies (3-5 yrs): 4:30-5 p.m.; Level 1-2: 5-5:30 p.m.; Level 3: 5:30-6 p.m. and Level 4/5/6: 6-6:30 p.m. at Golden Bell Camp in Divide. Call to be placed on an interest list for Parent and Tot class (6 months-2 yrs). Cost is $40 for first child and additional family member is discounted to $36 per session. Call or visit our website for level descriptions. Body sculpt. Jane Enger leads the body sculpt class from 11:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays in the Parks and Recreation Classroom. All fitness levels welcome. Cost is $60 per session, $8 for drop-in, or a fitness punch card. Namaste yoga. Jody Ajimura-Kessler leads namaste yoga from 5:30-6:30 p.m. Mondays in the Parks & Recreation Classroom. Cost is $21 per session (3 classes) or $9 for drop-in, or fitness punch card. Yoga for stress relief. Nancy Stannard leads yoga for stress relief from 5:30-6:30 p.m. Wednesdays in the Parks and Recreation Classroom. Cost is $28 per session (4 classes), $9 for drop-in, or fitness punch card. Lunch-time Zumba. Alison Grimm leads lunch-time Zumba class from noon to 1 p.m. Tuesdays and Thursdays at the Parks and Recreation Classroom. Cost is $8 drop in, or fitness punch card. Zumba. Sharron Johnson leads Zumba class from 5:30-6:30 p.m. Mondays. This class is at the Ute Pass Cultural Center in the main room, 210 E. Midland Ave. Cost is $8 per class, or fitness punch card.


15

Pikes Peak Courier View 15

May 22, 2013

s Censner named Coach D Scholar

e in a ondsBy Pat Hill phill@ourcoloradonews.com e will goal Honored for making a differThisence in the lives of his fellow stuNor-dents as well as the community, Mil-Jacob Censner won the $1,000 ight,Coach D Scholarship award. He owerplans to attend Fort Lewis College duc-in Durango next year. h 900 A senior at Woodland Park High School, Censner was recognized nine-for his role in a variety of projects win-throughout the community: Peu- • Participated in the Salvation Army’s bell-ringing during the alsoholiday season Peak • Participated in community Jean-clean-up projects imit- • Coached teams at local youth pen-sports camps ision • Coached third- and fourthat di-grade football teams win- • Participated in the freshmen on). mentoring program ajima • Helped with the Best Buddies isionprogram rt by • Served as captain of the varsity football and basketball teams of Le After the ceremony, Censner mousoffered a glimpse into his momedtivation to excel at community andservice. “I’ve been raised by my oundparents to help others,” he said.

“As many people who have helped me, it seemed like it should go back around. It’s good karma.” The award honors the late Coach Rich Dispenza, who died suddenly July 4, 2011. Students from high schools in Cripple Creek, Manitou Springs and Woodland Park are eligible for the award as “Coach D” coached teams at the three high schools. “Coach,” as he was affectionately called, touched the lives of kids all over the region, including those at the ChildrensARK, which closed last year. Under the direction of Paula and Neil Levy, the second annual Coach D Make a Difference Day is July 27. The day begins with a memorial golf tournament, includes a character-building camp for children and concludes with a community-wide spaghetti dinner at the Woodland Park Middle School Commons. The proceeds benefit the Coach D Making a Difference Scholarship program. For registration forms or more information, call Paula Levy at 331-3640 or email makingadifferencescholarship@ gmail.com

Jacob Censner, a senior at Woodland Park High School, received the $1,000 Coach D Scholarship award May 14 at an all-school assembly. Censner is pictured with two members of the selection committee, Paula Levy and Paul Harris. Photo by Pat Hill

CLUBS IN YOUR COMMUNITY CRIPPLE CREEK T Clubs continued from Page 9

UTE PASS Social Club is open to ladies of all ages days.

and interests. The club has many activities to pick ’s/laand choose from including bridge, hiking, luncheons, ided. mahjongg, crafts, needle works, and much more. Check e reout http://sites.google.com/site/upsocial/ or contact meetDianne Shafer, president, at 719-687-4133. Park VETERANS OF Foreign Wars Auxiliary meets at noon the second Tuesday of each month in a meeting room in the lower level of the Woodland Park Public Library. withWOODLAND NIGHTS, an evening MOPS group, rgestmeets on the second and fourth Friday of each month earnfrom 6:30-8:30 p.m. September to May at the Woodland artic-Park Christian Church, 27400 N. Colo. 67. MOPS is for densMothers of Pre-Schoolers, who may have different e ourlifestyles but all share a similar desire to be the very best Lay-moms they can be. Call Terri at 719-687-3669. m. in ClassWOODLAND PARK Community Singers rehearse Aug.from 7-8:30 p.m. Mondays at Mountain View United Methodist Church at 1101 Rampart Range Road in Woodland Park. No tryout needed. Just come and sing. Call 719-687-8545.

ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets from 9-10 a.m. every Sunday at the VFW, three and a half miles north of Woodland Park on Colo. 67. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS, AA, has a 4 p.m. discussion group every Sunday at St. Andrews Episcopal Church in Cripple Creek. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets for 12-steps

Bible discussion at 6 p.m. every Monday at the Aspen Mine Center in Cripple Creek. This meeting is open to AA members and the general public. An AA meeting follows at 7 p.m.

ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 7 p.m. every

Monday and at 5 p.m. Saturdays at the Community Partnership Family Resource Center in Divide.

ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS for women meets from 5:30-6:30 p.m. and from men from 7-8 p.m. every Tuesday at the Ute Pass Cultural Center in Woodland Park. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS, Hilltop AA, meets at 7 p.m. Tuesdays and at 2 p.m. Saturdays at the Cripple Creek Rehab & Wellness Center on North Street. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 7 p.m.

classWOODLAND PARK High School Panther Pride Athletic ny ofBoosters meets at 6:30 p.m. the first Wednesday of each month in the high school library. eads sonsWOODLAND PARK Holistic Luncheon is offered at s arenoon the second Wednesday of each month. Contact Jim yrs):at 719-687-4335 for location. This is a free group, often Levelpotluck style lunch.

Wednesdays at the Victor Community Center on Second and Portland.

p.m.WOODLAND PARK Senior Citizens Club hosts the o beGolden Circle daily hot lunch at 11:45 a.m. Monday d Totthrough Friday, except for the 2nd Tuesday Potluck and firstthe 4th Tuesday Catered Lunch, both with entertaindis-ment or an educational presentation. Pool on Tuesday t ourmorning, cribbage, euchre or dominoes most mornings, bridge right after lunch on Mondays and Wednesdays, bodyexercise for arthritis Wednesday and Friday mornings p.m.and a host of other activities. Monthly All You Can Eat n thePancake Breakfast every 3rd Saturday helps raise funds nessfor Senior Center activities. Contact the activities coordin, $8nator at 719-687-3877 to find out more or to receive a monthly newsletter. ssler p.m.SUPPORT lass-AA MEETS from noon to 1 p.m. and 6-7 p.m. every s) orMonday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, and Friday, and from 5-6 p.m. every Saturday, and from noon to 1 p.m. nardand 6-7 p.m. every Sunday at 10400 Ute Pass Ave. in -6:30Green Mountain Falls. ecreAA MEETING is from 7-8 p.m. Thursdays at Woodland ssion Park Community Church. This is a Beginners Book Study unch meeting.

ADULT CHILD Alcoholics Anonymous meets at 7

immAL-ANON ABOVE the Clouds is now meeting at the on toPeople’s Bank in Woodland Park at Hwy 24 and Sheridan ParksAve., rear entrance Mondays at 5:45-6:45 p.m. Handicap dropaccessible.

AL-ANON MEETS at noon Thursdays in Guffey next to mba the post office. Call 719-689-5808. This er inAL-ANON MEETS from 7-8 p.m. Thursdays at the ost isWoodland Park Community Church. 800 Valley View Dr. Ste. D in Woodland Park

ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets from noon to

1 p.m. every Thursday at the Nazarene Church, 750 N. Colo. 67, at the corner of Colo. 67 and Evergreen Heights.

ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 7 p.m. Fridays

at the Lake George Community Center.

p.m. Fridays. For meeting location check out www. adultchildren.org. The group no longer meets at the Victor Community Center.

ALATEEN ABOVE the Clouds meets at the People’s Bank in Woodland Park at Hwy 24 and Sheridan Ave., rear entrance Mondays at 5:45-6:45 p.m. Handicap accessible. For more info call 719-632-0063 THE ALZHEIMER’S Association Teller County Family Support Group meets at 4:30 p.m. the first Tuesday of each month and the fourth Wednesday of each month in the board room at the Woodland Park Public Library. Caregivers, family, and friends will discuss the daily challenges of caring for someone with Alzheimer’s disease or other dementias, whether at home, in a facility setting or long distance. Support and encouragement is offered in a confidential setting at no cost. Meet other caregivers and learn more about the disease, common caregiving issues and share suggestions on how to take care of yourself while taking care of your loved. Call 719-266-8773 or Paula Levy at 719-331-3640. BASIC LIFE support classes are taught, as needed, at the NETCO Fire Station No. I, with a minimum of three students. Heartsaver cardiopulmonary resuscitation and first aid classes are taught monthly, with a minimum of five students for CPR and three for first aid. There is a cost for classes. Registration is required at least one week prior to class. Call Sharon at NETCO Fire at 719-687-1866 during business hours, or Kay Poland at 719-686-1806. DOMESTIC VIOLENCE Education Program, an educational and support group where victims of domestic

violence can learn more about power and control issues and the cycle of violence, meets at 1:30 p.m. Tuesdays at Our Lady of the Woods Church in Woodland Park. Call Devra at 719-243-5508 or e-mail dgoodwin@tessacs. org.

GAMBLERS ANONYMOUS meets at 5:30 p.m. Sun-

days at St. Andrews Episcopal Church in Cripple Creek.

GAMBLERS ANONYMOUS meets at 7 p.m. every

Tuesday at Woodland Park Community Church Offices, Suite A, 700 Valley View Drive in Woodland Park.

GED, ADULT basic education classes are from 3-6 p.m. Tuesdays in the Aspen Mine Center, Cripple Creek. Free childcare provided. Open enrollment. Call 719-6860705. Sponsored by Community Partnership Family Resource Center. GED/ESL CLASSES are from 9 a.m. to noon Tuesdays, Wednesdays, and Thursdays in Divide with open enrollment. Free childcare is provided. Call 719-686-0705 for more information. Sponsored by Community Partnership Family Resource Center. TO HELP local families better prepare for an emergency, the local Home Instead Senior Care office has a Web site containing downloadable materials such as a checklist of important contact names and information, a medication tracker, allergies/conditions worksheet and a wallet card to carry when away from home. These materials also can be accessed and downloaded at www.senioremergencykit.com. Contact the local Home Instead Senior Care office at 719-534-3064 for more information. PARENT EDUCATION Workshops for parents with

children ages 1 through teens. Workshops provided throughout the year at Community Partnership in Divide. Childcare and meals included. Call 686-0705 for session dates and times.

REC REPORT

For hours for Cripple Creek Parks and Recreation, call 719-689-3514.

Ongoing

Kido 4 Kids is every Monday and Wednesday from 5-6 p.m. Kido is a self-defense focused martial arts system for kids ages 7-13. Cost is $25 a month for unlimited classes. Aikido is every Monday and Wednesday from 6-7:30 p.m. Aikido is a Japanese Martial Art. We teach mature adults technically pure martial arts. Cost is $30 a month for unlimited classes. Open ZUMBA meets Monday through Thursday from 5-6:30 p.m. Lose those extra pounds with an energetic dance. Free to all fitness member types.

EXTRA! EXTRA! Have a news or business story idea? We'd love to read all about it. To send us your news and business press releases please visit ourcoloradonews.com, click on the Press Releases tab and follow easy instructions to make submissions.

LE LECHE League, nursing mothers supporting nursing mothers, meets at 6 p.m. the second Monday of each month. Call Kathleen at 719-687-1164 for location and information. LA LECHE League meetings for those interested in breastfeeding are from 3-5 p.m. the second Wednesday of each month at CHOICES, 228 Baldwin St., Woodland Park. LITTLE CHAPEL Food Pantry, 69 County Road 5, Divide, is in search of volunteers to help distribute food to its clients. Any help with paper work, loading cars or packing boxes is greatly needed. Distribution days are the second and fourth Mondays of the month. Volunteer times are from 1-7 p.m. Client food pick-up times are from 4:30- 6:30 p.m. Call Little Chapel Food Pantry at 719-322-7610 or visit littlechapelfoodpantry.org. MONTHLY COMMODITIES food distribution program. Last Friday of each month at the Aspen Mine Center, 166 East Bennett Avenue, Cripple Creek. Proof of Teller County residence and income requirements must be met to participate. Call 689-3584 for more information. A MULTIPLE Sclerosis support group meets from 10:30 a.m. to noon on the second Thursday of each month at the Woodland Park Library. Call Annette at 719-687-4103.

Clubs continues on Page 16

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Cozy 2 bed, 2 bath with 2 car carport located on an unbelievable 6.27 acres with awesome mountain views! Southwestern style decor throughout with local artist touches. Masonry wood-burning fireplace, vaulted ceilings and wood beams on the main level. Mexican Saltillo tile and hardwood floors. Huge deck is great for entertaining or taking in the scenery. Lower level is finished with a large, cozy family room and walk-out to the carport. Extra storage/workshop attached to carport. Landscaped front yard. Clubhouse with pool, workout area and many other amenities. Immaculate home!


16

16 Pikes Peak Courier View

May 22, 2013

Honoring academic excellence at middle school Dozens of Woodland Park Middle School’s highest achieving students were inducted into the Panther Chapter of the National Junior Honor Society on May 13 in the Middle School

Commons. This is the school’s first year of membership and all of these students are considered the “charter members” of the organization. In order to be invited for con-

sideration of membership students had to have earned a 3.8 GPA or higher and demonstrate the additional qualities of leadership, service, citizenship and character.

The group includes sixth-, seventh-, and eighth-graders. The National Honor Society was formed in 1921 and the National Junior Honor Society was formed in 1929.

The Woodland Park RE-2 School District has had a NHS chapter for its high-school seniors for many years. The middle school chapter sponsor is Diana Roberts.

CLUBS IN YOUR COMMUNITY Clubs continued from Page 15

NEW BEGINNINGS with Food workshop graduates meet

every third Sunday of the month to provide ongoing support for overcoming health and weight issues and exchanging ideas and inspirations. For location and more information, contact Barbara Royal at 719-687-6823.

OVEREATERS ANONYMOUS 12-step program group meets from 5:30-6 p.m. every Thursday at Mountain View United Methodist Church in Woodland Park. Call 719-687-0246 or 719-475-0037. PARENTS AS Teachers and Bright Beginnings home visits available. Please call Community Partnership at 686-0705 to schedule a free visit for your newborn or young child. A SOUP kitchen is from noon to 1 p.m. every Tuesday and Wednesday at the Seventh-Day Adventist Church on Colo. 67. All soups and breads are homemade, and the kitchen is open to anyone wanting a warm meal and some fellowship. SUDDEN UNEXPECTED Infant Death Local Support Group. The group offers bereavement services for parents, families, friends and caregivers who have been affected by the sudden unexpected loss of an infant or toddler. There is no cost. The third Monday of the month from 6:30-8:30 p.m. at Colorado Springs Penrose Library, 20 N. Cascade Ave. Adult meeting only; no child care will be provided. For additional help and information, call Angel Eyes at 888-285-7437 or visit angeleyes.org. TRE’S CRIPPLE Creek playgroup meets 9-11 a.m. Fridays at

the Aspen MIne Center in downtown Cripple Creek. Call Cathy 719-687-8054.

TELLER COUNTY Nonprofit Roundtable, first Tuesday of

every month from noon to 1 p.m. (bring your own lunch). Free support group for nonprofits, covering various topics decided by local nonprofits. Contact Debbie Upton at the City of Woodland Park, 687-5218 for locations and more information.

TELLER COUNTY Search and Rescue meets the first Monday

of each month at the Woodland Park Library downstairs meeting room at 7 p.m. We are an all-volunteer, non-profit organization tasked with locating and rescuing lost and missing people in Teller County and the surrounding areas. Experience is not required as we conduct all of our own trainings. Levels of participation range from general support (auxillary), mission support, SarTech I and SarTech II. Please contact Janet Bennett, membership chair, at 719-306-0826 for more info.

DIVIDE PLAYGROUP meets from 9-10: 30 a.m. Mondays and Wednesdays at Community Partnership in Divide. Ffdd program. Call 686-0705 more more info. Drop-ins welcome. TRE’S WOODLAND Park Playgroup meets from 9-10:30 a.m. Wednesdays and Thursdays at the The Resource Exchange - Early Intervention Colorado, 509 Scott Ave. Suite B in the Woodland Exchange building. 719-687-5047 or 719-233-5873. EARLY INTERVENTION Colorado - The Resource Exchange offers free playgroups call Nicol Houghland at 719-233-5873. Also provides developmental supports and services to children birth through 3 years of age, who have special developmental needs. For free developmental screening call 719-687-5047 or visit www.tre.org THE TELLER County Cancer Education and Support Group meets from 5:30-7:30 p.m. every third Tuesday of each month at 1644 Cedar Mountain Road. in Divide. A program or handson activities are provided. For more information call Shelley or Carol at 687-1180. Survivors of any type cancer and caregivers

Church in the Church in the Wildwood Wildwood United Church of Christ United Church of Christ

HABITAT FOR Humanity of Teller County, 700 Valley View, Woodland Park. Call 719-687-4447

WEIGHT WATCHERS meetings are every Tuesday in Woodland Park and Cripple Creek. Woodland Park meetings are 5:30 p.m., weigh-ins start at 5 p.m. at the Ute Pass Cultural Center, 210 E. Midland Ave. Cripple Creek group opens at 5:30 p.m. and meetings begin at 6 p.m. at the Aspen Mine Center, 166 E. Bennett Ave. Weight Watchers meetings last about 35 minutes, and it is recommended members attend one meeting each week to learn about healthy eating, gain motivation and get a confidential weigh-in to track progress. Public is welcome to visit and see what it’s about at a participating Weight Watchers meeting with no obligation to join. WINGS PROVIDES therapist facilitated support groups for women and men in which survivors are believed, accepted and no longer alone. There is a women’s group on Tuesday evening and one on Thursday evening. We are also starting a Loved Ones Group for family and friends of survivors. For more information contact the WINGS office at 800-373-8671. Visit www. wingsfound.org YOUNG PARENTS Empowerment Support Group designed for teen and young mothers and fathers to aid in the life changes of having a child. Free program includes childcare and lunch. Please call Community Partnership 686-0705 for meeting times and locations.

HELP THE Needy is growing in its capacity to help our friends and neighbors in Teller County. To join a fun group of volunteers, an open heart and a generous spirit are all that is required. Call Vince Scarlata at 719-687-7273. INTERNATIONAL CULTURE club, which meets quarterly, is accepting applications for families wanting the opportunity to host a foreign high school exchange student for academic year 2013-2014. Students arrive in August. Contact Gbrovetto@ gmail.com or 719-460-0355. THE LOCAL Emergency Planning Committee meets 8-9 a.m. on the first Thursday of each month in the Divide Volunteer Fire Department conference room, 103 Cedar Mountain Road, Divide. This committee was created to help prepare Teller County to deal with the variety of emergencies including the possibility of a pandemic influenza outbreak. The meeting is open to the public and visitors are welcome. Call 687-6416. ODYSSEY HOSPICE. You can make a difference. Odyssey Hospice seeks volunteers to provide companionship to terminally ill patients living in the Ute Pass/Woodland Park area. Call 719-573-4166. THE PIKES Peak Regional Medical Center Foundation is accepting volunteer applications for its hospital gift shop. Help us run a fun and friendly gift shop/art gallery specializing in local art that raises money for projects supporting the hospital and the medical center campus. Pleasant environment, wonderful customers, light work load, no heavy lifting. Two shifts daily: from 9 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. or from 12:30-4 p.m. Monday through Friday. Call Susan 719-331-9762 or stop by.

Highland Bible Church



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Meeting at Tamarac Center 331-4903 Sunday School – 8:50 am Worship – 10:00 am

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Rev. David Shaw, Pastor Rev. David Shaw, Pastor

Sunday 10:30 AM

TOPS, TAKE Off Pounds Sensibly, the original nonprofit weight-loss group is an educational support group providing weekly weigh-ins and programs to help members make positive changes in the role food plays in their lives. Local chapter meets every Thursday at 10 a.m. in Green Mountain Falls at the Church of the Wildwood. Call Evelyn at 748-8383 for more information.

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Saturday 5:30 PM (free meal)

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VOLUNTEER

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Worship:

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Highway 24, just east of Lake George

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Adult Sunday School Sunday Adult9:00 Sunday School AM School 9:009:30 AMAM (Both Adults & Children) Worship Worship 10:00 AM Worship 10:00 AM 10:30 AM Sunday Children’s Sunday School Children’s Sunday School 7:00pM Tuesday During Worship During Worship Children’s Nursery Care (During Sunday Nursery School Care Worship) Provided Provided Nursery Care provided HU

are welcome.

684-9427

684-9427 www.church-in-the-wildwood.org www.church-in-the-wildwood.org

10585 Ute Pass Ave. 10585 Ute Pass Ave. Green Mountain Falls Green Mountain Falls

Mountain View United Methodist Church 1101 Rampart Range Road Woodland Park (719) 687-3868

Sunday Worship 10:30 am www.mt-viewumc.org

Sunday WorShip 10:30am and 6pm WedneSday 7:00 PM 2001 CR 31 • Florissant, CO Next to the Grange Hall

719-748 3272

Living StreamS ChurCh

Saint David of the Hills Episcopal Church

Sunday Worship - 9:30 a.m 36 Edlowe Road • Woodland Park 719-687-9195

A place of worship and prayer where people can come to escape their daily routine and enter into the presence of God. Mon. - Thurs. 10 a.m. - 10 p.m. Fri. 10 a.m. 4 p.m. Free Wi-Fi 107 West Henrietta Ave. Woodland Park, CO 80863 (719) 687-7626 www.prayermountainco.com Experience His Presence Encounter His Power Expand His Kingdom

Woodland Park Church of Christ Worship Service

Morning { Sunday Bible Class 10 am { Service { Worship { 11am Wednesday Bible { Class 7pm { 816 Browning Ave. & Burdette Call: 687-2323 or 687-6311

Worship Services Wednesday 7:00 p.m. Sundays 8 a.m. & 10:30 a.m. Sunday School 9:15 a.m. Adult Bible Study 9:15 a.m.

SUNDAY WORSHIP SERVICES 9:30am OR 11am

27400 North Hwy 67 • Woodland Park (2.6 miles from Hwy 24 across from Shining Mountain Golf Course)

719.687.3755

www.impactchristian.net

Building Relationships One Heart at a Time. Christ Centered, Spirit Filled, Bible Based

10:30 Sunday Morning Service 1000 north highway 67, Woodland Park Seventh Day Adventist Church

719-323-0525 pastortrish@q.com

www.livingstreamschurch.net

To advertise your place of worship in this section, call 303-566-4091 or email kearhart@ourcoloradonews.com


ol

17

Pikes Peak Courier View 17

May 22, 2013 Instruction

Help Wanted

Refuse To Be A Victim!

RE-2 Improve your personal safety strategies with NRA's Refuse To NHS Be A Victim® Program. niors Please contact Jon Davidson, NRA

Certified Instructor For more info: www.safety-4-u.com apter or 719-689-3204 Seating is limited, preregistration is recommended.

Help Wanted Advertising Executive for Pikes Peak Courier View & Teller County Extra Established Sales Territory with Growth Potential Base plus Commission Send Resume to rcarrigan@ourcoloradonews.com

Advertising Executive

for TriLakes Tribune Established Sales Territory with Growth Potential Base plus Commission Send Resume to rcarrigan@ourcoloradonews.com

Apartment Manager/ Maintenance

needed for a 10 unit complex multi-family apartment complex in Cripple Creek. Must live on site. For more information call 970-901-5616

Cripple Creek-Victor School District is accepting applications

for a District Psychologist . Experience working with students in a school setting preferred. Must hold a Master’s and appropriate Colo license. Qualifications, job description and application are located at ccvschools.org. Please submit application/resume to Cripple Creek-Victor School District, P.O. Box 897, Cripple Creek, CO 80813; or e-mail to jolmsted@ccvschools.com. All applications are subject to acceptance or rejection at the sole discretion of the Board of Education. Applications will be accepted until position is filled.

Evening Cook

Part Time or Full Time

Office Help

Part Time or Full Time available May-November. Experience required. Call (719)748-3475 or email sam@thenatureplace.net Laundry Attendant wanted for Part Time Summer Help We are looking for a mature and friendly person to add to our team. Apply in person 109 West Midland Ave. Woodland Park.

LOOKING FOR A MECHANIC

WILL BE WORKING ON FLEET TRUCKS- GOOD PAY IMMEDIATE POSITION AVAILABLE WE DRUG TEST PLEASE COME BY OUR OFFICE FOR A APPLICATION 400 W MIDLAND AVE- STE 250

News Reporter

for the Monument and Teller County area For two weekly publications. Salary position. Send resume to rcarrigan@ourcolroadonews.com Part Time 18 hours a week. Must be able to lift 80 pounds consistently. Please apply in person - 63 Buffalo Court Divide (719)687-8708

Peak Internet,

Internet and phone service provider looking for an outside sales person with experience to work in Teller and Eastern El Paso county's . Must be driven, and self motivated. Send cover letter and resume to careers@corp.peakinter.net

Garage Sales

Household Goods

Office Rent/Lease

Estate - Moving Sale

Kenmore Washer/Dryer large capacity, energy efficient, like new $500 Patio wicker furniture steel construction 6 peice set $300 2 Antique brass twin beds $300 Electric Keyboard $100 Antique Rocking chair $100 (719)963-0116

200 sq ft office space for rent in Woodland Park (Midland and Boundary). $250 per month (with a one year lease). Please call 719964-2808.

540 Black Bear Trail Woodland Park Friday May 24th / Saturday May 25 7am-5pm Antique Dealer selling inventory Household Furniture and Misc. Cash please - no early birds!

Need FT & PT help

for new packing and shipping store 719-686-5577 Positions available for Cooks or Laundry at a Summer Camp in Florissant. End of May to End of August. 748-3341

Teller County seeks an Administrative Assistant II for the Department of Social Services. Starting Salary: $1,861 $2,067 per month plus a complete benefit package (DOQ). Applications available at the Teller County Human Resources Office, 112 North A Street, Cripple Creek, CO or at www.co.teller.co.us. Completed application plus resume due by 12:00 noon, Monday, June 3rd, 2013 at the above address. EOE

TEMPORARY SEASONAL WORK WITH CDOT Come work for The Colorado Department of Transportation! CDOT is looking to fill summer temporary positions, in Woodland Park. Must have Class B CDL and at least 6 months heavy equipment and physical labor experience. To obtain an application please call Nickki at 719-227-3246 or visit our office located at 1480 Quail Lake Lp Co Springs, CO 80906.

Tezak Heavy Equipment Co., Inc. is a well- established family

owned and operated construction company. If you are interested in a position as a Laborer, are selfmotivated and interested in being a team player, have a good work ethic and a hard worker, then please send us your application. Job will include labor and/or laying pipe for underground utilities, storm water and sewer, channel stabilization projects and highway projects. Current projects are in the Colo. Spgs/Woodland Park areas. Travel may be required for future projects. Experience preferred but will train the right applicant. 205 Tunnel Drive, Canon City, CO 81212, Fax 719-269-1148, jobs@tezakheavyequipment.com. We are an Equal Opportunity Employer.

WW Plant Intern -

Full-time Temporary-3 months-no benefits. $10.74 an hour. City of Cripple Creek Wastewater Department. Must be 16 years old; Junior or Senior in good standing. Closing date: Open until filled, Full job ad at www.cripplecreekgov.com applications will be reviewed starting May 28, 2013. EOE.

Farm Products & Produce GRAIN FED PORK

LOCALLY RAISED-CORN FED WE HAVE FAIR QUALITY FEEDERS AND FATS FOR SALE YOU WON'T FIND BETTER TASTING PORK. WE TAKE OUR HOGS TO SCANGA MEATS IN SALIDA FOR PROCESSING. GET YOUR ORDER IN NOW 719-684-6543 www.bakermountainswine.com.

Grain Finished Buffalo

quartered, halves and whole

719-775-8742

Work Wanted AngloGold Ashanti (Colorado) Corp. Surveyor AngloGold Ashanti (Colorado) Corp., manager for the Cripple Creek & Victor Gold Mining Company, has an immediate opening for a Surveyor at the mine site located two miles east of Cripple Creek, Colorado. RESPONSIBILITIES/JOB DUTIES: Responsible for all phases of mine surveying including the mine survey control network, layout work, ore control, elevation control, data entry and data reduction via microcomputer, and special projects as assigned. Is also responsible for care and maintenance of the survey vehicle and the survey equipment. Works as a member of the survey crew and assists in coordinating surveying activities with the mine operations group. Works directly with mine geology, engineering, mine operations and other mine surveyors. QUALIFICATIONS: Should have a working knowledge of computers. Must be a self-starter with good organizational skills, a willingness to perform work in adverse conditions, which includes weather conditions, and should be detail oriented. The successful applicant must have a willingness to work wherever needed to assure the success of AngloGold Ashanti (Colorado) Corporation. Successful applicant must be able to maintain safe and adequate work surroundings as well as ensuring environmental compliance. Note: This is a salaried non-exempt position. It is eligible for overtime. Salary dependent upon experience. AngloGold Ashanti (Colorado) Corp. provides an excellent benefit package and a salary commensurate with experience. Please submit applications in confidence to:

AngloGold Ashanti (Colorado) Corp. Human Resources Attn: Surveyor P. O. Box 191 Victor, CO 80860 FAX (719) 218-6122 e-mail: ccvemployment@anglogoldashantina.com You may complete an application on line at: Ccvgoldmining.com AngloGold Ashanti (Colorado) Corp. is an Equal Opportunity Employer.

Miscellaneous

MOVING SALE

Saturday May 25th 8am-4p & Sunday May 26th 9am-2pm 216 Pennsylvania Ave., Woodland Park 3 miles west of Woodland Park on Highway 24 Furniture, Shop Tools, Kitchen & Bath Items, Bar Stools, Patio Set and lots of misc.

WOODLAND PARK

Aluminum & Steel Welding Custom Fabrication and Repair Hitchin' Post Trailer Sales

(719)748-8333

Sporting goods

CITY-WIDE GARAGE SALE

1980's Golf Clubs and Orange Suede bag. Never used also portable cart $125 cash (719)687-8787

Alpine Auto 687-3900

Apartments

Saturday June 1st at Woodland Park High School 7am-2pm. Vendors SIGN UP NOW at

Cleaning

Mrs. Clean

Offering Residential and light commercial cleans. Move In, Move Out Construction Clean Licensed, Insured & Bonded. Call Linda @

719-439-7085

Concrete/Paving

Available June 1st. For office space or apartment for Single or couple $700 + electric (719)689-2495

Saturday & Sunday May 25th & 26th Indoors 10am-5pm. NO EARLY BIRDS! Moving into an RV. EVERYTHING MUST GO! 16 Druid Trail, Florissant 748-5506

Homes 3 BR, 3 Bath with office, 2 car

garage on 2.2 acres. Peak Views, $1500/month 719-687-6241

CONCRETE PREP - PLACE - FINISH Driveways, Patios, Walkways Also Demo and Removal

Call Paul 719-200-6754

Computers Excavating/Trenching

Toshiba Laptop plus mouse, plus nice case, plus HP Printer with paper, books included. $120 cash obo (719)687-8787

Firewood Dry Split Pine $125 a cord delivered Call Mike at 689-0869

FIREWOOD FOR SALE Spring Special $125 per cord, split and delivered 719-748-1128

Awesome family living in this 2000 sq ft home with fantastic Pikes Peak view! 3 br, 3 ba, bonus room that can serve as office, rec room, bedroom, etc. 2 car garage with ample space for workshop or storage. Gas fireplace, deck, huge yard. Very clean & well appointed. Water/sewer included. Available June 3. No smokers. Pets negotiable. 719-648-2217

Land Resource Associates

Ute Pass 2 bed 1 bath. 1 car for $850 We have tenants looking for rentals. If you are interested in renting your property, please call Donna Jones at Land Resource Associates

719-684-8414

Furniture Dresser & 2 nightstands w/marble top, claw feet and tongue and groove $800 (719)689-2855

Woodland Park

near hospital, efficiency $450+ deposit. All utilities paid 646-3096

Help Wanted AngloGold Ashanti (Colorado) Corp. Community Affairs Communication Specialist AngloGold Ashanti (Colorado) Corp., manager for the Cripple Creek & Victor Gold Mining Company, has an immediate opening for a Community Affairs Communication Specialist based in Victor, Colorado. Description This position will be responsible for scheduling guided tours and supervision of tour guides of the CC&V surface gold mining operation. The Communication Specialist may also be called upon to conduct tours of the operation. The candidate must possess a valid Colorado driver license, and be able to safely operate a 14-passenger van in a variety of driving conditions, as well as provide information on mine operations, history and geology of the area. In this capacity, the Communication Specialist will be responsible for the safety and environmental compliance of tour visitors while on the mine site. The position includes an external communications component. These duties would include, but not be limited to: collecting information as well as writing articles for the website and newsletter; updates to social media and website, press releases, developing and creating brochures; and public presentations regarding the mining operations to elected officials and community organizations. Additionally, the incumbent will be expected to identify and participate in local organizations who are involved in economic development and promotion of the community. RESPONSIBILITIES/JOB DUTIES: • Manage tour program, supervise tour guides. Establish training program for tour guides. Schedule tours. • Formalize school tour program to conform to Colorado State Education standards, including classroom presentations, hand out materials, and site tours. Schedule school tours. • Evaluate tour program content and update message points as necessary. • Manage Cripple Creek Visitor Center, supervise attendants. Manage daily schedule and special events. • Develop and manage informational signage, brochures, displays, interpretive information and other needed media for current and future plans of operations. • Collect information and write press release articles, website, and newsletter. • Manage website media content, updating information and photos as needed. Establish press room for photo and B roll access. • Develop and update brochures for operational areas, and provide public outreach as needed. • Develop and oversee informational signage for tourist venues throughout the region regarding CC&V operations. • Partner with and participate in local organizations involved in economic development and promotion of the community. QUALIFICATIONS: • Working knowledge of Communications. • Demonstrated ability in public speaking, presentation development, and publication writing. • Experience in supervision of employees. • Bachelors Degree or equivalent in management, communications, public relations, education or similar program desired. AngloGold Ashanti (Colorado), Corp. provides an excellent benefit package and a salary commensurate with experience. AngloGold Ashanti (Colorado) Corp. is an Equal Opportunity Employer. Please submit resumes in confidence to:

AngloGold Ashanti (Colorado) Corp. ccvemployment@anglogoldashantina.com Attn: Communication Specialist P. O. Box 191 Victor, CO 80860 FAX (719) 218-6122

Gary Miller Painting

• Interior • Exterior • Pressure Washing • • Staining • Decks • Siding • Drywall • 33 Years Exp. - Insured Low Price – Licensed

Free estimates 719-331-9055 or 719-687-8066 MOUNTAIN SHADOWS PAINTING Randy Lyman 687-6419

EXTERIOR OIL STAIN & PAINTING SPECIALIST Licensed & Insured / LowPrices 33 years of local references

Guffey. Sunny Ground-Level

Estate Sales

Painting

Skidloader With

Operator

• Driveways • Backfill • Grading • • Horse Pens Landscaping, Concrete •

$50/Hour Call Paul 719-200-6754

SKID MAN SKID WORK SERVICES

Driveways. Culverts. Grade Work. Backfill Lot Clearing. Plus Much More

Pet Care & Services Sit, Stay, Pet Sitting Call Beth 719-466-7478 Plumbing

C.W’s Plumbing Repair, Remodel Residential, Commercial

winterize • FrOzen PiPeS Licensed & Insured! Free estimates!

719-687-4122 Printing Paul's Painting

Interior/Exterior Painting - Deck & Fence Staining - One job at a time Local References, Free Estimates Insured, 33 yrs. Exp., Reasonable Serving Teller & Park County

(719)287-9824

Roofing/Gutters

Locally owned and operated in Teller County

Licensed and Insured All Work Guaranteed | Free Estimates

719-210-9235

SEAMLESS GUTTERS Licensed and Insured www.sheltersystemsllc.com Call 719-246-4544

CALL 748-3246 719-464-6666 General HIGH COUNTRY MAINTENANCE Yard Mainenance & Hauling Painting & Staining Power Washing Gutter & Window Cleaning

719-687-4088

G ING VIN RV SER SE R LER TE TELLLE COUNTY R OVER FO FOR S AR RS YEA 43 47 YE 44

687-9645

www.woodlandroofing.com

Call John today for a free estimate!

Sand & Gravel TIGER TIMBER AND GRAVEL

• Wood • Gas • Pellet • Wood/Coal Ph. (719) 748-3831

Handyman

HOME REPAIR

Small repairs to complete remodeling. Tim Thomas, Woodland Park

687-6941

As Always Free Estimates References

Hauling Service

WE HAUL

Need A Dumpste? Free Labor Slash Removal Fire Mitigation Demolition

Home Property & Business Clean UP Save money on roof tearoffs. We recycle shingles.

Call Bob 719-748-8381

WE OFFER – ROAD BASE &FILL DIRT DELIVERY IS AVAILABLE OR PICK UP AT THE YARD.

719-748-3621 Storage

WOODLAND PARK U-STORE-IT 5 locations within city limits Huge Move-in Special & Free Circular Lock Carter Realty Property Mgmt. 719-687-9274 • 303 E. Hwy. 24

Did you know... Colorado Community Media was created to connect you to 23 community papers with boundless opportunity and rewards.


18 Pikes Peak Courier View

The current holder of the Evidence of Debt secured by the Deed of Trust described herein, has filed Notice of Election and Demand for sale as provided by law and in said Deed of Trust. THEREFORE, Notice Is Hereby Given that I will, at 10:00 a.m. in the forenoon of July 17, 2013, (After Qualified Owner Deferment) at the Teller County Public Trustee’s Office, 101 W. Bennett Ave., Cripple Creek, Colorado, sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder for cash, the said real property and all interest of said Grantor(s), Grantor(s)’ heirs and assigns therein, for the purpose of paying the indebtedness provided in said Evidence of Debt secured by the Deed of Trust, plus attorneys’ fees, the expenses of sale and other items allowed by law, and will issue to the purchaser a Certificate of Purchase, all as provided by law.

Public Trustees Public Notice NOTICE OF DEFERRED SALE (CRS §38-38-103) Foreclosure Sale No. 2012-0213 To Whom It May Concern: This Notice is given with regard to the following described Deed of Trust: On December 14, 2012, the undersigned Public Trustee caused the Notice of Election and Demand relating to the Deed of Trust described below to be recorded in the County of Teller records. Original Grantor: RAMONA KIMLER Original Beneficiary: WELLS FARGO BANK, N.A. Current Holder of Evidence of Debt: WELLS FARGO BANK, N.A. Date of Deed of Trust: 9/30/2010 Recording Date of Deed of Trust: 10/6/2010 Recorded in Teller County: Reception No. 638920 Original Principal Amount: $193,443.00 Outstanding Principal Balance: $188,124.59 Pursuant to C.R.S. §38-38-101 (4) (i), you are hereby notified that the covenants of the deed of trust have been violated as follows: Failure to pay principal and interest when due together will all other payments provided for in the Evidence of Debt secured by the Deed of Trust and other violations thereof. THE LIEN FORECLOSED MAY NOT BE A FIRST LIEN. THE PROPERTY DESCRIBED HEREIN IS ALL OF THE PROPERTY ENCUMBERED BY THE LIEN OF THE DEED OF TRUST. LOT 5, DIVIDE RANCHES FILING NO. 1, TELLER COUNTY, COLORADO which has the address of: 183 Joshua Road Divide, CO 80814 NOTICE OF SALE The current holder of the Evidence of Debt secured by the Deed of Trust described herein, has filed Notice of Election and Demand for sale as provided by law and in said Deed of Trust. THEREFORE, Notice Is Hereby Given that I will, at 10:00 a.m. in the forenoon of July 17, 2013, (After Qualified Owner Deferment) at the Teller County Public Trustee’s Office, 101 W. Bennett Ave., Cripple Creek, Colorado, sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder for cash, the said real property and all interest of said Grantor(s), Grantor(s)’ heirs and assigns therein, for the purpose of paying the indebtedness provided in said Evidence of Debt secured by the Deed of Trust, plus attorneys’ fees, the expenses of sale and other items allowed by law, and will issue to the purchaser a Certificate of Purchase, all as provided by law. First Publication: 5/22/2013 Last Publication: 6/19/2013 Published in: Pikes Peak Courier View Dated: 4/25/2013 ROBERT W. CAMPBELL Teller COUNTY PUBLIC TRUSTEE By: Pamela A. Cronce Deputy Public Trustee

First Publication: 5/22/2013 Last Publication: 6/19/2013 Published in: Pikes Peak Courier View

Public Trustees

Dated: 4/25/2013 ROBERT W. CAMPBELL Teller COUNTY PUBLIC TRUSTEE By: Pamela A. Cronce Deputy Public Trustee Attorney: KIMBERLY L MARTINEZ Attorney Registration #40351 THE CASTLE LAW GROUP, LLC 999 18TH STREET, SUITE 2201, DENVER, COLORADO 80202 Phone: 1 (303) 865-1400 Fax: 1 (303) 865-1410 Attorney file #: 12-13471 The Attorney above is acting as a debt collector and is attempting to collect a debt. Any information provided may be used for that purpose. Legal Notice No.: 2012-0213 First Publication: 5/22/2013 Last Publication: 6/19/2013 Published in: Pikes Peak Courier View Public Notice NOTICE OF SALE (CRS §38-38-103) Foreclosure Sale No. 2013-0016 To Whom It May Concern: This Notice is given with regard to the following described Deed of Trust: On March 1, 2013, the undersigned Public Trustee caused the Notice of Election and Demand relating to the Deed of Trust described below to be recorded in the County of Teller records. Original Grantor: SUSAN A PATTERSON AND MICHAEL PATTERSON Original Beneficiary: MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS , INC., AS NOMINEE FOR USAA FEDERAL SAVINGS BANK Current Holder of Evidence of Debt: PHH MORTGAGE CORPORATION Date of Deed of Trust: 11/14/2005 Recording Date of Deed of Trust : 11/17/2005 Recorded in Teller County: Reception No. 587634 Original Principal Amount: $138,450.00 Outstanding Principal Balance: $156,975.72 Pursuant to C.R.S. §38-38-101 (4) (i), you are hereby notified that the covenants of the deed of trust have been violated as follows: Failure to pay principal and interest when due together will all other payments provided for in the Evidence of Debt secured by the Deed of Trust and other violations thereof. THE LIEN FORECLOSED MAY NOT BE A FIRST LIEN. THE PROPERTY DESCRIBED HEREIN IS ALL OF THE PROPERTY ENCUMBERED BY THE LIEN OF THE DEED OF TRUST. L O T 3 7 , A R R O W H E A D E S T A T E S, COUNTY OF TELLER, STATE OF COLORADO which has the address of: 540 Red Feather Lane Woodland Park, CO 80863 NOTICE OF SALE The current holder of the Evidence of Debt secured by the Deed of Trust described herein, has filed Notice of Election and Demand for sale as provided by law and in said Deed of Trust.

are hereby notified that the covenants of scribed Deed of Trust: the deed of trust have been violated as 18-Color follows: On March 12, 2013, the undersigned Public Trustee caused the Notice of Election and Demand relating to the Deed of Trust Failure to pay principal and interest when described below to be recorded in the due together will all other payments County of Teller records. provided for in the Evidence of Debt secured by the Deed of Trust and other violOriginal Grantor: ANDREW B GOMLEY ations thereof. AND JANICE L BLAND THE LIEN FORECLOSED MAY NOT BE Original Beneficiary: CHASE MANHATA FIRST LIEN. TAN MORTGAGE CORPORATION THE PROPERTY DESCRIBED HEREIN Current Holder of Evidence of Debt: JPIS ALL OF THE PROPERTY ENMORGAN CHASE BANK, NATIONAL ASCUMBERED BY THE LIEN OF THE SOCIATION DEED OF TRUST. Date of Deed of Trust: 12/29/2000 Recording Date of Deed of Trust: 1/4/2001 LOT 37, ARROWHEAD ESTATES, Recorded in Teller County: Reception No. COUNTY OF TELLER, STATE OF COL513417 ORADO Original Principal Amount: $114,500.00 Outstanding Principal Balance: which has the address of: $73,334.64 540 Red Feather Lane Woodland Park, CO 80863 Pursuant to C.R.S. §38-38-101 (4) (i), you are hereby notified that the covenants of NOTICE OF SALE the deed of trust have been violated as follows: The current holder of the Evidence of Debt secured by the Deed of Trust described Failure to pay principal and interest when herein, has filed Notice of Election and due together will all other payments Demand for sale as provided by law and provided for in the Evidence of Debt sein said Deed of Trust. cured by the Deed of Trust and other violations thereof. THEREFORE, Notice Is Hereby Given that I will, at 10:00 a.m. in the forenoon of THE LIEN FORECLOSED MAY NOT BE July 3, 2013, at the Teller County Public A FIRST LIEN. Trustee’s Office, 101 W. Bennett Ave., THE PROPERTY DESCRIBED HEREIN Cripple Creek, Colorado, sell at public IS ALL OF THE PROPERTY ENauction to the highest and best bidder for CUMBERED BY THE LIEN OF THE cash, the said real property and all inDEED OF TRUST. terest of said Grantor(s), Grantor(s)’ heirs and assigns therein, for the purpose of paying the indebtedness provided in said LOT 3B, BLOCK 4, SUBDIVISION EXEvidence of Debt secured by the Deed of EMPTION PLAT OF LOTS 3A AND 10, Trust, plus attorneys’ fees, the expenses BLOCK 4, RAINBOW VALLEY UNIT 1, of sale and other items allowed by law, COUNTY OF TELLER, STATE OF COLand will issue to the purchaser a CertificORADO ate of Purchase, all as provided by law. which has the address of: First Publication: 5/8/2013 165 Timber Ridge Road Last Publication: 6/5/2013 Divide, CO 80814 Published in: Pikes Peak Courier View NOTICE OF SALE Dated: 3/5/2013 ROBERT W. CAMPBELL The current holder of the Evidence of Debt Teller COUNTY PUBLIC TRUSTEE secured by the Deed of Trust described herein, has filed Notice of Election and By: Pamela A. Cronce Demand for sale as provided by law and Deputy Public Trustee in said Deed of Trust.

Public Trustees

Attorney: KIMBERLY L MARTINEZ Attorney Registration #40351 THE CASTLE LAW GROUP, LLC 999 18TH STREET, SUITE 2201, DENVER, COLORADO 80202 Phone: 1 (303) 865-1400 Fax: 1 (303) 865-1410 Attorney file #: 13-01019 The Attorney above is acting as a debt collector and is attempting to collect a debt. Any information provided may be used for that purpose. Legal Notice No.: 2013-0016 First Publication: 5/8/2013 Last Publication: 6/5/2013 Published in: Pikes Peak Courier View Public Notice NOTICE OF SALE (CRS §38-38-103) Foreclosure Sale No. 2013-0019 To Whom It May Concern: This Notice is given with regard to the following described Deed of Trust: On March 12, 2013, the undersigned Public Trustee caused the Notice of Election and Demand relating to the Deed of Trust described below to be recorded in the County of Teller records. Original Grantor: ANDREW B GOMLEY AND JANICE L BLAND Original Beneficiary: CHASE MANHATTAN MORTGAGE CORPORATION Current Holder of Evidence of Debt: JPMORGAN CHASE BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION Date of Deed of Trust: 12/29/2000 Recording Date of Deed of Trust: 1/4/2001 Recorded in Teller County: Reception No. 513417 Original Principal Amount: $114,500.00 Outstanding Principal Balance: $73,334.64 Pursuant to C.R.S. §38-38-101 (4) (i), you are hereby notified that the covenants of the deed of trust have been violated as follows: Failure to pay principal and interest when due together will all other payments provided for in the Evidence of Debt secured by the Deed of Trust and other violations thereof.

THEREFORE, Notice Is Hereby Given Public Notice Attorney: KIMBERLY L MARTINEZ Attorthat I will, at 10:00 a.m. in the forenoon LIEN of FORECLOSED MAY NOTICE OF SALE The current holderofof theTHE Evidence Debt secured by the NOT DeedBE ney Registration #40351 July 3, 2013, at the Teller County Public A has FIRST (CRS §38-38-103) Foreclosure of Trust described herein, filedLIEN. Notice of Election and DeTHE CASTLE LAW GROUP, LLC Sale No. 2013-0015 Trustee’s Office, 101 W. Bennett Ave., mand for sale as provided by law and in said Deed of Trust. 999 18TH STREET, SUITE 2201, DENTHE PROPERTY DESCRIBED HEREIN Cripple Creek, Colorado, sell at public VER, COLORADO 80202 This Notice is given To Whom It May Concern: with regard to the S A L LGiven O F that THE P RatO10:00 P E R Ta.m. Y ENauction to the highest THEREFORE, and best bidder for Is IHereby Phone: 1 (303) 865-1400 following described Deed of Trust: Notice I will, BY THE LIEN OF THE cash, the said real property and allofin-July 3,CUMBERED Fax: 1 (303) 865-1410 in the forenoon 2013, at the Teller County Public DEED OF TRUST. terest of said Grantor(s), Grantor(s)’ heirs Attorney file 1, #: 2013, 12-13471 On March the undersigned Public Trustee caused the Trustee’s Office, 101 W. Bennett Ave., Cripple Creek, Colorado, assigns for at thepublic purpose of to the highest and best bidder for cash, the Notice of Election and Demand relating to theand Deed of Trusttherein, sell auction the indebtedness in said 3B,ofBLOCK 4, SUBDIVISION The Attorney above is recorded acting asinathe debt described below to be Countypaying of Teller records. saidprovided real property and allLOT interest said Grantor(s), Grantor(s)’EXEvidence of Debt secured by the Deed EMPTION PLAT of OF LOTS AND 10, collector and is attempting to collect a heirs and assigns of therein, for the purpose paying the3A indebtedTrust, plus attorneys’ fees, the expenses BLOCK 4, RAINBOW VALLEY UNIT 1, debt. AnyGrantor information provided may beJOSEPH G SCHMITZ Original LORY A SCHMITZ AND ness provided in said Evidence of Debt secured by the Deed of of sale and other items allowed by law, COUNTY OF TELLER, STATE OF COLused for that purpose. Original Beneficiary JPMORGAN CHASE BANK, N.A. Trust, plus attorneys’ fees, the expenses of sale and other items and will issue to the purchaser a CertificORADO Current Holder of Evidence of DebtJPMORGAN CHASE BANK,all asallowed by by law,law. and will issue to the purchaser a Certificate of ate of Purchase, provided Legal Notice No.: 2012-0213 NATIONAL ASSOCIATION Purchase, all as providedwhich by law. has the address of: First Publication: Date of Deed of5/22/2013 Trust: 7/24/2012 First Publication: 5/8/2013 165 Timber Ridge Road Last Publication: Recording Date6/19/2013 of Deed of Trust: 8/8/2012 Last Publication: 6/5/2013 First Publication: 5/8/2013 Divide, CO 80814 Published in: Pikes Peak Courier View Recorded in Teller County: Reception No. 655346 Last Publication: Published in: Pikes Peak Courier View 6/5/2013 Original Principal Amount: $201,900.00 Published in: Pikes Peak CourierOF View NOTICE SALE Outstanding Principal Balance: $201,640.11 Dated: 3/5/2013 Dated: 3/5/2013 ROBERT W. CAMPBELL The current holder of the Evidence of Debt Pursuant to C.R.S. §38-38-101 (4) (i), you areTeller hereby notified PUBLIC ROBERT W. CAMPBELLsecured by the Deed of Trust described COUNTY TRUSTEE that the covenants of the deed of trust have been violated as Teller COUNTY PUBLICherein, TRUSTEE has filed Notice of Election and follows: By: Pamela A. Cronce Demand for sale as provided by law and Deputy Public Trustee By: Pamela A. Cronce in said Deed of Trust. Failure to pay principal and interest when due together will all Deputy Public Trustee other payments provided for in the Evidence of Debt secured by L MARTINEZ Attorney: KIMBERLY THEREFORE, Notice Is Hereby Given the Deed of Trust and other violations of the terms thereof. Attorney: EMILY JENSIKthat Attorney Registration Attorney Registration #40351 I will, at 10:00 a.m.#31294 in the forenoon of ARONOWITZ & MECKLENBURG, LLP at the Teller County Public THE CASTLE LAW GROUP, LLC July 10, 2013, THE LIEN FORECLOSED MAY NOT BE A FIRST LIEN. STREET, SUITE 1199 BANNOCK STREET, DENVER, COLORADO 999 18TH 2201, DENTrustee’s Office, 101 W. 80204 Bennett Ave., Phone: (303) 813-1177 Cripple Fax: VER, COLORADO 80202 Creek, Colorado, sell at public THE PROPERTY DESCRIBED HEREIN IS ALL OF THE PROPAttorney file #: 1068.05853 Phone: 1 (303) 865-1400 auction to the highest and best bidder for ERTY ENCUMBERED BY THE LIEN OF THEFax: DEED OF TRUST. 1 (303) 865-1410 cash, the said real property and all inThe Attorney above is acting debtGrantor(s), collector and is attemptAttorney file #: 13-01019 terestasofasaid Grantor(s)’ heirs ATTACHED HERETO AS EXHIBIT ‘A’ AND INCORPORATED ing to collect a debt. Anyand information be used for of assigns provided therein, may for the purpose HEREIN AS THOUGH FULLY SET FORTH. The Attorney above is that purpose. paying the indebtedness provided in said acting as a debt Evidence of Debt secured by the Deed of collector and is attempting to collect a Trust, plus attorneys’ fees, the expenses provided which has the address of: 431 Twin Lakes Drdebt. Any informationLegal Noticemay No.:be 2013-0015 of sale and other items allowed by law, used for that purpose.First Publication: 5/8/2013 Divide, CO 80814 and will issue to the purchaser a CertificLast Publication: 6/5/2013 Legal Notice No.: 2013-0016 ate of Purchase, NOTICE OF SALE Published in: Pikes Peak Courier View all as provided by law. First Publication: 5/8/2013 Last Publication: 6/5/2013 First Publication: 5/15/2013 Published in: Pikes Peak Courier View Last Publication: 6/12/2013 Published in: Pikes Peak Courier View Dated: 3/21/2013 ROBERT W. CAMPBELL Teller COUNTY PUBLIC TRUSTEE By: Pamela A. Cronce Deputy Public Trustee Attorney: KIMBERLY L MARTINEZ Attorney Registration #40351 THE CASTLE LAW GROUP, LLC 999 18TH STREET, SUITE 2201, DENVER, COLORADO 80202 Phone: 1 (303) 865-1400 Fax: 1 (303) 865-1410 Attorney file #: 13-01472 The Attorney above is acting as a debt collector and is attempting to collect a debt. Any information provided may be used for that purpose. Legal Notice No.: 2013-0019 First Publication: 5/15/2013 Last Publication: 6/12/2013 Published in: Pikes Peak Courier View

Public Trustees

THEREFORE, Notice Is Hereby Given that I will, at 10:00 a.m. in the forenoon of July 10, 2013, at the Teller County Public Trustee’s Office, 101 W. Bennett Ave., Cripple Creek, Colorado, sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder for cash, the said real property and all interest of said Grantor(s), Grantor(s)’ heirs and assigns therein, for the purpose of paying the indebtedness provided in said Evidence of Debt secured by the Deed of Trust, plus attorneys’ fees, the expenses of sale and other items allowed by law, and will issue to the purchaser a Certificate of Purchase, all as provided by law. First Publication: 5/15/2013 Last Publication: 6/12/2013 Published in: Pikes Peak Courier View Dated: 3/21/2013 ROBERT W. CAMPBELL Teller COUNTY PUBLIC TRUSTEE By: Pamela A. Cronce Deputy Public Trustee Attorney: KIMBERLY L MARTINEZ Attorney Registration #40351 THE CASTLE LAW GROUP, LLC 999 18TH STREET, SUITE 2201, DENVER, COLORADO 80202 Phone: 1 (303) 865-1400 Fax: 1 (303) 865-1410 Attorney file #: 13-01472 The Attorney above is acting as a debt collector and is attempting to collect a debt. Any information provided may be used for that purpose. Legal Notice No.: 2013-0019 First Publication: 5/15/2013 Last Publication: 6/12/2013 Published in: Pikes Peak Courier View Public Notice NOTICE OF SALE (CRS §38-38-103) Foreclosure Sale No. 2013-0018 To Whom It May Concern: This Notice is given with regard to the following described Deed of Trust: On March 12, 2013, the undersigned Public Trustee caused the Notice of Election and Demand relating to the Deed of Trust described below to be recorded in the County of Teller records.

May 22, 2013

Public Notice NOTICE OF SALE (CRS §38-38-103) Foreclosure Sale No. 2013-0018 To Whom It May Concern: This Notice is given with regard to the following described Deed of Trust: On March 12, 2013, the undersigned Public Trustee caused the Notice of Election and Demand relating to the Deed of Trust described below to be recorded in the County of Teller records. Original Grantor: PATRICK B. CARVELL AND LESBIA P. CARVELL Original Beneficiary: MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., ACTING SOLELY AS NOMINEE FOR LENDER THE LENDING CONNECTION, INC. Current Holder of Evidence of Debt: BANK OF AMERICA, N.A. Date of Deed of Trust: 5/25/2006 Recording Date of Deed of Trust: 6/12/2006 Recorded in Teller County: Reception No. 594758 Original Principal Amount: $143,250.00 Outstanding Principal Balance: $134,637.47

Public Trustees

Pursuant to C.R.S. §38-38-101 (4) (i), you are hereby notified that the covenants of the deed of trust have been violated as follows: Failure to pay monthly installments due Note Holder. THE LIEN FORECLOSED MAY NOT BE A FIRST LIEN. THE PROPERTY DESCRIBED HEREIN IS ALL OF THE PROPERTY ENCUMBERED BY THE LIEN OF THE DEED OF TRUST. LOT 15, BLOCK 2, FOREST EDGE PARK -FIRST FILING, COUNTY OF TELLER, STATE OF COLORADO. which has the address of: 1130 Parkview Place Woodland Park, CO 80863 NOTICE OF SALE The current holder of the Evidence of Debt secured by the Deed of Trust described herein, has filed Notice of Election and Demand for sale as provided by law and in said Deed of Trust. THEREFORE, Notice Is Hereby Given that I will, at 10:00 a.m. in the forenoon of July 10, 2013, at the Teller County Public Trustee’s Office, 101 W. Bennett Ave., Cripple Creek, Colorado, sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder for cash, the said real property and all interest of said Grantor(s), Grantor(s)’ heirs and assigns therein, for the purpose of paying the indebtedness provided in said Evidence of Debt secured by the Deed of Trust, plus attorneys’ fees, the expenses of sale and other items allowed by law, and will issue to the purchaser a Certificate of Purchase, all as provided by law. First Publication: 5/15/2013 Last Publication: 6/12/2013 Published in: Pikes Peak Courier View Dated: 3/21/2013 ROBERT W. CAMPBELL Teller COUNTY PUBLIC TRUSTEE By: Pamela A. Cronce Deputy Public Trustee Attorney: HOLLY L DECKER Attorney Registration #32647 MEDVED DALE DECKER & DEERE, LLC 355 UNION BLVD., SUITE 250, LAKEWOOD, COLORADO 80228 Phone: (303) 274-0155 Fax: 1 (303) 274-0159 Attorney file #: 13-910-23992 The Attorney above is acting as a debt collector and is attempting to collect a debt. Any information provided may be used for that purpose. Legal Notice No. 2013-0018 First Publication: 5/15/2013 Last Publication: 6/12/2013 Published in: Pikes Peak Courier View

Notice To Creditors

PUBLIC NOTICE NOTICE TO CREDITORS Estate of Jo Annette Payne, Deceased Case Number: 2013PR8

Notice To Creditors

All persons having claims against the above-named estate are required to present them to the Personal Representative or to the District Court of Teller County, Colorado on or before September 22, 2013 or the claims may be forever barred. Laura Payne Personal Representative Address: 3536 Glencoe Street, Denver, CO 80207 Legal Notice No: 933613 First Publication: May 22, 2013 Last Publication: June 5, 2013 Publisher: Pikes Peak Courier View PUBLIC NOTICE NOTICE TO CREDITORS In the Matter of the Estate of Sheila Diane Ponders, Deceased Case Number: 2012 PR 1234 All persons having claims against the above-named estate are required to present them to the Personal Representative or to the District Court of Teller County, Colorado on or before October 1, 2013 or the claims may be forever barred. /s/ Tony C. Rossi Tony C. Rossi, Esq. Attorney for Estate 18401 E. Hwy 24, No. 122 Woodland Park, Colorado 80863 Legal Notice No: 933630 First Publication: May 22, 2013 Last Publication: June 5, 2013 Publisher: Pikes Peak Courier View

Misc. Private Legals PUBLIC NOTICE Pursuant to C.R.S. 38-21.5-103 sent via certified mail to Kimberly A. Shive, last known address, May 1, 2013 all contents in the below listed storage unit, located at Tregos Storage, 42 Buffalo Ct., Divide, CO 80814 will be sold or otherwise disposed of by removal to the Divide Colorado Dump Transfer Station on May 29, 2013 at 10:00 A.M. at the Tregos Venture Storage Facility Unit # M 33 located at 42 Buffalo Ct., Divide, CO 80814. The sale will be by Auction at the Site Unit # M 33 and will be sold in one lot. Sealed bids will be accepted and opened first. Any proceeds will be applied to unpaid rents. Tenant: Kimberly A. Shive Storage Unit #: M 33 Last Known Address Of: 940 Elfin Glen Dr. Divide, CO 80814 Contents consisting of, but not limited to: Boxes and bags of clothes, broken vacuum, small water heater, video recorder, 2 microwaves, 2 speakers, and a small green travel case. Legal Notice No.: 933595 First Publication: May 15, 2013 Last Publication: May 22, 2013 Publisher: Pikes Peak Courier View Public Notice DISTRICT COURT, TELLER COUNTY, COLORADO PO Box 997 Cripple Creek, Colorado 80813 Phone: 719-689-2574

Original Grantor: PATRICK B. CARVELL Plaintiff: DIOCESE OF COLORADO AND LESBIA P. CARVELL PUBLIC NOTICE SPRINGS, a Colorado corporation sole Original Beneficiary: MORTGAGE ELECv. TRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, NOTICE TO CREDITORS Defendants: ESTATE OF BERT BERGSTROM; CLARA MARIE INC., ACTING SOLELY AS NOMINEE Estate of Jo Annette Payne, Deceased BERGSTROM, an individual, THE FOR LENDER THE LENDING CONNECCase Number: 2013PR8 HEIRS AND DEVISEES OF CLARA TION, INC. MARIE BERGSTROM, JAMES R. HUNT, Current Holder of Evidence of Debt: BANK All persons having claims against the an individual, THE HEIRS AND DEOF AMERICA, N.A. above-named estate are required to VISEES OF JAMES R. HUNT, CLANON Date of Deed of Trust: 5/25/2006 present them to the Personal RepresentHUNT, an individual, THE HEIRS AND Recording Date of Deed of Trust: ative or to the District Court of Teller DEVISEES OF CLANON HUNT, an indi6/12/2006 County, Colorado on or before SeptemNotice vidual, PAGE PROPERTIES CORPORARecorded in Teller County: Reception No. ber 22, 2013 Public or the claims may be forever barred. TION, a Colorado corporation, and all 594758 NOTICE OF DEFERRED SALE persons who claim any inOriginal Principal Amount: $143,250.00 (CRS §38-38-103) Foreclosure Sale No. 2012-0195 The current holder of theunknown Evidence of Debt secured by the Deed Laura Payne terest in the subject matterand of Dethis acOutstanding Principal Balance: of Trust described herein, has filed Notice of Election Personal Representative tion. $ 1To3 4 , 6 3 7 It. 4May 7 Concern: This Notice is given Whom with regard to the mand for sale as provided by law and in said Deed of Trust. Address: 3536 Glencoe Street, following described Deed of Trust: Denver, CO 80207 for Plaintiff Pursuant to C.R.S. §38-38-101 (4) (i), you THEREFORE, Notice Is Attorneys Hereby Given that I will, at 10:00 a.m. in Michael Francisco, #39111 are hereby notified that the covenants of On December 4, 2012, the undersigned Public Trustee caused the forenoon of July 3, 2013, (After Qualified Owner Deferment) Notice No: 933613 Rothgerber & Lyons LLP Ave., the of of trust haveand been violated as toLegal thedeed Notice Election Demand relating the Deed of Trust at the Teller County Public Trustee’s Johnson Office, 101 W. Bennett First Publication: May 22, 2013 90 S. Cascade, Suite follows: described below to be recorded in the County of Teller records. Cripple Creek, Colorado, sell at public auction 1100 to the highest and Last Publication: June best 5, 2013 Colorado Springs, Colorado 80903 bidder for cash, the said real property and all interest of said Publisher: Pikes Peak Courier View Phone: Failure to Grantor: pay monthly installments due Original DAREN LEE STOECKEL Grantor(s), Grantor(s)’ heirs and719.386.3000 assigns therein, for the purpose E-mail: mfrancisco@rothgerber.com Note Holder. Original Beneficiary: MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRAof paying the indebtedness provided in said Evidence of Debt TION SYSTEMS, INC., ACTING SOLELY AS NOMINEE FOR secured by the Deed of Trust, plus attorneys’ fees, the expenses Case No.: 2013CV64 THE LIEN FORECLOSED NOT BE WACHOVIA MORTGAGE MAY CORPORATION of sale and other items allowed by law, and will issue to the SUMMONS BY PUBLICATION A FIRST LIEN. Current Holder of Evidence of Debt: JPMORGAN CHASE BANK, purchaser a Certificate of Purchase, all as provided by law. NATIONAL ASSOCIATION THE PROPERTY DESCRIBED HEREIN THE PEOPLE OF THE STATE First Publication: 5/8/2013 I SDate A L of L Deed O F TofHTrust: E P R6/25/2007 OPERTY ENOF COLORADO TO THE Recording Date Deed LIEN of Trust: Last Publication: 6/5/2013 CUMBERED BYofTHE OF7/16/2007 THE ABOVE-NAMED DEFENDANTS: Recorded Teller County: Reception No. 608662 Published in: Pikes Peak Courier View DEED OF in TRUST. Original Principal Amount: $213,150.00 You are hereby summoned and required Outstanding Principal Balance : $220,027.99 Dated: 4/19/2013 LOT 15, BLOCK 2, FOREST EDGE PARK to appear and defend the claims of the ROBERT W. CAMPBELLComplaint filed with the court in this ac-FIRST FILING, COUNTY OF TELLER, Pursuant to C.R.S. §38-38-101 (4) (i), you are hereby notified tion, by filing with the Clerk of this Court STATE OF COLORADO. that the covenants of the deed of trust have been violated as Teller COUNTY PUBLIC an TRUSTEE answer or other response. You are refollows: By: Pamela A. Cronce quired to file your answer or other rewhich has the address of: Deputy Public Trustee sponse within 21 days after the service of 1130 Parkview Place Failure toPark, pay principal and interest when due together will all this Summons upon you. Service of this Woodland CO 80863 other payments provided for in the Evidence of Debt secured by Attorney: EMILY JENSIKSummons Attorney Registration #31294 shall be complete on the day of the Deed of Trust and other violations of the terms thereof. ARONOWITZ & MECKLENBURG, LLP the last publication. A copy of the ComNOTICE OF SALE plaint may be obtained from the clerk of THE LIEN holder FORECLOSED MAY NOT BE A FIRST LIEN. 1199 BANNOCK STREET, COLORADO 80204 theDENVER, court. The current of the Evidence of Debt Phone: (303) 813-1177 Fax: secured by the Deed of Trust described THE PROPERTY DESCRIBED HEREIN Attorney file #: 1068.05716 If you fail to file your answer or other reherein, has filed Notice of Election and IS ALL OF THE PROPERTY ENCUMBERED BY THE OF THE DEED OF TRUST. sponse to the Complaint in writing within Demand for sale as provided by LIEN law and The Attorney above is acting as a debt collector and isjudgment attempt- by the applicable time period, in said Deed of Trust. ATTACHED HERETO AS EXHIBIT ‘A’ AND INCORPORATED ing to collect a debt. Anydefault information provided be used may be enteredmay against you for by the HEREIN AS THOUGH FULLY SETGiven FORTH. that purpose. court for the relief demanded in the ComTHEREFORE, Notice Is Hereby plaint, without any further notice. that I will, at 10:00 a.m. in the forenoon of which theat address of: County 909 Browning Legal Notice No.: 2012-0195 July 10, has 2013, the Teller Public Avenue WoodlandOffice, Park, CO First Publication: 5/8/2013 This is an action to quiet the title of the Trustee’s 10180863 W. Bennett Ave., Plaintiff in and to the real property situate Cripple Creek, Colorado, sell at public Last Publication: 6/5/2013 Teller County, auction to the NOTICE OF highest SALE and best bidder for Published in: Pikes PeakinCourier View State of Colorado. cash, the said real property and all inDATED: May 10, 2013. terest of said Grantor(s), Grantor(s)’ heirs ROTHGERBER JOHNSON & LYONS and assigns therein, for the purpose of LLP paying the indebtedness provided in said Evidence of Debt secured by the Deed of Trust, plus attorneys’ fees, the expenses s/ Michael Francisco of sale and other items allowed by law, Michael Francisco, #39111 and will issue to the purchaser a CertificAttorneys for Diocese of Colorado ate of Purchase, all as provided by law. Springs, a Corporation sole First Publication: 5/15/2013 Last Publication: 6/12/2013 THIS SUMMONS IS ISSUED PURSUANT TO RULE 4(g), C.R.C.P., AS Published in: Pikes Peak Courier View AMENDED Dated: 3/21/2013 Legal Notice No.: 933625 ROBERT W. CAMPBELL First Publication: May 22, 2013 Teller COUNTY PUBLIC TRUSTEE Last Publication: June 19, 2013 By: Pamela A. Cronce Publisher: Pikes Peak Courier View Deputy Public Trustee Attorney: HOLLY L DECKER Attorney Registration #32647 MEDVED DALE DECKER & DEERE, LLC 355 UNION BLVD., SUITE 250,


sales, marijuana product manufacturing

Plaintiff: DIOCESE OF COLORADO SPRINGS, a Colorado corporation sole v. Defendants: ESTATE OF BERT BERGSTROM; CLARA MARIE BERGSTROM, an individual, THE HEIRS AND DEVISEES OF CLARA MARIE BERGSTROM, JAMES R. HUNT, an individual, THE HEIRS AND DEVISEES OF JAMES R. HUNT, CLANON HUNT, an individual, THE HEIRS AND DEVISEES OF CLANON HUNT, an individual, PAGE PROPERTIES CORPORATION, a Colorado corporation, and all unknown persons who claim any interest in the subject matter of this action.

facilities, marijuana testing facilities, retail 19-Color

May 22, 2013

Misc. Private Legals

Attorneys for Plaintiff Michael Francisco, #39111 Rothgerber Johnson & Lyons LLP 90 S. Cascade, Suite 1100 Colorado Springs, Colorado 80903 Phone: 719.386.3000 E-mail: mfrancisco@rothgerber.com Case No.: 2013CV64 SUMMONS BY PUBLICATION THE PEOPLE OF THE STATE OF COLORADO TO THE ABOVE-NAMED DEFENDANTS: You are hereby summoned and required to appear and defend the claims of the Complaint filed with the court in this action, by filing with the Clerk of this Court an answer or other response. You are required to file your answer or other response within 21 days after the service of this Summons upon you. Service of this Summons shall be complete on the day of the last publication. A copy of the Complaint may be obtained from the clerk of the court. If you fail to file your answer or other response to the Complaint in writing within the applicable time period, judgment by default may be entered against you by the court for the relief demanded in the Complaint, without any further notice. This is an action to quiet the title of the Plaintiff in and to the real property situate in Teller County, State of Colorado. DATED: May 10, 2013. ROTHGERBER JOHNSON & LYONS LLP s/ Michael Francisco Michael Francisco, #39111 Attorneys for Diocese of Colorado Springs, a Corporation sole THIS SUMMONS IS ISSUED PURSUANT TO RULE 4(g), C.R.C.P., AS AMENDED Legal Notice No.: 933625 First Publication: May 22, 2013 Last Publication: June 19, 2013 Publisher: Pikes Peak Courier View

Government Legals Public Notice NOTICE OF PURCHASE OF REAL ESTATE TAX LIEN SALE AND OF APPLICATION FOR TREASURER’S DEED TAX SALE CERTIFICATE OF PURCHASE NO 0880004 The said premises were for the year A.D. 1987, assessed and taxed in the name of DAVID EUGENE MAYNARD and the properties are currently assessed and taxed in the name of DAVID EUGENE MAYNARD. To whom it may concern and to every person in actual possession or occupancy of the hereinafter described land, lots or premises, and to the person in whose name the same was taxes, and to all persons having an interest or title of record in or to the same, and particularly to: DAVID EUGENE MAYNARD NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that at a tax lien sale lawfully held on the 15th day of November A.D. 1988, the then County Treasurer of Teller County, State of Colorado, duly offered for delinquent taxes for the year 1987, the following described property, situated in County of Teller and State of Colorado, to-wit: 26-14-70 2401 ETHELYN PL MN That, at said sale, said property was stricken off to and a tax lien sale certificate of purchase was duly issued therefore to TELLER COUNTY, who on February 23, 2013 assigned said Certificate of Purchase to JBN CAPTIAL LLC, the present holder and legal owner thereof, who hath made request upon the Treasurer of Teller County for a deed, and that unless the same be redeemed on or before September 18, 2013, the said County Treasurer will issue a Treasurer’s Deed therefore to said certificate holder. Dated at Cripple Creek, Teller County, Colorado, this 1st day of May, 2013. ROBERT W CAMPBELL, TREASURER TELLER COUNTY, COLORADO Legal Notice No.: 933606 First date of Publication: May, 8, 2013 Second date of Publication: May 15, 2013 Third and last date of Publication: May 22, 2013 Publisher: Pikes Peak Courier View Public Notice ORDINANCE NO. 2013-03 A BILL FOR AN ORDINANCE APPROVING THE ZONING OF THE PROPERTY COMMONLY KNOWN AS THE MOUNT PISGAH CEMETERY PROPERTY GENERALLY LOCATED IN SECTION 14, TOWNSHIP 15 SOUTH, RANGE 70 WEST OF THE 6th PM, CRIPPLE CREEK, COLORADO TO PR (PRESERVE)

A BILL FOR AN ORDINANCE APPROVING THE ZONING OF THE PROPERTY COMMONLY KNOWN AS THE MOUNT PISGAH CEMETERY PROPERTY GENERALLY LOCATED IN SECTION 14, TOWNSHIP 15 SOUTH, RANGE 70 WEST OF THE 6th PM, CRIPPLE CREEK, COLORADO TO PR (PRESERVE)

Government Legals

WHEREAS, the Applicant, the City of Cripple Creek, as the owner of real property commonly known as the Mount Pisgah Cemetery as more fully described in the application on file (the “Property”), has applied for approval of an amendment to the City Zoning Map zoning the Property as PR (Preserve); and WHEREAS, a public hearing on the application was held before the Cripple Creek City Council on April 17, 2013, preceded by public notice of such hearing as required by Sec. 4.6 and 4.6.1 of the City of Cripple Creek Development Code; and WHEREAS, at the public hearing the City Council heard evidence from interested parties and considered the factors for approval of a rezoning set forth in Sec. 4.6.1 of the City of Cripple Creek Development Code, as well as the recommendation of the Cripple Creek Planning Commission; and WHEREAS, the City Council finds and determines that the proposed zoning to PR satisfies the criteria set forth in the Cripple Creek Development Code; and NOW THEREFORE BE IT ORDAINED BY THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF CRIPPLE CREEK; 1. The application for zoning of the Property as PR (Preserve) is hereby approved. This ordinance shall be recorded, shall run with the land, and shall serve as notice to prospective purchasers of this zoning. 2. Safety Clause. The City Council hereby finds, determines, and declares that this Ordinance is promulgated under the general police power of the City of Cripple Creek, that it is promulgated for the health, safety, and welfare of the public and that this Ordinance is necessary for the preservation of health and safety and for the protection of public convenience and welfare. The City Council further determines that the Ordinance bears a rational relation to the proper legislative object sought to be attained. 3. Severability. If any clause, sentence, paragraph or part of this Ordinance or the application thereof to any person or circumstances shall for any reason be adjudged by a court of competent jurisdiction invalid, such judgment shall not affect application to other persons or circumstances. 4. Effective Date. This Ordinance shall become effective nunc pro tunc April 17, 2013. PASSED ON THE FIRST READING AND ORDERED PUBLISHED THIS 1ST DAY OF MAY, 2013. Debra Blevins, City Clerk PASSED ON SECOND READING AND ADOPTED BY THE CITY COUNCIL THIS DAY OF , 2013. Approved: Bruce Brown, Mayor Attest: Debra Blevins, City Clerk Approved as to form: Herbert C. Phillips, City Attorney Legal Notice No.: 933610 First Publication: May 15, 2013 Last Publication: May 22, 2013 Publisher: Pikes Peak Courier View Public Notice CITY OF WOODLAND PARK, COLORADO ORDINANCE NO. 1185, SERIES 2013 AN ORDINANCE ANNEXING A TRACT OF LAND DEPICTED AS ROSEMONT ROAD RIGHT-OF-WAY AND SAND WASH, TOGETHER WITH A PORTION OF LAURA LANE, ALL AS SHOWN ON THE PLAT OF PROPERTY OF C.D. WEAVER LOCATED IN THE SOUTHEAST ONE-QUARTER OF THE SOUTHEAST ONE-QUARTER (SE1/4 SE1/4) OF SECTION 24, TOWNSHIP 12 SOUTH, RANGE 69 WEST OF THE 6TH PRINCIPAL MERIDIAN IN TELLER COUNTY, COLORADO, CONTAINING 1.46 ACRES OF LAND. SUMMARY: This Ordinance annexes a tract of land known as Rosemont Road Right-of-Way and Sand Wash, together with a portion of Laura Lane. PENALTY: None. This Ordinance was passed on second and final reading on May 16, 2013 after notice and public hearing and is hereby published by title only as required by Charter Section 7.6 to be effective seven days after this publication. Suzanne Leclercq, Deputy City Clerk City of Woodland Park Legal Notice No.: 933626 First Publication: May 22, 2013 Last Publication: May 22, 2013 Publisher: Pikes Peak Courier View Public Notice CITY OF WOODLAND PARK NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING

Public Notice

Government Legals CITY OF WOODLAND PARK NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING

Public Hearing on Ordinance No. 1186, Series 2013, shall be held in the Council Chambers of City Hall, 220 W. South Avenue, on the 6th day of June 2013 at 7:00 PM. The aforesaid Ordinance was posted in City Hall 24 hours prior to the June 6th, 2013 City Council meeting, passed on first reading, and ordered published, as required by Section 7.6 of the Charter of the City of Woodland Park. CITY OF WOODLAND PARK, COLORADO ORDINANCE NO. 1186, SERIES 2013 AN ORDINANCE AMENDING TITLE 18 OF THE WOODLAND PARK MUNICIPAL CODE BY THE ADDITION OF A NEW CHAPTER 18.79 TO PROHIBIT THE OPERATION OF MARIJUANA CULTIVATION FACILITIES AND SALES, MARIJUANA PRODUCT MANUFACTURING FACILITIES, MARIJUANA TESTING FACILITIES, RETAIL MARIJUANA STORES AND MARIJUANA MEMBERSHIP CLUBS IN THE CITY OF WOODLAND PARK; AND AMENDING CHAPTER 9.30 OF THE M U N I C I P A L C O D E T O P R O H I B IT SELLING MARIJUANA GROWN FOR PERSONAL USE WHEREAS, on November 6, 2012, the voters of Colorado approved the adoption of Amendment 64, Personal Use and Regulation of Marijuana; and WHEREAS, Amendment 64 became effective upon official declaration of the vote hereon by proclamation of the Governor, pursuant to Section 1(4) of Article V, of the Colorado Constitution on December 10, 2012; and WHEREAS, Amendment 64 adds a new Section 16 to Article XVIII of the Colorado Constitution; and WHEREAS, Amendment 64 allows the possession, use, display, purchase and transportation of one ounce or less of marijuana and marijuana accessories; and WHEREAS, Amendment 64 allows possessing, growing, processing, or transporting no more than six marijuana plants, with three or fewer being mature, flowering plants, and possession of the marijuana produced by the plants on the premises where the plants are grown, provided that the growing takes place in an enclosed, locked space, is not conducted openly or publicly, and the marijuana is not made available for sale; and WHEREAS, Amendment 64 defines a “Locality” in part in section 2(e) of Section 16 to include a municipality; and WHEREAS, part 5(f) of Section 16 provides, in pertinent part, the following: (f) “… A locality may prohibit the operation of marijuana cultivation facilities, marijuana product manufacturing facilities, marijuana testing facilities, or retail marijuana stores through the enactment of an ordinance or an initiated or referred measure,” and; WHEREAS, Amendment 64 conflicts with federal law, as the possession, cultivation, sale and use of marijuana remains illegal under federal criminal statutes; and WHEREAS, the City Council finds that the licensing and operation of marijuana cultivation facilities, marijuana product manufacturing facilities, marijuana testing facilities, retail marijuana stores or marijuana membership clubs, by making marijuana more readily available in the community and facilitating the recreational use of marijuana, presents a threat to the health and education of Woodland Park’s children, to the safety of the workplace and the travelling public and to the public health, safety and welfare as a whole; and WHEREAS, on February 11, 2013, the City Council adopted Ordinance No. 1181, which declared a temporary moratorium through July 1, 2013 on the establishment of marijuana clubs and on the submission, acceptance, processing, and approval of all applications for City permits and licenses relating to the operation of marijuana establishments; and WHEREAS, there is not now, nor has there ever been any property within the City zoned for marijuana cultivation facilities and sales, marijuana product manufacturing facilities, marijuana testing facilities, retail marijuana stores or marijuana membership clubs; and WHEREAS, the City Council hereby determines that marijuana cultivation facilities and sales, marijuana product manufacturing facilities, marijuana testing facilities, retail marijuana stores and marijuana membership clubs are prohibited within the corporate limits of the City. NOW, THEREFORE, THE CITY OF WOODLAND PARK ORDAINS: Section 1. Title 18 of the Woodland Park Municipal Code is hereby amended by the addition of the new Chapter 18.79: Chapter 18.79. Marijuana Cultivation Facilities, Marijuana Product Manufacturing Facilities and Sales, Marijuana Testing Facilities, Retail Marijuana Stores and Marijuana Membership Clubs. Sec. 18.79.01. Intent, Authority and Applicability. (1) Intent. The intent of this ordinance is to promote the general public welfare and safety throughout the City of Woodland Park, Colorado by prohibiting the operation of marijuana cultivation facilities and sales, marijuana product manufacturing facilities, marijuana testing facilities, retail marijuana stores and marijuana membership clubs. a. Based upon Article XVIII, § 16 of the Colorado Constitution, Personal Use and Regulation of Marijuana, and the potential secondary effects of marijuana cultivation facilities and sales, marijuana product manufacturing facilities, marijuana testing facilities, retail marijuana stores or marijuana membership clubs, such land uses have an adverse effect on the health, safety and welfare of the City and its inhabitants. b. As a matter of the City’s local land use and zoning authority, and consistent with the authorization provided by Article XVIII, § 16 of the Colorado Constitution, no appropriate location exists within the City for the operation of marijuana cultivation facilities, marijuana product manufacturing facilities, marijuana testing facilities, retail marijuana stores or marijuana membership clubs.

marijuana stores and marijuana membership clubs. a. Based upon Article XVIII, § 16 of the Colorado Constitution, Personal Use and Regulation of Marijuana, and the potential secondary effects of marijuana cultivation facilities and sales, marijuana product manufacturing facilities, marijuana testing facilities, retail marijuana stores or marijuana membership clubs, such land uses have an adverse effect on the health, safety and welfare of the City and its inhabitants. b. As a matter of the City’s local land use and zoning authority, and consistent with the authorization provided by Article XVIII, § 16 of the Colorado Constitution, no appropriate location exists within the City for the operation of marijuana cultivation facilities, marijuana product manufacturing facilities, marijuana testing facilities, retail marijuana stores or marijuana membership clubs.

Government Legals

(2) Authority. The City’s authority to adopt this Section is found in: Article XVIII, § 16 of the Colorado Constitution; the Local Government Land Use Control Enabling Act, C.R.S. § 29-20-101, et seq.; C.R.S. § 31-23-101, et seq. (municipal zoning powers); C.R.S. §§ 31-15-103, 31-15-401. (municipal police powers); and C.R.S. § 31-15-501 (municipal authority to regulate businesses); and the Woodland Park Home Rule Charter. (3) Applicability. The prohibition of the operation of marijuana cultivation facilities and sales, marijuana product manufacturing facilities, marijuana testing facilities, retail marijuana stores or marijuana membership clubs as set forth in this Chapter shall apply to all property within the City. Sec. 18.79.02. Definitions. Unless otherwise specified or the context otherwise requires, any terms used herein shall have the same meanings as provided in Article XVIII, Section 16 of the Colorado Constitution. These definitions include, but are not limited to the following: (1) “Marijuana” means all parts of the plant of the genus cannabis whether growing or not, the seeds thereof, the resin extracted from any part of the plant, and every compound, manufacture, salt, derivative, mixture, or preparation of the plant, its seeds, or its resin, including marijuana concentrate. “Marijuana” does not include industrial hemp, nor does it include fiber produced from the stalks, oil, or cake made from the seeds of the plant, sterilized seed of the plant which is incapable of germination, or the weight of any other ingredient combined with marijuana to prepare topical or oral administrations, food, drink, or other product. (2) “Marijuana accessories” means any equipment, products, or materials of any kind which are used, intended for use, or designed for use in planting, propagating, cultivating, growing, harvesting, composting, manufacturing, compounding, converting, producing, processing, preparing, testing, analyzing, packaging, repackaging, storing, vaporizing, or containing marijuana, or for ingesting, inhaling, or otherwise introducing marijuana into the human body. (3) “Marijuana cultivation facility” means an entity licensed to cultivate, prepare, and package marijuana and sell marijuana to retail marijuana stores, to marijuana product manufacturing facilities, and to other marijuana cultivation facilities, but not to consumers. (4) “Marijuana establishment” means a marijuana cultivation facility, a marijuana testing facility, a marijuana product manufacturing facility, or a retail marijuana store. (5) “Marijuana membership club” means any building or structure wherein two or more people gather for the primary purpose of consuming marijuana or marijuana products, or any building or structure wherein club members meet with the ongoing practice of routinely or regularly consuming marijuana or marijuana products. (6) “Marijuana product manufacturing facility” means an entity licensed to purchase marijuana; manufacture, prepare, and package marijuana products; and sell marijuana and marijuana products to other marijuana product manufacturing facilities and to retail marijuana stores, but not to consumers. (7) “Marijuana products” means concentrated marijuana products and marijuana products that are comprised of marijuana and other ingredients and are intended for use or consumption, such as, but not limited to, edible products, ointments, and tinctures. (8) “Marijuana testing facility” means an entity licensed to analyze and certify the safety and potency of marijuana. (9) “Medical marijuana center” means a person or entity licensed to operate a business as described in the Colorado Medical Marijuana Code that sells medical marijuana and medical marijuana-infused products to registered patients or primary caregivers as defined in Article XVIII, § 14 of the Colorado Constitution, but is not a primary caregiver, and which a municipality is authorized to prohibit as a matter of law. (10) “Retail marijuana store” means an entity licensed to purchase marijuana from marijuana cultivation facilities and marijuana and marijuana products from marijuana product manufacturing facilities and to sell marijuana and marijuana products to consumers. Sec. 18.79.03. Uses prohibited; penalty. (1) Uses Prohibited. a. It is unlawful for any person to operate marijuana cultivation facilities, marijuana product manufacturing facilities, marijuana testing facilities, retail marijuana stores or marijuana membership clubs in the City. b. It is unlawful to grow marijuana for personal use anywhere in the City other than in an enclosed, locked space which is not open or public. “Enclosed” means having a roof and all sides closed to the weather with walls, windows or doors. (2) Any remedies provided for herein shall be cumulative and not exclusive, and shall be in addition to any other remedies provided by law or in equity; and (3) In addition to any other penalties that may exist under state, federal, and local laws, violation of this Section shall be punishable by a fine not exceeding $1,000.00, or by imprisonment not exceeding one year, or by both such fine and imprisonment, as set forth in Cherry Hills Village Municipal Code Section 1.12.010. Each day that a violation of any of the provisions of this Chapter continues to exist shall be deemed a separate and distinct offense. (4) The conduct of any activity or business in violation of this Chapter is hereby declared to be a public nuisance and the City may, in addition to all other remedies set forth hereunder, commence an action or actions or proceedings, for the abatement, removal and enjoinment thereof, in a manner provided by the law; and shall take such other steps and shall apply to such court or courts as may have jurisdiction to grant such relief as will abate or remove such marijuana cultivation facility, marijuana product manufacturing facility, marijuana testing facility, retail marijuana store or marijuana membership club and restrain and enjoin any person from operating, conducting or maintaining such a business or establishment contrary to the provisions of this Ordinance.

marijuana membership clubs in the City. b. It is unlawful to grow marijuana for personal use anywhere in the City other than in an enclosed, locked space which is not open or public. “Enclosed” means having a roof and all sides closed to the weather with walls, windows or doors. (2) Any remedies provided for herein shall be cumulative and not exclusive, and shall be in addition to any other remedies provided by law or in equity; and (3) In addition to any other penalties that may exist under state, federal, and local laws, violation of this Section shall be punishable by a fine not exceeding $1,000.00, or by imprisonment not exceeding one year, or by both such fine and imprisonment, as set forth in Cherry Hills Village Municipal Code Section 1.12.010. Each day that a violation of any of the provisions of this Chapter continues to exist shall be deemed a separate and distinct offense. (4) The conduct of any activity or business in violation of this Chapter is hereby declared to be a public nuisance and the City may, in addition to all other remedies set forth hereunder, commence an action or actions or proceedings, for the abatement, removal and enjoinment thereof, in a manner provided by the law; and shall take such other steps and shall apply to such court or courts as may have jurisdiction to grant such relief as will abate or remove such marijuana cultivation facility, marijuana product manufacturing facility, marijuana testing facility, retail marijuana store or marijuana membership club and restrain and enjoin any person from operating, conducting or maintaining such a business or establishment contrary to the provisions of this Ordinance.

Government Legals

Section 2. To the extent the provisions of Section 18.69.010 of the Woodland Park Municipal Code apply to the City Council’s power to prohibit the operation of marijuana cultivation facilities, marijuana product manufacturing facilities, marijuana testing facilities, retail marijuana stores or marijuana membership clubs, there is hereby adopted a special suspension of Section 18.69.010 for purposes of this Ordinance. Therefore, Section 18.69.010 shall not apply to this Ordinance and this Ordinance shall be adopted in accordance with the procedures of Section 7.6 of the City Charter. Section 3. Ordinance 1181, Series 2013, is hereby repealed on the effective date of this Ordinance. Section 4. Chapter 9.30 of the Woodland Park Municipal Code is hereby amended by the addition of the new Section 9.30.040: Sec. 9.30.040 Sale of Marijuana grown for personal use; penalty. (1) It is unlawful to make marijuana grown for personal use available for sale in any manner. (2) In addition to any other penalties that may exist under state, federal, and local laws, violation of this Section shall be punishable by a fine not exceeding $1,000.00, or by imprisonment not exceeding one year, or by both such fine and imprisonment, as set forth in Cherry Hills Village Municipal Code Section 1.12.110. Section 5. Severability. In accordance with the Woodland Park Home Rule Charter, if any portion of this Ordinance should be found to be invalid by a court, such invalidity shall not affect the remaining portions of this Ordinance which can be given effect without the invalid portion, provided such remaining portions are not determined by the court to be inoperable. Section 6. Effective Date. This Ordinance shall be in full force and effect from and after its publication as required by law. PASSED BY CITY COUNCIL ON SECOND AND FINAL READING FOLLOWING PUBLIC HEARING THIS__ DAY OF ____, 2013 David J. Turley, Mayor Attest: Cindy Morse, City Clerk Approved as to Form: City Attorney Legal Notice No.: 933627 First Publication: May 22, 2013 Last Publication: May 22, 2013 Publisher: Pikes Peak Courier View Public Notice NOTICE OF PUBLIC MEETING TELLER COUNTY BOARD OF REVIEW Wednesday, June 05, 2013 AT 2:00 P.M. 1010 West Evergreen Heights Drive I. Convene A. Roll Call B. Review & Approve minutes from April 3 & May 1 2013 Meetings II. Contractor Licenses A. Gl a c i e r C o n s tru c ti o n C o mp a n y , In c ./Aa ro n Ka rra k e r/C l a s s A B. CCC Group, Inc./Mark C. Guthrie/ Class A C. Hoag Construction Company, Inc./Thomas A. Hoag/Class A D. Chamco Construction, Inc./Charles Chambers/Class B-1 III. Board Discussion A. Discuss the upcoming adoption of the 2009 International Codes. B. Consider and recommend to the Teller County Board of County Commissioners the adoption of the 2009 International Building Codes and the amendments to the Teller County Building Code. IV. Adjournment Legal Notice No.: 933628 First Publication: May 22, 2013 Last Publication: May 22, 2013 Publisher: Pikes Peak Courier View

Public Knowledge = Notices Community

WHEREAS, the Applicant, the City of Cripple Creek, as the owner of real property commonly known as the Mount Pisgah Cemetery as more fully described in the application on file (the “Property”), has applied for approval of an amendment to the City Zoning Map zoning the Property as PR (Preserve); and WHEREAS, a public hearing on the application was held before the Cripple Creek City Council on April 17, 2013, preceded by public notice of such hearing as required by Sec. 4.6 and 4.6.1 of the City of Cripple Creek Development Code; and

WHEREAS, at the public hearing the City Council heard evidence from interested parties and considered the factors for approval of a rezoning set forth in Sec. 4.6.1 of the City of Cripple Creek Development Code, as well as the recommendation of the Cripple Creek Planning Commission; and WHEREAS, the City Council finds and determines that the proposed zoning to PR satisfies the criteria set forth in the Cripple Creek Development Code; and

Public Hearing on Ordinance No. 1186, Series 2013, shall be held in the Council Chambers of City Hall, 220 W. South Avenue, on the 6th day of June 2013 at 7:00 PM. The aforesaid Ordinance was posted in City Hall 24 hours prior to the June 6th, 2013 City Council meeting, passed on first reading, and ordered published, as required by Section 7.6 of the Charter of the City of Woodland Park. CITY OF WOODLAND PARK, COLORADO ORDINANCE NO. 1186, SERIES 2013

AN ORDINANCE AMENDING TITLE 18 OF THE WOODLAND PARK MUNICIPAL CODE BY THE ADDITION OF A NEW CHAPTER 18.79 TO PROHIBIT THE OPERATION OF MARIJUANA CULTIVATION FACILITIES AND SALES, MARIJUANA PRODUCT MANUFACTURING FACILITIES, MARIJUANA TESTING FACILITIES, RETAIL MARIJUANA STORES AND MARIJUANA MEMBERSHIP CLUBS IN THE CITY OF WOODLAND PARK; AND AMENDING CHAPTER 9.30 OF THE MUNICIPAL CODE TO PROHIBIT SELLING MARIJUANA GROWN FOR PERSONAL USE

Read the Notices!

NOW THEREFORE BE IT ORDAINED BY THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF CRIPPLE CREEK;

1. The application for zoning of the Property as PR (Preserve) is hereby approved. This ordinance shall be recorded, shall run with the land, and shall serve as notice to prospective purchasers of this zoning.

WHEREAS, on November 6, 2012, the voters of Colorado approved the adoption of Amendment 64, Personal Use and Regulation of Marijuana; and WHEREAS, Amendment 64 became effective upon official declaration of the vote hereon by proclamation of the Governor, pursuant to Section 1(4) of Article V, of the Colorado Constitution on December 10, 2012; and WHEREAS, Amendment 64 adds a new

(2) Authority. The City’s authority to adopt this Section is found in: Article XVIII, § 16 of the Colorado Constitution; the Local Government Land Use Control Enabling Act, C.R.S. § 29-20-101, et seq.; C.R.S. § 31-23-101, et seq. (municipal zoning powers); C.R.S. §§ 31-15-103, 31-15-401. (municipal police powers); and C.R.S. § 31-15-501 (municipal authority to regulate businesses); and the Woodland Park Home Rule Charter.

(3) Applicability. The prohibition of the operation of marijuana cultivation facilities and sales, marijuana product manufacturing facilities, marijuana testing facilities, retail marijuana stores or marijuana membership clubs as set forth in this Chapter shall apply to all property within the City.

Sec. 18.79.02. Definitions. Unless otherwise specified or the context otherwise requires, any terms used herein shall have the same meanings as provided in Article XVIII, Section 16 of the Colorado Constitution. These definitions include, but are not limited to the following: (1) “Marijuana” means all parts of the plant of the genus cannabis whether growing or not, the seeds thereof, the resin extracted

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Section 2. To the extent the provisions of Section 18.69.010 of the Woodland Park Municipal Code apply to the City Council’s power to prohibit the operation of marijuana cultivation facilities, marijuana product manufacturing facilities, marijuana testing facilities, retail marijuana stores or marijuana membership clubs, there is hereby adopted a special suspension of Section 18.69.010 for purposes of this Ordinance. Therefore, Section 18.69.010 shall not apply to this Ordinance and this Ordinance shall be adopted in accord-

Be Informed!

Pikes Peak Courier View 19 Government Legals PUBLIC NOTICE Notice Is Hereby Given that a proposed budget has been submitted to the Board of Education of the Woodland Park School District Re-2, Teller County, Colorado, for the fiscal year July 1, 2013 through June 30, 2014, and has been filed in the office of the Director of Business Services where it is available for public inspection. Such budget will be considered for adoption at the regular meeting of the Board of Education at the administrative office conference room on June 12, 2013, at 7:00 PM. Any person paying school taxes in said District may at any time prior to the final adoption of the budget, file or register his/her objections thereto. A public work session will be conducted prior to the final adoption of the proposed budget at the regular meeting of the Board of Education on June 12, 2013 at 7:00 PM in the administrative office conference room. Final adoption of the budget will be at a special board meeting on June 26, 2013, at 5:00 PM. Board of Education Woodland Park School District Re-2 Teller County, Colorado Legal Notice No.: 933631 First Publication: May 22, 2013 Last Publication: May 22, 2013 Publisher: Pikes Peak Courier View Public Notice ADOPTION OF TELLER COUNTY, COLORADO ORDINANCE #18 MARIJUANA ESTABLISHMENTS PROHIBITED. AN ORDINANCE PROHIBITING THE OPERATION OF MARIJUANA CULTIVATION FACILITIES, MARIJUANA PRODUCT MANUFACTURING FACILITIES, MARIJUANA TESTING FACILITIES AND RETAIL MARIJUANA STORES WITHIN THE UNINCORPORATED BOUNDARIES OF TELLER COUNTY, STATE OF COLORADO DATE OF FIRST PUBLICATION: MARCH 27, 2013 AMENDMENTS SINCE INITIAL PUBLICATION: 1) DELETE THE NINTH WHEREAS PARAGRAPH IN ITS ENTIRETY: WHEREAS, the Board of County Commissioners of Teller County, Colorado ("Board") finds that the licensing and opera ti o n o f ma ri j u a n a e s ta b l i s h me n ts provided for in Amendment 64, by making marijuana more readily available in the community and facilitating the recreational use of marijuana, presents a threat to the health and education of Teller County's children, to the safety of the workplace and the traveling public and to the public health, safety and welfare as a whole; and 2) REVISION TO SECTION 6: Section 6: Enforcement. This The Teller County Sheriff and the Sheriff's officers, deputies, designees and agents are authorized by the Teller County Board of County Commissioners to enforce the provisions of this Ordinance. 3) REVISION TO CERTIFICATION PARAGRAPHS: CERTIFICATION: THE FOREGOING ORDINANCE WAS INTRODUCED AND READ ON MARCH 14, 2013 BY THE BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS OF TELLER COUNTY, COLORADO, AND APPROVED FOR PUBLICATION IN FULL IN THE PIKES PEAK COURIER VIEW. DATE OF FIRST PUBLICATION: MARCH 27, 2013 PURSUANT TO C.R.S.30-15-405 AND 30-15-406, THE FOREGOING ORDINANCE WAS CONSIDERED ON MAY 9, 2013 AND ADOPTED BY THE BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS OF TELLER COUNTY AND ORDERED PUBLISHED BY REFERENCE TO TITLE AND CHANGES ONLY, IN THE PIKES PEAK COURIER VIEW. DATE OF SECOND PUBLICATION: MAY 22, 2013 EFFECTIVE DATE: JUNE 21, 2013 Legal Notice No.: 933632 First Publication: May 22, 2013 Last Publication: May 22, 2013 Publisher: Pikes Peak Courier View Public Notice ADVERTISEMENT FOR BID City of Victor 2013 Brian’s Park Warming Hut Notice is hereby given that the City of Victor will accept sealed proposals for the construction of a 392 SF Warming Hut at Brian’s Park Ice Rink. The project work is to consist of delivery, set-up and general construction for all labor, materials and services for general, grading, concrete, steel, wood, and other materials necessary to complete the project as indicated with the Construction Documents. THREE (3) SETS (ONE ORIGINAL AND TWO COMPLETED COPIES) OF THE SEALED PROPOSALS, clearly marked with “2013 Brian’s Park Improvements” and the name, address and phone number of the bidder will be received by Debra Downs, City Administrator, at City Hall, 500 Victor Avenue, Victor, CO 80860 until 11:00 a.m. (local time), on Monday June 10th, 2013. Any bid received after the time stated above will be returned to the Bidder unopened. Bid Documents and related information (in PDF format) may be obtained by contacting Walker Christensen or Craig Stoffel, DHM Design, 970-385-4219 or wchristensen@dhmdurango.com after 9:00 a.m. (local time) on Monday May 20th , 2013. Legal Notice No.: 933633 First Publication: May 22, 2013 Last Publication: May 22, 2013 Publisher: Pikes Peak Courier View

“Trust Us!” Without public notices, the government wouldn’t have to say anything else.

Public notices are a community’s window into the government. From zoning regulations to local budgets, governments have used local newspapers to inform citizens of its actions as an essential part of your right to know. You know where to look, when to look and what to look for to be involved as a citizen. Local newspapers provide you with the information you need to get involved.

Notices are meant to be noticed. Read your public notices and get involved!


20-Color

20 Pikes Peak Courier View

May 22, 2013

teller county arrests The following list of arrests is provided by area law enforcement agencies. An arrest is not an indication of guilt or innocence and there might be several people with the same name living in the county.

Teller County Sheriff’s Office May 6

EriC allEn Beattie, 25, of Colorado Springs was arrested on charges of driving under restraint, registration required and speeding. Bond was set at $1,000.

CaSEy ThOMaS Fernau, 28, of Peyton was arrested on a warrant charging first degree criminal trespass, unauthorized use of a financial transaction device, theft, and criminal mischief. Bond was set at $2,000. May 12 STEvEn DalE Moody, 59, of Florissant was arrested on charges of domestic violence, third degree assault and harassment. Bond was set at $1,000. May 13

May 8

DarrEll WaynE Perry, 51, of Colorado Springs was arrested on a warrant charging felony theft. Bond was set at $100,000.

JOnEl KEElEy Phipps, 23, of Woodland Park was arrested on a warrant charging failure to appear on original charges of child abuse, marijuana cultivation and possession of drug paraphernalia. Bond was set at $500.

JaCOb anThOny Peterson, 21, of Florissant was arrested on a warrant charging defrauding an innkeeper. Bond was set at $800.

May 9 JuliE ann Myers-Johns, 33, of Cripple Creek was arrested on

charges of driving under the influence of alcohol, driving with excessive content and open container, bond of $1,000.

DErEK lEE Pierce, 49, of Colorado Springs was arrested on

charges of driving under the influence, driving with excessive alcohol content and weaving. Bond was set at $1,000.

KurT FrEDriCK Teskey, 30, of Colorado Springs was arrested on a warrant charging failure to comply on original charges of felony criminal impersonation to gain a benefit and felony weapon possession by a previous offender. Bond was set at $50,000. May 10 JOnaThan JaMES Houston, 30, of Colorado Springs was arrested on a warrant charging failure to appear on an original charge of driving under restraint and lane usage violation. Bond was set at $600. May 11

May 14 brEnDa buTlEr, 59, of Woodland Park was arrested on charges of domestic violence, third degree assault and harassment. Bond was set at $1,000. KErrigan DaviD Clark, 37, of Florissant was arrested on charges of felony criminal attempt, felony menacing, felony criminal mischief, crimes against at-risk adults, third degree assault, cruelty to animals, obstruction of telephone service and harassment. He was also arrested on a three warrants; first warrant charging failure to appear on original charges of driving under restraint and speeding, second warrant charging failure to appear on an original charge of driving under restraint, and third warrant charging failure to appear on an original charge of third degree assault. Bond was set at $29,000. May 15 TErry MOnTOya, 36, of Colorado Springs was arrested on a warrant charging felony unlawful distribution, manufacturing, dispensing, or sale, felony unlawful possession of a controlled substance, felony criminal possession of identification document and possession of drug paraphernalia. Bond was set at $10,000.

More than 100 cyclists participate in the Ride of Silence on May 15 in Woodland Park in memory of bicyclists who have been killed or injured in motor vehicle collisions. The ride has become a tradition around the world but this was Woodland Park’s first Ride of Silence. Courtesy photo

ride memorializes cyclists By Special to the Courier

Mountain Top Cycling Club The Mountain Top Cycling Club hosted its first Ride of Silence through Woodland Park on May 15. About 100 bicyclists, ranging from age 5 to older 80, pedaled down U.S. 24 from County Road 231 to Safeway. The Ride of Silence moved slowly and quietly through town. Bicyclists were escorted by the Woodland Park Police Department while Teller County Search and Rescue volunteers controlled traffic through intersections. Ride of Silence is held every May in hundreds of locations around the world. Ride of Silence is a sort of rolling memorial to honor bicyclists that have been injured or killed by motorists. Ride of Silence also promotes

sharing the road and provides awareness of bicycling safety. The bicyclists arrived at Safeway and were treated to a feast of sandwiches, fruits & veggies, and Buffalo wings provided by local businesses. Later, guest speakers gave tribute to each of the eight cyclists who were killed last year in Colorado, and spoke about ways cyclists can increase their safety. After an emotional poem, eight biodegradable balloons were released in remembrance of the eight killed bicyclists. The Woodland Park Ride of Silence was organized by Debbie Maresca of Mountain Top Cycling Club. Event sponsors include Subway, Wild Wings, Nuts and Bolts Quilts and Needle Works, Paradise Liquors, True Life Medicine, and Auto Zone of Woodland Park.

VFW and american legion host weekend memorials The Public is invited to come out and attend the following events in honor of Memorial Day: The Thomas E. Kelley VFW Post # 6051, along with local Military veterans and retirees, will place flags on veterans’ graves at 10 a.m. May 25 at the Thomas E. Kelley VFW #6051.

After the ceremony, the post will then move to the Wilderness and Westcreek cemeteries. The American Legion Post #1980 and the Thomas E. Kelley VFW #6051 will conduct a combined Memorial Day ceremony at 11 a.m. May 27 in the Woodland Park Cemetery.

WP PeeWee hockey ends season on high note Special to the Courier

Woodland Park Hockey Association The Woodland Park Hockey Association traveling PeeWee team, “The Terminators,” qualified for the Continental Divide Youth Hockey League playoffs and took a league championship. The team is made up of children ages 11 and 12. The hockey association is already planning for the 2013-2014 season and will provide opportunities for the following age divisions: Mites-ages 5-8, squirts-ages 9 and 1, PeeWees-ages 11 and 12 and Bantams-ages 13 and 14. The association has memberships in USA Hockey, Colorado Amateur Hockey Association and the Continental Divide Youth Hockey Association. Coaches for the 2012-

The Woodland Park PeeWee hockey team, The Terminators, won the Continental Divide Youth Hockey League championship in Aspen last month. Courtesy photo 2013 season included head coach Denny Trombetta, offensive coach Brian Kane,

defensive coach Dan Trombetta and goalie coach Brian Babin.

have a story idea? Email your ideas to Pikes Peak Community Editor Pat Hill at phill@ourcoloradonews. com or call her at 719-686-6458.


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