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Teller County, Colorado • Volume 52, Issue 20

May 15, 2013

75 cents

A Colorado Community Media Publication

ourtellercountynews.com

The Green Mountain Falls’ Public Works Department is spending the next few months mitigating the town’s roads in preparation for clearing the way for emergency vehicles, and in turn, the residents, in case of another command to evacuate.Courtesy photo

GMF evacuation routes cleared By Pat Hill

phill@ourcoloradonews.com As severe drought slams up against predictions of dangerous rainstorms, the town of Green Mountain Falls is vulnerable to both. With funds from an anonymous donor, the public works department is removing barriers in the town’s right-of-ways. “The whole point is to make

the roadways safe, safety devices visible and access to hydrants better,” said Rob McArthur, the department’s director. “We’re just fortunate to have the funds to be able to do this.” The project gets into full swing June 4, beginning with the roads on the east side of town and gradually moving west to finally mitigate every road in a three-year project.

‘If an emergency response vehicle can get where they need to go, so can everybody else.’ Rob McArthur, department director

Crews working for the Green Mountain Falls’ Public Works Department cut tree limbs to clear an escape path in the town’s rights-of-way , in the event of another catastrophic fire or flood. Courtesy photo While last year’s week-long evacuation during the Waldo Canyon Fire was successful, this project is designed to make the ingress-egress routes safer and more effective for the police and fire departments, McArthur said. “If emergency response vehicles can get where they need to go, so can everybody else,” he said. “That’s always been our priority, whether it’s tree mitigation, dirt

work or snow plowing, with the residual benefits for the residents and taxpayers.” There’s a two-fold benefit to the project. “This is a way for us to put some kids to work, to use that energy and effort for the betterment of the community,” McArthur said. “We’re hiring college kids who are local, some who graduated from Manitou Springs High School.”

To ensure adherence to forestry regulations, Jinnie Grigsby, the town’s forestry technician, is overseeing the project. “If we have to limb-out a tree she’ll be there to make sure it’s done properly,” McArthur said. Quizzed for the identity of the donor, McArthur said, “It’s an organization that is very much interested in the wellbeing of the region.”

From brown water to sinkhole, district woes persist By Pat Hill

phill@ourcoloradonews.com Troubles keep mounting for the Florissant Water & Sanitation District when a water main broke the afternoon of May 7. By the time officials turned off the main, 80,000 gallons of chlorinated water had flooded the road at Hillside Drive and left a cavernous sinkhole. “Nobody could get the water main turned off,” said Jeff McCammon, who is concerned that his entire house will slide down the hillside. “Our house is literally on stilts.” Happens every time. When 80,000 gallons of chlorine water leaked from a broken water main, sinkholes happen. This The break in the water main is nothone occurred on Hillside Drive in Florissant when a water main operated by the Florissant Water & Sanitation District ing new for the water company’s customfroze and broke, flooding the road. While a broken water main is not unusual for the water district, the fact that ers. “This is an ongoing problem; the main breaks every year, leaving a six-inch layer of nobody showed up to turn off the valve sealed the fate of homes on Hillside Drive. Courtesy photo by Jeff McCammon ice,” McCammon said. With no response from the water comPOSTAL ADDRESS pany, McCammon called in the troops. “The sheriff’s department, the water division and the EPA came out,” he said. Printed on recycled The break, which took out the stairs in newsprint. Please the home, is particularly frightening for the recycle this copy. McCammons, who invested $7,800 in a cistern in January.

‘Nobody could get the water main turned off. Our house is literally on stilts.’ Jeff McCammon “We’re not even part of their water-delivery system,” McCammon said. Nonetheless, the McCammon home is the poster child for what has gone wrong with the water company. Cited by the Water Quality Division of Colorado’s public health department, the district has consistently dispensed brown water to its customers. With a meeting at 6 p.m. May 14 of the district board, customers are hoping to find solutions, to the perennial freeze problem as well as the brown water.


2-Color

2 Pikes Peak Courier View

May 15, 2013

RotaRy champions

These students from the Cripple Creek/Victor High School and Woodland Park High School are Rotary Champions, each recognized by the foundation for their academic and athletic accomplishments. Photo by Pat Hill

coRRection Due to a reporting error, an article about the Stone Creek Farmstead that ran in the May 8 Pikes Peak Courier View stated that each of the seven goats cur-

rently providing milk produce 8 gallons a day when, in fact, all seven of the goats together produce a total of 8 gallons a day.

Road work is in Woodland Park’s near future as the Downtown Development Authority is starting construction at the intersections of Park, Center and South streets and U.S. 24 as part of development of Woodland Station. Photo by Norma Engelberg

Road work begins, banners on order Main Steet assessment planned in June

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By Norma Engelberg

nengelberg@ourcoloradonews.com Road work on U.S. 24 in Woodland Park will start soon on streets surrounding Woodland Station, according to Woodland Park Office of Economic and Downtown Development Director Brian Fleer. He gave an update to the Downtown Development Authority board on May 7. Barrels and barricades are visible at Park Street and U.S. 24 where construction will soon begin on a dedicated right-turn lane and a dedicated left-turn lane. The city is also working with Tom Lichina, owner of an auto repair shop behind the ditch on Park Street. The ditch will be filled in, creating two additional public parking spaces. “Our next focus will be on Center Street and then South Street,” Fleer said. “We’re staying close to merchants on the construction and taking barricades down

on weekends.” The Woodland Park Downtown Development Authority is working with developers and contractors on several projects in the station where Woodland Hardware is still on schedule for a late 2013 or early 2014 opening. Two other Woodland Station lots are also under consideration. Local developer Arden Weatherford and Kip Unruh, owner of Main Street Property in Kansas City, Mo., are collaborating on developing Lot 2 where Weatherford is planning to open a beer garden this summer. Bob and Carol Korzekwa are still working on an entertainment center/ bowling alley on Lot 3. The exclusivity contract they signed earlier this year has run out and Fleer said there is enough interest in Lot 3 that he is not inclined to extend their contract. “Once they finish their feasibility study they can come back to us,” he said, adding that the Korzekwas are out of the country, working on a military contract in Guam. Family Dollar’s opening the first weekend in May

Fishencord killed in crash Kyle Fishencord, 24, of Cripple Creek, was killed in a single-vehicle crash on Teller 1 in the early-morning hours of May 6. The crash closed both lanes of the county road for three hours, reopening around 9 a.m. Cripple Creek & Victor schools were put on a two-hour delay as a result of the crash and road closure.

A memorial has gone up at the sharp curve on Teller County Road 1 where 24-year-old Kyle Fishencord died in a crash on May 6 outside of Cripple Creek. Photo by Norma Engelberg

took some people by surprise. At the April authority meeting Fleer said the store probably wouldn’t open until later in May. The gas station/convenience store, known locally as Traveler’s Gourmet, Mountain Mercantile or the Cenex station, is up for sale by the owners. “It will probably become a retail shop,” Fleer said. “They’re offering a good price for the right group.” The city has ordered 80 banners to be hung from light poles in the downtown area. There are a variety of themes that can be changed throughout the year. “Our beautification committee has worked on this for months,” Fleer said. “The banners should start going up the first week in June…We’re also working with MES Jim Siebert to revisit the design standards for Woodland Station…and the (Colorado) Main Street program people will be here June 24-25 to conduct a downtown assessment. They will meet with all the downtown stakeholders they can. We’ll be submitting our Main Street application in July.”


3-Color

Pikes Peak Courier View 3

May 15, 2013

Recent storms increase snowpack inches Drought forecasted to continue By Norma Engelberg

nengelberg@ourcoloradonews. com According to the Colorado Snotel Snowpack Report for the week ending May 3, recent storms have increased snowpack in several of the state’s river basins. The Upper Colorado, South Platte, Laramie and North Platte and Yampa/White River Basins are currently between 103 and 95 percent of median. The Gunnison and Arkansas River Basins are hitting at about 75 percent of median and the Upper Rio Grande and San Miguel, Dolores, Animas and san Juan basins are 41 percent of median or less. A report from the Natural Resource Conservation Service in April said the snowpack is holding steady in all but those river basins located in southwestern Colorado. The U.S. Drought monitor through April 30 is also showing some improvements to the drought situation in northern and northeastern Colorado, but its report is tempered by the fact that areas of severe, extreme and exceptional drought are still growing in the southeastern part of the

The U.S. Drought Monitor map of Colorado shows that drought conditions continue across El Paso and Teller counties, prompting local governments to implement water restrictions and encourage continued water conservation. Courtesy photo, U.S. Drought Monitor, University of Nebraska, Lincoln state. According to the U.S. Drought Monitor Map for Colorado, Teller County and El Paso County

are both part of that spreading drought area. Teller is mostly D-3 (extreme drought) with a small section of

D-2 (severe drought) in its northern reaches. El Paso County has a sliver of D-2 in the northwest and a sliver of D-4 (exceptional

drought) in the southeast. The rest of the county is D-3. That’s why cities and towns across the region are mplementing water restrictions and encouraging residents to conserve water in other ways, as well. Colorado Springs moved to a two-day-aweek watering schedule more than a month ago and Woodland Park will implement a similar schedule on May 9. These drought designations also do not bode well for hay and feed prices later this year and, according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture, the high hay prices that became common in 2012 are likely to continue in 2013. However, improved snowpack and strict water conservation will not change the fact that Colorado has a semi-arid climate where drought it the norm rather than the exception. The National Atmospheric and Oceanic Administration says weather determines what a person is wearing today, a sweater or a sleeveless shirt; while climate determines how many sweaters or sleeveless shirts are in that person’s closet. The state recently opened the Colorado Drought Response Portal, www.coh2o.co, where visitors can find information on drought and water conservation and where communities that choose to participate can post watering restriction information.

CC-V asks voters to participate in survey By Special to the Courier

Cripple Creek-Victor RE-1 School District The Cripple Creek-Victor RE-1 School District Board of Education is interested in getting input from registered voters regarding two subjects: School Board Director Districts and School Board Terms.

Toward that effort, the district has created a short six-question survey and is asking district residents to go to the link on the school district website, www.ccvschools. org, or go directly to the survey at http:// www.surveymonkey.com/s/CCVSchoolBoardSurvey. The survey is introduced with the fol-

so muCh inside the Courier View this week Aerial demonstration. Airplane shows approved for graduation. Page 4

Worldwide ranking. High schooler takes first at chess tournament. Page 10

Woof woof. Wolf puppy gets new home. Page 20

End of the line. Panthers baseball falls in playoffs. Page 22

Singin’ out. High Altitude Youth Choir to perform at high school. Page 12

lowing information: “Currently Cripple Creek-Victor School District is represented by five board seats representing five different director districts with equal numbers of registered voters. “School Board directors serving in these seats are limited to two consecutive 4-year terms. In order to make changes to the di-

rector districts or to the term limits, a ballot issue must be brought before the voters. The school district is surveying registered voters regarding the director districts and the term limits. “We appreciate your feedback to our survey questions!” The last day to fill out the survey is June 21.

Fehn memorialized May 20 A memorial service for Frank Fehn is at 10 a.m. May 20 at Holy Rosary Chapel in Cascade.


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4 Pikes Peak Courier View

May 15, 2013

Preliminary reading assessment scores released RE-2 concerned about third-grade readers By Norma Engelberg

nengelberg@ourcoloradonews.com Colorado third-grade teachers are under a lot of pressure when it comes to reading because that’s the year elementary-school students take their first state assessment tests. According to this year’s extremely preliminary Transitional Colorado Assessment

Program third-grade reading scores for the Woodland Park RE-2 School District, Columbine and Gateway third-graders still scored well above the state average on the test, which was administered in February, but Summit third-graders scored slightly below the state average. All three schools’ test scores were lower than last year’s scores but for a second year Columbine thirdgraders’ outscored the other schools. “That shows that Columbine isn’t a onehit-wonder,” said district Superintendent Jed Bowman at the May 8 school board meeting.

Part of the problem for small rural school districts is that when there are small numbers of students, every test score carries more weight in the total score, Bowman said. “The high 70s (percent proficient and advanced) is not good enough,” he said. “But we need to be careful not to read too much into this, yet…there’s a lot of information you don’t see here.” For example, the scores don’t take into account the fact that in all three schools two/thirds of third-graders are boys. “In most of the bigger districts, the gen-

der ratio is 50/50,” he said. “We need to compare our scores to those of other districts that have a 60/40 gender ratio. It’s typical for girls to score better in reading at that age.” That being said, however, he pointed out that at Summit the boys outscored better the girls. “All this data is just making me ask more questions,” Bowman said, adding that final scores will be made public by the state next fall. “We need more analysis.”

New Summit principal named Aspen Mine Center hosts fundraiser Preliminary TCAP scores arrive at RE-2 By Norma Engelberg

nengelberg@ourcoloradonews.com The Woodland Park RE-2 School District board announced the hiring of two administrators. One of these is just a change in position for someone who has worked in the district for 18 years. The other will replace out-going Summit Elementary School Principal Eric Owen. For eight years Tina Cassens was the assistant principal at Woodland Park Middle School. Before that she worked four years in the school’s Information Resources and Technology and six years teaching seventhgrade math. Now she is moving out of the middle school to become the district’s Director of Educational Effectiveness and Information Technologies, replacing Jeff Gatlin. Katie Rexford also was an assistant principal before landing a position as the Summit Elementary School principal but not in the RE-2 district. She moved to Colorado from Buffalo, N.Y., and taught math at Liberty High School in Colorado Springs, where she later became an assistant principal. Both Cassens and Rexford were introduced at the May 8 regular school board meeting. The meeting also provided an opportunity for Woodland Park High School senior Alyssa Meier to present her Bear Mitigation program. This was the same presentation she gave to Woodland Park City Council earlier this year. She started working on the bear project as an independent study program with

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Colorado Parks and Wildlife. “When I started this project, it never occurred to me that people didn’t think that bears getting into their trash is a problem,” she said. “Even kids connect bears with eating trash.” She encouraged district parents to go to Woodland Park’s Bear Aware Facebook page, www.facebook.com/BearAwareWP‎, for more information. Meier plans to attend Colorado State University-Ft. Collins become a wildlife biologist. Superintendent Jed Bowman talked about the school profile, which shows that the number of elementary students getting free or reduced lunches has risen from 23 percent of students a few years ago to 34 percent this year: 47 percent at Summit Elementary School, 40 percent at Gateway and 24 percent at Columbine. “This shows we’re not as affluent as people think,” said board President Amy Nieman. Bowman said the number of students getting help in upper grades would be higher if it weren’t so hard to get parents to fill out the paperwork. Bowman also gave a legislative report and talked about the state’s new school finance act that will likely go to voters this fall. The act adds $1 billion to school funding, which if approved could add about $750 per pupil to the school budget in 2016. “This is going to be a heavy duty campaign,” Bowman said. “People are already taking sides and fundraising has started.” “It’s too bad we can’t take that money and give it to the schools,” said school board director Rick Wetzel. The school board will be discussing next year’s preliminary budget at its regular meeting on June 12 and at a special meeting on June 26.

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phill@ourcoloradonews.com The Aspen Mine Center & Community of Caring celebrate spring and summer with a fashion show fundraising event at 5:30 p.m. May 31. Guests will have an opportunity to vote on the best hors d’oeuvres and desserts, enjoy exciting wines presented by a local sommelier and be eligible to win exciting items in our drawing, including tickets to see Josh Gobran July 7th. The Aspen Mine Center is run by the 501(c)(3) nonprofit, Community of Caring Foundation, and is a “one-stop resource shop” for southern Teller County and the surrounding area. The center began as a

casino and later the building was donated to the foundation as a resource center. For more information, go to www.aspenminecenter.org or call Angie Trelstad at 6893584, ext. 118. The center has provided services that include: $900,000 worth of assistance provided 500,000 pounds of food distributed via commodities program 240,000 pounds of food distributed via Aspen Mine Center food pantry 37,000 senior citizen meals served 750 students attended courses at the Mountain Alternative School 1,300 volunteers helping Multi-million hugs and caring given

B-25J “Miss Mitchell” Mitchell bomber takes off from the National Museum of the U.S. Air Force at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio Pilots Alan Miller, James Gilmore and Mark Erickson will join a 17-ship formation of the bombers to fly over the museum prior to the Doolittle Raiders Memorial Service in the museum’s Memorial Park on April 18, 2010. At least one of these Mitchell Bombers will take part in the U.S.A.F.A. graduation flyover. Photo by U.S. Air Force photo/ Lance Cheung

Aerial demonstration approved for graduation events Special to The Tribune This year’s academy graduation week events will include flyover performances of historical U.S. military aircraft provided by privately owned aerial demonstration teams according to academy officials. More than a dozen pilots from multiple teams will volunteer their time to fly vintage aircraft during the 2013 Organizational Awards Parade on May 27, the Graduation Parade on May 28 and the Graduation Ceremony on May 29. The pilots volunteered their service to “honor the cadets and families,” said Tyson

Voelkel, president of Texas Flying Legends Museum. Scheduled teams include a group of privately-owned T-33 aircraft, the Texas Flying Legends, the Mile High Wing of the Commemorative Air Force, the Air Force Heritage Flight Foundation and the National Museum of WWII Aviation based in Colorado Springs. Participating aircraft will include the B-25J, P-47, P-51D, P-40K, FG1D, FM2 and TBM-3E. Information regarding the US Air Force Academy graduation can be found on www.usafa.af.mil under the graduation link.

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5

Pikes Peak Courier View 5

May 15, 2013

Fossil Beds monument celebrates new centers

ed to diso. It’s ng at

Florissant Fossil Beds National Monument celebrates the grand opening of the visitor center and research facility with activities during the weekend of June 14-16. The center has a new projection and sound system in the theater where park films will be shown. During the week of May 14, crews will transform the center exhibit wing with all new displays featuring new fossils, artwork and interactive features. “We can’t wait to share the monument’s new `home’ and

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Florissant Fossil Beds National Monument Ranger Jeff Wolin, left, compares the size of a Ponderosa pine tree to the size that the redwood tree fossils would have been in life 34 million years ago. He is talking to a group of Woodland Park Chamber of Commerce members and volunteers taking a familiarization tour on April 30. Photos by Norma Engelberg

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Commissioners say no to marijuana

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fresh exhibits,” said Jeff Wolin, park ranger and lead interpreter. “These improvements will help us help our visitors get the most out of their time here. The theater and displays are a wonderful introduction to the best part of the park - exploring the fossils and trails outside.” The new building also houses a paleontology research and storage facility. The new space will allow the park staff to better protect thousands of fragile fossils now kept in other park buildings that do not meet collection storage standards. The celebration begins with a ribboncutting ceremony at 10 a.m. June 14 and continues throughout the weekend, with free admission for all. For information, go to www.nps,gov/flfo and click the link for “Visitor Center 2013,” or call 748-3253.

phill@ourcoloradonews. com

With eloquence and powerful statements about the political process in Colorado, Teller County commissioners Dave Paul and Norm Steen approved the prohibition of recreational marijuana, including retail sales, cultivation, manufacturing and testing. At the May 9 commission meeting, Dettenrieder veered off from his colleagues and voted no; nonetheless, the ordinance passed. “I recognize the fact that marijuana is illegal at the federal level and understand there is a clear conflict between our state constitution and federal law,” Dettenrieder said. To complicate the issue, the federal government has not been entirely clear on its approach to medical or recreational marijuana, he said. Disgusted over the political process in Colorado, Dettenrieder railed against the fluidity of the state’s constitution. “I do not care for the fact that the Colorado state constitution is one of the easiest to amend in endsthe union,” he said. “I also

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do not like the fact that outside interests threw a ton of money in Colorado supporting the Amendment 64 campaign.” Leading up to his negative vote, Dettenrieider explained. “I am conservative, pro-business, believe in limited government, less regulation, local decisionmaking, economic freedom and individual liberties,” he said. “I believe that in representative government, the will of the people reigns. The people of Colorado voted for Amendment 64, in Teller County, by approximately 52 percent.” For this commissioner, the conflict between opinion and duty led to the vote. “I could do without retail marijuana in Teller County, but, in this case, my personal view comes second, the majority view comes first,” he said. “In line with my political philosophy, the people spoke so I cannot stand in support of the ordinance as written.” Before voting no, Dettenrieder took another dig at the initiative process in Colorado. “I still cannot get my head around this, that we can put a ballot initiative at the state level when the subject matter is illegal at the federal level,” he

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Force MetroNorth Newspapers, Mile High Newspapers and d on Community Media of Colorado. Colorado Commuation nity Media’s authority on the 18 local communities it serves is unparalleled. Our ability to make connections between community residents as well as the ability to connect businesses with the right resident buyers makes us the ideal Community Connector. As residents of the communities we serve, our philosophy is to operate responsibly and responsively both inside the company and in the community. In 2012, Colorado Community Media launched an all-new format across its community newspapers and online news media. To find out more about us visit www.ourColoradonews. com.

‘It may threaten its survival because now people can buy marijuana recreationally at a far lower price.’ Norm Steen said. “But, you know what? It’s the reality, here where we are and I’m flummoxed, okay?” Wrapping up what he termed his “spiel” Dettenrieder directed the staff to study the tax question that will appear on the November ballot. No less opinionated, Paul offered an alternative view of the statewide voter to approve the use and cultivation of recreational marijuana. “In reference to Amendment 64, which was a democratic ideal, as Marc pointed out, we are in fact a republic,” Paul said. Paul, too, took a potshot at the initiative process. “We get elected to go through stacks of paperwork, dig deep into these things because it’s not just a simple

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OFFICE: 1200 E. Highway 24, Woodland Park, CO 80863 PhOnE: 719-687-3006 A legal newspaper of general circulation in Teller County, Colorado, the Pikes Peak Courier View is published weekly on Wednesday by Colorado Community Media, 1200 E. Highway 24, Woodland Park, CO 80863. PERIODICALS POSTAGE PAID AT WOODLAND PARK, COLORADO. POSTMASTER: Send address change to: 9137 S. Ridgeline Blvd., Suite 210, Highlands Ranch, CO 80129 DEADLInES: Display advertising: Thurs. 11 a.m. Legal advertising: Thurs. 11 a.m. Classified advertising: Mon. 12 p.m.

vote of the people for everything,” he said. “If we were going to live by that there would be no sense in having a legislature, a governor or a county commission.” In relating the marijuana issue to the republican form of government, Paul talked about the influence of special interests. “It would just be `okay we want to do this, put it on the ballot, majority rules’, that’s it,” he said. “That’s not the way our system of government is. And I don’t think that system would necessarily work that well, especially with the amount of influence that

does get brought in from people who don’t live here.” Before voting, Paul referred to the veiled threat of federal enforcement, highlighting the letter sent in 2011 by the Department of Justice. “I think that was pretty good guidance. To a certain degree we are going to throw that guidance to the side because of the medical marijuana which we already have,” he said. In voting to approve the prohibition ordinance, Paul’s s vote complies with the opt-out option for local governments. Steen, on the other hand, expressed concern about the taxing issue, which will be left up to the voters in November. As well, Steen commented on the numbers. Of 11,909 votes, the difference between approving and denying recreational marijuana was 341 votes. “I still see this issue as nearly 50/50 in Teller County, not a mandate,” Steen said. If voters deny the tax is-

sue in November, the denial could have wide-range repercussions for the county. “In Teller County, it could be costly, enforcing and monitoring the law, without any funding,” he said. In fact, while Amendment 64 does not affect the sale of medical marijuana, the law could have an impact nonetheless on that industry. “It may threaten its survival because now people can buy marijuana recreationally at a far lower price,” he said. “You can’t miss the point about all those people in Colorado doing a great job professionally, so I see the recreational marijuana as a negative.” On another issue, Steen threw cold water on the supposed auxiliary benefit for school funding. “The amendment supports the capital construction assistance fund; there are no capital construction projects planned in Teller County,” he said.


6-Opinion

6 Pikes Peak Courier View

May 15, 2013

OPINIONS / YOURS AND OURS

Officer’s Last Call in Big Thompson Canyon “I’m stuck, I’m right in the middle of it, I can’t get out...about half mile East of Drake on the highway. Tell them to get out of the low area down below. And soon as the water starts picking up … (static)… high ground… “ Colorado State Highway Patrol Sergeant Hugh Purdy’s last radio transmission at 9:15 on July 31, 1976, recorded by a dispatcher in Greeley. A fierce, sudden, but long-lasting, thunderstorm dumped nearly 12 inches of rain in four hours in the Big Thompson River watershed on the eve of the Colorado Centennial celebration. The river rose 19 feet above normal and raged through the narrow canyon killing 144 people, destroying 418 private residences and 52 businesses (138 other homes had additional harm), accounting for more than $35.5 million in damage. This earned it the title of the worst natural disaster in Colorado history. Sergeant Hugh Purdy was off duty and had been watching the Olympics with his wife at their home in Loveland, but was called by dispatcher Jay Lorance, when two of the men under his supervision were dispatched at either end of the canyon upon initial reports of rockslides on U.S. 36, according to David McComb’s 1980 book “Big Thompson: Profile of a Natural Disaster”. Officer William Miller, who was at the upper end of the canyon near Estes Park,

responded to a citizen’s report of rocks in the highway and Officer Tim Littlejohn, who, at the time of the call, was cruising just south of Fort Collins was asked to assist. Miller became the first to officially report flash flooding when he radioed the following from the upper end of the canyon. “Advise, we have a flood. The whole mountainside is gone. We have people trapped on the other side. I’m going to have to move out. I’m up to my doors in water! Advise, we can’t get to them. I’m going to get out of here before I drown!” Miller was able to abandon his car and scramble up the hillside to high ground and relative safety. At about the same time Miller was reporting this, Purdy asked Officer Littlejohn, who had made as far as Drake in the can-

Bumper stickers say a lot about us Bumper stickers are disappearing but they’re not entirely gone. Magnetic bumper stickers and window decals are still here but most people don’t bother. Honest-to-goodness-stick-it-on-yourvehicle-and-never-get-it-off bumper stickers say a lot about vehicle owners. First, that they are willing to post their feelings semi-permanently in a place strangers can see. Second, there’s the message itself. “I brake for no apparent reason!” says the vehicle owner might be tired of being tailgated. “Ex-lovers make excellent speed bumps!” likely means the owner is disappointed in love. Some stickers are all about recent political affiliations, although I have seen stickers from long-past elections, including a few about Kennedy and Camelot, Reagan and even one “I Like Ike” sticker. Nixon and Carter stickers don’t seem to have this longevity. Other stickers tell of academic affiliations. I have a “Colorado State University Alumni Association” decal on my car. I used to have a window decal that said “Vulcan Science Academy” and it was great fun to tell non-Trekkies they can find it by taking a left at Albuquerque. Then there are sports teams. Most tout the major league teams like the Rockies, Broncos, Avalanche and Nuggets. Others are a little more obscure. I didn’t know that Denver had a professional Lacrosse team until I saw “Denver Outlaws” on a cap. I’m sure Lacrosse stickers can’t be far behind. I’ve seen stickers that take sides, such as “Ban mining: let the *#$#% freeze in the Dark,” “Earth First: we’ll strip-mine the other planets later,” “Make love not war” and “Nuke ‘em all and let God sort ‘em out.” There are a lot of variations on the

theme: “What would (fill in the blank) do?” I’ve seen the blank filled with Jesus, Xena Warrior Princess, Jimmy Buffett, Gandalf, Capt. Picard, Capt. Kirk, Lady Macbeth, Robin Hood, a variety of politicians (shouldn’t you really be asking “What wouldn’t said politician do?”) and sometimes “my dog,” “my cat” or even “my parrot.” Then there are the stickers that say they’re proud of their honor student, Boy or Girl Scout or their military son or daughter. Other stickers say their child can beat up your honor student, Boy Scout or Girl Scout. So far, I haven’t seen any stickers saying their kid can beat up your U.S. Marine or U.S. Army Soldier. Then there are literary stickers, including: “Not all those who wander are lost,” “I am an Elizabeth in a Darcy-less world” and “Like totally never, ever, mor.” Sometimes stickers don’t say as much about the owner as you might think. For example, my car has a sticker that says “I’m Marching to a Different Accordion.” This might make you think I’m pretty nonconformist but I actually conform to a lot of mainstream ideologies. I’m just not telling you what they are. I do, however, believe my sticker that says: “No Farms! No Food!” So, are you willing to share your feelings with the world? Get a bumper sticker, magnet or window decal!

WE WANT TO HEAR FROM YOU If you would like to share your opinion, go to www.ourcoloradonews.com or write a letter to the editor of 300 words or less. Include your name, full address and the best telephone number to contact you. Please send letters to letters@ourcoloradonews.com.

yon, to stop and setup a roadblock to turn travelers back down the highway. Meanwhile, Purdy continued on toward Drake. Littlejohn armed with his loudspeaker and flashing lights tried to warn people in Drake to flee for their lives. In his car pushing through the high water, he was able to make it up the grade to Glen Haven. “The officer kept his wheels ahead of the water as it covered the roadway. He could hear the deep rumble of large boulders as they ground together in the dark water, the clatter of rocks bounding off cliff sides, and the splintering of wooden houses. Over his radio he briefly talked to his Sergeant,” wrote McComb. Purdy continued on to see for himself what those under his charge were reporting, but ordered an officer following to turn back and cut off entry into the canyon from below. At 9 p.m. Purdy warned of a sudden rise in the river and told the Patrol to warn those in Loveland and below the narrows of the coming surge. His next and final transmission told of his own dire circumstances. Purdy’s car was found crushed under a slide of rock and mud near his last known location, two miles downstream from Drake, along with eight other cars. According to highway patrol reports, the only item that allowed identification of the patrol car was key ring found still in

the ignition. His body was discovered on a sandbar, eight miles downstream. Officer Littlejohn was able to get his patrol car to high ground and spent the night in Drake helping as he could in the aftermath of the deluge. Later, his car became a focal point for the helicopter evacuation. “I’m grieved when I think I didn’t save more people, but how could I imagine what was coming down? I had trouble getting people to believe the feeble excuses I had, much less something of that magnitude. Now, I regret turning people back down the canyon, because we all know that anyone caught in the canyon had no chance. There was no way to foresee where the danger zones would be. Nobody really knew until it got there,” Littlejohn related in an oral history interview afterwards. “The wall of water moved so fast that, even had Highway 34 not been washed out, the only avenue of escape was up the canyon walls. Vehicles and buildings became death traps for unsuspecting campers,” according to reports by National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. Of those killed, 41 lived in the canyon. The rest were visitors to the area. Five victims reported as dead have never been found. One man reported as missing turned up, alive and well, living in Oklahoma in 2008.

LIBRARY NOTES Prescription Painkillers—Number one cause of accidental death in the US

Learn about what our local medical professionals are doing to address the problem The Rampart Library District hosts the Pikes Peak Regional Hospital and Teller County Public Health for the showing of the film “Deadly Dose” at 6:30 p.m. May 23 at the Woodland Park library. Colorado has the second highest rate of prescription-painkiller abuse in the nation, according to a new federal report. Only Oregon has a higher rate.Opiate-based painkiller prescriptions have quadrupled in the last decade, as doctors moved to treat chronic pain directly rather than dismiss it as a symptom. Many clients assume these drugs are relatively safe because they are pure, have legitimate uses, and are prescribed by medical professionals. The slippery slope begins when individuals become addicted or more commonly, misuse their prescription either with mixing their drugs, being careless about dosage, timing, or falsely assum-

Pikes Peak Courier View 1200 E. Highway 24, Woodland Park, CO 80863

GERARD HEALEY President ROB CARRIGAN Editor and Publisher SCOTT GILBERT Assistant Editor ERIN ADDENBROOKE Classifieds Mgr., National Sales Mgr. AUDREY BROOKS Business Manager SCOTT ANDREWS Creative Services Manager JOANNE HORST Sales Executive SANDRA ARELLANO Circulation Director We welcome event listings and other submissions. News and Business Press Releases Please visit ourcoloradonews.com, click on the Press Releases tab and follow easy instructions to make submissions. Calendar calendar@ourcoloradonews.com Military Notes militarynotes@ourcoloradonews.com School accomplishments, honor roll and dean’s list schoolnotes@ourcoloradonews.com Sports sports@ourcoloradonews.com Obituaries obituaries@ourcoloradonews.com To Subscribe call 303-566-4100

ing “a little more” won’t hurt. Additionally, tragic consequences have resulted from prescription drugs used by those for whom they were not prescribed, either through adolescent experimentation, or innocently “sharing” with family or friends. A panel discussion follows the film which addresses the issues and talks about the measures Colorado as well as local medical and law-enforcement entities have initiated to better monitor and control opiate-based prescription drug usage and therefore reduce the number of needless deaths. The panel includes Pikes Peak Regional Hospital’s Dr. Rick Malyszek, M.D. FACS, Trauma Medical Director; Sherilyn Skokan, RN, BSN, Director of Patient Care Services; and Tricia Sichmeller, Director of Pharmacy. Representing Teller County Public Health is Director, Martha Hubbard, RN, BSN. Also on hand, will be representatives from the Teller County Sheriff’s Dept., and the Woodland Park Police Department for questions.

Colorado Community Media Phone 719-687-3006 • Fax 303-719-687-3009

Columnists and guest commentaries The Pikes Peak Courier View features a limited number of regular columnists, found on these pages and elsewhere in the paper, depending on the typical subject the columnist covers. Their opinions are not necessarily those of the Pikes Peak Courier View. Want your own chance to bring an issue to our readers’ attention, to highlight something great in our community, or just to make people laugh? Why not write a letter of 300 words or fewer. Include your full name, address and the best number to reach you by telephone.

Email your letter to letters@ourcoloradonews.com

WE’RE IN THIS TOGETHER Our team of professional reporters, photographers and editors are out in the community to bring you the news each week, but we can’t do it alone. Send your news tips, your own photographs, event information, letters, commentaries... If it happens, it’s news to us. Please share by contacting us at ne ws@ourcoloradonews.com, and we will take it from there. After all, the Courier View is your paper.


7-Color

Pikes Peak Courier View 7

May 15, 2013

A backpain therapy that brings satisfaction According to the American Chiropractic Association, 80 percent of Americans will experience back pain sometime in their life spending at least $50 billion a year in subsequent health care. With back pain one of the most common causes for missing work, the latest research coming out of the University of Southern Denmark could be welcomed news to our nation’s employers. The research contends that four in 10 chronic low-back-pain situations has its genesis in a bacterial infection that can be cured by a generic version of the antibiotic Augmentin. Eighty percent of the 162 participants in the 6 month study reported improvement in their chronic low back pain after taking the antibiotic three times a day for 100 days. While the researchers call for more studies to better understand the science behind the results out of Denmark, there is a modality of treatment for chronic low back pain that has enjoyed impressive success for than 100 years - Chiropractic.

The ACA defines chiropractic care as: “A health care discipline, which emphasizes the inherent recuperative power of the body to heal itself without the use of drugs or surgery. The practice of chiropractic focuses on the relationship between structure (primarily the spine) and function (as coordinated by the nervous system) and how that relationship affects the preservation and restoration of health.” Chiropractic is based on the scientific fact that the spine and nervous system are

directly linked to one’s health. The nerve impulses flow from the brain down the spinal cord, which is protected by the 24 moving bones of the spine, to every organ and tissue in the body. Nerve impulses respond back to the brain to confirm that the body is functioning properly. If there are problems with the function of these moveable spinal bones, a variety of symptoms and pain syndromes can arise. A doctor of chiropractic corrects these mechanical problems in the spine by means of manual adjustments, thereby alleviating the interference with the body’s nervous system. Chiropractors receive six years of rigorous training in the sciences and health care leading to a doctor of chiropractic degree. The major difference in the training of a D.C. and an M.D. is the method of treatment. Is chiropractic safe? Studies in both New Zealand and Great Britain have reported that, while delivering millions of adjust-

ments around the world daily, “chiropractic is remarkably safe.” The prevailing opinion among experts is that chiropractic is non-invasive therefore the body’s response to it is more predictable than its reactions to drugs or surgery. Not only is it safe, it is apparently quite effective with a nationwide Gallup poll reporting that nine of 10 chiropractic patients felt their treatment was effective. How do you know if you have a problem that can be helped by chiropractic treatment? Only a doctor of chiropractic can tell you that after a consultation and physical exam. A quick check of a local phone book will reveal a number of chiropractors, who, for the most part, offer free consultations. Cord Prettyman is a certified Master Personal Trainer and the owner of Absolute Workout Fitness and Post-Re-hab Studio in Woodland Park. He can be reached at 6877437 or cordprettyman@msn.com.

The Sundance Kid and Curry brothers connection

I lived in Sundance, Wyo., for three years. That has little to do with this column but I enjoyed the movie “Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid.” As a train guy, I know that the train scenes in that movie are mainly fiction. They are however, based on facts as are the characters. This story connects us with that movie and one of the events. Robert Curry, alias Bob Lee, was one of the most badly wanted criminals in the area in 1899. He was captured in Cripple ally, Creek! He had been involved in the robbing m of a Union Pacific train at Wilcox, Wyo. The hom gang was chased for weeks across the state gh and finally into the Jackson Hole country in ently Wyoming, but they were lost. During the chase Sheriff Hazen of Converse County was killed by someone in the gang. After that, as you know if you’ve s seen the movie, there were some interestti- ing developments. Hundreds of detecd tives throughout the country were looking, g mainly for the Curry Brothers. The Hole in r of

onal S, kan, ces; Asking for help I do not make a habit of asking for anything on Facebook or by email; I usuN, ally just pray for people via these types of ives networks. That being said, I am making an excepand for tion! This EXCEPTION is near and dear to my heart! For those of you that do not know, I am the Executive Director of In The Lord’s Service. We have been helping families since August, 2001 and I am going to ask everyone to pray about what I am going to ask (If you can’t give...I would appreciate all the prayers you can muster for In The Lord’s Service). We are a Faith Based 501c3 organization and we are in need of donations, to keep fighting the good fight, and expand our services for special-needs children/adults and the elderly. As to the Special Needs Families, we are raising funds for the extras that families may not have the financial wherewithal to pay for! Therapies such as, equine therapy (miracles can happen with and on horses), physical therapy, occupational therapy, respite care, days or weekend events to give the parents a break for everyday care, vision/dental care, etc..... (the list goes on and on). For the elderly, I don’t want anyone to have to CHOOSE, do I heat my home or put food on the table, or do I purchase my prescriptions that can run into hundreds

the Wall Gang, named for a spot in western Wyoming where they hid out, does not appear in the story of Robert’s capture either but Butch and Sundance were part of the gang. Robert Curry and his brother Lewis were tracked to Cripple Creek in late 1899. The detectives were not really sure they were in the district until in early January, 1900. Lewis Curry left the district and was tracked by Pinkerton detectives to Dodson, Mo. In

LETTER TO THE EDITOR of dollars) that I need so desperately, this can be literally life or death situation! The elderly also are in need of home maintenance, painting, roof repair, electrical/plumbing, yard care, fire mitigation (thinning of trees and leaf removal), snow removal services, etc. The Lord has recently put it on my heart to help in some way with foster/adoption for children without families that are just in the government system waiting for a good family to call theirs!! As I stated, at the beginning of this email message, please pray and if you have the financial ability to help someone in need, then In the Lord’s Service can make an even bigger impact on the individuals that we assist. Thank you for your prayerful consideration and may God bless you all days of your life! Our address is: In The Lord’s Service, P.O. Box 280 Woodland Park, Co. 80866. I can be reached at 636-293-9113 cellular or 719-873-4857 office, text/Facebook, or email me, prayers, words of encouragement or testimonies! Your heartfelt TAX deductible contribution, would not only go a long way towards the expansion of services, but help us in other areas that we currently provide. In Christ’s Service: Bob Piercefield Executive Director In The Lord’s Service

WE WANT TO HEAR FROM YOU If you would like to share your opinion, go to www.ourcoloradonews.com or write a letter to the editor. Include your name, full address and the best telephone number to contact you. Please send letters to rcarrigan@ourcoloradonews.com.

February, he was located in the little town just outside Kansas City where an arrest was attempted. He escaped but was later found, shot and killed. A telegram back to Cripple Creek asked the sheriff to locate Robert Curry and arrest him. Teller County was fairly new at the time, having just been separated from El Paso County. Undersheriff Harrington, assisted by deputies Matt Deering and Joe O’Brien, found him dealing a game of stud poker in the gambling room at the Antlers saloon on Bennett Avenue. The arrest went fairly quickly, as they wanted it to go. After answering a few simple questions they were sure it was the right man. In arresting him, a search found a huge pearl handled six shooter he had hidden in his coat. Curry went along without too much trouble but was not told the full story of his arrest until he was in the jail. It was then

that they told him he would be on the way to Wyoming once the details were worked out. The Curry Brothers had a history in the Cripple Creek Mining District. They had lived in the various camps since 1894, and had made quite a few friends. They would come here to “cool off,” working in various saloons. Robert Curry said little, and was quietly taken by train up to Cheyenne a short time after his arrest. I have not followed this story to see where it goes. The story of his arrest in Cripple Creek does not say much more about the four others that took part in the train robbery, but the memory of the incident as told in the movie certainly makes it fun. Mel McFarland, artist, author, retired teacher and railroader, is a Colorado Springs native who has a strong interest in the events of this area’s past.

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Colorado Community Media was created to connect you to 23 community papers with boundless opportunity and rewards. We now publish: Adams County Sentinel, Arvada Press, Castle Rock News Press, Centennial Citizen, Douglas County News Press, Elbert County News, Englewood Herald, Golden Transcript, Highlands Ranch Herald, Lakewood Sentinel, Littleton Independent, Lone Tree Voice, North JeffCo Westsider, Northglenn-Thornton Sentinel, Parker Chronicle, Pikes Peak Courier View, South Platte Independent, Teller County Extra, Tri-Lakes Tribune, Westminster Window, and Wheat Ridge Transcript.


8

8 Pikes Peak Courier View

May 15, 2013

teller county arrests The following list of arrests is provided by area law enforcement agencies. An arrest is not an indication of guilt or innocence and there might be several people with the same name living in the county.

Cripple Creek Police Department May 4 Terry Carlos Montoya, 36, of Colorado Springs was arrested and charged with driving under restraint, possession of illegal weapon and obedience to traffic control device. He was released on summons. Tonia Shetina, 38, of Colorado Springs/ Widefield was arrested on a warrant charging failure to appear on charges of aggravated motor vehicle theft and theft receiving and was transported to the Teller County Jail. May 10 Daniel Gottschall, 29, of Cripple Creek was summonsed and released on charges of false reporting to authorities and criminal mischief. May 11

Jessica Parsons, 26, of Cripple Creek was summonsed and released on charge of assault in the third degree.

Teller County Sheriff’s Office April 30 Andrew Aguirre, 29, of Pueblo was arrested on a warrant charging failure to appear on an original charge of driving under the influence. Bond was set at $4,000. May 2 Christina Marie Hilt, 33, of Manitou Springs was arrested on a warrant charging failure to appear on an original charge of criminal mischief, theft, disorderly conduct and harassment. Bond was set at $1,000. Jason Victor Sterner, 33, of Fairplay was arrested on a warrant charging failure to appear on an original charge of loud muffler, possession of under two ounces of marijuana and driving under restraint. Bond was set at $100. Tony Eugene Bell, 47, of Colorado Springs was arrested on a warrant charging failure to appear on an original charge of

driving without a driver’s license. This was a no bond warrant. May 3 Conner Frederick Smith, 19, of Colorado Springs was arrested on charges of driving under restraint, failure to present evidence of insurance and speed regulations. Bond was set at $1,000. Robert James Donnelly, 30, of Woodland Park was arrested on a warrant charging failure to comply on an original charge of possession of a schedule II controlled substance. Bond was set at $50,000. Jeffrey E. Nedjoika, 45, of Divide was arrested on a warrant charging failure to comply on an original charge of reckless endangerment. Bond was set at $1,000. May 4 Tonia Marie Shetina, 38, of Widefield was arrested on a warrant charging failure to appear on an original charge of felony aggravated motor vehicle theft and felony theft by receiving. Bond was set at $10,000. May 5 Jason William Martin, 43, of Colorado Springs was arrested on charges of driving

under revocation, driving under the influence of alcohol, defective head light and open container of an alcoholic beverage containing alcohol. Bond was set at $11,000. May 7 Carl Dee Martin, 39, of Divide was arrested on charges of violation of a protection order. Bond was set at $500. James Darryl Newell, 27, of Woodland Park was arrested on a warrant charging false imprisonment, violation of a protection order, third degree assault, child abuse, obstruction of telephone and domestic violence. Bond was set at $6,000. Christina Renee Metcalf, 36, of Jonesboro, Ark., was arrested on two warrants; first warrant charging failure to appear on an original charge of amphetamine possession, second warrant charging felony dangerous drugs. Both are no bond warrants. May 8 Holly Kathleen Haynes, 38, of Colorado Springs was arrested on a warrant charging failure to appear on an original charge of disorderly conduct and harassment. Bond was set at $2,000.

Brown rides to the rescue By Pat Hill

phill@ourcoloradonews.com A hero for many in Ute Pass and southern Teller County, Clay Brown spread financial optimism among the Green Mountain Falls’ trustees this month. Regional manager for the Department of Local Affairs, Brown is the go-to person for financial and technical assistance for local governments. “We are a unique beast; you won’t find a department like ours in any state government,” Brown said. At issue is the town’s grant application to DOLA to help finance the new town hall at Elk Crossing on the west side of town. The historic hall was destroyed by arson fire in February 2012. For the trustees, the burning question was whether or not the town had a chance to secure the grant in a time of steep competition. Brown offered a hint. “This is an opportunity for us to invest and help you out; we’ve invested in pretty much every town hall, especially after a disaster,” Brown said. “I think this is going to score pretty well, in several categories.” For an edge up, Brown suggested submitting the application during the second funding cycle that begins Aug. 1. “If you get the funding I write the contract and do all the disbursements,” he said. According to Rob McArthur, the project manager, the grant request will be roughly $600,000. On a positive note, with the restoration by the Colorado legislature of the state’s energy\mineral impact funds, DOLA has increased its funding base, Brown said. However, even without the energy/

mineral funds, during the lean years from 2009 to 2012, DOLA awarded $24 million in grants to projects in El Paso County and $12 million in Teller County, with leverages of $66 million and $18 million, respectively, in each county. “I spend most of my time in rural Colorado. That’s where our focus is that and where we try to invest most of our money,” Brown said. As well, DOLA grants provide an economic infusion into rural communities. “This really helps the economy, puts people to work, contractors and workers, so there’s a spinoff benefit to the community, especially when you do a big project,” Brown said. Despite the good news from Brown, the town still faces a hurdle, providing matching funds as a requirement to receive the DOLA grant. The funds could range from 25 to 40 percent of the total. To that end, trustee Jane Newberry, the public information officer for the project, has initiated a fundraising campaign, reaching out to the citizens. “This is a great time to contribute to the future of the town,” Newberry said “Every dollar gifted to the reconstruction project can give us that much more assurance of a great town hall and a lasting legacy.” Donations can be sent to Chris Frandina at Town Hall, PO Box 524, Green Mountain Falls, CO, 80819. Donations will be accepted throughout the project. While Rob Seever, local architect with Keystone Associates, has presented designs for the town hall, the bidding for architectural and engineering is open until May 31.

it’s official

The Pikes Peak Courier View newspaper and Exostrategies share the same building that once housed the entire offices of the Courier. Today, the newspaper office is on the upper level, on Paradise Circle, while Exostrategies, whose owners are Dan Heimerdinger and his wife, Evie Vance, has the entire first level. The new signs went up May 7 and were done by Spencer Swann, of Canyon Signs. Pictured with Swann, right, is Rudy Kovac, from left, and Greg Filip. Photo by Pat Hill


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Pikes Peak Courier View 9

May 15, 2013

Homeowners turn out for Day of Service

nfluand erageBy Pat Hill ,000.phill@ourcoloradonews.com

s ar- A movement that began slowly otec-and slowly built to a mini-frenzy, with homeowners in Woodland dlandPark cutting, trimming and rergingmoving limbs and debris from otec-their yards. buse, Galvanized by the Waldo c vio-Canyon Fire, with memories of the Hayman Fire lingering, ones-Scott Lord and Bonnie Sumner ants;have led the charge in Woodar onland Park, inspiring their neighsses-bors to protect their homes from dan-fire with adequate defensible nts. space. Each was instrumental in having their neighborhoods, Forest rado Edge and Majestic Park, respecrging ge oftively, recognized as Firewise

Communities. As Gov. John Hickenlooper declared May 4 as Wildfire Preparedness Day of Service in Colorado, the two organizers mustered their forces for a successful day of hacking away at dangerous debris, for a project that united neighbors with a common purpose. The day began with a workshop at Northeast Teller County Fire Protection District where Dave Root, with Colorado State Forest Service, offered tips and warnings about leaving homes vulnerable. From there, at least 30 homeowners fanned out to their respective neighborhoods. Lord was properly enthusiastic to his neighbors’ response to the day of service.

“We, the Woodland Park Friends of Forest Edge, treated 7.31 acres from 9 parcels with more than 48 yards of chips removed, with 22 volunteers doing the work,” he said. “We collectively put in 188 hours, with 2 chippers and a 2-yard tandem dump truck.” With a profusion of fires in Colorado recently, Sumner was encouraged by the hiring of Patti Maguire as the Firewise advisor for the Southwest region of Colorado. “Her job is to be the liaison with the state forestry department and local fire departments to implement Firewise techniques and achieve Firewise recognition status,” Sumner said.

National and state representatives of the nonprofit Firewise organization added star power to the wildfire preparedness day May 4. From left, Tyler Lambert, chief of Northeast Teller County Fire Protection District; Bonnie Sumner, volunteer extraordinaire; Patti Maguire, the region’s Firewise liaison; Michele Steinberg, who represents the national Firewise organization, Cathy Prudhomme, Wildland Fire Youth Operations Division in Denver and Scott Lord, another volunteer extraordinaire. Courtesy photo

Bond

e

With pot legal, here come laws, regulations

Legislature wraps up work on package fromof regulation bills on in

d $12By Vic Vela es of vvela@ourcoloradonews. ly, incom

Colo- The state Legislature and may have passed rules inney,”volving sales and usage of

recreational marijuana in eco- Colorado, but that doesn’t ities.mean there aren’t unreeoplesolved issues surrounding here’sthe newly created industry. espe- Questions loom as to rownwhether voters will support

the tax model that legisla, the tors put in place to support atch- retail pot regulations, and e thewhether the federal govern-

ment will intervene. Still, lawmakers believe they did good work creating y, thelaws to regulate an industry proj- where every movement is in aign,uncharted territory. “Given the short time o the frame, I think we’ve done Every the best job we possibly ojectcould,” said Rep. Dan Pae of a bon, D-Denver, a major driver of pot legislation this dinasession. “This was the projntainect I undoubtedly spent the cept-most amount of time on this session, to make sure withwe got it right.” signs Pabon was the sponsor itec- of House Bill 1317, which y 31. creates regulations for the operation of retail marijuana stores. Retail pot shops are to open beginning Jan. 1, under the supervision of the Department of Revenue. There will be limits as to what retail marijuana stores can and cannot do, as well as how much marijuana consumers are allowed to purchase. Some late-session amendments to the pot legislation would have allowed out-of-state residents to purchase greater amounts of the drug, as well as to permit the existence of marijuana clubs, where people could congregate to use the drug. However, those amendments failed. Sen. Cheri Jahn, DWheat Ridge, along with Pabon, was instrumental in crafting the Amendment 64 bills. She opposed those amendments, and said it’s important for the state to go slow in rolling out the new industry. Marijuana use and sales are illegal under federal law, and the U.S. Attorney’s Office has yet to provide per-

insight as to how it will respond to the new legislation. So, lawmakers like Jahn say they wanted to make sure they put in place regulations that support strong oversight and that also keep the drug away from children. “We have so much to lose if we don’t do this right,” Jahn said. “And because we have so many `I don’t know what I don’t knows,’ I just think we have to move really cautiously.” But regulations surrounding the industry are bound to change, and lawmakers certainly will address many other pot-related issues in the coming years. “It’s been 80 years since Prohibition and were still passing alcohol laws today,” said Pabon. “We’ve had 80 years to protect that system. We’ve had six months to implement this one.”

Voters to rule on tax

Another key piece of Amendment 64 legislation came in the form of House Bill 1318, which will ask voters to support a 15 percent excise tax, and an initial 10 percent sales tax on retail marijuana. House Republicans unanimously opposed the bill, even though the bill received bipartisan support in the Senate. Rep. Frank McNulty, R-Highlands Ranch, cautioned that if voters do not approve the tax, the money could end up coming out of the state’s general fund. “It was an issue of making sure we were protecting the state,” McNulty said. “We supported suspending retail operations if the tax doesn’t pass. If the tax doesn’t pass ... and if you’re not putting other options in front of voters, everything that state government does is vulnerable.” Fears over what the voters might end up doing in November led to a late-session effort aimed at a partial repeal of Amendment 64, one that was supported by McNulty. The resolution called for the suspension of retail marijuana sales if the pot taxes are not supported by voters. It would not have affected the decriminalization aspect of Amendment 64, so it still would have been legal to smoke the

drug. However, that legislation died almost as quickly as it was introduced in the Senate. Democratic Senate President John Morse teamed up with fellow Colorado Springs Sen. Bill Cadman, the chamber’s minority leader, to introduce the legislation. The resolution passed in a hastily scheduled committee hearing, just three days before the session ended. But it was never brought to the floor of the Senate for consideration. Morse said he “didn’t have the votes” to get the resolution passed. But he said he hoped the crafting of the legislation sent a message to the pro-Amendment 64 lobby, that they need to ensure the tax rate passes in November. Pabon said he didn’t think the partial repeal effort “ever would have gotten out of (a House) committee,

let alone to the floor.” “At the end of the day, the voters have already spoken about this issue and they don’t need to take another vote on it,” Pabon said. Gov. John Hickenlooper said he’s confident that Amendment 64 backers will work with lawmakers in making sure that the taxes pass in November, so that the state isn’t stuck with the bill. “I think we’ll all work on it,” the governor said. “I think they’ll commit resources because if it doesn’t pass, their lives will become chaos. And I don’t even want to speculate what the federal government will do. I don’t even want to speculate what the people of Colorado will do. “They can take it nonchalantly at their own risk.”

Provisions of bills

Here are some of the key aspects of each of the three

bills that deal with the regulation of retail pot sales and use: House Bill 1317: • In-state residents are allowed to purchase up to one ounce of marijuana at retail shops in a single transaction. Visitors to the state can purchase up to a quarter of an ounce per transaction. • Marijuana clubs — places where people could congregate to smoke the drug — are not allowed. • Pot shops cannot sell food or drinks that do not contain marijuana. However, they can sell products meant for using the drug, such as pipes and rolling papers. Stores also are not allowed to use known food products or cartoon characters to market marijuana products. • All marijuana-themed magazines, such as “High Times,” must be kept behind pot store counters. • Pot stores cannot be

mobile, operating like food trucks. • Allows existing medical marijuana stores to start retail pot shops before new businesses. • There must be common ownership between dispensaries and cultivation facilities, and 70 percent of the marijuana grown must come from that ownership. Senate Bill 283: • Revises criminal statutes that deal with children. The bill treats minors possessing marijuana the same as it does underage persons who possess alcohol. It also prohibits marijuana from being allowed on school grounds • Sets up law enforcement training that deals with roadside sobriety tests. • Prohibits open containers of marijuana from being inside vehicles. • Creates the same indoor air-quality restrictions as those dealing with tobacco.

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Vincen the Wi tion pr

Brennan Arndt, right, a Woodland Park High School student won three games and lost two at a recent chess tournament at Palmer High School in Colorado Springs. Courtesy photo Woodland Park High School student Brandon Farmer had a strong showing at a recent chess tournament at Palmer High School in Colorado Springs. Courtesy photo

WPHS chess player achieves worldwide ranking Special to the Courier

Woodland Park RE-2 School District Congratulations to Woodland Park High School freshman Gunnar Andersen for taking first at the recent chess tournament against Palmer High School. Anderson remains undefeated in both of this year’s tournaments against Palmer. One of his wins was in only six moves. Congratulations too to Brandon Farmer, Falon Watson and Brennan Arndt for strong showings at the tournament, each having three wins and two losses. Gunnar is a rated player worldwide, meaning he holds a rank amongst worldwide competitors. He sometimes plays with his back to the chess board, calling out his moves to his opponent. His opponent, in turn, calls his or her moves to Gunnar. Amazingly, Gunnar is able to keep track of all moves without ever looking at the board. He has never lost a game playing this way, and even won against two players at the same time playing “blind.”

Charm May 9 family the fam signifi South

Woodland Park High School ninth-grader Gunnar Anderson is a worldwide ranking chess player, who can keep track of his own and his opponent’s moves in his head. He took first place at a recent chess tournament at Palmer High School in Colorado Springs. Courtesy photo

Woodland Park High School student Falon Watson is one of four students who had strong showings at a recent chess tournament at Palmer High School in Colorado Springs. Courtesy photo


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Pikes Peak Courier View 11

May 15, 2013

Vincente Vlasco has no problem reaching the top tier of walls in the meeting area at Church in the Wildwood in Green Mountain Falls. The church is in the midst of a comprehensive renovation project.

Church dresses up for Green Box Arts Festival By Pat Hill

phill@ourcoloradonews.com Things are hopping in Green Mountain Falls. With the upcoming Green Box Arts Festival and the June delivery of the Tomas Saraceno sculpture from New York, there is a feeling of anticipation in the air. At Church in the Wildwood, the sound of hammers, drills and saws signal renovation and rejuvenation for the historic church built in 1889. “We are working really hard to make sure we are finished by the time the festival starts on June 23,” said Pastor David Shaw. “We expect to be finished by June 15.” Funded by a $74,000 grant from the Kirkpatrick Family Fund, the

project is another in a long line of renovations and cultural infusions from the fund’s president, Christian Keesee. Keesee is a part-time resident of Green Mountain Falls. The church renovation provides handicap accessibility on the west side of the building which leads to the revised main entrance. “ It’s important to us to correct the accessibility; we want everybody to feel equally welcome by having the same entryway,” Shaw said. The new entryway includes a lighted covered canopy and stained glass windows at the side of the door. The renovation incorporates the front room, the lower Fellow-

Pastor Dave Shaw hopes the renovation of Church in the Wildwood is completed by June 23, when the Green Box Arts Festival comes to town. The renovation is funded by a grant from the Kirkpatrick Family Fund. Photos by Pat Hill

‘We are working really hard to make sure we are finished by the time the festival starts on June 23.’ David Shaw, pastor ship Hall, which is a throwback to the 1970s, Shaw said. “With the old carpet, it looked like we weren’t doing anything and we’re doing a ton of things.” With weekly meals for the neighbors at the food pantry as

well as a volunteer program for the town’s senior citizens, the church is a vital part of the community. When Keesee “adopted” the town a few years ago, the church was among the beneficiaries,

23 Community papers

hosting rehearsals for Keigwin + Company whose dancers perform annually at the Green Box festival. This year Keesee has outdone himself. In June, the town will take delivery on the 16-module “Cloud City,” Saraceno sculpture, which the sculptor terms “an international space station.” Keesee has loaned the piece to the Metropolitan Museum of Art, where is has been displayed on the roof garden. As the highlight of the twoweek arts festival, the sculpture is expected to attract national and international attention.

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Charmee and Gary Andrews brought their candy business, Andrews Candies, to Woodland Park and opened for business May 9. Gary Andrews’ parents started the business in their home 58 years ago in Arkadelphia, Ark. Today, the Andrews family, which includes their sons, Jeff and Brett, offer a variety of nut brittle, each hand-made at the shop. As well, the family makes peanut and pecan patties. The Andrews feature their candies at shows across the nation and have a significant mail-order business. Along the way, Charmee became famous for her chocolate fudge and was featured in Southern Living magazine. Photo by Pat Hill

buzz business The Business Buzz features news about the economic scene, promotions, acquisitions and expansions. Contact Pat Hill at phill@ourcoloradonews.com or 687-3006. Sturman Industries in Woodland Park laid off 13 employees last week. The layoffs stem from a delay in payment from an un-

identified customer. The Woodland Park Downtown Development Authority is creating a quarterly newsletter that will be available in hard copy at local banks, the DDA office at the Centennial Trailhead, City Hall and the Woodland Park Chamber of Commerce.

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12 Pikes Peak Courier View

May 15, 2013

Second-graders rated A on Shakespeare By Pat Hill

phill@ourcoloradonews.com The ideal foil for her gifted and talented students, Candy Mowery exudes enthusiasm and a sense of drama. With a flair for the theatrical, in gesture and proclamation, Mowery transferred her intensity, her reverence for Shakespeare, to inspire a performance of “Midsummer Night’s Dream,” starring her second-grade students at Ute Pass Elementary School. “I’ve done Shakespeare for many years with third-, fourthand fifth-grade students. This is my first with second-grade,” she said. After a stunning performance, albeit only 10 minutes, by her students, Mowery was nearly dancing down the halls with excitement. “We’ve read the whole play, they know the whole story and were crushed that we’re only doing 10 minutes,” she said. “But it just proves what kids can do.” For their first performance, in the afternoon of May 7, the

nine actors were clearly enjoying their roles, thrusting their arms in the air to give their characters the proper emphasis or displaying emotions in tune with the script. As an experiment, Mowery is thrilled, perhaps, exonerated by her faith in the second-graders. “They don’t have to walk up to a microphone - if you teach them from the very beginning they can project (their voices),” she said. As producer and director, Mowery becomes part of the audience during the performance, the second of which was that evening for their parents. “If I stand backstage, then they never quite master it,” she said. “I have always been in the audience.” The actors were Kameron Becker as Oberon, Taylor Hansen as Titania, Elena Revis as Puck, Nicole Wickes as Peas-Blossom, Charlie Morgan as Cobweb, Riley Shearer as Bottom, Delaney Bartko as Thisbe, Aidan McQuagge as Lion and Garrett Savage as Wall.

In no particular order, the cast of “ Midsummer Night’s Dream,” all second-graders at Ute Pass Elementary School; Kameron Becker, Taylor Hansen, Elena Revis, Nicole Wickes, Charlie Morgan, Riley Shearer, Delaney Bartko, Aidan McQuagge and Garrett Savage. Photo by Pat Hill

High Altitude Youth Chorus to perform at WPHS By Special to the Courier Colorado Choral

Springs

Children’s

Eighteen months ago the Colorado Springs Children’s Chorale embarked on an experiment known as the High Altitude Youth Chorus. The Children’s Chorale had reached a critical juncture in its mission to provide the youth of the Pikes Peak region with a professional grade choral experience. The essence of the problem was that the chorale’s geographical sphere of influence had outgrown its centralized structure. It no longer made sense to operate out of one central location because singers who lived too far away were missing out on the opportunity to participate. This was especially true where Teller County was concerned. Though, many wonderful singers from Woodland Park, Divide, and surrounding areas have enjoyed membership in the chorale and benefited from its programs over

The Colorado Springs Children’s Choral brought the High Altitude Youth Chorus to Teller County two seasons ago. The chorus will show county residents just how good they’ve become with a free performance at 7:30 p.m. on May 17 at Woodland Park High School. Donations will be excepted but the chorus members are excited by the opportunity to perform for their families, friends and fellow community members. Courtesy photo the years, others have found the commute to Colorado Springs to be challenging. For nearly a de-

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cade the Children’s Chorale has been building relationships with schools, families, and community

leaders in Teller County through a series of residencies and workshops in local elementary schools. All these folks said their community needed a choir that operated locally and better fit their lives as Teller County residents. The chorale’s leadership decided that the situation provided a perfect opportunity for expansion and, with seed money from the National Endowment for the Arts, the High Altitude Youth Chorus was born. Two seasons have now gone by and the chorus is going strong. Each week young singers from around Teller County gather in a local school for two hours of tutoring by chorale Outreach Coordinator Lori Bammesberger, who also conducts the Pikes Peak Singers. Traveling to Teller County with Bammesberger, is accompanist, chorale alum Carlo Migliaccio, a high-school age dance captain and, frequently, chorale Executive Director Marcia Hendricks. The program has been so suc-

cessful, in fact, that this season the chorale expanded its Teller County offerings to include its Overture Performance Prep Class curriculum for young singers grades K-2 and world renowned music educator Ginger Littleton has joined the menagerie making its way up Ute Pass each week. The result of all this investment is that at 7:30 p.m. on May 17 these young Teller County performers will take the stage at Woodland Park High School ready to wow you with music from Mozart to Broadway to The Blues. They will be joined by the Pikes Peak Singers. The concert will culminate with the magic of children from many Pikes Peak region communities singing together with one voice. Admission is free and while donations will be accepted at the door, this is a unique event and a wonderful opportunity for the youth of Teller County that you can support just by showing up and enjoying the show.

Of yellow ribbons and sheriff ’s volunteers Two local organizations plan fundraisers for their causes By Norma Engelberg

nengelberg@ourcoloradonews.com There are no big oak trees at Lions Park in Woodland Park so Welcome Home Warriors will be tying yellow ribbons to a large pine. Doloretta Barber and Donna Finicle have planned the yellow ribbon fund drive not only to raise money to support returning soldiers, veterans and their families who need help coping with the effects of war and family separation, but also to create a Guinness World Record. Barber appeared before the Woodland Park City Council on May 2 to tell them about the event and seek support. The organization will be taking donations for yellow ribbons and hope to decorate the tree with 8,465, one ribbon for each foot in elevation the town is above sea level. “This town has attitude but it also has altitude and we want to use that altitude to support out returning warriors,” Barber said. “People can get

‘This town has attitude but it also has altitude and we want to use that altitude to support our returning warriors.’ Doloretta Barber a ribbon for as little as a $1 donation but we’re hoping for larger donations. For an $80 donation you can get your name and logo on a commemorative poster.” Volunteers are also needed to make the bows, collect donations and decorate the tree. For more information, contact Finicle at welcomehomewarrior@comcast.net or at 719-439-3621 or Barber at rabarber4@gmail.com or 719-6876542. Also at the Woodland Park City Council meeting, Teller County Sheriff’s Office’s Lt. Jason Mikesell talked about the Honorary Deputy Sheriff’s Association’s annual Charity Golf Tournament. This year, he said, the association is partnering with the Pikes

Peak International Hill Climb Association and the June 25 tournament will be at the Shining Mountain Golf Course in Woodland Park. The fundraiser is being developed to raise money for the Sheriff’s Office Auxiliary, which includes the Sheriff’s Posse and other volunteer programs. The deadline to sign up and pay the entry fee is June 1. The event, which starts at 7 a.m., is open to both individuals and groups and sponsorships are available. There will also be a silent auction and prizes, including those for the top three teams with the lowest team net score, closest to the pin (men and women), longest drive and hole-in-one. For more information, call 719687-9652.


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May 15, 2013

CC FIRE STATION #3 MUSEUM OPENING SOON

The Cripple Creek Fire Station # 3 Museum was built in 1896. There will be an open house on May 18 and the museum opens for the summer on May 24.From 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Friday through Monday Les Batson will portray Fireman James McCormack. Photo by Norma Engelberg

WWII vets visit memorials 29 are guests of Denver nonprofit for D.C. trip By Tom Munds

tmunds@ourcoloradonews.com Twenty-nine World War II veterans from communities along the Front Range, representing every branch of the military service, used words like “amazing,” “memorable” and “emotional” to describe their Rocky Mountain Honor Flight trip to Washington, D.C. “This was a very special trip for me. It was very memorable,” Littleton resident Frank Epperson, who flew with the famous Flying Tigers in China, said of the May 2-4 trip. “I appreciate all the honor flight did to make this a special trip for those of us who served in World War II. I was humbled and honored when people I have never met come up to thank me for my service. This is a trip I will not forget.” Rocky Mountain Honor Flight, a Denver-based nonprofit, gives World War II veterans the opportunity to visit the national World War II Memorial in Washington. The volunteers of Rocky Mountain Honor Flight did all they could to make this a very special trip for the guests of honor. Active-duty

military personnel met the veterans at the airport and helped them with their baggage. Then, people in the airport and on the plane applauded when the presence of World War II veterans was announced. The flight landed at Baltimore and a fire truck shot an arc of water over the plane, there were flag-waving volunteers as the group got off the plane and a brass band greeted them at baggage claim. Englewood resident Sel Hewitt, a radio operator on a B-29 in the Pacific during the war, said the trip was fantastic and was a neverto-be-forgotten experience. “I think every veteran appreciated every minute of that trip,” he said. “Everything was special, the places we visited and the contacts we had with people of all ages who were interested in what we had done and what we were doing.” Franktown resident Doug Brown, an Army veteran, agreed. “This trip was pretty unique, as were the greetings and bands and the other special things that were done for our visit,” Brown said. “We were greeted and treated very well. I was in an armored unit that took part in the invasion of Germany. It was very important to me to talk to people who had similar experiences.” Planners kept the vet-

erans busy. Among other activities, they visited the World War II Memorial, the Vietnam and Korean memorials, and watched the changing of the guard at the Tomb of the Unknowns at Arlington National Cemetery. Some activities just happened. For example, the Dothan (Ala.) High School band was at the World War II Memorial during the honor flight visit and they performed a special concert for the veterans. Numerous student groups were at the World War II Memorial, and Chase Burrows, a student at a Sumter, S.C., middle school, spent quite a bit of time talking to the veterans. “This is special to me. My great-grandfather died in World War II, when his plane was shot down. I have read about the war and we studied it in school but talking to these men means a lot more than reading and studying.” He said he talked to Dick Olson about his experience in a submarine, to Dick Frank about his experience as a Marine and Littleton resident Hos Varner about how he joined the Coast Guard and was assigned to crews bringing ships back from the Philippines. “I really thank these men for what they did,” Burrows said. “They are really heroes in my eyes.”

WW II veterans Greg Lawrence of Littleton, left, and Marv Olsen of Denver look at names on the Vietnam Memorial. The men were part of the May 2-4 honor flight to Washington, D.C. Photo by Tom Munds

On the flight back to Denver, the veterans had a surprise with a special “mail call” as each man received an envelope with 20 to 25 letters from family, friends and, more often, from people they had never met thanking them for their service. “This is a surprise and it is tremendous,” Vic Olson said as he read the letters. “I truly appreciate the letters and the sentiments they expressed. It is moving and very, very special.” The finale came when the veterans arrived at Denver International Airport, where they were met by a cheering, applauding crowd of about 200 friends, family, military personnel, police officers and firefighters in uniform and well-wishers. Members of the Patriot Guard lined the wall holding American flags, and the El Jebel pipe band played to welcome the veterans home.

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14 Pikes Peak Courier View

May 15, 2013

This angler is fishing in a stream at Rocky Mountain National Park. The new Colorado Fishing Atlas, offered by Colorado Parks and Wildlife, tells anglers where they can find fishing opportunities. Courtesy photo by Wayne LewisColorado Parks and Wildlife

This man holds a 41.5 pound lake trout he caught in Blue Mesa Reservoir. The new Colorado Fishing Atlas, offered by Colorado Parks and Wildlife, tells anglers where they can find fishing opportunities. Courtesy photos from Colorado Parks and Wildlife

State offers new online fishing resource Special to The Tribune and Courier

cific interest or proximity to your home or destination. Use the simple map interface to locate and view recommended opportunities for the family, remote fly fishing or ice fishing. Additional information such as handicap accessible fishing access, stocked waters, boat ramps, special fishing regulations, stream gages, license agents and Gold Medal waters is included overlaid on top of Bing™ street maps, U.S. Geological Survey topographic maps or high-resolution color aerial photography.

Colorado Parks and Wildlife

Whether you’re a seasoned angler or you’ve never picked up a rod, finding a place to fish in Colorado has never been easier! Colorado Parks and Wildlife has launched several new tools for anglers ready to enjoy everything Colorado fishing has to offer. The Colorado Fishing Atlas, the latest interactive mapping tool offered by Colorado Parks and Wildlife, allows users to search for fishing opportunities by species, spe-

Sheriff ’s office indentifies suspect from officer involved shooting On May 11 at 2 a.m., two officers from the Manitou Springs Police Department were conducting an investigation at the La Fon Motel at 123 Manitou Avenue. During the investigation an altercation ensued and the suspect fired at one of the officers who returned fire, striking the suspect.

The officer was not injured; the suspect was transported to a local hospital. The suspect is identified as 37-year old Christopher Clemons and is currently listed in stable condition. The El Paso County Sheriff’s Office and the 4th Judicial District Attorney’s Office are investigating the incident.

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The atlas also includes a printable “Fishing Resource Report” that provides nearby state and federal management agency offices, emergency facilities, campgrounds and fishing license agents. The Atlas can be found online through the fishing page on Colorado Parks and Wildlife website at http://cpw.state.co.us. New users of the Colorado Fishing Atlas can also watch short video tutorials that explain the system. In addition to the new interactive Colorado Fishing Atlas, Colorado anglers can

now share tips, share recipes, get the latest conditions, find a fishing buddy, find a fishing clinic, ask questions, or post pictures of their latest catch on the Colorado Parks and Wildlife Fishing page on Facebook. Facebook users can find and “like” the new page by searching for “CPW Fishing” or by going to http://facebook.com/CPWFishing. If Twitter is your social media platform of choice, Colorado Parks and Wildlife (@ COParksWildlife) has launched a Twitter feed for anglers. Follow the fish on Twitter @CPWFish.

THINGS TO DO MAY 15

MAY 18

CYCLING CLUB. The Mountain Top Cycling Club would like

SUPPORT GROUP. The Woodland Park Parkinson Support Group will meet from 10-11:30 a.m. May 18 at the Woodland Park Library, in the third floor board room. Our guest speaker will be Patti Glatfelter, a physical therapist. For questions email wpparkinson@gmail.com.

to invite everyone that has a bicycle, weather it is a mountain bike, road bike or a not quite sure kind of bike, to participate in the May 15 Ride of Silence. The Ride of Silence is a slow paced ride with little or no talking. It is to pay tribute to the people that were injure or killed while riding their bikes. In 2012 there were 8 people that were killed in the state of Colorado according to the League of American Bicyclists website. The registration check-in will be at the northeast corner of the Safeway parking lot. You can take however much time as you need to make it up hill to the staging area, Hwy 24 and County Rd 25. At 6 p.m. there will be a police escort through Woodland Park to the Safeway parking lot. Two miles down hill, a great opportunity to ride as a family. There will be a reception provided by Wild Wings, Subway and donations from Paradise liquors, Nuts and Bolts and True Life Medicine. We would like everyone to register on prerace.com, search Woodland Park. The Ride of Silence is a free event. If you register before May 1, you will be guaranteed a free bicycle angle pin. Call Debbie for information, 719-687-2489.

AUTHOR PROGRAM. A live streaming program from Dan Brown, internationally known author of Da Vinci code, will be shown at 5:30 p.m. May 15 at the Woodland Park and Florissant public libraries. In “An Evening of Codes, Symbols, and Secrets,” Brown will discuss his new novel, “Inferno,” as well as science, religion, codes, book publishing, movie making, and a few surprise topics. This will be his only public appearance. Come to either library in the district and be entered into a drawing for a copy of “Inferno!” For more information call 687-9281 ext. 132. MAY 16 HISTORY PROGRAM. Bill Reich relates the results of his research into the Colorado railroad houses, including the local Doyle ice house, at 7 p.m. May 16 at Palmer Lake Town Hall, 28 Valley Crescent, Palmer Lake. His presentation will include photographs showing various aspects of the ice industry. This Palmer Lake Historical Society event is free and refreshments will be served. PLANT SALE. On May 21, it’s time to pick up plants ordered through Prospect Home Care & Hospice’s Johnny Jump Up plant sale at the site of purchase. Call 719-687-0549. THROUGH MAY 17 STUDENT ART show. The Mountain Artists’ Student Art Show is ongoing through May 17 at the Woodland Park Public Library. Check out the Galleria on the first floor for 83 outstanding pieces of art submitted by Teller County high school Students. Call 687-9281 ext. 132 for more information.

HIGH ALTITUDE landscaping. Teller County master gardeners present a high altitude landscaping program from 8:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. May 18 at 540 Manor Court, Woodland Park. Topics include water law and rain harvesting, planting spring bulbs, FireWise landscaping, selecting the right tree/shrub and planting techniques, pruning and mistletoe management, and controlling wildlife. The cost is $15 per person or $20 per couple. Please contact Mark J. Platten at mark.platten@colostate.edu for registration info. THROUGH MAY 18 STUDENT ART show. The Teller County student art show, sponsored by the Mountain Artists Group is from April 27 to May 18, at the Woodland Park Library. An awards presentation is planned at 1:30 p.m. May 8. Up to $1,500 in awards will be given out. Visit www.TheMountainArtists.com for entry forms and rules. Contact the show’s director, Kenneth W. Shanika, at 303-647-1085 or shanikastudio@aol.com. MAY 20 VOLUNTEERS NEEDED. Junior Achievement of Teller County will bring the Junior Achievement Done In A Day school-based curriculum to the elementary schools in May: May 13, Columbine Elementary; May 20, Gateway Elementary. If you would like to help out in the classroom on any of those days, contact Sherri L. Albertson at sherri.albertson@ja.org or 719-650-4089. MAY 23 DEADLY DOSE. The leading cause of accidental death in the United States is prescription drug overdose. Come to the Woodland Park Public Library at 6:30 p.m. May 23 for this important potentially life-saving free program. Pikes Peak Regional Hospital, Teller County Public Health, Teller County Sheriff ’s Office and Woodland Park Police Department join in discussing the changing face of victims of overdose. Colorado has the second-worst rate of pain pill abuse and misuse according to a federal report boosting the urgency of various state efforts to curb rampant overuse of the pills. Call 687-9281 ext. 132 for more information. PICNIC-N-PLANES. CONGRATULATIONS to the Air Force Academy’s graduating class of 2013. The Western Museum of Mining and Industry is the perfect place to watch the amazing Calendar continues on Page 15


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Pikes Peak Courier View 15

May 15, 2013

Donations collected for Lindholm paver By Pat Hill

phill@ourcoloradonews.com In a farewell to the late Larry Lindholm, engraved pavers on the walkway around the Gazebo leaves a legacy for the beloved man who died suddenly April 22. Lana Fox initiated the campaign to collect funds for the pavers. Lindholm, a general contractor, built several homes in his hometown, including Fox’s. The pavers are memorials and legacies for loved ones as well as a fundraising for the restoration of the gazebo in 2006. Robert King, a town trustee at the time, led the paver project and collected donations for the flagstone and engraving. “This was a way of dressing up the outside but also ensuring a long-term funding avenue,” King said. King is helping Fox with the campaign while continuing to oversee the pavers as a fundraiser to complete restoration on the historic land office in Gazebo Park. “The restoration will be done entirely by donations,” said King, who continues to head up the paver project.

There are three tiers of engravings; one line of text is $250, 2 lines, $350 and three lines are $500. The paver accounts are held by the Pikes Peak Community Foundation which offers a taxdeductible benefit for the contributions. For the Lindholm pavers, donors are asked to make the checks out to the Pikes Peak Community Foundation, with Friends of Green Mountain Falls on the memo line. Fox and King hope to have the pavers in by the time of Lindholm’s memorial service at 1 p.m. June 8 at Joyland Church in Green Mountain Falls. Checks can be mailed to Lana Fox, PO Box 171 Green Mountain Falls, CO 80819.

Robert King, former trustee in Green Mountain Falls, heads up the campaign to place a memorial paver in honor of the late Larry Lindholm who died last month. Lindholm was raised in Green Mountain Falls and graduated from Manitou Springs High School. King started the paving project several years ago to help fund the restoration of the Gazebo. The pavers circle the town landmark. Photo by Pat Hill

THINGS TO DO aerial acrobatics of the U.S. Air Force Thunderbirds as they fly over for the Air Force Academy’s graduation. Bring and enjoy a picnic lunch by our spring fed ponds and flowering meadow as you experience the mighty Thunderbirds soar over you. The event is from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. May 23. A $5 donation is encouraged.

nior from Park or Teller counties who will go to college and major in agriculture. All high school counselors will have an application. Deadline for applications is May. For information, contact CCCA, PO Box 472, Fairplay, CO 80440-0472, or Jim Campbell at 719-689-2047.

JUNE 1 PET SHOT clinic. Four Mile Emergency

Room inside the Miramont Castle Museum is doing a soft opening to kick off the season with a special Light Victorian Tea and Crème Tea from 11 a.m to 3 p.m. May 24-27. By advance credit card reservation only. For information and to make reservations, call 719-685-1011 or 719-884-4109.

Services will host a pet shot clinic and bake sale from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. June 1 at Four Mile Fire Station 1. Both large and small animals welcome. Most shots cost $15. Exams also available for $15. Cash, checks and Visa accepted. First come first served. All animals must be on a leash, in a kennel or trailer. Delicious baked goods and coffee available for purchase. For additional information call Jane at 719-689-2503 or Lynne at 719294-7108 or visit www.fourmilees.com.

THROUGH MAY 28

JUNE 14

BALANCE CLASS. Matter of Balance is an eight-week series of classes for those 60 and older who have fears/concerns about falling and need to improve their balance. The class is offered from 2-4 p.m. Tuesdays from April 9 to May 28 at Woodland Fitness Center. A wide variety of issues and habits affecting balance and fall prevention are addressed. The program is free, paid for through a YMCA grant. Call Rebecca at 719-963-0988 to sign up and for more information.

RELAY FOR Life. The American Cancer Society Relay for Life celebration is at 7 p.m. June 14 at CSCS. Visit http:// www.tellerrelay.com/ or call Stacy at 650-0505.

MAY 24-27 TEA TIME. The Queen’s Parlour Tea

MAY 31 UPCOMING CONCERTS. Crystola Roadhouse presents several upcoming concerts. Big Bill Morganfield performs April 13. Buddy Whittington performs May 31. All concerts start at 7:30 p.m. Visit Crystola Roadhouse www.myspace. com/crystolaroadhouse. THROUGH MAY

SCHOLARSHIP. CENTRAL Colorado Cattlemen’s Association is giving its annual scholarship to any graduating se-

BIKE RODEO. The fourth annual Teller County Free Kids Bike Rodeo is from 10 a.m. to noon June 19 at the Meadow Wood Sports Complex. The bike rodeo is open to any child who can pedal and will include bicycle skill challenges, safety games, giveaways and more. Bring a bike and helmet. The event is cosponsored by Teller County Chiropractic and Parks and Recreation. Prize giveaway is at 11:45 a.m. (must be present to win). THROUGH JUNE 21; July 19-20 QUILT ENTRIES. Firehouse Quilts is

looking for quilt entries for its eighth annual quilt show to support its mission of helping children in crisis in Colorado. Early bird entries submitted by May 17 are taken at a discounted entry fee ($15). Otherwise, the fee is $18 per item, and the final deadline is June 21. This year’s show has a special theme, Patriotic, along with 13 other categories. The show is from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. July 19-20 at the Douglas County Events Center in Castle Rock. All forms and instructions are available at www.firehousequilts. org; click on the Quilt Show link at the top.

JULY 4 CEMETERY CRAWL. The Ute Pass

Historical Society presents its second annual Woodland Park Cemetery Crawl on July 4. Take a walk and meet some of the old pioneers who are resting in the Woodland Park Cemetery, 650 Short St. Tours start every 15 minutes from 1 to 3

THROUGH AUGUST ART EXHIBIT. Some of the works of

late local artist Nadine Kent Drummond were on exhibit in Woodland Park last summer. Now an expanded exhibit is on display through August in the Western Art History floor at the Denver Public Library, 10 W. 14th Ave. Parkway.

ONGOING NEW EXHIBIT. The Pikes Peak International Hill Climb Association “Over The Hill Gang” display is now complete. We invite you to see the amazing time line of photos from the 1920s to present day, in addition to memorabilia from the second oldest race in the world. ONGOING EXHIBIT. The Ute Pass Historical Society presents Scenic Views from the Colorado Midland Railway. The exhibit is on the second floor of the Woodland Park Public Library adjacent to the Colorado Room. The library is at 218 E. Midland Ave., Woodland Park. Call 686-7512. APPLY SPIRITUAL laws as taught by the Ascended Masters for the achievement of personal and global freedom, love, peace and abundance. Free study group meets every Saturday in Woodland Park. For information, contact Barbara Royal at 719-687-6823 or Angels911@ peakinter.net. VOLUNTEERS NEEDED. The Pikes Peak Regional Medical Center Foundation is accepting volunteer applications for its hospital gift shop. Help us run a fun and friendly gift shop/art gallery specializing in local art that raises money for projects supporting the hospital and the medical center campus. Pleasant environment, wonderful customers, light work load, no heavy lifting. Two shifts daily: from 9 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. or from 12:30-4 p.m. Monday through Friday.

Call Susan 719-331-9762 or stop by.

FREE COMPUTER classes. The Woodland Park Public Library offers computer basics, Internet basics, Microsoft Word, Excel, PowerPoint, and Digital Photo Management classes. Some classes have prerequisites, and registration is required for all. Call 719-687-9281, ext. 106 to register. MAY 31 FASHION SHOW. The Aspen Mine Cen-

ter & Community of Caring will celebrate spring and summer with a fashion show fundraising event at 5:30 p.m. May 31 at 166 E. Bennett Ave., Cripple Creek. Email angie@aspenminecenter.org or visit www.aspenminecenter.org for information.

MAY 31 to June 15 CABARET. THIN Air Theatre Company,

now in its seventh year at the Butte Theater, kicks off the 2013 season of all new productions with a preseason show, the all-new Cripple Creek Cabaret: Gems of the Silver Screen, with 11 performances from May 31 to June 15. To make reservations visit ThinAirTheatre.com or call 719-689-3247.

MAY 18 GOLF TOURNAMENT. Little Chapel Food Pantry in Divide will host its first golf tournament fundraiser May 18 at Shining Mountain Golf Club, 100 Shining Mountain Lane, Woodland Park. Shotgun start is at 8:30 a.m. with a format of a 4-person scramble. For information, to register and/or sponsor a hole, call Marc Dettenrieder 719-322-7610. THROUGH MAY 19 ADULT EDUCATION Teller County is gifted with some of the most varied geology on the planet. CPFRC (a Colorado non-profit) offers a six-Saturday course on The Geology of Teller County from April 6 to May 11 in Divide. Choose 9 a.m. to noon or 1-4 p.m. for your convenience. Learn about gold, gems, fossils, newly discovered giant meteorite craters, volcanoes, glaciers, and more,

May 22, 2013 • 6:00 pM Community Partnership Family Resource Center and Divide Chamber of Commerce

Business After Hours

Open to the Public • Refreshments • Snacks at Community Partnership Family Resource Center back parking lot of Highlands Shopping Center in Divide

For more info, call Lisa at 686-7587 or visit dividechamber.org

SAVE THE DATE

ART EXHIBIT. The Ute Pass Historical Society, in conjunction with the Pikes Peak Regional Medical Center Foundation, presents “Alverta Burns: Angel of the Hills,” an exhibit featuring vintage photographs, medical artifacts and clothing from the lifetime of one of our area’s most respected residents of the last century. Alverta’s story and many of the everyday objects from her nursing profession are featured in the display, including her medicine bag and nurse’s uniform (courtesy of the Burns family of Woodland Park). The exhibit runs through May in the Pikes Peak Regional Hospital lobby. Contact Karla Schweitzer at 719-686-7512 or via email at uphs@ peakinter.net.

JUNE 19

pm. Tickets cost $5, and are available at the Ute Pass Historical Society Gift Shop, 231 E. Henrietta Ave., Woodland Park, or at the gate. Call 719-686-7512 or e mail uphs@peakinter.net for information.

SAVE THE DATE

Calendar continued from Page 14

with computer imagery, specimens, and hands-on activities. Field trip included. Great for teachers, rock hounds, general interest or hikers. No tests. Cost: $80. Call 719-686-0705 for registration or information.

MAY 27 WOLFSTOCK 2013. Colorado Wolf and Wildlife Center presents Wolfstock 2013, from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. May 27. The event features music, food, fun and, of course, wolves. Tickets are $30 for adults and $15 for ages 12 and younger. Call 719687-9742 or visit www.wolfeducation. org for information. MAY 15 AUTHOR PROGRAM. A live streaming program from Dan Brown, internationally known author of Da Vinci code, will be shown at 5:30 p.m. May 15 at the Woodland Park and Florissant public libraries. In “An Evening of Codes, Symbols, and Secrets,” Brown will discuss his new novel, “Inferno,” as well as science, religion, codes, book publishing, movie making, and a few surprise topics. This will be his only public appearance. Come to either library in the district and be entered into a drawing for a copy of “Inferno!” For more information call 687-9281 ext. 132. MAY 18 CRAFT SHOW and sale. The spring craft show and sale is from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. May 18 at the Florissant Grange (the Old School House). This is a great place to find one-of-a-kind, hand-made items on your gift list, or to shop for those people who are hard to shop for. Many crafters and vendors are on hand with gifts for house and home. For information or to reserve a table, call 748-0358. MAY 31 CONCERT. HIGHWAY 24 will play at the Historic Ute Inn on May 31 with lead guitarist Cari Dell sitting in. JUNE 1 FLEA MARKET. The annual flea market and country breakfast is June 1 at the

Florissant Grange. Bring your treasures to sell, come shopping and enjoy breakfast of homemade sausage gravy, homemade biscuits, scrambled eggs, fried hash brown potatoes, and bacon or build your own breakfast burrito. Breakfast will be served from 7-11 a.m., and the flea market will be from 7 a.m. to 3 p.m. For information or to reserve your outdoor flea market spot, call 748-0358.

JUNE 8 PAINTING CLASS. Glass painting class is back at the Florissant Grange. Learn the “one stroke’ painting method from 10 a.m. to noon June 8 and find that your painting options are endless. Paint on glass, mirrors, or just about anything. Join us to learn this fun craft. For more information call 748-0358. ONGOING  FREE COMPUTER classes are offered starting in February at the Florissant Library. You can take Computer Basics, Word I, Word II, Excel, and PowerPoint. To register for a class, or for information and a schedule, call 719-748-3939. JAM NIGHT. The Grange Hall is open from 6-9 p.m. every Thursday for the Jammers music and potluck. This is a great night and the place to be on Thursdays. The music is always different depending on who and how many musicians show up. We always have fun, good food and dancing. All musicians are welcome to join in the jam session. If you are not a musician, come for a social evening out to meet other community members. Call 719-748-0358. YOGA CLASSES are offered at 5:30 p.m. Mondays and 9 a.m. Tuesdays and Thursdays, with a senior yoga class offered at 10:30 a.m. Tuesdays, at the Florissant Grange, 2009 County Road 31. Call Debbie at 719-748-3678 for information.  MUSIC LESSONS. Guitar, drums and general music lessons are now offered on Friday mornings at the Florissant Grange, 2009 County Road 31. Call 719-748-0358.

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16-Color

16 Pikes Peak Courier View

May 15, 2013

Free Parlour House tours to district residents Special to the Courier

The Old Homestead began as an exclusive brothel in 1896 during Colorado’s Gold Rush and is today a museum visited by hundreds of locals and tourists each year due to the support of local residents. May is National Preservation Month and The Old Homestead, once a grand brothel for the rich men of the Gold Rush Era in Cripple Creek, is offering free tours to those

who live or work in the Cripple Creek and Victor district. Bring identification that shows you live or work in the district for a FREE tour of The Old Homestead House Museum on from 1-6 p.m. May 16-17 or from 11 a.m.-5 p.m. on May 18. View beautiful furniture and clothing that represents the late 1800s and learn about the colorful history of Cripple Creek, Colorado in its heyday of the Gold Rush and the part that The Old Homestead played.

Built in 1896 by the famous madam Pearl DeVere to service the powerful men of the Cripple Creek mining district who became rich during Colorado’s Gold Rush, this historic building has been beautifully preserved through the support of local residents and businesses. Today the ladies of the house are local women who keep the story of the Old West alive through the stories they share about the lives of the girls who worked in the brothel and of the gold miners who made

Cripple Creek famous. The Old Homestead Museum is open for tours on weekends beginning May 4 and open seven days a week starting May 25. Regular admission is $5 for a 30 minute personalized tour of the house that was once the hottest ticket in town. For additional information about The Old Homestead Museum, contact Charlotte Bumgarner at 719-689-2485 or cb4mile@ hughes.net or The Old Homestead Museum at 719-689-9090.

Movie music comes to Butte

IDENTIFY THESE MINERS

By Special to The Tribune and Courier Thin Air Theatre Company

This photo of miners at the turn of the 19th century in the Cripple Creek Gold Mining District could be relatives of people living in the area today. Anyone with information about any of these miners should contact the Victor Lowell Thomas Museum at www.victorcolorado.com about photo number UN9-4. Photo courtesy of Victor Lowell Thomas Museum

Thin Air Theatre Company, now in its seventh year at the Butte Theater, kicks off the 2013 season with a pre-season show, the all-new Cripple Creek Cabaret: “Gems of the Silver Screen.” With only 11 performances May 31 to June 15, this will sell out quickly so be sure get your tickets now. Join two of your favorite TATC actors, Rebecca Myers and Kevin Pierce, as they tell the little-known story of Rosemary and Leo, a starcrossed couple of...stars. Their story is told through some of the most recognizable songs of the silver screen, with hits from the films of the 1930s, ‘40s and ‘50s, which have been musically arranged by Thin Air music director and composer of “A Cripple Creek Christmas Carol,” James Mablin. Don’t miss a special guest appearance by Mel Moser. The show runs May 31- June 15. Ticket Prices: Adult: 16.25; Senior: $14.25; Child: $10.25; Group 12+: $13.25; Group 20+: $12.25. For more information to make reservations visit ThinAirTheatre.com or call 719689-3247.

CLUBS IN YOUR COMMUNITY EDITOR’S NOTE: To add or update your club listing, e-mail calendar@ourcoloradonews.com, attn: Courier View. POLITICAL TELLER COUNTY’S Democrats In 2013, Teller County’s Democratic Party is hosting education programs and community activities. Members and interested citizens are invited to participate. For more information about the TellerDems’ 2013 schedule, contact Ellen Haase, 719-687.1813. TELLER COUNTY Republicans meets at 7 p.m. the second Tuesday of each month

at the Pikes Peak Community Center in Divide next to the Conoco. Come and help set the course for conservative thinking and direction in Teller County, Colorado, and the nation. Additional information at http://www.teller-gop. org.

PROFESSIONAL APPLY SPIRITUAL laws as taught by the Ascended Masters for the achievement of personal and global freedom, love, peace and abundance. Free study group meets every Saturday in Woodland Park. For information, contact Barbara Royal at 719-687-6823 or Angels911@

peakinter.net.

DIVIDE CHAMBER of Commerce. Contact president Lisa Lee at 719-686-7587 for meeting dates and times. COMPUTER CLASSES. The Woodland Park Public Library offers computer basics, Internet basics, Microsoft Word, Excel, PowerPoint, and Digital Photo Management classes. Some classes have prerequisites, and registration is required for all. Call 719-687-9281, ext. 106 to register. CUTTING EDGE Networking Group meets from 8-9:30 a.m. Wednesdays at Hungry Bear, 111 E. Midland Ave., Woodland Park. Help build your business by building community. Call 719-2371312 for information. TELLER BUSINESS Builders meets at 7 a.m. Mondays at the Hungry Bear, 111 E. Midland Ave., in Woodland Park. The group helps local businesses through cooperative marketing, professional education and trusted relationships. Call Gail Wingerd at 719-686-1076 or send email to gail@woodlandparkprinter.com or Mike Hazelwood at 719-473-5008

~ WOODLAND PARK ~ $457,000

Beautiful stucco and stone home in very desirable neighborhood with awesome Pikes Peak views! Great room with adobe style fireplace,cathedral ceilings and windows galore! Beautiful gourmet kitchen with granite tile countertops, huge counter bar, stainless appliances and pantry. Gorgeous hardwood floors on the main level. Main level master suite with private fireplace. Large loft area with walk-out to private patio.

THE TELLER Networking Team meet from 7:45-8:45 a.m. Thursdays at Denny’s Restaurant in Woodland Park. TNT is a local businesses owners networking group working to pass leads and help each others’ businesses grow. Join us to learn more or call Vickie at 719-748-1274. RECREATION EVERY THURSDAY all year the Florissant Grange Hall (The Old School House) is open from 6-9 pm for the Jammers Music and Pot Luck. This is a happening place to be on Thursday evenings.

Sometimes we have more musicians than people and sometimes we have more people than the hall can hold, but no matter what, we have fun and great music and fabulous food. All musicians are welcome to join in the jam session and if you are not a musician, come for the social evening out. Call 719-7480358.

GET IN shape with a parks and recreation fitness membership. The center offers Paramount and Nautilus equipment and free weights. Schedule a personalized fitness orientation and have an individual workout program designed for your fitness needs. Individuals ages 16 and older are welcome to become fitness members. Minors require signed parental permission. Corporate memberships are available. Call 719-689-3514. FRONT RANGE Fencing Club. Learn to fence class for children and adults. Meets at Discovery Canyon Campus. Visit http:// frontrangefencing.tripod.com/ Advanced competitive lessons available too. HEALTHIER LIVING Colorado, Chronic

Disease Self-Management Classes Are you tired of being sick and tired? Teller County Public Health and Community Partnership Family Resource Center offer six-week classes to help you with the challenges of living with an ongoing health condition. Participants learn skills to cope with fatigue, frustration, pain and stress of chronic disease, as well as effective action plans and problem solving. Call Teller County Public Health at 719-687-6416 or visit www.cpteller.org or www.tellercountypublichealth.org for information and a list of classes in your neighborhood. Suggested donation: $35.

KARATE PLUS meets at 6 p.m.

Mondays and Wednesdays at Woodland Park Community Church and at 6:30 p.m. Tuesdays at Lake George Bible Church. The class includes Japanese karate and jujitsu, Okinawan weapons, padded sparring and Judo throws. Self-defense is also taught. The program is Bible-based. Black belt instruction. KP has been in the Ute Pass area for more than 16 years. Low rates. Ages 5 through adult. Two free lessons. For more information call Ken at 719-687-1436. KP is nonprofit and non-denominational.

THE LAKE George Gem and Mineral Club Youth Program for Earth Science Education, Peblepups, meets from 6-6:45 p.m. the third Tuesday of each month at the Lake George Community Center on Hwy 24 on the east side of Lake George. The program is free to students age 8-18. Each session discusses a separate aspect of Earth science or mineral collecting. Warm weather will allow field trips on weekends. Further information from Steve Veatch 719-748-5010 or John Rakowski 719-748-3861 or at LGGMClub. org. THE LAKE George Gem and Mineral Club meets the second Saturday of every month at the Community Center, Lake George. Meetings begin at 10 a.m. until May, when it changes to 9 a.m. to accommodate a field trip in conjunction with the regular meeting. There is always a program or field trip. LEARN GUITAR from a guitar player, singer and entertainer, Cari Dell. Call 719-748-0358. MOTHER BEAR Self-Defense is offering Krav Maga classes from 9-10:30 a.m. Saturdays at the Corner Dance Studio in Woodland Park. Contact Wendy at 719-

323-7949 for information.

THE MOUNTAIN Top Cycling club holds monthly meetings for bicyclist of all types and skill levels. The club meets at different locations on the first Tuesday of the month. Membership fee is $25 for individual and $40 for family. We have guest speakers, presentations and door prizes. The meeting is from 7-8 p.m. Social time at 6:30 p.m. Visit www. mountaintopcyclingclub.com or write us Mountain Top Cycling Club P.O.Box 843 Woodland Park CO 80866. For more information, call Debbie at 719-687-2489. UTE PASS Historical Society offers free public tours of History Park from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. the second Saturday of the month from May through September. The tours start at the Museum Center, 231 E. Henrietta Ave., next to the Woodland Park Public Library. A historic walking tour of Woodland Park meets at 10:30 a.m. Contact UPHS at 719-6867512 or e mail uphs@peakinter.net. UTE PASS Historical Society Gift Shop is open from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Wednesdays through Saturdays in the Museum Center building at History Park, 231 E. Henrietta, next to the Woodland Park Library. Call 719-686-7512 for information or to schedule a group tour. TAI CHI is offered for free at 9 a.m. Mondays at the Florissant Public Library. Call Pam Powers, 719-748-3378 or Judy Ross, 719-686-9122. TAI CHI is offered every Wednesday at Florissant/Four Mile Fire Department. Call Meridel Gatterman, 719-689-5861. TAI CHI is offered from 9:30-10:30 a.m. Thursdays at the Woodland Park Senior Clubs continues on Page 18


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Pikes Peak Courier View 17

May 15, 2013

Markets sprout, and farmers survive

The early morning chill, left over from winter’s most recent unwelcome blast, settles along the quiet street where blue and white canopies have popped up like overdue buds, signaling the arrival of the season’s first farmers market. Soft music, lingering from a nearby restaurant, punctures the hush, along with occasional laughter and voices from vendors as they ready tables with wares and hopes for a good day. Danish bakery workers pull sugarcrusted strudels — apricot and apple raisin — from their truck to shelves along the sidewalk. Nearby is the homemade peanut butter woman and the Angus beef man and the cheerful El Salvador cook. At the end is the farmer. He is 63, the great-grandson of a farmer who bought a plot of land 108 years ago in Welby, between Denver and Thornton, off North Washington Street. andToday, he has 80 acres in Hudson, a country town of 2,300 northeast of Denver on Interstate 76, a solid hour-and15-minute drive to the Sunday market in nowHighlands Ranch. The- He stands next to his white truck, ith awatching the market unfold, an everipplepresent cigarillo clutched in a weathered Silverhand that tells a story of a working life ncesrooted in the soil. He is a content man l outwhose easy smiles crinkle soft grooves cketsaround blue eyes that peer intently from a sun-worn face. TATC “I might not be farming today if it Kevinweren’t for the markets,” Alan Mazzotti nownsays. “They’ve kept us in business.” star- And they’ve kept us, the customers, storyconnected to a less complicated time, rec-when people knew who had grown the reen,food on their table — a slice of knowl930s,edge that cultivated gratitude and nurmu-tured community. music Sean and Maria McAfee, married 22 ippleyears, can’t drive by a farmers market Mab-without stopping, whether it’s along the pear-

es

coastal drive to San Francisco or in their hometown. When they lived in Evergreen, they visited the local market there every Tuesday. Now, in Highlands Ranch, they never miss a Sunday. It’s a matter of principle and a matter of friendship. Besides the benefit of fresh produce, “I’d rather pay a little more to support local people,” Maria says. “We’re big believers in moving away from the Walmartization of the U.S.” And, over the years, many vendors have become friends — the Angus beef man invited them to his wedding last year. “They become part of the fabric of your life,” Maria says. “We were so excited,” Sean says of the week leading up to opening day. “We were talking about this all week.” They walk away, hand in hand, each with a small bag. Basil and oregano seedlings in one, peanut butter, pasta and honey in the other. This time, “we didn’t have a lot to buy,” Maria says. “It was seeing old friends.” Colorado has more than 100 farmers markets, with about half in the Denver metro area, according to the state Department of Agriculture. They operate individually or through sponsoring organizations. Most are seasonal, running from May through October, and their arrival seems to signal the start — finally

and highly unorganized place: my warped mind. It all starts with a recent conversation I had with a lobbyist at the Capitol about the correct pronunciation of the Latinbased “sine die.” It means “without day” and it’s typically used in b holds conjunction with a governing body ending its work for ll ets at a while — such as the case day was last week with the ad25 journment of the 2013 General Assembly. We The lobbyist pros and nounced sine die the way it -8 www. looks on paper. “I think it’s like saying rite us 843 `sign,’ or `Seinfeld,’” he told e in- me. That’s when I abruptly -2489. changed the subject to bes free gin sharing some of my fa0 a.m. vorite “Seinfeld” moments, he and to quote lines from classic episodes like “The Library” or “The Contest.” to the You see, I get distracted storic easily. ets at I continued to think 86about the pronunciation of t. sine die, and, at the same Shop is time, how hilarious of a esdays show “Seinfeld” was. And, Center after a while, I was certain nri- that the lobbyist had it all brary. wrong. You wanna know why? or to Because “Seinfeld” was endearingly dubbed a “show m. about nothing.” brary. And, say what you will Judy about this year’s legislative session, but it certainly was ay at something. ent. There, see. I warned 5861. you — warped mind. Only I

ge 18

As vendors begin to pack up, Mazzotti stands by his truck, behind the tables and ground laden with pansies, petunias and geraniums in planters, baskets and trays. Herb seedlings, also from his greenhouse, sit in the canopy shade. It’s too early in the season for most vegetables and fruit. The day’s proceeds: Just OK. “A little chilly,” he explains. But that’s all right. He’s reconnected with many of his customers, some now friends, like the brothers in their 90s at the Auraria market in Denver that he’s known for 30 years and who even visit his farm at times. Next week, he hopes to bring asparagus, spinach and lettuce with his flowers. Come June, he’ll be trucking loads of vegetables to six markets a week. Down the row of vendors, he watches canopies folding shut — like tulips closing at day’s end. Like the others, he loads up and heads for home. “I’m tired,” he says. A smile quickly appears. “I’m getting older every day.” And rest won’t come until the plants are back in the greenhouse, the truck is cleaned, the crops tended, the chores all done. Then, he’ll enjoy the peace of the land, the lack of pavement that traps heat, the friendliness of country neighbors. “I have to make a living. I have to feed my family, too.” But more than anything, he says, working the land and sharing its yield with the rest of us, “is a way of life.” A farmer’s life. And a good life. You’ll find farmers markets listed at www. coloradofarmers.org. Ann Macari Healey’s column about people, places and issues of everyday life appears every other week. She can be reached at ahealey@ourcoloradonews. com or 303-566-4110.

Democrats held the remote during Legislature show

15. nior: 12+: more tions I’m about to take 719-you to into a strange

0 a.m. enior

— of summer. The Metro Denver Farmers Market, founded 36 years ago, is the oldest organization. And that’s how long Mazzotti, an original member, has been selling at the outdoor markets, which he estimates have kept 70 percent of local farmers in business. In fact, he says, most farmers grow specifically for the markets. He has corn, carrots, green beans, cauliflower, sweet corn, cucumbers, winter and summer squashes, parsley, basil. “I can’t think fast enough,” he says as he rattles off the list. Farmers do have other outlets such as fruit and vegetable stands, garden centers and pumpkin patches. But they expect to earn most of their money in the summer markets. They are, however, no longer just for farmers. Walk through any market and you’ll see the realization of a melting pot of dreams. There’s the gourmet nut man, stirring almonds with a wooden paddle in a copper vat as a tantalizing aroma draws a crowd. There’s a local children’s book author. And there’s Monse Perez Hines, the young Salvadoran wife of a military man, who drives up from Colorado Springs each week to sell curtido and pupusas, traditional foods she makes in her home which are so popular she always returns with empty coolers. “I’ve received such great support from everyone here,” she says. And “I’ve been able to share my culture.” And Evi Bujdoso of Hungary, selling Danish pastries. She wears a white apron, and her short, blond hair pokes out from beneath a white cap. A half hour from closing time, just a handful of strudels and a few croissants are left. “We weren’t prepared all the way,” she says with a slight accent and a quick smile. “People were excited to see us back again.”

could go from Latin phrases to “Seinfeld” episodes to a summary of the legislative session. But it kinda makes sense. You see, Democrats truly believe that this year’s session was a Show About Something. And their definition of the word “something” is a heck of a lot different from Republicans’. “There’s a lot of good that came out of this session,” said Sen. Pat Steadman, D-Denver. “I think we put some really positive public policy out there and I think the people of Colorado are going to look back at this session and just be amazed at all the things we found the time to do.” So the Democrats are happy. For them, the session was about sunshine and puppy dog tails. As for the Republicans, not so much. “They charged hard to the left and stayed there the entire session,” said Rep. Frank McNulty, R-Highlands Ranch, of the Democrat agenda. I know what you’re thinking right now. You’re thinking, `Hey, wait a second, Vic. You mean to tell me that Democrats and Republicans disagreed on how this year’s legislative session turned out?’”

Yep. Shocking, ain’t it? Democrats feel like they hit the jackpot this session, by passing a host of major pieces of legislation: civil unions, education reform, election reform, in-state tuition for undocumented immigrants and gun control, just to name a few. Seriously. If there was such a thing as Democratic bingo, the entire card would be full of little dauberstained dots. “Any one of these things by themselves would have been historic and epic, frankly, in a session,” said Senate Majority Leader Morgan Carroll, D-Aurora. “And we did. One after the other, after the other.” Hmm. But did they do too much? Republicans sure think so. They think Democrats will rue the day that they tried to push such a progressive agenda on the voters. Senate Minority Leader Bill Cadman, R-Colorado Springs, mocked the Democrats’ legislative efforts on job creation. He said the Democrats proved they’re a party that’s beholden to unions and their efforts hurt small businesses. “This agenda is punishing people in Colorado,” Cadman said. McNulty agrees. “The Democrats have clearly shown that they are very liberal,” he said. “Colorado voters are not going to reward them for that.” But Democrats are making no apologies. They also

Colorado Governor John Hickelooper discusses the legislative session during the Politics and Pints event on May 10 at the Westin Westminster, sponsored by the Metro North Chamber of Commerce. Photo by Pam Wagner believe that Republicans didn’t do much of anything, except to complain and say no to just about everything throughout the 120-day session. That’s not what the voters wanted this session, Carroll said. “We would rather be criticized for tackling too many of Colorado’s problems, than not enough,” Carroll said. So, there ya have it. A legislative session that spanned five months, with reaction that can be summed up as: Democrats good; Republicans bad. And vice versa. Who would’ve thunk it, right? Or, maybe the session could be summed up as being a really long, and not nearly as funny, “Seinfeld” episode. Think about it. Whenever Democrats did something controversial, Republicans would bemoan

with a “Newman!”-like expression. And, when Republicans complained about Demo-

cratic overreach, Democrats like Carroll would respond with an Elaine Benes-like shove to the chest, and a hearty “Get out!” There was one episode where Kramer started the show by pretending to do a stand-up comedy routine, a la Jerry Seinfeld. “What’s the deal with politics?” Kramer said. “Am I right, people? I don’t get it.” I think Kramer might be on to something there. Hmm. Maybe it’s pronounced SINE-DIE after all. Just like “Seinfeld.” Vic Vela is the legislative reporter for Colorado Community Media. He can be reached at vvela@ourcoloradonews.com. Follow Vic on Twitter: @VicVela1.

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18-Color

18 Pikes Peak Courier View

May 15, 2013

Mueller plans Youth Outdoor Adventure Day Special to the Courier

Colorado Parks and Wildlife Families with youngsters who want to try their hand at archery, shooting, fishing or a host of other outdoor adventures are invited to Mueller State Park Sunday, May 19 for a day of safe outdoor skills fun. The day will be filled with lots of activi-

ties including: .22 rifle target shooting, archery, fishing, shotgun clay pigeons, hiking, geocaching, camping, and living and playing in bear country. All stations will be targeted at teaching kids of all ages the basic skills in that particular activity. Sessions for Essentials of Camping, Essentials of Hiking, and GeoCaching will be at 10:30 a.m. and 12:30 p.m. All other

events run continuously from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. so feel free to pick and choose stations or attempt them all! There will also be information on how to be “Bear Aware” while camping, hiking and at home. Colorado Parks and Wildlife will furnish all equipment, so just bring your willingness to learn about archery, shooting

sports, camping and fishing. The activities are free, but you must have a $7 parks pass per vehicle. More information can be found Mueller State Park website at http:// www.parks.state.co.us/Parks/Mueller/ Pages/MuellerHome.aspx or the Mueller Facebook page at https://www. f a c e b o o k . c o m / Mu e l l e r St a t e Pa r k C o.

CLUBS IN YOUR COMMUNITY

JUST HANGING OUT

Clubs continued from Page 16

Center. Call Rip Blaisdel, 719-686-1408. TAI CHI is offered from 5:30-6:30 p.m. Thursdays at the Woodland Park Library, in the downstairs resource room. Call Cheryl Koc, 719-687-2633 or Judy Ross at 719-686-9122. TAI CHI is offered from 9-10 a.m. Fridays at the Woodland Park Library, in the downstairs community room. Call Penny Brandt, 719-687-1848 or Judy Ross at 719-686-9122. TAI CHI, Sun Style 73 Forms, is offered from 10-11 a.m. Fridays at the Woodland Park Library, in the downstairs community room. Call Cheryl Koc, 719-687-2633.

This herd of mule deer watches traffic on Teller County Road 1 between snow squalls on May 10. Photo by Norma Engelberg

THE TELLER County 4-H Shooting Sports Club meets the first Sunday of each month at the Pikes Peak Community Club (PPCC) in Divide at 4 p.m. 4-H projects/disciplines covered by the club: .22 and Air Rifle, Archery, Shotgun, and Air Pistol. For more information about the club meetings or project/discipline practices, please call 719-235-7473. THURSDAY NIGHT Beginners Book Study meets from 7-8

p.m. Thursdays at Woodland Park Community Church. Email gclark25@live.com for information.

WALKING TOURS. The Cripple Creek District Museum

offers free walking tours at 2 p.m. each Sunday. Tours last approximately 45 minutes. Meet in front of the Colorado Trading & Transfer Company building at the museum, 500 E. Bennett Ave., for an extensive look at the history of downtown Cripple Creek. No reservations are required. Comfortable shoes, bottled water and jackets are advised. Tours may be postponed or canceled due to inclement weather. Call 719-689-2634, visit www. cripple-creek.org or email CCDMuseum@aol.com.

YOGA CLASSES are offered at 9 a.m. Tuesdays and Thursdays, with a senior class offered at 10:30 a.m. Tuesdays, at the Florissant Grange No. 420 (the old schoolhouse), 2009 County Road 31. Call Debbie at 719-748-3678 for information. YOGA CLASSES are offered in Woodland Park. All levels are welcome. Contact Michelle Truscelli at 719-505-5011 or check out www.shakti3yoga.com for information. SOCIAL

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A COURSE in Miracles classes meets at 6:30 p.m. Tuesdays in Woodland Park. Call 719-286-8421 or e-mail lynnzina@aol.com for information. ABOVE THE Clouds Cruisers meet the first Friday of the month at 6:30 p.m. at 1120 West Bowman Ave., Woodland Park. For information contact Marsh at 719-687-1058. AMERICAN LEGION Post 1980 Woodland Park meets at 7

p.m. the fourth Tuesday of each month at Grange Hall on Hwy 67, about three miles north of the US-24/Hwy-67 junction in Woodland Park. Visit http://post1980.org.

AMERICAN LEGION Post 171 meets at 7 p.m. at the Post

Building, 400 East Carr Ave. in Cripple Creek.

ART RECEPTION Today is planned for the second Friday of the month and will feature a different artist at Park State Bank in Woodland Park. BILL HARPER, as seen on the Grand Ole Opry, performs 4-7 p.m. every Saturday at Oney’s Restaurant in Florissant. Enjoy old country classic music in a family friendly atmosphere. THE BOOK Club at Woodland Park Public Library meets at 6:30 p.m. on the first Tuesday of each month in the quiet reading room at the Woodland Park Public Library. Call 719-687-9281, ext. 103. COLORADO MOUNTED Rangers Troop “B” is looking for civic minded people who wish to volunteer and contribute to their community. We primarily serve Teller and Park counties, and assist other troops throughout the state. Troop B meets at 6 p.m. the first Thursday of each month at the Highland Bible Church, 800 Research Drive, Woodland Park. We are an all-volunteer organization that is recognized as an auxiliary law enforcement agency by the state of Colorado. We assist law enforcement agencies, forest service, and search and rescue organizations. Experience is not necessary, just a willingness to contribute to your community. To volunteer, or for more information, contact us through www.coloradoranger.org. COLORADO MOUNTED Rangers Troop “I” is looking for responsible and dedicated volunteers who want to make a difference serving their community. You are invited to our monthly meeting the first Friday of the month at 7 p.m. at the Pikes Peak National Bank, in the upstairs conference room, 2401 W. Colorado Ave, on the corner of Colorado Ave and 24th

Street. Free parking is available for the meeting in the bank employee parking lot on the south side of the bank’s drive-up facility. Visit http://itroop.coloradoranger.org or e-mail Info@ coloradoranger.org.

CRIPPLE CREEK Friendship Club meets from 1-3 p.m. at the Henry C. “June” Hack Arena in City Park. The club is free and offers an opportunity to meet with acquaintances and make new friends. DOLL LOVERS of Teller County are invited to meetings at 10:30 a.m. the first Thursday of every month at the Village at Skyline. It’s free. A variety of programs include the study of antiques, and vintage and modern dolls. Everyone older than age 12 is welcome. Call Nancy at 719-390-8098. FLORISSANT GRANGE No. 420 meets at 7 p.m. the second Monday of each month. The grange continues to offer the Florissant Jammers every Thursday for a potluck dinner at 6 p.m. followed by the music of the great Jammers until 9 p.m. All are welcome to come to the Grange. Call 719-748-0358.  THE FLORISSANT Library Book Club welcomes all book readers to its group. It meets at 10:30 a.m. the third Wednesday of the month. Call 719-748-3939. GOLD CAMP Victorian Society is dedicated to the preservation of the history of Cripple Creek and the surrounding area. The Society plays a role in Cripple Creek’s historic events, celebrations, and festivals, including Donkey Derby Days, the Gold Camp Christmas, the Mt. Pisgah Speaks cemetery tour, the Salute To American Veterans, and many others. The Gold Camp Victorian Society also supports events in other communities in Teller County. The Society also sponsors a Victorian ball as well as a Victorian tea each year, both of which are open to members and non-members alike. Gold Camp Victorian Society members can be seen dressed in period attire welcoming visitors to Cripple Creek on Saturday afternoons during the summer months. The Society also includes the “Smokin’s Guns” club which presents historically-based skits and other entertainment during local events and festivals. The Gold Camp Victorian Society meets on the fourth Sunday of each month at 2 p.m. in the Centennial Building in Cripple Creek. Persons interested in participating as members of the Gold Camp Victorian Society are encouraged to call 689-0907 for more information. HELP U Club meets the third Thursday of every month. Pot luck at noon and meeting at 1 p.m. We help people and other nonprofits in Teller County and the Lake George area of Park County. Meetings are at the Lake George Community Center. Information: Joan 719-689-2486 or Help U Club, 1054 High Chateau Road, Florissant, CO 80816. JOIN US to knit, crochet or craft every Monday 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. Bring your projects. Meet new and old friends. Instructions are provided for free. Meeting are at Cripple Creek Coffee at Aspen Mine Center. KIWANIS CLUB of Ute Pass/Woodland Park meets at 6:45 a.m. Wednesdays at Mangia Magnia. Call 719-687-5534. Kiwanis is a global organization of volunteers dedicated to changing the world, one child and one community at a time. THE LADIES of the Veterans of Foreign Wars meets at noon, the second Tuesday of each month at the Woodland Park Public Library. Call 719-687-9157. LAKE GEORGE Fire Protection District Auxiliary meetings are at 6 p.m. the first Tuesday of the month at Station No. 1 at the corner of Hwy. 24 and County Road 90. THE LAKE George Gem and Mineral Club meets the second Saturday of every month at 10 a.m. at the Lake George Community Center. Mineral topics will be discussed but no field trips until spring. Call 719-748-3861. MODA U meets at 1 p.m. at Nuts ‘n Bolts Needleworks, 200 S. Chestnut, Woodland Park. Quilters from novice to professional share their craft and get all the latest info about fabrics and notions. Call 719-687-2272. THE MOUNTAIN Artists meets from 9-10:30 a.m. the second Saturday of each month at the Ute Pass Cultural Center in Woodland Park. Call 719-687-1374 or visit www.TheMountainArtists.com. The nonprofit group was established to promote, encourage and support the making and showing of visual arts in Teller County-Ute Pass area. MOPS, MOTHERS of Preschoolers in Woodland Park meets the firtst and third Tuesday of the month September through May from 8:45-11:30 a.m. All mothers of children pre-birth through kindergarten are invited to join. Meetings include guest speakers, social time, and creative activities. Childcare Clubs continues on Page 19


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May 15, 2013

Pikes Peak Courier View 19

CLUBS IN YOUR COMMUNITY

vitiesClubs continued from Page 18 pass is included! Register anytime online at oundwww.utepassmops.org or call 719-686tp://8745. ller/ Muel-THE TIMBERLINE Artists meet at 10 www.a.m. every Wednesday of each month, k C o.upstairs at the Aspen Mine Senior Center in Cripple Creek. Everyone is welcome. Bring your favorite craft or art medium and join a dedicated group.

PIKES PEAK Community Club meets

starting at 6:30 p.m. with a potluck supper the second Thursday of each month at the Pikes Peak Community Center in Divide. Supper is followed by a business meeting. The public is welcome to attend.

PIKES PEAK Lions Club meets at 6:30

p.m. the second and fourth Thursday in Woodland Park. Call 719-684-3081. The Pikes Peak Lions Club is part of Lions Club International, which is the largest worldwide service organization in the world. Our annual fundraiser is the annual Donkey Basketball Tournament. Our fundraisers and service projects provide support for our local community through work projects ranging from testing preschool age kids eyes for eye disease to sponsoring special needs kids to our local Lions Camp in Woodland Park.

PIKES PEAK Plein Air Painters is a

nationally recognized group of regional artists that meet Wednesdays to share the creative experience of painting out on location. New artists are welcome. Call 303-647-1085 or 719-930-7940, or e-mail shanikastudio@aol.com.

PIKES PEAK Rotary meets at 7 a.m.

Fridays at the Woodland Park Library, south entrance. Call 719-686-7855. Rotary is a worldwide organization working on projects ranging from polio eradication internationally to bell ringing for the Salvation Army locally. Call 719-687-0418.

QUILT MINISTRIES meets between

the hours of 9:30 a.m. and 4 p.m. the third Thursday of each month at Ute Pass Cultural Center to make quilts for families that have been burned out of their homes or are in need for some other reason. The quilts are simple, machine pieced and hand-tied and are excellent projects for both new and more experienced quilters. No sewing skills necessary. Participants are encouraged to bring their own sewing machines but machines also will be available onsite. Volunteers who don’t want to sew can still serve as cutters and pressers. This is a nondenominational group. Call 719-687-6828.

QUILTERS ABOVE the Clouds is a

quilting guild for all levels. The guild meets from 1-5 p.m. the fourth Friday of the month at Mountain View United Methodist Church in Woodland Park to share quilting experiences and exchange ideas. The group also participates in projects to benefit charity organizations.

RAMPART ROCK `n’ Jazz Retro Jammers (RJs) singers rehearse Saturday afternoons in Woodland Park. Rock, soul, jazz, blues; soprano, alto, tenor, and bass vocalists welcome in addition to keyboard or instrumental accompanists. Call 686-8228 for directions or visit www.rampartrocknjazz.com. SENIORS LEAGUE. The Seniors League at Pinz Bowling Center offers a seniors league at noon Tuesdays. The league is open and willing to take any new members who are 55 and older. The league requires no weekly commitment; bowlers may show up any week they like, without obligation to be there the next. They also get a senior discount price, playing three games (including shoe rental) all for less than $5. SECOND SUNDAY Scribes is for writers,

wannabe writers and all those who love the written word. Sponsored by the Cripple Creek Park and Recreation Department the group meets at 2 p.m. the second Sunday of the month at the Bennett Avenue Park and Rec center. Call 719-689-3514.

THE SNOWFLAKE Chapter No. 153

Order of the Eastern Star meets at 7:30 p.m. at 205 Park St. in Woodland Park.

Call 719-687-9800.

TELLER COUNTY Knitters meet from

10 a.m. to noon every Saturday at Community Partnership offices in Divide, located above McGinty’s Wood Oven Pub, turn north on Highway 5 and park in the lot onnorth side of building). Yarn fans of all skills and types are welcome for a chance to share projects and conversation. For more details check Teller Knitters on ravelry.com.

THE TELLER County Sport Horse

Club meets at 6:30 p.m. on the third Wednesday of each month. Call Grace at 719-661-8497 for more information.

TELLER COUNTY Search and Rescue is

an all-volunteer, nonprofit organization whose mission is to locate and rescue lost and missing people in Teller County and the surrounding area. Our general membership meetings are at 7 p.m. the first Monday of every month at the Woodland Park Library, downstairs meeting room. Although we are not accepting new members at this time, the public is invited to our meetings. We are available to give hiking safety presentations to schools, churches or local organizations and we do accept donations. For further information, please contact Janet Bennett at 719-306-0826.

THOMAS V. Kelly VFW Post 6051 meets at at 7 p.m. the first Wednesday of each month at Veterans Hall, 27637 Hwy 67, Woodland Park, CO 80863, the old Woodland Park Grange Hall where Eric V. Dickson American Legion Post #1980 meets. THE UTE Pass Historical Society board of directors meets at 5:30 p.m. the second Monday of each month at the Museum Center, 231 E. Henrietta Ave., next to the library. All patrons and members of the public are invited. Call 719-686-7512 for information. UTE PASS Masonic Lodge 188 meets at 7:30 p.m. the third Tuesday of the month. Call 719-687-9453. UTE PASS Social Club is open to ladies

of all ages and interests. The club has many activities to pick and choose from including bridge, hiking, luncheons, mahjongg, crafts, needle works, and much more. Check out http://sites. google.com/site/upsocial/ or contact Dianne Shafer, president, at 719-6874133.

VETERANS OF Foreign Wars Auxiliary meets at noon the second Tuesday of each month in a meeting room in the lower level of the Woodland Park Public Library. WOODLAND NIGHTS, an evening MOPS group, meets on the second and fourth Friday of each month from 6:30-8:30 p.m. September to May at the Woodland Park Christian Church, 27400 N. Colo. 67. MOPS is for Mothers of Pre-Schoolers, who may have different lifestyles but all share a similar desire to be the very best moms they can be. Call Terri at 719-687-3669. WOODLAND PARK Community Sing-

ers rehearse from 7-8:30 p.m. Mondays at Mountain View United Methodist Church at 1101 Rampart Range Road in Woodland Park. No tryout needed. Just come and sing. Call 719-687-8545.

WOODLAND PARK High School

Panther Pride Athletic Boosters meets at 6:30 p.m. the first Wednesday of each month in the high school library.

WOODLAND PARK Holistic Luncheon is offered at noon the second Wednesday of each month. Contact Jim at 719-6874335 for location. This is a free group, often potluck style lunch. WOODLAND PARK Senior Citizens Club hosts the Golden Circle daily hot lunch at 11:45 a.m. Monday through Friday, except for the 2nd Tuesday Potluck and the 4th Tuesday Catered Lunch, both with entertainment or an educational presentation. Pool on Tuesday morning, cribbage, euchre or dominoes most mornings, bridge right after lunch on Mondays and Wednesdays, exercise for arthritis Wednesday and Friday mornings and a host of other activities. Monthly All You Can Eat Pancake Breakfast every 3rd Saturday helps raise funds for Senior Center activities. Contact the activities

coordinator at 719-687-3877 to find out more or to receive a monthly newsletter.

AA MEETS from noon to 1 p.m. and 6-7

There is a cost for classes. Registration is required at least one week prior to class. Call Sharon at NETCO Fire at 719-6871866 during business hours, or Kay Poland at 719-686-1806.

Beginnings home visits available. Please call Community Partnership at 686-0705 to schedule a free visit for your newborn or young child.

AA MEETING is from 7-8 p.m. Thursdays at Woodland Park Community Church. This is a Beginners Book Study meeting.

DOMESTIC VIOLENCE Education Program, an educational and support group where victims of domestic violence can learn more about power and control issues and the cycle of violence, meets at 1:30 p.m. Tuesdays at Our Lady of the Woods Church in Woodland Park. Call Devra at 719-243-5508 or e-mail dgoodwin@tessacs.org.

every Tuesday and Wednesday at the Seventh-Day Adventist Church on Colo. 67. All soups and breads are homemade, and the kitchen is open to anyone wanting a warm meal and some fellowship.

AL-ANON ABOVE the Clouds is now

GAMBLERS ANONYMOUS meets

SUPPORT p.m. every Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, and Friday, and from 5-6 p.m. every Saturday, and from noon to 1 p.m. and 6-7 p.m. every Sunday at 10400 Ute Pass Ave. in Green Mountain Falls.

meeting at the People’s Bank in Woodland Park at Hwy 24 and Sheridan Ave., rear entrance Mondays at 5:45-6:45 p.m. Handicap accessible.

AL-ANON MEETS at noon Thursdays in Guffey next to the post office. Call 719-689-5808. AL-ANON MEETS from 7-8 p.m.

Thursdays at the Woodland Park Community Church. 800 Valley View Dr. Ste. D in Woodland Park

ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets from 9-10 a.m. every Sunday at the VFW, three and a half miles north of Woodland Park on Colo. 67. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS, AA, has a 4 p.m. discussion group every Sunday at St. Andrews Episcopal Church in Cripple Creek. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets

for 12-steps Bible discussion at 6 p.m. every Monday at the Aspen Mine Center in Cripple Creek. This meeting is open to AA members and the general public. An AA meeting follows at 7 p.m.

ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 7 p.m. every Monday and at 5 p.m. Saturdays at the Community Partnership Family Resource Center in Divide. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS for women meets from 5:30-6:30 p.m. and from men from 7-8 p.m. every Tuesday at the Ute Pass Cultural Center in Woodland Park. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS, Hilltop

AA, meets at 7 p.m. Tuesdays and at 2 p.m. Saturdays at the Cripple Creek Rehab & Wellness Center on North Street.

ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets

at 7 p.m. Wednesdays at the Victor Community Center on Second and Portland.

ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets

from noon to 1 p.m. every Thursday at the Nazarene Church, 750 N. Colo. 67, at the corner of Colo. 67 and Evergreen Heights.

ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 7 p.m. Fridays at the Lake George Community Center. ADULT CHILD Alcoholics Anonymous meets at 7 p.m. Fridays. For meeting location check out www.adultchildren. org. The group no longer meets at the Victor Community Center. ALATEEN ABOVE the Clouds meets at the People’s Bank in Woodland Park at Hwy 24 and Sheridan Ave., rear entrance Mondays at 5:45-6:45 p.m. Handicap accessible. For more info call 719-632-0063 THE ALZHEIMER’S Association Teller County Family Support Group meets at 4:30 p.m. the first Tuesday of each month and the fourth Wednesday of each month in the board room at the Woodland Park Public Library. Caregivers, family, and friends will discuss the daily challenges of caring for someone with Alzheimer’s disease or other dementias, whether at home, in a facility setting or long distance. Support and encouragement is offered in a confidential setting at no cost. Meet other caregivers and learn more about the disease, common caregiving issues and share suggestions on how to take care of yourself while taking care of your loved. Call 719-266-8773 or Paula Levy at 719-331-3640. BASIC LIFE support classes are taught, as needed, at the NETCO Fire Station No. I, with a minimum of three students. Heartsaver cardiopulmonary resuscitation and first aid classes are taught monthly, with a minimum of five students for CPR and three for first aid.

at 5:30 p.m. Sundays at St. Andrews Episcopal Church in Cripple Creek.

GAMBLERS ANONYMOUS meets at 7 p.m. every Tuesday at Woodland Park Community Church Offices, Suite A, 700 Valley View Drive in Woodland Park. GED, ADULT basic education classes are from 3-6 p.m. Tuesdays in the Aspen Mine Center, Cripple Creek. Free childcare provided. Open enrollment. Call 719686-0705. Sponsored by Community Partnership Family Resource Center. GED/ESL CLASSES are from 9 a.m.

to noon Tuesdays, Wednesdays, and Thursdays in Divide with open enrollment. Free childcare is provided. Call 719-686-0705 for more information. Sponsored by Community Partnership Family Resource Center.

TO HELP local families better prepare for an emergency, the local Home Instead Senior Care office has a Web site containing downloadable materials such as a checklist of important contact names and information, a medication tracker, allergies/conditions worksheet and a wallet card to carry when away from home. These materials also can be accessed and downloaded at www. senioremergencykit.com. Contact the local Home Instead Senior Care office at 719-534-3064 for more information. PARENT EDUCATION Workshops for

parents with children ages 1 through teens. Workshops provided throughout the year at Community Partnership in Divide. Childcare and meals included. Call 686-0705 for session dates and times.

LE LECHE League, nursing mothers supporting nursing mothers, meets at 6 p.m. the second Monday of each month. Call Kathleen at 719-687-1164 for location and information. LA LECHE League meetings for those interested in breastfeeding are from 3-5 p.m. the second Wednesday of each month at CHOICES, 228 Baldwin St., Woodland Park. LITTLE CHAPEL Food Pantry, 69 County Road 5, Divide, is in search of volunteers to help distribute food to its clients. Any help with paper work, loading cars or packing boxes is greatly needed. Distribution days are the second and fourth Mondays of the month. Volunteer times are from 1-7 p.m. Client food pick-up times are from 4:30- 6:30 p.m. Call Little Chapel Food Pantry at 719-322-7610 or visit littlechapelfoodpantry.org. MONTHLY COMMODITIES food distribution program. Last Friday of each month at the Aspen Mine Center, 166 East Bennett Avenue, Cripple Creek. Proof of Teller County residence and income requirements must be met to participate. Call 689-3584 for more information.

A SOUP kitchen is from noon to 1 p.m.

SUDDEN UNEXPECTED Infant Death Local Support Group. The group offers bereavement services for parents, families, friends and caregivers who have been affected by the sudden unexpected loss of an infant or toddler. There is no cost. The third Monday of the month from 6:30-8:30 p.m. at Colorado Springs Penrose Library, 20 N. Cascade Ave. Adult meeting only; no child care will be provided. For additional help and information, call Angel Eyes at 888-2857437 or visit angeleyes.org. TRE’S CRIPPLE Creek playgroup meets 9-11 a.m. Fridays at the Aspen MIne Center in downtown Cripple Creek. Call Cathy 719-687-8054. TELLER COUNTY Nonprofit Roundtable, first Tuesday of every month from noon to 1 p.m. (bring your own lunch). Free support group for nonprofits, covering various topics decided by local nonprofits. Contact Debbie Upton at the City of Woodland Park, 687-5218 for locations and more information. TELLER COUNTY Search and Rescue meets the first Monday of each month at the Woodland Park Library downstairs meeting room at 7 p.m. We are an all-volunteer, non-profit organization tasked with locating and rescuing lost and missing people in Teller County and the surrounding areas. Experience is not required as we conduct all of our own trainings. Levels of participation range from general support (auxillary), mission support, SarTech I and SarTech II. Please contact Janet Bennett, membership chair, at 719-306-0826 for more info. DIVIDE PLAYGROUP meets from

9-10: 30 a.m. Mondays and Wednesdays at Community Partnership in Divide. Ffdd program. Call 686-0705 more more info. Drop-ins welcome.

TRE’S WOODLAND Park Playgroup meets from 9-10:30 a.m. Wednesdays and Thursdays at the The Resource Exchange - Early Intervention Colorado, 509 Scott Ave. Suite B in the Woodland Exchange building. 719-687-5047 or 719-233-5873. EARLY INTERVENTION Colorado - The Resource Exchange offers free playgroups call Nicol Houghland at 719233-5873. Also provides developmental supports and services to children birth through 3 years of age, who have special developmental needs. For free developmental screening call 719-687-5047 or visit www.tre.org THE TELLER County Cancer Education and Support Group meets from 5:307:30 p.m. every third Tuesday of each month at 1644 Cedar Mountain Road. in Divide. A program or hands-on activities are provided. For more information call

Shelley or Carol at 687-1180. Survivors of any type cancer and caregivers are welcome.

TOPS, TAKE Off Pounds Sensibly, the original nonprofit weight-loss group is an educational support group providing weekly weigh-ins and programs to help members make positive changes in the role food plays in their lives. Local chapter meets every Thursday at 10 a.m. in Green Mountain Falls at the Church of the Wildwood. Call Evelyn at 748-8383 for more information. WEIGHT WATCHERS meetings are every Tuesday in Woodland Park and Cripple Creek. Woodland Park meetings are 5:30 p.m., weigh-ins start at 5 p.m. at the Ute Pass Cultural Center, 210 E. Midland Ave. Cripple Creek group opens at 5:30 p.m. and meetings begin at 6 p.m. at the Aspen Mine Center, 166 E. Bennett Ave. Weight Watchers meetings last about 35 minutes, and it is recommended members attend one meeting each week to learn about healthy eating, gain motivation and get a confidential weigh-in to track progress. Public is welcome to visit and see what it’s about at a participating Weight Watchers meeting with no obligation to join. WINGS PROVIDES therapist facilitated support groups for women and men in which survivors are believed, accepted and no longer alone. There is a women’s group on Tuesday evening and one on Thursday evening. We are also starting a Loved Ones Group for family and friends of survivors. For more information contact the WINGS office at 800-373-8671. Visit www.wingsfound.org YOUNG PARENTS Empowerment Support Group designed for teen and young mothers and fathers to aid in the life changes of having a child. Free program includes childcare and lunch. Please call Community Partnership 686-0705 for meeting times and locations. VOLUNTEER HABITAT FOR Humanity of Teller County, 700 Valley View, Woodland Park. Call 719-687-4447 HELP THE Needy is growing in its capacity to help our friends and neighbors in Teller County. To join a fun group of volunteers, an open heart and a generous spirit are all that is required. Call Vince Scarlata at 719-687-7273. INTERNATIONAL CULTURE club, which meets quarterly, is accepting applications for families wanting the opportunity to host a foreign high school exchange student for academic year 2013-2014. Students arrive in August. Contact Gbrovetto@gmail.com or 719460-0355. THE LOCAL Emergency Planning Committee meets 8-9 a.m. on the first Thursday of each month in the Divide Volunteer Fire Department conference room, 103 Cedar Mountain Road, Divide. This committee was created to help prepare Teller County to deal with the variety of emergencies including the possibility of a pandemic influenza outbreak. The meeting is open to the public and visitors are welcome. Call 687-6416.

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A MULTIPLE Sclerosis support group meets from 10:30 a.m. to noon on the second Thursday of each month at the Woodland Park Library. Call Annette at 719-687-4103. NEW BEGINNINGS with Food workshop graduates meet every third Sunday of the month to provide ongoing support for overcoming health and weight issues and exchanging ideas and inspirations. For location and more information, contact Barbara Royal at 719-687-6823. OVEREATERS ANONYMOUS 12-step program group meets from 5:30-6 p.m. every Thursday at Mountain View United Methodist Church in Woodland Park. Call 719-687-0246 or 719-475-0037. PARENTS AS Teachers and Bright

David Martinek 687.1516 Web: DavidMartinekcb.com 18401 E. Hwy 24 Woodland Park CO 80863


20

20 Pikes Peak Courier View

May 15, 2013

Many of the wildlife species living at the Colorado Wolf & Wildlife Center get mail, especially from children but only the fox family has its own mail box.

Darlene Kobobel, owner and director of the Colorado Wolf & Wildlife Center, holds up the center’s newest rescue, an 8-week-old full-blooded wolf puppy named Keyni. The puppy was rescued from Florida and will become a new ambassador for the center’s public outreach program. The puppy will be a featured guest at Wolfstock, a fundraiser for fire prevention on May 27 at the center. Photos by Norma Engelberg

Wolf puppy gets new home Colorado Wolf & Wildlife Center adopts young wolf By Norma Engelberg

nengelberg@ourcoloradonews.com The Colorado Wolf & Wildlife Center has a new resident and ambassadorin-training just in time for Wolfstock 2013, a Memorial Day fundraiser for fire prevention. Keyni (pronounced keen-eye) is an 8-week-old full-blooded wolf puppy that was rescued from the home of an older couple in Florida. Darlene Kobobel, founder of the center that spe-

cializes in rescuing native canids including wolves, coyotes and fox, said the owners didn’t keep its male and female wolves separated and ended up with two litters of puppies. “We took in Keyni, two other pups went to Mission: Wolf in Westcliff and two went to a zoo in Oregon,” she said. “This is the second time that’s happened with this couple. This time we and other wolf-rescue organizations are taking up a collection to get the wolves spayed or neutered. That’s the only way to solve the surplus animal problem.” She added that there are already many more domestic dogs and cats born in

This leg-hold trap is the kind of trap that is used to catch wolves and other wildlife. The trap can be seen in the Colorado Wolf & Wildlife Center gift shop.

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this country than there are available homes and that the problem is even worse for exotic animals like wolves. “There is no reason unless you’re preserving the species to ever breed these animals,” she said. It will cost $810 to spay two female wolves and neuter two males. The center has donated $250 toward the project and Mission: Wolf is also contributing. Besides its 17 wolves, the center is also home to four red fox, four coyotes and five swift fox that are part of a species preserving breeding program. Besides these, the center is also home to americauna chickens that lay blue and green eggs, rescued domesticated dogs, a cat, two burros, miniature horses, a couple of ferrets, some lovebirds and Kobobel’s cichlid fish collection. “We’re a menagerie,” she said. While the center does its part rescuing these animals, Kobobel is worried about the future. “All wildlife is endangered by what we’re doing,” she said. “Until that affects us directly there are very few people willing to be a voice for the animals.” She added that since the wolves have been taken off

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The red fox population at the Colorado Wolf & Wildlife Center near Divide have a skyline drive over the center’s entrance. The center keeps four red fox and five swift fox. The swift fox group is part of a nationwide breeding program designed to maximize the species’ genetic diversity. The swift fox is considered an endangered species in Canada but not in the United States.

Keara, left, and her partner Micah are one of three pairs of wolves at the Colorado Wolf & Wildlife Center that will be foster parents to the new wolf puppy the center recently rescued from Florida. the Endangered Species list in Wyoming, 20 percent of the Yellowstone wolves have been killed. “All of the (Yellowstone’s) radio collared wolves are dead,” she said. “Wolves are a keystone species. We are all imperiled by their loss.” The center was created when Kobobel rescued a wolf-dog named Chinook from a kill shelter and a

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wolf named Nikita rescued from a 5-foot by 8-foot crate he was locked inside of for three years. The two became constant companions, so much so that they came to be called “The Lovers.” Their story is told in detail during the Tuesday through Sunday, by reservation tours of the nonprofit center. Repeat visitors will see some changes at the center. There is a new meat house where meat for the canid population is stored in freezers and refrigerators, a veterinarian house, solar panels on the visitors’ center roof and a xeriscape garden created by Teller County Master Gardeners. “We’re trying to be as green as we can be,” Kobobel said. “We’ve also acquired the land next door so

now were up to 70 acres. That land allows us to have a bigger no-development buffer around our animal enclosures and to do some fire mitigation.” The new puppy will be introduced to the public at Wolfstock 2013, where, from 1 a.m.-5 p.m. at the center on Lower Twin Rock Road, there will be food and beer, a silent auction, bands, vendors and door prizes. Tickets are $30 for adults and $15 for children age 12 years old and younger and can be purchased at www. brownpapertickets.com or by calling 800-838-3006. Shuttles and parking will be available at the Divide Post office. For more information about the center and to reserve a tour date and time, visit www.wolfeducation. org or call 719-687-9742.


Pikes PeakSPORTS 21

Pikes Peak Courier View 21 May 15, 2013

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be

Woodland Park sophomore Meghan Sieracki scored the Panthers’ lone goal in their playoff loss to Palmer Ridge on May 7

Panthers End Season on a High Note Sieracki scores ‘There’s so much Woodland Park’s lone goal in playoff potential with all loss to Palmer Ridge By Danny Summers

jdsummers30@gmail.com MONUMENT – It wasn’t quite the “shot heard round the world,” but it might well have been the most important goal of the season for the Woodland Park High School girls soccer team. The monumental moment occurred 20 minutes into the second half of the Panthers’ first-round Class 4A state playoff game against No. 3 overall seed Palmer Ridge on May 7. Morghan Sieracki, off of a pass from Jenny Sells, blasted a shot from about 12 yards that found the back of the net to put Woodland Park on the scoreboard. A loud roar emerged from the Panthers faithful at Don Breese Stadium as the girls celebrated on the field with pats on the back, high fives and smiles. “We talked about getting a goal at halftime,” said Sieracki, who was second on the team in goals this season with 16. “We worked all season on those goals.

the girls.’

Shannon Bingen What I’ve been working on in practice is making a difference.” More important than Sieracki’s goal was the boost of confidence it gave the club. The Panthers – the No. 30 seed in the tournament – lost the game 9-1, but they gained a huge confidence boost heading into the offseason. “It’s going to give us hop instead of just waiting around for next season to begin,” Sieracki said. “We’re going to have a couple of practices a week starting (this) week so we can keep working together.” The playoff game was the first for Woodland Park since making back-to-back appearances in 2008 and 2009. The Panthers fashioned an impressive 10-5-1 mark this season. They were the

Woodland Park sophomore Katie Stunkard breaks free in the Panthers’ playoff game against Palmer Ridge on May 7 Photos by Paul Magnuson

No. 3 seed out of the Metro League. “Our goal next year is to make the playoffs again and win a playoff game; and maybe win the league,” said Sells, who led the team with 18 goals and 14 assists this season. “This game meant a lot. I felt everyone stepped up to the occasion today. We did not want to get mercied. We wanted to show some pride.” Things did not look good early for Woodland Park as Palmer Ridge built a 6-0 lead with 18:34 remaining in the first half. The Bears’

dominant ball handling and speed was a big reason for their success as Woodland Park had difficulty putting together more than two consecutive passes. It also didn’t help matters that the Panthers were without starting senior goalkeeper Grace Wyka, who broke her hand in the final crossover tournament game against Widefield on May 3 – a 5-0 victory that put Woodland Park in the playoffs. Junior Mary Polgar filled in for Wyka and did a solid job. “Mary played great,” said Woodland Park defender

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and captain Shannon Bingen. “She’ll work hard in the offseason and be back next year.” Bingen was proud of her teammates on many fronts. “I felt that all the hard work and sweat and tears were worth it,” she said. “This was definitely a great way to end my high school career. “There’s so much potential with all the girls. They’ve developed so much. They will hold their own next year.”

Woodland Park returns a strong core next season. Other varsity players include sophomores Katie Stunkard and MacKenzie Jones, juniors Julia BriggsHale, Grace Hopkins, Victoria Billings, Michaele McDonough and Kayla Liller and freshman Caitlan Thorne. “I’m pumped for next season,” Sieracki said. “There are some more freshmen playing on club teams that will really help us out.”


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22 Pikes Peak Courier View

May 15, 2013

The Woodland Park baseball players and coaches are all smiles prior to their playoff game with Montrose on may 11. Photos by David Turley

Panthers’ season comes to an end in playoffs By Danny Summers

Jdsummers30@gmail.com A 10-0 loss wasn’t the result the Woodland Park High School baseball teamwas expecting in its return to the post season. But that was the case May 11 when the Panthers played host Montrose in a Class 4A District 5 playoff game. Montrose right-hander Tyrus Lopez was dominating as he threw a perfect game over five innings. Fifteen Bears stepped to the plate and returned to the dugout without ever reaching first base. The game was called due to the run rule after Montrose scored a

run in the bottom of the fifth off of Jake Neal. “We played like we were the No. 31 seed and Montrose played like there were the No. 2 seed,” said Woodland Park coach Cliff Richardson. “It was disappointing, but we knew Montrose would be tough.” Richardson and his crew knew they had a tough matchup when pairings were announced on May 8. The Bears (11-9) were the No. 31 seed out of 32 teams in the playoffs. Montrose was the No. 2 overall seed. Montrosedefeated Erie to win the district and advance to this

weekend’s state quarterfinals. Lopez was Montrose’s No. 2 pitcher. But according to Richardson he was every bit as good as any No. 1 his club has seen all year. “He threw hard and he had a good curve ball,” Richardson said. “We were either flailing at curve balls or swinging above our heads. We didn’t really hit anything hard.” Panthers ace right-hander Jeremy Gwinn started the game, but was roughed up for nine runs (seven earned) on 10 hits in 3 1/3 innings. Gwinn did not walk a batter and struck out three to raise his

Woodland Park cleanup hitter Logan Watters take a rip at a ball during the Panthers’ playoff game against Montrose on May 11

‘I am very proud of our varsity baseball boys and the fact that they made it to division playoffs.’ Dave Turley, Woodland Park mayor season total to 81 – setting a new school record in the process. The old mark of 80 was held by Troy Kane in 2006. “Jeremy threw well,” Richardson said. “He’d get two strikes, hit his spot on the outside corner and they’d hit it into right field.” Gwinn’s father, Jeff, an assistant coach with the club, added that Jeremy wasn’t his usual sharp self due to a tired arm. “He left belt high too much,” Jeff Gwinn said. “He probably could get away with that against lesser opponents, but not when you’re playing the No. 2 seed.” Despite the quick playoff exit, Woodland Park had a lot to celebrate this season. The Panthers won six of seven games during one stretch following a four-game losing streak. Gwinn and Evan Lays put together impressive seasons on the mound, wining a combined nine games. Gwinn’s ERA was under 1.00 much of the season. Three times he struck out 11 or more batters in a game. Lays fashioned a 2.33 ERA over 33 innings, striking out 10 or more batters in a game on two occasions. Gwinn and Lays each had staggering strikeout-to-walk totals. Gwinn struck out 82 while walking 20. Lays had 53 strikeouts and 14 walks. Lays was also the team’s No. 1

catcher and one of the club’s top hitters. He batted .349 with four doubles, two triples, 13 RBIs and tied for the team lead in runs with 20. Six Panthers (Lays, Max Levy, Cody Hedges, Logan Watters, Keegan Harmen and Neal) batted over .300. Kayden Osborne hit a solid .293 with five doubles and 12 RBIs. “I am very proud of our varsity baseball boys and the fact that they made it to division playoffs,” said Woodland Park mayor Dave Turley, who made the trek to Montrose. “It’s a fine accomplishment for which they, their families, their classmates, and our community can be very proud also.” Turley is very close to the program on a number of levels. He photographs many of the games and oversees the American Legion summer program, which is set to begin June 10. Richardson will coach the summer team, which includes eight starters from this year’s club – Hedges, Watters, Osborne, Harmen, Dakota Herman, Carl Loy, Sam Ballard and Chase Fish. “I’m going to miss my seniors dearly, but I am excited to put players on the field with valuable varsity experience,” Richardson said. Woodland Park will host the Legion state tournament in late July at Meadow Wood Sports Park.

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23

Pikes Peak Courier View 23

May 15, 2013

Tapia Heads to State Track Meet as an Underdog Cripple Creek-Victor junior excels in the long jump By Danny Summers

jdsummers30@gmail.com COLORADO SPRINGS – Katie Tapia is hoping to sail beyond the competition at this week’s state track and field meet. The Cripple Creek-Victor High School junior has soared under the radar all season in the long jump. While that has not been by plan, she is using it as motivation to generate her best leap when it matters most. “I’ll be going to state as an underdog, but I’ll get ‘em,� Tapia said with confidence. “I just need to put it all into one jump.� Tapia will compete in the event Friday as competitors from all classifications gather at Jefferson County Stadium in Lakewood. Tapia is Cripple Creek-Victor’s lone representative. She competes in 2A. “She’s had a rough go of it this season,� Cripple Creek-Victor track coach Jill McCracken said of Tapia. “She’s a little frustrated, but she’s getting a lot better.� Tapia finished fifth in state in the long jump as a freshman and fourth last year as a sophomore with a career-best leap of 17 feet, 3.25 inches. This year has been marred by a series of scratches. It didn’t help that she was forced inside to practice much of the time because of the winter-type conditions. “All I really need to work on is my form,� Tapia said. “If I get a mark on my first jump I get confidence. If I scratch on my first jump it really gets to me. Tapia has shown signs of turning things around. She had a season-best leap of 16-9 at the Spartan Invitational on May 4. She is currently ranked fifth in the state. The top 18 in each event advance to the state meet. She won the Southern Peaks League meet on May 10 with a jump of 15-10.5. “She’s getting a lot better with practice,� McCracken said. Tapia is a multi-sport athlete. She was the top hitter on the school’s volleyball team, and led the basketball team in scoring. “Volleyball helps with my vertical,� Tapia said.

Cripple Creek-Victory junior Katie Tapia is flanked by Pioneers head coach Jill McCracken (left) and assistant coach Kris Riley (right). Tapia is competing at the state track meet this week in the long jump. Photo by Danny Summers A huge part of success in the long jump is speed. Tapia has that. She started running the 100 meters this year. Her best mark is 13.92 seconds. “What really helps me is my speed,� she said. “I need to work on my height. If I could get my height down I could be

‘All it takes is one good jump. I think I can take state if I can put it all together.’ Katie Tapia

CRIPPLE CREEK RECREATION REPORT Cripple Creek For hours for Cripple Creek Parks and Recreation, call 719-689-3514.

Ongoing

Kido 4 Kids is every Monday and Wednesday from 5-6 p.m. Kido is a selfdefense focused martial arts system for kids

SEND US YOUR NEWS Colorado Community Media welcomes event listings and other submissions. Please note our submissions emails. Events and club listings calendar@ourcoloradonews.com School notes schoolnotes@ourcoloradonews. com Military briefs militarynotes@ourcoloradonews.com

ages 7-13. Cost is $25 a month for unlimited classes. Aikido is every Monday and Wednesday from 6-7:30 p.m. Aikido is a Japanese Martial Art. We teach mature adults technically pure martial arts. Cost is $30 a month for unlimited classes. Open ZUMBA meets Monday through Thursday from 5-6:30 p.m. Lose those extra pounds with an energetic dance. Free to all fitness member types.

in the 18s.� Tapia ran the 200 as a freshman and sophomore, but gave it up. “I hate it,� she said with a smile. “I always dreaded that race.� McCracken believes Tapia could become one of the top 200 runners in state if she dedicated herself to the event.

“That’s her race,� McCracken said. “She’s good at it.� For now, at least, Tapia is focusing on the long jump at the state meet. She’s hoping for a warm day. “All it takes is one good jump,� she said. “I think I can take state if I can put it all together.�

 

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General press releases Submit through our website Obituaries obituaries@ourcoloradonews.com Letters to the editor editor@ourcoloradonews.com News tips news@ourcoloradonews.com Fax information to 719-687-3009 Mail to P.O. Box 340, Woodland Park, CO 80866

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24

24 Pikes Peak Courier View

May 15, 2013

Misc. Notices

Help Wanted

Garage Sales

Sporting goods

Office Rent/Lease

Local author, Lisa Keuhlen, will be at the Cellar Door to sign her newly released book, Deliverance from Evil, by Corinne Taylor. This is a 3rd Friday Art Walk event, May 17th. Free glass of wine with the purchase of a book!

Teller-Park Conservation District is seeking technician: part-time, 2 days per week from June 1-December 31, 2013, to work alongside the USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service in the Woodland Park field office. Technician will assist in the development of comprehensive natural resources conservation plans. Technician will also survey, design and oversee implementation of conservation practices. Applicant must possess a Bachelor’s Degree in Natural Resources Management, Soil Science, Wildlife Biology, Forestry or similar and also possess 5 years experience working in the natural resources field. This is a TEMPORARY Position. Pay DOE; no benefits. Announcement closes May 24th. Submit resume to Teller-Park Conservation District, PO Box 2027, Woodland Park, CO 80866.

Garage Sale 1150 Forest Edge Road Woodland Park, 2 Snowblowers, Mountain Bike, Kids Outdoor Playset, 2 Desks, Toddler Bed, Belari Pottery, Kids Toys and Clothes and Household Items, Friday May 17th 7am - 1pm and Sat May 18th 7am - 12:30pm

1980's Golf Clubs and Orange Suede bag. Never used also portable cart $125 cash (719)687-8787

250 sq ft office space for rent in Woodland Park (Midland and Boundary). $250 per month (with a one year lease). Please call 719964-2808.

Help Wanted Advertising Executive

for TriLakes Tribune Established Sales Territory with Growth Potential Base plus Commission Send Resume to rcarrigan@ourcoloradonews.com

Apartment Manager/ Maintenance

needed for a 10 unit complex multi-family apartment complex in Cripple Creek. Must live on site. For more information call 970-901-5616

Cripple Creek-Victor School District is accepting applications for a Colo licensed elementary special ed teacher. Experience preferred. EOE. Information and application process available at ccvschools.org. All applications are subject to acceptance or rejection at the sole discretion of the Board of Education. Applications will be accepted until the position is filled

Evening Cook

Part Time or Full Time

Office Help

Part Time or Full Time available May-November. Experience required. Call (719)748-3475 or email sam@thenatureplace.net

News Reporter

for the Monument and Teller County area For two weekly publications. Salary position. Send resume to rcarrigan@ourcolroadonews.com Part Time 18 hours a week. Must be able to lift 80 pounds consistently. Please apply in person - 63 Buffalo Court Divide (719)687-8708

Part Time Cleaning Position available in Woodland Park. Call Ben @ (719)633-2233 ext. 102

Police Dispatcher –

Cripple Creek Police Department $31,446-$42,544 yr. DOE. Full benefit package. For complete information, requirements and application, please visit the website at www.cripplecreekgov.com. Closing Date: May 31, 2013. EOE. Positions available for Cooks or Laundry at a Summer Camp in Florissant. End of May to End of August. 748-3341

WW Plant Intern -

Full-time Temporary-3 months-no benefits. $10.74 an hour. City of Cripple Creek Wastewater Department. Must be 16 years old; Junior or Senior in good standing. Closing date: Open until filled, Full job ad at www.cripplecreekgov.com applications will be reviewed starting May 28, 2013. EOE.

Cripple Creek-Victor School District is accepting applications

for a District Psychologist . Experience working with students in a school setting preferred. Must hold a Master’s and appropriate Colo license. Qualifications, job description and application are located at ccvschools.org. Please submit application/resume to Cripple Creek-Victor School District, P.O. Box 897, Cripple Creek, CO 80813; or e-mail to jolmsted@ccvschools.com. All applications are subject to acceptance or rejection at the sole discretion of the Board of Education. Applications will be accepted until position is filled.

Seasonal Housekeeping position available. Call (719)748-3398 or email brenda@mlazyc.com

Summer Ranch Help

Fence Work, Basic Labor, Help with cattle. Need to posses Horsemanship Skills. Call (719)748-3341

ALL GOES! May 18th, 8-3, 894 Teller Ln. W.P. Const. Tools., Furn., Home Gym, Quality Clothes, Misc.

Alpine Auto 687-3900

Estate Sales Saturday & Sunday May 25th & 26th Indoors 10am-5pm. NO EARLY BIRDS! Moving into an RV. EVERYTHING MUST GO! 16 Druid Trail, Florissant 748-5506

719-238-4250

Autos for Sale SNOW PLOW TRUCK 1976 International Scout II with Western snow plow. V8 runs well, auto transmission slips. $1600 OBO 719-687-6825

Cleaning

Apartments AFFORDABLE ROOMS & RV SITES No lease req'd. Furnished rooms incl. utils, phone, satellite TV starting at $220 a wk. FH RV sites for $36 a day, beautiful country setting, rec room, playground, laundry & free WiFi. Dog friendly GMF 719684-9044

Mrs. Clean

Offering Residential and light commercial cleans. Move In, Move Out Construction Clean Licensed, Insured & Bonded. Call Linda @

719-439-7085

Clean Ground-Level in Guffey avail. around June 1st, Single person or couple only $700 + electric (719)689-2495

Appliances

Concrete/Paving

Homes

Portable Dishwasher-Full SizeMaytag-Works Great! 719-2377466

3 BR, 3 Bath with office, 2 car

garage on 2.2 acres. Peak Views, $1500/month 719-687-6241

CONCRETE PREP - PLACE - FINISH

Firewood Dry Split Pine $125 a cord delivered Call Mike at 689-0869

Also Demo and Removal

FIREWOOD FOR SALE Spring Special $125 per cord, split and delivered 719-748-1128

Kenmore Washer/Dryer large capacity, energy efficient, like new $500 Patio wicker furniture steel construction 6 peice set $300 2 Antique brass twin beds $300 Electric Keyboard $100 Antique Rocking chair $100 (719)963-0116

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Garage Sales Community Cupboard

AngloGold Ashanti (Colorado) Corp., manager for the Cripple Creek & Victor Gold Mining Company, has an immediate opening for a Community Affairs Communication Specialist based in Victor, Colorado.

AngloGold Ashanti (Colorado) Corp. Surveyor AngloGold Ashanti (Colorado) Corp., manager for the Cripple Creek & Victor Gold Mining Company, has an immediate opening for a Surveyor at the mine site located two miles east of Cripple Creek, Colorado. RESPONSIBILITIES/JOB DUTIES: Responsible for all phases of mine surveying including the mine survey control network, layout work, ore control, elevation control, data entry and data reduction via microcomputer, and special projects as assigned. Is also responsible for care and maintenance of the survey vehicle and the survey equipment. Works as a member of the survey crew and assists in coordinating surveying activities with the mine operations group. Works directly with mine geology, engineering, mine operations and other mine surveyors. QUALIFICATIONS: Should have a working knowledge of computers. Must be a self-starter with good organizational skills, a willingness to perform work in adverse conditions, which includes weather conditions, and should be detail oriented. The successful applicant must have a willingness to work wherever needed to assure the success of AngloGold Ashanti (Colorado) Corporation. Successful applicant must be able to maintain safe and adequate work surroundings as well as ensuring environmental compliance. Note: This is a salaried non-exempt position. It is eligible for overtime. Salary dependent upon experience. AngloGold Ashanti (Colorado) Corp. provides an excellent benefit package and a salary commensurate with experience. Please submit applications in confidence to:

AngloGold Ashanti (Colorado) Corp. Human Resources Attn: Surveyor P. O. Box 191 Victor, CO 80860 FAX (719) 218-6122 e-mail: ccvemployment@anglogoldashantina.com You may complete an application on line at: Ccvgoldmining.com AngloGold Ashanti (Colorado) Corp. is an Equal Opportunity Employer.

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Description This position will be responsible for scheduling guided tours and supervision of tour guides of the CC&V surface gold mining operation. The Communication Specialist may also be called upon to conduct tours of the operation. The candidate must possess a valid Colorado driver license, and be able to safely operate a 14-passenger van in a variety of driving conditions, as well as provide information on mine operations, history and geology of the area. In this capacity, the Communication Specialist will be responsible for the safety and environmental compliance of tour visitors while on the mine site. The position includes an external communications component. These duties would include, but not be limited to: collecting information as well as writing articles for the website and newsletter; updates to social media and website, press releases, developing and creating brochures; and public presentations regarding the mining operations to elected officials and community organizations. Additionally, the incumbent will be expected to identify and participate in local organizations who are involved in economic development and promotion of the community. RESPONSIBILITIES/JOB DUTIES: • Manage tour program, supervise tour guides. Establish training program for tour guides. Schedule tours. • Formalize school tour program to conform to Colorado State Education standards, including classroom presentations, hand out materials, and site tours. Schedule school tours. • Evaluate tour program content and update message points as necessary. • Manage Cripple Creek Visitor Center, supervise attendants. Manage daily schedule and special events. • Develop and manage informational signage, brochures, displays, interpretive information and other needed media for current and future plans of operations. • Collect information and write press release articles, website, and newsletter. • Manage website media content, updating information and photos as needed. Establish press room for photo and B roll access. • Develop and update brochures for operational areas, and provide public outreach as needed. • Develop and oversee informational signage for tourist venues throughout the region regarding CC&V operations. • Partner with and participate in local organizations involved in economic development and promotion of the community. QUALIFICATIONS: • Working knowledge of Communications. • Demonstrated ability in public speaking, presentation development, and publication writing. • Experience in supervision of employees. • Bachelors Degree or equivalent in management, communications, public relations, education or similar program desired. AngloGold Ashanti (Colorado), Corp. provides an excellent benefit package and a salary commensurate with experience. AngloGold Ashanti (Colorado) Corp. is an Equal Opportunity Employer. Please submit resumes in confidence to:

AngloGold Ashanti (Colorado) Corp. ccvemployment@anglogoldashantina.com Attn: Communication Specialist P. O. Box 191 Victor, CO 80860 FAX (719) 218-6122

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Huge Garage Sale! Furniture, Household goods, toys, flowers, straw baskets, golf clubs, tools, too much to list. Saturday May 11th 8am-1pm & Saturday May 18th 8am-1pm 111 North Park Street Come one, Come all!

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Sand & Gravel TIGER TIMBER AND GRAVEL

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WE OFFER – ROAD BASE &FILL DIRT DELIVERY IS AVAILABLE OR PICK UP AT THE YARD.

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Handyman

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As Always Free Estimates References

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Woodland Park, CO 80863

May 15, 2013

NOTICE OF SALE The current holder of the Evidence of Debt secured by the Deed of Trust described herein, has filed Notice of Election and Demand for sale as provided by law and in said Deed of Trust. THEREFORE, Notice Is Hereby Given that I will, at 10:00 a.m. in the forenoon of June 12, 2013, at the Teller County Public Trustee’s Office, 101 W. Bennett Ave., Cripple Creek, Colorado, sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder for cash, the said real property and all interest of said Grantor(s), Grantor(s)’ heirs and assigns therein, for the purpose of paying the indebtedness provided in said Evidence of Debt secured by the Deed of Trust, plus attorneys’ fees, the expenses of sale and other items allowed by law, and will issue to the purchaser a Certificate of Purchase, all as provided by law.

Public Trustees Public Notice NOTICE OF SALE (CRS §38-38-103) Foreclosure Sale No. 2013-0013 To Whom It May Concern: This Notice is given with regard to the following described Deed of Trust: On February 11, 2013, the undersigned Public Trustee caused the Notice of Election and Demand relating to the Deed of Trust described below to be recorded in the County of Teller records. Original Grantor: MARY A DOWNEY Original Beneficiary: MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC. AS NOMINEE FOR INDYMAC BANK, F.S.B. Current Holder of Evidence of Debt: ONEWEST BANK, FSB Date of Deed of Trust: 5/23/2007 Recording Date of Deed of Trust: 6/18/2007 Recorded in Teller County: Reception No. 607709 Original Principal Amount: $144,000.00 Outstanding Principal Balance: $134,678.99 Pursuant to C.R.S. §38-38-101 (4) (i), you are hereby notified that the covenants of the deed of trust have been violated as follows: Failure to timely make payments as required under the Deed of Trust. THE LIEN FORECLOSED MAY NOT BE A FIRST LIEN. THE PROPERTY DESCRIBED HEREIN IS ALL OF THE PROPERTY ENCUMBERED BY THE LIEN OF THE DEED OF TRUST. LOT 1, BLOCK 1, SOUTH WEST STREET SUBDIVISION FILING NO. 1, COUNTY OF TELLER, STATE OF COLORADO which has the address of: 665 S West Street Woodland Park, CO 80863 NOTICE OF SALE The current holder of the Evidence of Debt secured by the Deed of Trust described herein, has filed Notice of Election and Demand for sale as provided by law and in said Deed of Trust. THEREFORE, Notice Is Hereby Given that I will, at 10:00 a.m. in the forenoon of June 12, 2013, at the Teller County Public Trustee’s Office, 101 W. Bennett Ave., Cripple Creek, Colorado, sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder for cash, the said real property and all interest of said Grantor(s), Grantor(s)’ heirs and assigns therein, for the purpose of paying the indebtedness provided in said Evidence of Debt secured by the Deed of Trust, plus attorneys’ fees, the expenses of sale and other items allowed by law, and will issue to the purchaser a Certificate of Purchase, all as provided by law. First Publication: 4/17/2013 Last Publication: 5/15/2013 Published in: Pikes Peak Courier View Dated: 2/20/2013 ROBERT W. CAMPBELL Teller COUNTY PUBLIC TRUSTEE

First Publication: 4/17/2013 Last Publication: 5/15/2013 Published in: Pikes Peak Courier View

Public Trustees

Dated: 2/20/2013 ROBERT W. CAMPBELL Teller COUNTY PUBLIC TRUSTEE By: Pamela A. Cronce Deputy Public Trustee Attorney: SHEILA J FINN Attorney Registration #36637 JANEWAY LAW FIRM, P.C. 19201 E. MAIN STREET SUITE 205, PARKER, COLORADO 80134-9092 Phone: 1 (303) 706-9990 Fax: 1 (303) 706-9994 Attorney file #: 30147 The Attorney above is acting as a debt collector and is attempting to collect a debt. Any information provided may be used for that purpose. Legal Notice No.: 2013-0013 First Publication: 4/17/2013 Last Publication: 5/15/2013 Published in: Pikes Peak Courier View Public Notice NOTICE OF SALE (CRS §38-38-103) Foreclosure Sale No. 2013-0014 To Whom It May Concern: This Notice is given with regard to the following described Deed of Trust: On February 11, 2013, the undersigned Public Trustee caused the Notice of Election and Demand relating to the Deed of Trust described below to be recorded in the County of Teller records. Original Grantor: EUGENE BROWN Original Beneficiary: GEORGE B MARSHALL Current Holder of Evidence of Debt: JANET M BAILEY Date of Deed of Trust: 1/21/2009 Recording Date of Deed of Trust: 6/11/2009 Recorded in Teller County: Reception No. 627272 Original Principal Amount: $33,000.00 Outstanding Principal Balance: $33,000.00 Pursuant to C.R.S. §38-38-101 (4) (i), you are hereby notified that the covenants of the deed of trust have been violated as follows: Failure to pay Principal and Interest when due with all other payments provided for the Evidence of Debt Secured by the Deed of Trust and other violations of the terms thereof. THE LIEN FORECLOSED MAY NOT BE A FIRST LIEN. THE PROPERTY DESCRIBED HEREIN IS ALL OF THE PROPERTY ENCUMBERED BY THE LIEN OF THE DEED OF TRUST. L 4 B1 HIGHLAND GROVE IND. PK. which has the address of: 18109 County Road 1 Florissant, CO 80816

On March 1, 2013, the undersigned PubPursuant to C.R.S. §38-38-101 (4) (i), you lic Trustee caused the Notice of Election 25-Color and Demand relating to the Deed of Trust are hereby notified that the covenants of described below to be recorded in the the deed of trust have been violated as County of Teller records. follows: Failure to pay Principal and Interest when due with all other payments provided for the Evidence of Debt Secured by the Deed of Trust and other violations of the terms thereof. THE LIEN FORECLOSED MAY NOT BE A FIRST LIEN. THE PROPERTY DESCRIBED HEREIN IS ALL OF THE PROPERTY ENCUMBERED BY THE LIEN OF THE DEED OF TRUST. L 4 B1 HIGHLAND GROVE IND. PK. which has the address of: 18109 County Road 1 Florissant, CO 80816

Original Grantor: SUSAN A PATTERSON AND MICHAEL PATTERSON Original Beneficiary: MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., AS NOMINEE FOR USAA FEDERAL SAVINGS BANK Current Holder of Evidence of Debt: PHH MORTGAGE CORPORATION Date of Deed of Trust: 11/14/2005 Recording Date of Deed of Trust: 11/17/2005 Recorded in Teller County: Reception No. 587634 Original Principal Amount: $138,450.00 Outstanding Principal Balance: $156,975.72

NOTICE OF SALE

Pursuant to C.R.S. §38-38-101 (4) (i), you are hereby notified that the covenants of the deed of trust have been violated as follows:

The current holder of the Evidence of Debt secured by the Deed of Trust described herein, has filed Notice of Election and Demand for sale as provided by law and in said Deed of Trust.

Failure to pay principal and interest when due together will all other payments provided for in the Evidence of Debt secured by the Deed of Trust and other violations thereof.

THEREFORE, Notice Is Hereby Given that I will, at 10:00 a.m. in the forenoon of June 12, 2013, at the Teller County Public Trustee’s Office, 101 W. Bennett Ave., Cripple Creek, Colorado, sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder for cash, the said real property and all interest of said Grantor(s), Grantor(s)’ heirs and assigns therein, for the purpose of paying the indebtedness provided in said Evidence of Debt secured by the Deed of Trust, plus attorneys’ fees, the expenses of sale and other items allowed by law, and will issue to the purchaser a Certificate of Purchase, all as provided by law.

THE LIEN FORECLOSED MAY NOT BE A FIRST LIEN. THE PROPERTY DESCRIBED HEREIN IS ALL OF THE PROPERTY ENCUMBERED BY THE LIEN OF THE DEED OF TRUST.

Public Trustees

First Publication: 4/17/2013 Last Publication: 5/15/2013 Published in: Pikes Peak Courier View Dated: 2/25/2013 ROBERT W. CAMPBELL Teller COUNTY PUBLIC TRUSTEE By: Pamela A. Cronce Deputy Public Trustee Attorney: JANET M BAILEY 4823 PICTURESQUE CIRCLE, COLORADO SPRINGS, COLORADO 80917 Phone: (719) 233-5660 Fax: Attorney file #: N/A The above is acting as a debt collector and is attempting to collect a debt. Any information provided may be used for that purpose. Legal Notice No.: 2013-0014 First Publication: 4/17/2013 Last Publication: 5/15/2013 Published in: Pikes Peak Courier View Public Notice NOTICE OF SALE (CRS §38-38-103) Foreclosure Sale No. 2013-0016 To Whom It May Concern: This Notice is given with regard to the following described Deed of Trust: On March 1, 2013, the undersigned Public Trustee caused the Notice of Election and Demand relating to the Deed of Trust described below to be recorded in the County of Teller records. Original Grantor: SUSAN A PATTERSON AND MICHAEL PATTERSON Original Beneficiary: MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., AS NOMINEE FOR USAA FEDERAL SAVINGS BANK Current Holder of Evidence of Debt: PHH MORTGAGE CORPORATION Date of Deed of Trust: 11/14/2005 Recording Date of Deed of Trust: 11/17/2005 Recorded in Teller County: Reception No. 587634 Original Principal Amount: $138,450.00 Outstanding Principal Balance: $156,975.72

NOTICE OF SALE

Pursuant to C.R.S. §38-38-101 (4) (i), you are hereby notified that the covenants of the deed of trust have been violated as follows:

The current holder of the Evidence of Debt secured by the Deed of Trust described herein, has filed Notice of Election and Demand for sale as provided by law and in said Deed of Trust.

Failure to pay principal and interest when due together will all other payments provided for in the Evidence of Debt secured by the Deed of Trust and other violations thereof.

Public Notice By: Pamela A. Cronce LIEN of FORECLOSED MAY THEREFORE, NoticeThe Is current Herebyholder Givenof theTHE NOTICE OF Trustee SALE Evidence Debt secured by the NOT DeedBE Deputy Public A has FIRST that I will, at 10:00 a.m. the described forenoon of (CRS §38-38-103) Foreclosure Sale No. 2013-0015 ofin Trust herein, filedLIEN. Notice of Election and DeTHE PROPERTY HEREIN June 12, 2013, at the mand Teller for County Pubsale as provided by law and in saidDESCRIBED Deed of Trust. IS ALL OF THE PROPERTY ENlic with Trustee’s To Whom It May JConcern: This Notice is given regardOffice, to the 101 W. Bennett Ave., Attorney: SHEILA FINN BY I THE Cripple Creek, Colorado, sell at public following described Deed of Trust: THEREFORE, Notice Is CUMBERED Hereby Given that will, atLIEN 10:00 OF a.m.THE Attorney Registration #36637 TRUST. auction to the highest in and bidderofforJuly 3,DEED thebest forenoon 2013, OF at the Teller County Public JANEWAY LAW FIRM, P.C. cash, the said real property and all inOn March 1, 2013, the undersigned Trustee’s Office, 101 W. Bennett Ave., Cripple Creek, Colorado, 19201 E. MAIN STREET SUITE 205, Public Trustee caused the L Ohighest T 3 7 , and A Rbest ROW HEAD S T Athe TES, heirs to the Notice ofCOLORADO Election and 80134-9092 Demand relating to theterest Deed of of said TrustGrantor(s), sellGrantor(s)’ at public auction bidder for E cash, PARKER, TELLER, STATE OF COLassigns therein, said for the described below to be recorded in the Countyand of Teller records. realpurpose property of and allCOUNTY interest ofOF said Grantor(s), Grantor(s)’ Phone: 1 (303) 706-9990 ORADO paying the indebtedness provided in said heirs and assigns therein, for the purpose of paying the indebtedFax: 1 (303) 706-9994 Evidence of Debt secured the Deed of Evidence of Debt secured by the Deed of Originalfile Grantor LORY A SCHMITZ AND JOSEPH G SCHMITZ nessby provided in said Attorney #: 30147 which has the address Trust, plus attorneys’ Trust, fees, the Original BeneficiaryJPMORGAN CHASE BANK, N.A. plusexpenses attorneys’ fees, the expenses of saleof: and other items of sale andBANK, other items allowed by and law, will issue 540 Red Feather Lanea Certificate of The Attorney above is acting as aJPMORGAN debt Current Holder of Evidence of Debt CHASE allowed by law, to the purchaser and will issue to the purchaser a CertificWoodland Park, CO 80863 collector andASSOCIATION is attempting to collect a NATIONAL Purchase, all as provided by law. ate of Purchase, all as provided by law. debt. information provided may be Date Any of Deed of Trust: 7/24/2012 NOTICE OF SALE used for thatDate purpose. Recording of Deed of Trust: 8/8/2012 First Publication: 5/8/2013 First Publication: 4/17/2013 Recorded in Teller County: Reception No. 655346 Last Publication: 6/5/2013 Last Publication: 5/15/2013 current holder of the Evidence of Debt Legal Notice No.: 2013-0013 Original Principal Amount: $201,900.00 Published in: Pikes PeakThe Courier View Published in: Pikes Peak Courier View secured by the Deed of Trust described First Publication: 4/17/2013 Outstanding Principal Balance: $201,640.11 herein, has filed Notice of Election and Last Publication: 5/15/2013 Dated: 3/5/2013 Dated: 2/25/2013 Demand for sale as provided by law and Published Courier (4) View Pursuantin: to Pikes C.R.S.Peak §38-38-101 (i), you areROBERT hereby notified ROBERT W. CAMPBELLin said Deed of Trust. W. CAMPBELL that the covenants of the deed of trust have been as PUBLIC Teller COUNTY PUBLIC TRUSTEE Tellerviolated COUNTY TRUSTEE follows: By: Pamela A. Cronce THEREFORE, Notice Is Hereby Given By: Pamela A. Cronce that I will, at 10:00 a.m. in the forenoon of Deputy Public Trustee Failure to pay principal and interest when due together will all Deputy Public Trustee July 3, 2013, at the Teller County Public other payments provided for in the Evidence of Debt secured Attorney: JANETby M BAILEY Trustee’s Office, 101 W. Bennett Ave., the Deed of Trust and other violations of the terms Attorney: EMILY JENSIKCripple Attorney Registration #31294 4823 thereof. PICTURESQUE CIRCLE, Creek, Colorado, sell at public ARONOWITZ & MECKLENBURG, LLPhighest and best bidder for COLORADO SPRINGS, COLORADO auction to the THE LIEN FORECLOSED MAY NOT BE A FIRST LIEN. 1199 BANNOCK STREET, DENVER, COLORADO 80204 80917 cash, the said real property and all inPhone: Fax: of said Grantor(s), Grantor(s)’ heirs Phone: (719) 233-5660 Fax: (303) 813-1177 terest THE PROPERTY DESCRIBED HEREIN IS ALL OF THE Attorney file #: 1068.05853 Attorney filePROP#: N/A and assigns therein, for the purpose of ERTY ENCUMBERED BY THE LIEN OF THE DEED OF TRUST. paying the indebtedness provided in said TheaAttorney above is acting as a debt collector andby is attemptEvidence of Debt secured the Deed of The above is acting as debt collector ATTACHED HERETO AS EXHIBIT ‘A’ AND INCORPORATED ing to collect a debt. Any information provided may used for Trust, plus attorneys’ fees,be the expenses and is attempting to collect a debt. Any inHEREIN AS THOUGH FULLY SET FORTH. formation provided may thatbe purpose. of sale and other items allowed by law, used for that and will issue to the purchaser a Certificpurpose. which has the address of: 431 Twin Lakes Dr Legal Notice No.: 2013-0015 ate of Purchase, all as provided by law. Divide, CO 80814 First Publication: 5/8/2013 Legal Notice No.: 2013-0014 Last Publication: 6/5/2013 First Publication: 5/8/2013 First Publication: 4/17/2013 NOTICE OF SALE Published in: Pikes Peak Courier View 6/5/2013 Last Publication: Last Publication: 5/15/2013 Published in: Pikes Peak Courier View Published in: Pikes Peak Courier View Dated: 3/5/2013 ROBERT W. CAMPBELL Teller COUNTY PUBLIC TRUSTEE By: Pamela A. Cronce Deputy Public Trustee Attorney: KIMBERLY L MARTINEZ Attorney Registration #40351 THE CASTLE LAW GROUP, LLC 999 18TH STREET, SUITE 2201, DENVER, COLORADO 80202 Phone: 1 (303) 865-1400 Fax: 1 (303) 865-1410 Attorney file #: 13-01019 The Attorney above is acting as a debt collector and is attempting to collect a debt. Any information provided may be used for that purpose. Legal Notice No.: 2013-0016 First Publication: 5/8/2013 Last Publication: 6/5/2013 Published in: Pikes Peak Courier View

Public Trustees

LOT 37, ARROWHEAD ESTATES, COUNTY OF TELLER, STATE OF COLORADO which has the address of: 540 Red Feather Lane Woodland Park, CO 80863 NOTICE OF SALE The current holder of the Evidence of Debt secured by the Deed of Trust described herein, has filed Notice of Election and Demand for sale as provided by law and in said Deed of Trust. THEREFORE, Notice Is Hereby Given that I will, at 10:00 a.m. in the forenoon of July 3, 2013, at the Teller County Public Trustee’s Office, 101 W. Bennett Ave., Cripple Creek, Colorado, sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder for cash, the said real property and all interest of said Grantor(s), Grantor(s)’ heirs and assigns therein, for the purpose of paying the indebtedness provided in said Evidence of Debt secured by the Deed of Trust, plus attorneys’ fees, the expenses of sale and other items allowed by law, and will issue to the purchaser a Certificate of Purchase, all as provided by law. First Publication: 5/8/2013 Last Publication: 6/5/2013 Published in: Pikes Peak Courier View Dated: 3/5/2013 ROBERT W. CAMPBELL Teller COUNTY PUBLIC TRUSTEE By: Pamela A. Cronce Deputy Public Trustee Attorney: KIMBERLY L MARTINEZ Attorney Registration #40351 THE CASTLE LAW GROUP, LLC 999 18TH STREET, SUITE 2201, DENVER, COLORADO 80202 Phone: 1 (303) 865-1400 Fax: 1 (303) 865-1410 Attorney file #: 13-01019 The Attorney above is acting as a debt collector and is attempting to collect a debt. Any information provided may be used for that purpose. Legal Notice No.: 2013-0016 First Publication: 5/8/2013 Last Publication: 6/5/2013 Published in: Pikes Peak Courier View Public Notice NOTICE OF SALE (CRS §38-38-103) Foreclosure Sale No. 2013-0019 To Whom It May Concern: This Notice is given with regard to the following described Deed of Trust: On March 12, 2013, the undersigned Public Trustee caused the Notice of Election and Demand relating to the Deed of Trust described below to be recorded in the County of Teller records.

Public Notice NOTICE OF SALE (CRS §38-38-103) Foreclosure Sale No. 2013-0019

Pikes Peak Courier View 25

To Whom It May Concern: This Notice is given with regard to the following described Deed of Trust: On March 12, 2013, the undersigned Public Trustee caused the Notice of Election and Demand relating to the Deed of Trust described below to be recorded in the County of Teller records. Original Grantor: ANDREW B GOMLEY AND JANICE L BLAND Original Beneficiary: CHASE MANHATTAN MORTGAGE CORPORATION Current Holder of Evidence of Debt: JPMORGAN CHASE BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION Date of Deed of Trust: 12/29/2000 Recording Date of Deed of Trust: 1/4/2001 Recorded in Teller County: Reception No. 513417 Original Principal Amount: $114,500.00 Outstanding Principal Balance: $73,334.64

Public Trustees

Pursuant to C.R.S. §38-38-101 (4) (i), you are hereby notified that the covenants of the deed of trust have been violated as follows: Failure to pay principal and interest when due together will all other payments provided for in the Evidence of Debt secured by the Deed of Trust and other violations thereof. THE LIEN FORECLOSED MAY NOT BE A FIRST LIEN. THE PROPERTY DESCRIBED HEREIN IS ALL OF THE PROPERTY ENCUMBERED BY THE LIEN OF THE DEED OF TRUST. LOT 3B, BLOCK 4, SUBDIVISION EXEMPTION PLAT OF LOTS 3A AND 10, BLOCK 4, RAINBOW VALLEY UNIT 1, COUNTY OF TELLER, STATE OF COLORADO which has the address of: 165 Timber Ridge Road Divide, CO 80814 NOTICE OF SALE The current holder of the Evidence of Debt secured by the Deed of Trust described herein, has filed Notice of Election and Demand for sale as provided by law and in said Deed of Trust. THEREFORE, Notice Is Hereby Given that I will, at 10:00 a.m. in the forenoon of July 10, 2013, at the Teller County Public Trustee’s Office, 101 W. Bennett Ave., Cripple Creek, Colorado, sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder for cash, the said real property and all interest of said Grantor(s), Grantor(s)’ heirs and assigns therein, for the purpose of paying the indebtedness provided in said Evidence of Debt secured by the Deed of Trust, plus attorneys’ fees, the expenses of sale and other items allowed by law, and will issue to the purchaser a Certificate of Purchase, all as provided by law. First Publication: 5/15/2013 Last Publication: 6/12/2013 Published in: Pikes Peak Courier View Dated: 3/21/2013 ROBERT W. CAMPBELL Teller COUNTY PUBLIC TRUSTEE By: Pamela A. Cronce Deputy Public Trustee Attorney: KIMBERLY L MARTINEZ Attorney Registration #40351 THE CASTLE LAW GROUP, LLC 999 18TH STREET, SUITE 2201, DENVER, COLORADO 80202 Phone: 1 (303) 865-1400 Fax: 1 (303) 865-1410 Attorney file #: 13-01472 The Attorney above is acting as a debt collector and is attempting to collect a debt. Any information provided may be used for that purpose. Legal Notice No.: 2013-0019 First Publication: 5/15/2013 Last Publication: 6/12/2013 Published in: Pikes Peak Courier View Public Notice

Public Notice NOTICE OF SALE (CRS §38-38-103) Foreclosure Sale No. 2013-0018 To Whom It May Concern: This Notice is given with regard to the following described Deed of Trust: On March 12, 2013, the undersigned Public Trustee caused the Notice of Election and Demand relating to the Deed of Trust described below to be recorded in the County of Teller records.

Public Trustees

Original Grantor: PATRICK B. CARVELL AND LESBIA P. CARVELL Original Beneficiary: MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., ACTING SOLELY AS NOMINEE FOR LENDER THE LENDING CONNECTION, INC. Current Holder of Evidence of Debt: BANK OF AMERICA, N.A. Date of Deed of Trust: 5/25/2006 Recording Date of Deed of Trust : 6/12/2006 Recorded in Teller County: Reception No. 594758 Original Principal Amount: $143,250.00 Outstanding Principal Balance: $134,637.47 Pursuant to C.R.S. §38-38-101 (4) (i), you are hereby notified that the covenants of the deed of trust have been violated as follows: Failure to pay monthly installments due Note Holder. THE LIEN FORECLOSED MAY NOT BE A FIRST LIEN. THE PROPERTY DESCRIBED HEREIN IS ALL OF THE PROPERTY ENCUMBERED BY THE LIEN OF THE DEED OF TRUST. LOT 15, BLOCK 2, FOREST EDGE PARK -FIRST FILING, COUNTY OF TELLER, STATE OF COLORADO. which has the address of: 1130 Parkview Place Woodland Park, CO 80863 NOTICE OF SALE The current holder of the Evidence of Debt secured by the Deed of Trust described herein, has filed Notice of Election and Demand for sale as provided by law and in said Deed of Trust. THEREFORE, Notice Is Hereby Given that I will, at 10:00 a.m. in the forenoon of July 10, 2013, at the Teller County Public Trustee’s Office, 101 W. Bennett Ave., Cripple Creek, Colorado, sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder for cash, the said real property and all interest of said Grantor(s), Grantor(s)’ heirs and assigns therein, for the purpose of paying the indebtedness provided in said Evidence of Debt secured by the Deed of Trust, plus attorneys’ fees, the expenses of sale and other items allowed by law, and will issue to the purchaser a Certificate of Purchase, all as provided by law. First Publication: 5/15/2013 Last Publication: 6/12/2013 Published in: Pikes Peak Courier View Dated: 3/21/2013 ROBERT W. CAMPBELL Teller COUNTY PUBLIC TRUSTEE By: Pamela A. Cronce Deputy Public Trustee Attorney: HOLLY L DECKER Attorney Registration #32647 MEDVED DALE DECKER & DEERE, LLC 355 UNION BLVD., SUITE 250, LAKEWOOD, COLORADO 80228 Phone: (303) 274-0155 Fax: 1 (303) 274-0159 Attorney file #: 13-910-23992

The Attorney above is acting as a debt NOTICE OF SALE collector and is attempting to collect a (CRS §38-38-103) Original Grantor: ANDREW B GOMLEY debt. Any information provided may be Foreclosure Sale No. 2013-0018 AND JANICE L BLAND used for that purpose. Original Beneficiary: CHASE MANHATTo Whom It May Concern: This Notice is TAN MORTGAGE CORPORATION Legal Notice No. 2013-0018 given with regard to the following deCurrent Holder of Evidence of Debt: JPFirst Publication: 5/15/2013 scribed Deed of Trust: MORGAN CHASE BANK, NATIONAL ASLast Publication: 6/12/2013 SOCIATION Published in: Pikes Peak Courier View On March 12, 2013, the undersigned PubDate of Deed of Trust: 12/29/2000 lic Trustee caused the Notice of Election Recording Date of Deed of Trust: 1/4/2001 and Demand relating to the Deed of Trust Recorded in Teller County: Reception No. described below to be recorded in the 513417 County of Teller records. Original Principal Amount: $114,500.00 Outstanding Principal Balance: Original Grantor: PATRICK $73,334.64 Public NoticeB. CARVELL AND LESBIA P. CARVELL NOTICE OF DEFERRED SALE Original Beneficiary: MORTGAGE ELEC-of the Evidence of Debt secured by the Deed Pursuant to C.R.S. §38-38-101 (4) (i), you (CRS §38-38-103) Foreclosure Sale No. 2012-0195 The current holder TRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, are hereby notified that the covenants of of Trust described herein, has filed Notice of Election and DeINC., ACTING SOLELY AS NOMINEE the deed of trust have been violated as To Whom It May Concern: This Notice is given withLENDER regard toTHE the LENDING mand for CONNECsale as provided by law and in said Deed of Trust. FOR follows: following described Deed of Trust: TION, INC. THEREFORE, Notice Is Hereby Given that I will, at 10:00 a.m. in Current Holder of Evidence of Debt: BANK Failure to pay principal and interest when On together Decemberwill 4, 2012, the undersigned Trustee caused OF AMERICA, N.A. the forenoon of July 3, 2013, (After Qualified Owner Deferment) due all other paymentsPublic the Notice of Election and Demand relating to the Deed of Trust at the Teller County Public Trustee’s Office, 101 W. Bennett Ave., Date of Deed of Trust: 5/25/2006 provided for in the Evidence of Debt sedescribed recorded in the CountyRecording of Teller records. Colorado, sell at public auction to the highest and Date ofCripple DeedCreek, of Trust: cured by thebelow Deedto ofbe Trust and other violbest bidder for cash, the said real property and all interest of said 6/12/2006 ations thereof. Original Grantor: DAREN LEE STOECKEL Recorded in Teller County: Grantor(s), Grantor(s)’ Reception No. heirs and assigns therein, for the purpose Original Beneficiary: MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRAof paying the indebtedness provided in said Evidence of Debt 594758 THE LIEN FORECLOSED MAY NOT BE INC., ACTING SOLELY AS Original NOMINEE FOR Amount: secured by the Deed of Trust, plus attorneys’ fees, the expenses Principal $143,250.00 A TION FIRSTSYSTEMS, LIEN. WACHOVIA MORTGAGE CORPORATION O u t s t a n d i n g P r i nof allowed by law, and will issue to the c isale p a l and B aother l a n citems e: Current Holder ofDESCRIBED Evidence of Debt : JPMORGAN purchaser a Certificate of Purchase, all as provided by law. $ 1 3 CHASE 4 , 6 3 7 . BANK, 47 THE PROPERTY HEREIN I SNATIONAL A L L O FASSOCIATION THE PROPERTY ENDate of Deed BY of Trust: First Publication: 5/8/2013 Pursuant to C.R.S. §38-38-101 (4) (i), you CUMBERED THE6/25/2007 LIEN OF THE Recording of Deed of Trust: 7/16/2007 are hereby notified that Last thePublication: covenants 6/5/2013 of DEED OF Date TRUST. Recorded in Teller County: Reception No. 608662 in: Pikes the deed of trust havePublished been violated as Peak Courier View Original Principal 4, Amount: $213,150.00 follows: LOT 3B, BLOCK SUBDIVISION EXOutstanding Principal Balance Dated: 4/19/2013 EMPTION PLAT OF LOTS 3A: $220,027.99 AND 10, ROBERT W. CAMPBELL Failure to pay monthly installments due BLOCK 4, RAINBOW VALLEY UNIT 1, PursuantOF to C.R.S. §38-38-101 (4) (i), you areNote hereby notified Holder. COUNTY TELLER, STATE OF COLthat the covenants of the deed of trust have been violated as Teller COUNTY PUBLIC TRUSTEE ORADO follows: By: Pamela A. Cronce THE LIEN FORECLOSED MAY NOT BE Deputy Public Trustee A FIRST LIEN. which has the address of: Failure to pay principal 165 Timber Ridge Road and interest when due together will all other CO payments Debt secured by DESCRIBED Attorney: EMILY JENSIK Attorney Registration #31294 THE PROPERTY HEREIN Divide, 80814 provided for in the Evidence of I S Athereof. L L O F T H E PARONOWITZ R O P E R T Y &EMECKLENBURG, Nthe Deed of Trust and other violations of the terms LLP CUMBERED BY THE LIEN OF THE NOTICE OF SALE DEED OF TRUST. 1199 BANNOCK STREET, DENVER, COLORADO 80204 THE LIEN FORECLOSED MAY NOT BE A FIRST LIEN. The current holder of the Evidence of Debt Phone: (303) 813-1177 Fax: LOT 15, BLOCK 2, FOREST EDGE secured by the Deed of Trust described THE PROPERTY DESCRIBED HEREIN IS ALL OF THE PROPAttorney file #:PARK 1068.05716 FILING, COUNTY OF TELLER, herein, filed Notice BY of THE Election ERTY has ENCUMBERED LIENand OF THE-FIRST DEED OF TRUST. STATE OF COLORADO. Demand for sale as provided by law and The Attorney above is acting as a debt collector and is attemptin ATTACHED said Deed of Trust. AS EXHIBIT ‘A’ AND INCORPORATED HERETO ing to collect a debt. Any information provided may be used for of: purpose. HEREIN AS THOUGH FULLY SET FORTH. which has the address that 1130 Parkview Place THEREFORE, Notice Is Hereby Given Woodland Park, CO 80863 that I will, at the 10:00 a.m. in forenoon of Avenue which has address of:the 909 Browning Legal Notice No.: 2012-0195 July 10, 2013, at the Woodland Park, CO Teller 80863County Public First Publication: 5/8/2013 NOTICE OF SALE Trustee’s Office, 101 W. Bennett Ave., Last Publication: 6/5/2013 Cripple Creek, Colorado, sell at public NOTICE OF SALE Published in: Pikes Peak Courier View The current holder of the Evidence of Debt auction to the highest and best bidder for secured by the Deed of Trust described cash, the said real property and all inherein, has filed Notice of Election and terest of said Grantor(s), Grantor(s)’ heirs Demand for sale as provided by law and and assigns therein, for the purpose of in said Deed of Trust. paying the indebtedness provided in said Evidence of Debt secured by the Deed of THEREFORE, Notice Is Hereby Given Trust, plus attorneys’ fees, the expenses that I will, at 10:00 a.m. in the forenoon of of sale and other items allowed by law, July 10, 2013, at the Teller County Public and will issue to the purchaser a CertificTrustee’s Office, 101 W. Bennett Ave., ate of Purchase, all as provided by law. Cripple Creek, Colorado, sell at public auction to the highest and best bidder for First Publication: 5/15/2013 cash, the said real property and all inLast Publication: 6/12/2013 terest of said Grantor(s), Grantor(s)’ heirs Published in: Pikes Peak Courier View and assigns therein, for the purpose of paying the indebtedness provided in said Dated: 3/21/2013 Evidence of Debt secured by the Deed of ROBERT W. CAMPBELL Trust, plus attorneys’ fees, the expenses Teller COUNTY PUBLIC TRUSTEE of sale and other items allowed by law, By: Pamela A. Cronce and will issue to the purchaser a CertificDeputy Public Trustee ate of Purchase, all as provided by law. Attorney: KIMBERLY L MARTINEZ First Publication: 5/15/2013 Attorney Registration #40351 Last Publication: 6/12/2013 THE CASTLE LAW GROUP, LLC Published in: Pikes Peak Courier View 999 18TH STREET, SUITE 2201, DEN-


DAY OF , 2013. WHEREAS, the Applicant, the City of 26-Color Approved: Cripple Creek, as the owner of real propBruce Brown, Mayor erty commonly known as the Mount Pisgah Cemetery as more fully described in Public Notice Attest: the application on file (the “Property”), has Debra Blevins, City Clerk applied for approval of an amendment to BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS the City Zoning Map zoning the Property REGULAR MEETING AGENDA Approved as to form: as PR (Preserve); and Thursday, May 23, 2013 Herbert C. Phillips, City Attorney TELLER COUNTY CENTENNIAL WHEREAS, a public hearing on the apBUILDING Legal Notice No.: 933610 plication was held before the Cripple 112 North A Street, First Publication: May 15, 2013 Creek City Council on April 17, 2013, prePUBLIC NOTICE Cripple Creek, CO Last Publication: May 22, 2013 ceded by public notice of such hearing as Commissioners' Meeting Room Publisher: Pikes Peak Courier View required by Sec. 4.6 and 4.6.1 of the City NOTICE TO CREDITORS of Cripple Creek Development Code; and Estate of Jo Annette Payne, Deceased 1. 9:15 a.m. Convene in regular session - Invocation Case Number: 2013PR177 Public Notice - Pledge of Allegiance WHEREAS, at the public hearing the City - Minutes of Previous Meetings Council heard evidence from interested All persons having claims against the Notice is hereby given that adjustments to - Accounts Payable parties and considered the factors for apabove-named estate are required to the adopted budget for Teller County, - Board Reports proval of a rezoning set forth in Sec. 4.6.1 present them to the Personal Representfor the calendar year 2013, are being - Elected Official's Report of the City of Cripple Creek Development ative or to the District Court of Teller proposed. Copies of such proposed - Administrator's Report Code, as well as the recommendation of County, Colorado on or before Septembudget adjustments will be made avail2. 9:25 a.m. Time reserved for the Cripple Creek Planning Commission; ber 15, 2013 or the claims may be forever able for inspection by the public on the Department Heads and Public without barred. and County’s web site at www.co.teller.co.us an appointment. and in the County Finance Department in 3. 9:35 a.m. Employee Service Awards Laura Payne WHEREAS, the City Council finds and dethe Centennial Building in Cripple Creek. 4. 9.40 a.m. Human Resources: Personal Representative termines that the proposed zoning to PR Any interested elector within such Teller Consider a resolution to amend 2013 Address: 3536 Glencoe Street, satisfies the criteria set forth in the Cripple County may inspect the proposed budget budget. Denver, CO 80207 Creek Development Code; and adjustments, direct any questions, and file 5. 9.50 a.m. Pikes Peak or Bust Rodeo or register any objections thereto, to the NOW THEREFORE BE IT ORDAINED BY Days: Informational presentation by Girls Legal Notice No: 933613 County Budget Officer, at any time prior to THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF of the West and Pikes Peak Range First Publication: May 15, 2013 the final adoption at a regular meeting of CRIPPLE CREEK; Riders. Last Publication: May 29, 2013 the Board of County Commissioners at the 6. 10:05 a.m. Public Trustee: Publisher: Pikes Peak Courier View County Centennial Building in Cripple 1. The application for zoning of the PropConsider approval of Public Trustee's Creek on Thursday, 05/23/2013 at 9:15 erty as PR (Preserve) is hereby approved. first quarter 2013 report. am. This ordinance shall be recorded, shall run with the land, and shall serve as notice to Commissioners Business Items: Legal Notice No.: 933611 prospective purchasers of this zoning. Sheryl Decker, County Administrator First Publication: May 15, 2013 Legal Matters: Last Publication: May 15, 2013 2. Safety Clause. The City Council hereby Chris Brandt, County Attorney PUBLIC NOTICE Publisher: Pikes Peak Courier View finds, determines, and declares that this Ordinance is promulgated under the genAdjournment Pursuant to C.R.S. 38-21.5-103 sent via Public Notice eral police power of the City of Cripple certified mail to Kimberly A. Shive, last Creek, that it is promulgated for the The implementation, modification, rescisknown address, May 1, 2013 all contents Notice of Judicial Auction Sale May 21, health, safety, and welfare of the public sion, or amendment of a restriction on in the below listed storage unit, located at 2013 2:00 p.m. with registration at 1:30 and that this Ordinance is necessary for open burning in Teller County may be adTregos Storage, 42 Buffalo Ct., Divide, p.m. Location: 168 Fetlock Circle, Florisded to the Agenda of, and considered at, the preservation of health and safety and CO 80814 will be sold or otherwise dissant, CO 80816 Property Offered: 168 this meeting. If possible, an Amended for the protection of public convenience posed of by removal to the Divide ColorFetlock Circle, Florissant, CO 80816 Lot Agenda adding that item will be posted, and welfare. The City Council further deado Dump Transfer Station on May 29, Size 546,678, 2,992 Sq Ft, 3 Bedrooms, 2 and placed on the Teller County website, termines that the Ordinance bears a ra2013 at 10:00 A.M. at the Tregos VenBath, 2-Fireplace, Garage 560 sq ft, Built at least 24 hours before the meeting. tional relation to the proper legislative obture Storage Facility Unit # M 33 loc1995 Tax Property ID #: 1387.181020180 ject sought to be attained. ated at 42 Buffalo Ct., Divide, CO 80814. MINIMUM BID - $183,000.00 Legal DeAppointments may vary by 15 minutes The sale will be by Auction at the Site Unit scription: Lots 19, 20, 21, and 37, Ranch earlier or later than scheduled depending 3. Severability. If any clause, sentence, # M 33 and will be sold in one lot. Sealed Resorts of Colorado Subdivision Filing No. upon cancellations and time required for paragraph or part of this Ordinance or the bids will be accepted and opened first. 2, County of Teller, State of Colorado. Unreview and/or consideration of an agenda application thereof to any person or cirAny proceeds will be applied to unpaid der the authority in Title 28 U.S.C., Secitem. cumstances shall for any reason be adrents. tions 2001 and 2002, the property dejudged by a court of competent jurisdicscribed below will be sold pursuant to the Legal Notice No.: 933617 tion invalid, such judgment shall not affect Tenant: Kimberly A. Shive Order of Foreclosure and Decree of Sale First Publication: May 15, 2013 application to other persons or circumStorage Unit #: M 33 filed on October 12, 2012 the United Last Publication: May 15, 2013 stances. Last Known Address Of: States of America v. Charles W Ledford, Publisher: Pikes Peak Courier View 940 Elfin Glen Dr. individually and as Trustee of Dos Mil4. Effective Date. This Ordinance shall beDivide, CO 80814 agros Trust II, Loraine Ledford, Dos Milcome effective nunc pro tunc April 17, agros Trust II and Park State Bank and Public Notice 2013. Contents consisting of, but not limited to: Trust, Civil No. 1:10-cv-01351 PAB-MEH, Boxes and bags of clothes, broken vacuin the United States District Court for the ORDINANCE NO. 2013-03 PASSED ON THE FIRST READING AND um, small water heater, video recorder, 2 District of Colorado. The sale of the propORDERED PUBLISHED THIS 1ST DAY microwaves, 2 speakers, and a small erty shall be free and clear of any inA BILL FOR AN ORDINANCE APPROVOF MAY, 2013. green travel case. terests of the defendants. The sale shall ING THE ZONING OF THE PROPERTY be subject to building lines, if established, COMMONLY KNOWN AS THE MOUNT Debra Blevins, City Clerk Legal Notice No.: 933595 all laws, ordinances, and governmental PISGAH CEMETERY PROPERTY GENFirst Publication: May 15, 2013 regulations (including building and zoning) ERALLY LOCATED IN SECTION 14, PASSED ON SECOND READING AND Last Publication: May 22, 2013 affecting the property, and easements and TOWNSHIP 15 SOUTH, RANGE 70 ADOPTED BY THE CITY COUNCIL THIS Publisher: Pikes Peak Courier View restrictions of record, if any. No bid shall WEST OF THE 6th PM, CRIPPLE DAY OF , 2013. be accepted unless it is accompanied by a CREEK, COLORADO TO PR (PRESERVE) certified check or cashier's check, in the Approved: minimum amount of 10% of the amount Bruce Brown, Mayor WHEREAS, the Applicant, the City of bid, made payable to the United States Cripple Creek, as the owner of real propDistrict Court for the District of Colorado. Attest: erty commonly known as the Mount PisBefore being permitted to bid at the sale, Debra Blevins, City Clerk gah Cemetery as more fully described in Public Notice all bidders shall display proof that they are the application on file (the “Property”), has able to comply with this requirement. No Approved as to form: applied for approval of an amendment to BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS bids will be received from any person who Herbert C. Phillips, City Attorney the City Zoning Map zoning the Property REGULAR MEETING AGENDA has not presented said proof. The sucas PR (Preserve); and Thursday, May 23, 2013 cessful bidder shall tender the balance of Legal Notice No.: 933610 the purchase price, in certified funds payTELLER COUNTY CENTENNIAL First Publication: May 15, 2013 able to the United States District Court for WHEREAS, a public hearing on the apBUILDING Last Publication: May 22, 2013 the District of Colorado, at the office of the plication was held before the Cripple 112 North A Street, Publisher: Pikes Peak Courier View Internal Revenue Service, Attn: Darlene Creek City Council on April 17, 2013, preCripple Creek, CO Jones, PALS, 4041 N Central Ave, MS ceded by public notice of such hearing as Commissioners' Meeting Room Notice 5021, Phoenix, AZ 85012 on or before required by Sec. 4.6 and 4.6.1 of thePublic City thirty (30) days SUPPL from the Cripple Creek Development 1. 9:15 a.m. Convene in VENDOR regular session PK ENTERPRISES 3:00 p.m., within 1,290.30 ROAD/SHOP DELTA DENTAL Code; and 2,533.90 P/R RELATED TELLER COUNTY PMT LIST APRILof2013 - Invocation date of sale, which July 11, 2013. In the PLATTEN, M 382.80is SVCS/TRNG/TRVL DEWBERRY ENGINEERS 175.00 SERVICES - GENERAL Pledge ofFUND Allegiance event that the purchaser fails to fulfill this WHEREAS, at the public hearing the City POLARIZED ELECTRIC 2,872.66 REP & MAINT DISH NETWORK 103.00 SERVICES $234,069.39 - ROAD Minutes ofBRIDGE Previous Meetings deposit shall be forfeited Council heardDIVIDE evidence from interested PP REG HOSPITAL requirement, the 144.26 PROF SVCS COLLISION CTR 2,065.36 ROAD/SHOP SUPPL AND FUND $14,581.93 - SOCIAL Accounts Payable and applied to the expenses of sale, and parties and considered the factors for apPREMIUM AUTO GLASS 665.00 ROAD/SHOP SUPPL DIVIDE MPC METRO DST 1,140.00 SERVICES SERVICES FUND $45,506.65 - CAPITAL Board Reports the Property shall be EMPLOYEE re-offered for proval of a rezoning forth PROVIDE in Sec. 4.6.1 632.83 INSsale or DIVIDEset WATER 778.50 OCCUPANCY COSTS PROFILE EAP PROJECTS FUND $90,734.00 - Elected Official's Report be offered to the second highest bidder in of the City of Cripple Creek Development PSI SYSTEMS 308.81 ROAD/SHOP SUPPL DORMAN REAL EST 6.00 REFUND CONSERVATION TRUST FUND $227.00 - Administrator's Report accordance with the provisions contained Code, as well as the recommendation of PUB AGENCY TRNG CNCL That any 295.00 TRAINING/TRAVEL DOUBLETREE 962.00 TRAINING/TRAVEL UTILITY FUNDfor $17,827.79 2.WASTEWATER 9:25 a.m. Time reserved herein. rights, title, liens, claims the Cripple Creek Planning HOTEL Commission; PUEBLO DHS PASS-THRU DRIVE TRAIN IND 342.13 ROAD/SHOP SUPPL JAIL ENTERPRISE $50,059.87 Department HeadsFUND and Public without or interests in 20.00 the Property of the United and PUEBLO RADIOLOGICAL 674.88 EATON SALES & SVC 421.00 ROAD/SHOP SUPPL FLEET MANAGEMENT FUND $142,413.95 an appointment. States and the other GRANT parties EXP in this action QUILL CORP 156.92 R 163.60 GRANT EXP 3.EMPLOYEE 9:35 a.m. BENEFITS EmployeeFUND Service Awards $2,533.90 are discharged upon SUPPLIES sale of the Property WHEREAS, theEBHERT, City Council finds and deR JORTBERG ASSOC 2,500.00 PROF SVCS ECOLAB 338.24 INMATE WLFR EXP CLERK & RECORDER’S TRUST FUND $217,857.74 4. 9.40 a.m. Human Resources: and confirmation of the sale. That the sale termines that the proposed zoning to PR REFUND R MOORE TRUST of the Property 31.00 EL PASO DA in the Cripple 28,893.75 PROF SVCS PAYROLL TRUST FUND to amend 2013$5,899.31 Consider a resolution shall be subject to confirmsatisfies the criteria set forth RAD/IMAG CONSULT 649.74and GRANT ELECTION SYSTEMS 5,230.82 REP & MAINT TOTAL $821,711.53 budget. ation by this Court, uponEXP confirmation Creek Development Code; and RALPH’S BREAKROOM 127.94 TRAINING/TRAVEL ELLIOTT, PAM 151.20 TRAINING/TRAVEL 5. 9.50 a.m. Pikes Peak or Bust Rodeo the IRS shall execute and deliver its deed, RAMPART SURVEYS 925.00 PROF ESPERANZA, C 226.80 GRANT EXP VENDOR AMOUNT DESCRIPTION NOW THEREFORE BE IT ORDAINED BY Days: Informational presentation by Girls conveying the Property to SVCS the successful RED DOG RADIOS purchaser; All 2,160.00 REPmust & MAINT EXPRESSTOLL 25.40 TRAINING/TRAVEL 150.00 TRAINING/TRAVEL THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF ofAAICAMA the West and Pikes Peak Range payments be by certiREICHEL & ASSOCfied check, cashiers 25.00 REFUND FAILLA, CH & PL 224.99 C&R LIABILITIES ACADEMY WOMEN’S HC 336.88 GRANT CRIPPLE EXP CREEK; Riders. or treasurer's check RIEGER, B TRAINING/TRAVEL FAMILY SUPPORT REG 1,922.90 PASS-THRU MED SUPP 6.AFFORDABLE 10:05 a.m. Public Trustee: 979.69 GRANT EXP or by a United40.80 States postal, bank, exROCKY MTN SPRING/SUS 29.94 money ROAD/SHOP SUPPL FARRELL & SELDIN 198.00 REFUND ALL AROUND ANTFRZ 578.20 ROAD/SHOP SUPPL 1. The application for zoning of the PropConsider approval of Public Trustee's press, or telegraph order. Make ROMERO, MICHELLE 27.20order TRAINING/TRAVEL FEDEX KINKO’S 340.07 SUPPLIES APPLIED CONCEPTS 110.00 ROAD/SHOP SUPPL erty as PR (Preserve) is hereby approved. first quarter 2013 report. check or money payable to the RR DONNELLEY United States 6,001.06 76.80 TRAINING/TRAVEL ASSET COLL EXPERTS 21.00 REFUNDThis ordinance FISHER, shall be M recorded, shall run District SERVICES Court for the District RUCKER, M 60.80 FORWARD COMM 675.00 REP & MAINT ASSOC PLAY THERAPY with the land, and shall serve as notice to Commissioners Business Items: 110.00 MEMB/CERT of Colorado. The U.S.TRAINING/TRAVEL may bid as a creditRUNBECK ELECT SVCS 91.00 SUPPLIES FOSBURGH, L zoning. 4,589.13 GRANT EXP AT&T Decker, County Administrator 73.96 SERVICES prospective purchasers of this Sheryl or against its judgment without tender of SAFEWAY 126.00 FRANK J BALL, ATTY 2.00 REFUND BARNES GROUP 1,036.98 ROAD/SHOP SUPPL Legal Matters: cash up to the valueGRANT of theEXP outstanding SAMS CLUB SUPPLIES FRED’S TOWING BATTERIES PLUS balance on 1,179.10 the mortgage, without tender 2. Safety Clause. The City Council hereby 1,289.00 PROF SVCS Chris Brandt, County Attorney 69.97 REP & MAINT SENECA CO ROAD/SHOP SUPPLthe FSH and COMMUNICATIONS 140.00 SERVICES BAUER, DAVID A PC 3.00 REFUNDfinds, determines, of cash. The308.61 government reserves declares that this SHERATON G D PRINTING 84.90 SUPPLIES BEN MEADOWS 211.59 SUPPLIES right to reject 258.00 any andTRAINING/TRAVEL all bids and to withOrdinance is promulgated under the genAdjournment draw the property sale. The property the City of Cripple 1,050.80 UNIFORM SHERWIN-WILLIAMS 139.45from REP & MAINT G&K of SERVICES BENHART, C M 30.00 REFUNDeral police power is” and “where is” Creek, that itGLASER is promulgated The implementation, modification, rescisSHIPPING PLUS is offered for sale 67.51“as SERVICES ENERGY for the 40.00 ROAD/SHOP SUPPL BEST WESTERN 560.94 TRAINING/TRAVEL against the United health, safety, GLASER and welfare sion, or amendment on SHRED-IT DENVERand without recourse 406.98 SUPPLIES STEELof the public 18.86 ROAD/SHOP SUPPL BEYOND TECHNOLOGYof a restriction 268.45 SUPPLIES States. The United States makes no guarand that this Ordinance is necessary for open burning in Teller County may be adSICKLES, F 100.00 REFUND GLOBAL EQUIPMENT 1,968.00 FURN/EQUIP BIGHORN PRINTING 66.30 SUPPLIES ded to the Agenda of, and considered at, of the property, or its fitthe preservation of health and safety and 2,078.31 SUPPLIES/EQUIP SIMPLEXGRINNELLantee of condition 3,517.96 SERVICES GLOBAL GOVT/ED BIRCHAM’S OFFICE PRD 6,078.25 EQUIP/R&M/SUPPL this meeting. If possible, an9,548.10 Amended ness for any purpose. The United States for the protection of CAMP publicBAKERY convenience SKAGGS, T 172.54 TRAINING/TRAVEL GOLD 113.50 GRANT EXP BLACK HILLS ENERGY OCCUPANCY COSTS Agenda adding that item will1,088.15 be posted, will not consider anyTRAINING/TRAVEL claim for allowance City Council further deSLOAN, D 112.00 GOLD CAMP PRINTING 724.35 SUPPLIES BLEAKNEY, M GRANT and EXP welfare. The and placed onTROPHIES the Teller County46.00 website, or for the rescission of the termines Ordinance bears a ra- 1,802.53 SUPPLIES SMITH MED PTNRSor adjustment258.72 GRANT EXP GOVCONNECTION BLUE RIBBON PUB/EMPL RELATNthat the atBOB least 24 hours sale based on85.60 failure of theEXP property to toGRAINGER the proper legislative obSMITH, K GRANT 131.18 ROAD/SHOP SUPPL BARKER CO before the meeting. 1,682.68 INMATEtional WLFR relation EXP any expressed or implied repattained. SPARKS WILLSON comply ET AL with34,850.53 PROF SVCS GRAY OIL 74,764.46 ROAD/SHOP SUPPL BRIM HEALTHCARE 105.55 GRANT ject EXP sought to be Appointments may vary by 15139.09 minutes resentation. The7.83 sale SUPPLIES is ordered in accordSTANDARD COFFEE SVC GREEN MTN FALLS 29.00 C&R LIABILITIES BROWN, K TRAINING/TRAVEL earlier or later than scheduled1,031.00 depending U.S.C. OCCUPANCY Section 2001COSTS and is 3. Severability.HELLMAN, If any clause, sentence, STATE BD OF LANDance COMwith 28 32,200.88 S 70.00 TRAINING/TRAVEL BTR INTERIORS REP & MAINT upon cancellations and time required for made without the right of redemption. For paragraph or part of this Ordinance or the STENGER & STENGER 21.00 REFUND HEWLETT-PACKARD 1,494.65 GRANT EXP BUCKHOUSE, D 31.54 SERVICES review and/or agenda more info: www.irssales.gov or call Darthereof to any person or cirSTERICYCLE 90.77 OCCUPANCY COSTS HITCHIN’ POST 870.89 ROAD/SHOP SUPPL BURGESS, K consideration of an16.00 GRANT application EXP item. cumstances forDEPOT any reason be ad- 1,930.86 SUPPLIES/EQUIP SUCCESSORIES lene Jones, (602) 70.84501-2146 PUB/EMPL RELATN HOME CA CONTRACTORS SUPPL 99.50 ROAD/SHOP SUPPL shall 4/24, 5/1, 5/8, 5/15/13 judged by a court of competent jurisdicSWEET OFFICE SUPPL 239.73 SUPPLIES HUMANA 2,517.30 P/R RELATED CA STATE DISB UNIT 270.00 PASS-THRU Legal NoticeRNo.: 933617 CNS-2468628#25.00 EMS SUPPORT tionRELATN invalid, such judgment shall SWTC EMS HUTCHCRAFT, D not affect 198.65 TRAINING/TRAVEL CAMPBELL, 80.00 PUB/EMPL First Publication: May 15, 2013 349.81 ROAD/SHOP application other persons TANDY, K 57.00 TRAINING/TRAVEL IN INK or circum110.00 SUPPLIES CARQUEST SUPPL to IMAGES Last Publication: May 15, 20133,818.33 GRANT stances. Legal Notice No.: 933556 TC EXTENSION FUND 100.34 SUPPL/TRNG/TRVL INN&STES AT RVRWLK 1,085.09 REP & MAINT CASA EXP Publisher: View First Publication: AprilINMATE 24, 2013 TC JAIL 216.00 WLFR EXP INTEGRA TELECOM 8,840.20 SERVICES CBM FOODPikes SVC Peak Courier 8,990.73 INMATE MEALS 4. Effective Date. This Ordinance shall beLast Publication: May 15, 2013 TCSAR 100.00 EMS SUPPORT INTERSTATE BATTERY 1,442.35 ROAD/SHOP SUPPL CC HARDWARE & SUPPLY 67.16 SUPPLIES come effective nunc pro tunc April 17, Publisher: Pikes Peak Courier View TDS 3,493.50 ROAD/SHOP SUPPL INTL BUSINESS FORMS 240.90 SUPPLIES CCNC, INC 100.00 MEMB/CERT 2013. 6,125.00 COMMUNITY SVCS IREA 14,129.56 OCCUPANCY COSTS TELLER SENIOR COALTN CC-V SCHOOL RE-1 60.00 GRANT EXP TELRITE CORP 320.63 SERVICES JAMAR TECHN 611.76 ROAD/SHOP SUPPL CDD 513.00 GRANT PASSED EXP ON THE FIRST READING AND TESSCO 514.98 SERVICES JET SERVICE 286.50 PROF SVCS CDHS 340.00 C&R LIABILITIES ORDERED PUBLISHED THIS 1ST DAY THE GAZETTE 163.54 SERVICES 36.00 TRAINING/TRAVEL CDPHE 51.00 C&R LIABILITIES OF MAY, 2013.JOHNSON, L THE KEMPE CTR 500.00 TRAINING/TRAVEL JOHNSTONE SUPPLY 608.50 REP & MAINT CDPHE 491.75 PROF SVCS THE UPS STORE 24.96 SUPPLIES JOINT INITIATIVES 400.00 MEMB/CERT CDPHE 220.00 PASS-THRU Debra Blevins, City Clerk TKE CORP 1,835.30 SERVICES JOURNEYWORKS PUB 79.20 GRANT EXP CENTER PRINTING 604.53 SUPPLIES TOSHIBA 131.77 REP & MAINT JSI R&T READING AND 12.00 GRANT EXP CENTURYLINK 3,194.66 SERVICES PASSED ON SECOND TOTAL OFFICE SOLUTNS 195.85 SUPPLIES KARTCO LLCCOUNCIL THIS 863.74 ROAD/SHOP SUPPL CHAPMAN, L 75.35 TRAIN/TRVL/SUPP ADOPTED BY THE CITY TRANSWEST TRUCKS 159.80 ROAD/SHOP SUPPL KELLY’S OFFICE CONN 75.00 SUPPLIES CHM 27,591.19 PROF SVCS DAY OF , 2013. TRI-LAKES PRINTING 47.00 ROAD/SHOP SUPPL KEYSTONE RESORT 529.52 TRAINING/TRAVEL CHUCKIE’S PLACE 100.00 GRANT EXP TRIPLE C 160.16 GRANT EXP KIEWIT 93.60 ROAD/SHOP SUPPL CITY MARKET 87.16 GRANT Approved: EXP TROY GROUP 406.00 FURN/EQUIP KILLAM GAS BURNER CO 1,443.25 REP & MAINT CITY OF CC 241.26 OCCUPANCY BruceCOSTS Brown, Mayor TYLER TECHN 70,000.00 EQUIPMENT KNOX CO 470.00 REP & MAINT CITY OF CC 33.35 C&R LIABILITIES U OF CO 150.00 TRAINING/TRAVEL KONICA MINOLTA 21.53 REP & MAINT CITY OF WP 8,327.69 C&R LIABILITIES Attest: US POSTMASTER 1,236.00 SERVICES KS PMT CTR 180.00 PASS-THRU CITY OF WP 195.72 OCCUPANCY DebraCOSTS Blevins, City Clerk US TREASURY 116.00 PASS-THRU LIBERTY ACQUISITIONS 5.00 REFUND CITY OF WP 16,576.51 SRVCS/SUPP/TRNG VAIL RESORTS MGT 1,323.80 TRAINING/TRAVEL F 150.00 GRANT EXP CNTRL MTN TRNG FND 300.00 MEMB/CERT Approved as to LILAWSA, form: VALERO MKTG 640.00 GRANT EXP LONGMIRE, M 71.20 TRAINING/TRAVEL CNTY SHERIFFS OF CO 300.00 SUPPLIES Herbert C. Phillips, City Attorney VECTRA BANK 330.00 SUPPLIES LORIG’S 56.95 SUPPLIES CO CNTY ATTY ASSOC 450.00 MEMB/CERT Legal Notice No.: 933610 VENTURE FOODS CC 47.77 TRAINING/TRAVEL LYLE SIGNS 190.88 ROAD/SHOP SUPPL CO COMPRESSED GASES 246.31 SRVCS/SUPPL First Publication: May 15, 2013 VERIZON WIRELESS 4,119.33 SERVICES MACHOL & JOHANNES 554.71 PASS-THRU CO CORONER’S ASSOC 650.00 TRAINING/TRAVEL Last Publication: May 22, VERNON, R 215.00 PROF SVCS MCBEE, J &2013 RS 73.56 C&R LIABILITIES CO DEPT OF REV 365.00 PASS-THRU Publisher: PikesMCCANDLESS Peak Courier View VISION SVC PLAN 3,175.55 EMPLOYEE INS 2,143.63 ROAD/SHOP SUPPL CO DEPT OF REV 208,778.15 C&R LIABILITIES WAGNER EQUIP 2,506.62 ROAD/SHOP SUPPL MCMILLAN, R III 120.00 REP & MAINT CO HEALTH MED GRP 104.77 GRANT EXP WALMART 763.24 SUPPLIES 2,475.13 SRVCS CO NATURAL GAS 3,974.73 OCCUPANCY COSTS MEMORIAL HEALTH SYS WASTE MGT 1,354.47 OCCUPANCY COSTS MHC KENWORTH 218.37 ROAD/SHOP SUPPL CO SPGS BUSINESS JRN 149.00 SUPPLIES WAXIE SANITARY SUPP 392.50 SUPPLIES MIKE’S CAMERA 1,537.95 PROF SVCS CO SPGS EXPRESS COUR 88.00 SERVICES WEBER-WETZEL, D 15.20 TRAINING/TRAVEL MONGER, L 101.60 GRANT EXP CO SPGS PATH ASSOC 130.68 GRANT EXP WESTRN CONVENIENCE 380.00 GRANT EXP MOUNTS, S 1,066.60 SERVICES CO SPGS POLICE DEPT 120.00 SERVICES WHISLER BEARING 119.14 ROAD/SHOP SUPPL MTECH 220.00 SERVICES CO STATE TREASURER 7,310.61 EMPLOYEE INS WILKS, G 18.80 TRAINING/TRAVEL MTN ENERGY 1,287.86 R&M/SUPPL COLO CANYON SIGNS 200.00 FURN/EQUIP WINGFOOT COMM TIRE 901.68 ROAD/SHOP SUPPL MULLIGAN, T 75.00 REFUND COLO CHAPTER ICC 30.00 MEMB/CERT WOODLAND HARDWARE 166.67 SUPPLIES NATIONAL IMPRINT 214.15 SUPPLIES COLO MACHINERY 228.94 ROAD/SHOP SUPPL WP NAPA 2,302.77 SUPPLIES NEWALL, FW 30.00 REFUND COLORADO COUNTIES 2,450.00 TRAINING/TRAVEL WP SCHOOL DIST RE-2 13,456.62 GRANT EXP NEWMAN TRAFFIC SIGNS 6,080.00 ROAD/SHOP SUPPL COMFORT INN 158.00 TRAINING/TRAVEL XEROX 15,419.00 EQUIPMENT OFFICE DEPOT 3,165.03 SUPPLIES COMM MEDIA OF CO 1,094.61 SERVICES YOUNG WILLIAMS PC 8,617.50 SERVICES OFFICEMAX INC 520.44 SUPPLIES COMM OF CARING 300.00 GRANT EXP YOUTH DIRECTIONS 30.00 GRANT EXP 39,519.00 EQUIPMENT COMM OF CARING 570.00 OCCUPANCY COSTS OJ WATSON CO ZEE MEDICAL 125.60 SERVICES OMNI 25.00 GRANT EXP COMM OF CARING 4,500.00 COMMUNITY SVCS ZENTZ, S C 5,850.00 PROF SVCS OR DEPT OF JUSTICE 188.40 PASS-THRU CONFIDENTIAL CLIENT 550.81 GRANT EXP ORACLE AMERICA 665.84 REP & MAINT CRAIG’S POWER EQUIP 44.49 ROAD/SHOP SUPPL PUBLISHED BY ORDER OF THE BOARD OF COUNTY PENRAD IMAGING 373.26 GRANT EXP CRESSON ELEMENTARY 1,400.00 GRANT EXP COMMISSIONERS TELLER COUNTY, COLORADO PERFORMANCE RADIATOR 115.00 ROAD/SHOP SUPPL CS UTILITIES 258.82 ROAD/SHOP SUPPL PERKINS MOTOR CITY 234.00 ROAD/SHOP SUPPL CURASCRIPT 13.56 GRANT EXP PETERSON, D 45.00 SUPPLIES DA OFFICE 30.00 REFUND PETTY CASH 129.32 SVCS/TRNG/TRVL DASH MEDICAL GLOVES 175.60 INMATE WLFR EXP Legal Notice No.: 933619 PETTY, D 15.20 TRAINING/TRAVEL DAVIS, J 142.78 TRAINING/TRAVEL First Publication: May 15, 2013 PHIL LONG FORD 3,751.41 ROAD/SHOP SUPPL DAYS INN 325.00 TRAINING/TRAVEL Last Publication: May 15, 2013 PITNEY BOWES 2,000.00 SERVICES DEEP ROCK 189.32 SUPPLIES PK ENTERPRISES 3,280.35 OCCUPANCY COSTS Publisher: Pikes Peak Courier View DELL 1,391.88 GRANT EXP

26 Pikes Peak Courier View

Notice To Creditors

Misc. Private Legals

Government Legals

Government Legals

Government Legals

Government Legals

minimum amount of 10% of the amount bid, made payable to the United States District Court for the District of Colorado. Before being permitted to bid at the sale, all bidders shall display proof that they are able to comply with this requirement. No bids will be received from any person who has not presented said proof. The successful bidder shall tender the balance of the purchase price, in certified funds payable to the United States District Court for the District of Colorado, at the office of the Internal Revenue Service, Attn: Darlene Jones, PALS, 4041 N Central Ave, MS 5021, Phoenix, AZ 85012 on or before 3:00 p.m., within thirty (30) days from the date of sale, which is July 11, 2013. In the event that the purchaser fails to fulfill this requirement, the deposit shall be forfeited and applied to the expenses of sale, and the Property shall be re-offered for sale or be offered to the second highest bidder in accordance with the provisions contained herein. That any rights, title, liens, claims or interests in the Property of the United States and the other parties in this action are discharged upon sale of the Property and confirmation of the sale. That the sale of the Property shall be subject to confirmation by this Court, and upon confirmation the IRS shall execute and deliver its deed, conveying the Property to the successful purchaser; All payments must be by certified check, cashiers or treasurer's check or by a United States postal, bank, express, or telegraph money order. Make check or money order payable to the United States District Court for the District of Colorado. The U.S. may bid as a creditor against its judgment without tender of cash up to the value of the outstanding balance on the mortgage, without tender of cash. The government reserves the right to reject any and all bids and to withdraw the property from sale. The property is offered for sale “as is” and “where is” and without recourse against the United States. The United States makes no guarantee of condition of the property, or its fitness for any purpose. The United States will not consider any claim for allowance or adjustment or for the rescission of the sale based on failure of the property to comply with any expressed or implied representation. The sale is ordered in accordance with 28 U.S.C. Section 2001 and is made without the right of redemption. For more info: www.irssales.gov or call Darlene Jones, (602) 501-2146 4/24, 5/1, 5/8, 5/15/13 CNS-2468628#

Government Legals

Legal Notice No.: 933556 First Publication: April 24, 2013 Last Publication: May 15, 2013 Publisher: Pikes Peak Courier View PUBLIC NOTICE PETITION FOR ANNEXATION OF LAND TO THE CITY OF WOODLAND PARK AN INCORPORATED HOME RULE CITY UNDER THE HOME RULE PROVISIONS OF THE CONSTITUTION OF THE STATE OF COLORADO, AND THE MUNICIPAL HOME RULE ACT OF 1971, CRS 1975 31.12 SOUTHWEST VALLEY ANNEXATION PLAT 1 Hereby petition(s) the City of Woodland Park, Colorado, through the City Council of said City for annexation of the real property with an address of 1000 West Road (County Road 231), Woodland Park, Colorado and more particularly described with a legal description attached hereto, as Exhibit A and incorporated herein by reference in accordance with the provisions of 31-12-107 CRS 1973 as amended, and in compliance with the City Charter of the City of Woodland Park; and, represent to the City of Woodland Park and the fully constituted officials of said City and to the City Council duly qualified and constituted, the following: 1. That not less than one-sixth of the perimeter of the area proposed to be annexed is contiguous with the annexing municipality. 2. That a community of interest exists between the territory proposed to be annexed and the annexing municipality; that the territory proposed to be annexed is urban or will be urbanized in the near future; and that the territory proposed to be annexed is integrated or is capable of being integrated with the annexing municipality. 3. The undersigned Petitioner(s) are the owners of 100 percent of the property proposed to be annexed. 4. All the requirements of Section 31-12104 and 31-12-105 CRS 1973 exist or are met. 5. That it is desirable and necessary that such territory be annexed to the municipality. 6. A written legal of description of the boundaries of the area proposed to be annexed attached hereto as Exhibit A. 7. Copies of an Annexation Map showing the boundary of the area proposed to be annexed with such information as required by CRS 31-12-107 (III) and (IV). 8. Mailing address of each of the signers is as follows: Donald McCarl and Beth McCarl, 350 Ranch Road, Woodland Park, Colorado, 80863. Notice is hereby given that the City Council of the City of Woodland Park, Colorado, will hold a Public Hearing on June 6, 2013 at 7:00 PM in the Council Chambers, City Hall, 220 West South Avenue, Woodland Park, Colorado, concerning the petition for Annexation of land to the City of Woodland Park, filed by Southwest Valley Annexation – Plat 1 to determine whether the area proposed to be annexed meets the applicable requirements of Colorado Revised Statutes 31-12-104 and 31-12-105 (1972) and should be considered eligible for annexation. The Petition for Annexation and all supporting documents are available for inspection and copying during normal business hours at the office of the Planning Director, City Hall, 220 West South Avenue, Woodland Park, Colorado. Suzanne Leclercq, Deputy City Clerk City of Woodland Park EXHIBIT A LEGAL DESCRIPTION – SOUTHWEST VALLEY ANNEXATION PLAT 1: PARCELS 1 AND 3 OF THAT DEED RECORDED FEBRUARY 09, 1996 UNDER RECEPTION NO. 443568 OF THE RECORDS OF THE TELLER COUNTY CLERK AND RECORDER, SITUATED IN THE NORTHWEST ONE-QUARTER OF THE NORTHWEST ONE-QUARTER (NW1/4 NW1/4) OF SECTION 25, TOWNSHIP 12 SOUTH, RANGE 69 WEST OF THE 6TH P.M., TELLER COUNTY, COLORADO, AND BEING MORE PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: BEGINNING AT THE MOST WESTERLY CORNER OF SAID PARCEL 3, SAID POINT ALSO BEING AN ANGLE POINT ON THE SOUTHEASTERLY RIGHT-OFWAY LINE OF U.S. HIGHWAY NO. 24, FROM WHICH THE MOST SOUTHERLY CORNER OF SAID PARCEL 3 BEARS S40°07'50"E, A DISTANCE OF 246.55 FEET AND IS THE BASIS OF BEARINGS USED HEREIN;

NORTHWESTERLY LINE OF SAID PARCEL 3 AND SAID PARCEL 1, SAID LINE ALSO BEING THE SOUTHEASTERLY RIGHT-OF-LINE OF SAID U.S. HIGHWAY NO. 24, A DISTANCE OF 147.74 FEET TO THE NORTHWESTERLY CORNER OF SAID PARCEL 1;

May 15, 2013

Government Legals

THENCE N89°24'16"E ALONG THE NORTH LINE OF SAID PARCEL 1, A DISTANCE OF 103.17' TO THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF SAID PARCEL 1, SAID POINT ALSO BEING THE NORTHWEST CORNER OF PARCEL 2, AS RECORDED UNDER SAID RECEPTION NO. 443568; THENCE S03°56'39"E ALONG THE COMMON LINE OF SAID PARCELS 1 AND 2, A DISTANCE OF 294.49 FEET TO THE SOUTHERLY CORNER COMMON TO SAID PARCELS 1, 2, AND 3, SAID POINT ALSO BEING A POINT ON THE NORTHWESTERLY RIGHT-OFWAY LINE OF WEST STREET (COUNTY ROAD NO. 231); THENCE S48°08'45"W ALONG THE SOUTHEASTERLY LINE OF SAID PARCEL 3 AND ALONG SAID NORTHWESTERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY LINE, A DISTANCE OF 41.57 FEET TO THE MOST SOUTHERLY CORNER OF SAID PARCEL 3; THENCE N40°07'50"W ALONG THE SOUTHWESTERLY LINE OF SAID PARCEL 3, A DISTANCE OF 246.55 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. SAID TRACT CONTAINS 38,157 SQUARE FEET (0.88 ACRES) OF LAND, MORE OR LESS. Legal Notice No.: 933572 First Publication: April 24, 2013 Last Publication: May 15, 2013 Publisher: Pikes Peak Courier View PUBLIC NOTICE COMMUNITY ADVISORY COMMITTEE VACANCY The City Council of the City of Woodland Park is accepting applications from persons who are interested in serving as a member on the Community Advisory Committee for the Pikes Peak Area Council of Governments (PPACG), located in Colorado Springs. This committee provides citizen input on planning matters related to the mission of PPACG. It is composed of citizens appointed by the general governments in the Colorado Springs urban planning area, an at-large membership and representatives of community-based organizations. Committee meetings are held on the last Wednesday of the month at 3PM at the PPACG office in Colorado Springs. Application forms are available on the City’s website www.city-woodlandpark.org or at the City Clerk’s office in City Hall, 220 West South Avenue in Woodland Park. Completed applications are submitted to the City Clerk’s Office. Position will remain open until filled. Applications may be personally delivered to the City Clerk’s office at City Hall; delivered by FAX at 719-687-5232; or delivered by mail to the City Clerk at PO Box 9007, Woodland Park, CO 80866. Please contact the City Clerk’s office at 687-5295 with any questions. Legal Notice No.: 933590 First Publication: May 1, 2013 Last Publication: May 15, 2013 Publisher: Pikes Peak Courier View Public Notice NOTICE OF PURCHASE OF REAL ESTATE TAX LIEN SALE AND OF APPLICATION FOR TREASURER’S DEED TAX SALE CERTIFICATE OF PURCHASE NO 0880004 The said premises were for the year A.D. 1987, assessed and taxed in the name of DAVID EUGENE MAYNARD and the properties are currently assessed and taxed in the name of DAVID EUGENE MAYNARD. To whom it may concern and to every person in actual possession or occupancy of the hereinafter described land, lots or premises, and to the person in whose name the same was taxes, and to all persons having an interest or title of record in or to the same, and particularly to: DAVID EUGENE MAYNARD NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that at a tax lien sale lawfully held on the 15th day of November A.D. 1988, the then County Treasurer of Teller County, State of Colorado, duly offered for delinquent taxes for the year 1987, the following described property, situated in County of Teller and State of Colorado, to-wit: 26-14-70 2401 ETHELYN PL MN That, at said sale, said property was stricken off to and a tax lien sale certificate of purchase was duly issued therefore to TELLER COUNTY, who on February 23, 2013 assigned said Certificate of Purchase to JBN CAPTIAL LLC, the present holder and legal owner thereof, who hath made request upon the Treasurer of Teller County for a deed, and that unless the same be redeemed on or before September 18, 2013, the said County Treasurer will issue a Treasurer’s Deed therefore to said certificate holder. Dated at Cripple Creek, Teller County, Colorado, this 1st day of May, 2013. ROBERT W CAMPBELL, TREASURER TELLER COUNTY, COLORADO Legal Notice No.: 933606 First date of Publication: May, 8, 2013 Second date of Publication: May 15, 2013 Third and last date of Publication: May 22, 2013 Publisher: Pikes Peak Courier View Public Notice CRIPPLE CREEK HISTORIC PRESERVATION COMMISSION SPECIAL MEETING MAY 20, 2013 * AGENDA 5:00 PM - Work Session 1. Continued Review of Requests for Funding from the 2013 Historic Preservation Grant Programs. Legal Notice No.: 933612 First Publication: May 15, 2013 Last Publication: May 15, 2013 Publisher: Pikes Peak Courier View Public Notice The Teller County Historic Preservation Advisory Board is holding their quarterly meeting on Wednesday, May 22, 2013 at 10:00 a.m. at Teller County Public Health, 11115 West Hwy 24, Unit 2C, Divide, CO.

THENCE N26°44'00"E ALONG THE NORTHWESTERLY LINE OF SAID PARCEL 3 AND SAID PARCEL 1, SAID LINE ALSO BEING THE SOUTHEASTERLY RIGHT-OF-LINE OF SAID U.S. HIGHWAY NO. 24, A DISTANCE OF 147.74 FEET TO THE NORTHWESTERLY CORNER OF SAID PARCEL 1;

The public is invited to attend.

THENCE N89°24'16"E ALONG THE NORTH LINE OF SAID PARCEL 1, A DISTANCE OF 103.17' TO THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF SAID PARCEL 1, SAID POINT ALSO BEING THE NORTHWEST CORNER OF PARCEL 2, AS RECORDED UNDER SAID RECEPTION

PETITION FOR ANNEXATION OF LAND TO THE CITY OF WOODLAND PARK

Legal Notice No.: 933614 First Publication: May 15, 2013 Last Publication: May 15, 2013 Publisher: Pikes Peak Courier View PUBLIC NOTICE

AN INCORPORATED HOME RULE CITY UNDER THE HOME RULE PROVISIONS OF THE CONSTITUTION OF THE STATE OF COLORADO, AND THE MU-


1050 CR 231, Woodland Park, CO 80863..

May 15, 2013 PUBLIC NOTICE

Government Legals

PETITION FOR ANNEXATION OF LAND TO THE CITY OF WOODLAND PARK AN INCORPORATED HOME RULE CITY UNDER THE HOME RULE PROVISIONS OF THE CONSTITUTION OF THE STATE OF COLORADO, AND THE MUNICIPAL HOME RULE ACT OF 1971, CRS 1975 31.12 SOUTHWEST VALLEY ANNEXATION PLAT 2 Hereby petition(s) the City of Woodland Park, Colorado, through the City Council of said City for annexation of the real property with an address of 1050 and 1000 West Street (County Road 231), Woodland Park, Colorado and more particularly described with a legal description attached hereto, as Exhibit A and incorporated herein by reference in accordance with the provisions of 31-12-107 CRS 1973 as amended, and in compliance with the City Charter of the City of Woodland Park; and, represent to the City of Woodland Park and the fully constituted officials of said City and to the City Council duly qualified and constituted, the following: 1. That not less than one-sixth of the perimeter of the area proposed to be annexed is contiguous with the annexing municipality. 2. That a community of interest exists between the territory proposed to be annexed and the annexing municipality; that the territory proposed to be annexed is urban or will be urbanized in the near future; and that the territory proposed to be annexed is integrated or is capable of being integrated with the annexing municipality. 3. The undersigned Petitioner(s) are the owners of 100 percent of the property proposed to be annexed. 4. All the requirements of Section 31-12104 and 31-12-105 CRS 1973 exist or are met. 5. That it is desirable and necessary that such territory be annexed to the municipality. 6. A written legal of description of the boundaries of the area proposed to be annexed attached hereto as Exhibit A. 7. Copies of an Annexation Map showing the boundary of the area proposed to be annexed with such information as required by CRS 31-12-107 (III) and (IV). 8. Mailing address of each of the signers is as follows: Donald McCarl and Beth McCarl, 350 Ranch Road, Woodland Park, Colorado, 80863 and Karl Hirschbeck, 1050 CR 231, Woodland Park, CO 80863.. Notice is hereby given that the City Council of the City of Woodland Park, Colorado, will hold a Public Hearing on June 6, 2013 at 7:00 PM in the Council Chambers, City Hall, 220 West South Avenue, Woodland Park, Colorado, concerning the petition for Annexation of land to the City of Woodland Park, filed by Southwest Valley Annexation – Plat 2 to determine whether the area proposed to be annexed meets the applicable requirements of Colorado Revised Statutes 31-12-104 and 31-12-105 (1972) and should be considered eligible for annexation. The Petition for Annexation and all supporting documents are available for inspection and copying during normal business hours at the office of the Planning Director, City Hall, 220 West South Avenue, Woodland Park, Colorado.

Government Legals

City ofDeputy CrippleCity Creek Suzanne Leclercq, Clerk Summary City ofCheck Woodland ParkReport February 2013 EXHIBIT A HISTORIC PRESERVATION COLORADO SPRINGS CONVENTION $235.00 LEGAL DESCRIPTION – SOUTHWEST CRIPPLE CREEK DISTRICT MUSEUM VALLEY ANNEXATION PLAT 2: $50,000.00 PETTY CASH $63.00 PETTY CASH PARCELS A AND B, AS RECORDED $1.15 IN STEPH623 HILLIARD $7.24 BOOK AT PAGE 183-184 OF THE CRIPPLE CREEK ACE HARDWARE $8.97 RECORDS OF TELLER COUNTY CLERK COLORADO COMMUNITY MEDIA $7.20 AND RECORDER, SITUATED IN THE BANK CARD CENTER $434.63 NORTHWEST ONE-QUARTER OF THE ST PETERS CHURCH $9,787.50 NORTHWEST ONE-QUARTER (NW1/4 AUTOMATED SECURITY 25, TOWNSHIP $240.00 NW1/4) OF SECTION 12 SKYBEAMRANGE 69 WEST OF THE $261.04 SOUTH, 6TH BLACKTELLER HILLS ENERGY $3,221.71 P.M., COUNTY, COLORADO BOOKS WESTMORE PARTICULARLY DE$6.35 AND BEING TELLER COUNTY WASTE $122.00 SCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: RHINO OFFICE PRODUCTS, INC $47.25 ORCHARD TRUST LLC SOUTH$529.58 BEGINNING ATCOMPANY, THE MOST ERLY CORNER CITY OF VICTOR OF PARCEL 3 AS RE$50.00 CORDED UNDER RECEPTION NO. HISTORY COLORADO $80.00 443568 NAPC OF SAID COUNTY RECORDS, $35.00 SAID UPHSPOINT ALSO BEING THE MOST $50.00 EASTERLY CORNER OF SAID PARCEL COLORADO NATURAL GAS $1,727.66 A PROFILE AND A EAP POINT ON THE NORTHWEST$25.90 ERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY LINE OF WEST STANDARD COFFEE SERVICE $13.89 STREET, FROM WHICH THE MOST QUILL CORPORATION $13.84 WESTERLY CENTURYLINKCORNER OF SAID PAR$32.04 CEL 3, SAID POINT ALSO BEING AN CENTURYLINK $6.37 ANGLE POINT ON THE SOUTHEASTXEROX CORPORATION $45.20 ERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY LINE OF U.S. PINNACOL ASSURANCE $828.87 HIGHWAY NO. 24 BEARS N40°07'50"W, AT&T $494.67 A STEVEN DISTANCE OF 246.55 FEET AND IS W VEATCH $163.78 THE BASIS BEARINGS USED CRIPPLE CREEKOF ACE HARDWARE $66.27 HEREIN; NATIONAL TRUST FOR HISTORIC PR $25.00 KATHLEEN STOCKTON $88.68 THENCE ALONG JIM SAWATZKI PDP THE SAID NORTH$502.00 WESTERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY LINE THE AUTOMATED SECURITY $35.00 FOLLOWING TWO (2) COURSES; $180.73 NANCY JANE McDONALD 1)BOOKS THENCE WESTS48°08'45"W, A DISTANCE $213.07 OF 83.85 FEET; THE PRAIRIE SCHOONER $565.50 2)RUBIN THENCE THE ARC OF A BROWN,ALONG LLP $1,689.46 1337.03 FOOT RADIUS CURVE TO THE CBEYOND $424.27 RIGHT, THROUGH A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 01°17'09", AN ARC LENGTH OF 30.00 FEET, (THE LONG CHORD OF WHICH BEARS S48°56'31"W, A LONG CHORD DISTANCE OF 30.00 FEET);

Government Legals

THENCE N41°42'01"W, A DISTANCE OF 205.05 FEET TO A POINT ON SAID SOUTHEASTERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY LINE; THENCE N37°26'44"E ALONG SAID Public Notice SOUTHEASTERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY LINE, A DISTANCE OF 122.29 FEET TO OFON GREEN MOUNTAINLINE FALLS, ATOWN POINT THE COMMON OF SAID PARCEL A AND SAID PARCEL 3; THENCE S40°07'50"E COLORADOALONG SAID COMMON LINE, A DISTANCE PUBLIC HEARING NOTICE – OF 7:00228.27 P.M. FEET TO THE POINT OF 4, BEGINNING. TUESDAY, JUNE 2013 AND SAID T RTUESDAY, A C T C OJUNE N T A I 18, N S 2013 25,322 TOWN SQUARE FEETHALL (0.58 BUILDING, ACRES) OF LAND, 10605 MOUNTAIN FALLS ROAD MOREGREEN OR LESS. TOGETHER WITH A PORTION OF THAT TRACTisOF LAND DESCRIBED AS PARNotice hereby given that the Green CEL 2, AS RECORDED UNDER RECEPMountain Board Trustees will hold TION NO.Falls 443568 OFof SAID COUNTY REa Public Hearing to solicit publicNORTHWinput CORDS, SITUATED IN THE on Ordinance 01-2013 OF An Ordinance EST ONE-QUARTER THE NORTHWEST ONE-QUARTER (NW1/4 NW1/4) OF Prohibiting the Operation of Marijuana SECTION Facilities, 25, TOWNSHIP SOUTH, Cultivation Marijuana12Product RANGE 69 WEST OF Marijuana THE 6THTestP.M., Manufacturing Facilities, TELLER COUNTY, COLORADO AND ing Facilities or Retail Marijuana StoresDEBEING MORE PARTICULARLY within the Town Green Mountain Falls, SCRIBED AS ofFOLLOWS: Colorado. Copies of Ordnance 01-2013 COMMENCING AT THE Hall MOST SOUTHare available at the Town for review. ERLY CORNER OF PARCEL 3 AS RECORDED RECEPTION NO. Town Clerk, UNDER Chris Frandina 443568 OF SAID COUNTY RECORDS, 719-684-9414 SAID POINT ALSO BEING THE MOST EASTERLY CORNER OF SAID PARCEL Legal No.: ON 933620 A ANDNotice A POINT THE NORTHWESTERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY First Publication: May 15, LINE 2013 OF WEST STREET, FROM WHICH THE MOST Last Publication: May 15, 2013 WESTERLY CORNER OF Publisher: Pikes Peak CourierSAID View PARCEL 3, SAID POINT ALSO BEING AN ANGLE POINT ON THE SOUTHEASTERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY LINE OF U.S. HIGHWAY NO. 24 BEARS N40°07'50"W, A DISTANCE OF 246.55 FEET AND IS THE BASIS OF BEARINGS USED HEREIN; THENCE N48°08'45"E ALONG SAID NORTHWESTERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY LINE, A DISTANCE OF 41.57 FEET TO THE MOST SOUTHERLY CORNER OF SAID PARCEL 2 AND THE POINT OF BEGINNING OF THE TRACT OF LAND HEREIN DESCRIBED;

Notice is hereby given that the City Council of the City of Woodland Park, Colorado, will hold a Public Hearing on June 6, 2013 at 7:00 PM in the Council Chambers, City Hall, 220 West South Avenue, Woodland Park, Colorado, concerning the petition for Annexation of land to the City of Woodland Park, filed by Southwest Valley Annexation – Plat 2 to determine whether the area proposed to be annexed meets the applicable requirements of Colorado Revised Statutes 31-12-104 and 31-12-105 (1972) and should be considered eligible for annexation. The Petition for Annexation and all supporting documents are available for inspection and copying during normal business hours at the office of the Planning Director, City Hall, 220 West South Avenue, Woodland Park, Colorado.

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Suzanne Leclercq, Deputy City Clerk City of Woodland Park EXHIBIT A LEGAL DESCRIPTION – SOUTHWEST VALLEY ANNEXATION PLAT 2: PARCELS A AND B, AS RECORDED IN BOOK 623 AT PAGE 183-184 OF THE RECORDS OF TELLER COUNTY CLERK AND RECORDER, SITUATED IN THE NORTHWEST ONE-QUARTER OF THE NORTHWEST ONE-QUARTER (NW1/4 NW1/4) OF SECTION 25, TOWNSHIP 12 SOUTH, RANGE 69 WEST OF THE 6TH P.M., TELLER COUNTY, COLORADO AND BEING MORE PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: BEGINNING AT THE MOST SOUTHERLY CORNER OF PARCEL 3 AS RECORDED UNDER RECEPTION NO. 443568 OF SAID COUNTY RECORDS, SAID POINT ALSO BEING THE MOST EASTERLY CORNER OF SAID PARCEL A AND A POINT ON THE NORTHWESTERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY LINE OF WEST STREET, FROM WHICH THE MOST WESTERLY CORNER OF SAID PARCEL 3, SAID POINT ALSO BEING AN ANGLE POINT ON THE SOUTHEASTERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY LINE OF U.S. HIGHWAY NO. 24 BEARS N40°07'50"W, A DISTANCE OF 246.55 FEET AND IS THE BASIS OF BEARINGS USED HEREIN; THENCE ALONG THE SAID NORTHWESTERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY LINE THE FOLLOWING TWO (2) COURSES; 1) THENCE S48°08'45"W, A DISTANCE OF 83.85 FEET; 2) THENCE ALONG THE ARC OF A 1337.03 FOOT RADIUS CURVE TO THE RIGHT, THROUGH A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 01°17'09", AN ARC LENGTH OF 30.00 FEET, (THE LONG CHORD OF WHICH BEARS S48°56'31"W, A LONG CHORD DISTANCE OF 30.00 FEET); THENCE N41°42'01"W, A DISTANCE OF 205.05 FEET TO A POINT ON SAID SOUTHEASTERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY LINE; THENCE N37°26'44"E ALONG SAID SOUTHEASTERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY LINE, A DISTANCE OF 122.29 FEET TO A POINT ON THE COMMON LINE OF SAID PARCEL A AND SAID PARCEL 3; THENCE S40°07'50"E ALONG SAID COMMON LINE, A DISTANCE OF 228.27 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. SAID TRACT CONTAINS 25,322 SQUARE FEET (0.58 ACRES) OF LAND, MORE OR LESS.

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TOGETHER WITH A PORTION OF THAT TRACT OF LAND DESCRIBED AS PARCEL 2, AS RECORDED UNDER RECEPTION NO. 443568 OF SAID COUNTY RECORDS, SITUATED IN THE NORTHWRHINO OFFICE PRODUCTS, $10.28 EST ONE-QUARTER OFINC THE NORTHWANTHEM BLUE CROSS & (NW1/4 BLUE SHIEL $2,716.29 EST ONE-QUARTER NW1/4) OF LINCOLN NATIONAL LIFE INSURANC $67.40 SECTION 25, TOWNSHIP 12 SOUTH, AMERICAN69 FIDELITY CO.THE 6TH P.M., $94.00 RANGE WESTINS. OF ORCHARD COUNTY, TRUST COMPANY, LLC $1,076.78 TELLER COLORADO AND CBEYONDMORE PARTICULARLY $211.96 BEING DEAFLAC $36.84 SCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: TOTAL $76,543.37 COMMENCING AT THE MOST SOUTHBANK OF CCPARCEL TREASURER ERLY CORNER OF 3 AS REPIKES PEAK COURIER CORDED UNDERVIEW RECEPTION $20.00 NO. AUTOMATIC INC. $198.00 443568 OFACCESS, SAID COUNTY RECORDS, HISTORIC PRESERVATION FUND THE MOST $36.00 SAID POINT ALSO BEING RICK’S EDGE CORNER OF SAID PARCEL $73.00 EASTERLY $125.09 APETTY ANDCASH A POINT ON THE NORTHWESTCPRA RIGHT-OF-WAY LINE OF WEST $30.00 ERLY COLORADO DIVISION OF FIRE SAFE $80.00 STREET, FROM WHICH THE MOST WATER/SEWERCORNER FUND WESTERLY OF SAID$1,469.27 PARRALF’S CEL 3,BREAK SAIDROOM,INC POINT ALSO BEING$15.00 AN ANGLE POINT PITNEY BOWES INCON THE SOUTHEAST$87.54 ERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY LINE OF U.S. PETTY CASH $21.50 HIGHWAY NO. 24 BEARS N40°07'50"W, QUILL CORPORATION $956.16 ACINTAS DISTANCE OF 246.55 IS FAS LOCKBOX 636525 FEET AND $585.00 THE BASIS OF BEARINGS USED CENTURYLINK $422.97 HEREIN; SAMS CLUB #8272 $64.40 HOBBY LOBBY STORES, INC $79.68 THENCE N48°08'45"E ALONG SAID ZIRKLE STUDIOS-VICTOR $80.99 NORTHWESTERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY CONNIE DODRILL $130.20 LINE, A CREEK DISTANCE OF 41.57 FEET TO CRIPPLE ACE HARDWARE $153.94 THE MOSTSTATE SOUTHERLY OF COLORADO FIRE CHIEFSCORNER $682.00 SAID PARCEL 2 AND THE POINT OF PHIL LONG FORD $998.46 BEGINNING OF THE MEDIA TRACT OF LAND COLORADO COMMUNITY $92.40 HEREIN DESCRIBED; BANK CARD CENTER $85.93 BANK CARD CENTER $306.59 THENCE N03°56'39"W ALONG$1,000.00 THE AMORY PROPERTIES, LLC WESTERLY LINE OF SAID PARCEL$467.40 2, A MCI COMM SERVICE DISTANCE OF 294.49 FEET TO $165.00 THE CnR MECHANICAL NORTHWEST CORNER THEREOF; FIRE SYSTEMS WEST, INC. 5-13 $420.00 THENCE N89°24'16"E ALONG THE TODD HABERMAN $65.54 NORTH LINE OF SAID PARCEL $500.00 2, A TODD HABERMAN DISTANCE OF VENTURE 65.17 FEET TO A POINT CRIPPLE CREEK FOODS $19.47 ON WESTERLY LINE OF LOT 7, MEL THE MOSER $25.00 BLOCK SUNNY SLOPE ACRES INHOLLAND1, VENTURES $375.00 CORPORATED FILING NO. 1, AS RECRIPPLE CREEK MOUNTAIN ESTATES $195.00 CORDED UNDER RECEPTION NO. 167288 OF SAID COUNTY RECORDS; THENCE S02°05'01"W ALONG SAID WESTERLY LINE, A DISTANCE OF 246.37 FEET TO A POINT ON THE SOUTHERLY LINE OF SAID PARCEL 2, SAID POINT ALSO BEING A POINT ON SAID NORTHWESTERLY RIGHT-OFWAY LINE; THENCE S48°08'45"W ALONG SAID SOUTHERLY LINE AND SAID NORTHWESTERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY LINE, A DISTANCE OF 72.33 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. SAID TRACT CONTAINS 16,428 SQUARE FEET (0.38 ACRES) OF LAND, MORE OR LESS. Legal Notice No.: 933573 First Publication: April 24, 2013 Last Publication: May 15, 2013 Publisher: Pikes Peak Courier View

246.37 FEET TO A POINT ON THE SOUTHERLY LINE OF SAID PARCEL 2, THENCE N41°42'01"W, A DISTANCE OF 27-Color SAID POINT ALSO BEING A POINT ON 205.05 FEET TO A POINT ON SAID SAID NORTHWESTERLY RIGHT-OFSOUTHEASTERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY WAY LINE; LINE; THENCE S48°08'45"W ALONG SAID THENCE N37°26'44"E ALONG SAID SOUTHERLY LINE AND SAID NORTHSOUTHEASTERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY WESTERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY LINE, A LINE, A DISTANCE OF 122.29 FEET TO DISTANCE OF 72.33 FEET TO THE A POINT ON THE COMMON LINE OF POINT OF BEGINNING. SAID PARCEL A AND SAID PARCEL 3; THENCE S40°07'50"E ALONG SAID SAID TRACT CONTAINS 16,428 COMMON LINE, A DISTANCE OF 228.27 SQUARE FEET (0.38 ACRES) OF LAND, FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. MORE OR LESS. SAID TRACT CONTAINS 25,322 SQUARE FEET (0.58 ACRES) OF LAND, Legal Notice No.: 933573 MORE OR LESS. First Publication: April 24, 2013 Last Publication: May 15, 2013 TOGETHER WITH A PORTION OF THAT Publisher: Pikes Peak Courier View TRACT OF LAND DESCRIBED AS PARCEL 2, AS RECORDED UNDER RECEPPublic Notice TION NO. 443568 OF SAID COUNTY RECORDS, SITUATED IN THE NORTHWCity of Woodland Park EST ONE-QUARTER OF THE NORTHWEST ONE-QUARTER (NW1/4 NW1/4) OF CITY COUNCIL AGENDA SECTION 25, TOWNSHIP 12 SOUTH, May 16, 2013 * 7:00 PM RANGE 69 WEST OF THE 6TH P.M., TELLER COUNTY, COLORADO AND 1. CALL TO ORDER BEING MORE PARTICULARLY DE2. ROLL CALL SCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: 3. PLEDGE OF ALLEGIANCE 4. CEREMONIES, PRESENTATIONS COMMENCING AT THE MOST SOUTH& APPOINTMENTS: ERLY CORNER OF PARCEL 3 AS RETurley A. Elevate your Education Art CORDED UNDER RECEPTION NO. Contest. 443568 OF SAID COUNTY RECORDS, Turley B. Presentation of Columbine SAID POINT ALSO BEING THE MOST Elementary School Science Fair winners. EASTERLY CORNER OF SAID PARCEL Parnell C. Presentation of Bear Aware A AND A POINT ON THE NORTHWESTDrawing Contest by Gateway Elementary ERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY LINE OF WEST School Students. STREET, FROM WHICH THE MOST Campbell D. Presentation by Scott CampWESTERLY CORNER OF SAID PARbell, Executive Director of Palmer Land CEL 3, SAID POINT ALSO BEING AN Trust. ANGLE POINT ON THE SOUTHEASTMorse E. Appointments to the Keep ERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY LINE OF U.S. Woodland Park Beautiful Committee. (A) HIGHWAY NO. 24 BEARS N40°07'50"W, Morse F. Appointment to the Parks and A DISTANCE OF 246.55 FEET AND IS Recreation Advisory Board. (A) THE BASIS OF BEARINGS USED 5. ADDITIONS, DELETIONS HEREIN; OR CORRECTIONS TO AGENDA: (Public comment not necessary) THENCE N48°08'45"E ALONG SAID 6. CONSENT CALENDAR: NORTHWESTERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY (Public comment may be heard) LINE, A DISTANCE OF 41.57 FEET TO Morse A. Approve minutes of May 16, THE MOST SOUTHERLY CORNER OF 2013 Regular Meeting. (A) SAID PARCEL 2 AND THE POINT OF Morse B. Approve April 2013 Statement BEGINNING OF THE TRACT OF LAND of Expenditures and authorize the Mayor HEREIN DESCRIBED; to sign warrants in payment thereof. (A) Morse C. Approve construction contract THENCE N03°56'39"W ALONG THE with Rocky Mountain Materials and AsWESTERLY LINE OF SAID PARCEL 2, A phalt, Inc. to resurface the Centennial DISTANCE OF 294.49 FEET TO THE Trail. (L) NORTHWEST CORNER THEREOF; 7. UNFINISHED BUSINESS: THENCE N89°24'16"E ALONG THE A. None. NORTH LINE OF SAID PARCEL 2, A 8. ORDINANCES ON INITIAL POSTING: DISTANCE OF 65.17 FEET TO A POINT Smith A. Approve Ordinance No. 1186 on ON THE WESTERLY LINE OF LOT 7, initial posting Amending Title 18 of the BLOCK 1, SUNNY SLOPE ACRES INWoodland Park Municipal Code by the adCORPORATED FILING NO. 1, AS REdition of a New Chapter 18.79 to Prohibit CORDED UNDER RECEPTION NO. the Operation of Marijuana Cultivation Fa167288 OF SAID COUNTY RECORDS; cilities and Sales, Marijuana Product Manufacturing Facilities, Marijuana Testing FaTHENCE S02°05'01"W ALONG SAID cilities, Retail Marijuana Stores and WESTERLY LINE, A DISTANCE OF Marijuana Membership Clubs in the City of 246.37 FEET TO A POINT ON THE Woodland Park; and Amending Chapter SOUTHERLY LINE OF SAID PARCEL 2, 9.30 of the Municipal Code to Prohibit SAID POINT ALSO BEING A POINT ON Selling Marijuana Grown for Personal use SAID NORTHWESTERLY RIGHT-OFand set the Public Hearing for June 6, WAY LINE; 2013. (L) THENCE S48°08'45"W ALONG SAID 9. PUBLIC HEARINGS: SOUTHERLY LINE AND SAID NORTH(Public comment is appropriate) WESTERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY LINE, A Riley A. Approve Ordinance No.1185 anDISTANCE OF 72.33 FEET TO THE nexing a tract of land depicted as RosePOINT OF BEGINNING. mont Road right-of-way and Sand Wash, together with a portion of Laura Lane, all SAID TRACT CONTAINS 16,428 shown on the Plat of Property of C.D. SQUARE FEET (0.38 ACRES) OF LAND, Weaver located in the SE1/4 of the SE1/4 MORE OR LESS. of Section 24, Township 12 South, Range 69 West of the 6th P.M. in Teller County, Legal Notice No.: 933573 Colorado containing 1.46 acres of land. First Publication: April 24, 2013 (L) Last Publication: May 15, 2013 Riley B. To be TABLED to June 6, 2013. Publisher: Pikes Peak Courier View Approve Resolution No. 757 setting forth the findings of fact and conclusion concerning the annexation petition for the Public Notice Southwest Valley Annexation Plat 1, Parcels 1 and 3 containing 0.88 acres situCOLORADO GOVERNMENT FINANCE OF $40.00 GALL’S INC. ated in the NW¼ of the NW¼ of the$11.80 SecAREA COUNCIL $2,687.00 EMERGENCY REPORTING $1,896.00 PIKES tion PEAK 25, Township 12 GOVERN South, Range 69 CORPORATION $106.76 WAL-MART COMMUNITY $47.91 QUILL West of 6th P.M. in Teller County with an HARRIS CROWN TROPHY $178.59 PAUL address of 1000 CR 231 (S. West $133.90 Street) $625.75 123 EAST BENNETT AVENUE, LLC $420.00 CENTURYLINK as requested by the petitioners Donald R. AUTOMATED SECURITY $34.00 CENTURYLINK $51.03 and Beth J. McCarl. (L) HARDWARE & RENTAL CAPET $35.00 WOODLAND Riley C. To be TABLED to June 6,$146.11 2013. CORPORATION $984.49 THIN AIR THEATRE COMPANY $85,000.00 XEROX Approve Resolution No. 758 setting forth ASSURANCE $8,525.55 MARIA CUNNINGHAM $250.00 PINNACOL the findings of fact and conclusion conUPS STORE #1374 $2.68 RYAN FROST $375.00 THE cerning the annexation petition the SouthBLACK HILLS ENERGY $12,303.55 SAMS #8272 $110.41A westCLUB Valley Annexation Plat 2, Parcels & CARB THYSSEN KRUPP ELEVATOR $257.29 HAYES,PHILLIPS,HOFFMANN and B containing 0.58 acres and a$5,976.25 portion CREEK ACE HARDWARE $222.49 CHUCK CALDWELL $91.00 CRIPPLE of Parcel 2 containing 0.38 acres situated DBAof CCOM $70.00 FARMER’S UPHOLSTERY $18.00 TOTAL in theHEALTHCARE NW¼ of theINC. NW¼ the Section 25, DEPOT,12THE CRC Range 69 West$84.97 WAXIE SANITARY SUPPLY $719.77 HOME Township South, of 6th TELLER NETWORKING, INC $5,581.20 MOUNTAIN MUTUALCounty WATER with addresses $200.00 P.M. in Teller of MEDIA $51.84 TELLER COUNTY WASTE $738.00 COLORADO 1050 andCOMMUNITY 1000 CR 231 (S. West Street) JOHN HARTELT $264.25 BANK CARD CENTER $1,632.13 as requested by the petitioners Karl HirshCREEK VENTURE GINA PILEGGI $186.20 CRIPPLE beck (Parcels A and B)FOODS and Donald R.$6.32 and OF CARING $5,170.57 US IMAGING $4,139.25 COMMUNITY Beth J. McCarl (portion of Parcel 2). (L) EMERGENCY MEDICAL PRODUCTS, IN $346.60 WAL-MART $92.96 10. NEWCOMMUNITY BUSINESS: $27.96 THE FIRE STORE $409.44 VALCOM A. None. RADIO COMMUNICATIONS $475.00 DIRT CHEAP EXCAVATING $2,500.00 FRONTIER 11. PUBLIC COMMENT ON ITEMS NOT TECHNOLOGIES CORPORAT $380.00 FAMILY SUPPORT REGISTRY $155.54 COUNTING ON THE AGENDA ORCHARD TRUST COMPANY, LLC $6,433.48 BLACK HILLS ENERGY $116.70 12. REPORTS: (Public comment not necessary) $153.89 OFFICE SOLUTIONS COLORADO FIRE CAMP $1,900.00 TOTAL A. Mayor's POL & Report. BRIDGES, INC $3,105.00 HISTORIC PRESERVATION $300.00 KANET, B. Council Reports. INDUSTRIAL PRODUCTS $335.49 PROGRESSIVE SERVICES, INC. $78.44 STATE C. City Attorney's Report. SANITARY SUPPLY $1,084.78 TELLER COUNTY ASSOCIATION $1,000.00 WAXIE D. City Manager's and Department TELLER HISTORIC $50.00 ORKIN-COLORADO SPRINGS, CO $75.00 Manager's Report. BROWN, LLP $11,115.02 CHILD CARE CONNECTIONS, INC. $240.00 RUBIN 13. COMMENTS ON WRITTEN $3,922.13 SHERRY ROWE $33.78 CBEYOND CORRESPONDENCE: HARDWOODS $506.10 TELLER COUNTY TREASURER $3,567.88 WELLCO (Public comment not necessary) $500.00 BARRY WEBER $35.00 FPSI 14. ADJOURNMENT GWENDOLYN WEBER $35.00 COLORADO ADVANCED LIFE SUPPORT $24.00 * * Per Resolution No. 90, OFFICE PRODUCTS, INCSeries 1982. $776.92 COLORADO NATURAL GAS $7,042.68 RHINO (A) Administrative PILEGGI $78.40 PETTY CASH $78.48 GINA (QJ) Quasi-Judicial Action $3,790.55 CO. DEPT. OF HUMAN SERVICES $176.00 EXCELL CRIPPLE CREEK, LLC (L) Legislative Action INN & SUITES $595.00 WATER/SEWER FUND $4,541.26 HAMPTON $155.54 PROFILE EAP $258.99 FAMILY SUPPORT REGISTRY Legal Notice FUND No.: 933615 $ 1,763.50 BJ FETT JR $661.50 WATER/SEWER First Publication: May 15, 2013 FOXWORTH-GALBRAITH LUMBER COMP $27.16 AFLAC $450.00 Last Publication: May 15, 2013 CENTRAL UNIFORM & LINEN $83.03 ANTHEM BLUE CROSS & BLUE SHIEL $38,617.13 Publisher: Pikes LIFE PeakINSURANC Courier View$859.43 NATIONAL DEEP ROCK WATER $127.76 LINCOLN

Government Legals

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Government Legals

Government Legals

Pikes Peak Courier View 27 (Public comment is appropriate) Riley A. Approve Ordinance No.1185 annexing a tract of land depicted as Rosemont Road right-of-way and Sand Wash, together with a portion of Laura Lane, all shown on the Plat of Property of C.D. Weaver located in the SE1/4 of the SE1/4 of Section 24, Township 12 South, Range 69 West of the 6th P.M. in Teller County, Colorado containing 1.46 acres of land. (L) Riley B. To be TABLED to June 6, 2013. Approve Resolution No. 757 setting forth the findings of fact and conclusion concerning the annexation petition for the Southwest Valley Annexation Plat 1, Parcels 1 and 3 containing 0.88 acres situated in the NW¼ of the NW¼ of the Section 25, Township 12 South, Range 69 West of 6th P.M. in Teller County with an address of 1000 CR 231 (S. West Street) as requested by the petitioners Donald R. and Beth J. McCarl. (L) Riley C. To be TABLED to June 6, 2013. Approve Resolution No. 758 setting forth the findings of fact and conclusion concerning the annexation petition the Southwest Valley Annexation Plat 2, Parcels A and B containing 0.58 acres and a portion of Parcel 2 containing 0.38 acres situated in the NW¼ of the NW¼ of the Section 25, Township 12 South, Range 69 West of 6th P.M. in Teller County with addresses of 1050 and 1000 CR 231 (S. West Street) as requested by the petitioners Karl Hirshbeck (Parcels A and B) and Donald R. and Beth J. McCarl (portion of Parcel 2). (L) 10. NEW BUSINESS: A. None. 11. PUBLIC COMMENT ON ITEMS NOT ON THE AGENDA 12. REPORTS: (Public comment not necessary) A. Mayor's Report. B. Council Reports. C. City Attorney's Report. D. City Manager's and Department Manager's Report. 13. COMMENTS ON WRITTEN CORRESPONDENCE: (Public comment not necessary) 14. ADJOURNMENT * * Per Resolution No. 90, Series 1982. (A) Administrative (QJ) Quasi-Judicial Action (L) Legislative Action

Government Legals

Legal Notice No.: 933615 First Publication: May 15, 2013 Last Publication: May 15, 2013 Publisher: Pikes Peak Courier View Public Notice REQUEST FOR PROPOSALS GREEN MOUNTAIN FALLS TOWN HALL/POLICE STATION 10615 GREEN MOUNTAIN FALLS ROAD GREEN MOUNTAIN FALLS, COLORADO Notice is hereby given by the Green Mountain Falls Board of Trustees that sealed proposals from qualified architectural firms will be received until 3:00 p.m. local time on Friday, May 31, 2013 at the Green Mountain Falls (temporary) Town Hall, 10605 Green Mountain Falls Road, Unit A, Green Mountain Falls, Colorado. The bid opening will be private.

Government Legals

The project scope will consist of the subdivision of an existing 3.569 acre commercial parcel, site design of the approved site, design of a new approximately 3,200 square foot Town Hall and Police Station, and assistance in support of the preparation of a DOLA Tier II grant application. AMERICAN FIDELITY INS. CO. $1,241.00to RFP documents including instructions ORCHARD COMPANY, LLC building $11,994.87 bidders,TRUST project schedule, proCBEYOND $263.37 gram, site concept plan, floor plan, and TOTAL $261,983.35 conceptual elevations are available at the office of: BANK OF CC WATER/SEWER ECTOWN POWERCLERK SYSTEMS OF COLORADO $187.85 TIMGREEN GRAY MOUNTAIN FALLS TOWN$63.86 HALL DISTRICT SUPPLY $2,197.25 PO BOX 524 PETTY CASH 10605 GREEN MOUNTAIN FALLS $2.30 BAXLEY OILUNIT A $1,956.77 ROAD, INTERSTATE CHEMICAL CO, INC $10,962.28 GREEN MOUNTAIN FALLS, FELT,MONSON & CULICHIA, LLC $575.00 COLORADO 80819 W.W. GRAINGER, INC. $104.09 PHONE: 719-684-9414 MOUNTAIN STATES PIPE & SUPPLY $1,058.00 FAX: 719-684-7850 STANDARD COFFEE SERVICE $37.27 QUILL CORPORATION $1,045.33 Proposals must be identified in the followENVIROTECH SERVICES, $11,222.51 ing manner: GREENINC MOUNTAIN FALLS CRIPPLE ACEAND HARDWARE $474.06 TOWNCREEK HALL POLICE STATION, EL1PASO COUNTY DEPARTME 0615 G R EHEALTH EN MO U N TA I N$1,528.00 FA L L S BANK CARDMay CENTER ROAD, 31, 2013, 3:00 p.m.$1,000.00 Any proALERT FIRST AID SERVICE $90.26 posal received after the time and date McCANDLESS INTERNATIONAL TRUCK unopened. $284.75 stated above will be returned STEVE DICAMILLO $37.80 BARNES DISTRIBUTION $207.65 Questions and requests for clarification may be sent via phone, fax, or email to the DPC INDUSTRIES $1,151.60 Town Clerk (above) or to Rob McArthur, SKYBEAM $36.45 Project BLACK HILLSManager. ENERGY Phone 719-684-7850, $9,453.33 Fax 719-684-7850, TELLER COUNTY WASTE email $240.00 The question JIMGmfpublicworks@aol.com. BLASING $48.32 deadline is 5:00 p.m. on Wednesday May ECONO SIGNS, LLC $970.00 29, 2013. ORCHARD TRUST COMPANY, LLC $3,372.46 ALLDATA $1,500.00 All prospective architectural firms shall GARY BEHAM $71.19be responsible RYAN BOWMAN for acquisition of proposal $750.00 documents, site, NALCO COMPANYevaluation of the work $3,368.85 preparation of insurance certificates, and TIMBER LINE ELECTRIC & CONTROL $6,011.20 presentation of properly identified bid docED ARDEN $86.09 uments.GARAGE DOOR CO., INC. $1,515.20 PRUTCH’S DISTRICT SUPPLY $1,645.65 The Town of Green reAMERICAN TRAFFIC SAFETYMountain SERVIC Falls $165.00 serves the right to reject any and all proCOLORADO NATURAL GAS $3,418.44 posals,EQUIPMENT waive irregularities and accept the WAGNER CO $757.00 proposal which in its opinion best $17.93 serves UNCC the needs and purposed of the Town of Green Mountain Falls. The successful architect shall be required to sign a contractAIA Standard Form of Agreement between Owner and Architect. The Town of Green Mountain Falls is an Equal Opportunity Employer.

Notice is hereby given by the Green Mountain Falls Board of Trustees that sealed proposals from qualified architectural firms will be received until 3:00 p.m. local time on Friday, May 31, 2013 at the Green Mountain Falls (temporary) Town Hall, 10605 Green Mountain Falls Road, Unit A, Green Mountain Falls, Colorado. The bid opening will be private.

Government Legals

The project scope will consist of the subdivision of an existing 3.569 acre commercial parcel, site design of the approved site, design of a new approximately 3,200 square foot Town Hall and Police Station, and assistance in support of the preparation of a DOLA Tier II grant application. RFP documents including instructions to bidders, project schedule, building program, site concept plan, floor plan, and conceptual elevations are available at the office of: TOWN CLERK GREEN MOUNTAIN FALLS TOWN HALL PO BOX 524 10605 GREEN MOUNTAIN FALLS ROAD, UNIT A GREEN MOUNTAIN FALLS, COLORADO 80819 PHONE: 719-684-9414 FAX: 719-684-7850 Proposals must be identified in the following manner: GREEN MOUNTAIN FALLS TOWN HALL AND POLICE STATION, 1 0 6 1 5 G R E E N M O U N TA I N FA L L S ROAD, May 31, 2013, 3:00 p.m. Any proposal received after the time and date stated above will be returned unopened. Questions and requests for clarification may be sent via phone, fax, or email to the Town Clerk (above) or to Rob McArthur, Project Manager. Phone 719-684-7850, Fax 719-684-7850, email Gmfpublicworks@aol.com. The question deadline is 5:00 p.m. on Wednesday May 29, 2013. All prospective architectural firms shall be responsible for acquisition of proposal documents, evaluation of the work site, preparation of insurance certificates, and presentation of properly identified bid documents. The Town of Green Mountain Falls reserves the right to reject any and all proposals, waive irregularities and accept the proposal which in its opinion best serves the needs and purposed of the Town of Green Mountain Falls. The successful architect shall be required to sign a contractA I A S t a n d a r d F o r m o f A g r e e m e nt between Owner and Architect. The Town of Green Mountain Falls is an Equal Opportunity Employer. Robert McArthur Public Works Director Green Mountain Falls, Colorado Legal Notice No.: 933616 First Publication: May 15, 2013 Last Publication: May 15, 2013 Publisher: Pikes Peak Courier View

Government Legals

PROFILE EAP $48.57 BAXLEY OIL $5,448.40 CENTRAL UNIFORM & LINEN $51.88 W.W. GRAINGER, INC. $81.08 CARQUEST AUTO PARTS $1,489.55 CENTURYLINK $84.87 WOODLAND HARDWARE & RENTAL $19.86 XEROX CORPORATION $61.79 $1,894.57 PINNACOL ASSURANCE THE UPS STORE #1374 $15.05 CRIPPLE CREEK ACE HARDWARE $271.24 NAPA WOODLAND PARK $845.31 TOTAL HEALTHCARE INC. DBA CCOM $29.00 PHIL LONG FORD $124.24 COLORADO COMPRESSED GASES $324.11 SGS NORTH AMERICA INC $203.30 CATHRYN D GARCIA $1,856.75 ROSS BETHEL, LLC $540.00 RUBIN BROWN, LLP $4,100.63 BAIRD & SONS PLUMBING, INC $90.00 CBEYOND $1,050.74 ACZ LABORATORIES, INC $150.00 KIOWA ENGINEERING CORPORATION $700.00 KIOWA ENGINEERING CORPORATION $1,425.00 LEGALSHIELD $47.85 BAXLEY OIL $1,392.50 AFLAC $231.42 ANTHEM BLUE CROSS & BLUE SHIEL $6,922.21 LINCOLN NATIONAL LIFE INSURANC $147.19 AMERICAN FIDELITY INS. CO. $272.00 ORCHARD TRUST COMPANY, LLC $3,386.18 SKYBEAM $36.45 VELOCITY CONSTRUCTORS, INC $13,293.90 TOTAL $114,249.38

Get Involved! Legal Notice No.: 933618 First Publication: May 15, 2013 Last Publication: May 15, 2013 Publisher: Pike Peak Courier View

Robert McArthur Public Works Director Green Mountain Falls, Colorado

Legal Notice No.: 933616 First Publication: May 15, 2013 Last Publication: May 15, 2013 Publisher: Pikes Peak Courier View

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28-Color

28 Pikes Peak Courier View

May 15, 2013

Four Panthers Headed to State Track Meet Ruddick, Westfall, and Hannah and Hayden Erickson qualify By Danny Summers

jdsummers30@gmail.com WOODLAND PARK – Gabby Ruddick leads a contingent of four Woodland Park High School athletes who will compete at this week’s Class 4A state track and field meet. Ruddick, a senior, will compete in the high jump and 100 meter low hurdles. Ruddick finished third in the high jump at the 2012 state meet and second in 2011. Ruddick won the Metro League championship in both events last weekend. Joining Ruddick at state will be senior Hannah Erickson (discus, shot put), sophomore Hayden Erickson (shot put) and senior Cody Westfall (discus). Ruddick has already equaled the school record in the high jump with a leap of 5-4. She is ranked second in the state in the event. “Gabby’s right there,” said Woodland Park coach Ron Payton. “She usually rises to the challenge, so I can see her doing very well at state. She’s a game-day kid.” Ruddick is ranked seventh in the hurdles (15.64 seconds). The school record in the event is held by Cassidy Nettles (15.33 in 2008). Ruddick believes her best chance to place at state is in the high jump. “I’m always looking to do more,” Ruddick said. “I’m not settling for a certain height. I’ve jumped 5-6 in practice, and just missed 5-7.” Ruddick plans to step away from track after the state meet to focus on her career as a photographer. She’s owned her own photography business (GKRPhotography) for several years and plans on attending the Art

Institute of Colorado in Denver in the fall. “Track is not where my heart is,” Ruddick said. “I am excited about starting something new in my career path.” Woodland Park sprints coach Jennifer Royer believes Ruddick has a chance to do very well in the hurdles at state. “She’s an incredible athlete,” Royer said. “She will be successful in any event she competes – relays, sprint medley, 4x100.” Hannah Erickson is ranked fifth in the discus at 133-1. She is less than a foot behind Ashley Hutchinson’s school record of 134-0 set in 2002. Erickson is ranked ninth in the shot put (38-0). Laura Daily holds the school record of 39-8.5 in 2010. Hayden Erickson is ranked 10th in the shot put with a throw of 49-7. Rick Stennet owns the school record with a toss of 52-9 back in 1975. “Hannah and Hayden both have a chance of being top eight,” Payton said. “It’s a matter of putting it all together when it counts most.” Several other Woodland Park athletes came close to qualifying for the state meet. Junior Randy Westfall, Cody’s brother is ranked 20th in the discus. The girls 4x800 relay team is ranked 20th (10:09.01) – just 38/100ths of a second away from qualifying. The relay team consists of Megan Dillinger, Savannah Ebhert, Lexi Harrison and Anne Fisher. The league meet produced good results for the Panthers’ boys and girls teams. The girls finished second to Coronado – 194 to 143.5. The 4x800 relay team was second. Elsa Huber and Megan Roughen finished second and third, respectively, in the pole vault. Hannah Erickson won the shot put and discus. The boys finished fourth. Hayden Erickson and Cody Westfall won their events, while Randy Westfall was second.

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Woodland Park senior Gabby Ruddick is ranked second in the state in the high jump and seventh in the 100 meter hurdles. File photo

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