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ELBERT 12.20.12

Elbert County

December 20, 2012

75 cents

A Colorado Community Media Publication

ourelbertcountynews.com

Elbert County, Colorado • Volume 117, Issue 47

Chamber names member of year Coontz honored with ‘well-deserved award’ By Deborah Grigsby

dgrigsby@ourcoloradonews.com Ann Coontz, a sales associate with Viaero Wireless, was named 2012 Member of the Year by the Elizabeth Area Chamber of Commerce at the group’s annual meeting Dec. 13. Coontz, who was nominated along with Dr. Brooke Terry of Elizabeth Family Dental, was selected for her many business and charitable contributions throughout the community. “I was very shocked when I heard my name,” said Coontz, who insists the award is more about the community than it is the individual. Coontz said the honor is the result of a growing symbiotic relationship between the chamber and the community, describing it as a “tornado of positive energy that just keeps coming back.” “The chamber is really a way for all of us, as members of the business community, to

give back by things like employing students or supporting the school,” said Coontz. “It’s great when we can rally together and connect with each other in a variety of ways.” “The award is very well deserved,” said chamber president Kari May. “Ann’s willingness to step up and help, as well as her positive attitude is, I think, what I appreciate most.” Coontz said one of her main goals for the coming year is to develop an ambassador program where new members of the community could be welcomed with a gift basket of community resources. The award ceremony also coincided with the chamber’s annual meeting. Chamber members Tammy Hanes of 2 Chics and a Kitchen, Trudy Slack of BC Building Services, Shawna Jarvis of Big R of Elizabeth, and Kari May of the Elbert County Library District were named to the 2013 board of directors. May and chamber executive director Beverly Durant presided at the luncheon meeting held at Spring Valley Golf Club. Each year, chamber members nominate candidates for the award and vote on a list of finalists.

Ann Coontz, a sales associate with Viaero Wireless in Elizabeth, was named Elizabeth Area Chamber of Commerce Member of the Year at an annual membership luncheon, held Dec. 13 at Spring Valley Golf Course. Coontz and Dr. Brooke Terry of Elizabeth Family Dental were both nominated for the award recognizing community contributions by local business members. Photo by Deborah Grigsby

Official ousted by board

Trustees suddenly terminate contract of town administrator By Deborah Grigsby

dgrigsby@ourcoloradonews.com

“When his country called, he answered,” U.S. Sen. Mark Udall said of Schar. “This is a place, a home to transition back to civilian life.” A grateful Schar stood to thank the crowd, joking how “total strangers built a house for a guy they don’t even know.” Schar’s parents presented the large pewter ceremonial key and local Boy Scouts marked the occasion with a flag-raising detail. While on his third deployment, Schar lost both of his legs above the knees on Sept. 19, 2007, when an explosive projectile stuck his vehicle as it traveled through Baghdad. After more than two years of rehabilitation, Schar walks with the help of specialized prosthetic legs. While handicapped-accessible, the couple’s apartment still presented several challenges including a small kitchen, carpeted floors and cabinets that were too tall. Homes for Our Troops is a national non-

A recent Elizabeth Board of Trustees meeting turned sour when members voted to terminate the town administrator’s contract. According to witnesses, the move at the trustees’ Dec. 11 meeting dropped jaws and fostered an atmosphere ripe for speculation. “A motion was made by a member of the board and there was a vote of 4-3 to terminate the contract of Trudy Peterson,” confirmed Elizabeth Police Chief Michael J. Phibbs. Phibbs, who now also serves as the acting town manager, said there was no formal discussion of the matter preceding the motion and he is unaware of any personnel issues that may have prompted the action. Those at the meeting, as well as Phibbs, confirmed after the vote that Peterson was escorted to her desk where she collected her personal things, relinquished keys and was immediately removed from the premises. Phibbs would not speculate on reasons or motives behind the board’s decision. Attempts to contact Peterson were unsuccessful at press time. Trustees and other officials were not available for comment. Town Hall was closed to accommodate a move to new offices at 151 S. Banner St. However, Phibbs said neither Peterson’s departure, nor the move, will disrupt local government services. “We’ll still have police services, you can still pay your water bill and streets will still get plowed,” he said. “For most citizens, they won’t really see much of a change at all.”

Schar continues on Page 10

Ouster continues on Page 10

Local Boy Scouts help Army Staff Sgt. Brian Schar (wearing cap) raise the flag over his new home in Elizabeth on Dec. 15. Homes for Our Troops presented Schar with the keys to his new home, specially adapted to meet the needs of the Iraq War veteran and double amputee. Photo by Deborah Grigsby

‘Welcome home, Schar family’ By Deborah Grigsby

dgrigsby@ourcoloradonews.com Five years ago, when Army Staff Sgt. Brian Schar lost both legs in in Iraq, he had doubts he’d ever walk again, much less walk down the driveway to his new home in Elizabeth. But he did. On Dec. 15, Homes for Our Troops presented Schar and his family with the keys to

a new, specially adapted home in Elizabeth. Schar, his wife Michelle and infant son John made their way through a sea of American flags to the small heated tent outside their new home in the Wild Pointe Ranch subdivision. More than 100 members of the community, including friends, family and elected officials, braved the chilly Colorado weather for a key presentation and tour of the couple’s new home.

POSTAL ADDRESS

Printed on recycled newsprint. Please recycle this copy.


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2 Elbert County News

December 20, 2012

Looking forward to the new year ’Tis the season for self-improvement! Following closely on the heels of the festivities of Christmas is the time-honored tradition of making New Year’s resolutions. I tend to participate in this tradition. Every year I try to attain 1,000 miles of exercise from a variety of activities. I’m at about 50 percent in reaching this goal each year, and it has made for some interesting New Year’s Eves on the bike at the gym. I also want to end the year weighing less than I started — with the amount of clutter I have in my house, that is. According to a study conducted by students at the University of Scranton, 45 percent of Americans do make resolutions; 24 percent of us fail to keep them. Choose your resolutions carefully so that you don’t end up a part of the latter statistic. According to usa.gov, top New Year’s

resolutions include: Eat healthy food, get fit, lose weight, manage debt, drink less, quit smoking, save money, volunteer, take a trip, and find a better job. The University of Scranton study ranks the following top 10 resolutions: Lose weight, get organized, spend less and save more, enjoy life to the fullest, stay fit and healthy, learn something exciting, quit smoking, help others with

ELBERT COUNTY NEWS IN A HURRY County seeks volunteers

The Elbert County commissioners are seeking applications from residents interested in serving on an advisory board or committee. Vacancies are set to be filled during the first quarter of 2013 on the following boards and committees: building authority, prairie development corporation, planning commission, board of adjustments, child protection team and placement alternatives commission, cooperative extension advisory committee, fair board and the oil and gas advisory board. Qualified applicants must reside in Elbert County. Applicants who wish to serve on the board of adjustments or the planning commission live on or own property in unincorporated Elbert County. All letters of intent and accompanying resumes must be received no later than Jan. 2, 2013. Applicants may fax information directly to 303-6213194 or sent by mail to: Elbert County Board of County Commissioners, Attention: Boards and Committees, P.O. Box 7, Kiowa, CO 80117.

Tis the season for smart giving.

setting yourself up for failure. Want to save money and get out of debt? Set small, attainable goals each month to benchmark your progress. One way to save money is to check out the resources at the library. We have books to help you set reasonable, attainable goals for 2013. From healthy cookbooks to financial planning, foreign language print and audiobooks to dating advice, we can help! So as you enjoy the last of the holiday leftovers and recover from the post-gathering bliss, stop in and research your resolutions. Kari May lives in Elizabeth and is the director of the Elbert County Library District. She can be contacted through the library at director@elbertcountylibrary.org. Visit the library at www.elbertcountylibrary.org.

Airborne deer study about to take off Loveland-to-Limon survey will take place by helicopter By Rhonda Moore

rmoore@ourcoloradonews.com State biologists with Colorado Parks and Wildlife are taking to the skies to study deer on the Front Range. Officials with the wildlife division will use a low-flying helicopter to con-

duct aerial surveys of the Front Range deer population, with flyovers expected in northeast portions of Elbert County. Flight dates are dependent on the weather, with flights scheduled to begin Dec. 17 and last through the end of January 2013, according to Colorado Parks and Wildlife. “We will primarily be flying west of Loveland to the Continental Divide, down to I-70, east of Denver out to Limon and along the South Platte River up to Nebraska,” said senior terrestrial biologist Janet George.

The aerial surveys are part of an effort to monitor Colorado’s deer populations. The surveys help officials count the ratio of bucks to does and fawns to estimate the composition of the herd, which in turn is used to estimate herd size. The data is then used to help wildlife biologists determine the number of hunting licenses to be issued in future hunting seasons. For more information about Colorado Parks and Wildlife, visit www. cpw.state.co.us.

SO MUCH INSIDE THE NEWS THIS WEEK

Sheriff ’s Posse wants members 

The Elbert County Sheriff’s Posse is looking for new members. New applicants must complete an application, pass a background check and interview, and have no recent criminal history. Members who meet the criteria are sworn in by the sheriff or undersheriff, receive a badge, uniform, a sheriff’s office identification card, training, and insurance while on duty. The posse is particularly interested in members who are retired or otherwise available during the day and during the week. Posse membership requires eight hours of work each month and can be completed either in the sheriff’s office or within the county. Typical dutes may include directing traffic at community events, search and rescue, and ride-alongs with deputies. For more information, visit the Elbert County Sheriff’s Posse website at countyposse.org.

their dreams, fall in love, and spend more time with family. But according to Time magazine, many of these same resolutions are also the most likely to be broken. The magazine shares some interesting statistics. Have you ever noticed how crowded the gym is in January, but by April the crowds have thinned out? Sixty percent of gym memberships go unused, and crowds have usually thinned out by mid-February. Only 15 percent of smokers successfully quit for more than six months. Want to spend more time with family? This seems nice in theory, but sometimes when you do, you remember why you stopped spending so much time together in the first place. Eating healthfully? Make gradual changes, don’t restrict yourself too much or you’re

Great outdoors. Rocky Small but mighty. Down the road in Palmer Lake, a model Mountain Arsenal train set-up is tied to fundraising that helps wounded veterans. National Wildlife Refuge Page 14 is a prize for those who enjoy viewing nature, says contributor Tony Lane. Page 7 Not a sqeaker. Kiowa boys smothered Flagler by more than 50 points on the hardwood. Page 16 Bowled over. With 35 bowl games, college football has achieved the ridiculous, says columnist Craig Marshall Smith. Page 6

Smoke signal. Washington state, where marijuana legalization occurred a little earlier than in Colorado, may offer a glimpse of the future in the Centennial State. Page 5

Misdemeanor case. A driver involved in a crash that killed a Parker woman will not face a felony charge, authorities have decided. Page 4

LET US CELEBRATE WITH YOU Have a wedding, anniversary, engagement, birth and special occasion coming up? Share it! Colorado Community Media invites you to place an announcement to share your news. Go to ourcoloradonews.com/celebrations for package and pricing information. Deadline is 10 a.m. Tuesdays the week preceding the announcement.

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December 20, 2012

Elbert County News 3

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4 Elbert County News

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December 20, 2012

Governor says it’s time to talk gun laws By Ivan Moreno and Kristen Wyatt Associated Press

Colorado Gov. John Hickenlooper said “the time is right” for state lawmakers to consider gun control measures, offering his firmest stance in the aftermath of several high-profile shootings, including a movie theater rampage in Aurora, that have shocked the nation. The Democratic governor upset some in his party for not taking a stronger position when he said last summer that stricter laws would not haven’t prevented the mass shooting in Aurora. In an interview on Dec. 12, Hickenlooper said the legislative session in January would be an appropriate time to take up a debate on gun control in his state. “I wanted to have at least a couple of months off after the shooting in Aurora to let people process and grieve and get a little space, but … now the time is right,” Hickenlooper said. The comments also come after a mass shooting at an Oregon mall and a murdersuicide involving a professional football player this month touched off a national debate over gun laws. Hickenlooper said the issues that merit discussion include “things like, do we all need assault weapons?” which he said are “designed for warfare” and “designed to pierce bulletproof vests and body armor.” Former neuroscience graduate student James Holmes is charged with killing 12 people and wounding 70 others in the July movie shootings. He has been in jail since the attack and has not entered a plea in the case. Hickenlooper did not call for specific legislation, but did give a strong indication of what kind of debates and proposals he’d like to see. “When you look at what happened in Aurora, a great deal of that damage was from the large magazine on the AR-15 (rifle). I think we need to have that discussion and say, `Where is this appropriate?’” He said many guns exist now and that there’s no “immediate solution” for stopping gun violence. But he quoted Tom Mauser, the father of one of the students killed over a decade ago in the Columbine

High School shootings, saying, “If you don’t start now, you’re not going to get anywhere.” One of the nation’s most popular governors, Hickenlooper also tried to quiet talk about a potential presidential run in 2016. Hickenlooper said he and his Cabinet decided a couple of weeks ago that they wanted to focus on improving health care and education in the state in the next three years. “What I’m saying is, we’re not going to spend any time on (a presidential run), which essentially makes it impossible,” he said. Hickenlooper also said he believes he’s too moderate to survive a Democratic primary. “I mean if you really think about it, realistically, I am so moderate I would be difficult candidate to imagine succeeding anywhere,” he said. Hickenlooper has long prided himself on being a moderate who tries to forge compromises between Republicans and Democrats. But the upcoming session could pose challenges to Hickenlooper with Democrats controlling both chambers of the Legislature, unlike the previous two years of split legislative control. Now legislation that Republicans heavily oppose can actually get to Hickenlooper’s desk, forcing him to take difficult stances. Gun control could be at the top of the list. “I don’t think it’s appropriate to try to capitalize on tragedies to further some political agenda,” said Colorado Springs Republican Rep. Mark Waller, the GOP’s incoming House minority leader. Waller said he agrees with what Hickenlooper said initially after the Aurora shootings that further restrictions on guns would not have prevented what happened. Boulder Democratic Rep. Claire Levy said she doesn’t like to legislate in response to specific events, but she applauded Hickenlooper for his comments. “I applaud him for being willing to have a conversation that could be contentious and invokes a lot of strong emotions on people on both sides,” said Levy, who is considering legislation to prohibit public colleges from allowing concealed-carry guns on college campuses.

No felony charge in fatal crash 27-year-old driver faces misdemeanor counts By Chris Michlewicz

cmichlewicz@ourcoloradonews.com The driver allegedly at fault in a fatal crash on South Parker Road will not be charged with a felony. Investigators for the Colorado State Patrol decided to move forward with the original misdemeanor charges filed against Jason Lee Jones, 27, of Elizabeth. Jones was driving a Ford F-350 that struck a Cadillac sport utility vehicle driven by Vicki Boyer, a 59-year-old Parker resident who died five days after the Oct. 25 crash at South Parker Road and North Pinery Parkway. Boyer was stopped at a red light when the accident occurred. Trooper Dan Musgrave, who oversaw the accident reconstruction, said Jones faces one count of careless driving causing death, a class 1 misdemeanor that could carry a sentence of up to 18 months in jail. Jones also faces one count of careless driving causing injury because of injuries to an 18-year-old passenger who was riding with him, and two counts of driving without a seat belt. Musgrave recommended the charges to the 18th Judicial District Attorney’s Office late last month. When asked what factors led to the

deadly crash, Musgrave said there was nothing apparent and that Jones was “likely just distracted.” “He was not on the phone at the time,” he said. “We’ve ruled that out.” Jones was traveling slightly above the posted 55 mph speed limit and reportedly did not apply the brakes before striking Boyer’s vehicle. The circumstances, however, do not indicate recklessness or warrant a felony charge, Musgrave said. Drugs or alcohol are not suspected as factors. Boyer family friend Mike Denson is reserving judgment until more information comes out, but said the lack of answers from authorities has caused significant frustration among Boyer’s friends. “The thing that’s still out there in my mind is: What is the explanation of what happened?” he said. “The frustration is not knowing more about what happened and why.” Denson said rumors about the circumstances surrounding the crash have spread around the Pinery. He is considering attending upcoming court hearings to “find out what kind of guy (Jones) is.” Hundreds attended a “celebration of life” service for Boyer at the Parker Arts, Culture and Events Center Dec. 1. Boyer was an active member at the Pinery Country Club and had a large circle of friends.


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December 20, 2012

Elbert County News 5

Pot officially becomes legal s

Washington don’t ere.”state may offer govpeek into future quiet

Rings’ marathon in the privacy of your own home, if you want to,” SpangenthalLee wrote.

un in By Ryan Boldrey Cabirboldrey@ourcoloradonethey ws.com care hree The state of Washington may provide Colorado with ng to some ideas of how — or run), how not — to handle the le,” he galization of marijuana. As the reality of legalized he’s pot in Colorado became priofficial Dec. 10 when Gov. John Hickenlooper signed a realproclamation, certifying the e difvote, marijuana advocates anyin the northwest coastal state had already been lemself gally lighting up for a few forge days. and According to an Assocission ated Press story that ran oper Dec. 7 — one day after pot mbers officially became legal in two Washington — the Seattle egisPolice Department instructe can ed its officers only to issue rcing verbal warnings in cases of public use and not to write f the citations as offenders of the public use law flocked ry to to the Space Needle to celome ebrate legalization publicly. rings According to the story, ’s inpolice spokesman Jonah Spangenthal-Lee wrote on kenthe SPD Blotter that officers hootwould be advising people to ould take their marijuana inside. “The police department Levy believes that, under state onse law, you may responsibly Hickget baked, order some pizzas and enjoy a ‘Lord of the ave a s and eople iderleges n col-

Lawmakers in Colorado, led by Hickenlooper’s recently appointed task force, are still figuring out details of the new Colorado law. Will local law enforcement act the way of Seattle’s police force? No one can say for sure when it comes to municipalities such as Denver, Boulder or some of the more liberal-leaning mountain towns, but in Douglas County, lighting up in public will definitely cross the line. “I’m the type of guy where what you do in your house is your business, but once you bring it out to the street it’s a different ballgame,” said Douglas County Sheriff David A. Weaver. “Especially with our youth. If someone (possessing pot) is coming from a school, there’s a problem there.” Under Amendment 64, marijuana remains illegal on school grounds throughout the state, and even the University of Colorado at Boulder recently announced pot would not be allowed on campus or in campus dormitories. “Local law enforcement is in a very tight spot, because you are going to have this possession which is legal, but there’s no legal supply yet,” said Colorado Deputy Attorney General

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On the home front

‘It’s an entirely new world. We’ve just created a new

market that has been illegal for decades. Alcohol was legal before it was prohibited. We’re facing some very difficult, challenging questions.’ Colorado Deputy Attorney General David Blake David Blake. “We know it came from an illicit source, but where?”

DUID, a growing problem

Now that Hickenlooper has certified the vote, officers could be dealing with an increase in impaired drivers, something that will be somewhat of a gray area until laws are set into place. “Law enforcement,” Blake said, “is going to be interacting soon with questions of ‘What the heck do I do when I pull someone over who is impaired?’ ‘How do I establish probable cause to get to testing for impairment?’ and then ‘When I take that person to court how do I prove it that they were in violation of the law?’” Weaver said his deputies will be on the lookout for drivers under the influence, but as Blake points out, there are numerous legalities at play when making an arrest. “We can’t do blood draws on the street like we can do a breathalyzer test without a warrant,” Blake said.

“That backs into the question of what does probable cause look like. If an ounce of pot is legal, it doesn’t create probable cause to actually conduct a search or go get a blood test.” Blake said estimates are that somewhere between 50,000 and 200,000 adults in Colorado who have been deterred by the illegality of marijuana are expected to take advantage of the new law. This is likely to add to already growing issues on the road. The number of impaired drivers due to marijuana has been steadily growing since new medical marijuana regulations were put in place in 2008 and, according to Blake, a record 11,000-plus drivers were pulled over for DUID last year. “The strongest thing we can do to try and deter that is to pass a DUID bill,” Blake said. “(Colorado Attorney General) John (Suthers) has endorsed that at a 5 nanogram level. The opposition to that is that there is no science behind that, that at a 5

nanogram level, everyone is impaired. Our answer to that is that there is no evidence at .08 under alcohol that everyone is impaired. It is purely a public policy decision. You have to draw a line somewhere.”

Growing legally and the feds

According to Blake, there are massive grows currently going on in warehouses throughout the Centennial State, with upward of 50,000 plants per warehouse. Each of those grows is currently restricted as to how much they can grow based on their working partnership with medical dispensaries and are capped at 50,000 plants. “There are no such restrictions in Amendment 64,” Blake said, “meaning not only could you have grows of 50,000 plants, you could have grows of much, much larger.” That said, Blake’s assumption is that if the feds make the decision to supersede the new state laws with federal law, it is expected that they will go after the

big grow operations as well as the manufacturers that are producing edibles and other marijuana-infused products. “Will the feds do something? I don’t know,” Blake said. “We are certainly pushing the federal government to take a position, some sort of clear, bright line. If they are not going to enforce, that tells us one thing. If they are going to enforce, that tells us another. If they are going to enforce aggressively against grows and therefore affect the supply chain, that tells us something else entirely. “It’s an entirely new world. We’ve just created a new market that has been illegal for decades. Alcohol was legal before it was prohibited. We’re facing some very difficult, challenging questions.”

ELBERT COUNTY NEWS

(USPS 171-100) OFFICE: 9137 S. Ridgeline Blvd., Suite 210, Highlands Ranch, CO 80129 PHONE: 303-566-4100 A legal newspaper of general circulation in Elizabeth, Colorado, the Elbert County News is published weekly on Thursday by Colorado Community Media. PERIODICALS POSTAGE PAID AT ELIZABETH, COLORADO and additional mailing offices. POSTMASTER: Send address change to: 9137 S. Ridgeline Blvd., Suite 210, Highlands Ranch, CO 80129 DEADLINES:

Display advertising: Thurs. 11 a.m. Legal advertising: Thurs. 11 a.m. Classified advertising: Mon. 12 p.m.


6OPINION

6 Elbert County News

December 20, 2012

OPINIONS / YOURS AND OURS

Joey Chestnut’s on an open fire, and bowl games That’s not a typo in the headline. There is a guy named Joey Chestnut. He is a nearrecord setting Nathan’s Hot Dog Eating Contest champion. He once ate 68 hot dogs in 12 minutes. By the time Alabama and Notre Dame have taken off their shoulder pads on Jan. 7, it may seem as if we have metaphorically eaten 68 hot dogs in a short period of time too. Thirty-five bowl games were scheduled. That means 70 Division I teams. I now cringe at the words “bowl eligible.” They simply mean that a team managed to win at least 6 out of 12 games. Big wow. When I was a kid there were four bowl games and all of them were played on Jan. 1. They had discreet names like Rose, Cotton, Sugar and Orange. The Gator Bowl came along, and so did the Liberty Bowl and the Sun Bowl. I always felt like they were outsiders. Before you knew it bowl games started to sprout like something in a bad greenhouse. And they all took sponsors and names that sounded like something Monty Python had

made up. There’s now one called Belk Bowl. I am not kidding. My favorite (or least favorite) is called Bridgepoint Education Holiday Bowl. We all know why there has been this heinous proliferation of bowl games: $. Division I college football is the only college sport that doesn’t have a playoff arrangement. It makes no sense. There is no logical argument against it. They somehow manage to have playoffs in D-II and D-III. And Pop Warner, and Colorado state 5A, 4A, 3A, 2A, and six-man. The levels of selfishness and imbecility are felt by all of us, except sponsors, some

parents and girlfriends, and the nutcake alumni at Nowhere State that went 6-6. If a coach and a team go to a bowl game, it becomes an implied achievement, and the coaches can negotiate it into their contracts, even if their records might have included losses to North South Dakota State and South North Dakota State. I used to love college football. Maybe I would have lost a lot of interest over time no matter what. And if it all really bothers me, why not just read a book, or take a walk, instead of investing my time on a lost cause? But if I did either of those I would have one less topic to write about. Would you really want to know what I was reading on Jan. 7? Milton’s “Paradise Lost.” Now that would be a joy to read about. My alma mater played in a minor bowl a few years ago. I wore my sweatshirt and cheered. We won. And then I asked myself, “Who really cared about whether we won or lost or played or whom the sponsor was or what the game-time temperature was or much of anything else?” Maybe bettors.

There’s a line on every game, all 35, no matter what the teams’ records were, and there will always be bettors, because there will always be money to be made. If we can’t have the logic of a playoff system, perhaps we could have bowls that were more fascinating. A Zen Bowl might be fun. The Metaphysical Bowl. A Dysfunctionally Officiated Bowl, where there might be penalties for illegal team colors, or for getting in a prevent defense during the National Anthem. One thing has improved. When I was a kid we watched the four bowl games on a blonde Philco. If any of the games overlapped, and you wanted to switch, you had to get up, walk across the room, and change the channel. One year my father had the bright idea of buying a second television, which sat next to the blonde Philco. Craig Marshall Smith is an artist, educator and Highlands Ranch resident. He can be reached at craigmarshallsmith@comcast. net

Hope, encouragement, Corruption in Afghanistan success and Zig Ziglar “The doors of hope swing widest on the hinges of encouragement” — Zig Ziglar Born in 1926 and passed away in November 2012. And somewhere along the way, Zig Ziglar went from selling pots and pans door-todoor, to being considered the world’s ambassador of hope, encouragement, motivation and success. As you read my thoughts this week, please do so under the umbrella of success. Because at the end of the day, Zig Ziglar was about success and helping individuals, small business owners and large corporations succeed. So whether we grew personally, professionally or spiritually because of Zig, that would have been his definition of success. Yes, this is a tribute column to a man who has changed millions of lives for the better. And yes, that is millions with an “M.” For each one of us whose life has been positively impacted by Mr. Ziglar, we certainly care about the other 999,999-plus people who have experienced a positive change in some way because of Zig, but we are intimately familiar with how he was able to influence and change our own personal situation. I attended his funeral and memorial service. It was a sad, happy, motivating and inspiring event. Kind of like what you would absolutely come to expect from Zig Ziglar, even as he left this world and entered eternity. During the services, people in attendance and even those who spoke during the service used one-word descriptors of Zig to try and capture his essence and who he was as a man, a husband, a father, a friend, a coach, a motivator and a believer in God. Words like coach, teacher, motivator, consistent, encourager, leader, salesman, genuine, Christian and mentor were shared and accurate. In his speeches, Mr. Ziglar focused on five key areas of life: Healthy Self Image, Positive Attitude, Winning Relationships, Setting and Achieving Goals, and Hope. Now it didn’t matter what your role was in life or what job you had or who you were related to, his message was meant for every single person on this planet no matter who you were and where you were from. Race, religious belief, family history, work history, past, present, or future didn’t matter to Zig because his purpose, his passion and his intent was to be a difference maker in the lives of each and every one of us. For those of you who read my column

each week, I feel like even though you may have never met Mr. Ziglar, you do know him and have known him ever since I started writing this column. I say that with confidence because everything that I write, even though they come from my personal experience and observations each week, are founded, grounded and based on the impact Zig Ziglar has had on me for the past 26 years. “The doors of hope swing widest on the hinges of encouragement.” I remember the first time I heard Zig say this. He was the master encourager, the ambassador of hope, and the most genuine and consistent man I have ever had the blessing and privilege to know and work for. My hope and my encouragement to you is to keep looking for ways to encourage others, build them up, inspire and motivate them, and help them become the person that you know and that they will soon discover that they are meant to be. “You can have everything in this world that you want, just as long as you help enough other people get what they want.” This is Zig’s most famous quote, and I am here as living proof that he lived this principle every day of his life. He helped me become the man, the husband, the dad, the friend, the employee and the believer in God that I am today, and I will be eternally grateful. For many years I have heard hundreds if not thousands of Zig Ziglar stories from people all over the world. Anyone who ever had a history, or encounter at a seminar, or just read his books or listened to his audio programs all shared what that meant. I would love to hear your Zig Ziglar story at gotonorton@gmail.com, and when we all look forward with hope it will be a better than good week. Michael Norton, a resident of Highlands Ranch, is the former president of the Zig Ziglar organization and CEO and founder of www.candogo.com

WE WANT TO HEAR FROM YOU If you would like to share your opinion, go to www.ourcoloradonews.com or write a letter to the editor. Please send letters to letters@ourcoloradonews.com.

Last year I began pushing for a congressional investigation into allegations of corruption and mismanagement at a U.S.sponsored Afghan National Army hospital, known as the Dawood National Military Hospital, in Kabul. I did this after a story broke in the Wall Street Journal about senior Afghan medical personnel selling U.S. military medical aid on the black market. Afghan soldiers and police were dying at the U.S.-sponsored Dawood Hospital because their families couldn’t come up with bribes. The investigation culminated in two hearings, on July 28 and Sept. 12, 2012, by a subcommittee of the Oversight and Government Reform Committee chaired by Congressman Jason Chaffetz of Utah. The conclusion anyone listening to the testimony can easily reach is that the Afghan Surgeon General, Gen. Ahmed Zia Yaftali, was complicit in the corruption and that U.S. Army Lt. Gen. William Caldwell not only delayed an investigation to shield the administration from any political embarrassment prior to the 2010 midterm elections, but he purposely limited the scope of the investigation to shift the focus away from the obvious issue of corruption. It is unfortunate that, despite the chairman’s recommendations, the Department of Defense has refused to fully investigate the conduct of Caldwell and the Afghan government has also refused to prosecute Yaftali. Unfortunately, I believe that the behavior of General Caldwell in Afghanistan — either a lack of leadership or a willingness to look the other way while Afghan officials are free to steal from U.S. taxpayers with impunity — is not uncommon. I was in Afghanistan recently and I vis-

Elbert County News 9137 S. Ridgeline Blvd., Suite 210, Highlands Ranch, CO 80129

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ited the hospital. The visit reminded me of what it was like for me when I was in the military and had to stand inspections. However, it is impossible for me to know the real story about current conditions at the facility since the hospital staff has put on such performances before and then reverted back to their corrupt practices as soon as the oversight pressure on them was lifted. I left Afghanistan confirming my belief that the greatest threat to its future is not the Taliban but the pervasive corruption that permeates every level of Afghan governance along with the lack of leadership by the United States in confronting it. In the hearing on July 24, 2012, an officer who first reported the abuses at the hospital and was rebuffed by Caldwell, commented that in the Afghan culture when you are haggling over the price at a bazaar the seller will only take you seriously when he knows you are prepared to walk away. We must set firm benchmarks in place for combating corruption and if they fail to reach them we must be prepared to stop funding the Afghan government and walk away. U.S. Rep. Mike Coffman serves Colorado’s 6th Congressional District.

Colorado Community Media Phone 303-566-4100 • Fax 303-566-4098

Columnists and guest commentaries The Elbert County News features a limited number of regular columnists, found on these pages and elsewhere in the paper, depending on the typical subject the columnist covers. Their opinions are not necessarily those of the Elbert County News. Want your own chance to bring an issue to our readers’ attention, to highlight something great in our community, or just to make people laugh? Why not write a letter of 300 words or fewer. After all, the News is your paper.

WE’RE IN THIS TOGETHER Our team of professional reporters, photographers and editors are out in the community to bring you the news each week, but we can’t do it alone. Send your news tips, your own photographs, event information, letters, commentaries... If it happens, it’s news to us. Please share by contacting us at news@ourcoloradonews.com, and we will take it from there.


7

December 20, 2012

Elbert County News 7

es A conservation success story

5, no and there

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The Rocky Mountain Arsenal, once a waswartime and chemical manufacturing site, es onnow contains a 15,000-acre wildlife refuge over-that has become an outstanding conservau hadtion success story. ange The Rocky Mountain Arsenal National

Wildlife Refuge is home to over 300 species ea ofof birds, mammals, fish, reptiles and amnextphibians. There are a number of excellent hiking trails, seasonal fishing lakes, wildlife viewing tours, nature photography, periduca-odic special events, and a nine-mile wilde canlife drive where you can experience nature mcast.from the convenience of your own vehicle. The drive provides the opportunity to explore three distinct types of habitat: prairie, wetlands and woodlands. Just inside the refuge a large and welcoming visitor center comes into view. Inside you will find the history of the arsenal with a collection of photos and equipment used during wartime. There are displays of artifacts, native animal and plant species, an information desk, a small gift shop and very clean restrooms. Pick up a map of the refuge and head out. Most folks start with the wildlife drive. It is well-marked and provides a sense of the refuge while traveling through the different habitats. Traveling north on B Street from the visitor center is the prairie habitat. The terrain is fairly flat with reclamation efforts me ofstill under way. n the Howe real facilsuch erted on as ed. belief s not ption overip by

n

fficer pital nted u are seller nows

placeA prairie dog stands alert to the dangers from predators y fail such as coyotes and from aerial attacks by owls, hawks stop walkand eagles. Prairie dogs are not only an important food

source, but the habitat they create can be instrumental to the survival of other species of birds and mammals.

A large mule deer buck cautiously scans the prairie horizon. Mule deer are just one of the many species of animals found on the National Wildlife Refuge. Photos by Tony Lane

Prairie dogs abound

Black-tailed prairie dogs are just about everywhere. These furry little rabbit-sized rodents are the favorite food of coyotes and hawks. Their abundant numbers even attract bald eagles from the north that winter on the refuge. Prairie dog burrows provide shelter for other animals, such as rabbits, burrowing owls and snakes. At the end of B Street the road turns east onto 7th Avenue. Bison are the main attraction along this portion of the drive. At times they may be difficult to see as they graze beyond the gently rolling hills of prairie. The fences of the enclosure are being expanded to allow these legends of the Old West to roam much closer to the visitor center and provide better public viewing. Watch for deer, coyotes and other wildlife along the way. At the end of 7th Avenue the drive turns south onto C Street. Ahead and on the right is the entrance to the contact station and the wetlands habitat. A parking lot, trailheads, two lakes, a floating boardwalk, picnic tables and restrooms are some of the features found here. Deer are frequently seen browsing around the facilities. Geese, ducks and other waterfowl enjoy the tranquility and safety of the lakes. I have photographed raccoons feeding along the water’s edge near the pump house on several occasions.

ado’s

Raccoons are usually nocturnal, feeding under the cover of darkness, so I was somewhat surprised to see them during mid-day. The lakes are open to fishing from midApril through mid-October on a permit basis. The waters contain trophy bass, pike, bluegill and catfish, and no, they don’t glow in the dark. It’s catch and release only, but you would be hard-pressed to find other waters containing such exciting fishing. Take a quick picture and release your trophy back into the water to fight another day.

Sites facilitate photos

After exploring the wetlands habitat, take the main road south to 6th Avenue. Mule deer and sometimes whitetail deer can be seen along the way hanging around the locust groves on the west side of the road. The drive turns east at 6th Avenue and into the woodlands habitat. A short drive will bring you to a parking lot on the north side of the road overlooking Lake Ladora. The parking lot sits next to a locust grove where deer sometimes rest during midday. It also provides access to trailheads. Two of the trails lead to “blinds” that have been strategically located near small ponds. The blinds can be an excellent platform for watching and photographing wildlife. Sneak back into one of them just before daylight and wait for the first rays of the sun. You will likely see wildlife viewing at its

finest. Continuing east, 6th Avenue passes through rows of tall cottonwoods, creek bottoms and thick locust groves that provide a haven for wildlife. While you may see animals anywhere on the refuge, the woodlands habitat seems to provide the best wildlife viewing opportunities, especially for the more elusive whitetail deer that prefer the dense cover. Catching them in the open is not always easy. Best times are early mornings and late afternoons as they move from bedding area to feed. The refuge is not a zoo. The animals are totally wild and the only time you will see them is when they want to be seen.

Open year-round

Each season brings different opportunities, and except for federal holidays, the refuge is open year-round. Gates open at 6 a.m. and close at 6 p.m. The visitor center is also closed on federal holidays as well as Mondays. The center is open from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.; however, maps can still be obtained at the information kiosk as you enter B Street. The refuge is located in Commerce City. Take I-70 to the Northfield/Quebec exit and then north on Quebec about 2.5 miles to Prairie Parkway. Turn right until you see Gateway Road, then left into the Refuge. For updated holiday hours and information call 303 289-0930. Enjoy your trip!

Holiday Worship

Celebrate the Season! You are invited to join these churches for their Holiday Worship Services.

Rejoice, Rejoice! Come celebrate with us this season CHRISTMAS EVE

Jay S. Rabinowitz, M.D., F.A.A.P. Brian B. Stanga, M.D., F.A.A.P. Wanda J. Venters, M.D., F.A.A.P. E. Jann Quaife, M.D., F.A.A.P. Amy Gensler, M.D., F.A.A.P. Lauren Finney, M.D., F.A.A.P.

Julie C. Durr, C.P.N.P. Richard O. Hayes, PA-C Erin Jacob, PA-C Michelle, Whitner, PA-C Tracy Stam, R.D., C.L.E. Lindsey Einhorn, PH.D. Susie DeVere, Administrator

4 pm Family Service 7 & 9 pm Candlelight Service & Holy Communion

Nursery available at the 4 and 7 pm services

Join us for our Christmas Cantata Sunday, December 16th • 8 & 10:30 am service

Joy LUTHERAN CHURCH, ELCA

7051 East Parker Hills Ct. • Parker, CO 303-841-3739 • www.joylutheran-parker.org

“Glory of His Majesty” Christmas Dinner and Cantata Dec. 16 @ 5:00 pm

Christmas Eve Services Dec. 24 4:00 pm | 6:00 pm 8:00 pm |11:00 pm

$10 adult | $5 child

Christmas Day Service Dec. 25 @ 10:00 am 9300 E. Belleview Ave. Greenwood Village, CO 303.770.9300


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8 Elbert County News

December 20, 2012

Holiday Worship

Celebrate the Season! You are invited to join these churches for their Holiday Worship Services.

Celebrate the Birth of Our Savior St. Philip-in-the-Field Episcopal Church

Christmas Eve Services: 6 p.m Family Mass 10 p.m. Solemn High Mass

397 S. Perry Park Rd.* 303-688-5444

Christmas Begins with Christ! 12/24 -- Christmas Eve Candlelight Worship Times: 4:00, 6:00, and 8:00 p.m. 12/25 -- Christmas Day Worship: 10:00 a.m.

Begin the New Year with Hope!

CELEBRATE ADVENT IN WORSHIP WITH PEPC Sunday Services at 8:45 and 10:30am

TRINITY LUTHERAN CHURCH

December 16: Conspire to Give Gratefully December 23: Conspire to Love the World December 24: The Christmas Conspiracy (5:00pm, 7:00pm, 8:30pm - Candlelight Services)

4740 N Hwy 83 Franktown, CO (303) 841-4660

Parker Evangelical Presbyterian Church 9030 Miller Road; Parker, CO 80138 303-841-2125 • www.pepc.org

“… a SAVIOR has been born to you; He is CHRIST the LORD.” Luke 2:11

Rise Up, Shepherd, and Follow December 24 (Christmas Eve) 3:00 and 7:00 pm — Traditional Christmas Services 5:00 pm — Family Christmas Service 11:00 pm — Christmas Eve Vigil December 25 (Christmas Day)

Join Us Christmas Eve

10:00 am – Traditional Christmas Service

5:30, 7:30 & 11:00 p.m. Come and Adore Him! Christ Jesus Is Born!

Shepherd of the Hills Lutheran Church (LCMS)

Child Care Available. Communion Served at 7:30 &11:00 p.m. Wonderful Music! Traditional Candlelight Evening Services! Family Friendly!

7691 S. University Blvd Centennial, CO 80122 www.ShepherdHills-Church.org

303-798-0711

Shepherd of the Hills Christian School Preschool—Grade 8

www.ShepherdHills-School.org

Littleton United Methodist Church 5894 South Datura St. / 303.794.6379

www.littletonumc.org


9COLOR

December 20, 2012

Elbert County News 9

Holiday Worship

Celebrate the Season! You are invited to join these churches for their Holiday Worship Services.

   

New beginning  

   

Community  Church    

10550  S.  Progress  Way,  Suite  100   Parker,  CO  80134-­‐4029  

Looking  For  a  New  Beginning?   Join  us  for  our  Christmas   Eve  Candlelight  Service     Celebrating  our  Lord  a   nd  Savior  Jesus  Christ’s  birth     4:00PM  and  5:30PM     –  Monday  –  December  24th           us  in  our  regular  Services   We  invite  you  to  join   Sunday  School  for  all     ages   -­‐        9:00AM     Coffee   a nd   F ellowship     -­‐     10:00AM     Praise  and  Worship     -­‐     10:30AM     Eve  Youth  Group     Wed   -­‐        7:00PM  

  E-­‐mail:  office@nbccparker.com  –  Phone:  [303]  495-­‐2949  –  Web  Site:  nbccparker.com  

Make Parker United Methodist Church

Your Home for the Holidays

Christmas Services

Sun, Dec. 16 & 23 at 9:30 am

Dec. 23 - Final Sunday of Advent

Adult Choir featured Sun, Dec 16 Children’s Choir featured Sun, Dec 23

Christmas Eve services

Annual Candlelight Christmas Eve Service

Services at 8 a.m., 9:30 a.m. and 11 a.m. 4 p.m. Children's Service 6 and 8 p.m. Lessons and Carols 8 p.m. Carols and Communion

Mon, Dec. 24 at 6:00 pm

PARKER

Resolve to build your relationship with God in the New Year! Join us in January for discussions on UNITED METHODISTage-old questions of faith.

www.parkerumc.org

11805 S. PINE DR. PARKER, CO 80134 303-841-3979

PARKER UNITED METHODIST

935 Evalena St. Castle Rock, CO 80108 303-660-8011 gracecr.org

www.parkerumc.org

11805 S. PINE DR. PARKER, CO 80134 303-841-3979

C reekside B ible C hurch

invites you to celebrate the birth of our

Christmas Eve Candlelight Service

S avior, J esus C hrist, with us!

Sunday, Dec. 23 • 9:00 & 10:30 a.m. Worship Services “A Not-So-Silent Night” – Matthew 1:18-25, Luke 2:4-20

Please join us at 5:00 p.m. on December 24th, 2012

Candlelight Christmas Eve Services Monday, December 24th, 3:00 & 5:00 p.m. Childcare provided for ages five and under during all services

2180 S. Interstate 25 Castle Rock www.creeksidebible.net 303-688-3745

Christmas Eve Services Monday, December 24

2:00, 4:30 and 7:00 p.m.

Weekly Sunday Worship 9:00 a.m.

immediately followed by Adult Bible Communities and Children’s Sunday School Please call for information about Children's, Youth and Adult Ministries

11150 Hilltop Road Parker, CO 80134

303.841.2273

Merry Christmas

Christmas at Christ Lutheran Church

Carols, Communion & Candlelight at all services. 1:00 p.m. & 3:00 p.m. Children’s and Family Service 5:00 p.m. Contemporary Service Crossroads Band

7:00 p.m. Traditional Service Celebration Choir & Carillon Ringers

11:00 p.m. Traditional Service Special Music

 Child Care at 1, 3, 5 & 7 p.m.

www.gracecolorado.com You are invited to worship with us on Christmas 3:00 pm: Service For Young Children & Families 8:00 pm: Carols by Candlelight Service 10:00 pm: Carols and Communion Service

Eve

Grace is on the NE corner of Santa Fe Drive and Highlands Ranch Parkway, (across from Murdoch’s).

303-798-8485

Come and join the joy & wonder of Christmas at one of our five Christmas Eve Services on December 24th, 2012!

Christ Lutheran Church

8997 S. Broadway, Highlands Ranch ½ Southof ofC-470 C-470 ½ Block Mile South

303-791-0803 • www.clchr.org


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SAU 2x2

SAU 2x3

10 Elbert County News

BRING THIS COUPON FOR $1 OFF ADMISSION

GUN & KNIFE SHOW

DEC. 22ND & 23RD SAT 9-5 & SUN 9-4 DOUGLAS CO. FAIRGROUNDS • CASTLE ROCK WWW.PESHOWS.COM • 800-519-0307

BUY - SELL - TRADE - NEW - USED - SELF-RELIANCE

December 20, 2012

THINGS TO DO

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GUN & KNIFE SHOW

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at 589 S. Banner St., Elizabeth.

SERVICE PROJECTS. Frontier High School students plan community service projects. For the toy drive, bring a new, unwrapped toy for the holiday toy drive sponsored by the Elizabeth Fire Department. For the food drive, bring any non-perishable food items for distribution by the American Legion Post 82. Collection boxes will be located at the Frontier campus. Call the school at 303-646-1798 or email its director, Rob McMullen, at rmcmullen@esdk12.org to make a donation. Frontier High School is at 589 S. Banner St., Elizabeth.

THE OUTBACK Express is a public transit service provided through the East Central Council of Local Governments is open and available to all residents of Kit Carson and Lincoln counties and NDCheyenne, Elbert,RD provides an economical and efficient means of travel for the four-county region. Call Kay Campbell, Kiowa, at 719- 541-4275. You may also call the ECCOG office at 1-800-825-0208 to make reservations for any of the trips. You may also visit http://outbackexpress.tripod. com.

CASTLE ROCK, CO DECEMBER 22 & 23 SAT 9-5 & SUN 9-4 DOUGLAS CO. FAIRGROUNDS

SIMLA, MATHESON TO LIMON, DEC. 27

DEC. 24

WWW.PESHOWS.COM • 800-519-0307 DIVORCE AND Post-Decree Clinic. Elbert and Lincoln

DENTAL CARE. Comfort Dental offers free dental care from 7:30-11:30 a.m. Dec. 24. For locations, see www. ComfortDental.com.

Pro Se Divorce Clinic is offered from 9 a.m. to BUY - SELL - TRADE - NEW - USEDCounty - SELF-RELIANCE noon the third Friday of each month at the Elbert Coun-

JAN. 10 BUSINESS AFTER hours. The Elizabeth Area Chamber of Commerce invites you to a Business After Hours from 5-7 p.m. Jan. 10 at Kat Eyes Optical in the Safeway shopping Center in Elizabeth. Come meet Kathy at the only eye specialist in Elbert County. Enjoy visiting a local business and meeting other area business people. Great networking tool. Refreshments provided by the local business.

FEB. 14 FRONTIER FUNDRAISING. Frontier High School students will make reindeer and snowmen to sells at the EMS craft fair Nov. 17 and the local craft fair on Dec. 1. A spaghetti dinner, sponsored by students and staff, is planned for Feb. 14. Call the school at 303-646-1798 or email its director, Rob McMullen, at rmcmullen@ esdk12.org to make a donation. Frontier High School is

ty Justice Center, 751 Ute St., in Kiowa. For information, call 303-520-6088 or email morgan@hayday.org. The clinic is free for parties who have no attorney and who are going through dissolution of marriage, legal separation, or post-decree cases. All walk-ins are welcome, and will be assisted on a first-come, first-served basis.

THE ELBERT County Sheriffs Posse is a nonprofit volunteer organization that is part of the Elbert County Sheriffs Office. As volunteers we support the Elbert County Sheriffs Office, all law enforcement in our county, and the community at large. Membership is open to anyone without a criminal record. It meets the last Monday of the month at the Elbert County Sheriffs Office at 7 p.m. For more information or a membership application, go to http://www.elbertcountysheriff.com/ posse.html, or contact Dave Peontek at 303-646-5456. THE ELIZABETH Food Bank, 381 S. Banner in Elizabeth (next door to Elizabeth Presbyterian Church) needs

to let the public know that we are available to help anyone who needs food. The hours are Friday 12:30-3 p.m. and Saturdays from 9-11:30 a.m. Other times by appointment.

ELIZABETH GUITAR Group. Elizabeth guitar circle will meet on the first and second Wednesday of each month at the Elizabeth Library. Traditional protocol/ courtesy. Country, pop, bluegrass, cowboy, Beatles, 50s, 60s, 70s, blues, jazz and more. We who play for pleasure would love to meet more of same. Acoustic or power down. Come prepared to share a few songs, perform, play along, sing along with others. Enjoy new guitar friends to jam with. Gerry Vinson hosts on the first Wednesday from 6:30-9 p.m., and Laurie Smith hosts on the second Wednesday from 6-9 p.m. Uncertain? Drop by and observe. Banjo, ukelele, mandolin welcome. Call Laurie at 720-363-3531. LAWYERS AT the Library, a free legal clinic for parties who have no attorney, will be featured from 6-9 p.m. the third Tuesday of every other month in Elizabeth. Volunteer attorneys will answer questions, help fill out forms and explain the process and procedure for the areas of family law, civil litigation, criminal defense, property law, probate law, collections, appeals, landlord-tenant law and civil protection orders. Walk-ins are welcome. Everyone will be helped on a first-come, first-served basis. SATURDAY GENEALOGY Fun meets at the Elbert Public Library at 1 p.m. on the seocnd Saturday of each month. Beginning to advanced genealogy enthusiasts are invited to attend. The Elbert Public Library is in the Elbert School library at 24489 Main Street in Elbert. Call 303-648-3533 for more information.

Schar: ‘I’m so thankful now’ Ouster:

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Schar continues from Page 1

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profit, nonpartisan organization that assists severely injured veterans and their immediate families by raising donations of money, building materials and professional labor to build homes. The homes, like Schar’s, are designed around each veteran’s needs and provide maximum freedom of movement and the ability to live more independently. The barrier-free homes are provided at no cost to the veteran. “I’m just so thankful now to have a safe home for my family,” said Schar. “It’s not the barracks and it’s not a foxhole. It has a roof, and it has plumbing — thank you.” “This is a prime example of what can be

Ouster continues from Page 1

Army Staff Sgt. Brian Schar marvels at a giant pewter key that represents the keys to his new home in Elizabeth’s Wild Point Ranch subdivision. Schar, who lost his legs in an explosion while serving in Iraq, was given the specially adapted home by Homes for Our Troops, a nonprofit that provides homes for severely injured veterans and their families. Photo by Deborah Grigsby

done for those who wear the uniform,” said retired Command Sgt. Major Terrance McWilliams, El Pomar Foundation director

of military and veterans affairs. “So, welcome home, Schar family, welcome home.”

Phibbs will remain as the acting administrator until the board selects a new candidate. A job description will have to be approved by the board, posted and interviews conducted, a process that historically has taken weeks. Elizabeth has had multiple town administrators in recent years. Peterson’s departure comes just more than 12 months after he accepted the position.

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11COLOR

December 20, 2012

Giving Thanks

Join us for

Capt. Patrick Glavey Address: 8550 Ehler Pkwy, Brighton, CO 80601

Elbert County News 11

Homes for Our Troops would like to thank the many companies and individuals who helped make a specially adapted home for

Marine Captain Patrick Glavey Adams County Sheriff’s Office American Flags & Fireworks BAE Systems Ben Lomond Gun Club-Franktown Chapter

ABOUT OUR VETERAN Marine Captain Patrick (PJ) Glavey was one and a half months into his first deployment when he lost both of his legs in an IED blast in Helmand Province, Afghanistan on October 28, 2010. While working on a routine clearing operation with the Explosive Ordinance Disposal Team and members of the 2nd Battalion, 1st Marines, Cpt. Glavey stepped on an IED resulting in the traumatic amputations of his right leg above the knee, his left leg below the knee, and one of his fingers. Medically evacuated by helicopter, Cpt. Glavey was treated at the field hospital at Camp Dwyer before being transported to Landstuhl, Germany. PJ arrived at Bethesda Naval Medical Center within days of his injuries and remained there for nearly eight months enduring more than a dozen surgeries before being transferred to Balboa Naval Medical Center where he remained for one year.

“Thanks to Homes for Our Troops, I will have the opportunity to live alongside my family…assisting them in daily life rather than being a burden. This is such an amazing opportunity given the terrible incident that occurred to me. Thank you so much, I am eternally grateful.” -Marine Capt Patrick Glavey

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12 Elbert County News December 20, 2012

12COLORLIFE

South MetroLIFE Word is, a capella group coming Yale University’s famous a capella group, the Whiffenpoofs, founded in 1909, will perform at 7:30 p.m. Jan. 4 at the Newman Center, 2344 E. Iliff at the University of Denver. The ensemble, consisting of 14 senior men, began as a quartet that gave weekly concerts at Mory’s Temple Bar. Tickets: $20/$15/$10, includes parking. Newman Box Office, 303-871-7720, newmancenterpresents.com. This was a sell-out last season, so advance reservations are probably in order.

Of Gandalf and more

Members of the Douglas/Elbert Horse Council ride in the Christmas Carriage Parade in Parker. Equestrian groups from across the area saddled up and entertained during the annual tradition, which had a theme this year of “Jingle Bells.”

“One Man Lord of the Rings” is back at Lone Tree Arts Center with Canadian comedian Charlie Ross, who packs that story into a 70-minute trip, where you meet 46 characters from Tolkein’s tales. Timely — two weeks after “The Hobbit” opens in area theaters. Performances are scheduled on Dec. 27 and 28 at 8 p.m. at Lone Tree Arts Center, 10075 Commons St., Lone Tree. Tickets start at $36, 720-509-1000 (10-4, Monday-Friday) or LoneTreeArtsCenter.org.

Las Posadas at the Fort

CARRIAGES CARRY ON TRADITION

On Dec. 24, the Tesoro Cultural Center at the Fort Restaurant in Morrison celebrates the traditional Hispanic Las Posadas in the courtyard from 4-5:30 p.m. This traditional Mexican and Southwestern ceremony about Mary and Joseph’s journey to Bethlehem in search of shelter on the night of Jesus’ birth is re-enacted by local children, with seasonal carols led by Dr. Lorenzo Trujillo, Southwest musicians and Rex Rideout. Biscochitos and hot beverages follow. Free. Dress warmly. 303-839-1671, tesoroculturalcenter.org. The Fort is at 19192 Highway 8.

PHOTOS BY COURTNEY KUHLEN The Parker Christmas Carriage Parade drew an estimated 2,000-3,000 people to downtown Parker Dec. 8 for the annual holiday event. Crowds formed along Mainstreet and Victorian Drive to watch equestrian groups, horse-drawn carriages and marching bands. Other activities included a holiday market, ice sculptors, pony rides, pictures with Santa and a petting zoo. Honors were awarded to six of the 49 parade entries. In the Carriage Category the DouglasElbert County Horse Council won Judge’s Favorite, while the El Paso Country Wagon Train won Best Jingle Bell Christmas Theme. In the Minis Category the Elizabeth Mini’s Go Jingle All the Way entry won Judge’s Favorite, and the Suzie Halle and the Jingle Bell Express entry won best theme. In the Riding Category, Happy Haven Farm and Sanctuary won Judge’s Favorite and Billy Bob’s Pony Show (Champion Bank) won best theme.

Help with bird count

Across the U.S. and in Europe, the holiday bird count by citizen scientists is compiled to keep track of various species. In Douglas County, Dec. 29 is the date this year, offered in partnership between the Audubon Society and Roxborough State Park (register by Dec. 26). There are about a dozen walks to join. Chili supper follows. 303-979-3959. Also, on Jan. 1, the Denver Urban count takes place at various location within a 15-mile diameter. Leader is Hugh Kingery, 303-814-2723.

CSO and friends Maxence Pestore and Trevor Mackey lead one of the horses in the Stellar PCRC Pony Club’s Christmas Carriage Parade entry.

“Hansel and Gretel” with the Colorado Symphony Orchestra, new conductor Andrew Litton and the Colorado Children’s Choir will be performed at 7:30 p.m. Dec. 29 and 2:30 p.m. Dec. 30 at Boettcher Concert Hall, Denver Performing Arts Complex. Tickets: coloradosymphony.org.

Extra hours in Pompeii

The Denver Museum of Nature & Science, 2001 Colorado Blvd., will offer extra hours for families to enjoy its “A Day in Pompeii” exhibit: It will stay open until 7 p.m. from Dec. 21 through Jan. 13 (excluding Christmas Eve, Christmas Day, New Year’s Eve and Jan. 10). The IMAX film and gift shop will also be open. Also: The film “Rocky Mountain Express” take you on a trip through the Canadian Rockies and the story of building the transcontinental railroad. A steam engine provides the power. It will play at 1 and 4 p.m. and at 7 p.m. on Fridays and Saturdays. Dmns.org.

Winter solstice celebration Members of Sedalia Spurs 4-H Club ride in the annual Christmas Carriage Parade and loop through downtown Parker. This year, horses and their riders were decked out for the “Jingle Bells” theme. Skylar Graham enjoys her first Christmas Carriage Parade under a fuzzy Santa hat and fluffy coat.

A Welcome Winter Celebration is planned by artist Mary Williams and others at her Winter Solstice Sculpture at Elk Ridge Park in Castle Pines. She says: “We will be serving hot cocoa and cookies from 11:30 to 12:30. Weather permitting.” The public is invited to don warm clothes and join in. Marywilliamsart.com.


13COLOR

December 20, 2012

Elbert County News 13

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14

14 Elbert County News

December 20, 2012

Polar Express pulls in at The Depot Holiday-season event accepting donations for Wounded Warrior USA By Norma Engelberg

nengelberg@ourcoloradonews.com Every Christmas for the past seven years, Gary Coleman has been setting up a models of the Polar Express and other trains for the public to see but his fascination with trains started in childhood. “There used to be model trains under my Christmas tree every year,” he said. “Dad always made sure the train was set up on Christmas Eve. I thought Santa had done it.” Seven years ago, Coleman set up his model trains for public viewing at the Westend Center. “There was plenty of room and there were windows for people to look through but there wasn’t any traffic there after dark,” he said. He found other venues but it wasn’t until three years ago that he started setting up the trains on the first floor in The Depot Restaurant & Lounge in Palmer Lake. When visitors come in to see the trains and make donations, this year for Wounded Warrior USA, they receive a copy of a ticket for the Polar Express that entitles them to a free hot chocolate upstairs in the restaurant. “We really like it when the kids make the actual donation,” Coleman said. “Besides the free hot chocolate, donated by The Depot’s owners, each kid also gets a bell like in the movie.” Most of the trains are actually owned by Coleman’s son Travis, who has Down Syndrome. “His birthday is in November and every year I give him something for the trains so we can play with it later,” Gary Coleman said. “He’s really big on birthdays; he doesn’t even start to talk about Christmas until after his birthday. He helps me set up every year.” Like many real railroads, this year’s model-train exhibit is running late. Instead of opening on Dec. 5 as it usually does, this year it opened on Dec. 12. It closes on Dec. 30. Most of the trains are N-Gauge, which Coleman said is

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Just like the movie, The Polar Express model train set up for the public by father and son Gary and Travis Coleman runs through a winter wonderland at The Depot Restaurant & Lounge in Palmer Lake. Courtesy photo by Jack Anthony becoming a very popular size for model train aficionados. “The Polar Express is O-Scale,” he said. “It’s the Lionel Train size I played with as a kid. I use five and a half sheets of plywood to set it up. I also depict scenes from the movie.” “The Polar Express” is a Caldecott award winning children’s book by Chris Van Allsburg published in 1985. In 2004, the book was made into an animated movie starring the voice of Tom Hanks. The Polar Express steam locomotive in the book and the movie is modeled after a real locomotive that ran on the Pere Marquette Railway system, which operated in the Great Lakes area from 1899-1951. “Lionel started out with the locomotive and a couple of cars,” Coleman said. “Every year they add more cars. I even have the one with Tom Hanks’ voice calling `All aboard!’” The trains will be open for viewing at The Depot, 11 Primrose St. in Palmer Lake, on Wednesday from noon-2 p.m., Thursday, Friday, Saturday from noon-2 p.m. and 5-8 p.m. and Sunday from 11 a.m.-2 p.m. For more information about Wounded Warrior USA, visit www.WoundedWarriorUSA.com.

The Polar Express, set up by model train collector Gary Coleman and his son, Travis, is among trains the pair placed for public viewing at The Depot Restaurant & Lounge. Donations will be accepted for Wounded Warrior USA. Courtesy photo by Gary Coleman

CURTAIN TIME Political portrait

“RFK — A Portrait of Robert F. Kennedy” by Jack Holmes will play Jan. 4-27 at Vintage Theatre, 1468 Dayton St., Aurora. Terry Dodd will direct James O’Hagan Murphy in this portrait of a politician’s life — in particular the darker last four years. Performances: 7:30 p.m. Fridays and Saturdays; 2:30 p.m. Sundays. Tickets: $25 ($20 advance), 303-8567830, vintagetheatre.com.

World premiere

“Newark Violenta” by Jonson Kuhn is a tribute to the Poliziotteschi film genre, Italian stories of crime and the Mafia, and Leo Betti, who tries to lead a non-criminal life. Plays Jan. 4-26 at The Edge Theater, 9797 W. Colfax Ave., Lakewood. Performances: 8 p.m. Fridays, Saturdays; 6 p.m. Sundays. Tickets: $20/$16, 303-232-0363, theedgetheater.com.

New holiday production

The South Metro Denver Small Business Development Center is partially funded by the U.S. Small Business Administration. The Support given by the U.S. Small Business Administration through such funding does not constitute an express or implied endorsement of any of the co-sponsors' or participants' opinions products or services. The Colorado SBDC is a partnership between the Colorado Office of Economic Development and International Trade, the U.S. Small Business Administration, Colorado's institutions of higher education, and local development organizations.

“Home for the Holidays” plays through Dec. 23 at Lone Tree Arts Center, 10075 Commons St., Lone Tree. Performances: 7:30 p.m. Wednesday, Thursday; 8 p.m. Friday, Saturday; 1:30 p.m. Saturday, Sunday. Tickets start at $29, lonetreeartscenter.org,


15

December 20, 2012

Elbert County News 15

Western works assembled for exhibit Adams known for landscapes showing Colorado By Sonya Ellingboe

sellingboe@ourcoloradonews.com “Rocky Mountain Majesty: The Paintings of Charles Partridge Adams” opened Dec. 16 at the Denver Art Museum and runs through IF YOU GO Sept. 8, 2013. It is the first The Denver Art Museum time Adams’ is located on 13th Avenue masterworks between Broadway and have been disBannock in Downtown played togethDenver. The parking garage er at a major is entered from 12th Ave., art museum. just west of Broadway. This will be Admission: $10/$8/$3, free the only venue 5 and younger. Members for this exhibit free. (Additional tickets reof 37 oils and quired for some special exwatercolors hibits, such as “Becoming by the prolific Van Gogh.”) DenverartmuAdams (1858seum.org, 720-865-5000. 1942). He is best known for his images of the Colorado mountains, although he created more than

“ Rocky Mountain Majesty” by Charles Partridge Adams is exhibited at the Denver Art Museum. Courtesy photo a thousand paintings in his lifetime, including images of Yellowstone, the Tetons, the Canadian Rockies, the New Mexican desert and California, where the versatile artist spent his last years painting marine subjects. According to biographical material from the David Cook Gallery in Denver, which carries his work, he came to Denver in 1876 with his mother and two sisters. It was hoped that the Colorado air would cure the sisters’ tuberculosis — a frequent reason for arrival in Colo-

rado at that time, before drugs were available to cure the disease. He found a job with the Chain and Hardy Bookstore and received his only art training from the owner’s wife, artist Helen Chain, who introduced him to area artists, including Alexander Phiminster Proctor. He and Proctor went on a threemonth camping trip, where both developed many sketches, transformed into paintings in the studio — they shared a studio for a short while, before Proctor moved to New York. Adams married in 1890 and opened a studio on Larimer Street in Denver. He did business card watercolors and crayon portraits and was a charter member of the Denver Artists Club. He constructed a home and studio for the couple in Estes Park in 1905, called “The Sketch Box,” where the family spent their summers — and Adams painted many of the Rocky Mountain National Park and Longs Peak scenes. Adams sold paintings in stores in Denver, Colorado Springs, Kansas City, Pueblo and Chicago, and developed a wealthy clientele. His paintings were sold to decorate homes and as gifts. The exhibit is included in general admission. It is installed in the second-level Western Art galleries.

Email your Elbert County story ideas to newsrooms at news@ourcoloradonews.com or call us at 303-566-4100.

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Our streams want to say thanks for giving them a gift this year. Your actions made a difference for keeping our water clean. You chose to properly dispose of household chemicals, pet waste and trash. You used fertilizers appropriately and kept harmful material out of runoff’s path. You volunteered at local events to preserve our waterways. Keep up the good work.

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16 Elbert County News December 20, 2012

16SPORTS

Elbert CountySPORTS

Indians get defensive in rout of Flagler Kiowa puts the clamps on in 53-point win By Daniel Williams

dwilliams@ourcoloradonews.com Defense was the key for Kiowa in last Friday’s 65-12 victory over home-standing Flagler. The Indians held the Panthers to zero points in the third quarter and only five baskets through the course of the game. Kiowa, under coach Walter Sutton, improved to 4-1 with the victory while Flagler, coached by Sherry Peterson, dropped to 0-5. Kiowa led 11-5 after the first quarter, 23-9 at the half and then tacked on 21 points in each of the third and fourth quarters. But observers should also take into account that Flagler only has 15 boys in the high school this year, 12 of whom are on the basketball team. Kiowa was led offensively by Jordan Gabehart who individually outscored Flagler with his 18 point effort. Steve Mizak and Caleb Smith added 11 points each for the Indians. “No points allowed in the third quarter that was a surprise,” said Gabehart, who also put down three, three-point baskets. “But a quarter we can always look back on and somewhere along the line hope to do it again. We got off to a slow start, too, in the first half. But in the second we were able to

put things together. We needed to be patient on offense. “In that first half we kind of fell apart,” Gabehart said. “In the second, we were able to take care of the ball and handle the pressure and run the floor. They were applying pressure on defense. We just need to be a lot more mental out there, as well.” It was also an interesting night for Sutton. “All-in-all it was a fine output from the boys tonight,” Sutton said. “Defensively, we had the upper hand all the way. We’ve got a long wait until our next game as we don’t play until almost the middle of January. I’ve got high hopes the boys can continue to make the progress they have made to this point. “Jordan and Caleb stepped right up,” Sutton said. “Jordan’s the captain and the guys look up to him for his leadership. Caleb just always comes ready to play. Overall, all the boys put out tonight and that’s what I want to see all the time. A scoreless third, that was interesting to say the least.” Flagler’s Wyatt Witt, who led the Panthers with seven points, hit his final basket of the game to open the fourth quarter. But the Panthers wouldn’t add another point until 4:26 was left in the game on a free throw by Lee Banister, his only point of the game. Smith was also surprised by the game’s outcome. “We had our mistakes tonight, but this time it didn’t hurt us,” Smith said. “We want

‘We had our mistakes tonight, but this time it didn’t hurt us. We want to get to the point where we are all handling the ball well with few mistakes..’ Caleb Smith to get to the point where we are all handling the ball well with few mistakes. It’s hard to believe that third quarter, but I guess one can say we could not have been better defensively. “I think we’ve had some standout practice sessions and that’s helped a lot,” continued Smith. “Our key is playing good defense and working hard and fly up the court on offense.” Peterson was pleased the way in which Flagler got started in the first quarter. With :21-seconds left in the opening eight minutes, the Panthers trailed 8-5. But one can say from that point, disaster set in. “I was pretty happy with our first half, but we just couldn’t stay up with them,” Peterson said. “The boys attacked as I had hoped they would, but we certainly could have used a few more hit shots. We stayed with them in the first quarter, we just couldn’t convert when we needed to later on. “It’s a tough season, but the boys are giving it everything they have and I’m happy

with their efforts,” Peterson said. “We have an up and coming middle school group so our future does look a lot brighter. We’re lacking the boys in our school, but the ones we have are certainly not short of efforts.” KIOWA 65, FLAGLER 12 Kiowa 11 12 21 21 -- 65 Flagler 5 4 0 3 -- 12 Kiowa -- Steven Mizak 5 1-1 11, Isaac Janes 2 0-0 4, Drew Pruitt 1 1-2 3, Caleb Smith 5 1-2 11, Jordan Gabehart 7 1-4 18, Jacob Sewald 4 0-1 8, Joe Jantz 1 0-0 2, Spencer Pierson 1 4-4 6, Marshall Deering 1 0-0 2, Ben Appleman 0 0-0 0. Totals: 27 8-14 65. Three-point baskets: Gabehart (3). Fouls: 18. Fouled out: None. Flagler -- Tristen Cesko 1 1-2 3, Nathan Witt 0 1-5 1, Marcus Cross 0 0-4 0, Ty Conrad 0 0-2 0, Wyatt Witt 3 1-5 7, Lee Banister 0 1-2 1, Michael Cross 0 0-0 0, Kevin Eberle 0 0-0 0. Totals: 4 4-18 12. Fouls: 15, Fouled out: None.

Flagler kicks visiting Kiowa girls All-Conference By Scott Stocker

sports@ourcoloradonews.com It was not the best of nights for the Kiowa girls basketball team last Friday. Kiowa dropped to 1-4 on the season as the Indians of coach Mark Clemmons were soundly beaten by Flagler, 51-21. And, until the fourth quarter the Indians had only scored three baskets and found themselves trailing 33-8. But in the fourth quarter they played nearly equal to the home standing Panthers, being outscored 18-13. “We have to work on turnovers and boxing out,” Clemmons said. “We need the break now to get things back together.” And, there is a lot to get back together. Kiowa fell behind 5-0 in the first minute of the game and, from that point, never recovered. The Indians only scored three points in the quarter on a basket by Ashley Sandoval and free throw by Sam Trehal. Trehal would finish the game as the leading scorer for the Indians with six points, followed by Sandoval with five. Yet it wasn’t a night in which Kiowa couldn’t get the ball up the court against a swarming Flagler full court press. It was once they tried to go inside the Indians ran into trouble. “We were able to beat their press, but then we got caught in our own mistakes,” Clemmons said. “We would get off a shot, but our shot selection was not that good. They have a fine team, we just couldn’t match up. We have to work on turnovers and boxing out. We gave them a lot of second shots and that killed us.”

There was little that either Sandoval or Trehal could say in a positive manner. “We really needed to execute,” Sandoval said. “They boxed out well and that killed us. We just need to try harder in practice and then be patient. It seemed as if we didn’t show up to play tonight. But they are a pretty good team and they put their game together.” Trehal agreed. “We were not dishing off as we should have and we got out rebounded big time,” Trehal said. “It was helter-skelter and we just couldn’t seem to get under control. Our press didn’t work and they played to our mistakes.” And mistakes were plenty. In the first half along Kiowa committed 17 turnovers and would finish the game with a resounding 29. “We didn’t run the offense in a through manner and that killed us,” Zielinski said. “We seemed lazy and not reliable. They got off a lot of put backs and we were just not playing very well.” On the other hand, Flagler was on top of its game. “We just got out in front and came through when we needed to,” said Flagler’s Kayleigh Santala, who scored a game high 24 points for the Panthers. “Our defense was pretty good and I’m proud of the way we were able to step up. “The confidence got us going and we were able to move the ball and I thought we fought exceptionally well,” Santala said. “They did a good job getting the ball up the court, but we were able to stop them when we needed to.” Guard Katie Oestman was more than

pleased with the flow of the game. “Yes. I thought we were really flowing at times and we were able to get past their press and make ours work,” Oestman said. “We got the rebounds and that worked for a lot of our second shots. Defensively, we were able to trap and defend well. The key is staying focused and get up and down the court. I just want to make sure I’m in the right place to help were needed.” And it was a night that put a smile on the face of Flagler coach Gary Elrick. “Our defense was pretty scrappy and the girls played hard,” Elrickk said. “We must have gotten off 80 shots - wish more would have gone in - but we had the opportunities to score more. The girls were quick and were moving all the time. We just couldn’t seem to hit those first shots, but the second ones count, that’s for sure.” FLAGER 51, KIOWA 21 Kiowa 3 2 3 13 -- 21 Flagler 13 12 8 18 -- 51 Kiowa -- Ashely Sandoval 2 1-3 5, Sam Trehal 3 0-4 6, Jessica Ramierez 0 1-2 1, Cheyenne McKenzie 0 0-0 0, Rebecca Sewald 0 0-0 0, Ronnie Wallden 0 0-0 0, Courtney Crocker 2 0-1 4, Madison Zielinski 0 1-5 1, Julie Smith 0 1-2 1, Tabitha Miner 0 2-2 2, Krista Wood 0 1-2 1. Totals: 7 7-21 21. Total fouls: 20, Fouled out: None. Flagler -- Kayleigh Santala 10 4-5 24, Katie Oestman 1 2-9 4, Morgan Oestman 0 2-2 2, Christina Stratton 1 2-6 4. Darrien Allison 2 0-2 4, Melissa Poet 2 0-0 4, Carissa Roan 1 0-0 2, Jade Ostman 1 0-0 2, Elisha Rodwell 1 0-0 2, Olivia Charles 1 0-0 2, Elizabeth Grimes 0 1-2 1. Totals: 20 11-26 51. Fouls: 20. Fouled out: None.

football selections Staff report

sports@ourcoloradonews.com Black Forest League (8-Man) First team Ricky Baumert, Simla; Damian Bell, Simla; Roger Carlson, Elbert; Sean Engstrom, MiamiYoder; Jordan Gabehardt, Kiowa; Kaleb Ham, Pikes Peak Christian; Nathan Harris, Pikes Peak Christian; Dakota Hedger, Elbert; Tyler Hendricks, Genoa-Hugo; Trey James, Genoa-Hugo; Isaac Janes, Kiowa; Joe Jantz, Kiowa; James McBride, Miami-Yoder; Blake Nicholas, Elbert; Cody Norris, Simla; Noah Schafer, Elbert; Lonnie Trehal, Kiowa; Al Zelney, Elbert. Honorable mention Kurt Baumann, Miami-Yoder; Zach Bray, Genoa-Hugo; Jason George, Simla; Nathan Harmon, Pikes Peak Christian; Bryce Hutchins, Elbert; Josh Parsons, Pikes Peak Christian; Jacob Pieper, Genoa-Hugo; Cody Pranger, Elbert; Kade Pyatt, Simla; Jack Thomas, Kiowa; Tyler Veros, Miami-Yoder; Connor Wills, Kiowa.

HAVE A STORY IDEA? Email your ideas to Sports Editor John Rosa at sports@ourcoloradonews.com or call him at 303-279-5541 ext. 243.

THE IRV & JOE SHOW M–F 1p–3p

LISTEN ONLINE www.milehighsports.com

Irv Brown and Joe Williams are the longest-running sports talk tandem in the history of Denver radio. For more than 28 years, Irv Brown and Joe Williams have teamed to bring sports talk to fans in Denver. That tradition continues on Mile High Sports Radio.


Elbert County News 17

ourcolorado

CLASSIFIEDS Elizabeth in the Pines Missing female black lab REWARD 720-301-0885

Commercial Property/ Rent

Office Warehouse

Real Estate

For Lease in Elizabeth 2,907 Sq.Ft. Please Recycle this Door Publication Large O/H when Finished 3 Phase Electric Cheap!

Call 303-688-2497

Concrete/Paving

Service Directory

Lost and Found

Rentals

Pets

TO ADVERTISE, CALL 303-566-4100

Landscaping/Nurseries MOUNTAIN HIGH LANDSCAPE, IRRIGATION, AND LAWNCARE

Family Owned and Operated We are a full service design, installation and maintenance company.

CALL DON

AT

303-915-6973

SNOW REMOVAL - FALL CLEAN UP - SPRINKLER DESIGN, INSTALLATION AND REPAIRS - AERATION/POWER RAKE - LAWN CARE - TREE AND SHRUB CARE - WEED CONTROL

Tile

Castle Rock

Greenwood Village

Highlands Ranch

Open hearts. Open minds. Open doors.

Open and Welcoming

Sunday Worship 8:00 am Chapel Service 9:00 & 10:30 am

Little Blessings Day Care www.littleblessingspdo.com

CENTER FOR SPIRITUAL LIVING Affiliated with United Church of Religious Science

Sunday Services 10 a.m.

Castle Rock Recreation Center 2301 Woodlands Blvd, Castle Rock www.OurCenterforSpiritualLiving.org 720-851-0265

Sunday School 9:00 & 10:30 am

Sunday Worship 8:30 am |10:45 am Adult and youth education 9:40 am

Sunday Worship 10:30 4825 North Crowfoot Valley Rd. Castle Rock • canyonscc.org 303-663-5751 CHRISTMAS AT CANYON’S December 9th 6:30pm Christmas Eve Service 6:30pm

  

“The earth is but one country, and mankind its citizens.”

 children’s classes, devotions and study Weekly ColoradoBahais.org • 303 947 7540

Franktown

Trinity Lutheran Church & School

303-794-2683 Preschool: 303-794-0510 9203 S. University Blvd. Highlands Ranch, 80126

H olidays to you and yours from everyone at

Colorado Community Media

Highlands Ranch

Worship Services Sundays at 9:00am

303-791-3315

pastor@awlc.org www.awlc.org

Littleton

First Presbyterian Church of Littleton

Sunday Worship: 10:45AM & 6PM Bible Study: 9:30AM Children, Young People & Adults 4391 E Mainstreet, Parker, Colorado 80134 Church Office – (303) 841-3836

www.parkerbiblechurch.org

You are invited to worship with us:

8:30 a.m. 11:00 a.m.

1609 W. Littleton Blvd. (303) 798-1389 • www.fpcl.org

303-798-8485

Horizon Community Church

A Christian Reformed Ministry

Sunday Worship 10am 2121 E. Dad Clark Drive Highlands Ranch, 80126

Trinity Lutheran School & ELC (Ages 3-5, Grades K-8)

www.horizoncommunity.org

303-791-2143

www.SpiritofHopeLCMC.org

at the Parker Mainstreet Center

Visit our website for details of classes & upcoming events.

303.805.9890

www.P a r k er C C R S.org P.O. Box 2945—Parker CO 80134-2945

Looking  For  a  N  ew  Beginning  ?    

 

Join  Us   A  Friendly   Place  to   Worship  

New Beginning Community Church

10550  S.  Progress  Way  &  Longs  Way   Parker,  CO  80134    

Sunday  School  for  All  Ages     Coffee  and  Fellowship     Praise  and  Worship  Service     Wed  Evening  Youth  Fellowship  

Lone Tree

5755 Valley Hi Drive Parker, CO 303-941-0668

Sunday services held in the historic Ruth Memorial Chapel

Sundays at 9:00 & 10:45 am Grace is on the NE Corner of Santa Fe Dr. & Highlands Ranch Pkwy. (Across from Murdochs)

Fellowship & Worship: 9:00 am Sunday School: 10:45 am

Parker

...19650 E. Mainstreet, Parker 80138

Sunday

Pastor David Fisher

Community Church of Religious Science

& Children’s Church 10:00 a.m.

Sunday Worship 8:00 & 10:45 a.m.

 303-841-4660 www.tlcas.org 

(Next to RTD lot @470 & University)

Parker

Where people are excited about God’s Word.

Sunday Service

www.gracecolorado.com

9300 E. Belleview Ave. Greenwood Village, CO 80111 303.770.9300

8391 S. Burnley Ct., Highlands Ranch

Parker

New Thought...Ancient Wisdom

Alongside One Another On Life’s Journey

The Bahá’í Faith

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www.st-andrew-umc.com

GRACE PRESBYTERIAN

An Evangelical Presbyterian Church

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H appy

Your Community Connector to Boundless Rewards

Abiding Word Lutheran Church

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.com

For Local News Anytime of the Day Visit OurColoradoNews.com



17

December 20, 2012

   9:00AM   10:00AM   10:30AM      7:00PM  

Joy LUTHERAN CHURCH, ELCA

SERVICES:

SATURDAY 5:30pm

SUNDAY 8:00 & 10:3Oam

Parker evangelical Presbyterian church Connect – Grow – Serve – Love

New Sunday Worship Services

8:45 am & 10:30 am 9030 MILLER ROAD PARKER, CO 80138 3038412125 www.pepc.org Orthodox Mission Church 11550 Club Dr Parker Co Divine Liturgy December 9, 9:30am Luncheon after services More info call: Don: 720-851-5212 Mark: 720-870-5210

EDUCATION Sunday 9:15am

Joyful Mission Preschool 303-841-3770 7051 East Parker Hills Ct. • Parker, CO 303-841-3739 www.joylutheran-parker.org

Affordable Advertising Options Call Today 303-566-4091


18COLOR

18 Elbert County News

Giving Thanks

Join us for

SSG Brian Schar Address: Lot 11 Wild Pointe Ranch Subdivision., Elizabeth, CO 80107 ABOUT OUR VETERAN Army Staff Sergeant Brian Schar was on his third deployment when he lost both of his legs above the knees and suffered nerve damage to his left arm when an Explosively Formed Penetrator was fired at his vehicle in Baghdad, Iraq on September 19, 2007. While on a mission and on route to another base, the platoon received word about a possible IED in the road. As his vehicle slowed, SSG Schar looked out the window and saw an EFP on the side of the bridge they were crossing…it was at that moment the Projectile was detonated, blasting into the side of the vehicle. Life saving measure by his platoon enabled SSG Schar and two other injured soldiers to be MEDEVACed to the Green Zone where they were stabilized for the trip to Landstuhl, Germany. Having no recollection of his journey back to the States, SSG Schar awoke to find himself at Walter Reed where he spent more than two and a half years enduring surgeries, and receiving treatments and therapies. SSG Schar would like to thank everyone who has supported him through his transition back to civilian life. Brian is grateful that his homecoming was not the same one received by his father and the other Viet Nam Veterans after they sacrificed so much so that others could live a life of freedom and independence. He is especially grateful to those who will help make his new barrier-free home become a reality.

December 20, 2012

Homes for Our Troops would like to thank the many companies and individuals who helped make a specially adapted home for

Army Staff Sergeant Brian Schar Aggregate Industries

Lee’s Painting

Alpine Lumber

Lighthouse Builders Inc.

American Flags & Fireworks

Lone Tree Sam’s Club

Amy Wiles

Mastic Home Exteriors

Anchor Engineering

Medved Castle Rock

BAE Systems

Mr. Appliance

BC Building Services.

Patriot Guard Riders

Birdies for the Brave

Peace in Christ Elm

BMC Building Materials

Peter Svedin of Lifetime Windows,

Buckley AFB

KMD Inc.

Butler Rents

Ramirez Concrete.

Chances Are We Can Do It Inc.

Regis Jesuit High School

Cherry Creek Valley Rotary Club

Ricardo Sandoval

Costco

Rio Grande Building

Country Life Landscaping

Materials

DAR

Santana Roofing

Domestic Insulation

Santiago’s

Douglas County Rotarians

Scott Angell Excavation

Elbert County Building Dept. Ed

and Septic

Watkins

Sherwin Williams Paint

Elbert County Sheriff Dept

South Metro Fire Dept

Elizabeth Fire Dept.

Starbucks coffee

Elizabeth Fire Station

Stephen Wheat

Elizabeth Police

Sterling

Elizabeth Presbyterian

Subway

Energy Logic

Sun Country Family

Fromaggi’s Pizza

Community Education

Graybox studios

The Crash Church Group

Hampton Inn Castle Rock

The Floor Club

Harvey Building Products

The Home Depot

Home Depot

Foundation

Image Audiovisuals, Inc.

The Sprucery Landscape

Johns Mansville Insulation

Nursery

Kohler

Veterans United

L&D Electric

VOLVO RENTS

L3

Voth Plumbing

Lake Construction

O 100 M RE...

THANK YOU TO ALL OF OUR VOLUNTEERS!

ww

w. h o

mesf

0 0m or o u r t r o op s . o r g / 1

or

e

www.homesforourtroops.org


December 20, 2012 Public Notice

DISTRICT COURT, WATER DIVISION 1, COLORADO NOVEMBER 2012 WATER RESUME PUBLICATION Public Notice DISTRICT COURT, WATER DIVISION 1, COLORADO NOVEMBER 2012 WATER RESUME PUBLICATION TO: ALL PERSONS INTERESTED IN WATER APPLICATIONS IN WATER DIV. 1

Name Changes PUBLIC NOTICE Public Notice of Petition for Change of Name Public notice is given on November 16, 2012 that a Petition for a Change of Name of an adult has been filed with the Elbert County Court. The Petition requests that the name of L i n d a Bo y l e b e c h a n g e d to L i n d a Chynoweth. Case No.: 2012 C 49 Cheryl A. Layne Clerk of Court By: Jafeen Jenkins Deputy Clerk Legal Notice No: 927828 First Publication: December 6, 2012 Last Publication: December 20, 2012 Publisher: Elbert County News

Misc. Private Legals Public Notice DISTRICT COURT, WATER DIVISION 1, COLORADO NOVEMBER 2012 WATER RESUME PUBLICATION TO: ALL PERSONS INTERESTED IN WATER APPLICATIONS IN WATER DIV. 1 Pursuant to C.R.S. 37-92-302, you are notified that the following is a resume of all water right applications and certain amendments filed in the Office of the Water Clerk during the month of NOVEMBER 2012 for each County affected. 12CW239, Travis and Roberta Inga, Terence and Laurie Walker, Earl and Sue Ernst, Joyce Hexum, and Lee and Linda Pizzuto c/o 35746 Whispering Drive, Elizabeth, Colorado 80107 (James J. Petrock, Petrock & Fendel, 700 17th Street, #1800, Denver, CO 80202), AMENDED APPLICATION FOR NONTRIBUTARY DENVER, ARAPAHOE, AND LARAMIEFOX HILLS AQUIFERS, ELBERT COUNTY. 12.5 acres being Lots 35, 36, 43, 44, and 46 Filing 1, Saddlewood Subdivision, mostly located in the NW1/4 of Section 5, T8S, R64W of the 6th P.M., Elbert County, as shown on Attachment B. The location of the lots satisfy the requirements of Local Rule 3(b)(1) as shown on Attachment C. Applicants will own a prorata interest in the total amount of groundwater requested herein underlying their respective lots. Estimated Amounts: Denver: 5.7 acre-feet; Arapahoe: 4.8 acrefeet; Laramie-Fox Hills: 3.8 acre-feet. Use: domestic, commercial, irrigation, stockwatering, fire protection, and augmentation purposes, both on and off the Subject Property. Further, Applicant prays that this Court grant the amended application and for such other relief as seems proper in the premises. (7 pages). THE WATER RIGHTS CLAIMED BY THESE APPLICATIONS MAY AFFECT IN PRIORITY ANY WATER RIGHTS CLAIMED OR HERETOFORE ADJUDICATED WITHIN THIS DIVISION AND OWNERS OF AFFECTED RIGHTS MUST APPEAR TO OBJECT WITHIN THE TIME PROVIDED BY STATUTE OR BE FOREVER BARRED. YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that any party who wishes to oppose an application, or an amended application, may file with the Water Clerk, P. O. Box 2038, Greeley, CO 80632, a verified Statement of Opposition, setting forth facts as to why the application should not be granted, or why it should be granted only in part or on certain conditions. Such Statement of Opposition must be filed by the last day of JANUARY 2013 (forms available on www.courts.state.co.us or in the Clerk’s office), and must be filed as an Original and include $130.00 filing fee. A copy of each Statement of Opposition must also be served upon the Applicant or Applicant’s Attorney and an affidavit or certificate of such service of mailing shall be filed with the Water Clerk. Legal Notice No.: 927850 First Publication: December 20, 2012 Last Publication: December 20, 2012 Publisher: The Elbert County News Public Notice DISTRICT COURT, WATER DIVISION 1, COLORADO NOVEMBER 2012 WATER RESUME PUBLICATION TO: ALL PERSONS INTERESTED IN WATER APPLICATIONS IN WATER DIV. 1 Pursuant to C.R.S. 37-92-302, you are notified that the following is a resume of all water right applications and certain amendments filed in the Office of the Water Clerk during the month of NOVEMBER 2012 for each County affected. 12CW252, Seth and Tammi Biggi, 1975 County Road 150, Elizabeth, CO 80107 (Bradford R. Benning, Petrock & Fendel, 700 17th Street, #1800, Denver, CO 80202), APPLICATION FOR UNDERPublic Notice GROUND WATER RIGHTS FROM NONTRIBUTARY AND NOT NONTRIBUTARY SOURCES Public Auction SaleAND FOR APPROVAL OF PLAN FOR AUGMENTATION, IN THE NONTRIBUTARY DAWSON, Under the authority inLOWER Internal Revenue DENVER, ARAPAHOE, AND LARAMIECode sectionAND 6331,THE the property described FOX HILLS NOT NONTRIBUbelow beenDAWSON seized forAQUIFERS, nonpaymentELof TARY has UPPER internal revenue taxes due from BERT COUNTY. Subject Property: 5 acres being Lot 16, Ponderosa Park Estates, Unit in the Lawrence M 9, Birkgenerally & Jean A.located Birk SW1/4SW1/4 of Section 25, T7S, R65W of the 6th P.M., Elbert County, as shown TheAttachment property will be at public auction on A sold (Subject Property). as provided by Internal Revenue Source of Water Rights: UpperCode Dawson section is 6335 related regulations. aquifer not and nontributary as described in Sections 37-90-103(10.7), C.R.S., Lower Dawson, Denver, Arapahoe and LaramieDate of Sale: Fox Hills aquifers are nontributary as described in Section 37-90-103(10.5), C.R.S. Thursday, December 2012Dawson: 1.5 Estimated Amounts: 27, Upper Time of Sale: 11am: Registration 10:30am acre-feet, Lower Dawson: 0.6 acre-feet, Place of 1.6 Sale: 2864 South Circle Drive, Denver: acre-feet, Arapahoe: 1.9 acrefeet, Laramie-Fox Hills: 1.4 acre-feet. ProIRS office; Colorado Springs, CO posed Use: Domestic, commercial, irrigation, livestock watering, fire protection, Title Offered: Only the right, title, and interand augmentation purposes, including est of Lawrence Birk Jean A. BirkPropin storage, both on M and off&the Subject and the property for sale. erty.toDescription of will planbeforoffered augmentation: If requested, the Internal Revenue Service Groundwater to be augmented: 1 acrefoot per year of the available Upper Dawson aquifer groundwater as requested herein. Water rights for augmentation:

Government Legals

CV also has the ability to store water in Barr Lake on a “space available” basis subject to and in compliance with its agreements with FRICO, and any subsequent agreements they may enter. 3.1.1. Location of Dam. At a point at the center of Section 23, Township 1 South, Range 66 West of the 6th P.M., Adams County, Colorado. 3.1.2. Surface Area. 1,900 acres at high water line. 3.1.3. Storage Height. 34 feet. 3.1.4. Capacity. 30,057 acre-feet, dead storage is less than 300 acre-feet. 3.2. Barr Lake Toe Drains. FRICO constructed a toe drain system into the Barr Lake dam to drain the seepage in and through the dam, and an interceptor ditch to collect underflow surfacing from beneath the structure. The water in the toe drain system is measured by a gage on the collection trench fed by the toe drain and then released into the Beebe Canal. Flows in the interceptor ditch are measured at the head of the Beebe Seep Canal. 4. Sources of ECCV’s Fully Consumable Water Stored in Barr Lake. 4.1. The 70 Ranch Water Rights decreed in Case Nos. 02CW404 and 03CW442; 4.2. ECCV’s FRICO-Barr and Burlington-Barr shares decreed in Case No. 02CW403; 4.3. FRICO’s MultiPurpose Water Right decreed in Case No. 02CW403 (limited to the extent of ECCV’s pro rata ownership of FRICO shares, or as otherwise allocated by and between FRICO shareholders); 4.4. The fully consumable portion of all water rights claimed in ECCV’s pending applications in Case Nos. 06CW40, 11CW151/ 05CW58, 11CW280, 11CW285, and 12CW73; and 4.5. The fully consumable portion of ECCV’s currently owned but unchanged water sources and future acquired water sources, which include but may not be limited to shares in the New Cache la Poudre Irrigating Company, the Cache la Poudre Reservoir Company, and the Ogilvy Irrigation and Land Company. Once the currently owned and future acquired water sources are changed ECCV will follow the procedures in paragraph 19 of the decree in Case No. 02CW403 and paragraphs 25 and 58.5 of the decree entered in Case Nos. 02CW404 and 03CW442 to add those rights as additional sources of replacement supply. 5. Determination of the Claimed Seepage from Barr Lake. 5.1. Toe Drain and Interceptor Ditch Seepage. ECCV seeks a determination of its pro rata portion of seepage attributable to ECCV’s fully consumable water stored in Barr Lake that is discharged to the Beebe Canal through the Barr Lake toe drains and interceptor ditch. The precise amount of this seepage varies based upon the total amount of water in Barr Lake, the amount in ECCV’s Barr Lake accounts, and other variables such as evaporation and precipitation. Accordingly, as part of determining ECCV’s pro rata seepage, ECCV will seek to adjudicate a methodology that will account for the variables and enable the calculation of ECCV’s pro rata seepage. 5.2. Ground Water Seepage. ECCV seeks a determination of the amount of ground water seepage into the Beebe Draw aquifer that is attributable to ECCV’s fully consumable water stored in Barr Lake and the adjudication of a methodology to evaluate the calculation of such water. ECCV is not claiming seepage on water stored in Barr Lake that is allocated for ditch loss replacement or historic return flow obligations. ECCV is in the process of gathering data from monitoring wells in and around Barr Lake. The data from the monitoring wells will be used to determine the amount of underground seepage from Barr Lake. 6. Determination of the Use of Recharge Accretions in the Beebe Draw to Replace Historical Return Flow Obligations. ECCV seeks a determination that it can replace the historical return flow obligations for its changed Burlington-Barr and FRICO-Barr shares with recharge accretions from its reusable supplies in the Beebe Draw aquifer. ECCV’s water rights, as described in paragraph 4, have been and/or will be decreed for use as a replacement source of supply, which includes the replacement of historical return flow obligations. ECCV will use the URFs decreed in Case Nos. 02CW404 and 03CW442 to determine the timing and amount of the recharge accretions in the Beebe Draw in order to replace the historical return flows from the Burlington-Barr and FRICO-Barr shares in timing, location, and amount. 7. Owners of Land upon which Structures are Located. The Farmers Reservoir and Irrigation Company (“FRICO”), 80 South 27th Avenue, Brighton, Colorado 80601, is the fee owner of Barr Lake and the Burlington Ditch. The United Diversion Facility No. 3 and the land at the point of diversion for United Reservoir No. 3 are owned by United Water and Sanitation District (“United”), 8301 East Prentice Avenue #100, Greenwood Village, Colorado 80111. (6 pages – application; 1 page – exhibit)

19COLOR

Pursuant to C.R.S. 37-92-302, you are notified that the following is a resume of all water right applications and certain amendments filed in the Office of the Water Clerk during the month of NOVEMBER 2012 for each County affected.

Misc. Private Legals

12CW252, Seth and Tammi Biggi, 1975 County Road 150, Elizabeth, CO 80107 (Bradford R. Benning, Petrock & Fendel, 700 17th Street, #1800, Denver, CO 80202), APPLICATION FOR UNDERGROUND WATER RIGHTS FROM NONTRIBUTARY AND NOT NONTRIBUTARY SOURCES AND FOR APPROVAL OF PLAN FOR AUGMENTATION, IN THE NONTRIBUTARY LOWER DAWSON, DENVER, ARAPAHOE, AND LARAMIEFOX HILLS AND THE NOT NONTRIBUTARY UPPER DAWSON AQUIFERS, ELBERT COUNTY. Subject Property: 5 acres being Lot 16, Ponderosa Park Estates, Unit 9, generally located in the SW1/4SW1/4 of Section 25, T7S, R65W of the 6th P.M., Elbert County, as shown on Attachment A (Subject Property). Source of Water Rights: Upper Dawson aquifer is not nontributary as described in Sections 37-90-103(10.7), C.R.S., Lower Dawson, Denver, Arapahoe and LaramieFox Hills aquifers are nontributary as described in Section 37-90-103(10.5), C.R.S. Estimated Amounts: Upper Dawson: 1.5 acre-feet, Lower Dawson: 0.6 acre-feet, Denver: 1.6 acre-feet, Arapahoe: 1.9 acrefeet, Laramie-Fox Hills: 1.4 acre-feet. Proposed Use: Domestic, commercial, irrigation, livestock watering, fire protection, and augmentation purposes, including storage, both on and off the Subject Property. Description of plan for augmentation: Groundwater to be augmented: 1 acrefoot per year of the available Upper Dawson aquifer groundwater as requested herein. Water rights for augmentation: Return flows from the use of not nontributary and nontributary groundwater and direct discharge of nontributary ground water. Statement of plan for augmentation: The Upper Dawson aquifer water will be used for in-house use (0.4 acre-feet), irrigation of lawn, garden, and trees (0.55 acre -feet), and stockwatering (0.05 acre-feet) through an existing Upper Dawson aquifer well (Well Permit No. 184199). Sewage treatment for in-house use will be provided by a non-evaporative septic system and return flow from in-house and irrigation use will be approximately 90% and 10% of that use, respectively. During pumping Applicants will replace actual depletions to the affected stream system pursuant to Section 37-90-137(9)(c.5), C.R.S. Depletions may occur to the Running Creek stream system. Return flows accrue to the South Platte River stream systems, and those return flows are sufficient to replace actual depletions while the subject groundwater is being pumped. Applicants will reserve an equal amount of nontributary groundwater underlying the Subject Property to meet post pumping augmentation requirements. Further, Applicant prays that this Court grant the application and for such other relief as seems proper in the premises. (4 pages). THE WATER RIGHTS CLAIMED BY THESE APPLICATIONS MAY AFFECT IN PRIORITY ANY WATER RIGHTS CLAIMED OR HERETOFORE ADJUDICATED WITHIN THIS DIVISION AND OWNERS OF AFFECTED RIGHTS MUST APPEAR TO OBJECT WITHIN THE TIME PROVIDED BY STATUTE OR BE FOREVER BARRED. YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that any party who wishes to oppose an application, or an amended application, may file with the Water Clerk, P. O. Box 2038, Greeley, CO 80632, a verified Statement of Opposition, setting forth facts as to why the application should not be granted, or why it should be granted only in part or on certain conditions. Such Statement of Opposition must be filed by the last day of JANUARY 2013 (forms available on www.courts.state.co.us or in the Clerk’s office), and must be filed as an Original and include $130.00 filing fee. A copy of each Statement of Opposition must also be served upon the Applicant or Applicant’s Attorney and an affidavit or certificate of such service of mailing shall be filed with the Water Clerk. Legal Notice No.: 927836 First Publication: December 20, 2012 Last Publication: December 20, 2012 Publisher: The Elbert County News Public Notice DISTRICT COURT, WATER DIVISION 1, COLORADO NOVEMBER 2012 WATER RESUME PUBLICATION TO: ALL PERSONS INTERESTED IN WATER APPLICATIONS IN WATER DIV. 1 Pursuant to C.R.S. 37-92-302, you are notified that the following is a resume of all water right applications and certain amendments filed in the Office of the Water Clerk during the month of NOVEMBER 2012 for each County affected. 12CW257 East Cherry Creek Valley Water and Sanitation District, acting by and through the East Cherry Creek Valley Water and Sanitation District Water Activity Enterprise, Inc. (“ECCV”), 6201 S. Gun Club Road, Aurora, CO 80016 (c/o William B. Tourtillott, Esq., Brian M. Nazarenus, Esq., Sheela S. Stack, Esq., Susan M. Ryan, Esq., RYLEY CARLOCK & APPLEWHITE, 1700 Lincoln Street, Suite 3500, Denver, Colorado 80203, will furnish information about Attorneys possible for Telephone: 303-863-7500, encumbrances, which may beDETERMINuseful in ECCV), APPLICATION FOR ATION OF WATER IN ADAMS, determining the valueRIGHTS, of the interest being ARAPAHOE, DENVER, DOUGLAS, sold. (See “Nature of Title” for further ELBERT, JEFFERSON, MORGAN, AND details.) WELD COUNTIES, 2. Introduction. ECCV has developed an integrated system Description of Property: Parcel #collection, for the diversion, accretion, R0040908/ Alt apn 10810020020. “That storage, transmission, and treatment of its water rights. system, part of the ElmerThe Lode,integrated Mineral Survey which is also referred to as the Water No. 10810, Bordeaux Lode, Mineral Supply No. Project or the Northern Project, is Survey 10810, Ulva Lode, Mineral designed to provide ECCV with a longSurvey No. 10810 and Deed Rabbit Lode, term, sustainable municipal water supply Mineral Survey area No. 10810. lying South of for its service located in Arapahoe Hosea Mineral Survey No. as County,P,Colorado. A map of 10045, ECCV’sallservice area attached as patents Exhibit thereof, 1. Acdefined andislimited by the cording to ECCV’s Water Conservation Teller County, Colorado. Together with and Plan, at those full build out whichasisdescribed expectedinto sharing instruments occur in twenty years, ECCV will require deed recorded 12,000 at Reception No. 494829 approximately to 14,000 acre-feet and 494828. of water. The Water Court has previously decreed various components of the Water Supply Project. In Case No. 02CW403, Property may be Inspected at: From the Water Cripple Court approved a plan for augdowntown Creek take County mentation (“ECCV Augmentation Road 1 west appox 1 mile then turn Plan”) right for ECCV’s Upper Beebe Draw wellfield on private rd. Field”), as described in para(“ECCV Well graph 15.1 of that decree. The ECCV Payment Terms:Plan Deferred payment folAugmentation allowed for theasaddition of wells to the augmentation plan and for the use of additional sources of substitute supply to replace the out-of-priority

Government Legals

TO: ALL PERSONS INTERESTED IN WATER APPLICATIONS IN WATER DIV. 1 Pursuant to C.R.S. 37-92-302, you are notified that the following is a resume of all water right applications and certain amendments filed in the Office of the Water Clerk during the month of NOVEMBER 2012 for each County affected.

Misc. Private Legals

12CW257 East Cherry Creek Valley Water and Sanitation District, acting by and through the East Cherry Creek Valley Water and Sanitation District Water Activity Enterprise, Inc. (“ECCV”), 6201 S. Gun Club Road, Aurora, CO 80016 (c/o William B. Tourtillott, Esq., Brian M. Nazarenus, Esq., Sheela S. Stack, Esq., Susan M. Ryan, Esq., RYLEY CARLOCK & APPLEWHITE, 1700 Lincoln Street, Suite 3500, Denver, Colorado 80203, Telephone: 303-863-7500, Attorneys for ECCV), APPLICATION FOR DETERMINATION OF WATER RIGHTS, IN ADAMS, ARAPAHOE, DENVER, DOUGLAS, ELBERT, JEFFERSON, MORGAN, AND WELD COUNTIES, 2. Introduction. ECCV has developed an integrated system for the diversion, accretion, collection, storage, transmission, and treatment of its water rights. The integrated system, which is also referred to as the Water Supply Project or the Northern Project, is designed to provide ECCV with a longterm, sustainable municipal water supply for its service area located in Arapahoe County, Colorado. A map of ECCV’s service area is attached as Exhibit 1. According to ECCV’s Water Conservation Plan, at full build out which is expected to occur in twenty years, ECCV will require approximately 12,000 to 14,000 acre-feet of water. The Water Court has previously decreed various components of the Water Supply Project. In Case No. 02CW403, the Water Court approved a plan for augmentation (“ECCV Augmentation Plan”) for ECCV’s Upper Beebe Draw wellfield (“ECCV Well Field”), as described in paragraph 15.1 of that decree. The ECCV Augmentation Plan allowed for the addition of wells to the augmentation plan and for the use of additional sources of substitute supply to replace the out-of-priority depletions resulting from pumping the ECCV Well Field. Case No. 02CW403 also decreed a change in use for ECCV’s shares in the Burlington Ditch Reservoir and Land Company (the “Burlington-Barr Shares”) and ECCV’s shares in the Farmers Reservoir and Irrigation Company (the “FRICO-Barr Shares”). The decree in Case No. 02CW403 excluded Barr Lake toe drain seepage from the quantification of the historical consumptive use associated with ECCV’s shares. In Case Nos. 02CW404 and 03CW442, the Court approved the addition of six (6) wells to the ECCV Well Field, additional sources of replacement water to the ECCV Augmentation Plan approved in Case No. 02CW403, and a recharge project in the Beebe Draw (the “Beebe Draw Recharge Project”). The Water Court also approved a plan for augmentation to replace the out-of-priority depletions created by the pumping of wells located on 70 Ranch (“70 Ranch Augmentation Plan”) and a recharge project on 70 Ranch (“70 Ranch Recharge Project”). By this application, ECCV seeks a determination of: 1) its pro rata portion of seepage attributable to ECCV’s fully consumable water stored in Barr Lake that is discharged to the Beebe Canal through the Barr Lake toe drains and interceptor ditch; and 2) the amount of ground water seepage into the Beebe Draw aquifer that is attributable to ECCV’s fully consumable water stored in Barr Lake. ECCV seeks to use its pro rata portion of these reusable water supplies as a source of substitute supply for the ECCV Augmentation Plan decreed in Case No. 02CW403. ECCV also seeks a determination that it can replace the historical return flow obligations for its Burlington-Barr and FRICO-Barr shares that were changed in Case No. 02CW403 with recharge accretions from its reusable water supplies in the Beebe Draw aquifer, using the Unit Response Functions (“URFs”) decreed in Case Nos. 02CW404 and 03CW442. 3. Description of Barr Lake. 3.1. Barr Lake. Barr Lake is an off-channel reservoir located in Sections 15, 21, 22, 23, 26, 27, 28, and 33, Township 1 South, Range 66 West of the 6th P.M., Adams County, Colorado. Barr Lake is an enlargement of the original Oasis Reservoir. ECCV is a shareholder in the Burlington Barr Lake Division of FRICO and the Barr Lake Division of FRICO, and has the right to store water in Barr Lake. ECCV also has the ability to store water in Barr Lake on a “space available” basis subject to and in compliance with its agreements with FRICO, and any subsequent agreements they may enter. 3.1.1. Location of Dam. At a point at the center of Section 23, Township 1 South, Range 66 West of the 6th P.M., Adams County, Colorado. 3.1.2. Surface Area. 1,900 acres at high water line. 3.1.3. Storage Height. 34 feet. 3.1.4. Capacity. 30,057 acre-feet, dead storage is less than 300 acre-feet. 3.2. Barr Lake Toe Drains. FRICO constructed a toe drain system into the Barr Lake dam to drain the seepage in and through the dam, and an interceptor ditch to collect underflow surfacing from beneath the structure. The water in the toe drain system is measured by a gage on the collection trench fed by the toe drain and then released into the Beebe Canal. Flows in the interceptor ditch are measured at the head of the Beebe Seep Canal. 4. Sources of ECCV’s Fully Consumable Water Stored in Barr Lake. 4.1. The 70 Ranch Water Rights decreed in Case Nos. 02CW404 and 03CW442; 4.2. ECCV’s FRICO-Barr and Burlington-Barr shares decreed in Case No. 02CW403; 4.3. FRICO’s MultiPurpose Water Right decreed in Case No. 02CW403 (limited to the extent of ECCV’s pro rata ownership of FRICO shares, or as otherwise allocated by and between FRICO shareholders); 4.4. The fully consumable portion of all water rights claimed in ECCV’s pending applications in Case Nos. 06CW40, 11CW151/ 05CW58, lows: Twenty (20) percent of highest 11CW280, 11CW285, anddown 12CW73; and winning dueconsumable date of auction. Remain4.5. Thebid fully portion of ECCV’s currently owned but waing eighty (80) percent dueunchanged 30 days after ter sources auction date. and future acquired water sources, which include but may not be limited to shares in the New Cache la Poudre Form of Payment: All the payments be Irrigating Company, Cache must la Poudre by cash, certified check, or IrrigatreaReservoir Company, andcashier’s the Ogilvy surer’s by a UnitedOnce Statesthe postal, tion andcheck LandorCompany. currently owned and future acquired water bank, express, or telegraph money order. sources are changed ECCV will follow Make check or money order payable to the procedures in paragraph 19 of the decree the United States Treasury. in Case No. 02CW403 and paragraphs 25 and 58.5 of the decree entered in Case Dated: 12-10-2012and 03CW442 to add Nos. 02CW404 those rights as additional sources of replacement supply. 5. Determination of Doug McDonald, Property Appraisal the Claimed Seepage and Liquidation Specialistfrom Barr Lake. 5.1. Toe Drain and Interceptor Ditch Seep751 Daily Drive Suite 100; age. ECCV seeks a determination of its Camarillo, CA 93010-6076 pro rata portion of seepage attributable to Mobile phone # (805) 233-2976 ECCV’s fully consumable water stored in emailLake Douglas.G.McDonald@irs.gov Barr that is discharged to the Beebe Canal through the Barr Lake toe drains 805-445-4571 and interceptor ditch. The precise amount of thisNotice seepage Legal No.: varies 927853based upon the total amount of water in Barr Lake, the First Publication: December 20, 2012 amount in ECCV’s Barr Lake accounts, Last other Publication: December 20, 2012 and variables such as evaporation Publisher: Elbert County News as part of and precipitation. Accordingly, determining ECCV’s pro rata seepage, ECCV will seek to adjudicate a methodology that will account for the variables and

Government Legals

Misc. Private Legals

THE WATER RIGHTS CLAIMED BY THESE APPLICATIONS MAY AFFECT IN PRIORITY ANY WATER RIGHTS CLAIMED OR HERETOFORE ADJUDICATED WITHIN THIS DIVISION AND OWNERS OF AFFECTED RIGHTS MUST APPEAR TO OBJECT WITHIN THE TIME PROVIDED BY STATUTE OR BE FOREVER BARRED. YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that any party who wishes to oppose an application, or an amended application, may file with the Water Clerk, P. O. Box 2038, Greeley, CO 80632, a verified Statement of Opposition, setting forth facts as to why the application should not be granted, or why it should be granted only in part or on certain conditions. Such Statement of Opposition must be filed by the last day of JANUARY 2013 (forms available on www.courts.state.co.us or in the Clerk’s office), and must be filed as an Original and include $130.00 filing fee. A copy of each Statement of Opposition must also be served upon the Applicant or Applicant’s Attorney and an affidavit or certificate of such service of mailing shall be filed with the Water Clerk. Legal Notice No.: 927847 First Publication: December 20, 2012 Last Publication: December 20, 2012 Publisher: The Elbert County News Public Notice DISTRICT COURT, WATER DIVISION 1, COLORADO NOVEMBER 2012 WATER RESUME PUBLICATION TO: ALL PERSONS INTERESTED IN WATER APPLICATIONS IN WATER DIV. 1

DISTRICT COURT, WATER DIVISION 1, COLORADO NOVEMBER 2012 WATER RESUME PUBLICATION

Elbert County News 19

TO: ALL PERSONS INTERESTED IN WATER APPLICATIONS IN WATER DIV. 1 Pursuant to C.R.S. 37-92-302, you are notified that the following is a resume of all water right applications and certain amendments filed in the Office of the Water Clerk during the month of NOVEMBER 2012 for each County affected.

Misc. Private Legals

Public Notice

DISTRICT COURT, WATER DIVISION 1, COLORADO NOVEMBER 2012 WATER RESUME PUBLICATION TO: ALL PERSONS INTERESTED IN WATER APPLICATIONS IN WATER DIV. 1 Pursuant to C.R.S. 37-92-302, you are notified that the following is a resume of all water right applications and certain amendments filed in the Office of the Water Clerk during the month of NOVEMBER 2012 for each County affected. 12CW259, Roger and Lisa Garner, David and Stacey Wilson, James and Karla Ross, Thaddeus and Jennifer Schleisman, Thomas Barth, William Willis, and David and Susan Grzywa c/o 779 Vienna Drive, Parker, Colorado 80138 (James J. Petrock, Petrock & Fendel, 700 17th Street, #1800, Denver, CO 80202), Application for Underground Water Rights from Nontributary Sources in the NONTRIBUTARY DENVER, ARAPAHOE, AND LARAMIEFOX HILLS AQUIFERS, ELBERT COUNTY, 43.3 acres being Lot 52, 50, 42, 49, 48, 43, 44, and 77, Parker Hylands Subdivision Filing 2, generally located in parts of the NE1/4 of Section 3, T7S, R65W of the 6th P.M., as shown on Attachment B (Subject Property). The location of the lots satisfy the requirements of Local Rule 3(b)(1) as shown Attachment C. Applicants will own a pro-rata interest in the total amount of groundwater requested herein underlying their respective lots. Estimated Amounts: Denver: 27.7 acrefeet; Arapahoe: 17.4 acre-feet; LaramieFox Hills: 12.8 acre-feet. Use: domestic, commercial, irrigation, stockwatering, fire protection, and augmentation purposes, both on and off the Subject Property. Further, Applicant prays that this Court grant the application and for such other relief as seems proper in the premises. (8 pages). THE WATER RIGHTS CLAIMED BY THESE APPLICATIONS MAY AFFECT IN PRIORITY ANY WATER RIGHTS CLAIMED OR HERETOFORE ADJUDICATED WITHIN THIS DIVISION AND OWNERS OF AFFECTED RIGHTS MUST APPEAR TO OBJECT WITHIN THE TIME PROVIDED BY STATUTE OR BE FOREVER BARRED. YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that any party who wishes to oppose an application, or an amended application, may file with the Water Clerk, P. O. Box 2038, Greeley, CO 80632, a verified Statement of Opposition, setting forth facts as to why the application should not be granted, or why it should be granted only in part or on certain conditions. Such Statement of Opposition must be filed by the last day of JANUARY 2013 (forms available on www.courts.state.co.us or in the Clerk’s office), and must be filed as an Original and include $130.00 filing fee. A copy of each Statement of Opposition must also be served upon the Applicant or Applicant’s Attorney and an affidavit or certificate of such service of mailing shall be filed with the Water Clerk. Legal Notice No.: 927848 First Publication: December 20, 2012 Last Publication: December 20, 2012 Publisher: The Elbert County News Public Notice Notice of Sale Contents unknown belonging to Jason Ayers whose last known address is: P.O Box 2511 Elizabeth, CO 80107, and stored in unit #65 STORAGE ONE/Elizabeth, 5229 Hwy 86, Elizabeth, CO. 80107, will be sold at auction or otherwise disposed of at this location after 1/4/2013. Legal Notice No.: 927851 First Publication: December 20, 2012 Last Publication: December 27, 2012 Publisher: Douglas County News-Press Public Notice DISTRICT COURT, WATER DIVISION 1, COLORADO NOVEMBER 2012 WATER RESUME PUBLICATION TO: ALL PERSONS INTERESTED IN WATER APPLICATIONS IN WATER DIV. 1 Pursuant to C.R.S. 37-92-302, you are notified that the following is a resume of all water right applications and certain amendments filed in the Office of the Water Clerk during the month of NOVEMBER 2012 for each County affected. 12CW260, John and Laura Brandon, 244 Vienna Drive, Parker, CO 80138 (James J. Petrock, Petrock & Fendel, 700 17th Street, #1800, Denver, CO 80202), UNDERGROUND WATER RIGHT AND NONTRIBUTARY DENVER, ARAPAHOE, AND LARAMIE-FOX HILLS AQUIFERS, ELBERT COUNTY, 5.2 acres being Lot 28, Parker Hylands Filing 1, generally located in the SW1/4NW1/4 of Section 3, T7S, R65W of the 6th P.M. Nontributary Denver: 3.3 acre-feet; Arapahoe: 2.1 acrefeet; and Laramie-Fox Hills: 1.5 acre-feet, for domestic, commercial, irrigation, stockwatering, and augmentation purposes, including storage, both on and off the Subject Property. Request Pursuant to Section 37-92-602(4), C.R.S.: Well Permit No. 96293; Priority and Appropriation Date: January 23, 1978; Source and Well Depth: Upper Dawson aquifer/ 310 feet deep; Amount: 12 gpm/1 acre-foot (absolute); Use: Domestic; Legal Description: In the SW1/4NW1/4 of Section 3, T7S, R65W of the 6th P.M., approximately 1690 feet from the north and 1210 feet from the west section lines. Further, Applicants pray that this Court grant the application and for such other relief as seems proper in the premises. (8 pages).

Have you seen how Classifieds can work for you?

Pursuant to C.R.S. 37-92-302, you are notified that the following is a resume of all water right applications and certain amendments filed in the Office of the Water Clerk during the month of NOVEMBER 2012 for each County affected.

12CW259, Roger and Lisa Garner, David and Stacey Wilson, James and Karla Ross, Thaddeus and Jennifer Schleisman, Thomas Barth, William Willis, and David and Susan Grzywa c/o 779 Vienna Drive, Parker, Colorado 80138 (James J. Petrock, Petrock & Fendel, 700 17th Street, #1800, Denver, CO 80202), Application for Underground Water Rights from Nontributary Sources in the NONTRIBUTARY DENVER, ARAPAHOE, AND LARAMIEFOX HILLS AQUIFERS, ELBERT COUNTY, 43.3 acres being Lot 52, 50, 42, 49, 48, 43, 44, and 77, Parker Hylands Subdivision Filing 2, generally located in parts of the NE1/4 of Section 3, T7S, R65W of the 6th P.M., as shown on Attachment B (Subject Property). The location of the lots satisfy the requirements of Local Rule 3(b)(1) as shown Attachment C. Applicants will own a pro-rata interest in the total amount of groundwater requested herein underlying their respective lots. Estimated Amounts: Denver: 27.7 acrefeet; Arapahoe: 17.4 acre-feet; LaramieFox Hills: 12.8 acre-feet. Use: domestic, commercial, irrigation, stockwatering, fire

THE WATER RIGHTS CLAIMED BY THESE APPLICATIONS MAY AFFECT IN PRIORITY ANY WATER RIGHTS CLAIMED OR HERETOFORE ADJUDICATED WITHIN THIS DIVISION AND OWNERS OF AFFECTED RIGHTS MUST APPEAR TO OBJECT WITHIN THE TIME PROVIDED BY STATUTE OR BE FOREVER BARRED.

YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that any party who wishes to oppose an application, or an amended application, may file with the Water Clerk, P. O. Box 2038, Greeley, CO 80632, a verified Statement of Opposition, setting forth facts as to why the application should not be granted, or why it should be granted only in part or on certain conditions. Such Statement of Opposition must be filed by the last day of JANUARY 2013 (forms available on www.courts.state.co.us or in the Clerk’s office), and must be filed as an Original

12CW260, John and Laura Brandon, 244 Vienna Drive, Parker, CO 80138 (James J. Petrock, Petrock & Fendel, 700 17th Street, #1800, Denver, CO 80202), UNDERGROUND WATER RIGHT AND NONTRIBUTARY DENVER, ARAPAHOE, AND LARAMIE-FOX HILLS AQUIFERS, ELBERT COUNTY, 5.2 acres being Lot 28, Parker Hylands Filing 1, generally located in the SW1/4NW1/4 of Section 3, T7S, R65W of the 6th P.M. Nontributary Denver: 3.3 acre-feet; Arapahoe: 2.1 acrefeet; and Laramie-Fox Hills: 1.5 acre-feet, for domestic, commercial, irrigation, stockwatering, and augmentation purposes, including storage, both on and off the Subject Property. Request Pursuant to Section 37-92-602(4), C.R.S.: Well Permit No. 96293; Priority and Appropriation Date: January 23, 1978; Source and Well Depth: Upper Dawson aquifer/ 310 feet deep; Amount: 12 gpm/1 acre-foot (absolute); Use: Domestic; Legal Description: In the SW1/4NW1/4 of Section 3, T7S, R65W of the 6th P.M., approximately 1690 feet from the north and 1210 feet from the west section lines. Further, Applicants pray that this Court grant the application and for such other relief as seems proper in the premises. (8 pages).

Misc. Private Legals

THE WATER RIGHTS CLAIMED BY THESE APPLICATIONS MAY AFFECT IN PRIORITY ANY WATER RIGHTS CLAIMED OR HERETOFORE ADJUDICATED WITHIN THIS DIVISION AND OWNERS OF AFFECTED RIGHTS MUST APPEAR TO OBJECT WITHIN THE TIME PROVIDED BY STATUTE OR BE FOREVER BARRED. YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that any party who wishes to oppose an application, or an amended application, may file with the Water Clerk, P. O. Box 2038, Greeley, CO 80632, a verified Statement of Opposition, setting forth facts as to why the application should not be granted, or why it should be granted only in part or on certain conditions. Such Statement of Opposition must be filed by the last day of JANUARY 2013 (forms available on www.courts.state.co.us or in the Clerk’s office), and must be filed as an Original and include $130.00 filing fee. A copy of each Statement of Opposition must also be served upon the Applicant or Applicant’s Attorney and an affidavit or certificate of such service of mailing shall be filed with the Water Clerk. Legal Notice No.: 927849 First Publication: December 20, 2012 Last Publication: December 20, 2012 Publisher: The Elbert County News

Government Legals Public Notice NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING Notice is hereby given that on Thursday, January 10, 2013, at 7:00 P.M., or as soon as possible thereafter, the Elbert County Planning Commission will conduct a public hearing in the Exhibit Hall at the Elbert County Fairgrounds in Kiowa, Colorado, and on Wednesday, January 23, 2013, at 9:00 A.M., or as soon as possible thereafter, the Board of County Commissioners will conduct a public hearing in the Exhibit Hall at the Elbert County Fairgrounds in Kiowa, Colorado, or at such other time and place as these hearings may be adjourned, for a proposed amendment to the Elbert County Zoning Regulations, a proposed new Section 26, Oil and/or Gas Operations – Special Use Permit, with the “Definitions” becoming Section 27, and a proposed Memorandum of Understanding for oil and/or gas facilities in Elbert County, on file with the Elbert County Community and Development Services Office, 215 Comanche Street, Kiowa, Colorado 80117, telephone: 303.621.3141. Legal Notice No.: 927852 First Publication: December 20, 2012 Last Publication: January 17, 2013 Publisher: The Elbert County News PUBLIC NOTICE NOTICE OF FINAL SETTLEMENT PROJECT #C 0704-231 PROJECT ID #19377 In accordance with the notice provisions contained in 38 26 107 C.R.S. 1973 as amended, the DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION, STATE OF COLORADO has established January 10, 2013 as the date of final settlement date with TLM Constructors, Inc. for Project #C 0704231, Project ID #19377, in Elbert County. Work consists of removal of concrete pavement and concrete patching on I-70 beginning at MP 344.5 and extending eastward approximately one mile to MP 345.5. Claims containing a verified statement of the amounts due and unpaid must be in the form of a written affidavit and must be received by the CONTROLLER, Department of Transportation at 4201 E. Arkansas Avenue, Denver, Colorado, 80222, on or before 5:00 p.m. of the final settlement date above. Timothy J. Harris, P.E., Chief Engineer, Department of Transportation Legal Notice No: 927835 First Publication: December 20, 2012 Last Publication: December 27, 2012 Publisher: The Elbert County News


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Elbert County News 122012