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Elbert County

News

November 8, 2012

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A Colorado Community Media Publication

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Elbert County, Colorado • Volume 117, Issue 41

Toddler continues to fight for life Family hopes for ‘any signs of improvement’ By Deborah Grigsby

dgrigsby@ourcoloradonews.com

Oberon and Tatiana, played by Ethen Woolf and Robyn Tapp, are locked in dispute over a young boy she has adopted in Elizabeth High School’s production of “A Midsummer Night’s Dream.” The classic Shakespeare piece takes on an ’80s theme, complete with decade-appropriate wardrobe and music. Photos by Deborah Grigsby

Play a total Shakespearience New director gives Bard’s standard a radical twist By Deborah Grigsby

dgrigsby@ourcoloradonews.com Drama students at Elizabeth High School have taken a popular William Shakespeare classic and made it, well, “pretty gnarly.” “A Midsummer Night’s Dream” came to life on stage with a funky 1980s twist for two performances, under the direction of the school’s new drama instructor, Emma Michel. With a cast and crew of more than 40, the Bard’s famous comedy of love, drama and sorcery donned a more contemporary look, complete with glitter, headbands, leg warmers and decade-appropriate music. Some scenes also included the obligatory use of a fog machine and strobe lights. “I’ve always loved setting Shakespeare in untraditional time periods,” said Michel. “Because `Midsummer’ is such a fun and colorful show, I thought it would lend itself well to a 1980s theme.” But seriously? Doing Shakespeare in a rural school district? Then mixing it with

Lauren Turner portrays William Shakespeare’s Helena in the Elizabeth HIgh School production of “A Midsummer Night’s Dream.” The production marks the first performance of Shakespeare in the school’s history. a pinch of Valley Girl and Goth? It had to raise a few eyebrows, right? Michel admits not everyone was completely sold on the idea. “While it wasn’t met with quite as much resistance as I had feared, there were a few honest people who came forward and said they were not so sure about

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how the play might be received, but they still planned to come.” And they kept good on that promise. Michel said the school sold more than 300 seats for the Nov. 1 performance, which is an unusually high number for a Thursday night show. According to Michel, this is the first time in the school district’s history that Shakespeare has been performed. “And since it’s my first year, too, it makes it kind of appropriate,” she said. “I am always looking for ways to make Shakespeare more accessible, and I thought setting the play in the ‘80s, with all those popular hits, might help to do that.” Michel said the school’s spring production will be Rodgers and Hammerstein’s “Oklahoma!”

The Black Forest boy who nearly drowned in a family duck pond now fights for his life at Children’s Hospital Colorado. Two-year-old Conner Kuczborski wandered off from his mother, Dorit White, on Sept. 22 and was found floating face-down in a shallow stock trough outside his 5-acre rural home. The toddler was transferred from Memorial Hospital in Colorado Springs to Children’s Hospital in Aurora in late October to begin intensive physical therapy and to investigate an abscess that had developed on his brain. “The abscess is gone now, but we just wait and hope for any signs of improvement,” said White. “No matter how small they are.” White and her boyfriend, Matt Kuczborski, Conner’s father, have maintained a constant presence with the child since he was first admitted to the hospital. The couple have been splitting long shifts between the two of them, said friend and family spokeswoman Marion Rhodes. “Neither one of us is comfortable with him sleeping alone,” said White. “I know the care here is good, but he is just so little; I realize this feeling is more emotional than it is logical.” The boy’s condition is still very serious, but he has been able to open his eyes, said Rhodes. “He’s expressed some feelings, such as fear of the MRI machine and dislike of some of the physical therapy treatments, but for the most part, he’s still `not there,’ as his mom puts it,” said Rhodes. White said her son’s condition is reevaluated each week and the length he will remain at Children’s Hospital is yet to be determined. “But it really comes down to three things,” she said. “Our insurance, how well he responds to the treatments and to physical therapy.” While many medical expenses are covToddler continues on Page 5

Conner Kuczborski is hospitalized after nearly drowning in a duck pond at his home near Elbert. Courtesy photo


2 Elbert County News

November 8, 2012

E-books gain, but publishers hold back Last month, I attended a library workshop on e-content in libraries, and the relationship between digital content and the library. Digital content is growing, and the prevalence of e-reading devices such as the Amazon Kindle and Nook from Barnes and Noble, and tablets such as the iPad and the Kindle Fire, has really taken off. According to a Pew survey conducted in February, 19 percent of the U.S. population owns some form of ereader or tablet, up from just 10 percent of the population who reported having such a device two months earlier. I don’t know which camp you fall in, whether you like to read books on an electronic tablet or not. When the first Kindle device came out, Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos proclaimed that he wanted the reading experience to transcend the format. I realized I had arrived at that place the moment I tried to turn the (physical) page of my electronic reader. I also appreciated the relative light weight of my Nook last

night as I sat in bed reading a 1,000-page novel that would be harder to hold in its physical format without endangering my nose when it slips out of my hand. Where do libraries fit into the e-book landscape? That was the nature of the discussion at our workshop last month, titled an “eMedia Smackdown.” Publishers are struggling to understand where they feel that libraries should fit in the e-book market and, at least at the major publishing houses, they do not seem to agree that libraries should play in the earena. Of the six major publishing houses, only three of them are selling e-books to libraries, and that is with limitations

or severe increases in costs, as in charging libraries 200-300 percent more for a copy of a book than what they charge to individuals. Their concern is that they will lose out on sales if people check out e-books from the library rather than purchasing them. I really struggle to understand the logic of the publishers in this argument. I mean, we’ve been checking out physical books for hundreds of years, and publishers have been seen as good partners in that relationship. Readers frequently discover new authors through books they first encounter at the library and then later go out and purchase their books. Why should that be any different in the digital form than has been true in print? Another Pew study found that 12 percent of library patrons had checked out an e-book from their library, but also that many people (62 percent) did not know if they could check out e-books from their library or not. Nationwide, 75 percent of

libraries offer e-books for checkout. The Elbert County Library District offers a collection of e-books. We belong to a consortium with about 30 other libraries from around the state. Some of the popular books have long hold lists; other popular titles we simply cannot purchase, because we are a library. Have you checked out an e-book from the library? Want to know how to contact publishers so that you can voice your opinion about e-books in libraries? Let us know. To read the full survey results from Pew, go to http://libraries.pewinternet. org. If you’d like more information about our collection, stop in or call one of our branch libraries.

Kari May lives in Elizabeth and is the director of the Elbert County Library District. She can be contacted through the library at director@elbertcountylibrary. org. Visit the library at www.elbertcountylibrary.org.

SO MUCH INSIDE THE NEWS THIS WEEK Top-notch performance. Elizabeth girls won the state gymnastics championship. Page 9

You don’t say. Want to say nothing and imply you’re saying a lot? Try “it is what it is,” writes columnist Craig Marshall Smith. Page 4

Helping kids. Bikes for Tykes gets donated, refurbished bicycles into the hands of abused and neglected children around the area. Page 6 Election results. For results of the Nov. 6 election, go to ourelbertcountynews.com.

Excellent exhibition. Longtime Colorado educator Floyd Tunson, an influential artist in the Rocky Mountain West, has four decades of his work on display. Page 7

Special time of year. Hudson Gardens will light up the holiday season with its glowing decor. Page 12

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Elbert County News 3

November 8, 2012

Local man may face charges in fatal crash Woman killed after vehicle hit from behind By Chris Michlewicz

cmichlewicz@ourcoloradonews.com A Parker woman was killed after a man driving a full-size pickup failed to stop at a red light on South Parker Road and struck her vehicle from behind. Vicki Jo Boyer, 59, was stopped in the center northbound lane of South Parker Road at North Pinery Parkway when a Ford F-350 hit her Cadillac SRX shortly before 12:30 p.m. Oct. 25, said Colorado State Patrol Trooper Josh Lewis. Boyer was resuscitated at the scene and listed

in critical condition for five days before succumbing to a brain injury Oct. 30 at Littleton Adventist Hospital. The state patrol’s lead investigator, Dan Musgrave, said the driver of the pickup, Jason Jones, 27, of Elizabeth, faces charges of careless driving causing death and careless driving causing injury, both first-class misdemeanors. An 18-year-old passenger in his vehicle suffered minor injuries in the accident, as did Jones. Jones was issued a summons for a first-appearance court date, however, that date was not immediately available. Formal charges have not yet been filed with the 18th Judicial District Attorney’s office.

The Elizabeth Middle School annual craft fair takes place from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Nov. 17 at the school gymnasium, 34427 County Road 13 in Elizabeth. Each year more than 80 crafters and local artists showcase their wares throughout the school. Visitors can also purchase homemade holiday cookies by the pound and help fund school needs. Proceeds generated from booth rentals, cookiesby-the-pound and food sales will help fund the eightgrade celebration, student scholarships for field trips, supplies and other school needs. For more information, email at emscraftfair@esdk12.org or call Jamie Roberts at 720-333-0712.

Education foundation stages fundraiser

The Elizabeth Education Foundation is selling reloadable Safeway gift cards. The reloadable gift cards may be purchased through the foundation for $10 each and come pre-loaded with a $10 credit. Cardholders may then add more credit as needed with funds from debit and credit cards, checks or cash. The gift cards may be used for groceries, fuel and pharmacy items. For every $100 used from the gift card, $3 to $5 is donated to EEF. Card order forms can be found online at the EEF website, www.elizabethef.org or email contribute@elizabethef.org.

Free legal clinic set for library

A free legal clinic for those without an attorney will be held from 6 to 9 p.m. Nov. 13 at the Elizabeth Public Library, 651 W. Beverly St. Volunteer attorneys will answer questions, help with forms, and explain procedures for family law, civil litigation, criminal defense, property law, probate law, collections, appeals, landlord-tenant law and civil protection orders. Walk-ins are welcome, and everyone will be helped on a first-come, first-served basis.

Kiowa Library to have silent auction

A silent auction will be held from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Nov. 16 at the Kiowa Library, 331 Comanche. Sponsored by Friends of the Kiowa Library, the auction will feature a variety of themed gift baskets donated by local individuals and businesses.

cle of friends as an energetic and “feisty” woman with an “indomitable spirit,” said Trish Hershey, a close friend who spoke to Boyer hours before the accident. Hershey said she is glad Boyer had the chance to visit her son and twin 10-month-old grandchildren in California a week before she died. Boyer’s death will leave a big hole in a tight-knit community. “She’s one of those people you would never forget. Just a lot of fun,” Hershey said. “She’s going to be greatly missed by all of us.” A celebration of Boyer’s life is scheduled for 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Dec. 1 at the Parker Arts, Culture and Events Center.

THINGS TO DO

ELBERT COUNTY NEWS IN A HURRY Middle school holds craft fair

According to Musgrave and Boyer’s friends who visited the scene, there were no tire marks or other indications that Jones applied the brakes before striking Boyer’s vehicle. Musgrave said the Ford F-350 was likely traveling at or slightly above the posted speed limit of 55 mph at the moment of impact. It is unknown whether drugs or alcohol played a factor, he said. Boyer, who lived on Fox Sparrow Road in the Timbers, was wearing her seat belt at the time of the crash. Boyer was an avid golfer and active member at the Pinery Country Club, serving as the president of the Pinery Ladies Golf Association for the last two years. She is being remembered by a large cir-

NOV. 1-30

DRIVER SAFETY. AARP is offering a free drivers safety classroom course from Nov. 1-30 to veterans. The class is open to all veterans regardless of age who serve or have served in the U.S. Army, Navy, Air Force, Marines, National Guard/Reserves or Coast Guard. Their spouses, widows/widowers and children may also take the free class. The AARP driver safety course is the nation’s first and largest course for drivers ages 50 and older. Classes are available all over Colorado. To register, call 303-764-5995 or go online at www.aarp.org/drive. THROUGH DEC. 1 SENIOR BASKETS. The Elizabeth Area Chamber of Commerce will help the seniors of Elbert County by gathering and creating baskets to distribute. We need your help to provide them with toiletry items, postage stamps, towels, Ziplock bags, gloves, hats, scarves, and lip balm. We will also accept gift cards and/or money donations. Look for the decorated donation boxes at the following locations: Big R, Community Banks of Colorado Elizabeth, Community Banks of Colorado Kiowa, Elbert County Library - Elizabeth, Elodji’s Wine & Tapas, Magic Dog and True Value of Elizabeth. The project will conclude with the last drop off at our Olde Country Christmas celebration Dec. 1. Contact Beverly at the chamber 303-646-4287. NOV. 8 BUSINESS AFTER Hours. Elizabeth Area Chamber of Commerce presents its monthly Business After Hours from 5-7 p.m. Nov. 8 at The Funky Fondue Pot & Tea, 392 Main St. in Elizabeth. Come see this great addition to Elizabeth and unique restaurant. Meet the owner, Christy, and sample her great cuisine. Enjoy visiting a local business and meeting other area business people. Great networking tool. Refreshments provided by the local business. NOV. 10 TOY RUN. EC Riders plan its 9th annual toy run

from 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. Nov. 10. Registrationo is from 8-10 a.m. at Stagecoach in Franktown with breakfast available for a small fee. An 8-mile parade of vehicles, including Marines, motorcycles, old cars, and the Elizabeth Fire Department, will start at 10 a.m. in Franktown and parade through Elizabeth ending at Casey Jones Park for everyone to enjoy door prizes, a 50/50 raffle, live auction, food and fun. The cost of admission is a new unwrapped toy or cash donation for the U.S. Marine Corps Reserve Toys for Tots Campaign. All monies and toys stay in and support the children of Elbert County. If you cannot make the run, and wish to donate a new, unwrapped toy you can come by the pavilion at Casey Jones after 11 a.m. the day of the ride, or do so at area businesses throughout the county marked with an official U.S. Marine Corps Toys for Tots drop box and Poster. Contact 303-435-2793 or www.ecriders.org.

CHRISTMAS BAZAAR Have lunch, a famous apple dumpling and shop for handcrafted gifts from dozens of crafters at Elbert’s 46th Christmas bazaar from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday, Nov. 10 at the Russell Gates Mercantile Community Hall and at the Elbert School lunchroom. Call 303-648-3118. PARKINSON’S SERIES Colorado residents affected by Parkinson’s disease will have the opportunity to learn from leading national and local experts about the latest research advances, treatment options and practical ways to live well with Parkinson’s disease at the Davis Phinney Foundation’s The Victory Summit from 9 a.m. to 3:15 p.m. Saturday, Nov. 10 at the Denver Marriott Tech Center. There is no charge, but registration is required. For information and to register for The Victory Summit, visit http://davisphinneyfoundation.org/victory-summit/upcomingvictory-summits/. NOV. 13, DEC. 11 LAWYERS AT the Library, a free legal clinic for parties who have no attorney, will be featured from 6-9 p.m. the third Tuesday of every other month in Elizabeth.

Volunteer attorneys will answer questions, help fill out forms and explain the process and procedure for the areas of family law, civil litigation, criminal defense, property law, probate law, collections, appeals, landlord-tenant law and civil protection orders. Walk-ins are welcome. Everyone will be helped on a first-come, first-served basis. Upcoming dates are Nov. 13, and Dec. 11. NOV. 15 TO DEC. 15

HOLIDAY PROGRAM. Home Instead Senior Care has partnered with retailers and community organizations to make sure isolated seniors receive gifts and companionship through the Be a Santa to a Senior program, running from Nov. 15 to Dec. 15. Christmas trees will go up in Walgreens stores at 355 S. Wilcox St. and 14 E. Allen St. in Castle Rock and at 3510 Evergreen Parkway in Evergreen. Holiday shoppers are asked to pick up an ornament off special Be a Santa to a Senior Christmas trees, buy items on the list and return them unwrapped to the store, along with the ornament attached. The Home Instead Senior Care office will then enlist the volunteer help of its staff, senior-care business associates, nonprofit workers and others to collect, wrap and distribute the gifts. Home Instead serves Douglas and Elbert counties, and portions of Clear Creek, Summit, Jefferson and Gilpin counties. For information, visit www.beasantatoasenior. com or call 303-688-7852. NOV. 16 TO DEC. 7 SILENT AUCTION. Friends of the Kiowa Library silent auction items will be on display starting Nov. 16. The theme-based gift baskets were donated by businesses and individuals in the area. Bidding ends at 2 p.m. Dec. 7, following the Kiowa Library’s holiday party at 10:30 a.m. The baskets will be on display during library hours from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Monday through Thursday, and from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Friday. Call 303-621-2111.

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4 Elbert County News

November 8, 2012

OPINIONS / YOURS AND OURS

It is what it is — but it always is Maybe it’s “It is what it isn’t,” but around here it is definitely not “It is what it is.” We are not pro-slogan, phrase, or cliché in this tract house. We don’t do “One day at a time” or “Let go and let God.” We also don’t do “do.” So don’t be asking me to “do lunch.” We eat lunch. I avoid clichés like there is no tomorrow. Like the plague. I am not interested in gimme-expressions. I prefer to reach a little further than a “calm before the storm.” “Katie bar the door” is better. And “A hearty man eat a toad” is better still. Clichés enable us to all-purpose a thought or reaction without really thinking or reacting. Trying to really say something meaningful puts us between a rock and a hard place, and who wants that? You would have to have bats in the belfry. You’ve heard me say over and over that we no longer care about what we say over and over. I just returned from New York City, barely, just ahead of Sandy, and everyone everywhere was tapping away like fat

little pigeons — on their cell phones, and each of them was sending this identical message. “It is what it is.” It’s a phrase that means absolutely nothing but implies that it covers everything. It is empty. The language cupboard is bare. It’s garbage in and garbage out. I will bet you a squeaky wheel that you will hear “It is what it is” more than once today. Chances are you will say it your own self. It gets worse. Americans have turned their refrigerators into bulletin boards. It’s been reported that 88 percent of us have some kind of malarkey on our

refrigerators: appalling magnets (birdies, kitties, piggies, Broncos crap, cars, cookies, bookies, and Snookies), childish drawings by children, childish drawings by grown-ups, business cards, reminders, photos of grandma holding a fish, a soccer schedule from last season, and a picture of Ann Coulter with horns on her head, something I approve of. It’s not exactly Aesthetics 101. You can buy magnetic letters and create a spell out: “Housework is evil! It must be stopped.” Or even, “It is what it is.” OMG! When someone says, “It is what it is,” I feel like I have been handed a Wish Sandwich: two slices of bread and wish you had some meat in between. I ate a lot of those when I was a kid. It goes without saying that we were as poor as a church mouse. I think that’s what made my father reach for the hair of the dog. Around here life imitates art. It has to because I am an artist. For me, art is the only game in town. When I was a kid I was caught red-handed, painting

Just not that important after all The other day as I was reviewing my upcoming calendar I realized I was double booked on a few days, so I began to try and determine if there were meetings I could possibly reschedule or delegate to someone else. In my head I was really focused on rescheduling the meetings because they all seemed very important, and of course I felt like I was the only one who could possibly lead the meetings and deliver the best possible outcome. And so I was staring at the large dry erase calendar in my office that was filled with appointments as my wife came by. She had asked what I was doing and so I told her. Her immediate reply, too immediate if you ask me, was this, “You sometimes think you are more important than you really are.” Ouch, and it still stings a little as I write this, because it’s true. The truth hurts sometimes. She pointed out that I am too quick to want to handle everything and be involved in every opportunity and initiative and that I needed to trust the very capable, smart, and talented people on my team. Maybe she overheard some coaching I had done or read something I had written about delegation in the past, and was now serving me a heaping helping of my own advice. How about you? Are you that important? Are you the only one who can get the job done, or are there people, processes and technology that you can rely on to take some of the burden or pressure off of your busy schedule? Big question, right? It’s a big question because we first have to determine what is truly important to us and what our priorities really are. Every one of us will have the order of our own priorities. Some will consider relationships with their spouses, children and close friends as first on their list. Others will place their emphasis on their faith. And there are many of us who prioritize our lives and schedules around our work. Then there are the folks who seem to have money as the highest on their list of things most important. Based on where we all are at the moment, our priorities could easily shift, as each of the above could be more important at any given season of our lives. As I reflected on my own importance or lack thereof, I realized I could delegate a couple of the meetings and avoid a trip

Michael Norton, a resident of Highlands Ranch, is the former president of the Zig Ziglar organization and CEO and founder of www.candogo.com

Craig Marshall Smith is an artist, educator and Highlands Ranch resident. He can be reached at craigmarshallsmith@ comcast.net

LETTER TO THE EDITOR Close the schools for sake of budgets

or two here at the end of the year. There are people who can complete the task effectively and productively without me, and I can focus my energy and time on other things, things that do matter most. Just like many of you, work and money are a priority for me too. But perhaps I have deluded myself and have made excuses that both were so important that I have accepted placing my family and faith behind work and money. Big mistake. There is a framed poster on my office wall with one of my favorite quotes and reminders by Forest E. Witcraft that reads, “A hundred years from now it will not matter what my bank account was, what sort of house I lived in, or kind of car I drove … but the world may be a different place because I was important in the life of a child.” There it is in big print on my wall, right in front of me, I have to pass by it every day I come in and out of my office. And there are pictures of my children, my family, and my friends all over my office, once again right in front of me. I have memories of others so very important in my life embedded in my mind and held in my heart, not only right in front of me but a part of me. Yet, I had to be reminded that maybe, just maybe, I am really not that important after all. Now please don’t take this out of context. I know we are all important in the lives of other people in both our personal and my professional life. I get that. But I think I will accept the fact that sometimes I can allow myself to simply be … not that important. I would love to hear all about your priorities and importance, or lack thereof at gotonorton@gmail.com, and I hope that this will be a better than good week for you.

on the walls. Now I paint on canvases. I have a horse of a different color in the permanent collection of the Museum of Outdoor Arts. You’ll have to hold your horses when you see it for the first time. I think it will make your day. It might even be a wake-up call for you. I know I created it when I was back in the saddle, artistically. Enjoy. My therapist likes to tell me, “What goes around comes around.” I know exactly what she means. She also tells me, “Craig, it’s three strikes and you’re out.” No way! I know I have two strikes on me and I have fouled off a dozen pitches. But I am hanging in there, because back in the day I had it all going on. Then I barked up the wrong tree. It was monkey see monkey do, and I made a few mistakes. I started to count my chickens before they were hatched. It wasn’t what it is. It isn’t what it was.

I propose we balance the current state and county budgets immediately by shutting down the public schools for one year. The current state budget is $20 billion and the school spending is $9.7 billion, nearly half of all state spending! All students would be given iPods with a one-year assignment, which could be completed at home. A self-study course if you will. Those that are too young to study on their own could be helped by their parents in this course. This would cause an immediate economic boom within the stat,e not to mention the improvement in family bonding. Property taxes could be cut, etc. With the average spending of over $12,000 per student per year the costs have become exorbitant. The highest spending per student is in San Juan school district and was $89,336! The

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state needs to declare an economic emergency, suspend all school bond payments, furlough all school employees and shut down the school system for at least one year! Teachers could find abundant work traveling around teaching those children whom their parents don’t want to teach in small local groups. I’m sure there will be some parents willing to pay for this service! All those who don’t want their children around and rely on the school system for babysitting services will complain loudly about this plan. We will find out who does or doesn’t want to take care of their children and be responsible for them. It is time to face the facts, the school system is bankrupting us!

Dan Mason Kiowa

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Elbert County News 5

November 8, 2012

Toddler: ‘I have to stay strong’ Toddler continues from Page 1

ered by insurance, White said she still anticipates even more coming out of pocket. “There will be a big deductible that will have to be covered, as well as payment for many of the alternative treatments we hope to use.” Once released from the hospital, White said she will seek hyperbaric treatments for the child in an effort to get more oxygen to the brain. Rhodes said the family will also need assistance in planning for long-term care and recovery in their

ELBERT COUNTY NEWS

(USPS 171-100) OFFICE: 9137 S. Ridgeline Blvd., Suite 210, Highlands Ranch, CO 80129 PHONE: 303-566-4100 A legal newspaper of general circulation in Elizabeth, Colorado, the Elbert County News is published weekly on Thursday by Colorado Community Media. PERIODICALS POSTAGE PAID AT ELIZABETH, COLORADO and additional mailing offices. POSTMASTER: Send address change to: 9137 S. Ridgeline Blvd., Suite 210, Highlands Ranch, CO 80129

home, and that means specialized beds, chairs and strollers. The Conner Care Fund has been set up at Key Bank to assist the family with Conner’s ongoing medical bills. Donations can be made either by check or in person at any Colorado branch. “I’m not a person to give up,” said White. “I have to stay strong and keep going; there’s still a long road ahead.”

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6 Elbert County News November 8, 2012

South MetroLIFE Holiday show is glass act

Maggie Heard, president of the area Glass Artists Fellowship, has announced that the group would participate in Echter’s Holiday Art Show for the ninth year. The show opens with a reception from 1 to 4 p.m. on Nov. 10 and will run through Nov. 18 at 5150 Garrison St., Arvada. Hours: 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Mondays through Fridays; 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. Saturdays; 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Sundays.

Car club helps celebrate

Robert Seydel, co-founder of Project ReCycle, fixes up a donated bike Oct. 27 in warehouse space in unincorporated Douglas County near Parker. The Bikes for Tykes holiday bike distribution provides bikes for children in need. More information and how to volunteer with Bikes for Tykes and Project ReCycle can be found at bikesfortykescolorado.org or 3tministry.org. Project ReCycle, a program of 3t Ministry, is working in conjunction with Bikes for Tykes. Photos by Courtney Kuhlen | ckuhlen@ourcoloradonews.com

Wheeling out holiday help

Project is bright spot for abused, neglected kids

By Rhonda Moore

rmoore@ourcoloradonews.com

When Jeff Fleck started the Bikes for Tykes program, his hope was to deliver a simple gift to children in a place of darkness. The program reaches children who are victims of abuse or neglect in Douglas County and the south metro area. The gift of a donated and refurbished bicycle is delivered through nonprofit agencies that serve children at risk. In its first year, the program served about 70 children in Douglas County. This year, Castle Rock resident Fleck expanded his program to a warehouse

Celebrate Veterans Day with a free visit and tour on Nov. 11 at Fort Logan, 3742 W. Princeton Circle, Denver. Hosted by the Friends of Fort Logan. The restored Officer’s Home, an 1889 U.S. Field Officer’s Quarters, is on the south side of the loop. (Look for the cannon on the front lawn.) The Ford Flathead Auto Club will visit the Fort with its vintage vehicles, heralding the legendary V-8 Ford engine. An exact replica of Ford’s very first engine was built by Ray Zeihm, a retired automotive/ aerospace engineer, and will be on display for the Ford Flathead Club. Others are welcome to visit. Jack Stokes Ballard’s book on the history of Fort Logan and a 2013 calendar will be on sale. The home will be open from 9 a.m. to noon, with the Ford Club arriving at 9:30. 303-789-3568.

Arts center staying busy

A.J. Stapleton, Jeff Fleck and Robert Seydel are working together to bring free bikes to children in need. near C-470. By mid-October, he had 1,000 bicycles collected for the 2012 holiday distribution season. He can hardly wait to see the look on the faces of those first children who open the warehouse doors the day they arrive to select their bike. “It’s awesome, it’s like riding a bike all over again for me,” Fleck said. “We all know the feeling of our first bicycle. We all know the feeling of freedom, almost the feeling of flight.” Fleck started Bikes for Tykes when he watched his brother-in-law, Craig Secher, run Realities for Children, an outreach program in Larimer County. Secher helped Fleck launch Bikes for Tykes in 2009 and the program reaches families served by agencies that include the Douglas County Department of Human Services, the Women’s Crisis and Family

Robert Seydel of Project ReCycle works on a donated bicycle. The Bikes for Tykes annual holiday bike distribution provides bikes for children in need.

Outreach Center and the Douglas/Elbert Task Force. The Bikes for Tykes program provides a great experience for the families it reaches, said Heather Orr, executive director, Women’s Crisis and Family Outreach Center. The center serves victims of domestic violence in Douglas and Elbert counties and in 2011 reached 623 kids. Each year Orr provides Fleck with a list of about 20 kids who hope for a bike for Christmas and, each year, Fleck delivers. “What I really like is they understand the need for our confidentiality for our clients and they’re really respectful of that.” Orr said. “Getting a bike is a pretty big deal especially for the younger kids. It gives them a chance to think about something else instead of what they’re going through. It’s a pretty generous donation.” For more information about the Bikes for Tykes program visit www.bikesfortykescolorado.org.

A full schedule is planned for Lone Tree Arts Center in November. • Colorado Children’s Chorale Holiday Concert will be at 3 p.m. Nov. 18, preceded by a pre-show workshop at 1:30 for children 5-11. Performance only tickets: $5; workshop plus concert: $7. A Passport to Culture event. • “Harry the Great” by John DiAntonio, presented by the Creede Repertory Theatre, will run Nov. 1 to Nov. 11. Tickets start at $29. • Essential Jazz by the newly formed Colorado Jazz Repertory Orchestra, at 7:30 p.m. Nov. 11. Music of Ellington and Basie. Tickets: $15. • “Geography of Adventure” Episode I: The 50 States. By Stephen Cole Hughes and Jessica Jackson of Creede Repertory Theatre. Nov. 13 at 10 a.m. and 7 p.m. and Nov. 14 at 10 a.m. Tickets: $8, individuals; $5, groups of 10 or more. • Chamber Music Insights: “Narrative in Music: Beethoven Until the Present Day.” 1:30 p.m. Nov. 14, in the Event Hall. Tickets: $15.

‘Fixated’ is theme 

Stories on Stage will round up Denver Arts Week on Nov. 10 with readings by James Avery, Jamie Ann Romero and Drew Horowitz, on the theme, “Fixated.” Performances 1:30 and 7:30 p.m. at Su Teatro, 721 Santa Fe Drive, Denver. Tickets: $25 — two for one. 303-494-0523, storiesonstage.org.


Elbert County News 7

November 8, 2012

Tunson retrospective displayed in Springs By Sonya Ellingboe

sellingboe@ourcoloradonews.com “Floyd Tunson: Son of Pop” opened on Oct. 27 at the Colorado Springs Fine Arts Center — a 40-year retrospective of his sculpture, painting, photography and printmaking. It’s the first major survey of his work and runs through Jan. 20. He is a highly influential artist in the Rocky Mountain West, although not a “Western artist” as such, with red rocks, rivers, canyons … Tunson was born in Denver in 1947 and has lived and worked in Colorado Springs, where he taught art at Palmer High School from 1971 to 2000, touching the lives of more than 5,000 students. At the center of the exhibition, which addresses cultural identity, American social history, pop culture, art history and the pleasure of pure abstraction, the visitor finds strong installations: “Hearts and Minds,” “Delta

Queen,” “Haitian Dream Boats” and “Pop-Up Rodeo.” They pull together Tunson’s themes and variety of media over four decades. A catalog includes an essay by Pulitzer Prize-winning poet Yusef Komunyakaa, who said: “Tunson is a master of visual satire, but, from the moment we met, I also sensed his gift of cool deliberation.” The “Pop” in the title has several meanings, including Tunson’s father (Curtis Oscar David) and the artist’s fondness for pop artists such as Robert Rauschenberg, Jasper Johns and Andy Warhol.

Tunson said that from one direction he sees “the terror of chaos, man’s inhumanity to man, mortality and the unknown. From another direction, the human condition seems like a magnificent, orderly evolution of extraordinary beauty” and he states that the totality of his work reflects his “quest to comprehend and express these forces and their interconnectedness.” The Colorado Springs Fine Arts Center is at 30 W. Dale St. More information: csfineartscenter.org.

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8 Elbert County News

November 8, 2012

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A less than welcome guest: “The Man Who Came to Dinner,” by George S. Kaufman and Max Hart will take over the Stanley home. After a slip on an icy front doorstep, radio personality Sheridan Whiteside is confined to the home of Mr. and Mrs. Stanley to recuperate, an event that will take over many lives. “The Man Who Came to Dinner” plays Nov. 17 to Dec. 22 at the John Hand Theater, 7653 E. First Place, Denver. Directed by Pat Payne and Bernie Cardell. Tickets: $20, 18; 720-880-8727; www.thisisspotlight.org.

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will be presented by Front Range Theatre Company in cooperation with the Douglas County Memorial Foundation. The program will feature veterans performing brief monologues, sometimes funny, sometimes shocking. Show is at 7 p.m. Nov. 16 at Douglas County High School Auditorium, 2842 Front St., Castle Rock.

Hills to come alive Richard Rodgers and Oscar Hammerstein II composed the beloved score for “The Sound of Music,” next in line for Town Hall Arts Center, 2450 W. Main St., downtown Littleton. Robert Wells will direct, Donna Coplan Debrecini is music

director and Kelly Kates will choreograph. Performances: Nov. 16 to Dec. 30. Tickets, $22-$42; for information, go to townhallartscenter.com or call 303-794-2787.

Family tension

“On Stage Next” will be onstage Nov. 9 through Dec. 23 at Miners Alley Playhouse, 1224 Washington St., Golden, 303935-3044. In an evening at the Gorski house, a Pittsburgh son brings home his atheist fiancee to meet his very Catholic parents. Performances: Thursdays through Sundays. Tickets: $19 to $2650. Rita Broderick directs. www.minersalley.com; 303-935-3044.

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“Mame,” by Patrick Dennis and Jerry Herman, winner of five Tony Awards, plays Nov. 8 through Jan. 13 at Candlelight Dinner Playhouse, 4747 Marketplace Drive, Johnstown (I-25 at Exit 254, just south of Johnson’s Corner). Adapted from Dennis’ 1955 novel, the play went to Broadway and to films by Lucille Ball and Rosalind Russell. Tickets: Adult show and ticket: Thursday to Saturday evening, $45.50-$57.50, depending on what day of the week, seating at 6 p.m., show at 7:30. Saturday matinees: dinner at noon, seating at 1:30 p.m. Sunday matinees: dinner at 2 p.m. Show-only tickets : $29.50, $19.50. 970-744-3747. coloradocandlelight.com.

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Colorado Community Media welcomes event listings and other submissions. Please note our new submissions emails. Events and club listings calendar@ourcoloradonews. com School notes, such as honor roll and dean’s list schoolnotes@ ourcoloradonews.com Military briefs militarynotes@ ourcoloradonews.com General press releases pressreleases@ ourcoloradonews.com Letters to the editor letters@ourcoloradonews. com News tips news@ourcoloradonews. com Fax information to 303566-4098 Mail to 9137 S. Ridgeline Blvd., Ste. 210, Highlands Ranch, CO 80129


Elbert CountySPORTS

9 Elbert County News

November 8, 2012

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The Elizabeth gymnastics team pose with the Class 4A championship trophy after capturing the title Friday at Thornton High School. Photos by Kevan Sheppard

Cardinals capture 4A gymnastics crown

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Peterson edges Goldsberry for all. -around title

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By Scott Stocker

sports@ourcoloradonews.com THORNTON — It makes no difference what the sport, one can always expect the unexpected. And, that certainly was the case last Friday in the Class 4A state gymnastics tournament held at Thornton High School. Elizabeth’s Danae Goldsberry came into state as the probable favorite to win the all-around title, but it was her teammate, Kimmy Peterson, who came through as the champion. Peterson, surprised that she won, scored 36.625 to edge Goldsberry’s 36.5. Bobbles and falls have always been a downfall in gymnastics and it was a fall on floor, a .5 deduction, that eventually cost Goldsberry the title. Despite the fall, she, as well as her teammates and coach Stacey Folmar, was elated that Elizabeth was able to win the team title. Elizabeth scored 179.425 with Evergreen finishing second with 174.35 and Thompson Valley third, 174. Only six teams were in competition for the title with Lone Star (165.175), Pueblo Central (157.2) and Fort Morgan (157.05) rounding out the field. “I did have a better meet in our team competition,” said a modest Peterson. “We said a prayer before and that helped me. But I feel that Danae actually deserved to win it. I didn’t know it was that close, but at least we are one-two. Being first as a team is even better, something we all worked hard for. “Danae had a better day today (Saturday), and being able to rebound was

great,” said Peterson, who won the vault with a 9.5 to again edge Goldsberry’s 9.35. “But when you look at the total picture it was just a great meet for all of us.” Goldsberry was able to complete her rebound by coming through to win the balance beam with a 9.45 and floor, scoring 9.575. And, it was floor in which she edged Peterson, who scored 9.55, but then, she also had to settle for second on the uneven bars where she was beaten by Evergreen’s Callie Cohen, 9.375 to 9.275. “(Friday) was a really bad day for me,” said a tearful Goldsberry. “It just seemed unbelievable. The fall on floor, just so hard to take. My beam was not as good as it should have been, so there is nothing great about today.” However, the sentiments changed on Saturday as Goldsberry was able to depart a state individual champion and her beam certainly was a winner. “I just made up for yesterday and I’m just so proud of our team,” Goldsberry said. “You have to get back up and in this game, that’s how it is.” Thompson Valley held a slight lead over Elizabeth after the first two rounds in the team competition. With the balance beam and floor completed the Eagles had tallied 87.825 points while the Cardinals had scored 44.0 and 43.05, respectively, on the uneven bars and balance beam. Thankfully for the Cardinals the lead didn’t hold up as they scored a met high 46.5 on floor and 45.775 on vault. “”It just feels great, winning and that we’ve had a fine season overall,” Folmar said. “We had some difficulties (Friday). Danae and Emily (Reynolds) had some slips, but we had others who helped bring us up. Winning the championship is great. I’m proud of the girls and they are certainly proud of what they have been able to accomplish.” Adding to the success was the fourthCardinals continues on Page 10

Elizabeth’s Kimmy Peterson competes on the vault. Peterson edged teammate Danae Goldsberry to win the 4A allaround championship.


10 Elbert County News

November 8, 2012

Cardinals: Goldsberry captures pair of individual titles Cardinals continued from Page 9

place finish in the all-around by Reynolds, who scored 35.575. Cohen won third with her 36.35 while Thompson Valley’s Kelsey Vreeman (35.05) and Savannah Carlson (35.03) rounded out the top six. “I think we all did well,” Reynolds said. “I felt confident, but I did put more pressure on myself. (Saturday) was a little harder for me, but I still was confident. I messed up my bar and floor, but as a team, we came out alright, just great.” Making the finals all the more enjoyable were the efforts of Hailey Breikss, Shelby Morgan, Jessie Gerczynski and Alissa Poland. In fact, the vault brought a lot of smiles to the Cardinals as they took five of the six top places. Thompson Valley’s Shaina Burton broke the string as she finished fourth on the event with a 9.3. The order for the Cardinals - 1. Peterson, 2. Goldsberry. 3. Reynolds. 5. Breikss and 6, Morgan. Briekss also came through with a sixth on floor (9.25), Gerczynskie sixth on the uneven bars and Poland sixth on the balance beam (8.825). The foursome were quick to add their thoughts as the season concluded. “We could have done a little better overall, but we had the confidence to go around,” Poland said. “Floor and vault were good for me. I’m proud of our team. I wish I could have scored better (Saturday). I’m best on beam, not the best today, but a good routine.” “This has been my only year on the team and it has been great,” Gerczynski said. “The bars were a problem for me, only an 8.75, but that is good for me. Being in state is just awesome.” And, that was true for Morgan and Briekss.

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“I’m pleased as a freshman for us to win state,” Morgan said. “I wanted to go as hard as I could and just do my best. The vault in the finals, that was pretty good.” Said Briekss, closing out the day, “This is the best experience that I’ve ever had. I just wanted to stop worrying, go out and have fun. I think we all did that.” CLASS 4A Thornton High School Team: Elizabeth 179.425, Evergreen 174.35, Thompson Valley 174.00, Lone Star 165.175, Pueblo Central 157.2, Fort Morgan 157.05. All-around: 1. Kimmy Peterson, Elizabeth, 36.625. 2. Danae Goldsberry, Elizabeth, 36.5. 3. Callie Cohen, Evergreen, 36.35. 4. Emily Reynolds, Elizabeth, 35.575. 5. Kelsey Vreeman, Thompson Valley, 35.05. 6. Savannah Carlson, Thompson Valley, 35.03. Balance Beam: 1. Danae Goldsberry, Elizabeth, 9.45. 2. Callie Cohen, Evergreen, 9.175. 3. Kimmy Peterson, Elizabeth, 9.05. 4. Kelsey Vreeman, Thompson Valley, 9.025. 5. Savannah Carlson, Thompson Valley, 8.925. 6. Alissa Poland, Elizabeth, 8.825. Floor: 1. Danae Goldsberry, Elizabeth, 9.575. 2. Kimmy Peterson, Elizabeth, 9.55 (tie-breaker). 3. Kelsey Vreeman, Thompson Valley, 9.55. 4. Callie Cohen, Evergreen, 9.45. 5. Savannah Carlson, Thompson Valley, 9.375. 6. Hailey Breikss, Elizabeth, 9.25. Uneven Bars: 1. Callie Cohen, Evergreen, 9.375. 2. Danae Goldsberry, Elizabeth, 9.275. 3. Erika Kissler, Evergreen, 9.025 (tie-breaker). 4. Alex Greenbaum, Evergreen, 9.025. 5. Kimmy Peterson, Elizabeth, 9.0. 6. Jessie Gerczynskie, Elizabeth, 8.875. Vault: 1. Kimmy Peterson, Elizabeth, 9.5. 2. Danae Goldsberry, Elizabeth, 9.35. 3. Emily Reynolds, Elizabeth, 9.325. 4. Shaina Burton, Thompson Valley, 9.3. 5. Hailey Breikss, Elizabeth, 9.225. 6. shelby Morgan, Elizabeth, 9.2.

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Elizabeth’s Danae Goldsberry competes on the uneven bars. Goldsberry came in second in the all-around, and won a pair of individual event championships. Photo by Kevan Sheppard.

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Elbert County News 11

November 8, 2012

Poundstone to share humor at Denver’s Newman Center Comic speaks out for libraries By Sonya Ellingboe

sellingboe@ourcoloradonews.com Paula Poundstone creates humor on the spot as she speaks — equipped only with a stool, a microphone and a Diet Pepsi. Her spontaneous interaction with

audience members will bring guffaws when she appears in concert at 8 p.m. on Nov. 9 at the Newman Center. The Comedian a regular panelist on National Public Radio’s weekly news quiz show, “Wait Wait … Don’t Tell Me” and offers commentary on NPR’s Morning Edition at times. Literate comedy would describe her style. Poundstone has for some time been

the national spokeswoman for the Association of Library Trustees, Advocates, Friends and Foundations (ALTAFF), a national network of library supporters. Libraries benefit from her appearances as she partners with local groups. She said: “It’s funny that we think of libraries as quiet demure places where we are shushed by dusty, bun-balancing bespectacled women. The truth is that

libraries are raucous clubhouses for free speech, controversy and community. Librarians have stood up to the Patriot Act, sat down with noisy toddlers and reached out to illiterate adults. Librarians can never be shushed. If you haven’t been to your library lately, you’re overdue.” The Newman Center is at 2344 E. Iliff Ave. at the University of Denver. Tickets: $44. 303-871-7720.

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For Local News Anytime of the Day Visit OurColoradoNews.com Public Notice NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING PLANNING COMMISSION, ELBERT COUNTY, COLORADO ON FIRST AMENDMENT TO THE SERVICE PLAN AND THIRD REVISED FINANCIAL PLAN FOR NORTH PINES METROPOLITAN DISTRICT

PUBLIC NOTICE Public Notice of Petition for Change of Name Public notice is given on October 16, 2012 that a Petition for a Change of Name of an adult has been filed with the Elbert County Combined Court. The Petition requests that the name of Sarah Adamson be changed to Sarah Nicole Zoesch. Case No.: 2012 C 47 Cheryl A. Layne Clerk of Court By: Jafeen Jenkins Deputy Clerk Legal Notice No: 927815 First Publication: November 1, 2012 Last Publication: November 15, 2012 Publisher: Elbert County News

Notice To Creditors PUBLIC NOTICE NOTICE TO CREDITORS In the Matter of the Estate of John Edward Thompson, John E. Thompson, aka John Thompson, Deceased Case Number: 2012 PR 38 All persons having claims against the above-named estate are required to present them to the Personal Representative or to the District Court of Elbert County, Colorado on or before March 8, 2013 or the claims may be forever barred. Daniel Vincent Patrick O’Connor and Catherine Ellen O’Connor Co-Personal Representatives 6572 S. Queensburg Court Aurora, Colorado 80016 Legal Notice No: 926822 First Publication: November 8, 2012 Last Publication: November 22, 2012 Publisher: Elbert County News

Government Legals Public Notice NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING BOARD OF COUNTY

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NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING PROPOSED BUDGET FOR 2013 AND BUDGET AMENDMENT FOR 2012 OF THE NORTH PINES METROPOLITAN DISTRICT

Government Legals

Public Notice

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS, ELBERT COUNTY, COLORADOON FIRST AMENDMENT TO THE SERVICE PLAN AND THIRD REVISED FINANCIAL PLAN FOR NORTH PINES METROPOLITAN DISTRICT PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that there has been filed with the Board of County Commissioners, Elbert County, Colorado, a First Amendment to the Service Plan and Third Revised Financial Plan (“Plan”) for the North Pines Metropolitan District. The property affected is located east of Delbert Road and north of Amanda Pines Estates subdivision, Elbert County, including the Sky Rim and Whisper subdivisions. The District desires to amend its service plan to allow issuance of general obligation debt unlimited as to mill levy in the approximate amount of $2,560,000. A copy of the Plan is on file at the Elbert County Planning and Zoning Department, 215 Comanche Street , Kiowa, Colorado, 303-621-3136, and is available for public inspection Monday through Thursday between the hours of 7:30 a.m. and 5:00 p.m. NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN that the Board of County Commissioners, Elbert County, Colorado, will hold a public hearing on Wednesday, November 14, 2012 at 9:00 a.m. at 215 Comanche Street, Kiowa, Colorado, for the purpose of considering approval of the Plan. Legal Notice No.: 927805 First Publication: October 25, 2012 Last Publication: November 8, 2012 Publisher: The Elbert County News Public Notice NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING PLANNING COMMISSION, ELBERT COUNTY, COLORADO ON FIRST AMENDMENT TO THE SERVICE PLAN AND THIRD REVISED FINANCIAL PLAN FOR NORTH PINES METROPOLITAN DISTRICT PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that there has been filed with the Planning Commission, Elbert County, Colorado, a First Amendment to the Service Plan and Third Revised Financial Plan (“Plan”) for the North Pines Metropolitan District. The property affected is located east of Delbert Road and north of Amanda Pines Estates subdivision, Elbert County, including the Sky Rim and Whisper subdivisions. The District desires to amend its service plan to allow issuance of general obligation debt unlimited as to mill levy in the ap-

PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that there has been filed with the Planning Commission, Elbert County, Colorado, a First Amendment to the Service Plan and Third Revised Financial Plan (“Plan”) for the North Pines Metropolitan District. The property affected is located east of Delbert Road and north of Amanda Pines Estates subdivision, Elbert County, including the Sky Rim and Whisper subdivisions. The District desires to amend its service plan to allow issuance of general obligation debt unlimited as to mill levy in the approximate amount of $2,560,000. A copy of the Plan is on file at the Elbert County Planning and Zoning Department, 215 Comanche Street, Kiowa, Colorado, 303621-3136, and is available for public inspection Monday through Thursday between the hours of 7:30 a.m. and 5:00 p.m.

Government Legals

NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN that the Planning Commission, Elbert County, Colorado, will hold a public hearing on Thursday, November 8, 2012 at 7:00 p.m. at 215 Comanche Street, Kiowa, Colorado, for the purpose of considering approval of the Plan. Legal Notice No.: 927806 First Publication: October 25, 2012 Last Publication: November 8, 2012 Publisher: The Elbert County News Public Notice NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING PROPOSED BUDGET FOR 2013 AND BUDGET AMENDMENT FOR 2012 OF THE NORTH PINES METROPOLITAN DISTRICT NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that a proposed budget has been submitted to the Board of Directors of the North Pines Metropolitan District, of the County of Elbert, State of Colorado, for the ensuing year 2013; that a copy of such proposed budget has been filed in the office of the District Management located at, Burg Simpson Eldredge Hersh Jardine P.C., 40 Inverness Drive East, Englewood, Colorado 80112, (303) 792-5595, where the same is open for public inspection; and that such proposed budget will be considered at a regular meeting of the Board of Directors of the District to be held on November 8, 2012, at 5:00 p.m., at Blackstone Country Club, 7777 S. Country Club Pkwy, Aurora, CO 80016. Any interested elector of the North Pines Metropolitan District may inspect the budget, and file or register any objection thereto prior to the adoption of the 2013 Budget. NOTICE IS HEREBY ALSO GIVEN that a proposed budget amendment for the 2012 Budget has been submitted to the Board of Directors of the North Pines Metropolitan District, of the County of Elbert, State of Colorado; that a copy of the amendment has been filed in the office of the District Management located at Burg Simpson Eldredge Hersh Jardine P.C., 40 Inverness Drive East, Englewood, Colorado 80112, (303) 792-5595, where the same is open for public inspection, and that such Proposed Budget Amendment will be considered at a regular meeting of

posed budgetElizabeth has been submitted to the or Board of Directors of the North Pines MetSurrounding ropolitan District, of Communities the County of Elbert, State of Colorado, for the ensuing year 2013; that a copy of such proposed Call Mike budget has been filed in the office of the District Management located at, Burg Simpson Eldredge Hersh Jardine P.C., 40 Inverness Drive East, Englewood, Colorado 80112, (303) 792-5595, where the same is open for public inspection; and that such proposed budget will be considered at a regular meeting of the Board of Directors of the District to be held on November 8, 2012, at 5:00 p.m., at Blackstone Country Club, 7777 S. Country Club Pkwy, Aurora, CO 80016. Any interested elector of the North Pines Metropolitan District may inspect the budget, and file or register any objection thereto prior to the adoption of the 2013 Budget.

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NOTICE IS HEREBY ALSO GIVEN that a proposed budget amendment for the 2012 Budget has been submitted to the Board of Directors of the North Pines Metropolitan District, of the County of Elbert, State of Colorado; that a copy of the amendment has been filed in the office of the District Management located at Burg Simpson Eldredge Hersh Jardine P.C., 40 Inverness Drive East, Englewood, Colorado 80112, (303) 792-5595, where the same is open for public inspection, and that such Proposed Budget Amendment will be considered at a regular meeting of the Board of Directors of the District to be held on November 8, 2012 at 5:00 p.m. at Blackstone Country Club, 7777 S. Country Club Pkwy, Aurora, CO 80016. Any interested elector of the North Pines Metropolitan District may inspect the budget amendment, and file or register any objection thereto prior to the adoption of the 2012 Budget Amendment. This Meeting is open to the public.

Government Legals

BY ORDER OF THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS THE NORTH PINES METROPOLITAN DISTRICT /s/ BURG SIMPSON ELDREDGE HERSH JARDINE, P.C. Legal Notice No.: 927810 First Publication: November 1, 2012 Last Publication: November 8, 2012 Publisher: The Elbert County News Public Notice NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING PROPOSED BUDGET FOR 2013 AND BUDGET AMENDMENT FOR 2012 OF THE CLEARWATER METROPOLITAN DISTRICT NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that a proposed budget has been submitted to the Board of Directors of the Clearwater Metropolitan District, of the County of Elbert, State of Colorado, for the ensuing year 2013; that a copy of such proposed budget has been filed in the office of the District Management located at, Burg Simpson Eldredge Hersh Jardine P.C., 40 Inverness Drive East, Englewood, Colorado 80112, (303) 792-5595, where the same is open for public inspection; and that such proposed budget will be considered at a regular meeting of the Board of Directors of the District to be held on November 8, 2012, at 4:00 p.m., at Blackstone Country Club, 7777 S. Country Club Pkwy, Aurora, CO 80016. Any interested elector of the Clearwater Metropolitan District may inspect the budget, and file or register any objection thereto prior to the adoption of the 2013 Budget. NOTICE IS HEREBY ALSO GIVEN that a proposed budget amendment for the 2012 Budget has been submitted to the Board of Directors of the Clearwater Metropolitan District, of the County of Elbert, State of Colorado; that a copy of the amendment has been filed in the office of the District Management located at Burg Simpson Eldredge Hersh Jardine P.C., 40 Inverness Drive East, Englewood, Colorado 80112, (303) 792-5595, where the same is open for public inspection, and

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NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING PROPOSED BUDGET FOR 2013 AND BUDGET AMENDMENT FOR 2012 OF THE CLEARWATER METROPOLITAN DISTRICT NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that a proposed budget has been submitted to the Board of Directors of the Clearwater Metropolitan District, of the County of Elbert, State of Colorado, for the ensuing year 2013; that a copy of such proposed budget has been filed in the office of the District Management located at, Burg Simpson Eldredge Hersh Jardine P.C., 40 Inverness Drive East, Englewood, Colorado 80112, (303) 792-5595, where the same is open for public inspection; and that such proposed budget will be considered at a regular meeting of the Board of Directors of the District to be held on November 8, 2012, at 4:00 p.m., at Blackstone Country Club, 7777 S. Country Club Pkwy, Aurora, CO 80016. Any interested elector of the Clearwater Metropolitan District may inspect the budget, and file or register any objection thereto prior to the adoption of the 2013 Budget. NOTICE IS HEREBY ALSO GIVEN that a proposed budget amendment for the 2012 Budget has been submitted to the Board of Directors of the Clearwater Metropolitan District, of the County of Elbert, State of Colorado; that a copy of the amendment has been filed in the office of the District Management located at Burg Simpson Eldredge Hersh Jardine P.C., 40 Inverness Drive East, Englewood, Colorado 80112, (303) 792-5595, where the same is open for public inspection, and that such Proposed Budget Amendment will be considered at a regular meeting of the Board of Directors of the District to be held on November 8, 2012 at 4:00 p.m. at Blackstone Country Club, 7777 S. Country Club Pkwy, Aurora, CO 80016. Any interested elector of the Clearwater Metropolitan District may inspect the budget amendment, and file or register any objection thereto prior to the adoption of the 2012 Budget Amendment. This Meeting is open to the public.

Government Legals

BY ORDER OF THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS THE CLEARWATER METROPOLITAN DISTRICT /s/ BURG SIMPSON ELDREDGE HERSH JARDINE, P.C. Legal Notice No.: 927811 First Publication: November 1, 2012 Last Publication: November 8, 2012 Publisher: The Elbert County News Public Notice SPRING VALLEY METROPOLITAN DISTRICT NOS. 1-3 NOTICE CONCERNING 2012 BUDGET AMENDMENT AND PROPOSED 2013 BUDGET NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN to all interested parties that the necessity has arisen to amend the Spring Valley Metropolitan District Nos. 1-3 2012 Budgets and that proposed 2013 Budgets have been submitted to the Board of Directors of the Spring Valley Metropolitan District Nos. 13; and that copies of the proposed Amended 2012 Budgets and 2013 Budgets have been filed at the District's offices, 141 Union Boulevard, Suite 150, Lakewood, Colorado, where the same is open for public inspection; and that adoption of Resolutions Amending the 2012 Budgets and Adopting the 2013 Budgets will be considered at a public meeting of the Board of Directors of the Districts to be held at Running Creek Investments, LLC, 7108 South Alton Way, Bldg. M, Englewood, Colorado, on Monday, November 19, 2012, at 2:00 P.M. Any elector within the District may, at any time prior to the final adoption of the Resolutions to Amend the 2012 Budgets and Adopt the 2013 Budgets, inspect and file or register any objections thereto. SPRING VALLEY METROPOLITAN DISTRICT NOS. 1-3 By /s/ Lisa A. Johnson Secretary

Tile Public Notice SPRING VALLEY METROPOLITAN DISTRICT NOS. 1-3

NOTICE CONCERNING 2012 BUDGET AMENDMENT AND PROPOSED 2013 BUDGET

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN to all interested parties that the necessity has arisen to amend the Spring Valley Metropolitan District Nos. 1-3 2012 Budgets and that proposed 2013 Budgets have been submitted to the Board of Directors of the Spring Valley Metropolitan District Nos. 1 3; and that copies of the proposed Amended 2012 Budgets and 2013 Budgets have been filed at the District's offices, 141 Union Boulevard, Suite 150 Lakewood, Colorado, where the same is open for public inspection; and that adoption of Resolutions Amending the 2012 Budgets and Adopting the 2013 Budgets will be considered at a public meeting of the Board of Directors of the Districts to be held at Running Creek Investments, LLC, 7108 South Alton Way, Bldg. M, Englewood, Colorado, on Monday, November 19, 2012, at 2:00 P.M. Any elector within the District may, at any time prior to the final adoption of the Resolutions to Amend the 2012 Budgets and Adopt the 2013 Budgets, inspect and file or register any objections thereto. SPRING VALLEY METROPOLITAN DISTRICT NOS. 1-3

Government Legals

By /s/ Lisa A. Johnson Secretary

Legal Notice No.: 927820 First Publication: November 8, 2012 Last Publication: November 8, 2012 Publisher: The Elbert County News Public Notice NOTICE OF PURCHASE OF REAL ESTATE AT TAX LIEN SALE AND OF APPLICATION FOR ISSUANCE OF TREASURER'S DEED TSC 2009-00870

To Every Person in Actual Possession or Occupancy of the hereinafter Described Land, Lot or Premises, and to the Person in Whose Name the Same was Taxed or Specially Assessed, and to all Persons having an Interest or Title of Record in or to the said Premises and To Whom It May Concern, and more especially to: Destiny Ventures LLC

You and each of you are hereby notified that on the 17th day of November A.D 2009 the then County Treasurer of the County of Elbert, in the State of Colorado sold at public tax lien sale to Philip C Berggren the following described real estate situate in the County of Elbert, State of Colorado, to wit:

Section: 13 Township: 8 Range: 65 Subdivision: ELIZABETH STREET PLAZA 1ST AMENDEMENT Lot: 002D and said County Treasurer issued a certificate of purchase therefore to Philip C Berggren. That said tax lien sale was made to satisfy the delinquent taxes assessed against real estate for the year 2008:

That said real estate was taxed or specially assessed in the name(s) of Destiny Ventures LLC for said year 2008.

That a Treasurer's Deed will be issued for said real estate to the said Philip C Berggren at 3:00 o'clock P.M., on the 14 day for February, A.D. 2013, unless the same has been redeemed.

Said property may be redeemed from said sale at any time prior to the actual execution of said Treasurer's Deed. Witness my hand this 24 day of October, A.D. 2012. Richard Pettitt County Treasurer of Elbert County Legal Notice No.: 927821 First Publication: November 8, 2012 Last Publication: November 22, 2012 Publisher: The Elbert County News


12 Elbert County News

November 8, 2012

Hudson Gardens powers up for holidays By Sonya Ellingboe

sellingboe@ourcoloradonews.com

Wagon rides are available each evening for $6 per person. Hudson Gardens and Event Center is

at 6117 S. Santa Fe Drive, Littleton. Free parking. 303-7978565.

At sundown on Nov. 23, Hudson Gardens and Event Center will glow with its new holiday decor: 30 acres of lights, decorated trees and fountains shooting into the night. A signature Aurora Borealis will weave a pattern in the sky among the tall cottonwoods. Hot chocolate and wassail will warm visitors as they ride on horse-drawn wagons in their journey around the grounds. “A Hudson Christmas” will run between 5:30 and 8:30 p.m. on 25 selected evenings, Thanksgiving through January 1, including Nov. 23 and 24, Nov. 30, Dec. 1; Dec 7, 8 and daily from Dec. 14 through Jan. 1 — including Christmas Eve, Christmas Day, New Year’s Eve and New Year’s Day. Tickets cost $9/adult; $7/member; $6/child 4-12; free 0-3. Tickets are available at www.tickethorse.com or at the door.

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Elbert County News 110812