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News

Elbert 6-27-13

Elbert County

Elbert County, Colorado • Volume 118, Issue 22

June 27, 2013

75 cents

A Colorado Community Media Publication

ourelbertcountynews.com And the winners are ... Look inside to find out who made Colorado Community Media’s list.

Man enters guilty plea in wildfire Staff report

Elbert County Emergency Manager Cory Stark is starting a new career with the Colorado Office of Emergency Management. Working at the division level, Stark will serve as the north central regional field manager, helping 10 counties — including Elbert — build and manage better emergency management programs. Photo by Deborah Grigsby

Search on for new emergency manager State picks Stark to serve as regional field manager By Deborah Grigsby

dgrigsby@ourcoloradonews.com Just as wildfire season heats up, Elbert County will lose its emergency manager to the Colorado Office of Emergency Management. Cory Stark, the tall, soft-spoken “master of disaster” who helped forge multi-jurisdictional partnerships and scrape together grant money for critical upgrades to the county’s emergency dispatch system, began his new position June 24 as the state’s

new north central regional field manager. “This really is a dream job for me,” Stark said from his office in Kiowa. “I first heard about the position back in 2009, but of course, it wasn’t open then. So when it was re-advertised at the beginning of the year, I applied and said, `If this job really is for me, then the doors will open.’” And open they did. “We are very excited to have Cory in our office as well as our division,” said Colorado Director of Emergency Management Dave Hard. “Cory has demonstrated excellence in building relationships, teams and good systems out in Elbert County and we look forward to him applying those skills here in the North Central Region.”

In his new role, Stark will assist 10 counties, including Elbert, helping local governments and community agencies improve emergency management plans and programs. Stark’s position has been advertised on the county website, offering an annual salary of up to $55,000. Applications for the position will be accepted until 5 p.m. on July 1. Elbert County District 2 Commissioner Kurt Schlegel said the county will not appoint an interim emergency manager to serve until the position can be permanently filled. “We simply don’t have the staff to do Search continues on Page 11

A former volunteer firefighter has pleaded guilty to intentionally setting a wildfire, a Class 3 felony, according to an Elbert County Sheriff’s Office news release. Alex Averett, of Elbert, is scheduled to face sentencing Sept. 16. Earlier this year, authorities said Averett admitted to starting the June 2012 County Road 102 Fire. The blaze scorched 600 acres and forced the evacuation of 100 residents from the town of Elbert. More than 100 fire and law enforcement Averett personnel from multiple agencies responded to the fire at a time when resources were strained due to the Waldo Canyon and Hyde Park fires. At the time, Averett was a 19-year-old volunteer with the Elbert Fire Protection District. “I speak for all officers and volunteers of the Elbert Fire Department, as well as members of the Elbert community, in stating we were shocked and saddened to learn the alleged arsonist was one of our own,” Fire Chief John Gresham said in February. Averett also pleaded guilty June 17 to criminal mischief, a Class 1 misdemeanor. He remains in jail on a $50,000 bond.

In tornado country, what goes around comes around DIA twister is reminder of Colorado weather patterns By Kevin Vaughan and Burt Hubbard I-News Network

The tornado sighting that set off alarms and frightened passengers at Denver International Airport on June 18 was a startling reminder that Colorado is indeed twister country. Since 1950, only six other states have experienced more tornadoes than the 1,948 documented here, an I-News examination of federal weather data found. And two of the state’s fastest-growing counties — Weld and Adams, which surrounds DIA — had the most tornadoes during that 63-year span. Combined, they accounted for 410 tornadoes, more than one of every five. In addition, the Weld County town of Windsor experienced the most de-

structive twister in state history. And then there’s the airport sitting on the high plains 25 miles from downtown Denver. On an average day, DIA sees about 145,000 passengers, and at any given time as many as 20,000 people may be in the terminal and concourses. Officials there are keenly aware that the airport could become a tornado bull’s-eye at any given time. Two separate tabletop exercises conducted earlier this year for just such an eventuality became showtime reality June 18. “We followed protocol and everything went very smoothly,” Laura Coale, director of media relations at DIA, said June 19. There were no reported injuries, damage or calls for paramedics, she said. The tornado was preliminarily rated an EF1 by the National Weather Service, and touched down between two runways on the airport’s east side.

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A tornado ripped through parts of Elbert and El Paso counties in June 2012, leaving behind areas of devastation, like this property in Ramah. No deaths were reported. File photo

DIA has safe spaces

Even in practice scenarios that assumed backed-up traffic at DIA with larger passenger loads, the airport has a safe place for everyone. In addition to the bathrooms and stairwells, the airport can evacuate people to the underground baggage tunnels if necessary, officials have said. On May 8, 1975 — long before DIA was even conceived — an F3 tornado touched down near 56th Avenue and Picadilly Road and tracked to the northeast. It was on the ground for four miles and was a quartermile wide. Back then, the area was farmland, and

the twister did no damage. But if that historic tornado had been the one to hit June 18, it could have been a different story. That tornado’s track went directly across present-day Pena Boulevard, across a runway and into the west-side parking lot next to the main terminal. While it’s true that tornadoes are much more common in Colorado than one might realize, it’s equally true that they are not likely to pack the power of those that hit farther east — such as the destructive and deadly twisters that ravaged parts of Oklahoma in May. Tornado continues on Page 10


2-Color

2 Elbert County News

June 27, 2013

elbert county news in a hurry Tree board seek applicants

The Elizabeth Tree Board is currently seeking applications to fill vacancies in its membership. The board provides assistance and advice regarding the condition of trees on public property as well as the planting, maintenance and removal of trees; shrubs within the town; and encouraging good landscaping practices. Those interested should forward a letter of interest to the Elizabeth Town Hall, P.O. Box 159, Elizabeth, CO 80107. Applications will be accepted until seats are filled.

Pioneer Fourth slated

The Elbert County Historical Society’s 13th Annual Pioneer Fourth Celebration will be held on July 4 on the museum grounds, 515 Comanche St. in Kiowa. Activities will run from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. and include a museum open house, a pie baking contest, live music, silent auction, local crafters, watermelon eating contest, and games for all ages. For more information, or to register as a vendor or crafter, visit www.elbertcounty-

museum.org.

Horse show scheduled

The Elbert County All Breed Open Show has been set for July 14 at the Elbert County Fairgrounds in Kiowa. Circuit halter and showmanship classes will start at 8 a.m. English and Western classes will follow. For more information or to sponsor show awards, contact Rex Roberts at 303805-2094 or 720-837-7299.

Get free legal help

Lawyers at the Library, a legal clinic for those without an attorney, returns to the Elizabeth Public Library from 6 to 9 p.m. July 9. This free clinic for Elbert and Lincoln counties covers several areas of the law including: family law, civil litigation, criminal defense, property law, probate law, collections, appeals, landlord-tenant law, veterans’ benefits, and protection orders. The clinic is sponsored by the 18th Judicial District. The library is located at 651 Beverly St., in Elizabeth. For more information, call 303-646-3416.

Column will return in july Ann Macari Healey’s column will return in Colorado Community Media newspapers on July 11 and 12.

things to do June 27, July 9, July 11 Summer ProGramS. Elbert County Library District presents weekly summer reading programs. Digging History is June 27. Explore Colorado’s past, focusing on jobs and industries that drew people to our state. Third is a program about Fossils July 9 and 11. Learn what fossils are, who studies them and where they can be found. Kids will see what a fossil looks like by making one to take home. Underground critters will be the topic of the next programs July 16 and July 18. Read about prairie dogs, badgers and bears. The craft will be a puppet of one of the animals. Local musican Roann Keene, aka Ms.Ro, presents her interactive Dig Into Music performance July 23 and July 25. Programs are offered at 10:30 a.m. Tuesdays at the Simla Library, at 10 a.m. Thursdays at the Elizabeth Library; and at noon Thursdays at the Kiowa Library. For a complete list, to register or for information, visit www.elbertcountylibrary.org or call 303-646-3792. June 29 Kiowa STreeT Fair. Come see the treasures within Elbert County and enjoy a family fun filled day at the Kiowa Street Fair from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. June 29 at AF Nordman Park. Food, live music, vendors, activities and more. Visit www.townofkiowa. com. Then head on over to the Elbert County Fairgrounds for the Cowboy Up Rodeo in Kiowa. Starts at 6 p.m. and will give you an evening of excitement and rodeo adventure. www.cowboyupinkiowa.org. The evening ends with Fireworks, weather permitting, provided by the Kiowa Fire Protection District. July 2 ScHool in the Woods: Lessons Learned from Creating a Nature Based School is offered from 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. July 2. Teachers will learn about nature-inspired lessons that they can implement in their classrooms, on their school grounds or on field trips. Teachers should come prepared to spend a day outdoors; please wear appropriate outdoor clothing (no sandals). The seminar is open to the public. Teachers may receive credit through Adams State College or BOCES. Fees and reservations apply; call 719-748-3253 ext. 109 or visit www.nps.gov/flfo/ forteachers/professionaldevelopment.htm. The class is at Florissant Fossil Beds National Monument. July 4

County Justice Center, 751 Ute St., in Kiowa. All walk-ins are welcome, and everyone will be assisted on a first-come, firstserved basis. Upcoming dates are March 15; April 19; May 17; June 21; July 19; Aug. 16; Sept. 20; Oct. 18; Nov. 15; Dec. 20.

July 19-20 QuilT enTrieS. Firehouse Quilts is looking for quilt entries for its eighth annual quilt show to support its mission of helping children in crisis in Colorado. Early bird entries submitted by May 17 are taken at a discounted entry fee ($15). Otherwise, the fee is $18 per item, and the final deadline is June 21. This year’s show has a special theme, Patriotic, along with 13 other categories. The show is from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. July 19-20 at the Douglas County Events Center in Castle Rock. All forms and instructions are available at www.firehousequilts.org; click on the Quilt Show link at the top. July 20-21 celTic FeSTival. The Elizabeth Celtic Festival is July 20-21 at Casey Jones Park in Elizabeth. Take yourself back in time and enjoy traditional Scottish Highland Games with a Medieval and Renaissance Fest, a British Dog Show, and a community fair to create a great weekend of fun for the entire family. www. elizabethcelticfestival.com. auG. 17 muSic FeSTival. The Elizabeth Music & Arts Festival is from 10 a.m. to 10 p.m. Aug. 17 at Casey Jones Park in Elizabeth. Enjoy a day of live music, arts and crafts vendors, food and more. Activities all day long. Visit www.elizabethfestival.com auG. 23-25 camPdraFT evenT. A campdrafting clinic and competition is Aug. 23-25 at Elbert County Fairgrounds in Kiowa. Be sure to be in Elbert County for the first ever in the United States Campdrafting event. Learn how to do this Australian sport at the clinic (champions coming from Australia to show you how it is done) and then test your skills at the first competition in the US. Don’t miss this unique opportunity. Contact Mary Harris at kiowacountryc@earthlink.net or 303-621-5836. Visit http:// campdraft.us. SePT. 13

4 at the Elbert County Museum in Kiowa. Good old-fashioned fun with free tours of the Elbert County Museum, pie eating contest, silent auction, music, food and more. Go to www. elbertcountymuseum.org for all the details.

GolF TournamenT. The Elizabeth Area Chamber of Commerce presents the chamber golf tournament on Sept. 13 at Spring Valley Golf Club. Enjoy a morning of golf, fun, and meeting other business people. Shotgun starts at 8 a.m. with lunch and awards following all the fun. Visit www.elizabethchamber.org.

July 9, July 11

ocT. 26

Pioneer FourTH celebration is from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. July

SoFTball camP. Elizabeth High School presents the Lady

Cards softball camp for players ages 6-18 from 9:30 a.m. to noon July 9 and July 11. Camp will focus on the fundamentals of hitting, throwing, fielding, base running and defense. Bring tennis shoes (cleats recommended), glove and water. Bats, helmets, sliding gear, catching equipment, etc., are also allowed. The camp is at Elizabeth High School, on the varsity softball field, 34500 CR 13. Cost is $25 per player if registered by July 5, and $30 for camp-day registration. Call Coach Steve Biller at 720-480-2680 for information.

July 19 leGal clinic. A free clinic for parties who have no attorney and who are going through divorce, legal separation, custody, post-decree cases or protection order cases is offered from 9 a.m. to noon the third Friday of each month at the Elbert

HarveST FeSTival. The Elizabeth Area Chamber of Commerce presents the Harvest Festival from noon to 3 p.m. Oct. 26 on Main Street in Elizabeth. Food, music, games and more. Spend an afternoon in Elizabeth for a safe Halloween by coming for trick-or-treat street throughout the town and enjoying games, vendors, food, and more on Main Street. Visit www. elizabethchamber.org. THe ouTbacK Express is a public transit service provided through the East Central Council of Local Governments is open and available to all residents of Cheyenne, Elbert, Kit Carson and Lincoln counties and provides an economical and efficient means of travel for the four-county region. Call Kay Campbell, Kiowa, at 719- 541-4275. You may also call the ECCOG office at 1-800-825-0208 to make reservations for any of the trips. You may also visit http://outbackexpress.tripod.com.


3-Color

Elbert County News 3

June 27, 2013

Jewelry thief gets 48-year sentence 53-year-old is ‘career criminal,’ judge says By Chris Michlewicz

cmichlewicz@ourcoloradonews.com A Douglas County District Court judge showed no leniency to a man who showed no remorse for committing his 13th felony. Prosecutors for the 18th Judicial District Attorney’s Office said Thomas Hild’s criminal record speaks for itself. Prior to his latest indiscretion, Hild had been convicted of 12 felonies — forgery, thirddegree burglary, repeated driving infractions, leaving the scene of an accident and escape among them — and has been in and out of prison since 1978. Hild’s latest felony conHild viction — this one for a brazen, four-hour-long heist that netted $480,000 in jewelry — was the final straw for Douglas County District Court Judge Paul A. King, who referred to the defendant as a “career criminal” before handing down a 48-year prison sentence June 14. Hild, 53, was arrested in May 2012 after the Parker Police Department identified him as one of three suspects in a burglary at Apex Jewelers two months earlier. Detective Penny VanDenBerg said Hild was recruited for his ability to drill through the wall of an adjacent vacant store and break into a safe using heavy-duty construction tools. Hild’s alleged co-conspirators, Charles Williams and Daniel Delgado, face separate trials. Laura Wilson, deputy district attorney, said the men would have gotten away with the crime if not for good detective work by VanDenBerg, who spotted Delgado on surveillance video going through a nearby McDonald’s drive-thru while the alleged

burglary was taking place. VanDenBerg said Delgado was supposed to be the “lookout.” Hild was found guilty on all eight charges he faced after a four-day jury trial in late February. Three of Hild’s relatives attended the June 14 sentencing hearing, in which prosecutors asked for consecutive sentences totaling 72 years behind bars. Wilson said the DA’s office was trying to make sure Hild would not become eligible for parole, regardless of his age. “The defendant has been given every opportunity in the community for rehabilitation,” Wilson said. “Nothing seems to deter him from criminal acts.” King said state law mandates concurrent sentences unless there are multiple victims. Ida Reinhold, the only family member to speak on Hild’s behalf, said Hild had started his own business, bought a home and was living a “normal life” since getting out of prison the most recent time. “He is a good person,” Reinhold said. While detailing his reasons for the 48year sentence, King delivered a pointed response to her assertion, saying, “Good people do not commit 13 felonies.” King also admonished Hild for not taking responsibility for his actions and said incarcerating him was the “only way to keep the community safe.” Hild’s defense attorney, Marques Ivey, said he believes the evidence was not enough to support the jury’s decision to find him guilty. “I don’t think they proved it,” Ivey said, referring to prosecutors’ circumstantial case. The judge granted Ivey’s request to find Hild indigent so he can immediately retain counsel to represent him in an appeal. Hild has 45 days to file a notice of appeal. He was given 400 days of credit for time served. The amount of restitution will be determined at a later date. The jewels that were stolen have not been recovered.

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4 Elbert County News

June 27, 2013

Newly insured to worsen doctor gap Shortage of physicians, more insured patients create dilemma By Ann Sanner

Associated Press Getting face time with the family doctor could soon become even harder. A shortage of primary care physicians in some parts of the country is expected to worsen as millions of newly insured Americans gain coverage under the federal health care law next year. Doctors could face a backlog, and patients could find it difficult to get quick appointments. Attempts to address the provider gap have taken on increased urgency ahead of the law’s full implementation January 1, but many of the potential solutions face a backlash from influential groups or will take years to bear fruit. Lobbying groups representing doctors have questioned the safety of some of the proposed changes, argued they would encourage less collaboration among health professionals and suggested they could create a two-tiered health system offering unequal treatment. Bills seeking to expand the scope of practice of dentists, dental therapists, optometrists, psychologists, nurse practitioners and others have been killed or watered down in numerous states. Other states have proposed expanding stu-

dent loan reimbursements, but money for doing so is tight. As fixes remain elusive, the shortfall of primary care physicians is expected to grow.

Shortage to get worse

Nearly one in five Americans already lives in a region designated as having a shortage of primary care physicians, and the number of doctors entering the field isn’t expected keep pace with demand. About a quarter million primary care doctors work in America now, and the Association of American Medical Colleges projects the shortage will reach almost 30,000 in two years and will grow to about 66,000 in little more than a decade. In some cases, nurses and physician assistants help fill in the gap. The national shortfall can be attributed to a number of factors: The population has both aged and become more chronically ill, while doctors and clinicians have migrated to specialty fields such as dermatology or cardiology for higher pay and better hours. The shortage is especially acute in impoverished inner cities and rural areas, where it already takes many months, years in some cases, to hire doctors, health professionals say. “I’m thinking about putting our human resources manager on the street in one of those costumes with a ‘We will hire you’ sign,” said Doni Miller, chief executive of the Neighbor-

hood Health Association in Toledo, Ohio. One of her clinics has had a physician opening for two years. In southern Illinois, the 5,500 residents of Gallatin County have no hospital, dentist or full-time doctor. Some pay $50 a year for an air ambulance service that can fly them to a hospital in emergencies. Women deliver babies at hospitals an hour away. The lack of primary care is both a fact of life and a detriment to health, said retired teacher and community volunteer Kappy Scates of Shawneetown, whose doctor is 20 miles away in a neighboring county. “People without insurance or a medical card put off going to the doctor,” she said. “They try to take care of their kids first.” In some areas of rural Nevada, patients typically wait seven to 10 days to see a doctor. “Many, many people are not taking new patients,” said Kerry Ann Aguirre, director of business development at Northeastern Nevada Regional Hospital, a 45-bed facility in Elko, a town of about 18,500 that is a four-hour drive from Reno, the nearest sizable city. Nevada is one of the states with the lowest rate per capita of active primary care physicians, along with Mississippi, Utah, Texas and Idaho, according to the Association of American Medical Colleges.

An influx of patients

The problem will become more acute nationally when about 30 million uninsured people eventu-

ally gain coverage under the Affordable Care Act, which takes full effect next year. “There’s going to be lines for the newly insured, because many physicians and nurses who trained in primary care would rather practice in specialty roles,” says Dr. David Goodman of the Dartmouth Institute for Health Policy and Clinical Practice. Roughly half of those who will gain coverage under the Affordable Care Act are expected to go into Medicaid, the federal-state program for the poor and disabled. States can opt to expand Medicaid, and at least 24 and the District of Columbia plan to. In Ohio, which is weighing the Medicaid expansion, about one in 10 residents already lives in an area underserved for primary care. Mark Bridenbaugh runs rural health centers in six southeastern Ohio counties, including the only primary care provider in Vinton County. The six counties could see some of the state’s largest enrollments of new Medicaid patients per capita under the expansion. As he plans for potential vacancies and an influx of patients, Bridenbaugh tries to identify potential hires when they start their residencies — several years before they can work for him. “It’s not like we have people falling out of the sky, waiting to come work for us,” he said. State legislatures working to address the shortfall are finding that fixes are not easy. Bills to expand the roles of nurse practitioners, optometrists and pharmacists

tors in underserved areas and increases the level of Medicaid reimbursements for those practicing primary care.

Trying to draw doctors

Providers are recruiting young doctors as they gear up for the expansion. Stephanie Place, 28, a primary care resident at Northwestern University’s medical school in Chicago, received hundreds of emails and phone calls from recruiters and health clinics before she accepted a job this spring. The heavy recruitment meant she had no trouble fulfilling her dream of staying in Chicago and working in an underserved area with a largely Hispanic population. She’ll also be able to pay off $160,000 in student loans through a federal program aimed at encouraging doctors to work in areas with physician shortages. Place said the federal law turned needed attention to primary care as a specialty among medical students. “Medical students see it as a vibrant, evolving, critical area of health care,” she said. Even so, many experts say the gap between doctors and those gaining care under the health reforms in many parts of the country will not close quickly. Access to care could get worse for some people before it gets better, said Dr. Andrew Morris-Singer, president and co-founder of Primary Care Progress, a nonprofit in Cambridge, Mass. “If you don’t have a primary care provider,” he said, “you should find one soon.”

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have been met with pushback in California. Under the proposals, optometrists could check for high blood pressure and cholesterol while pharmacists could order diabetes testing. But critics, including physician associations, have said such changes would lead to inequalities in the health care system — one for people who have access to doctors and another for people who don’t. In New Mexico, a group representing dentists helped defeat a bill that would have allowed socalled dental therapists to practice medicine. And in Illinois, the state medical society succeeded in killing or gutting bills this year that would have given more medical decision-making authority to psychologists, dentists and advanced practice nurses. Other states are experimenting with ways to fill the gap. Texas has approved two public medical schools in the last three years to increase the supply of family doctors and other needed physicians. New York is devoting millions of dollars to programs aimed at putting more doctors in underserved areas. Florida allowed optometrists to prescribe oral medications — including pills — to treat eye diseases. The federal health care law attempts to address the anticipated shortage by including incentives to bolster the primary care workforce and boost training opportunities for physicians’ assistants and nurse practitioners. It offers financial assistance to support doc-

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Associated Press The morning-after pill is finally going over-the-counter. The Food and Drug Administration last week approved unrestricted sales of Plan B One-Step, lifting all age limits on the emergency contraceptive. The move came a week after the Obama administration ended months of back-and-forth legal battles by promising a federal judge it would take that step. Women’s health advocates had pushed for easier access to next-day birth control for more than a decade. “Over-the-counter access to emergency contraceptive products has the potential to further decrease the rate of unintended pregnancies in the United States,” FDA drug chief Dr. Janet Woodcock said in a statement announcing the approval. It wasn’t clear how quickly Plan B One-Step would move from behind pharmacy counters to sit on drugstore shelves. Until now, customers could buy that morning-after pill and competing generic versions without a prescription only if they proved to a pharmacist that they were 17 or older. FDA said the product will have to be repackaged to reflect the change; maker Teva Women’s Health didn’t immediately respond. FDA has not lifted age limits on competing generics. The morning-after pill contains a higher dose of the hormone in regular birth control pills. Taking it within 72 hours of rape, condom failure or just forgetting regular contraception can cut the chances of pregnancy by up to 89 percent, but it works best within the first 24 hours. If a girl or woman already is pregnant, the pill, which prevents ovulation or fertilization of an egg, has no effect. Back in 2011, the FDA was preparing to allow over-thecounter sales of emergency contraceptives with no limits when Health and Human Services Secretary Kathleen Sebelius overruled her own scientists in an unprecedented move. She said she worried that girls as young as 11 could use the pill with no supervision, a concern that President Barack Obama echoed. In April, U.S. District Judge Edward Korman blasted that decision as putting politics ahead of science and ordered the FDA to allow unrestricted sales of emergency contraceptives. He said hardly any 11-year-olds would use the pill, which costs about $50. The Obama administration lost a round in the appeals court, too, before telling the judge it would approve the one-pill brand.


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Elbert County News 5

June 27, 2013

Real Estate Breakfast is eye-opener

areas el of ments mary

Panelists see market revival in south metro Denver area

iting By Jane Reuter gearjreuter@ourcoloradonews.com

8, a Panelists at the South Metro t atDenver Chamber of Commerce’s sity’s18th annual Real Estate Breakfast cago,forecast a happy future for those mailsin the industry, as well as home m re-sellers and the overall south subinicsurban economy. a job “Clearly, the real estate market

is recovering and strengthening, mentthe residential market particuoublelarly,” Sterling Ranch principal stay-Harold Smethills told an audirkingence of about 500 gathered June with20 at Lone Tree’s Marriott Denver pula-South. le to South Metro Denver Realtor dentAssociation chairwoman Jo Pelpro-legrino Ellis ticked off a list of urag-positive metro-area housing staareastistics, which showed from May es. 2012 to May 2013 new listings inl lawcreased by 21.8 percent, sales by on to22.5 percent, median home prices cialtyby 8 percent, and the days of buyts. ers pitching successful low-ball ee itoffers are ending. criti- “Total days on the market are ” shedown about 38 percent (to) about

47 days,” Ellis said, adding the pertsaverage changes with location. doc-“Some places in Highlands Ranch, carethey’re on the market for a numms inber of hours.” untry Acworse re it drew dent mary profit

From left, Sterling Ranch principal Harold Smethills, Studley vice president Jim McGrath, South Metro Denver Realtor Association chairwoman Jo Pellegrino Ellis and Everitt Real Estate director Eric Holsapple were panelists at a June 20 breakfast presentation. Photo by Jane Reuter

Everitt Real Estate Center director Eric Holsapple echoed some of Smethills’ and Ellis’ optimism, noting that 60,000 new jobs are expected in Colorado in the next year. The bad news? “People are making less money,” Holsapple said. “I call it the Walmarting effect. Lower-price housing is really in demand. Housing starts are up, but only

about 50 percent of where we were in 2006-07.” Holsapple and Ellis both said the anticipated rise in interest rates isn’t cause for fear, particularly for real estate agents. “When interest rates start to creep up a little bit, buyers really jump on the market,” Ellis said. A lack of temporary housing is creating roadblocks for some po-

tential sellers, she said. “If my house sells in two days, will I have a place to go?” Ellis said. “Temporary housing, sixmonth leases, now even those are hard to find.” Smethills said the demand for types of housing is changing, however. The Millennials, also known as Generation Y and the echo boomers, are in their prime real

estate buying years, with many singles seeking smaller housing units, while aging baby boomers want homes with main-floor master bedrooms. Meanwhile, a rise in multi-generational housing requires yet another housing type, he said. “All of this winds up making a large amount of our (existing) real estate obsolete,” Smethills said. The availability of industrial space in the south metro area is tightening as more businesses move in, Industrial Property Group vice president Jeremy Ballenger said. “These groups are looking for workforce and quality of life,” he said. “That’s why they’re coming here.” Smethills advised companies looking for commercial property to carefully consider location. “Having your commercial/ industrial next to a robust, multilevel-price point housing market is very important,” he said. “Many people want to live close to work. They don’t want to commute.” Ongoing and approved construction in the south metro area further supports the panelists’ good-news statements. In Lone Tree alone, the city has so far in 2013 approved $200 million in building permits; that figure stood at $177.4 million in 2012. Both annual tallies represented a fourfold increase from the five preceding years.

Voter citizenship checks yield few responses

Democrats question effort by priRepublican secretary of state he

one

‘I think it is a bit of a waste of time. Clearly he’s not getting results.’

By Ivan Moreno Associated Press

The latest round of letters questioning the citizenship of some Colorado registered voters has 63 out of 298 people affirming their right to vote, and most recipients are ignoring the May letters altogether. The letters are part of an ongoing effort by Republican Secretary of State Scott Gessler to address what he says is a risk for voter fraud. Gessler’s office provided the latest numbers to The Associated Press last week. Another 15 people who received letters last month said they weren’t U.S. citizens and asked to be removed from voter rolls. Gessler has defended his effort amid criticism from Democrats who question whether the issue of noncitizens on voter rolls is a systemic problem.

State Rep. Dickie Lee Hullinghorst “Colorado election officials are required by law to ensure only eligible voters are participating,” said Gessler spokesman Rich Coolidge. “Our best line of defense is to coordinate and verify using public databases like we do now.” State Rep. Dickie Lee Hullinghorst, the Democratic House leader, said she’s not impressed by the most recent figures. “It is a bit of an exercise in futility, in my opinion,” she said. Gessler is conducting the checks using driver’s license records and the Systematic Alien Verification for Entitlements, a federal

database that tracks who is a legal resident eligible to receive government benefits. The database was not designed to conduct voter citizenship checks, and critics say it’s not foolproof. But Gessler’s office said it’s the best they have at their disposal. Gessler can’t take action on the registrations of people who don’t respond to the letters or compel them to answer. Democratic lawmakers rejected a bill this year that would have put a process in place enabling Gessler and future secretaries to take action. Last August, Gessler sent 3,903 letters to

Fire restrictions in effect in national forests Staff report

All of Pike and San Isabel national forests are currently under Stage 1 fire restrictions. The two forests extend into 14 Colorado counties, and nearly a quarter of Douglas County falls in Pike National Forest. The Stage 1 Ban means that fires are only allowed in constructed, permanent fire pits or grates within developed recreation sites. The use of portable stoves, gas lanterns, jellied petroleum, pressurized liquid fuel or a fully enclosed stove with a quarterinch spark arrester type screen is also permitted. Smoking is prohibited in the forests, except in an enclosed vehicle or building, a developed recreation site or while stopped in an area at least

tips foR fiRE usE whilE camping • Before building a campfire, check to ensure it is permitted and obey all restrictions. • Keep a bucket of water and a shovel near the campfire. • When putting the fire out, drown it with water, then stir it with dirt and more water until all the fuel is cold to the touch. Never abandon the fire until it is out cold. • If you do not have water, use dirt. Add and stir until all material is cool. • Do not bury the fire, as the fire will continue to smolder and could catch roots on fire that will eventually get to the surface and start a wildfire. Tips courtesy of the U.S. Forest Service three feet in diameter that is barren or cleared of all flammable materials. Use of chain saws is only allowed

with a USDA- or SAE-approved spark arrester, a chemical pressurized fire extinguisher on hand and a roundpoint shovel with an overall length of at least 35 inches readily available for use. In addition, welding and other torches are only permitted with at least 10 feet of clear space all around the user and a fire extinguisher present. No explosives or fireworks are allowed in the national forest at this time. Visitors are encouraged to be cognizant of weather conditions and to careful with any use of fire outdoors. Prior to use of fire, forest visitors are also asked to check with their local U.S. Forest Service office or visit www. fs.usda.gov/psicc.

suspected noncitizens, causing alarm from voter rights groups who argued the initiative risked disenfranchising eligible voters in a swing state crucial to the presidential election. Some of those letters went to voters who insisted they were citizens. Florida also conducted checks using the SAVE federal database. The letters from last month bring the tally of letters sent since last year to 4,201. Coolidge said Gessler’s office is waiting for responses from 486 who are not U.S. citizens, according to the federal database. “I think it is a bit of a waste of time,” Hullinghorst said. “Clearly he’s not getting results.” Gessler’s office could not immediately provide an estimate of how much it has cost to run the checks and send the letters. Coolidge said the costs are “part of our normal course of duties to ensure clean and accurate voter rolls.” “All we can do is estimate time spent and that is not an easy task,” he said.

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6-Opinion

6 Elbert County News

June 27, 2013

OPINIONS / YOURS AND OURS

Pulling together in time of emergency Unfortunately, we know the smoke all too well. Amid dry grass and strong winds, a wildfire struck Colorado again this month, consuming more than 480 homes and leaving two dead seemingly in the blink of an eye in the Black Forest area near Colorado Springs. Family after family grabbed photos first then bundled other treasures in an evacuation estimated at 40,000 people — about the size of the population of cities like Parker, Littleton or Northglenn. Meanwhile, other fires continued to burn across the state. Once again the smell of smoke reached

OUR VIEW the northern confines of our Colorado Community Media coverage area in Westminster — much like the Hayman fire of 2002, which smoke could be smelled more than 100 miles away. We had hoped the loss of about 330 homes and property caused by that blaze would not happen again. So here go again. Many know the drills by heart — how to help, how to stay safe,

LETTER TO THE EDITOR Exchange student had successful year

My name is Yu Ando and I’m from Japan. I went to George Washington High School and Elizabeth High School this exchange year. I had a great experience in Colorado so I am so thankful from my heart for this amazing opportunity. Youth for Understanding has so many exchange students from all over the world, and we had orientations, which are like all exchange students’ meetings, so it was interesting to meet the people from many different countries. In this exchange year, I got to trust in myself and I found out I have nothing that I cannot do if I make an effort, and also I found out the common point between

the people in Japan and the people in the States. I thought the people in the States are very different from Japanese people before I came to Colorado, but they are not. It makes me happy because it is not that hard to understand each other and share our opinions. It is not easy to decide to be an exchange student because we exchange students need to be apart from our family and friends for whole year and live in the different country, but if there’s anyone who has an opportunity to be an exchange student, don’t be afraid and try it. It is worth to be an exchange student. Thank you. Yu Ando Japan

A fifth sense tells me where to shop When it’s time to go to the grocery store and pick up some dog food and strawberries, where do you go? And why? There are five good grocery stores ten minutes from my front door. I wind up at the same one most of the time. You’ll never guess why. They’re all convenient, so that isn’t it. Because one has the best coupons? I think coupons are a form of condescension. If you want to act like a gerbil and nibble coupons out of the newspaper, go ahead. The employees? If I stray from my favorite, that’s the reason. There’s a vegetable gentleman who knows his vegetables. There’s a woman in the deli who knows her deli. There’s a cute girl in meat and seafood. I’m fond of an employee who works at self-checkout. She and my sister have the same name. Value for my dollar? I am not very conscious of things like that. I should be. I’ll pay more for the item with the bestlooking label. If I lived in Nowhere, Colorado, I might not have a choice. There might be only one store in town, and it could an important hub in my life. That’s not true when you have five to choose from. Most of the time I shop and never say a word to anyone. I scowl now and then, when someone is myopically blocking the aisle. Or when it seems as if parents have brought their children in for Mickey Mouse Club auditions. You can’t shop for groceries online. You can to a point, but it’s not practical or timely to order a pumpkin that way. Or a banana. While we’re here: How long do your bananas last? Mine turn brown on the way home from the store. It seems. The reason why I shop at one store more than the others is the sound of music. I am not sure why there is music in grocery stores at all. Is it awkward if it’s too quiet around the crab cakes. Does music lubricate sales? All I know is that in four of the five stores, the music is abysmal. Most of the music is offensive, too loud, and chosen by Farmer Ted, Hallmark, or

someone named Dude. It doesn’t seem to matter. “Here is some music, on the house. It may be an irritant, but at least we were thinking of you.” No you weren’t. Stores spend a lot of money on marketing, but, like I said, Dude is the disc jockey. The shopping experience, if it must include music, is much better when it seems like someone cares what I am listening to, not just the stuff the feds used to try to flush out the Branch Davidians. One of the four stores began to play Christmas music before Thanksgiving. I can’t stand Christmas music to begin with. Five weeks of it is unbearable. I am not going to name names, but here’s a hint. In my favorite store, you can buy some of the music you have just listened to — in the checkout line. And another thing, you won’t hear some irksome recording telling you how great the place is over and over from the store’s speakers while you’re shopping. I asked someone who works in The Four how she could stand the music all day, and she said, “I tune it out.” What if the music contributed to the in-store experience, instead of being a perfunctory adjunct, as it is now? Who cares, right? I do. The world of music has never been more inclusive and brilliant. Employ someone to program it who sees that. And hears that. Craig Marshall Smith is an artist, educator and Highlands Ranch resident. He can be reached at craigmarshallsmith@comcast. net

WE WANT TO HEAR FROM YOU If you would like to share your opinion, go to www.ourcoloradonews.com or write a letter to the editor of 300 words or less. Include your name, full address and the best telephone number to contact you. Please send letters to letters@ourcoloradonews.com.

how to comfort others. We heartily commend all the people, agencies and organizations that always step up so quickly to help others. Fairground facilities and associated volunteers were so quick to take in animals, and donated food and essentials always seem to show up pronto. We are not surprised at the energy and commitment of volunteers and firefighters — who are always at the ready. That’s Colorado. Many of these seasoned vets also are not surprised by the wildfires, and even express surprise that wildfires don’t happen more often. Various ways to reduce wild-

fires are discussed, but increased preventive measures is a talk for another time. But for today, we simply commend all who are so ready, willing and able to help. And for those wanting to donate or volunteer, please seek out your local agencies, or more broadly, the American Red Cross is a good place to start by visiting www.redcross.org/co/denver or calling 1-800-REDCROSS. But before reaching out with helping hands, be sure to cover your own bases too — sign up for your respective county emergency alert system, have a kit prepared for emergencies and be ready to leave quickly in case of emergency. Safety first.

Every battle has spiritual element “A fire never says, `Enough.’” Those words are found in the Bible — Proverbs chapter 30, verse 16 — and I believe them! Fires consume, and the hotter they get the hungrier they get. The more they burn the more they want, and the stronger they get the more they take. Here we are again. Another event that challenges our value systems, causes us to feel unsafe and brings grief to our souls has hit us again. This time it is not a bomb at a marathon or a batch of tornadoes in a nearby state, but a consuming fire in our own back yard. The events keep coming. Maybe some of the people reading this column are experiencing loss in the first person — it was your house, or your friend or neighbor who died. I am sorry for your loss and I pray for your comfort and recovery. It seems there is often an adversary to oppose, steal and destroy the beautiful things that enrich our lives with pleasure and peace. Bodies are harmed, possessions are damaged or destroyed and beauty that took years to mature needs to start all over again, first with healing as black washes away and time to wait for new green grass and seedlings to emerge that take a lifetime to turn into beautiful trees. What happens to our spirit in these tragedies is a major part of the story — perhaps the main part. When I was writing “Welcome to the Big Leagues,” I discovered how fiery the competition is against each of us. Most of the time it is from outside events and other people who, knowingly or unknowingly, fill the role of tragedy, competitor or villain in our lives. Sometimes it is subversive doubt or fear that grows in our own minds. We compete against ourselves when it emerges with anxiety and dread that hinders our perspective and hope. Trained and professional firefighters, police, National Guard and strong and valiant citizens fight a fire to keep it from consuming more. The fire will not say, “enough” until it is forced to stop or until it runs out of fuel. I see the spiritual battles and competi-

Elbert County News 9137 S. Ridgeline Blvd., Suite 210, Highlands Ranch, CO 80129

GERARD HEALEY President and Publisher CHRIS ROTAR Editor SCOTT GILBERT Assistant Editor ERIN ADDENBROOKE Advertising Director AUDREY BROOKS Business Manager SCOTT ANDREWS Creative Services Manager SANDRA ARELLANO Circulation Director RON ‘MITCH’ MITCHELL Sales Executive

tion for faith in these events. St. Paul, in Ephesians chapter 6, described the threat to a life of faith as a battle from the forces of evil. “We wrestle not against flesh and blood, but against principalities, rulers of the darkness of this world … Take the shield of faith to repel the fiery arrows of the enemy.” Beyond the obvious damage of the bombs, tornadoes and fires is the competition against our souls. Other times, the tragedies are metaphors for the work of our adversary though divorce, bankruptcy, illness, drugs, rumors and wars. If we don’t fight the enemy, it will continue to consume more of our lives. Not all battles are spiritual, but there is a spiritual part to every battle. When the churches of our town teach on the attacks of Satan, the effectiveness of prayer, the power of worship they are helping people fight the fires in their own lives. It is easy to use the cliché, on a day filled with irritating problems, “I was putting out fires today.” But, after living here through the Hayman Fire, the Waldo Canyon Fire and now the Black Forest Fire, that expression means a lot more. Instead I want to stand in the protection of Jesus and say, “Fire, enough!” Dan Hettinger is director of pastoral services at Hospice of Saint John and president of The Jakin Group, a ministry of encouragement, especially to Christian workers. You can email him at dhettinger@hospiceofsaintjohn.org or dan@welcometothebig leagues.org.

Colorado Community Media Phone 303-566-4100 • Fax 303-566-4098

Columnists and guest commentaries The Elbert County News features a limited number of regular columnists, found on these pages and elsewhere in the paper, depending on the typical subject the columnist covers. Their opinions are not necessarily those of the Elbert County News. Want your own chance to bring an issue to our readers’ attention, to highlight something great in our community, or just to make people laugh? Why not write a letter of 300 words or fewer. Include your full name, address and the best number to reach you by telephone.

Email your letter to letters@ourcoloradonews.com We welcome event listings and other submissions. News and Business Press Releases Please visit ourcoloradonews.com, click on the Press Releases tab and follow easy instructions to make submissions. Calendar calendar@ourcoloradonews.com Military Notes militarynotes@ourcoloradonews.com School accomplishments, honor roll and dean’s list schoolnotes@ourcoloradonews.com Sports sports@ourcoloradonews.com Obituaries obituaries@ourcoloradonews.com To Subscribe call 303-566-4100

WE’RE IN THIS TOGETHER Our team of professional reporters, photographers and editors are out in the community to bring you the news each week, but we can’t do it alone. Send your news tips, your own photographs, event information, letters, commentaries... If it happens, it’s news to us. Please share by contacting us at news@ourcoloradonews.com, and we will take it from there. After all, the News is your paper.


7

Elbert County News 7

June 27, 2013

y Parker Days attracts at least 120,000

en.

Minor reconfigurations helped with flow of crowd

By Chris Michlewicz o or cmichlewicz@ourcoloradonews.com genAlmost as soon as the hustle and bustle d arrives for the Parker Days Festival, it moves g on to the next town. g The work involved with creating the out our temporary village of stages, booths and carec- nival rides is staggering. Structures tower ave a over downtown Parker, making for an odd, ady albeit short-lived, skyline. Joyful noises and a collective of wonderful smells pour from Mainstreet and O’Brien Park. The time and effort involved in making sure everything goes according to plan is no easy feat either. Events Etc., an event planning firm hired by the Parker Chamber of Commerce, made a few minor tweaks to the configuration that helped foot traffic flow more smoothly for this year’s festival, with rides starting June 13 and the threeday event running June 14-16. Delightful weather also was part of the recipe for success in 2013. Attendance at this year’s Parker Days Festival closely matched numbers from 2012. Dan Rodriguez, president of the Parker chamber, said 120,000 to 140,000 people attended the three-day festival and sales figures closely matched those seen in 2012. n Organizers saw a “substantial increase” eat in traffic on Friday after scheduling the ces headlining music act then instead of Saturd day, but Saturday remained the busiest day, Rodriguez said. e Sunday attendance was down roughly of 10-20 percent, partly because of light early afternoon rain showers and the fact that it was Father’s Day. peMore carnival rides, an improved sound he system, and a change to the VIP tent were f the result of notes taken by event officials ptcy, on’t -

nt

The “Hang Glider” ride was among the most popular attractions at the 2013 Parker Days Festival. Photos by Chris Michlewicz last year. “The changes made things more comfortable,” Rodriguez said. “We got great responses from people who attended with the entertainment choices, the buskers in downtown, pretty much everything.” The festival generates $75,000 to

e is he cks e ple

$100,000 for the Parker Chamber of Commerce, which uses the proceeds on member programs throughout the year. It also generated an estimated $2.5 million economic impact for the surrounding businesses. Space has become tighter because of

increased development, but Rodriguez said the festival could extend east in the downtown district. When the vacant land is developed, the chamber might have to have discussions about moving the festival, although Rodriguez said those talks are at least two years out.

OBITUARIES

filled g out

ay-

on nd ,

vices of geou g

Zaylee Hills, 2, was among the lucky kids who stopped by the face-painting booth.

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Funeral Homes

Visit: www.memoriams.com

Teenagers enjoy the thrill of the “Freak Out” carnival ride.


8-Color

8 Elbert County News

June 27, 2013

Child-care aid coming up short Funding model puts many in bind By Burt Hubbard I-News

The measures passed by Congress and signed by President Bill Clinton in 1996 “to end welfare as we know it” were heralded as a ticket to economic selfsufficiency. The poor would be encouraged to enter the workforce and eventually leave all welfare assistance behind.

But for most of the tens of thousands of working poor families in Colorado, the vision of self-sufficiency is illusive. One of the most significant components of the work support programs — child-care assistance — doesn’t reach about threefourths of the state’s working poor and generally fails the other fourth’s attempt to escape poverty, according to an I-News analysis of state data, census figures and Colorado-specific research reports, as well as

Income lImIts by county Income eligibility limits for Colorado Child Care Assistance in communities covered by Colorado Community Media: Adams County Eligibility ceiling: 225 percent of poverty or about $44,000 for a family of three. College students eligible: Yes Number of children served in 2012: 3,545 Arapahoe County Eligibility ceiling: 185 percent of poverty or about $36,000 for a family of three. College students eligible: Yes Number of children served in 2012: 2,855 Denver County Eligibility ceiling: 225 percent of poverty or about $44,000 for a family of three. College students eligible: Yes Number of children served in 2012: 5,028 Douglas County Eligibility ceiling: 200 percent of poverty or about $39,100 for a family of three. College students eligible: Yes Number of children served in 2012: 632 El Paso County Eligibility ceiling: 150 percent of poverty or about $29,300 for a family of three. College students eligible: Yes Number of children served in 2012: 4,634 Jefferson County Eligibility ceiling: 185 percent of poverty or about $36,000 for a family of three. College students eligible: Yes Number of children served in 2012: 2,843 Teller County Eligibility ceiling: 150 percent of poverty or about $29,300 for a family of three. College students eligible: Yes Number of children served in 2012: 97

interviews with benefit recipients, policy experts and government officials. The I-News inquiry found: Working families can fall prey to the “cliff effect,” in which even a modest rise in family income can lead to termination of a government benefit, including subsidized child care, worth thousands of dollars a year. The family can suffer a big net loss by earning more. Colorado is the only state that allows counties to set income levels for eligibility for child-care assistance, or CCAP, the biggest work support program. The state’s system has created broad inequities in what families can earn before losing child care. Most experts say higher education is essential to rising out of poverty. Yet, 11 counties don’t give childcare help to parents attending college. A parent in Boulder County can get child-care subsidies to attend the University of Colorado, but a Larimer County parent gets no help to attend Colorado State University. Families facing the cliff effect report having employed strategies such as turning down raises, promotions or passing on better jobs to avoid losing an essential benefit. Proposed reforms center on phasing out payments gradually as family incomes rise toward self-sufficiency. Yet, when Colorado lawmakers twice tried to require counties to phase out child-care benefits, the pro-

Income eligibility limits by county for Colorado Child Care Assistance Sedgwick Jackson

Moffat

Logan

Larimer

Phillips

Weld

Routt

Morgan Grand

Rio Blanco Eagle

Garfield

Pitkin

Boulder

Summit

Broomfield Gilpin Denver Clear Creek Jefferson

Gunnison

Kit Carson Lincoln

Teller

Delta

Cheyenne

El Paso

Chaffee Fremont

Montrose Ouray San Juan

La Plata

Custer

Saguache

Hinsdale

San Miguel

Montezuma

Elbert

Park

Mesa

Dolores

Arapahoe

Douglas

Lake

Kiowa

Crowley

Pueblo

Bent

Otero Mineral

Archuleta

Rio Grande

Alamosa

Conejos

Yuma

Washington

Adams

Prowers

Huerfano Las Animas

Costilla

Baca

Source: I-News analysis of data from the Colorado Department of Human Services

Colorado's system of empowering each county to set income eligibility limits for child care benefits is unique. As this map indicates, there are broad inequities even among neighboring counties.

Income eligibility limits by county to receive Colorado Child Care Assistance. Income level is for a family of three -- one adult and two children. Legend $25,400 to $27,300 $28,300 to $31,200 $33,200 to $34,200 $35,200 to $39,100 $43,900

ROCKY MOUNTAIN PBS

The Rocky Mountain Investigative News Network

posals were watered down after lobbying by Colorado counties to make them voluntary. There are more than 63,000 working families in Colorado earning 130 percent of poverty-level income or less, about $25,000 per year, according to the I-News analysis. In 2012, according to state figures, CCAP served about 31,000 of the almost 137,000 children in those families — “a pittance,” in the words of one state senator. “The reason the cliff effect matters, and the reason it matters to all of us in society, is that we want to provide the opportunity for these families to get into the workforce, to stay working, to reach self-sufficiency, to get ahead,” said Rich Jones, director of research at Bell Policy Center in Denver, a self-described progressive think tank. “That’s the whole design. By keeping the cliff effect, by keeping the barriers in place, we’re actually providing a disincentive to continue working.” For many poor working families who receive work supports, the cliff effect isn’t an issue. They don’t earn enough to trip the loss of benefits. The real threat of the cliff effect is to those close to self-sufficiency. “A fraction of these folks can actually make it work,” said Susan Roll, a California professor who did her doctoral thesis at the University of Denver on the cliff effect. “It is very difficult to be on these programs and it is certainly next to impossible to escape the programs.” The work support benefits can include child-care assistance, food stamps, housing assistance, assistance with energy bills and Medicaid, among others. The steepest cliff in the state is posed by the childcare assistance program, experts say. Even a raise of $1 hour per hour, which would translate into roughly $2,000 a year for a full-time employee, could trigger the termination of the benefit worth $6,000 or $8,000 per year or more to the family, and might even impact the parent’s ability to work.

“I would say the cliff effect is the No. 1 reason preventing women and their families from achieving self-sufficiency,” said Lorena Garcia, executive director of Denver-based COLOR, which works with young women trying to escape poverty. Academic researchers and county social workers all said they have seen families forgo raises or promotions so they didn’t lose child-care benefits. “It’s frustrating to hear their stories,” said Tamara Schmidt, supervisor of the child-care assistance program in Larimer County. “To have them calling in tears because they’re over income by 10 cents (an hour). I mean, there’s really not a whole lot of wiggle room.” Self-sufficiency is pegged by most studies at about 225 percent of the federal poverty guideline, or about $44,000 annually for a family of three. That number comes particularly into play in Colorado’s county system for setting income limits for child-care assistance. The limit for a family of three ranges from $25,000, or 130 percent of poverty, to $44,000, 225 percent of poverty. And these vast disparities exist next door to each other. For example, in southeastern Colorado, Prowers County cuts off child care at $25,000 for a three-person family, while adjacent Bent and Kiowa counties allow up to $44,000. A 2008 state audit found that more than 1,000 families denied childcare assistance because their incomes were too high would have qualified in a neighboring county. Higher education is another touchstone in the debate over Colorado’s county system. “Post-secondary education, especially for single-parent households, is critical as far as financial security, social mobility, all of those things,” said state Sen. John Kefalas, D-Fort Collins. That Larimer County doesn’t allow higher education as an eligible activity ultimately comes down to

a matter of resources, officials said. “We had to make the choice to serve the poorest of the poor,” said Laura Sartor of Larimer County Human Services. “It was very difficult. It was a very hard choice to make. We did a lot of research and a lot of statistics in determining who we could and couldn’t serve. And unfortunately the student population was one of the populations that were an option, so we had to eliminate them and not be able to cover child care anymore.” Many counties change eligibility levels as budgets and caseloads rise and fall. El Paso County Commissioner Sallie Clark, a Republican, said it’s critical that these decisions be made at the close-to-the-ground county level. El Paso recently raised its level to 150 percent of poverty, but allows recipients, once approved, to stay with the program up to 165 percent. Colorado Counties Inc., the lobbying organization for the state’s 64 counties, has twice lobbied against legislation requiring the counties to phase out childcare assistance to counter the cliff effect. Each time, the counties lobbied successfully to make the proposals voluntary. The 2012 bill called for a 10-county pilot project to test phasing out the benefit. So, far no county has volunteered. Clark said requiring counties to phase out the benefit would be too costly. But Kefalas, the Fort Collins Democrat, said there would be benefits in embracing reform. “In my opinion, if we make these investments up front, we’re going to save an awful lot of money for the taxpayer in terms of public assistance programs, in terms of dealing with the criminal justice system,and the research bears that out,” he said. I-News is the public service journalism arm of Rocky Mountain PBS. For more information: inewsnetwork.org. Contact Burt Hubbard at bhubbard@ inewsnetwork.org or 303446-4931.


9-Color

June 27, 2013

Woman puts face on struggle to succeed Self-sufficiency is goal for student mom By Jim Trotter I-News

Jennine Jeffries is a woman with an engaging smile, a firm handshake and an articulate yet unvarnished way of telling her own story: broken and abusive childhood home, a frequent runaway and juvenile delinquent, alcohol and drug addictions as she became a bartender, a stint in jail. But her story doesn’t stop there. With determination and hard work, with help from those who believe in her, with an unfading desire to be something more for her own four children, she has pulled her life back on course. She’s carrying a shiny 3.97 grade point average at Metropolitan State University of Denver, with graduation set for next spring. Her 19-year-old son has made that possible in part by caring at home for her 4-year-old twins. She wants him to have a chance at education next. Jeffries has worked for Metro’s Institute for Women’s Studies and Services, and is now an intern at Project Wise, a Denverbased agency that offers counseling and offi-other services to women. She knows who she is and what she wants to be. the “Given the pain I have put my family orestthrough, given the pain I have put myself Sar-through, given the struggles I have been Hu-through, I want a career where I can help verythose who are like me, women in transihardtion, women who feel that maybe they’re did anot worthy, or that they have no hope,” said ot ofJeffries, 39. “I want to make a difference in ningpeople’s lives.” uldn’t As she prepares for that day to arrive, atelymaking the long bus ride each day into wasDenver from her Section 8 apartment in thatEnglewood, working low-wage jobs, volunhadteering, keeping up with her family life and d nother studies, she worries about how she will caredo it.

Jennine Jeffries, 39, stands at the Tivoli Student Union on the Auraria Campus in Denver recently. Jeffries, a mother of four, has done much to turn her life around after it went off course, and is carrying a near-perfect grade point average at Metropolitan State University of Denver. However, she is concerned about what will happen when her work support benefits ends. She wants to be off assistance, yet will need to earn $40,000 a year to be self-sufficient. Photos by The I-News Network at Rocky Mountain PBS Can she possibly make, as a new college graduate, the $40,000 or more it will take for her family to minimally survive the loss of the work support benefits she receives — housing assistance, food stamps and Medicaid? “I’m terrified that once I graduate I won’t be self-sufficient,” she said, but there’s no turning back now. “What do I next? I want to be the hell off assistance.” For more information about the cliff effect, go to inewsnetwork.org.

‘Cliff effect’ looming for achiever with fresh degree

ange dgets fall. mispubthat made ound centper-Magna cum laude grad lowsin ‘really scary’ situation oved, m upBy Jim Trotter

I-News

Inc., ation Rachel Contizano, a Denver native, nties,moved to New York and finished commuainstnity college there with highest distinction. theShe was employed by an apparel manuhild-facturer, living independently in New York unterCity, just as she wanted. time, Then she went on maternity leave before suc-Christmas in 2009 and was soon notified pro-that her job had been eliminated. 2012 She applied for unemployment benefits untyand received them for the full 99 weeks alasinglowed, her job search fruitless month after r nomonth. d. “I got up the courage that I needed to iringmove back home,” she said of those dark t thedays. “It was just getting too difficult to surostly. vive.” Col- Surviving still wasn’t a picnic back in hereColorado, although her family helped. As em-she began to apply for work support benefits for herself and her son, Kingston, to f wetry to get back on her feet, she encountered ts upwhat she described as a very difficult prove ancess with Denver Human Services. r the “I did everything I was supposed to do. pub-I followed all the rules,” she said. “If I did s, inwhat I was responsible for, then they were theresponsible to help me. And that wasn’t the ,andcase.” out,” She determined that she needed to learn more about advocating for herself. Her eventual mastery of work support ser-benefit rules led to her appointment to m ofthe Denver Welfare Reform Board. She was . Fornamed a “Woman to Watch” by the League ews-of Women Voters. She just graduated magna Burtcum laude from the Colorado Women’s Colard@lege at the University of Denver with a de303-gree in business administration.

Rachel Contizano, 32, works on a research paper in her apartment in Aurora recently. Contizano, a single mother who lost her job in 2009, has gotten work support and public assistance while going to college. She recently graduated magna cum laude from Colorado Women’s College at the University of Denver. She has calculated she needs to earn about $43,000 to make up for her loss of food stamps, child care assistance for her 4-year-old son, Medicaid and rental subsidies. Now 32, she wants a career in public policy to help others. She dreams of running for public office. But first there is a matter of finding a job. She has calculated she needs to earn about $43,000 to make up for the loss of food stamps, child care assistance for her son, now 4, Medicaid and rental subsidies she receives. Even for all of her accomplishments, avoiding the cliff effect is daunting. “It’s very hard to find a job in 30 days, something that is going to keep my head above water,” she said. “So that is something I’m really struggling with right now and that is really scary.” To learn more about the cliff effect go to inewsnetwork.org.

Elbert County News 9


10-Color

10 Elbert County News

June 27, 2013

Tornado

NOTABLE COLORADO TORNADOES

Continued from Page 1

“They certainly do occur in Colorado,” said Josh Wurman, of the Center for Severe Weather Research in Boulder. “Sometimes they can be quite major — there have been famous tornadoes, like the Limon tornado and the Windsor tornado, which have caused a lot of damage. There probably have been a lot of tornadoes capable of causing F4-, F5-type damage that just have churned through open rangeland, and prior to recent decades not have even been reported at all, even as a tornado.”

State racks up twisters

An I-News examination of data since 1950 kept by the National Weather Service showed that Colorado experiences frequent if not always powerful tornadoes: • Five of the 10 counties with the most tornadoes were along the Front Range. In addition to Weld and Adams, they included El Paso, Arapahoe and Elbert counties. • Despite their frequency, tornadoes have killed only five people in Colorado since 1950 — two people near Holyoke in 1960, two people in Holly in 2007, and one person in Windsor in 2008. • A total of 283 residents have been injured by 53 tornadoes since 1950. More than 40 percent of the injuries came from two tornadoes — the Windsor tornado, which injured 78, and one in Thornton in 1981,

An aerial view on May 23, 2008, shows parts of Windsor, Colo., which was hit by a massive tornado early the day before. The storm killed a man and damaged or destroyed at least 100 homes. File photo which injured 42. • The greatest concentration of tornadoes took place in the four-year time period from 1990 to 1993, spawning 283 twisters — or about one of every seven recorded since 1950. However, recordkeeping in the 1950s and 1960s may have undercounted tornados. The national database shows only one tornado taking place in 1959 and only two each in 1950 and 1964. • At least 10 tornadoes have caused $1 million or more in damage. Beginning in 1971, tornadoes in the United States were categorized on what was known as the Fujita Scale, a six-step ranking — from F0, the weakest, to F5, the strongest. The different categories accounted for potential for damage inflicted by a particular tornado. In 2007, the Enhanced Fujita Scale was adopted, which updated the rating system to include a specif-

ic range of wind speed for each category of tornadoes. The new system ranked tornadoes from EF0, the weakest, to EF5, the most powerful.

Few powerful tornadoes

Since 1950, a tornado rated either F5 or EF5 has never been recorded in Colorado. Only one twister was rated as either F4 or EF4 — a twister in 1977 in Baca County — and 21 were categorized as either F3 or EF3. The rest were less powerful — 111 that were F2 or EF2; 531 that were F1 or EF1; and 1,229 that were F0 or EF0, including a small but dramatic tornado that startled motorists at nearly 12,000 feet on Mount Evans road last July 28. An additional 55 of the state’s tornadoes were listed as “unknown.” “The good news is that the vast majority of our tornadoes are weak — EF0, EF1 — so those winds go up to maybe 130 mph or so, and those tornadoes don’t cause a lot of damage,” said Bob Glancy, the warning coordination meteorologist at the National Weather Service’s Boulder office. Two EF5 twisters that hit the Oklahoma City area in

late May took more than 30 lives and injured nearly 500 people — one in the town of Moore, and one near the town of El Reno that took the lives of people including Colorado storm chasers Tim and Paul Samaras. At one point that twister was 2.6 miles across — the widest ever recorded. Those tornadoes were part of large, rotating storms known as supercells — which are much more common as you move east out of Colorado. Although they can occur here, they are less likely, in part because the moisture flowing north from the Gulf of Mexico doesn’t often reach Colorado. But that doesn’t mean there can’t be big trouble here.

Windsor storm unusual

“Nothing’s impossible in meteorology, and the Windsor storm is an example,” Glancy said. That tornado, which touched down about 11:30 a.m. on May 22, 2008, was rated an EF3 and it was unusual in many respects — it hit before noon, it was a mile wide, it was on the ground for 38 miles, and it traveled from the southeast

• Nov. 4, 1922: A freak late fall tornado hit a farmhouse in Lincoln County at 5 a.m., killing four and injuring 25 others, and later that morning it hit a school in the Holyoke area, killing one and injuring three. • Aug. 10, 1924: A tornado hit just east of the High Plains hamlet of Thurman, killing 10 people — nine of them children — at a farmhouse. • June 27, 1960: An early evening twister that was on the ground for six miles north of Holyoke in northeastern Colorado killed two motorists and injured three other people. • Oct. 17, 1971: A relatively rare October tornado injured nine people and caused more than $1 million in damage after touching down on the south side of Wray just after 9 p.m. and barreling up Main Street. • June 3, 1981: A twister that skipped across Thornton inflicted millions in damage an injured at least 42 people. • June 18, 1987: A twister that was on the ground for about a mile touched down at an elevation of roughly 9,000 feet at Colorado State University’s Pingree Park campus, uprooting an estimated 1,500 trees and destroying a just-completed ropes course. • June 6, 1990: A tornado that hit Limon just before 9 p.m. inflicted severe damage but no serious injuries. • March 28, 2007: A powerful twister that was on the ground for more than 30 miles killed two people, injured several others, and wiped out homes and other buildings in Holly. • May 22, 2008: A tornado that hit Windsor killed one person, injured 78 others and inflicted heavy damage along its 38-mile path. • July 30, 2012: A small but well-defined twister touched down at an elevation of 11,900 feet on Mount Evans — believed to be the second highest tornado ever recorded. — Kevin Vaughan Source: Tornado Project; National Weather Service; The Denver Post; Tornado History Project to the northwest. It also killed one person, injured 78 others and inflicted $147 million in property damage, making it the most destructive tornado in state history. “It wasn’t an EF5, but that’s an example of what could happen here,” Glancy said. The I-News analysis also found that other historic twisters that in decades past hit harmlessly in open land could have different consequences if they struck the same places today. On May 20, 1961, for example, a twister hit open land just outside Castle Rock where the Douglas County Courthouse stands today, and on July 19, 1985, another touched down on land where Lone Tree’s Sky Ridge Medical Center is now located. While there’s no way to

predict the future, it’s inevitable that the state will experience more tornadoes. Still, Wurman, the Boulder-based weather researcher, said he’d advise people to be aware but also not overreact. There’s no reason to dig a hole in the backyard and construct a tornado shelter, he said. “If I were going to list ways to spend your money to stay safe, I would list getting a new car with better air bags higher than building a tornado shelter, because that’s more likely to save your life than a tornado shelter,” he said. I-News is the public service journalism arm of Rocky Mountain PBS. For more information, go to inewsnetwork.org. Contact Kevin Vaughan at 303-4464936 or kvaughan@inewsnetwork.org.

TORNADO FACTS AND FIGURES SINCE 1950 Top months for tornadoes June — 714 July — 422 May — 422 August — 192 April — 90 September — 45 October — 39 March — 22 Feb. — 2 Top five tornados for injuries May 22, 2008 — 78 injuries, one fatality, Windsor June 3, 1981 — 42 injuries, Thornton June 6, 1990 — 14 injuries, Limon Oct. 17, 1971 — 9 injuries, Wray

Join Us for the 17th Annual Biergarten Festival Celebrating German Traditions and Culture!

Friday, July 12th 4PM-10PM Saturday, July 13th 11AM-10PM Sunday, July 14th 10AM-2PM Authentic German Food, Drink, and Live Music Kids’ Games • Bratwurst Eating Contest

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Friday & Saturday--$8/person Sunday--Frühschoppen!

(FREE entry and $15 all-you-can-eat brunch buffet)

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Edelweiss Pavilion, Hwy 8. Morrison

(just north of the Fort Restaurant and south of Red Rocks)

March 28, 2007 — 9 injuries , 2 fatalities, Holly Top five counties for tornadoes Weld — 252 Adams — 158 Washington — 133 Elbert — 101 Kit Carson — 93 Top five tornadoes in miles traveled May 22, 2008 — Windsor — 38.7 miles June 18, 1951 — Crowley and Otero counties — 29.9 miles March 28, 2007 — Prowers and Kiowa counties (Holly) — 28 miles Sept. 18, 1986 — Morgan County — 25 miles

June 9, 1990 — Larimer and Weld counties — 23 miles May 17, 1962 — Baca County — 23 miles Most destructive (property damage) since 1996 $147 million — Windsor — May 22, 2008 $8 million — El Paso County — May 28, 2001 (two others occurred at the same time in El Paso that caused a total of $120,000 in damage) $6 million — Arapahoe County — Aug. 29, 2002 $4.01 million — Prowers and Kiowa counties (Holly) — March 28, 2007

$4 million — Lincoln County — May 31, 1999 Top five widest tornados May 22, 2008 — Windsor — 1,760 yards June 17, 1953 — Conejos County — 1,417 yards July 5, 2000 — Logan County — 1,320 yards June 9, 2001 — Lincoln County — 1,320 yards May 5, 1996 — Washington County — 1,320 yards Source: An I-News analysis of 63 years of tornado data kept by the National Weather Service


11-Color

Elbert County News 11

June 27, 2013

Search

Baby-sitter convicted of sex assault

Continued from Page 1

that,” said Schlegel from his home. “And Cory has agreed, and made arrangements with the state, to step in should something big happen between now and then. As our regional rep, he’d probably be out here anyway.” By statute, if an interim emergency manager is not appointed, responsibility for coordination of emergency resources within unincorporated areas of the county falls back on the Board of County Commissioners, according to Fran Santagata, community preparedness manager for the Colorado Division of Homeland Security and Emergency Management. Stark, who will still reside in Elbert County, said he will be providing some assistance to the county until his position is filled. “It’s really hard to leave,” said an emotional Stark. “I’m just crazy for all the emergency responders out here in the county, but mostly I am so very grateful for the many opportunities I’ve been presented out here, and the incredible amount of trust that’s been placed in my hands.” Stark has served as the Elbert County emergency manager since 2009. “We are certainly sorry to see Cory leave,” Schlegel said. “He has made great strides here in Elbert County and will do a great job for the state — definitely our loss and their gain.”

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Man victimized children in Douglas, Arapahoe counties By Ryan Boldrey

rboldrey@ourcoloradonews.com A 24-year-old baby-sitter has been convicted by a Douglas County jury for the sexual assault of a pre-teen Highlands Ranch boy in his care in the summer of 2010. Justin Jefferson, of Parker, who previously pleaded guilty to sexually assaulting another pre-teen boy he baby-sat in Aurora in 2011, is scheduled to be sentenced by 18th Judicial District Court Judge Richard Caschette on Aug. 28. Jefferson, who was convicted in Douglas County June 14, faces a prison term ranging from 10 years to life for one count of sexual assault on a

child while in a position of trust. The charge is listed as a “pattern of abuse.” “The two victims in these cases were remarkably brave to come forward with their families and describe their assaults,” said Deputy District Attorney Chris Gallo, who prosecuted the Highlands Ranch case for the 18th. “Thanks to them, no more children will be victimized. Justin Jefferson will never be alone with a helpless boy again.” Both families that were victimized by Jefferson hired him through the website www.Care.com. The Douglas County Sheriff’s Office and the District Attorney’s Office ask that anyone who hired Jefferson as a baby-sitter between the years of 2009 and 2011 contact law enforcement if they suspect that he engaged in any sexual contact with their children or other inappropriate behavior. “This case is a chilling reminder that our children are at risk if left

with strangers,” said District Attorney George Brauchler. “As a parent of young children, I am determined to make sure that these predatory practices are discovered and punished. Nobody gets to victimize our children with impunity.” According to Gallo, it took the Highlands Ranch victim two years to come forward, and the boy did so after Jefferson pleaded guilty to a lesser charge of sex assault on a child by a person in a position of trust in Arapahoe County for the 2011 incident. Jefferson, who avoided potential prison time in the Arapahoe County case after prosecutors agreed to drop the “pattern of abuse” part of the initial charge, was in the midst of a 10-years-to-life term of sexual offender intensive supervision probation while undergoing his recent trial in Castle Rock. He is now in custody in Douglas County on a no-bond hold pending his sentencing.


South Metrolife 12-Life-Color

12 Elbert County News June 27, 2013

Photos bring outdoors in “Called to the Sporting Life,” photographer Dusan Smetana’s exhibition at The Wilderness Experience, 10035 Peoria St., Parker, will be open until Sept. 29, with images of wildlife, fishermen and striking landscapes. His photos appear regularly in “Field and Stream,” “Sports Afield,” “Outdoor Life” and many other publications. He learned both forestry and photography in Czechoslovakia. Drawn by stories of cowboys and Indians, he has made the Western wilderness his own. He lives with his family in Montana. The exhibit will be open during museum hours. Information: thewildlifeexperience.org, 720-488-3301.

Jazz fest coming

Bodysuits made of white materials are installed under a canopy of buttons in Nick Cave’s “Sojourn” exhibit. Courtesy photo

Sculpture, fashion, performance Artist Nick Cave introduces his ‘Sojourn’ in Denver By Sonya Ellingboe

sellingboe@ourcoloradonews.com It’s colorful, whimsical, engaging, multi-sensory, mindbending …. Internationally acclaimed artist Nick Cave was in Denver to introduce his new exhibit, “Sojourn,” at the Denver Art Museum through Sept. 22. It’s a major piece of the campus-wide “SPUN,” a multifaceted look at textiles, tied in with the opening of new textile galleries on the sixth floor of the North Building. The ebullient Cave led a walk through the exhibit on June 6, offering some insight on how he thinks to assemble an astonishing collection of sculptural works, which often start with a thrift store or flea market find. He continually visits these markets around the world. To the left of the entrance to the second-floor Anschutz Galleries is a screen showing dancers in Cave’s trademark bodysuits. The entry and first gallery are wallpapered in a bright red design, created with images of the colorful vintage ceramic birds that inhabit Cave’s world. An antique baptismal font is the basis for a sculptural piece, topped with a fantastic branching structure filled with birds, flowers and miscellany. Next is a long, narrow gallery

if you go “Sojourn” is on the second floor of the Hamilton Building at the DAM through Sept. 22. It is a ticketed exhibition. While there, seek out other elements of the extensive “SPUN.” See denverartmuseum. org or call 720-865-5000.

connected by a wall and canopy of button-covered screen — each button sewn on individually, by hand. A platform runs the length of the gallery, carrying figures in white bodysuits — each different, most covered with buttons. The face on one is made from a burial wreath found at a Paris flea market. “The button is a way of embellishment, a way of adorning the body,” Cave observed. Craftsmanship is meticulous throughout the exhibit. Cave has about eight assistants who come with the needed skills to the studio in the loft building where he lives, and he contracts with fabricators in the Chicago area who understand his methods and design sense. Materials include fabrics, metals, knickknacks, wood, furniture pieces and much more. “The level of commitment to quality is the way I feel the work has to be handled,” Cave said. Next, viewers see a huge tonga, a round piece, called “Constellation,” created from black, sparkly bits of sweaters and other garments, sewn together and stretched on a frame. He was thinking of childhood nights on the farm where he and his six brothers would lie on their backs looking at the starry sky. A departure from the trademark Soundsuits — wearable fabric sculptures — is a series he calls “Rescues.” It opens a “new vocabulary and another form of commitment.” It started with finding a large white ceramic poodle — his assistant Bob Faust saw it — and then they found a regal plaster Doberman. “We’ve got to find a gold sofa,” Cave decided, and tells of asking a shop owner if he could bring his dog in to try it out. That Doberman is in the show with an arched canopy including a chandelier, branches, flowers and more — as are five

Littleton Jazz Festival tickets go on sale July 1 at Town Hall Arts Center. The festival concert date is August 16 at 6:30 p.m. The program includes: Highlands Ranch-based “After Midnight,” a band that plays from Benny Goodman’s playbook; “Sazon”; the Bobby Trujillo Quartet, joined by vocalist Norma Tell; and the Neil Bridge 7+, with Karen Lee on vocals. Tickets cost $25, 303794-2787, townhallartscenter.com.

Welcome back!

Spotlight Performing Arts Center, once located in Centennial, has returned to Colorado in a new location at 6328 E. County Line Road #102, Highlands Ranch, where director Teresa Hill-Putnam, with her daughter Ashley Putnam, will offer classes for age 2 through adults in ballet, tap. It offers beginning through advanced classes in jazz dance, tumbling, lyrical/contemporary, pointe, musical theater, voice and vocal performance. Information: 720-4432623, spotlightperformers.com.

Outdoor movies

The Aspen Grove Free Family Film Series is Tuesdays at dusk: July 2 — “Despicable Me” and July 9 — “Iron Giant.” Sponsored by Alamo Drafthouse, which will give beer vouchers to adults in exchange for a $4 donation. Before the screening, there will be games, contests, props and giveaways. Gates open at 7 p.m., and films are shown outside the theater in the Aspen Grove shopping center at 7301 S. Santa Fe Drive, Littleton. Food available for purchase. Bring a blanket or chairs and the family.

Audubon Summer Camps

Three Audubon Summer Camps are offered through Colorado Academy, 3800 S. Pierce St., Denver. They will meet at the Audubon Nature Center at Chatfield. The academy will offer transportation to Audubon. Included: Wildlife Detectives, ages 8-11, July 15-19, 9 a.m. to 3:30 p.m.; Wetland Warriors: ages 10-14, July 22-26; Bird Nerds, ages 5-8, July 29-Aug. 2. Tuition: $355. Register: coloradoacademysummer.org, 303914-2531.

Renowned artist Nick Cave. Courtesy photo by James Prinz Photography other dogs and a monkey — all rescued and in protective spaces. A series of four huge “paintings” appear together, also assemblages of many objects and each backed by an afghan. “I was thinking about fashion, the opulence of life — just glam. Then the more mystical and magical …” Another installation of multi-colored and textured Soundsuits on a platform led to his comment that “this is my

playground.” Each is distinctive and all can be worn. They “evolve in the studio from textiles sought out around the world.” Finally, the viewer enters “Drive By,” a darkened room with videos of dancers in Soundsuits and images of his often-used crocheted doilies on the floor. (We observed delighted children trying to hop from one to another. This exhibit is a wonderful introduction to art for young ones.)

Reminder to artists

Kaleidoscope Juried Art Show entries will be due between 9 and 11 a.m. July 6 at the ACC Colorado Gallery of the Arts, Annex Building, Arapahoe Community College, 5900 S. Santa Fe Drive. Eligible: 2-D and 3-D work that one person can lift. Fee: $10 per entry. Actual work must be submitted. It will be juried that day and artists will be notified. Pick up work not selected from 1-3 p.m. If you volunteer that day to help with set-up, you may submit up to three works at no charge. Information: Trish Sangelo at trish.sangelo@arapahoe.edu or 303-7975649. The show will run July 8 to 31. Gallery hours are 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Mondays through Fridays.


13-Color

Elbert County News 13

June 27, 2013

Crochet coral is collaboration Textile project on display in ‘Spun’ exhibit at DAM

if you go The Crochet Coral Reef Project will be exhibited at the Denver Art Museum through Sept. 21, with the rest of the SPUN exhibits. See denverartmuseum.org for more information. Covered by general admission.

By Sonya Ellingboe

sellingboe@ourcoloradonews.com “Spun,” the textile-focused menu of exhibits at the Denver Art Museum, includes the Institute For Figuring’s charming, mostly colorful, Crochet Coral Reef Project. The little sculptural clusters are displayed on pedestals in both the Hamilton and the North buildings, leading the way from one gallery to the next. Sisters Christine and Margaret Wertheim, who grew up in Australia, conscious of the coral reefs along the coast and concerned about their fragility, started the IFF in 2005. The organization is now located in Los Angeles. The IFF has about 40 contributors worldwide and has helped to raise concern about these endangered organisms. The Wertheims have crocheted about half of the pieces themselves and curated the collection as it grew. See how many cases you can locate throughout the museum. Look for the tiny critters that inhabit the reefs. The inspiration came from “hyperbolic crochet,” discovered in 1997 by Cornell University mathematician Daina Taimina, according to the IFF website. The Wertheim sisters adopted Taimina’s techniques and elaborated on them “to develop a whole taxonomy of reef-life forms.” Loopy “kelps,” fringed “anemones,”

“Satellite Coral Reef,” a work in progress by local artists. Courtesy photo by Denver Art Museum crenelated “sea slugs” and curlicued “corals” have all been modeled with these methods.” Jenna Madison of the DAM Education Department said this is the largest collaborative art project in the world. It has been exhibited in many venues. “It came on our radar screen and we thought, wouldn’t it be great to have it here for SPUN,” Madison said. “So emails and calls went back and forth, as arrangements fell into place. Including this very contem-

Thousands listen to Meadows music First show in free summer series attracts about 4,500

CURTAIN TIME

Germinal One-Act and more

“The Twelve Pound Look” by James M. Barrie (author of “Peter Pan”) plays through July 7 at the Germinal Stage Denver, 44th and Alcott, Denver. Described by Ed Baerlein as “a prescient feminist gem from 1914,” it plays at 7 p.m. Fridays and Saturdays. Tickets $8.75, 303-455-7108. The final production in this building will be Peter Handke’s “Offending the Audience,” Aug. 9 to Aug. 25, a Germinal favor-

By Virginia Grantier

vgrantier@ourcolorado news.com The scene was pretty sweet at the The Meadows subdivision’s kick-off concert for its free summer concert series in Castle Rock. Sweet music wasn’t all that filled the air at Butterfield Crossing Park. Downwind from the cotton-candy machine, wisps of the stuff took flight frequently as the breeze blustered, and scads of kids would open their baby-bird mouths and leap and grab. The grass far beyond, and around tents and chairs, got a coating of the light-blue sugar hair. It was just another thing that seemed to spark smiles of those nearby in the crowd of several thousand, in this scene of peoplewatching and picnics, and of alert dogs wanting some of the picnic, and kids running and dancing around like they had never known this kind of freedom before. And then there was the music: Denver area talent, Lost Caravan with some gypsy jazz, and country tunes with singer Walker Williams.

porary work seems especially appropriate, especially since local crafters are now involved.” She said that Christine Wertheim has a fine arts background and Margaret is a scientist. A standard ingredient in the crocheted Coral Reef exhibits is a Satellite Coral Reef by local artists, and Denver’s version is underway in a special space where local craftsmen appear on Saturdays and Sundays to add to the project. It will grow through the

Country singer Walker Williams sang June 19 to about 4,500 people at The Meadows subdivision’s first concert of its annual summer series in Castle Rock.

if you go What: Second concert in The Meadows concert series When: 5 to 8:30 p.m. July 17 Bands: The Nacho Men, 5 to 6 p.m.; FourEverFab, 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. Where: Butterfield Crossing Park, 3952 Butterfield Crossing Drive, Castle Rock. (Limited parking at park and at adjacent Meadow View Elementary School, 3700 Butterfield Crossing Drive.) Price: Free. But donations of new school supplies will be accepted to benefit the Douglas County Educational Foundation’s Fill the Gap Program. People seemed to be listening. Some said they were listening, kind of. “It’s a social event. You’re looking for people you know,” said Brenda Brailsford, 38, of Castle Rock.

Send uS your newS Colorado Community Media welcomes event listings and other submissions. Please note our new submissions emails. events and club listings calendar@ourcoloradonews.com School notes, such as honor roll and dean’s list schoolnotes@ourcoloradonews.com

“We’re usually not picky about the music.” A representative spreading information about Castle Rock’s new hospital, Centura Health, said she enjoyed her tent’s location near the porta-potties. “Everyone comes by here,” she said and laughed. “We ended up with 4,500 attendees at our first concert and cannot wait until July 17 and 31 when we get to do it again,” said Katie McCormick, sponsorship and communications specialist for The Meadows Neighborhood Co. The July 17 concert starts with warm-up group The Nacho Men, which has been a warm-up group for singer Chuck Berry and others. The headliner is FourEverFab, a Beatles tribute band.

Military briefs militarynotes@ourcoloradonews.com General press releases Submit through our website Letters to the editor letters@ourcoloradonews.com Fax information to 303-566-4098 Mail to 9137 S. Ridgeline Blvd., Ste. 210, Highlands Ranch, CO 80129

summer. Christine Wertheim came to Denver to train the educational department and other area artists so they could, in turn, help the community crocheters get started. “It’s growing beautifully,” Madison said. People also work at home and bring in pieces. “It’s open to anyone.” It will be arranged and rearranged as more pieces come in. When the show closes in late September, the Satellite Coral Reef will be harvested and pieces given to museum visitors. Note especially the bleached coral in the lobby of the Hamilton Building, a collective work by many IFF contributors, crocheted in white and off-white yarns to illustrate what happens to coral under environmental stress. The color in coral comes from tiny microorganisms, zooanthellae, that live within the polyps. When environmental toxins or rising water temperatures stress corals, the polyps expel the zooanthellae, which they need for long-term survival. In August, the local Ladies Handiwork Society will be creating a garden in the North Building complete with critters and surprise moments.

ite. It plays at 8 p.m. Fridays and Saturdays. Tickets: $21.75/$23.75. 303-455-7108.

Musical whodunit

“Curtains,” a musical whodunit by John Kander and Fred Ebb, plays July 9-28 at the Arvada Center, 6901 Wadsworth Blvd., Arvada. Performances: 7:30 Tuesdays through Saturdays; 1 p.m. Wednesdays; 2 p.m. Saturdays and Sundays. Tickets start at $53, 720898-7200, arvadacenter.org.


14

14 Elbert County News

June 27, 2013

Dyslexic Mensa opens up with book Author shares full life of struggle, triumph By Ryan Boldrey

rboldrey@ourcoloradonews.com For most of his life, Glenn Harrington had a secret. He couldn’t read. It was a secret that never got in the way, though, just one that forced him to work harder and develop his own systems in order to succeed. At 17, he enlisted in the Air Force in order to bypass the last six weeks of high school, admittedly knowing he wouldn’t be able to pass his finals. By working this “con,” as he called it, he was able to accomplish three important things. First, by enlisting when he did during the Korean War, he was able to forgo the mandatory four years of reserve service that would have come after his four years of enlisted service. Second, by leaving high school with a 72 average in order to serve his country, Harrington’s principal awarded him his diploma. But perhaps most importantly, in the Air Force, Harrington discovered a passion for teaching, and realized he was good at it. It was this experience, teaching other airmen about mechanics, that led him to two degrees in geology and a life of teaching. But how could he teach without being able to read beyond a fourth-grade level? That marvelous story is depicted in the

Castle Rock

Melva and Glenn Harrington, of Highlands Ranch, have been through a lot together, including 61 years of marriage and a lifelong secret kept by Glenn that he reads at a fourth-grade level. The former college professor and member of the American Mensa Society, now 80, discovered he was dyslexic 10 years ago and recently published a book, “Two Lives in One: The Struggles and Triumphs of a Dyslexic Mensa.” Courtesy photo 80-year-old Harrington’s book, “Two Lives in One: The Struggles and Triumphs of a Dyslexic Mensa.” Harrington resides in Highlands Ranch

Highlands Ranch

Littleton

Parker

Parker

Parker

First United Methodist Church 1200 South Street Castle Rock, CO 80104 303.688.3047 www.fumccr.org

Services:

Saturday 5:30pm Sunday 8am, 9:15am, 10:30am Sunday School 9:15am Little Blessings Day Care www.littleblessingspdo.com

Open and Welcoming

Sunday Worship 8:00 am Chapel Service 9:00 & 10:30 am

Sunday School 9:00 & 10:30 am

www.st-andrew-umc.com

Welcome Home!

Weaving Truth and Relevance into Relationships and Life

worship Time 10:30AM sundays

Affiliated with United Church of Religious Science

303-794-2683 Preschool: 303-794-0510

Castle Rock Recreation Center 2301 Woodlands Blvd, Castle Rock

9203 S. University Blvd. Highlands Ranch, 80126

303 798 6387

CENTER FOR SPIRITUAL LIVING Sunday Services 10 a.m.

www.OurCenterforSpiritualLiving.org 720-851-0265

4391 E Mainstreet, Parker, Colorado 80134 Church Office – (303) 841-3836

www.parkerbiblechurch.org

303-791-3315

pastor@awlc.org www.awlc.org

A place for you

Lutheran Church & School

GRACE PRESBYTERIAN Alongside One Another On Life’s Journey

You are invited to worship with us:

Sundays at 10:00 am

Sunday Worship 8:00 & 10:45 a.m.

Grace is on the NE Corner of Santa Fe Dr. & Highlands Ranch Pkwy. (Across from Murdochs)

Trinity Lutheran School & ELC (Ages 3-5, Grades K-8)

303-798-8485

 303-841-4660 www.tlcas.org 

8:45 am & 10:30 am

Sunday

8:30 a.m. 11:00 a.m.

1609 W. Littleton Blvd. (303) 798-1389 • www.fpcl.org

Sunday 9:30am

Joyful Mission Preschool 303-841-3770 7051 East Parker Hills Ct. • Parker, CO 303-841-3739 www.joylutheran-parker.org

Parker

Parker, CO 10am Worship Service www.hilltopucc.org 303-841-2808

Sunday services held in the historic Ruth Memorial Chapel at the Parker Mainstreet Center

...19650 E. Mainstreet, Parker 80138

Fellowship & Worship: 9:00 am Sunday School: 10:45 am 5755 Valley Hi Drive Parker, CO 303-941-0668

www.SpiritofHopeLCMC.org

New Thought...Ancient Wisdom Sunday Service

& Children’s Church 10:00 a.m.

Visit our website for details of classes & upcoming events.

303.805.9890

www.P a r k er C C R S.org P.O. Box 2945—Parker CO 80134-2945

www.gracecolorado.com

Trinity

Sunday Worship

Community Church of Religious Science Hilltop United Church Of Christ 10926 E. Democrat Rd.

  

Connect – Grow – Serve – Love

SErviCES:

Saturday 5:30pm

Pastor David Fisher

of Littleton

Worship Services Sundays at 9:00am

“Loving God - Making A Difference”

Franktown

Parker evangelical Presbyterian church

9030 Miller road Parker, Co 80138 303-841-2125 www.pepc.org

www.gracepointcc.us





LUTHERAN CHURCH, ELCA

Abiding Word Lutheran Church First Presbyterian Church 8391 S. Burnley Ct., Highlands Ranch

Sunday Worship 10:30  4825 North Crowfoot Valley Rd. Castle Rock • canyonscc.org  303-663-5751



Sunday Worship: 10:45AM & 6PM Bible Study: 9:30AM Children, Young People & Adults

(Next to RTD lot @470 & University)

An Evangelical Presbyterian Church

Joy

Where people are excited about God’s Word.

Open hearts. Open minds. Open doors.

9:00am Spiritual Formation Classes for all Ages 90 east orchard road littleton, co



with his wife, Melva, whom he met in high school in Baytown, Texas. He never understood what dyslexia was or that he had the condition until 10 years ago. It was four

years ago that he learned he was something else too, a Mensa. Harrington is in the 99.6th percentile for intelligence. “I developed my own system of learning,” he says. “I was using this elevated IQ that I didn’t know I had all these years. I could learn but I had to learn a different way.” Harrington’s life includes years of teaching public school, at a junior college, and as a naturalist working for the National Park Service. Understanding that he was different — and that he had never received individualized attention or understanding growing up in the era he did — led him to utilize patience and make himself constantly available on or off the clock for his own students. Learning he was dyslexic at the age of 70, and living a life without reading in a world of readers, has led him to another place, and one that is somewhat ironic. Harrington, despite having never having read a book cover to cover, is now an author. “The purpose of the book is encouragement,” he said, “to encourage other people that are dyslexic that you can succeed and you can live a full life without reading. You can’t crawl off into a corner and feel sorry for yourself. If you have a problem, I don’t care if it is dyslexia or money or what, you have to embrace that problem. “You will see miracles happen.” Harrington’s book is available in paperback and for Kindle at www.amazon.com.

Greewood Village Saint Peter Lutheran Church and Rainbow Trail Lutheran Camp

Day Camp 2013 August 5 – 8 9300 E. Belleview Ave. Greenwood Village Colorado 80111 303-770-9301 or www.stplc.org

*ages 3 yrs to those entering 6th grade

To advertise your place of worship in this section, call 303-566-4091 or email kearhart@ourcoloradonews.com.


15

k

Elbert County News 15

June 27, 2013

Rocky Mountain Praise Choir seeks singers

Musician aims to line up 250 to 350 volunteers hing to take part in Aug. 11 e forconcert at church

earn-By Tom Munds vatedtmunds@ourcoloradonews.com ears. erent Jerry Nelson, pianist, composer, conductor and arranger, seeks ach-singers to join him performing at nd asthe Aug. 11 concert at Denver First ParkChurch of the Nazarene. dif- “The Rocky Mountain Praise eivedChoir was established in the early ding1990s and we did a concert and prom toduced a CD about every two years con-until about 2000,” Nelson, a Cenr histennial resident, said. “People have been asking, ‘Is the Rocky Mountain of 70,Praise Choir history?’ Obviously, the worldanswer is no, as we will be back in lace,concert Aug. 11.” Har- He said singers can receive more ead ainformation about how to become part of the choir by sending an erage-mail to Rachael@jerrynelsonmusic. eoplecom. and “All singers who register will . Yoube sent a compact disc and musorrysic so they can rehearse on their don’town,” Nelson said. “We haven’t set , youthe date, but I expect we will hold our first group rehearsal in early July and there will be a second one aper-about 10 days later. That leaves om. about three weeks for singers to rehearse individually before we have a dress rehearsal Aug 10.” There will be no charge for admission but an offering will be taken. However, concert-goers who want to assured a seat can purchase reserved seats in the artists circle near the stage as well as tickets guaranteeing a seat if the performance is sold out. The talented international performer also is releasing a new compact disc at the Aug. 11 performance called “Quiet Time Reflec-

‘Unplugged’ weddings are trend with brides Couples starting to ask guests to leave cameras, cell phones at home By Deborah Grigsby

dgrigsby@ourcoloradonews. com

Composer and pianist Jerry Nelson performs with a choir and orchestra at a concert. Nelson is recruiting singers for a choir to do a concert with him Aug. 11. Courtesy photo tions” which is a collection of music performed by Nelson on the piano. He noted that a large portion of the proceeds from concerts and compact disc sales enable him and his wife, Rachael, to occasionally make trips to the Congo and Zimbabwe. On those African trips, Jerry performs concerts and his wife works with AIDS victims training youth peer groups. Together they also work on humanitarian programs such as economic water purification and the education for promising young people. Nelson noted the program for the concert would be a bit different than past performances. “Most of our past concerts included Broadway themes and popular songs along with songs of the church,” he said. “But the music for the Aug. 11 concerts will be tra-

ditional hymns of the church and gospel songs. Most people know the words to these songs so we will urge members of the audience to sing along with us.” He said he is hopeful the Aug. 11 event will be the first concert in a series of performances he and the Rocky Mountain Praise Choir will do at locations around Colorado and perhaps at venues in surrounding states. Jerry Nelson took his first piano lesson at seven, spent a decade in public school music before he became the Artist-in-Residence at Denver First Church of the Nazarene. Over the years, he created 5,000 arrangements, has written more than 50 songs and performed piano concerts nationally and internationally.

In a plugged-in world, even the most techno-savvy brides are asking wedding guests to ditch the digital cameras and cell phones and simply “be present.” “Unplugged” weddings are gaining in popularity among trendy couples who want friends and family to share in their special moment without digital distractions. Alysson Graham, who lives in San Diego but will be married this fall in Littleton, has been planning her wedding for about 18 months. Every detail, from the dress, to flowers, to the way she and her new husband will leave the venue, has been meticulously researched and choreographed. “I have waited for this day all my life and I want it to be perfect,” said Graham. “And I don’t want cell phones, beeps, dings and fake camera sounds ruining the moment.” So Graham will announce in her invitations that friends, family and even dogs are welcome, but phones and cameras are not. Online bridal publications like “The Offbeat Bride” are helping push the trend and have even provided downloadable art and copyright-free ver-

biage for brides wanting to pull the cord. While some wedding guests may not be so happy with what wedding planners are calling the new “chic,” wedding photographers are downright elated. Photographer Jenn Hafelfinger, who has a large client base in the South Metro Denver area, thinks the move is long overdue. “I think the concept is fantastic and I wish more brides would consider going unplugged,” said Hafelfinger, who owns Cherished Snapshots in Loveland. “I can’t tell you how many times I’ve had to compete with family members who feel it’s their job to be the photographer, too.” Hafelfinger says in the end, it’s the client who suffers. “I understand it’s an exciting time, but too many cameras become a distraction,” she said. “People don’t know where to look; there’s multiple flashes going off and that makes it a real challenge to get those pristine, magazine-like photos all the brides want.” And while she admits much of the frenzy may be driven by the immediacy of social media apps, Hafelfinger said cell phone cameras in dark venues rarely produce quality images. “I totally see the point with keeping people out of the photos,” said Graham. “However, for me, it’s more important that my friends and family are emotionally — not digitally — connected with me on my wedding day. Seriously, just turn it all off and enjoy the day with us.”

The flexibility of online classes. The quality of UCCS.

Looking to finish your Bachelor’s Degree but can’t afford to quit your current job? ■ UCCS offers Bachelor Degree completion programs in Business, Nursing and Criminal Justice through our flexible, affordable online classes. ■ Our on-campus faculty teach our online classes. ■ Class sizes are limited to give you the personal attention UCCS is known for. For more information, visit www.uccs.edu/online

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ElbertSPORTS 16-Sports

16 Elbert County News June 27, 2013

Using a wooden bat, Blake Goldsberry doubles to drive in three runs, helping Cherry Creek’s under-17 team defeat Carlsbad, N. M., in tournament action. Photo by Tom Munds

Old-style bats are wave of future Wood becoming more prevalent in summer games By Jim Benton

jbenton@ourcoloradonews.com The sound of the crack of the bat has replaced the ping in many baseball games this summer. More U18, U17 and U16 baseball games and tournaments are being contested using wooden bats rather than aluminum bats. “They’ve had this for a few years now,” said Cherry Creek U17 Connie Mack coach Jeff Mielnicki. “It’s great. The games are a lot shorter, there’s more strategy, teams are bunting more, and they are playing baseball the old-fashioned way, getting runners on, moving them over and getting them in.” There has been a trend of going back to wooden bats, mostly for safety reasons. The wood versus metal debate has been raging for years and will likely continue. Baseballs come off metal bats faster, and that trampoline effect makes it hard for pitchers, coaches and infielders to defend themselves from balls hit towards them. Aluminum bats are generally easier to swing and have a larger sweet spot or center of percussion. New BBCOR (Batted Ball Co-Efficient Of Restitution) regulations state the ball exit speed ratio can’t exceed .728 because that is the point at which a pitcher loses his ability to protect himself. Players using wooden bats have to develop good hitting fundamentals because the bats don’t produce as many cheap hits as with metal bats. However, wooden bats break more easily than their metal counterparts. Pro-aluminum-bat advocates and companies argue that hitting with metal bats

these days is more like using wooden bats and the astronomical scores of many games have been reduced. “With the new BBCOR regulations, the metal bats are much more like wooden bats compared to two or three years ago,” said Ponderosa coach Jarod Nicholson. “Three or four years ago they were swinging lightning rods and balls were flying out of parks everywhere. We don’t see that any more. I thought it would be a more obvious change. “For me, the guys that should hit home runs still hit home runs with BBCOR bats. It’s probably the guys that shouldn’t don’t anymore. That’s probably the biggest difference.” Many programs like Ponderosa’s use wooden bats in the summer, fall and preseason workouts to stress hitting fundamentals that must be solid to be a good hitter with a wooden bat. “Hitters are learning two things,” said Mielnicki. “They need to keep their nose down and focus more on the sweet part of the barrel. They are finding not only are they not getting the cheap hit, they are breaking their bats. We do a lot of tee work, focusing on the barrel. “What we have found over the last few years, at least on my teams, we have some players that have better averages in the spring and not as good in the summer. And some of the average players actually have better averages in the summer because they adjust better for some reason.” Nicholson claims hitting with wooden bats helps his players. “It does make them better,” he said. “It’s one of those things where the kids aren’t swinging for the fence with wooden bats. I like that. I tell our kids I’d rather have them hit a line drive in the gap. That’s kind of our philosophy here. It makes kids stay within their shoes a little bit.”

Chaparral summer coach Ryan Serena agrees. “Wood bats help players refine their swings,” he said. “You don’t get as many cheap hits with wood. I think it’s good to use wood. The players do, except when they break the bat. It’s an $80 swing of the bat.” Cherry Creek right fielder and pitcher Jack Gillet enjoys hitting with a wooden bat. “When you use wooden bats, it is a different kind of game at the plate,” he explained. “The wooden bats do make you focus on executing the right way in order to drive the ball hard.” Ponderosa’s Brandon Kryzanski claims you have to learn how to hit with a wooden bat. “I like using wooden bats because the power off the bat is like the pros,” said Kryzanski. “It’s just getting used to the wood bats. If pitchers pitch inside on me with wood bats that will break them, so it teaches you to get your hands through quicker so you don’t get jammed. Then you switch to a metal bat in the spring, and you get an inside pitch but your get your hands through quicker and it is going to go a lot farther than with a wood bat.” Eric Tokuyama of Ponderosa claims it is easier to identify the good hitters when everybody is using wooden bats. “Wood bats help you in the summer get your natural swing and you have to find the sweet sport,” he said. “It shows how good of a hitter you really are.” Blake Goldsberry, a shortstop and pitcher for Cherry Creek, prefers aluminum bats. “Wooden bats are OK but they break pretty easily,” he said. “Personally, I prefer the aluminum bat because you get more pop and drive the ball farther than you do with a similar hit with a wooden bat.” Jim Haag owns Haag Bat Co. in Parker, and his sales of wooden bats have swelled

this year. The company sells four models of wood composite bats that are manufactured with fiberglass fabric reinforced outer layers, bonded on with a waterproof resin. The bats, which sell for $120, come with a fourmonth, 120-day replacement warranty policy. “This is our tenth year of business,” said Haag, whose son Alex played at Ponderosa and Regis College. “We’re anti-aluminum. We look at it as wood is the best thing for baseball. It makes them better hitters; if you can hit with wood, it’s a lot better for you. The next level, college and getting drafted, they want to see you hit with wood. The whole wood bat concept is growing. A lot of states are going to wood only, no metal. “This is our best year ever. The first three months of this year, we’ve sold more wood composite bats than we did in the first nine years. The economy is better, we’re out into different states, colleges in Arizona and we’re one of the approved vendors in New Mexico with their high schools. We’ve done over $100,000 in sales this year.” New Mexico, North Dakota and schools in New York City have banned the use of metal bats. Massachusetts and Montana introduced proposals to eliminate aluminum bats in high school games, but neither passed. No proposals to use wood-only bats in spring baseball for boys or girls softball in the fall have been presented to the Colorado High School Activities Association’s Board of Control. “What I would love to see is high school baseball with wood bats and to play nine innings,” said Nicholson. “Wood bat games are significantly quicker and faster, so to me that would be the best of both worlds, to play with wood bats for nine innings, that’s real baseball.”


e

June 27, 2013 Public Notice DISTRICT COURT, WATER DIVISION 1, COLORADO MAY 2013 WATER RESUME PUBLICATION TO: ALL PERSONS INTERESTED IN WATER APPLICATIONS IN WATER DIV. 1 Pursuant to C.R.S. 37-92-302, you are notified that the following is a resume of all water right applications and certain amendments filed in the Office of the Water Clerk during the month of MAY 2013 for each County affected.

Public Trustees Public Notice DISTRICT COURT, WATER DIVISION 1, COLORADO MAY 2013 WATER RESUME PUBLICATION TO: ALL PERSONS INTERESTED IN WATER APPLICATIONS IN WATER DIV. 1 Pursuant to C.R.S. 37-92-302, you are notified that the following is a resume of all water right applications and certain amendments filed in the Office of the Water Clerk during the month of MAY 2013 for each County affected. 13CW36 FRED W. AND LOIS A. NOE, 5915 CR 114, Elizabeth, CO 80107. 303646-4055. APPLICATION FOR UNDERGROUND WATER RIGHT IN ELBERT COUNTY. Noe Well, permit 58462 located SW1/4, SE1/4, S9, T9S, R64W of the 6th PM. Source: Upper Dawson Aquifer. Depth: 270 ft. Date of appropriation: 0421-72. Date water applied to beneficial use: 08-01-72. Amount: 15 gpm, Absolute. Use: Fire protection, normal household use, irrigation of 1 acre of lawns, gardens, watering domestic animals. This application is to adjudicate rights to all aquifers under described property, including Upper Dawson, Lower Dawson, Denver, Arapahoe and Laramie-Fox Hills. THE WATER RIGHTS CLAIMED BY THESE APPLICATIONS MAY AFFECT IN PRIORITY ANY WATER RIGHTS CLAIMED OR HERETOFORE ADJUDICATED WITHIN THIS DIVISION AND OWNERS OF AFFECTED RIGHTS MUST APPEAR TO OBJECT WITHIN THE TIME PROVIDED BY STATUTE OR BE FOREVER BARRED. YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that any party who wishes to oppose an application, or an amended application, may file with the Water Clerk, P. O. Box 2038, Greeley, CO 80632, a verified Statement of Opposition, setting forth facts as to why the application should not be granted, or why it should be granted only in part or on certain conditions. Such Statement of Opposition must be filed by the last day of JULY 2013 (forms available on www.courts.state.co.us or in the Clerk’s office), and must be filed as an Original and include $158.00 filing fee. A copy of each Statement of Opposition must also be served upon the Applicant or Applicant’s Attorney and an affidavit or certificate of such service of mailing shall be filed with the Water Clerk. Legal Notice No.: 927680 First Publication: June 27, 2013 Last Publication: June 27, 2013 Publisher: The Elbert County News

Misc. Private Legals Public Notice DISTRICT COURT, WATER DIVISION 1, COLORADO MAY 2013 WATER RESUME PUBLICATION TO: ALL PERSONS INTERESTED IN WATER APPLICATIONS IN WATER DIV. 1 Pursuant to C.R.S. 37-92-302, you are notified that the following is a resume of all water right applications and certain amendments filed in the Office of the Water Clerk during the month of MAY 2013 for each County affected. 13CW35 GARY L. SHELTON, PO BOX

wood1902, Elizabeth, CO 80107. 303-6465781. APPLICATION FOR UNDERwithGROUND WATER RIGHT IN ELBERT Shelton 1 Well, permit 213000, yers,COUNTY. located NW1/4, NW1/4, S16, T9S, R64W Theof the 6th PM at a distance 380 ft. from North and 1000 ft. from West. Source: Upfour-per Dawson Aquifer. Depth: 365 ft. Date of 07-16-98. Date water aprantyappropriation: plied to beneficial use: 01-12-99. Amount:

15 gpm, Absolute. Use: Fire protection, normal household use, irrigation of 1 acre

saidof lawns, gardens, watering domestic animals. erosastock THE WATER RIGHTS CLAIMED BY APPLICATIONS MAY AFFECT IN num.THESE PRIORITY ANY WATER RIGHTS g forCLAIMED OR HERETOFORE ADJUDICATED WITHIN THIS DIVISION AND f youOWNERS OF AFFECTED RIGHTS APPEAR TO OBJECT WITHIN you.MUST THE TIME PROVIDED BY STATUTE OR BE FOREVER BARRED. fted, TheYOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that any who wishes to oppose an applicaot ofparty tion, or an amended application, may file with the Water Clerk, P. O. Box 2038, . Greeley, CO 80632, a verified Statement hreeof Opposition, setting forth facts as to why application should not be granted, or woodthe why it should be granted only in part or on conditions. Such Statement of Opninecertain position must be filed by the last day of intoJ U L Y 2 0 1 3 ( f o r m s a v a i l a b l e o n www.courts.state.co.us or in the Clerk’s andoffice), and must be filed as an Original include $158.00 filing fee. A copy of Newand each Statement of Opposition must also doneb e s e r v e d u p o n t h e A p p l i c a n t o r Applicant’s Attorney and an affidavit or certificate of such service of mailing shall be filed with the Water Clerk.

hools se ofLegal Notice No.: 927679 First Publication: June 27, 2013 tanaLast Publication: June 27, 2013 umi-Publisher: The Elbert County News Public Notice ither DISTRICT COURT,

DIVISION 1, COLORADO ts in WATER MAY 2013 WATER RESUME PUBLICATION all in Colo-TO: ALL PERSONS INTERESTED WATER APPLICATIONS ion’sIN IN WATER DIV. 1 Pursuant to C.R.S. 37-92-302, you are no-

hooltified that the following is a resume of all right applications and certain ninewater amendments filed in the Office of the WaClerk during the month of MAY 2013 amester for each County affected. o me 10CW306 Arapahoe County Water And s, toWastewater Authority (“ACWWA”), c/o Atkin, General Manager, 13031 East hat’sGary Caley Avenue, Centennial, Colorado

80111; United Water and Sanitation District acting directly and by and through the United Water and Sanitation District ACWWA Enterprise (“United”), c/o Robert Lembke, 8301 East Prentice Avenue

10CW306 Arapahoe County Water And Wastewater Authority (“ACWWA”), c/o Gary Atkin, General Manager, 13031 East Caley Avenue, Centennial, Colorado 80111; United Water and Sanitation District acting directly and by and through the United Water and Sanitation District ACWWA Enterprise (“United”), c/o Robert Lembke, 8301 East Prentice Avenue #100, Greenwood Village, Colorado 80111; and East Cherry Creek Valley Water and Sanitation District, acting directly and by and through the East Cherry Creek Valley Water and Sanitation District Water Activity Enterprise, Inc. (“ECCV”), c/o David Kaunisto, District Manager, 6201 South Gun Club Road, Aurora, Colorado 80016. SECOND AMENDED APPLICATION FOR APPROVAL OF ADDITIONAL USER IN THE PLANS FOR AUGMENTATION AND RECHARGE PROJECTS DECREED IN CASE NOS. 02CW403, 02CW404, AND 03CW442; TO AMEND THE PLANS FOR AUGMENTATION AND RECHARGE PROJECTS DECREED IN CASE NOS. 02CW403, 02CW404, AND 03CW442; AND FOR CONDITIONAL WATER RIGHTS, IN ADAMS, ARAPAHOE, DENVER, DOUGLAS, ELBERT, MORGAN AND WELD COUNTIES. 1. The above listed parties will be collectively referred to as the “Applicants.” Please send all pleadings and correspondence to: Brian M. Nazarenus, Esq., Sheela S. Stack, Esq., Susan M. Ryan, Esq., Ryley Carlock & Applewhite, 1700 Lincoln, Suite 3500, Denver, Colorado 80203, (Attorneys for ACWWA); Tod J. Smith, Esq., The Law Office of Tod J. Smith, 1007 Pearl Street, Suite 220, Boulder, Colorado 80302, Scott B. McElroy, Esq., Alice E. Walker, Esq., Daniel E. Steuer, Esq., Gregg H. DeBie, Esq., McElroy, Meyer, Walker & Condon, P.C., 1007 Pearl Street, Suite 220, Boulder, Colorado 80302, (Attorneys for United); William B. Tourtillott, Esq., Brian M. Nazarenus, Esq., Sheela S. Stack, Esq., Susan M. Ryan, Esq., Ryley Carlock & Applewhite, 1700 Lincoln, Suite 3500, Denver, Colorado 80203, (Attorneys for ECCV). 2. Introduction. By this Second Amended Application (also referred to as the “Application”), ACWWA, ECCV, and United seek to amend the plans for augmentation and recharge projects decreed in Case Nos. 02CW403 (“403 Decree”), 02CW404 and 03CW442 (“404/442 Decree”), to add ACWWA to certain portions of those Decrees, and for the approval of a conditional water right. The Applicants are not seeking to replace the 403 Decree or the 404/442 Decree, but instead to amend those decrees to include additional wells, recharge ponds, and water rights. This Application also seeks to amend the plans for augmentation, recharge projects, and conditional water rights decreed in Case Nos. 02CW403, 02CW404 and 03CW442 to include ACWWA. 3. Background and Description of Applicants’ Prior Decrees. 3.1. Background. The Water Supply Project, or the Northern Project, is an integrated system for the diversion, accretion, collection, storage, transmission, and treatment of water rights that was originally designed to provide ECCV with a long-term, sustainable municipal water supply for its service area. In order to implement the Water Supply Project, ECCV, United, and the Farmers Reservoir and Irrigation Company (“FRICO”) entered into a Water Supply Agreement, dated December 18, 2003, which was amended in May 2007. On December 15, 2009, ACWWA, United, and ECCV entered into an Intergovernmental Agreement (“IGA”) to provide for ACWWA’s participation with ECCV and United in the Water Supply Project. The Water Supply Project is now designed to provide ECCV and ACWWA with a longterm, sustainable municipal water supply for their respective service areas located in Arapahoe and Douglas Counties, Colorado. Maps of ECCV’s and ACWWA’s service areas were attached to the original application in this case as Exhibit 1 and Exhibit 2, respectively, which are incorporated into this Second Amended Application. 3.2. Decreed Components of the Water Supply Project. The Water Court has previously decreed various components of the Water Supply Project for ECCV and United’s use: 3.2.1. Case No. 02CW403. The Water Court approved a plan for augmentation (“ACWWA/ECCV Augmentation Plan”) (by this Application, the ECCV Augmentation Plan for ECCV’s Upper Beebe Draw well field defined in the 403 Decree is redefined as the ACWWA/ECCV Augmentation Plan) for ECCV’s Upper Beebe Draw wellfield (“ACWWA/ECCV Well Field”), (by this Application, the ECCV Well Field defined in the 403 Decree is redefined as the ACWWA/ECCV Well Field), as described in paragraph 15.1 of the 403 Decree. The ACWWA/ECCV Augmentation Plan allowed for the future addition of wells to the augmentation plan and for the use of additional sources of substitute supply to replace the out-of-priority depletions resulting from pumping the ACWWA/ECCV Well Field. 3.2.2. Case Nos. 02CW404 and 03CW442. The Water Court approved the addition of six (6) wells to the ACWWA/ECCV Well Field, additional sources of replacement water to the ACWWA/ECCV Augmentation Plan, and a recharge project in the Beebe Draw (the “Beebe Draw Recharge Project”). The Water Court also approved a plan for augmentation to replace the out-of-priority depletions created by the pumping of wells located on 70 Ranch (“70 Ranch Augmentation Plan”) and a recharge project on the 70 Ranch (“70 Ranch Recharge Project”). Finally, the Water Court approved a one-time diversion conditional surface water right, a Milton Lake 2003 Storage Right, a Plan for Augmentation for the Milton Lake 2003 Storage Right, a right of substitution, and an appropriative right of exchange. The 403 and 404/442 Decrees were attached to the Firs t Amended Application as Exhibits 7 and 8 respectively, which are incorporated into this Second Amended Application. 4. Claims in the Original and First Amended Applications. The claims in the original application in this case to include ACWWA as an end user in the Water Supply Project mirrored the claims pled in the amended applications in the 404/442 Case. As a result of negotiations with opposers and three separate motions to dismiss claims, the 404/442 Decree was significantly different from the amended applications in those cases. As part of the negotiations, for example, the Applicants withdrew their claims for conjunctive use projects in the Beebe Draw and the 70 Ranch alluvial aquifers, and their claims related to the Lower Beebe Draw wellfield. ACWWA was not an end user of water under the 404/442 Decree. Therefore, the Applicants sought in the First Amended Application to incorporate ACWWA into the Water Supply Project as it was set forth in the 404/442 Decree, and to add components consistent with the requirements in that Decree. The Applicants withdrew their claims related to: a) the conjunctive use projects in the Beebe Draw and 70 Ranch alluvial aquifers; and

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the Milton Lake 2003 Storage Right, a right of substitution, and an appropriative right of exchange. The 403 and 404/442 Decrees were attached to the First Amended Application as Exhibits 7 and 8 respectively, which are incorporated into this Second Amended Application. 4. Claims in the Original and First Amended Applications. The claims in the original application in this case to include ACWWA as an end user in the Water Supply Project mirrored the claims pled in the amended applications in the 404/442 Case. As a result of negotiations with opposers and three separate motions to dismiss claims, the 404/442 Decree was significantly different from the amended applications in those cases. As part of the negotiations, for example, the Applicants withdrew their claims for conjunctive use projects in the Beebe Draw and the 70 Ranch alluvial aquifers, and their claims related to the Lower Beebe Draw wellfield. ACWWA was not an end user of water under the 404/442 Decree. Therefore, the Applicants sought in the First Amended Application to incorporate ACWWA into the Water Supply Project as it was set forth in the 404/442 Decree, and to add components consistent with the requirements in that Decree. The Applicants withdrew their claims related to: a) the conjunctive use projects in the Beebe Draw and 70 Ranch alluvial aquifers; and b) the Lower Beebe Draw Well Field. The Applicants also: a) included ACWWA in the Beebe Draw Recharge Project, and the 70 Ranch Augmentation Plan and Recharge Project; b) added wells to the 70 Ranch Augmentation Plan with a claim for a conditional water right for those wells; and c) added the 70 Ranch Recharge Collection Pipeline and additional amounts of recharge water to the 70 Ranch Recharge Project. 5. Purpose of the Second Amended Application. In this Second Amended Application, the Applicants seek to: a) amend the ACWWA/ECCV Augmentation Plan decreed in Case No. 02CW403 to add five (5) wells, to establish priority dates for the ACWWA/ECCV Well Field, to add additional sources of replacement water to the ACWWA/ECCV Augmentation Plan; b) amend the Beebe Draw Recharge Project decreed in Case Nos. 02CW404 and 03CW442 to add a recharge pond; c) amend the 70 Ranch Augmentation Plan decreed in Case Nos. 02CW404 and 03CW442 to add eight (8) wells to the 70 Ranch Augmentation Plan; d) incorporate ACWWA into the ACWWA/ECCV Augmentation Plan decreed in Case No. 02CW403 as amended by the 404/442 Decree and this Application; e) incorporate ACWWA into the Beebe Draw Recharge Project decreed in Case Nos. 02CW404 and 03CW442 as amended by this Application; f) incorporate ACWWA into the 70 Ranch Augmenta t i o n P l a n d e c r e e d i n C a s e N o s. 02CW404 and 03CW442 as amended by this Application; g) incorporate ACWWA into the 70 Ranch Recharge Project decreed in Case Nos. 02CW404 and 03CW442 as amended by this Application; h) add ACWWA as an end user of the conditional water rights decreed in Case Nos. 02CW404 and 03CW442; i) approve a conditional water right for the United Diversion Facility No. 6 located on the 70 Ranch; and j) add storage facilities from which the Applicants may deliver replacement water to replace out-of-priority depletions and winter return flow obligations. Additionally, the prior applications described ACWWA’s service area as being located in Arapahoe County. ACWWA’s service area also includes areas in Douglas County as depicted on the map attached as Exhibit 2 to the original application, which is incorporated into this Second Amended Application, and Applicants include Douglas County in the description of ACWWA’s service area. In this case, the Applicants do not seek to adjudicate ACWWA as a user of the appropriative rights of exchange, or right of substitution decreed in the 404/442 Decree. An application to adjudicate exchanges related to ACWWA’s participation in the Water Supply Project is pending in Case No. 09CW283. This Second Amended Application supersedes and replaces the original application filed on December 29, 2010, and the First Amended Application filed on October 28, 2011. Application to Amend the ACWWA/ECCV Augmentation Plan. 6. General Description. The Applicants seek approval of ACWWA’s incorporation into the ACWWA/ECCV Augmentation Plan approved in the 403 Decree as amended by the 404/442 Decree for the pumping of the ACWWA/ECCV Well Field for ACWWA’s benefit, and delivery of that water to ACWWA’s service area. The Applicants also seek to amend the ACWWA/ECCV Augmentation Plan to add new wells, establish priority dates, and to add sources of substitute supply. 7. Augmented Structures to be Utilized by ACWWA and ECCV. The ACWWA/ECCV Well Field currently includes a total of twelve (12) wells. The ACWWA/ECCV Well Field is located in the Beebe Draw. United is the fee owner of the land on which the wells are located. 7.1. List of Currently Decreed Wells. 7.1.1. The 403 Decree approved a plan for augmentation for six (6) of the wells in the ACWWA/ECCV Well Field. Copies of the well permits were attached to the original application in this case as Exhibit 3, which is incorporated into this Second Amended Application. The legal descriptions of the six (6) wells are also found in Appendices 4 and 7 to the 403 Decree. The six (6) wells are all located in T1S, R66W of the 6th PM, Adams County, Colorado, as follows: P-6 (Well Permit No. 64478-F) located in the SE1/4 of the SW1/4 of Section 1; E-7A (Well Permit No. 64477-F) located in the SW1/4 of the SW1/4 of Section 1; P-8 (Well Permit No. 64476-F) located in the NW1/4 of the NW1/4 of Section 12; P-11 (Well Permit No. 64475-F) located in the SW1/4 of the SW1/4 of Section 12; P-12 (Well Permit No. 64473-F) located in the SW1/4 of the NW1/4 of Section 12; and P13 (Well Permit No. 64474-F) located in the SE1/4 of the NE1/4 of Section 11. 7.1.2. In the 404/442 Case, the Water Court approved adding six (6) wells to the Augmentation Plan approved in the 403 Decree. These wells were originally monitoring wells. The permits for the monitoring wells were attached to the original application in this case as Exhibit 4, which is incorporated into this Second Amended Application. They have now been converted to production wells. The wells are equipped with totalizing flow meters and are identified as Well Permit Nos. 75063-F through 75068-F, copies of which were attached to the First Amended Application as Exhibit 9, which is incorporated into this Second Amended Application. The six wells are located in the Beebe Draw all in T1S, R66W of the 6th PM, Adams County, Colorado, as follows: P-2 (Well Permit No. 75063) located in the NE1/4 of the NE1/4 of Section 1; P-3 (Well Permit No. 75064) located in the SE1/4 of the NE1/4 of Section 1; P-4 (Well Permit No. 75065) located in the NW1/4 of the SE1/4 of Section 1; P-5 (Well Permit No. 75066) located in the NE1/4 of the SW1/4 of Section 1; P-15 (Well Permit No. 75067) located in the SW1/4 of the NE1/4 of Section 1; and P-18 (Well Permit No. 75068) located in the NE1/4 of the NE1/4 of Section 1. United is the fee owner of the land on which they are located. Legal descriptions of the well locations are also found in paragraph 14.1 of the 404/442 Decree, as well as in the permits attached to the original Application as Exhibit 4, which is incorporated into this Second Amended Application. 7.1.3. Priority Dates Added to the Currently Decreed Wells. The Applicants did not previously claim priority dates for the wells in the ACWWA/ECCV Well Field. The Applicants claim the following priority dates for the previously decreed wells: 7.1.3.1. For the six (6) wells approved in the 403 Decree, described in paragraph 7.1.1. above, a priority date of August 31, 2005, the date by which water was pumped from the wells and delivered via the Northern Pipeline to ECCV’s service area. 7.1.3.2. For the six (6) wells

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wells are located in the Beebe Draw all in

17 T1S, R66W of the 6th PM, Adams County,

Colorado, as follows: P-2 (Well Permit No. 75063) located in the NE1/4 of the NE1/4 of Section 1; P-3 (Well Permit No. 75064) located in the SE1/4 of the NE1/4 of Section 1; P-4 (Well Permit No. 75065) located in the NW1/4 of the SE1/4 of Section 1; P-5 (Well Permit No. 75066) located in the NE1/4 of the SW1/4 of Section 1; P-15 (Well Permit No. 75067) located in the SW1/4 of the NE1/4 of Section 1; and P-18 (Well Permit No. 75068) located in the NE1/4 of the NE1/4 of Section 1. United is the fee owner of the land on which they are located. Legal descriptions of the well locations are also found in paragraph 14.1 of the 404/442 Decree, as well as in the permits attached to the original Application as Exhibit 4, which is incorporated into this Second Amended Application. 7.1.3. Priority Dates Added to the Currently Decreed Wells. The Applicants did not previously claim priority dates for the wells in the ACWWA/ECCV Well Field. The Applicants claim the following priority dates for the previously decreed wells: 7.1.3.1. For the six (6) wells approved in the 403 Decree, described in paragraph 7.1.1. above, a priority date of August 31, 2005, the date by which water was pumped from the wells and delivered via the Northern Pipeline to ECCV’s service area. 7.1.3.2. For the six (6) wells approved in the 404/442 Decree, described in paragraph 7.1.2. above, a priority date of April 15, 2011, the date the 404/442 Decree was entered by the Water Court. 7.2. Wells Added to the 403 Decree. The Applicants seek to add five (5) new wells to the ACWWA/ECCV Well Field (“New Wells”). As required by paragraph 20 of the 403 Decree, this claim constitutes an application for a change of water right. The New Wells will be used to withdraw water from the Beebe Draw for delivery to the ECCV Reverse Osmosis Plant, in compliance with the ACWWA/ECCV Augmentation Plan approved in the 403 Decree, as amended by the 404/442 Decree and a decree entered in this case. The wells will be located as follows: 7.2.1. Well No. E-1 located in the SW1/4 of the NE1/4 of Section 1, T1S, R66W of the 6th PM, Adams County, Colorado. 7.2.2. Well No. P-14 located in the NE1/4 of the SE1/4 of Section 1, T1S, R66W of the 6th PM, Adams County, Colorado. 7.2.3. Well No. P-19 located in the NE1/4 of the SE1/4 of Section 1, T1S, R66W of the 6th PM, Adams County, Colorado. 7.2.4. Well No. P-20 located in the NW1/4 of the SE1/4 of Section 1, T1S, R66W of the 6th PM, Adams County, Colorado. 7.2.5. Well No. P-21 located in the SE1/4 of the SW1/4 of Section 1, T1S, R66W of the 6th PM, Adams County, Colorado. 7.2.6. Priority Date: For the five (5) wells described above, a priority date of May 31, 2013, the date on which this Second Amended Application was filed with the Water Court. 7.2.7. United is the grantee of perpetual easements for Well Nos. E-1, P-19, P-20 and P-21 sites. United owns the site for Well No. P-14. 8. Incorporation of ACWWA in the ACWWA/ECCV Augmentation Plan. This application seeks to incorporate ACWWA into the ACWWA/ECCV Augmentation Plan set forth in the 403 Decree as amended by the 404/442 Decree and by this Application. This Application seeks approval of ACWWA’s pumping from the ACWWA/ECCV Well Field for delivery to its service area. ACWWA will replace its out- of- pr i or i ty depl eti ons fr om the ACWWA/ECCV Well Field and its historical return flow obligations from its changed water rights in time, location, and amount, as required by the terms and conditions in the 403 and 404/442 Decrees and as may be decreed in this case. ACWWA’s sources of substitute supply are described in paragraph 9 of this application. Applicants will make projections and account for the depletions associated with ACWWA’s use of the ACWWA/ECCV Well Field, the historical return flow obligations associated with ACWWA’s changed water rights as they are added to the ACWWA/ECCV Augmentation Plan, and projected supplies of replacement water as required by the terms and conditions in the 403 and 404/442 Decrees and as may be decreed in this case. 9. Replacement Sources for the ACWWA/ECCV Well Field Added to the 403 Decree. Pursuant to the procedures for adding supplies to the ACWWA/ECCV Augmentation Plan described in paragraph 19 of the 403 Decree, Applicants will add the sources of substitute supply listed below to replace out- of- pr i or i ty depl eti ons fr om the ACWWA/ECCV Well Field, as these sources are decreed for use in the ACWWA/ECCV Augmentation Plan. The sources listed below are in addition to the replacement sources decreed in the 403 and the 404/442 Decrees. The replacement sources include, but are not limited to the following: 9.1. Pending Change in Use Cases. Applicants have filed applications to change their shares in the Greeley Irrigation Company (Case No. 06CW40), Weldon Valley Ditch Company (Case No. 11CW151/05CW58), the Fulton Irrigating Ditch Company (Case No. 10CW313), and the Farmers Independent Ditch Company (Case No. 12CW73), all of which are pending in Water Division 1. The shares in the pending change in use cases may not be included in the ACWWA/ECCV Augmentation Plan until Applicants complete the ditch or irrigation company’s legally applicable requirements and procedures, if any, regarding approval of a change of water right, and comply with the terms and conditions for adding new sources of supply to the ACWWA/ECCV Augmentation Plan set forth in paragraph 19 of the 403 Decree. 9.2 Currently Owned But Unchanged Water Sources and Future Acquired Water Sources. Applicants have acquired water rights represented by shares in or the right to use water associated with the Western Mutual Ditch Company, Lake Canal Company, New Cache la Poudre Irrigating Company, Cache la Poudre Reservoir Company, North Side Lateral Ditch Company, Larimer and Weld Irrigation Company, Larimer and Weld Reservoir Company, Fort Morgan Reservoir and Irrigation Company, Fort Morgan Asset Management, Inc., Fort Morgan Water Company, Lucas Lateral Ditch Company, New Von Gohen Lateral Ditch Company, Ogilvy Irrigation and Land Company, Owl Creek Supply and Irrigation Company, Pleasant Valley Lateral Company, Whitney Irrigation Company, Windsor Reservoir and Canal Company, and Water Supply and Storage Company (“Currently Owned But Unchanged Water Sources”). Applicants may also acquire additional water for use as a source of substitute supply in the ACWWA/ECCV Augmentation Plan (“Future Acquired Water Sources”). Application to Amend the Beebe Draw Recharge Project 10. Incorporation of ACWWA in the Beebe Draw Recharge Project. The Applicants seek to incorporate ACWWA into the Beebe Draw Recharge Project decreed in paragraphs 19-22 of the 404/442 Decree. Once changed in use, ACWWA’s fully consumable water supplies will be diverted through the diversion and delivery structures described in paragraph 21 of the 404/442 Decree and delivered to the recharge facilities described in paragraph 20 of that Decree and a decree entered in this case. Deliveries to the recharge structures will result in accretions to the Beebe Draw above and below Milton Lake, to Box Elder Creek, and to the South Platte River, within the decreed reaches described in paragraph 17.1 and depicted on Exhibit 3 to the 404/442 Decree, and attached to this Second Amended Application as Exhibit 11. ACWWA will use its recharge accretions to augment its out-of-priority depletions from the ACWWA/ECCV Well Field, replace historical return flows from its changed water rights and recharge the Beebe Draw aquifer in accordance with the terms and conditions of the 403 and 404/442 Decrees. 10.1. Recharge Locations. 10.1.1. Delivery Canals. The Applicants may recharge water into the Beebe Draw alluvial aquifer through the

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ture Acquired Water Sources”). Application to Amend the Beebe Draw Recharge Project 10. Incorporation of ACWWA in the Beebe Draw Recharge Project. The Applicants seek to incorporate ACWWA into the Beebe Draw Recharge Project decreed in paragraphs 19-22 of the 404/442 Decree. Once changed in use, ACWWA’s fully consumable water supplies will be diverted through the diversion and delivery structures described in paragraph 21 of the 404/442 Decree and delivered to the recharge facilities described in paragraph 20 of that Decree and a decree entered in this case. Deliveries to the recharge structures will result in accretions to the Beebe Draw above and below Milton Lake, to Box Elder Creek, and to the South Platte River, within the decreed reaches described in paragraph 17.1 and depicted on Exhibit 3 to the 404/442 Decree, and attached to this Second Amended Application as Exhibit 11. ACWWA will use its recharge accretions to augment its out-of-priority depletions from the ACWWA/ECCV Well Field, replace historical return flows from its changed water rights and recharge the Beebe Draw aquifer in accordance with the terms and conditions of the 403 and 404/442 Decrees. 10.1. Recharge Locations. 10.1.1. Delivery Canals. The Applicants may recharge water into the Beebe Draw alluvial aquifer through the Barr Lake Delivery Canals decreed for recharge and described in paragraph 20.1 of the 404/442 Decree. The Delivery Canals are located as follows: (a) Speer, the entire length of the Speer I Canal extends from the NW1/4 of the NW1/4 of the NW1/4 of Section 13, T2N, R66W of the 6th PM to Barr Lake, located in Section 23, T1S, R66W, of the 6th PM, Adams County, Colorado; (b) Bowles Seep, the entire length of the canal extends from the NE1/4 of the NE1/4 of the NE1/4 of Section 6, T1N, R65W of the 6th PM to the NW1/4 of the NE1/4 of the SW1/4 of Section 31, T1N, R65W of the 6th PM, Adams County, Colorado; (c) East Burlington, the entire length of the canal extends from the SW1/4 of the SE1/4 of the NW1/4 of Section 28, T1N, R65W of the 6th PM to Barr Lake, located in Section 23, T1S, R66W, 6th PM, Adams County, Colorado; (d) West Burlington, the entire length of the canal extends from the NE1/4 of the NW1/4 of the NE1/4 of Section 18, T1N, R65W of the 6th PM to Barr Lake, located in Section 23, T1S, R66W, of the 6th PM, Adams County, Colorado; (e) East Neres, the entire length of the canal extends from the NW1/4 of the SW1/4 of the SE1/4 of Section 18, T4N, R64W of the 6th PM to the NW1/4 of the SE1/4 of the NW1/4 of Section 6, T3N, R64W of the 6th PM, Adams County, Colorado; and (f) Neres, the entire length of the canal extends from the NW1/4 of the NW1/4 of the SW1/4 of Section 2, T1N, R65W of the 6th PM to Barr Lake, located in Section 23, T1S, R66W of the 6th PM, Adams County, Colorado. 10.1.2. Recharge Ponds. The Applicants may recharge water into the Beebe Draw alluvial aquifer through the recharge ponds decreed and described in paragraph 20.2 of the 404/442 Decree. The recharge ponds are located as follows: (a) Moser, in the SE1/4 of Section 7, T1N, R65W of the 6th PM, Weld County, Colorado. The Moser pond has been constructed and is operational; (b) Tu, in the SE1/4 of Section 2, T1S, R66W of the 6th PM, Adams County, Colorado. The Tu pond has been constructed and is operational; (c) Mile High Lakes, in the SE1/4 of Section 1, T1S, R66W of the 6th PM and a parcel of land in the NW1/4 of Section 12, T1S, R66W of the 6th PM, Adams County, Colorado; (d) Bromley, in the NW1/4 of Section 14, T1S, R66W of the 6th PM, Weld County, Colorado; (e) Schupman, in the NW1/4 of Section 19, T1N, R65W of the 6th PM, Weld County, Colorado; (f) Pettinger East and West, in the SE1/4 of Section 18, T1N, R65W of the 6th PM, Weld County, Colorado; (g) Artese, in the NE1/4 of Section 6, T1N, R65W of the 6th PM, Weld County, Colorado; (h) Dechant, in the NW1/4 of Section 28, T2N, R65W of the 6th PM, Weld County, Colorado; (i) Carlin, in the SW1/4 of Section 19, T2N, R65W of the 6th PM, Weld County, Colorado; (j) Klug, in the NE1/4 of Section 12, T2N, R65W of the 6th PM, Weld County, Colorado; and (k) Sater, in the NW1/4 of the SW1/4 of Section 13, T4N, R64W of the 6th PM, Weld County, Colorado. 10.1.3. Recharge Pond Added to the 404/442 Decree. In addition to the recharge ponds approved in the 404/442 Decree, the Applicants seek to add the DiSanti recharge pond which will be located in the SE1/4 of the SE1/4 of Section 11, T1S, R66W of the 6th PM, Weld County, Colorado. This pond is added pursuant to the requirements of paragraph 22.2 of the 404/442 Decree and ACWWA’s use of the pond is claimed pursuant to this Second Amended Application. The land on which the DiSanti recharge pond will be located is owned by United. 10.2. Diversion and Delivery Structures. The Applicants will divert and deliver their water rights into the recharge ponds described in paragraph 10 of this Application, through the structures and at the rates described in paragraph 21 of the 404/442 Decree. The Applicants will only use these structures pursuant to and in compliance with the terms and conditions of the 404/442 Decree, and any necessary agreements with the owners. The location of the structures is as follows: (a) Burlington Ditch (also known as Burlington/O’Brian Canal), the headgate is on the east bank of the South Platte River in the NE1/4 of the SW1/4, Section 14, T3S, R68W of the 6th PM, City and County of Denver, Colorado; (b) Beebe Canal Diversion Structures, thirtyone (31) diversion structures constructed along the entire length of the canal which extends from Barr Lake, located in Section 23, T1S, R66W of the 6th PM, Adams County, Colorado, to Milton Lake, located near the center of Section 22, T3N, R65W of the 6th PM, Weld County, Colorado; (c) Metro Pump Station, the discharge of the Metro Pump Station to the Burlington Canal is in the NE1/4 of the NW1/4 of Section 12, T3S, R68W of the 6th PM, Denver County, Colorado; (d) Platte Valley Canal (also known as the Evans No. 2 Ditch), the headgate is on the east bank of the South Platte River in Section 19, T2N, R66W of the 6th PM, Weld County, Colorado; (e) United Diversion Facility No. 3, the headgate is on the east bank of the South Platte River in the SW1/4 of Section 26, T1S, R67W of the 6th PM, Adams County, Colorado; (f) Bowles Seep, described above in paragraph 10.1.1; (g) Speer, described above in paragraph 10.1.1; (h) East Burlington, described above in paragraph 10.1.1; (i) West Burlington, described above in paragraph 10.1.1; (j) Neres, described above in paragraph 10.1.1; and East Neres, described above in paragraph 10.1.1. 11. Location of Delivery of Augmentation Water. Applicants seek to replace the total out-ofpriority depletions caused by the wells added by this application and ACWWA’s use of the ACWWA/ECCV Well Field by delivering sources of substitute supply decreed in Case Nos. 02CW403, 02CW404, and 03CW442 and the water rights described in paragraph 9 of this Second Amended Application to the Beebe Draw or the South Platte River from the following locations; provided the water is capable of being delivered upstream of the calling water right, including decreed exchanges: (a) Barr Lake, an off-channel reservoir located in Sections 15, 21, 22, 23, 26, 27, 28, and 33, T1S, R66W of the 6th PM, Adams County, Colorado; (b) Milton Lake, an off-channel reservoir located in Sections 10, 11, 14, 15, 22, and 23, T3N, R65W of the 6th PM, Weld County, Colorado; (c) United Reservoir No. 3, an off-channel reservoir in the E1/2 of Section 26, T1S, R67W of the 6th PM, Adams County, Colorado. The Beebe Pipeline extends three (3) miles from the United Reservoir No. 3 to the Burlington Canal immediately above Barr Lake; (d) Gilcrest Reservoir, an off-channel reservoir located within a part of Section 2, T3N, R67W and sections 23, 26, 34, and

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10.1.1; (j) Neres, described above in paragraph 10.1.1; and East Neres, described above in paragraph 10.1.1. 11. Location of Delivery of Augmentation Water. Applicants seek to replace the total out-ofpriority depletions caused by the wells added by this application and ACWWA’s use of the ACWWA/ECCV Well Field by delivering sources of substitute supply decreed in Case Nos. 02CW403, 02CW404, and 03CW442 and the water rights described in paragraph 9 of this Second Amended Application to the Beebe Draw or the South Platte River from the following locations; provided the water is capable of being delivered upstream of the calling water right, including decreed exchanges: (a) Barr Lake, an off-channel reservoir located in Sections 15, 21, 22, 23, 26, 27, 28, and 33, T1S, R66W of the 6th PM, Adams County, Colorado; (b) Milton Lake, an off-channel reservoir located in Sections 10, 11, 14, 15, 22, and 23, T3N, R65W of the 6th PM, Weld County, Colorado; (c) United Reservoir No. 3, an off-channel reservoir in the E1/2 of Section 26, T1S, R67W of the 6th PM, Adams County, Colorado. The Beebe Pipeline extends three (3) miles from the United Reservoir No. 3 to the Burlington Canal immediately above Barr Lake; (d) Gilcrest Reservoir, an off-channel reservoir located within a part of Section 2, T3N, R67W and sections 23, 26, 34, and 35, T4N, R67W of the 6th PM, Weld County, Colorado; (e) 70 Ranch, which is depicted on the map attached to the original application as Exhibit 5 and incorporated into this Second Amended Application; and (f) Recharge Accretions to the Beebe Draw from the recharge facilities listed in paragraph 10.1 above. The Applicants will only use these structures pursuant to and in compliance with the terms and conditions of the 404/442 Decree, and any necessary agreements with the owners. 11.1 In addition, the Applicants seek to include two additional structures from which they may deliver water to replace return flow obligations and out-ofpriority depletions: 11.1.1. Union Reservoir. Union Reservoir, and any enlargement thereof, is located in Sections 29, 30, 31 and 32, T3N, R68W of the 6th PM, and upon parts of Sections 5 and 6, T2N, R68W of the 6th PM, Weld County, Colorado. Union Reservoir receives water through the Oligarchy Ditch the headgate of which is located on the North side of St. Vrain Creek in the SE1/4 of the NE1/4 of Section 27, T3N, R70W of the 6th PM, Boulder County, Colorado, at a point whence the East quarter corner of said Section 27 bears South 27°26’ East a distance of 560 feet, more or less; the East line of the NE1/4 of said Section 27 as bearing North 0°32’42” West with all bearings relative thereto, and through a ditch from Spring Gulch, a tributary of St. Vrain Creek, leading into the Reservoir. Other conditional points of diversion for Union Reservoir are described in paragraph 9 of the February 19, 1991 Decree entered in Case No. 86CW394, District Court, Water Division No. 1. The Applicants have a temporary agreement with the City of Longmont for use of fully consumable water owned by Longmont and stored in Union Reservoir to meet the Applicants’ winter return flow obligations. The Applicants intend to seek a long-term agreement with the City of Longmont on terms similar to those in the temporary agreement. The Applicants do not and will not seek to store any water they own, whether by exchange or direct diversion, in Union Reservoir unless agreed to by Longmont and the Reservoir’s owner. Union Reservoir is owned by the Union Reservoir Company, 3005 West 29th Street, Suite G1, Greeley, Colorado 80631, mailing address: PO Box 445, Greeley, Colorado 80632. 11.1.2. Cornish Plains Reservoir. Cornish Plains Reservoir is an off-channel reservoir located within portions of the NW1/4 of the SE1/4, the SW1/4 of the SE1/4, and the SE1/4 of the SE1/4 of Section 5; the E1/2 of the NW1/4, the entire NE1/4, and the N1/2 and the SE1/4 of the SE1/4 of Section 8; and the SW1/4 of the NW1/4 and the W1/2 of the SW1/4 of Section 9, all in T6N, R63W of the 6th PM, Weld County, Colorado. The point of diversion for Cornish Plains Reservoir from the Cache la Poudre River is at the headgate of the Greeley No. 2 Canal, located in the SE1/4 of the NE1/4 of Section 11, T6N, R68W of the 6th PM, Larimer County, Colorado. Other points at which water is delivered into the Greeley No. 2 Canal are identified in paragraph 7.1.1 of the Decree in Consolidated Case Nos. 01CW201, 01CW288 and 04CW343, District Court, Water Division No. 1. Pursuant to a temporary agreement with the New Cache la Poudre Irrigating Company, the Applicants will store their fully consumable water in Cornish Plains Reservoir to meet return flow obligations and out of priority depletions. The Applicants intend to seek a long-term agreement similar to their temporary agreement with the New Cache la Poudre Irrigating Company, 33040 Railroad Avenue, P.O. Box 104, Lucerne, Colorado 80646, which owns Cornish Plains Reservoir. 12. Diversion Structures. The Applicants will divert and deliver their water rights into the surface storage facilities through the structures described in paragraph 21 of the 404/442 Decree and in paragraphs 10.2 and 11 of this Second Amended Application. Additionally, the Applicants may divert their water rights at the St. Vrain Pipeline (also known as United Diversion Facility No. 5), which is a surface diversion facility that will be constructed on the east bank of the St. Vrain River approximately 500 feet West and 200 feet North of the SE1/4 corner of Section 20, T3N, R67W of the 6th PM, Weld County, Colorado, pursuant to the claims in Case No. 07CW335, District Court, Water Division No. 1 (which has been consolidated for trial with Case Nos. 11CW285 and 09CW283, District Court, Water Division No. 1). Water will be delivered through the St. Vrain Pipeline to the South Platte River. Depending on the pipeline configuration, the point of discharge on the South Platte River will be located in SW1/4 of the SW1/4 of Section 19, T3N, R66W, or the SE1/4 of the SE1/4 of Section 24, T3N, R67W, or the E1/2 of Section 25, T3N, R67W, of the 6th PM, Weld County, Colorado. From the point of discharge, the water may be exchanged upstream to the United No. 3 Diversion or Burlington Canal headgate. The Applicants do not seek approval of an exchange in this Second Amended Application. United holds an easement over the property on which the St. Vrain Pipeline Diversion structure will be constructed. The owners of the underlying property are the Elverna Burchfield Trustee and Sherry Rose, 221 West Platte Avenue, Fort Morgan, CO 80701. The Department of Transportation, State of Colorado, 4201 East Arkansas Ave., Denver, CO 80222, may also own a parcel of property on which the diversion structure may be located. 13. Location of Delivery of Sources of Substitute Supply. ACWWA will replace its outof-priority depletions by delivering its substitute supply water from the sources described in paragraph 9 of this Second Amended Application as necessary to prevent injury to other water rights pursuant to and from the locations decreed in paragraph 16.3 of the 404/442 Decree and claimed in this Second Amended Application. 14. Determination of Out-of-Priority Depletions and Replacement Obligations. The determination of out-of-priority depletions and replacement obligations will be made pursuant to and in compliance with the terms and conditions set forth in the 403 and 404/442 Decrees, including but not limited to the augmentation requirements, lagged well depletions, historical return flow obligations, and transit losses on the sources of substitute supply. 15. Depletion and Substitute Water Supply Projections. The Applicants will make projections of their annual depletions from the ECCV Well Field, the historical return flow obligations, and the projected supplies of replacement water pursuant to and in compliance with the terms and conditions of the 403 and 404/442 Decrees including,

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made pursuant to and in compliance with the terms and conditions set forth in the 403 and 404/442 Decrees, including but not limited to the augmentation requirements, lagged well depletions, historical return flow obligations, and transit losses on the sources of substitute supply. 15. Depletion and Substitute Water Supply Projections. The Applicants will make projections of their annual depletions from the ECCV Well Field, the historical return flow obligations, and the projected supplies of replacement water pursuant to and in compliance with the terms and conditions of the 403 and 404/442 Decrees including, but not limited to paragraphs 16, 18.3, 28 and 53 of the 403 Decree and paragraphs 17, 68 and 105 of the 404/442 Decree. 16. Accounting and Reporting. Applicants will make an accounting of the plan for augmentation and make reports to the Division Engineer pursuant to the terms and conditions of the 403 and 404/442 Decrees including, but not limited to paragraph 105 of the 404/442 Decree. Application to Amend the 70 Ranch Augmentation Plan and the 70 Ranch Recharge Project. 17. General Description of the Incorporation of ACWWA in the 70 Ranch Augmentation Plan. Applicants seek approval to incorporate ACWWA into the 70 Ranch Augmentation Plan set forth in the 404/442 Decree as amended by this Application. ACWWA may pump water from the wells on the 70 Ranch for delivery to ACWWA’s service area. ACWWA will replace its out-of-priority depletions from the wells on the 70 Ranch and its historical return flow obligations from its changed water rights in time, location, and amount, as required by the terms and conditions in the 404/442 Decree and as may be decreed in this case. ACWWA’s sources of substitute supply are described in paragraphs 9 and 31 of this Second Amended Application. Applicants will make projections and account for the depletions associated with ACWWA’s use of the wells on the 70 Ranch, the historical return flow obligations associated with ACWWA’s changed water rights as they are added to the 70 Ranch Augmentation Plan, and projected supplies of replacement water as required by the terms and conditions in the 404/442 Decree and as may be decreed in this case. A map of the 70 Ranch was attached to the original application in this case as Exhibit 5, which is incorporated into this Second Amended Application. 18. Augmented Structures to be Utilized by ACWWA. 18.1. ACWWA may use the three (3) wells included in the United Diversion Facility No. 2 Wells, approved and described in paragraph 24.2 of the 404/442 Decree as follows: (a) Well No. 1, is to be located 601.5 feet from the East line of the SE1/4 and 1062.7 feet from the South line of the SE1/4 in Section 34; (b) Well No. 3, is to be located within 100 feet of the following location: 1382.4 feet from the East line of the SE1/4 and 1995.5 feet from the South line of the SE1/4 in Section 34; (c) Well No. 4, is to be located within 100 feet of the following location: 1896.6. feet from the East line of the SE1/4 and 2454.1 feet from the South line of the SE1/4, in Section 34, all in T5N, R63W of the 6th PM, Weld County, Colorado; and (d) any additional wells that may in the future be decreed as part of the United Diversion Facility No. 2 Wells. The 70 Ranch LLC, 8301 East Prentice Avenue #100, Greenwood Village, Colorado 80111, is the fee owner of the land on which the United Diversion Facility No. 2 Wells are or will be located. 19. Wells Added to the 404/442 Decree. As required by paragraph 26 of the 404/442 Decree, the Applicants seek to add the following wells to the 70 Ranch Augmentation Plan (“Added Wells”). The Added Wells shall be operated and used for the benefit of the Applicants, and the out-ofpriority depletions shall be replaced on terms and conditions at least as restrictive as the 70 Ranch Augmentation Plan decreed in Case Nos. 02CW404 and 03CW442. 70 Ranch LLC owns the lands on which the Added Wells will be constructed. 19.1. The Applicants are adding eight (8) wells to the 70 Ranch Augmentation Plan. The Added Wells are located in a well field (referred to as United Diversion Facility No. 6) to be constructed on the 70 Ranch on the south side of the South Platte River in the S1/2 of Section 34, T5N, R63W, N1/2 of Section 3, T4N, R63W, NE1/4 of the NE1/4 of Section 4, T4N, R63W, and the N1/2 of Section 33, T5N, R63W all in the 6th PM, Weld County, Colorado. 19.2. All out-of-priority depletions that result from pumping the Added Wells will be replaced in time, location, and amount, from the sources of substitute supply listed in paragraph 9 above, as required by the terms and conditions set forth in the 404/442 Decree. Under the 70 Ranch Augmentation Plan, the outof-priority depletions resulting from the pumping of wells on the 70 Ranch are replaced when those depletions are legally required at the South Platte River to prevent injury to downstream calling senior water rights. 20. Replacement Sources for the Wells Added to the 404/442 Decree. In addition to the sources of substitute supply described in paragraph 25 of the 404/442 Decree, the water rights described in paragraph 9 of this Second Amended Application will be added as they are changed for use as sources of substitute supply in the 70 Ranch Augmentation Plan, pursuant to and in compliance with paragraph 25.6 of the 404/442 Decree. The Currently Owned But Unchanged Water Sources and Future Acquired Water Sources will not be included in the 70 Augmentation Plan until the Applicants complete the ditch or irrigation company’s lawful requirements and procedures, if any, regarding approval of a change of water right, and comply with the terms and conditions for adding new sources of supply set forth in paragraph 25.6.1 of the 404/442 Decree. The Applicants also seek to use the conditional water right for United Diversion Facility No. 6 as described in paragraph 31 of this Second Amended Application as a source of substitute supply. 21. Location of Delivery of Sources of Substitute Supply. The Applicants will replace the out-of-priority depletions by delivering their substitute supply water from the sources described in paragraph 9 of this Second Amended Application, at or above the calling senior water right on the South Platte River. 22. Determination of Out-of-Priority Depletions and Replacement Obligations. The determination of out-of-priority depletions and replacement shall be as set forth in paragraph 31.2 of the 404/442 Decree, including but not limited to the augmentation requirements, lagged well depletions, historical return flow obligations, and transit losses on the sources of substitute supply. 23. Depletion and SubPublicWater NoticeSupply Projections. The Apstitute plicants will make projections and acINVITATION BID count for theTO depletions from ACWWA’s use of United Diversion Facility No. 2 Wells, the historical return flow obligaThe Board of Elbert County Commistions from ACWWA’s changed sioners, County of Elbert, State ofwater rights used as a source of substitute supColorado, are hereby accepting sealed ply, and projected supplies of replacebid proposal for roadway treatment water pursuant to andsurface in compliance ments on CR 1, CR 13.of the with paragraphs 32,166 68and andCR 105 404/442 Decree. The Applicants shall make projections andconsists accountof: for(i)the deThe Project generally chip pletions from the Wells on terms seal resurfacing of Added approximately 4 miles and conditions no less restrictive than of Elbert 1 (Delbert those setCounty forth inRoad paragraphs 32,Road); 68 and (ii) seal resurfacing of approximately 105chip of the 404/442 Decree. 24. Account3.1 of Elbert County 166 will ing miles and Reporting. The Road Applicants make anHills accounting of the for aug(Singing Road); and (iii) plan chip seal mentation and make reports5.4 tomiles the Diviresurfacing of approximately of sion Engineer pursuant to the terms and Elbert County Road 13. In addition, Elbert conditions of the 404/442 Decree includCounty considering hot bituminous ing, butisnot limited to,a 2” paragraph 105 of asphalt overlay25. on CR 166 as an alternate that Decree. General Description of to chip seal overlay for that road. thethe Incorporation of ACWWA in the 70 Ranch Recharge The Applicants Installation will takePlan. place within the seek toofincorporate ACWWA into the 70 County Elbert, Colorado. Ranch Recharge Project as set forth in the 404/442 Decree. ACWWA may divert its Bids will be accepted until sources 9:30 a.m.added on fully consumable water Wednesday 10, 2013. copiesas pursuant to July the terms and Three conditions of said shouldin bethis submitted. Bids will may beBid decreed case through the diversion or delivery structures as stated in paragraph 37 of the 404/442 Decree. ACWWA may also deliver its fully con-

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ter right for United Diversion Facility No. 6 as described in paragraph 31 of this Second Amended Application as a source of substitute supply. 21. Location of Delivery of Sources of Substitute Supply. The Applicants will replace the out-of-priority depletions by delivering their substitute supply water from the sources described in paragraph 9 of this Second Amended Application, at or above the calling senior water right on the South Platte River. 22. Determination of Out-of-Priority Depletions and Replacement Obligations. The determination of out-of-priority depletions and replacement shall be as set forth in paragraph 31.2 of the 404/442 Decree, including but not limited to the augmentation requirements, lagged well depletions, historical return flow obligations, and transit losses on the sources of substitute supply. 23. Depletion and Substitute Water Supply Projections. The Applicants will make projections and account for the depletions from ACWWA’s use of United Diversion Facility No. 2 Wells, the historical return flow obligations from ACWWA’s changed water rights used as a source of substitute supply, and projected supplies of replacement water pursuant to and in compliance with paragraphs 32, 68 and 105 of the 404/442 Decree. The Applicants shall make projections and account for the depletions from the Added Wells on terms and conditions no less restrictive than those set forth in paragraphs 32, 68 and 105 of the 404/442 Decree. 24. Accounting and Reporting. The Applicants will make an accounting of the plan for augmentation and make reports to the Division Engineer pursuant to the terms and conditions of the 404/442 Decree including, but not limited to, paragraph 105 of that Decree. 25. General Description of the Incorporation of ACWWA in the 70 Ranch Recharge Plan. The Applicants seek to incorporate ACWWA into the 70 Ranch Recharge Project as set forth in the 404/442 Decree. ACWWA may divert its fully consumable water sources added pursuant to the terms and conditions as may be decreed in this case through the diversion or delivery structures as stated in paragraph 37 of the 404/442 Decree. ACWWA may also deliver its fully consumable water sources to the canals and recharge ponds as stated in paragraph 35 of the 404/442 Decree and/or through the wells included in the 70 Ranch Augmentation Plan as amended by this application. Such deliveries will result in accretions to the alluvial aquifer underlying the 70 Ranch. ACWWA seeks to recharge up to 3,600 acre-feet per year, as long as the total amount of water recharged by ECCV and ACWWA does not exceed 3,600 acrefeet per year. ACWWA may, subject to the terms and conditions decreed in the 404/442 Decrees and as may be decreed in this case, use its recharge accretions to augment its out-of-priority depletions from the ACWWA/ECCV Well Field, the out-ofpriority depletions from the wells in the 70 Ranch Augmentation Plan, and to replace historical return flows from its changed water rights. 25.1. 70 Ranch Recharge Ponds. ACWWA’s fully consumable water supplies, described in paragraph 9 of this Second Amended Application, may be diverted through the diversion and delivery structures described in paragraph 37 of the 404/442 Decree as follows: (a) United Diversion Facility No. 1, the headgate will be located at the existing headgate for the Riverside Intake Canal on the north bank of the South Platte River in the SW1/4 of the SW1/4 of Section 20, T5N, R63W of the 6th PM, Weld County, Colorado. Absent an agreement with the Riverside Irrigation District, the headgate will be located on the north bank of the South Platte River in the S1/2 of the SW1/4 of Section 20, T5N, R63W of the 6th PM, Weld County, Colorado between the headgate of the Riverside Intake Canal and the west section line of Section 20, T5N, R63W of the 6th PM, at a location to be established within that reach, approximately 200 yards in extent; (b) United Diversion Facility No. 2, described above in paragraph 18.1; (c) United Diversion Facility No. 4, consisting of the three (3) NFC Wells, No.1, located in the SE1/4 of the NE1/4 of Section 35, T5N, R63W, No. 3, located in the NE1/4 of the SE1/4 of Section 35, T5N, R63W, and No. 4, located in the NE1/4 of the NE1/4 of Section 7, T4N, R62W, all in the 6th PM, Weld County, Colorado; and (d) the Added Wells claimed in paragraph 31 of this Second Amended Application, and delivered to the recharge facilities described below in paragraph 25.2. Deliveries to the recharge structures will result in accretions to the South Platte River, and are depicted by decreed reaches as shown on Exhibit 3 to the 404/442 Decree, which is attached to this Second Amended Application as Exhibit 11. 25.2. Annual Maximum Volumetric Limit on Deliveries to Recharge Ponds. In paragraph 36 of the 404/442 Decree, recharge on the 70 Ranch was limited to 3,600 acre-feet annually through recharge ponds and canals that are depicted on the map attached as Exhibit 5 to the 404/442 Decree and are located as follows: (a) Pond 4/5, located in the NE1/4 and SE1/4 of Section 1, T4N, R63W of the 6th PM in Weld County, Colorado; (b) Pond 8a, located in the SW1/4 of Section 25, T5N, R63W of the 6th PM and the NE1/4 of Section 35, T5N, R63W of the 6th PM in Weld County, Colorado; (c) Ponds 8b and 8c, located in Section 25, T5N, R63W of the 6th PM in Weld County, Colorado; (d) Pond 9a, located in the SE1/4 of Section 31, T5N, R62W of the 6th PM and Section 5, T4N, R62W of the 6th PM in Weld County, Colorado; (e) Pond 11a, located in NE1/4 of Section 24, T5N, R63W of the 6th PM, the E1/2 of Section 13, T5N, R63W of the 6th PM, NW1/4 of Section 19, T5N, R62W of the 6th PM, and the W1/2 of Section 18, T5N, R62W of the 6th PM in Weld County, Colorado; (f) Pond 11b, located in NE1/4 of Section 24, T5N, R63W of 6th PM and the W1/2 of the W1/2 of Section 19, T5N, R62W of the 6th PM; and (g) Canals Between Recharge Ponds, conveyance canals may be constructed from Pond 11b to Pond 8c, from Pond 8a to Pond 4/5, and from Pond 8a to Pond 9a. Applicants seek to allow ACWWA to share in the 3,600 acre-feet of recharge previously approved in the 404/442 Decree through the facilities listed in this paragraph. ACWWA will use its recharge accretions to augment its out-of-priority depletions from the ECCV/ACWWA Well Field, the United Diversion No. 2 Wells decreed in the 404/442 Case, the historical return flow obligations associated with their changed water rights, and the out-of-priority depletions from the Added Wells claimed in paragraphs 19 and 31 of this Second Amended Application. 26. No Addition or not be considered which arePonds. received Modification of Recharge Inafter this the time Amended stated andApplication, any bids so the received Second Applicwill unopened. bids the or antsbedoreturned not seek to add toFaxed or modify decreed bids recharge ponds or conveyance e-mailed will not be accepted. Bids canals at the 70 Ranch described in parawill be opened at 10:00 a.m., or as soon graph 35 of thereafter, the 404/442 27. Use as possible onDecree. Wednesday of Recharge Credits/Accretions. The ApJuly 10, 2013, thetheir Elbert County Public plicants shall by use recharge accreWorks the BOCC Meeting tions toDirector, augmentinout-of-priority depletions Room located at 215 Comanche Street,and from the ACWWA/ECCV Well Field wells augmented underPlease the 70 Ranch Kiowa, Colorado 80117. mail bids Augmentation Plan, including wells adto: Elbert County Public Worksthe Office, ded this Second Amended Attn:by Lynne Eschbach, P.O. BoxApplication, 116, to replace return flows from the ApplicKiowa, CO 80117, or rights deliverby to direct Elbert use, ants’ changed water County Public Works Department, Attn: exchange or substitution in accordance Lynne Eschbach, 215404/442 Comanche Street, with the terms of the Decree and the applications Consolidated Kiowa, CO 80117.inPlease mark the Case Nos. 11CW285, 09CW283 and 07CW335, outside of envelope “Surface Treatment the decree in this Project - CRentered 1, CR 166, CRcase, 13”. and/or future decrees benefiting the Applicants entered by the Water Court. 28. AccountElbert County Government reserves ing and Reporting. Applicants will the make right, as its interest may requires, to reject an accounting of the plan for augmentation and and all make to formalities the Division Enany bids,reports to waive and gineer pursuant to theinterms andand condiinformalities contained said bids tions of the 404/442 Decree including, but furthermore to award a contract for items not limited to paragraph 105 of that Deherein, eitherWithdrawal in whole orof in Additional part, if it is Recree. 29. deemed to be in the bestclaims interest Elbert charge Claims. The forof the 70 County to do so. Additionally, Elbert and Ranch Recharge Collection Pipeline an increase in recharge on the 70 Ranch, which were set forth in paragraphs 27-32 of the First Amended Application, are with-

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orado; (f) Pond 11b, located in NE1/4 of pumping from the ACWWA/ECCV Well Section 24, T5N, R63W of 6th PM and the Field. 33.1. Incorporation of ACWWA in 18-Color W1/2 of the W1/2 of Section 19, T5N, the Plan for Augmentation for the Milton R62W of the 6th PM; and (g) Canals Lake 2003 Storage Right. The Applicants Between Recharge Ponds, conveyance seek to incorporate ACWWA into the augcanals may be constructed from Pond 11b mentation plan decreed at paragraphs 49 to Pond 8c, from Pond 8a to Pond 4/5, to 52 of the 404/442 Decree for the Milton and from Pond 8a to Pond 9a. ApplicLake 2003 Storage Right. 33.2. Reservaants seek to allow ACWWA to share in the tion of Issues Related to Milton Lake. Al3,600 acre-feet of recharge previously apthough a dispute exists among some proved in the 404/442 Decree through the parties, the Applicants are not seeking to facilities listed in this paragraph. ACWWA litigate in this matter the issue of whether will use its recharge accretions to augMilton Lake is entitled to inflows from ment its out-of-priority depletions from the Beebe Draw under its decreed 1909 waECCV/ACWWA Well Field, the United Diter right. All parties subject to the 404/442 version No. 2 Wells decreed in the Decree and a decree entered in this case, 404/442 Case, the historical return flow or affected thereby reserve the right to asobligations associated with their changed sert their factual and legal positions on water rights, and the out-of-priority deplethat matter in the future and those detions from the Added Wells claimed in crees shall not give rise to any argument, paragraphs 19 and 31 of this Second claim, defense or theory of acquiescence, Amended Application. 26. No Addition or waiver, bar, merger, stare decisis, res juModification of Recharge Ponds. In this dicata, estoppel, laches, or preclusion, by Second Amended Application, the Applicor against any of the parties on that issue. ants do not seek to add to or modify the Accordingly, in the future any party may decreed recharge ponds or conveyance litigate the issue of whether Milton Lake is canals at the 70 Ranch described in paraentitled to inflows from Beebe Draw under graph 35 of the 404/442 Decree. 27. Use its 1909 Milton Storage Right. 34. Exof Recharge Credits/Accretions. The Apcess Credit. Subject to the limitations deplicants shall use their recharge accrescribed herein, any fully consumable wations to augment out-of-priority depletions ter or augmentation credits or recharge from the ACWWA/ECCV Well Field and credits not used by the Applicants for the wells augmented under the 70 Ranch uses and purposes set forth in this Augmentation Plan, including the wells adSecond Amended Application that are reded by this Second Amended Application, turned to the South Platte River or its alluto replace return flows from the Applicvium may be re-diverted at any of the diants’ changed water rights by direct use, version points set forth in the Second exchange or substitution in accordance Amended Application and used for purwith the terms of the 404/442 Decree and poses decreed in this case, Case No. the applications in Consolidated Case 02CW403, Case Nos. 02CW404 and Nos. 11CW285, 09CW283 and 07CW335, 03CW442, decrees issued in Consolidthe decree entered in this case, and/or fuated Case Nos. 11CW285, 09CW283 and ture decrees benefiting the Applicants 07CW335, and future decrees obtained by entered by the Water Court. 28. Accountthe Applicants. 35. General Location ing and Reporting. Applicants will make Map. A map generally showing the relaan accounting of the plan for augmentationship of the area encompassed by the tion and make reports to the Division Enclaims in this Second Amended Applicagineer pursuant to the terms and condition was attached as Exhibit 6 to the oritions of the 404/442 Decree including, but ginal application in this case and is incornot limited to paragraph 105 of that Deporated into this Second Amended Appliccree. 29. Withdrawal of Additional Reation. 36. Landowner Information. Use charge Claims. The claims for the 70 of the facilities owned by the Riverside IrRanch Recharge Collection Pipeline and rigation District/Riverside Reservoir and an increase in recharge on the 70 Ranch, Land Company, the Henrylyn Irrigation which were set forth in paragraphs 27-32 District, Gilcrest LLC, the Platte Valley Irof the First Amended Application, are withrigation Company, the Public Service drawn in their entirety. 30. TH Ranch Company, the City of Longmont, the UniAgreements. The construction and operaon Reservoir Company, the Cache la tion of the 70 Ranch Recharge Project, as Poudre Irrigating Company, and the use of amended by this Second Amended ApState land administered by the Colorado plication, will be in compliance with all Division of Parks and Wildlife and the terms and conditions set forth in the ApState Land Board, will only be by agreeplicants’ agreements with TH Ranch, inment with those entities, pursuant to the cluding the following: a) Stipulation Applicants’ request for permission to use between United, ECCV, FRICO and TH those facilities. Facilities owned and operRanch, Case Nos. 02CW404 and ated by FRICO or United are included with 03CW442, District Court, Water Division the permission of and pursuant to various No. 1, dated April 13, 2011; b) Grant of agreements with and between FRICO and Drain and Pipeline Easement – Covenant United, and may require further agreeand Agreement by TH Ranch, dated Aument between the Applicants and FRICO. gust 17, 2011; and c) Access License 37. Discrepancies. In the event there is Agreement between TH Ranch and any discrepancy between the description United, dated August 18, 2011. Applicaof the points of diversion, storage facilities, tion for a Conditional Water Right – United or water rights described in this Second Diversion Facility No. 6. 31. Claim for Amended Application and the terms of any Conditional Water Right. The Applicants respective decrees, the decrees are conclaim a conditional water right for the Adtrolling. Any person reading this Second ded Wells described in paragraph 19 as Amended Application should rely upon follows: 31.1. Priority Date: October 28, these descriptions for purposes of inquiry 2011. 31.2. How appropriation was initinotice only, and should rely upon the ated: By the preliminary location of well terms of any respective decrees adjudicatsites on the 70 Ranch and filing of the ing the water rights and structures when First Amended Application. 31.3. Date evaluating the claims made in this Second Water Applied to Beneficial Use: Not apAmended Application. plicable – conditional water right. 31.4. Uses or proposed uses: The water withTHE WATER RIGHTS CLAIMED BY drawn through these wells will be used for THESE APPLICATIONS MAY AFFECT IN the following purposes: agricultural, irrigaPRIORITY ANY WATER RIGHTS tion and municipal uses including, but not CLAIMED OR HERETOFORE ADJUDIClimited to, agricultural irrigation, domestic, ATED WITHIN THIS DIVISION AND mechanical, manufacturing, commercial, OWNERS OF AFFECTED RIGHTS industrial, fire protection, sewage treatMUST APPEAR TO OBJECT WITHIN ment, street sprinkling, irrigation of parks, THE TIME PROVIDED BY STATUTE OR lawns, and grounds, exchange, augmentBE FOREVER BARRED. ation and replacement, substitute supply, groundwater recharge, streamflow enYOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that any hancement, adjustment and regulation of party who wishes to oppose an applicawater supply, including exchange with othtion, or an amended application, may file er water systems and other water users, with the Water Clerk, P. O. Box 2038, including agricultural and other water Greeley, CO 80632, a verified Statement rights appropriators, and for all other beof Opposition, setting forth facts as to why neficial uses within the ECCV and the application should not be granted, or ACWWA service areas, as they now exist why it should be granted only in part or on or may exist in the future. Application for certain conditions. Such Statement of OpACWWA’S Use of the Conditional Water position must be filed by the last day of Rights Decreed in the 404/442 Decree. JULY 2013 (forms available on 32. ACWWA’s Use of the ECCV One www.courts.state.co.us or in the Clerk’s Time Diversion Conditional Surface Right. office), and must be filed as an Original Applicants seeks approval of ACWWA’s and include $158.00 filing fee. A copy of use of the conditional water right decreed each Statement of Opposition must also in paragraph 47 of the 404/442 Decree. be served upon the Applicant or The Applicants seek approval of the use Applicant’s Attorney and an affidavit or of the conditional water right to provide certificate of such service of mailing shall both ACWWA and ECCV with 6,000 acrebe filed with the Water Clerk. feet of water for delivery to the Beebe Draw Recharge Project facilities, the 70 Legal Notice No.: 927678 Ranch Recharge Project facilities, GilFirst Publication: June 21, 2013 crest Reservoir, United Reservoir No. 3, Last Publication: June 21, 2013 Milton Lake, and/or Barr Lake. Following Publisher: Elbert County News the diversion of 6,000 acre-feet any one or combination of the structures listed in Public Notice paragraph 47 of the 404/442 Decree, the conditional water right shall automatically DISTRICT COURT, expire and be of no further force and efWATER DIVISION 1, COLORADO fect. Applicants shall measure diversions MAY 2013 WATER RESUME for the ECCV One Time Diversion CondiPUBLICATION tional Surface Rights at the diversion structures identified in paragraph 47.2 of the 404/442 Decree and shall account for TO: ALL PERSONS INTERESTED such diversions on a daily basis and reIN WATER APPLICATIONS port to the Division Engineer on a monthly IN WATER DIV. 1 basis. Applicants shall file a notice of expiration promptly following completion of Pursuant to C.R.S. 37-92-302, you are nosuch fill, setting forth the dates and locatified that the following is a resume of all tions of such fill. 33. ACWWA’s Use of water right applications and certain the Milton Lake 2003 Storage Right. Apamendments filed in the Office of the Waplicants seek the approval of ACWWA’s ter Clerk during the month of MAY 2013 use of the Milton Lake 2003 Storage Right for each County affected. decreed in paragraph 48 of the 404/442 Decree. The Milton Lake 2003 Storage 13CW37 DENNIS W. AND SHARON A. Right will not exceed 5,000 acre-feet durMCKINNEY, 7891 Sun Country Drive, ing each water storage year, which shall Elizabeth, CO 80107. 303-646-1898. APbe November 1 through October 31. PLICATION FOR UNDERGROUND WAACWWA’s use of the Milton Lake 2003 TER RIGHTS IN THE DENVER BASIN Storage Right is for augmentation and reAQUIFERS UNDERLYING APPLICANT’S placement of depletions associated with PROPERTY IN ELBERT COUNTY. Appumping from the ACWWA/ECCV Well plicant seeks to adjudicate the well, perField. 33.1. Incorporation of ACWWA in mit 227670, and to adjudicate the non tribthe Plan for Augmentation for the Milton utary and not nontributary Denver basin Lake 2003 Storage Right. The Applicants groundwater underlying a 4.023 acre tract seek to incorporate ACWWA into the augof land lying in the NE1/4, NE1/4, S26, mentation plan decreed at paragraphs 49 T6S, R64W of the 6th PM, including the to 52 of the 404/442 Decree for the Milton Dawson, Denver, Arapahoe and LaramieLake 2003 Storage Right. 33.2. ReservaFox Hills aquifers. tion of Issues Related to Milton Lake. AlTHE WATER RIGHTS CLAIMED BY though a dispute exists among some THESE APPLICATIONS MAY AFFECT IN parties, the Applicants are not seeking to PRIORITY ANY WATER RIGHTS litigate in this matter the issue of whether CLAIMED OR HERETOFORE ADJUDICMilton Lake is entitled to inflows from ATED WITHIN THIS DIVISION AND Beebe Draw under its decreed 1909 waOWNERS OF AFFECTED RIGHTS ter right. All parties subject to the 404/442 MUST APPEAR TO OBJECT WITHIN Decree and a decree entered in this case, THE TIME PROVIDED BY STATUTE OR or affected thereby reserve the right to asBE FOREVER BARRED. sert their factual and legal positions on that matter in the future and those deYOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that any crees shall not give rise to any argument, party who wishes to oppose an applicaclaim, defense or theory of acquiescence, County the right negotiate tion, or an amended application, may file waiver, reserves bar, merger, staretodecisis, res juoptional items and/or services with the by with the Water Clerk, P. O. Box 2038, dicata, estoppel, laches, or preclusion, successful bidder. Greeley, CO 80632, a verified Statement or against any of the parties on that issue. of Opposition, setting forth facts as to why Accordingly, in the future any party may the application should not be granted, or litigate the issuewill of be whether Milton Lake is Bid Documents available starting why it should be granted only in part or on entitled toJune inflows Draw Thursday 27,from 2013Beebe and can be under certain conditions. Such Statement of Opits 1909 Milton Storage Right. 34. Exobtained through SeantoO’Hearn, Enertiadeposition must be filed by the last day of cess Credit. Subject the limitations Consulting Group, Larimer waJULY 2013 (forms available on scribed herein, anyLLC, fully1437 consumable Street, Denver, CO 80202. www.courts.state.co.us or in the Clerk’s ter or augmentation credits or recharge office), and must be filed as an Original credits not used by the Applicants for the and include $158.00 filing fee. A copy of uses set regarding forth in this this Pleaseand directpurposes any questions each Statement of Opposition must also Second Amended Application that are rebid to: Sean O’Hearn, Enertia Consulting be served upon the Applicant or turned to the South Platte River or its alluGroup, LLCbe(720) 473-3131. Applicant’s Attorney and an affidavit or vium may re-diverted at any of the dicertificate of such service of mailing shall version points set forth in the Second ELBERT COUNTY PUBLIC be filed with the Water Clerk. Amended Application and WORKS used for purposes decreed in this case, Case No. DEPARTMENT Legal Notice No.: 927681 02CW403, Ed Ehmann, Case DirectorNos. 02CW404 and First Publication: June 27, 2013 03CW442, decrees issued in ConsolidLast Publication: June 27, 2013 ated Case Nos. 11CW285, 09CW283 and Legal Notice No.: 927684 Publisher: The Elbert County New 07CW335, and future decrees obtained by First Publication: June 2013 Location the Applicants. 35. 27, General Last Publication: June 27, 2013 Map. A map generally showing the relationship ofThe the Elbert area encompassed Publisher: County News by the claims in this Second Amended Application was attached as Exhibit 6 to the original application in this case and is incorporated into this Second Amended Application. 36. Landowner Information. Use of the facilities owned by the Riverside Irrigation District/Riverside Reservoir and Land Company, the Henrylyn Irrigation District, Gilcrest LLC, the Platte Valley Ir-

Misc. Private Legals

Government Legals

Misc. Private Legals

PROPERTY IN ELBERT COUNTY. Applicant seeks to adjudicate the well, permit 227670, and to adjudicate the non tributary and not nontributary Denver basin groundwater underlying a 4.023 acre tract of land lying in the NE1/4, NE1/4, S26, T6S, R64W of the 6th PM, including the Dawson, Denver, Arapahoe and LaramieFox Hills aquifers. THE WATER RIGHTS CLAIMED BY THESE APPLICATIONS MAY AFFECT IN PRIORITY ANY WATER RIGHTS CLAIMED OR HERETOFORE ADJUDICATED WITHIN THIS DIVISION AND OWNERS OF AFFECTED RIGHTS MUST APPEAR TO OBJECT WITHIN THE TIME PROVIDED BY STATUTE OR BE FOREVER BARRED.

Misc. Private Legals

YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that any party who wishes to oppose an application, or an amended application, may file with the Water Clerk, P. O. Box 2038, Greeley, CO 80632, a verified Statement of Opposition, setting forth facts as to why the application should not be granted, or why it should be granted only in part or on certain conditions. Such Statement of Opposition must be filed by the last day of JULY 2013 (forms available on www.courts.state.co.us or in the Clerk’s office), and must be filed as an Original and include $158.00 filing fee. A copy of each Statement of Opposition must also be served upon the Applicant or Applicant’s Attorney and an affidavit or certificate of such service of mailing shall be filed with the Water Clerk. Legal Notice No.: 927681 First Publication: June 27, 2013 Last Publication: June 27, 2013 Publisher: The Elbert County New

Government Legals Public Notice NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING ON ADOPTION OF 2012 SUPPLEMENTAL BUDGET NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN to all interested parties that the necessity has arisen for the Elizabeth Fire Protection District Board of Directors to adopt a 2012 Supplemental Budget to appropriate and expend funds received from an Urban Areas Security Initiative (UASI) grant; that a copy of the proposed 2012 Supplemental Budget has been filed at the Fire District’s administrative offices, located 155 W. Kiowa Ave., Elizabeth, Co. 80107 (Station #1), where the same is open for public inspection; and that a Resolution to adopt a 2012 Supplemental Budget will be considered at a public meeting of the Board of Directors of the Fire District to be held at 155 W. Kiowa Ave., Elizabeth, Co. 80107 on July 9, 2013 at 7:00 P.M. Any interested elector within the District may, at any time prior to the final adoption of the 2012 Supplemental Budget, inspect and file or register any objections thereto. ELIZABETH FIRE PROTECTION DISTRICT By: /s/ Wayne Austgen, Secretary Legal Notice No.: 927682 First Publication: June 27, 2013 Last Publication: June 27, 2013 Publisher: The Elbert County News Public Notice Request for Proposal Elbert County Government, State of Colorado, issues this Request for Proposal for the purpose of restructuring the County’s benefit services and plans offered to County Employees. All items listed on the proposal specification sheet must be included in the proposal. Failure of the Offeror to provide any information requested in the proposal specification sheet may result in disqualification of the proposal. Elbert County Government is requesting proposals on Services and Resources, with no authorization to quote offered. Proposals will be accepted until 4:00 p.m. MST, Thursday the 18th of July, 2013. Late proposals and proposals received by telephone, fax, or electronic means will not be accepted or considered for award. Proposals will be opened at 2:00 p.m., or as soon as possible thereafter, Monday the 22nd of July, 2013, in the BOCC Meeting Room, Elbert County Courthouse, 215 Comanche Street, Kiowa, Colorado 80117. Offerors may, but need not, be present at the proposal opening. Offeror names and the number of responders will be the only information announced at the proposal opening. The proposal opening is open to the public. Please mail proposals to: Elbert County Government, HR Department ATTN: Candace Meece P.O. Box 7, Kiowa Colorado 80117 or deliver to: Elbert County Government, HR Department 215 Comanche St., (2nd Floor), Kiowa, Colorado 80117. Please mark outside of envelope: Benefits Proposal Elbert County Government reserves the right, as its interest may require, to reject any and all proposals, to waive formalities and informalities contained in-said proposal and furthermore to award a contract for items herein, either in whole or in part, if it is deemed to be in the best interest of Elbert County to do so. Additionally, Elbert County reserves the right to negotiate optional items and or services with the successful Offeror. Proposal Specifications General Information 1. Provide a description of your firm including state(s) of licensure; size, financials, and a brief history. 2. How many employees are there in your company? What National, State, and Local resources and support are available? 3. Who would be working directly with our administrative issues, questions or problem solving? Please provide the roles and qualifications of each person. Also, include the number of clients each person is expected to handle. 4. Describe the form of professional liability or errors and omissions insurance carried by your company and the amount of coverage.

June 27, 2013

1. Provide a description of your firm including state(s) of licensure; size, financials, and a brief history. 2. How many employees are there in your company? What National, State, and Local resources and support are available? 3. Who would be working directly with our administrative issues, questions or problem solving? Please provide the roles and qualifications of each person. Also, include the number of clients each person is expected to handle. 4. Describe the form of professional liability or errors and omissions insurance carried by your company and the amount of coverage.

Government Legals

Account Services 1. Describe your account services department and customer service philosophy. 2. What is your process for ensuring customer satisfaction? 3. What kind of training (industry, internal, computer, other) does your staff receive? 4. Do you provide employee communication services for your clients’ employees? If so, please provide a general description of your capabilities. Please provide a sample of employee communication materials that you have distributed to other clients. 5. How can you assist in facilitating employee meetings? 6. Do you help facilitate annual open enrollments? Strategic Planning/Vendor Selection 1. What resources do you have available to help us manage our benefits and outline a benefits strategy consistent with current and future business plans? 2. How will you help us with the competitive marketing and placement of our plans, including development of marketing specifications, identification of market conditions, evaluation of proposals, negotiations and placement of insurance contracts for annual renewals? 3. How will you help with the management of insurance, including: monthly (or quarterly) supervision and/or preparation of claims activity reports from carriers; executive summary reports; underwriting analysis for annual renewals; annual financial projections for budgeting purposes; and alternative funding analyses? 4. How is the “rebidding” process handled? 5. How are plan design changes handled? 6. Furnish a list of insurance companies, third party administrators, and other providers for which the consultant is an authorized agent or broker. 7. How will you work with us to ensure we are keeping costs minimized? 8. How will you demonstrate the cost savings? 9. How do you review PPO discounts and what is your criteria for recommending changes in network affiliations? 10. How would your firm help us decide whether we should offer a cafeteria plan or a modified flexible program? 11. What sort of benchmarking data can you provide? Plan Administration and Legislative Compliance 1. Do you have an in-house benefits attorney? If yes, please provide his or her credentials and the number of years he or she has provided counsel on benefits issues. If no, do you use an external benefits attorney? Which firm do you use? 2. Will your firm notify us of changes in federal and/or local laws that would affect us? 3. Explain the steps you have taken to facilitate compliance for your clients around Healthcare Reform. 4. Describe your capabilities for modeling scenarios under Healthcare Reform. Wellness Programs 1. What tools can you provide us to help implement/continue our wellness program? 2. Can you provide examples of low-cost wellness tools? 3. How can you help evaluate and refine our wellness program over time? 4. What is your process for measuring the success or failure of a wellness program? HR Tools 1. Describe how you keep your clients abreast of employment laws in a timely manner. 2. What resources do you provide to help remain compliant? 3. What types of materials can you provide to communicate pertinent information to employees? 4. Do you have any Internet-based employee communication tools? Fees 1. Describe your proposed form of compensation (i.e., commission, annual retainer, fee-for-service). If you are proposing a fee, please include your fee schedule/hourly rates. 2. If you charge fees for consulting and employee communication, please indicate the basis of your charges (hourly, by project, etc.) and what typical charges might be. 3. Does your agency accept overrides and/or contingencies from carriers? References/Other 1. Please provide references that include name, address, phone number and length of time associated with your organization. Indicate whether your firm’s role was as a broker, consultant or both. Please provide a minimum of four references, including at least one that is a previous client. 2. Describe any other facets of your organization and your firm’s experience that are relevant to this proposal which have not been previously described and that you feel warrant consideration. (e.g. local government experience). Legal Notice No.: 927674 First Publication: June 20, 2013 Last Publication: June 27, 2013 Publisher: The Elbert County News

BE Informed! Account Services 1. Describe your account services department and customer service philosophy. 2. What is your process for ensuring customer satisfaction? 3. What kind of training (industry, internal, computer, other) does your staff receive? 4. Do you provide employee communication services for your clients’ employees? If so, please provide a general description of your capabilities. Please provide a sample of employee communication materials that you have distributed to other clients. 5. How can you assist in facilitating employee meetings? 6. Do you help facilitate annual open enrollments?

Strategic Planning/Vendor Selection 1. What resources do you have available to help us manage our benefits and outline a benefits strategy consistent with current and future business plans? 2. How will you help us with the competitive marketing and placement of our plans, including development of marketing specifications, identification of market conditions, evaluation of proposals, negotiations and placement of insurance contracts for annual renewals? 3. How will you help with the management of insurance, including: monthly (or

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June 27, 2013

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Alberto “AJ” Stapleton stands among more than 1,000 donated bicycles inside Project ReCycle’s new location at 13796 Compark Blvd. in unincorporated Douglas County. A Texas developer donated the 21,000-square-foot space where the charity now houses its repair shop, inventory and resale shop called “The Kick Stand.” Photo by Deborah Grigsby

Used-bike program picking up speed Project ReCycle able to expand in new space By Deborah Grigsby

dgrigsby@ourcoloradonews.com As Alberto “AJ” Stapleton walks across the floor of an empty warehouse, his tall, sturdy frame seems to disappear in the vast space. “This is a long ways from the eight storage units we used to have to work out of in Littleton,” said Stapleton. He serves as executive director of Project Recycle, a charity organization founded in 2008 that repairs donated bicycles and puts them in the hands of those less fortunate. Stapleton said the space, donated by the private developer who owns the building, has added momentum and reach to the group’s mission. “We were actually surprised when we pulled all the bikes out of storage and set them up,” he said. “We had no idea how many we had because they were all stuffed into these public storage units, but now, we see how much more we have to give.” The group moved into the space at 13796 Compark Blvd. in unincorporated Douglas County in October. Stapleton said

the extra breathing room has fostered the addition of nine new bicycle repair stations, and the creation of a new resale shop called The Kick Stand. While Project Recycle accepts bike donations of all makes, models and condition, some are not always a good for kids or the average rider, according to Stapleton. Higher-end bikes, such as those with specialized frames or those that may have a higher resale value, are sold, and the proceeds go back into Project Recycle. But Stapleton said the new space is just the beginning of bigger things to come. “The bikes aren’t always just for kids,” he explained. “We have a lot of bikes for parents as well. Some need them to get to and from work or the bus; others often ride with their kids.” Project Recycle, which has given away more than 3,000 bikes since its inception, is looking at expansions into Castle Rock, Colorado Springs and New Mexico. Among Project ReCycle’s biggest needs right now is a pickup truck to pull a small covered trailer. “We’ve got a lot of work ahead of us before that happens,” Stapleton said. “But it’s worth it, when you see that smile on a kid’s face. That’s what makes it all worthwhile.” For more information, visit Project ReCycle online at www.projectrecycle.org.

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Government Legals

Public Notice ELBERT COUNTY VENDOR PMT LIST MaY 2013 GENERaL FUND HEaLTH FUND ROaD & BRIDGE FUND SaLES & USE TaX FUND LEaF FUND HUMaN SERVICES FUND RETIREMENT FUND MEaDOw STaTION DEBT SERVICE FOXwOOD ESTaTES DEBT SERVICE CONSRVaTIONTRST FUND TOTaLS VENDOR NaME ADVANCED QUALITY AUTO AERO DESIgNS AgATE mUTUAL TELEPHONE AIRgAS INTERmOUNTAIN ALANE RIVERA ARC ELECTRIC ARROWHEAD FENCINg ASPHALT SPECIALTIES CO AT&T AUTO gLASS gUYS AUTO-CHOLOR SYSTEm AV-TECH ELECTRONICS AVAYA bAbY bEAR HUgS bASS VIVA I. bENDER mENDERS bEST WEST TIRE DISTRIbUTORS bLACK HILLS ENERgY bLUE SKY PROmOTIONS bLUE STAR POLICE SUPPLY CONFIDENTIAL bORAL AggREgATES bREVARD ExTRADITIONS bUILDERADIUS bUSINESS INK CO CAROLYN bURgENER CAROLYN PARKINSON CAROLYN SHERIDAN CATHERINE LAmbERT CCP INDUSTRIES INC CDW gOVERNmENT CENTENNIAL mENTAL HEALTH CENTURYLINK CERTIFIED LAbORATORIES CHEmTOx CHRISTOPHER JOHNSON CNA SURETY CO ASSESOR ASSOCIATION CO COmmUNITY

CO COUNTIES INC. CO COUNTIES INC. CO DEPT OF HEALTH EVRmT CO DEPT OF PUbLIC HEALTH CO DEPT OF REVENUE CO DIV OF FIRE PREV

$438,773.59 $9,023.69 $195,658.38 $165,245.43 $15,043.04 $49,115.04 $18,010.87 $11,216.25 $7,510.00 $9,174.00 $918,770.29

DESCRIPTION AUTO REPAIRS EmbROIDERY PHONE SERVICE WELDINg SUPPLIES REImbURSEmENT OPERATINg ExPENSE DEPOSIT OPERATINg ExPENSE APRIL bILL-SImLA LD VEHICLE mAINT mONTHLY SVC EQUIPmENT ExPENSE SERVICE AgREEmENT TANF CONTRACT APRIL REImbURESEmENT TRUCK REPAIRS

aMT 3,304.86 297.00 22.54 555.61 29.12 2,835.00 5,356.00 151,614.94 175.74 770.00 326.00 73.22 430.83 1,648.00 168.62 1,455.09

TIRES 937.35 mONTHLY SERVICE 2,562.66 SHERIFF EmbLEmS 485.20 mISC. UNIFORmS 1,751.96 CHILD CARE 150.00 SALT & SQUEEgE 4,286.00 OPERATINg ExPENSE 2,730.57 SUPPORT AND mAINT. 4,000.00 LIQUOR NOTICE SIgN 73.00 mONTHLY CLEANINg CONTRACT 400.00 REImbURSEmENT 106.29 REImbURSEmENT 118.50 mILEAgE REImbURSEmENT 43.66 JANITORIAL SUPPLIES 319.72 OFFICE SUPPLIES 1,181.90 OPERATINg ExPENSE 320.00 mONTHLY SERVICE 658.48 PUREWASH SYSTEmS 124.90 OPERATINg ExPENSE 626.98 REImbURSEmENT 48.24 NOTARY ERRORS POLICY 260.00 AbSTRACT AND CERT. CLASSES 40.00 PUbLIC NOTICES mAY 32.75

CO mACHINERY COmCAST COmmUNITY mEDIA OF CO COmPLETE WIRELESS TECHNOL CORbIN & ASSOC CORPORATE bILLINg LLC CORRECTIONAL HEALTHCARE COUNTY SHERIFF’S OF CO COUNTY WIDE DIESEL REPAIR CREDIT UNION OF CO CUmmINS ROCKY mOUNTAIN CYNTHIA HIgDON D-J PETROLEUm INC. DALES PAINT SUPPLY CO DEbbIE JONES DEEP ROCK DENVER INDUSTRIAL SALES & SVC

ELBERT COUNTY VENDOR PMT LIST

SUmmER CONFERENCE 350.00 DEDUCTIbLE 10,000.00 PERmIT AND FEE 441.67 APRIL TOx TEST 160.00 CONSUmER PROTECTION FEE 172.00 FY13 EmERgENCY FOREST CONTROL 4,641.90 OPERATINg ExPENSE 400.00 mONTHLY SERVICE 326.81 ADVERTISINg 195.00 ImPRESS bATTERY 569.00 CHALLENgES OF A SAVE SCHOOL 325.00 AIR SPRINg 677.53 mEDICAL INmATE SVC 20,382.26 TRAININg 190.00 EQUIPmENT REPAIR 1,936.00 CREDIT CARD TRANS 9,172.75 PISTON COOLINg NOzzELS 174.00 REImbURSEmENT 200.00 FUEL 40,488.67 PRImER,PAINT 137.51 mILEAgE REImbURSEmENT 34.06 WATER COOLER LEASE 8.45

RENTAL CRACK SEAL mACHINE 3,785.70 DIgbY PROPERTIES SImLA mAY RENT 725.00 E470 TOLL FEES 31.95 ECCg DUES 5,802.25 ECCO mARCH PSSF CONTRACT 1,261.10 EIDE bAILLY PROFESSIONAL SERVICES 25,100.00 EL PASO COUNTY AUTOPSY 4,050.00 ECCA 2ND QUARTER CALLS 8,811.25 ELbERT COUNTY HUmAN SVCS OPERATINg ExPENSE 231.90 ELbERT COUNTY NEWS SUbSCRIPTION 20.00 ELbERT COUNTY R&b VEHICLE mAINT 1,574.79 ELbERT CTY TREASURER PR VENDORS 125,474.49 ELIzAbETH FIRE DEPT. bLOOD DRAW 150.00 EmERgENCY VEHICLE SPECIALISTS OPERATINg ExPENSE 764.00 ENERTIA CONSULTINg gR OPERATINg ExPENSE 15,479.32 ESRI ARCgIS bASIC 6,400.00 EVERETT TATmAN mTHLY CONTRACT APRIL 1,440.00 FAIR POINT COmmUNICATIONS mONTHLY SERVICE 375.55 FASTENAL COmPANY NUTS 7.41 FLAgS USA FLAg 138.00 FRONTIER bUSINESS PRODUCT CONTRACT 399.19 FRONTIER COmmUNICATIONS COPIER RENTAL 995.96 g&K SERVICES UNIFORmS 311.96 gLASER gAS COmPANY PROPANE 330.17 gLENN A. OHRNS CONTRACT 1,862.50 gOODYEAR WHOLESALE TIRE OPERATINg SUPPLIES 1,340.44 gRAINgER OPERATINg SUPPLIES 172.12 gREAT WEST LIFE & ANNUITY COUNTY RETIREmENT 39,631.23

2012

gROUND ENgINEERINg mATERIALS TESTINg 187.50 HALLCREST KENNEL bOARDINg 306.00 HEADS UP COLORADO YOUTH TANF CONTRACT 5,343.75 HENRY SCHEIN ANTIbOTIC 223.73 HLND RNCH LAW ENFCmENT TRAIN RANgE FEE 100.00 HILFERTY’S TOWN AND COUNTRY STRAW bALES CR 125 264.00 HOmE DEPOT CREDIT SERVICE PRESERVER/bATTERIES 238.84 HONNEN EQUIPmENT COmPANY OPERATINg ExPENSE 2,536.14 I-70 & HARLAN TOWINg TOWINg 175.00 ILENE ALLISON gRAVEL/FILL DIRT 2,657.40 IREA mONTHLY SERVICE 8,580.81 INTERSTATE ALL bATTERY bATTERIES 802.89 INVENTORY TRADINg CO DEPARTmENT SHIRTS 395.31 J&A TRAFFIC PRODUCTS OPERATINg ExPENSE 3,647.00 JAmES RObISON EmPLOYEE SETTLEmENT 12,184.53 JERRI SPEAR mILEAgE REImbURSEmENT 84.00 JESSICA gRIgLIO REImbURSEmENT 129.00 JODIE SHERRIER REImbURSEmENT 54.74 JOHN DEERE FINANCIAL OPERATINg ExPENSE 21,415.38 JRg ALL TERRAIN mEDICAL & SAFETY REPAIRS TO SUSV 1,589.81 KANSAS STATE bANK LEASE PAYmENTS 17,743.83 KIOWA CONSERVATION DIST WEED bARRIER, JUNIPERS, POLYmER 957.60 KIOWA CREEK COmm CHURCH TANF CONTRACT 2,280.00 LAb CORP TESTINg 38.00 LARRY ROSS mILEAgE REImbURSEmENT 105.56 LEAH TEgLOVIC REImbURSEmENT 55.20 LVmPD ACCOUNTINg SECTION REImbURSEmENT 13.32 LYLE SIgN INC Nm 7165 OPERATINg ExPENSE 1,441.99 m7 bUSINESS SYSTEmS NOD LASER SHEETS 30.07 mARINI DIESEL INC JAKE STUD 16.63 mARSHALL & SWIFT RESIDENTIAL COST HANDbOOK 569.90 mARY LOUISE JACObSON OPERATINg ExPENSE FAIR 155.00 mCAFEE INC WEb & EmAIL PROTECTION 727.56 mHC KENWORTH bLOWER DOUbLER 861.09 mINES & ASSOCIATES PC EmPLOYEE ASST. PROg. 267.90 mOUNTAIN VIEW ELECTRIC mONTHLY SERVICE 455.27 NEVE’S UNIFORmS INC OPERATINg ExPENSE 96.75 NExTEL COmmUNICATIONS CELL PHONES 4,586.13 PARKER PORT-A-POTTY INC. mONTHLY SERVICE 295.00 PATRICK DONATELLI TORx SET 173.86 ARNOLD AND ASSOCIATES ATTNY FEES 9,230.00 PHOENIx TECHNOLOgY OPERATINg ExPENSE 12,133.94 PITNEY bOWES INC SERVICE AgREEmENT 1,221.00 POLICE & FIRE COmmUNICATION 2-1 bAY AC CHARgER 300.00 POSTmASTER gENERAL POSTAgE 1,844.00 POTESTIO bROS EQUIP. INC RADIATOR CLEANER 23.54 POWER mOTIVE CORP POLY WAFER 476.00 PRONgHORN COUNTRY ACE OPERATINg ExPENSE 86.02 PSYCHOLOgICAL DImENSIONS, PC PRE-EmPLOYmENT 175.00

PULL TARPS OPERATINg ExPENSE 1,385.55 PUREWATER DYNAmICS INC mONTHLY ExPENSE 50.00 QUALITY FIRST PLUmbINg REPAIR CAST IRON PIPE IN JAIL1,650.00 QUILL CORPORATION OFFICE SUPPLIES 546.67 QWEST mTHLY PHONE bILLINg 227.03 RC PRECISION INSTALLATIONS COURT RECEPTION DESK 1,875.00 RECALL SECURE DESTRUCTION SVC SERVICES-PREmISE 78.13 RI TEC DEgREASER 296.00 PORTA POTTY RENTAL APRIL bILLINg 390.00 RObERT ROWLAND REImbURSEmENT 83.91 ROCK PARTS CO OPERATINg ExPENSE 2,578.15 ROD WILSON DEPUTY COmP 200.00 RT SERVICES CORP TRASH REmOVAL 265.00 RUNNINg CREEK QUICK LUbE VEHICLE mAINT 838.36 RURAL SOLUTIONS OPERATINg ExPENSE 14.23 SAFETY-KLEEN CORP. OPERATINg ExPENSE 243.66 SHERYL HEWLETT REImbURSEmENT 81.00 SIgNAL gRAPHICS OFFICE SUPPLIES 218.63 STAPLES ADVANTAgE OFFICE SUPPLIES 1,563.54 STATE WIRE & TERmINAL OPERATINg ExPENSE 257.90 STONE OIL CO INC FUEL 21,063.36 STORAgE ONE STORAgE 150.00 SUSAN LUDWIg OPERATINg ExPENSE 236.25 SYSCO FOOD SVCS VARIOUS FOODS 9,033.98 TAPP AUTO SVC CENTER LAmP ASSY 61.24 THE LIgHTHOUSE STRObE LIgHTS 498.00 TLC AUTO gLASS EQUIPmENT REPAIR 250.00 TLO LLC SECURITY DATA 114.50 TONY SCHIEFELbEIN REImbURSEmENT 50.12 TOWN OF ELIzAbETH 2010 TAx REPAYmENT 28,724.41 TOWN OF KIOWA mONTHLY SERVICE 2,725.38 TOWN OF SImLA WATER 201.07 TRUE VALUE HARDWARE OPERATINg ExPENSE 264.73 8,081.00 TYLER TECHNOLOgIES EAgLE AgREEmENT Umb bANK NA bOND INTEREST 18,726.25 UPS SHIPmENTS 18.14 USA mObILITY WIRELESS PAgER SERVICE 221.96 VERIzON WIRELESS WIRELESS PHONE SERVICE 639.31 VISITINg NURSES OF CO NURSINg SERVICE 102.00 WAgNER EQUIPmENT CO EQUIPmENT ExPENSE 356.44 WASTE mANAgEmENT TRASH REmOVAL 710.47 WELLS bUSINESS bKg INTEREST bOND PAYmENT 167,140.31 WITT bOYS-NAPA OPERATINg ExPENSE 129.88 xEROx CORP. mONTHLY COPIER ExPENSE 831.52 zEE mEDICAL SAFETY SUPPLIES 351.60

Legal Notice No.: 927683 First Publication: June 27, 2013 Last Publication: June 27, 2013 Publisher: Elbert County News


20-Color

20 Elbert County News

June 27, 2013

Market deals in fresh food, air Farmers offer goods on Sundays in Parker By Chris Michlewicz

cmichlewicz@ourcoloradonews.com One Sunday morning trip to downtown Parker is enough to show why families have turned regular visits into a summer-long ritual. The town’s most recognized corridor — the section of Mainstreet east of South Parker Road — is the idyllic venue for the Parker Farmers’ Market, which this year has a record 80 vendors. Booths stacked with fresh breads, jars of exotic jellies, justpicked veggies, locally grown produce and other wares line Mainstreet between Pikes Peak Drive and the eastern end of Victorian Drive. The farmers’ market is open from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. every Sunday from Mother’s Day through October. Although it has changed locations over the years, market organizers seem to have found a permanent home on Mainstreet. It was only six years ago that 40 vendors were forced to squeeze into a small church parking lot. Extra space has increased visibility and made the market more accessible. The crowd is a mix of young families, empty-nesters and retirees, all of whom enjoy the vast selection of natural foods and friendly chatter with the vendors. Many of the booth-minders have personally overseen the crops, or, in the case of Boulder-

A customer loads a bag with fresh vegetables at the Parker Farmers’ Market. Courtesy photo based Wild Alaska Salmon, pulled the product from the sea. “The fisherman was there himself selling the salmon,” said Jason Williams, who purchased the Parker Farmers’ Market with his wife, Jillane, back in April. “It’s things like that that we want at the market.” Williams said he has every intention of maintaining the charm of the market and sensibly building on its 13-year tradition.

That’s good news for people like Kayte Quinn, a married mother of a 13-monthold. She lives in the nearby Town & Country Townhomes and has become a frequent customer at the Parker Farmers’ Market. “I like having all of the vendors in one place, and they’re mostly local vendors who always have fresh fruit and produce,” Quinn said. “Since we have a child now, we’re trying to get more organic, locally

grown food.” The market attracts an estimated 4,000 to 7,000 people each week, said Nanci Simmons, who owned and expanded the market in recent years and has stayed on as a consultant. Even after rattling off some of the goods that can be found — peaches, crafts, salsa, pickles, jalapenos, pastries, cakes, pies, cobblers — Simmons still marvels at the market’s popularity. “It blows my mind how crazy busy it is,” she said. “It’s unbelievable.” Organizers recently worked with town leaders and fire department officials to get approval to widen a narrow, congested section on the east end of the market. The change received an overwhelmingly positive response. “I struggled to get through there with a stroller,” Quinn said. “We would have to skip over some booths. When it opened up, we got a chance to visit more vendors.” The most important booth to stop by, at least for Quinn’s daughter, is the one run by Great Harvest Bread Co. The 13-month-old happily devours the freshly baked bread. Quinn and her husband are also fans of the dairy products containing goat’s milk, as well as the vendor with preservative-free jalapeno jelly. The variety of fresh food is the biggest attraction, but a leisurely outdoor stroll in downtown Parker adds an element of fun. “It’s a fantastic community event that has a little bit of something for everybody,” Williams said. “If you have kids or don’t have kids, it’s a great way to spend a Sunday morning. There is so much to do and see.”

University of Colorado launches political diversity study Conservatives have aired concerns about school Associated Press University of Colorado regents are conducting a survey to determine whether the school respects diversity for people who disagree on politics, race, gender and sexual orientation. The survey, which was approved June 20 by University of Colorado regents, is planned for the upcoming school year on all campuses. Some conservatives have expressed concern that many educators are too liberal, while other critics have complained that

some school officials are intolerant of social differences. In March, the university hired a history professor to be the resident conservative at the Boulder campus. Steven Hayward will serve as the school’s first visiting scholar in conservative thought and policy, a temporary position paid by more than $1 million in private funds. The board postponed consideration of a second resolution that sought to amend CU regent laws to prohibit discrimination based on political affiliation or philosophies. The board’s law and policy committee is being asked for more information. Regents Sue Sharkey, R-Windsor, and Jim Geddes, R-Sedalia, brought forward the

two measures. “Neither resolution is designed to impose an ideological agenda upon the University of Colorado, its campuses or its faculty,” Sharkey said. Geddes said a CU-Boulder professor told him the campus lacks political diversity, conservatives are made fun of for their views, and there seemed to be a major departure of conservatives concerned about ideological differences. Mark Bauerlein, a professor from Emory University who has described himself as an “educational conservative,” addressed the board via videoconference to share his experience when he took a one-year leave of absence to teach at CU. Bauerlein said he met with the chair of

the English department and was told that people did not trust him to be fair to students. Carol Perry, who testified before the board, said she would never send her daughters to CU because of what she perceives to be a persistent liberal bias. Paul Chinowsky, an engineering professor and incoming chairman of the Boulder Faculty Assembly, said he has “never witnessed or encountered any intellectual discrimination on this campus.” Patty Limerick, faculty director of the Center of the American West, told the board about the diverse voices her center brings in, whether it’s for a series about the U.S. Department of the Interior or on the topic of fracking.

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