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News

ELBERT 1/3/12

Elbert County

January 3, 2013

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A Colorado Community Media Publication

ourelbertcountynews.com

Elbert County, Colorado • Volume 117, Issue 49

Off-duty deputy rescues family

2012: A WILD RIDE

Heap pulls mother, child, dog from burning home By Deborah Grigsby

dgrigsby@ourcoloradonews.com

In one of our Images of the Year, Ty Hamaker, of Centennial, Wyo., takes a shot from the bull Nike Blend after being bucked June 1 during the Elizabeth Stampede PRCA Xtreme Bulls rodeo. Turn to pages 4 and 5 for more photos that helped make 2012 a special year. File photo by Courtney Kuhlen

National Western gets ready to roll Livestock judging, displays, rodeos, entertainment on tap By Tom Munds

tmunds@ourcoloradonews.com Cowboy boots and hats will be in abundance Jan. 12-27 for the 107th edition of the National Western Stock Show. Each day’s schedule can include activities such as livestock judging and sales, rodeos, displays and entertainment, drawing hundreds of thousands of patrons through the turnstiles. While special events draw a lot of attention, the National Western is billed as the Super Bowl of livestock shows and sales. There are judging competitions for horses, cattle, sheep, swine, goats, llamas, bison, yaks, poultry and rabbits. Other livestock-related events include a sheepshearing contest and the catch-a-calf competition, where young livestock enthusiasts try to catch a calf to keep and then are judged the next year on their ability to raise and care for the animal. There also are numerous livestock sales where millions of dollars change hands as thousands of animals are sold to new owners. The National Western Stock Show is Colorado’s largest trade show. The 2010 show drew about 637,000 people. The show events are spread among a number of facilities. Stock show activities are centered at the National Western

The Westernaires Big Red team presents the flags at one of the rodeos at last year’s National Western Stock Show. Several teams from the youth riding club, which is based in Jefferson County, will take part in this year’s National Western, which runs Jan. 12-27. Courtesy photo Stock Show Arena and Hall of Education near 46th Avenue and Humbolt Street, the Events Center at 1515 E. 47th Ave. and the Denver Coliseum. A general admission ticket is required to get into the National Western Stock Show. The ticket entitles the holder to visit the trade show, displays, stock shows and auctions. Ticket prices vary from $12 to $17 for

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an adult, with high-priced tickets required on the weekend. Tickets for children 3 to 11 are $2 to $3, depending on the day. Children under 3 get in free. The general admission ticket also is good for visits to the Children’s Ranchland and petting farm, open daily on the third floor of the Expo Hall. In addition, there are a variety of activities at the new Ames Activity Pavilion including stick horse rodeos, kids’ pedaltractor pulls, horseshoe pitching and dummy roping contests. The pavilion is open daily from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. and the daily activity lists are posted on the website. There are a total of 42 entertainment events requiring admission tickets that range in price from $8 to $100 each. The entertainment schedule includes: two MexiWestern continues on Page 7

An off-duty Elbert County deputy should be wearing a big red cape instead of a badge after busting his way into his neighbor’s burning home to save an expectant mother and toddler. Up early, feeding his own newborn, Sgt. Joel Heap heard glass breaking outside his Arapahoe County home around 2:15 a.m. on the morning of Dec. 11. “I looked out the window, thinking someone was breaking into the car,” he explained. “The car was fine, but when I looked across the street, the neighbor’s garage was engulfed Heap in flames.” Heap woke his wife and instructed her to call 911. “That morning, I had my clothes all laid out, pressed and ready to go, which is something I never do,” he said. Rushing across the street, hoping to access the home via the interior garage door, Heap said he couldn’t because flames were too high. From the front porch, he then pounded on the door, calling to any occupants inside. “No one answered, but I was gonna get into that house, one way or another.” With his shoulder to the door, two solid hits forced the frame to collapse. Tracie McKnight, a neighbor he barely knew, who was in her last trimester of pregnancy, stood motionless at the top of the stairs. Heap told her the house was on fire, she had to get out and to tell him who was still inside. “I think at first she thought I was a burglar, but she said it was just her, her daughter and the dogs.” Heap led the woman and toddler through heavy smoke and across the street where his wife and neighbors waited to help. “As we left, I could see flames hitting the second story where the girl would have been sleeping, but that night, she slept with her mother.” Heap thought the dogs would follow. “But when I looked behind me, I saw them go back inside.” A confessed dog lover, Heap went back to save the family pets. “I made it about 10 to 15 feet inside the door, where the dog and I just stood there,” he said. “It was a standoff as I debated how I was going to get the animal out.” Heap grabbed the medium-sized dog and bolted through the door. “Again, I thought the other dog would follow, but it didn’t.” Attempting a third trip back inside the burning home, Heap said conditions worsened and he was forced to turn back. Firefighters found the dog frightened, but alive, curled up inside a dollhouse in the toddler’s bedroom. Cunningham Fire Protection District Chief David Markham said McKnight was evaluated by a local hospital as a precaution. Deputy continues on Page 7


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2 Elbert County News

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January 3, 2013

Elbert County News 3

Bills would put troops in schools Legislation would also create task force on safety By Deborah Grigsby

dgrigsby@ourcoloradonews.com As the nation grieves over the mass slaying at a Newtown, Conn. grade school, legislation is afoot that would put military personnel in schools. Two bills proposed by Sen. Barbara

Boxer (D-Calif.) on Dec. 19 hope to free up money for governors to use National Guard troops in schools. According to a press statement, Boxer’s first bill, the School Safety Enhancements Act, would increase the existing Secure Our Schools authorization from $30 million to $50 million. It would also create a joint task force between the Justice Department and the Department of Education to develop new school safety guidelines. But her second bill, dubbed the Save Our Students (SOS) Act, would allow governors to be reimbursed by the federal govern-

ment for the cost of deploying National Guard troops for duty at schools. Boxer’s statement said the legislation is modeled after a National Guard program that’s been in place since 1989 that lets states use the Guard to assist law enforcement efforts. Under the new program, Guard troops would help support local law enforcement agencies to ensure schools are safe. While the proposed legislation makes its way through Washington, D.C., local soldiers and airmen wait for instruction. “The Colorado Guard stands ready to support the direction of our civilian lead-

ership,” said Col. Peter Byrne, director of the Colorado National Guard’s Joint Staff based in Centennial. “The Colorado Guard has supported civil authority for nearly 152 years and our forces have never been more ready to serve.” Boxer’s statement said her legislation should be considered as part of a comprehensive response to the shooting at Sandy Hook Elementary School, “which would include enacting sensible gun laws — including banning assault weapons and high-capacity clips — and ensuring that the mentally ill are not able to purchase guns.”

Come on in — join your library board

For many, the start of a new year means getting going with a new workout regimen. File photo

Resolve resolutely Gain success with New Year’s plans By Rhonda Moore

rmoore@ourcoloradonews.com It’s the time of year for the ultimate transformation exercise with a longstanding tradition — the New Year’s resolution. The practice of making a resolution at the annual turn of the calendar is rooted in ancient civilizations, many of which had customs that mimicked the modern-day commitment to realize a self-improvement promise, according to the website 123NewYear.com. The site looks at ancient Babylonians and Romans, who would begin the New Year by making promises to their deities, and the knights of the medieval era, who took vows at the beginning of the new Christian year. The practice to resolve a positive change in the coming year is permanently ingrained in modern customs.

Top trends

At the cusp of 2013, the resolution trends for the coming year include a promise to spend more time with family, adopt healthy lifestyle changes, reduce stress, manage money more efficiently and acquire a new skill. According to a study conducted by the University of Scranton Journal of Clinical Psychology, the top 10 resolutions for 2013 were: to lose weight; get organized; spend

SEND US YOUR NEWS Colorado Community Media welcomes event listings and other submissions. Please note our new submissions emails. Events and club listings calendar@ourcoloradonews.com School notes, such as honor roll and dean’s list schoolnotes@ourcoloradonews.com Military briefs

less/save more; enjoy life to the fullest; stay fit; learn something exciting; quit smoking; help others pursue their dreams; fall in love; and spend more time with family. The statisticians at the university estimate that 45 percent of Americans usually make a New Year’s resolution, and each year only 8 percent are successful in achieving their resolution. Based strictly on the numbers, it appears that the adage “you can’t teach an old dog new tricks” extends to the resolution business. According to the university’s Dec. 13 publication, each year 39 percent of people in their 20s achieve their resolutions, while only 14 percent of those older than 50 do the same. The upside is that those who make an explicit resolution are 10 times more likely to attain their goals, compared with those who do not.

Tips for success

The experts at 123NewYear recommend the following steps to ensure you stick to your goal and experience success with your 2013 resolutions. • Start slow, one resolution at a time. • Be clear about your goal; people lose drive with vague resolutions. • Make a plan; being organized produces better results. • Don’t wait for New Year’s Day, plan early to be ready for a Jan. 1 start. • Learn from your past mistakes to avoid repeating them. • To maintain high motivation, be positive about your resolution.

militarynotes@ourcoloradonews.com General press releases pressreleases@ourcoloradonews.com Letters to the editor letters@ourcoloradonews.com News tips news@ourcoloradonews.com Fax information to 303-566-4098 Mail to 9137 S. Ridgeline Blvd., Ste. 210, Highlands Ranch, CO 80129

I am fortunate to work with an enthusiastic library board of trustees comprised of five dedicated citizens of Elbert County. Each member volunteers and is appointed to serve a three-year term on the board to help set policy and direct the goals of the library district in its mission to serve the cultural, educational, and leisure needs of our diverse communities. This year, I have one seat open on the board. Would you consider joining us? The library board governs the library district, establishes policies, and employs the library director to carry out the policies and to manage the district. Board members are advocates for the libraries in our communities. We strive to have a board that represents our community’s diversity; represents various interests; and has experience or knowledge in a variety of fields. Members of the Elbert County Library District Board of Trustees are appointed by the Elbert County commissioners upon the recommendation of the board. You might wonder why you should consider becoming a board member. Current board President Ron Vermillion echoed a sentiment shared by many of the board members - they joined the library board to give something back to the community. The board members believe in the value of a library to enhance the quality of life in their community. Board member Karen Suchan says that “libraries have always been a beloved resource to me throughout my life. When my daughter went into premature labor in Texas, I rushed there to watch her 3-year-old.

We spent so many hot Texas August days in the library opening this new world to my granddaughter.” Suchan concludes: “we are very fortunate to have an excellent library system here in our county. I believe life would be much less satisfying without this resource for information, learning, connection and entertainment — come join us!” The Library District Board meets on the fourth Wednesday of each month at 6:30 p.m. at one of the branch libraries in Elizabeth, Elbert, Kiowa and Simla. Our next meeting will be on Jan. 23 at the Elizabeth Library. If you’re interested in learning more about the library you are always welcome to attend our meetings. Interested parties may send a Board of Trustees application to me at director@elbertcountylibrary.org or the district office at 651 W. Beverly St., Elizabeth, CO 80107. The application may be found online at www.elbertcountylibrary.org under the “Information” tab. I do hope you will consider joining us! Kari May lives in Elizabeth and is the director of the Elbert County Library District.

ELBERT COUNTY NEWS IN A HURRY Swearing-in ceremony slated

Commissioners-elect Larry Ross and Robert Rowland will take the oath of office at 8 a.m., Jan. 8. The official swearing-in ceremony will be held on the second floor of the Elbert County building in the BOCC Chambers, 215 Colorado St. in Kiowa. For more information, call (303) 621-3126.

Planning commission to meet

The Elbert County Planning Commission will meet Jan. 10, from 7 to 11 p.m. in the Exhibit Hall at the fairgrounds, 75 Ute Ave., Kiowa. Residents interested in the county’s recent approval of the Sylvester well and potential for further oil and gas exploration, should attend. The committee will discuss the county’s draft oil and gas regulations and memorandum of understanding. For more information, contact Richard Miller at 303-621-317 or at richard. miller@elbertcounty-co.gov.

State revenue forecast improves

Colorado’s financial outlook continues to improve. A Dec. 20 announcement from the Governor’s Office of State Planning and Budgeting projects general fund revenue to be $159.6 million higher in the current fiscal year than was previously forecast in September. Under current law, excess funds in the new forecast will carry over into next year’s budget and eventually be transferred to the State Education Fund.

This fund supports per-pupil funding in Colorado school districts. Based on Gov. John Hickenlooper’s budget request, the new total available for fiscal year FY 2013-14 is $142.7 million. The governor indicated he would ask the increased funds go to education, economic development, public health, safety and infrastructure.

USDA rules on livestock traceability

The U.S. Department of Agriculture has released a new policy on interstate livestock movement. A Dec. 20 ruling permits livestock producers to develop animal tracing systems that work best for them, but yet still met requirements necessary for the USDA’s overall disease response efforts. Under the final rule, unless specifically exempted, livestock moved interstate would have to be officially identified and accompanied by an interstate certificate of veterinary inspection or other documentation, such as owner-shipper statements or brand certificates. Also, beef cattle under 18 months of age, unless moved interstate for shows, exhibitions, rodeos, or recreational events, are exempt from the official identification requirement in this rule. For more details about the new regulation and how it will affect producers, visit www.aphis.usda.gov/traceability.


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4 Elbert County News

January 3, 2013

IMAGES OF THE YEAR

Marie Soderberg of Elizabeth is concerned about the ripple effect of oil and gas exploration within Elbert County, She offered public comment at the Nov. 28 county commissioners’ hearing in Kiowa.

Elizabeth High School seniors toss their mortarboards at the conclusion of commencement exercises at the school gymnasium in May.

MOMENTS TO REMEMBER

4 January 5 January 6 January

FILE PHOTOS BY COLORADO COMMUNITY MEDIA STAFF American photographer Edward Steichen once said: “Photography records the gamut of feelings written on the human face. It is a major force in explaining man to man.” Newspapers often rely on imagery to better illustrate a story and the nature of the human condition. Looking back, 2013 was a memorable year for Elbert County. The Elbert County News presents some of those memorable images, from stories we’ve covered throughout the year and throughout the county.

Denver Merchandise Mart www.flyfishingshow.com Free Parking

Lender’s Panel The South Metro Denver SBDC and SCORE are hosting a panel of experts to discuss various lending options available for small businesses

Thomas Braum, 14, of Elizabeth, pauses to give his turkey Fred a pep talk after a disappointing round during the turkey judging during the Elbert County Fair in August.

Debbie Studer and her husband Mark lost everything in the June 7 tornado that hit Elbert County. Studer says she is grateful for televised storm warnings, as well as her three “church candles” for saving their lives.

Wednesday, Dec. 5, 2012 6:00 pm– 8:30 pm $10 per person

2154 E. Commons Avenue, Suite 342 Centennial, CO 80122 Don’t miss out on this chance to get all the information you need about funding your business! To register: go to www.SmallBusinessDenver.com and click on “Workshops.” www.SmallBusinessDenver.com South Metro Denver SBDC 2154 E. Commons Ave., Suite 342 Centennial, CO 80122

Joyce Remp, a raptor expert with Nature’s Educators, is joined by Ares, a dark morph redtailed hawk, at this year’s ElizaBash, the annual street fair that follows the Elizabeth Stampede Rodeo parade in June.

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HAVE A STORY IDEA? Email your Elbert County story ideas to newsrooms at news@ourcolorado

The South Metro Denver Small Business Development Center is partially funded by the U.S. Small Business Administration. The Support given by the U.S. Small Business Administration through such funding does not constitute an express or implied endorsement of any of the co-sponsors' or participants' opinions products or services. The Colorado SBDC is a partnership between the Colorado Office of Economic Development and International Trade, the U.S. Small Business Administration, Colorado's institutions of higher education, and local development organizations.

news.com or call us at 303-566-4100.


January 3, 2013

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Elbert County News 5

IMAGES OF THE YEAR

In May, graduating seniors at Kiowa High School took a moment during their commencement program to fan out among the audience and present roses to those who helped them achieve their academic goals.

Two-year-old Anna Deering of Elizabeth enjoys the last bite of cherry pie at the 20th annual Frontier High School Thanksgiving meal. Danielle Bernal, 7, of Kiowa shows Main Street how she rolls during Elizabeth’s Harvest Festival and Trick or Treat Street in October.

Elbert County Commissioner Del Schwab, dressed in period costume, served as master of ceremonies at a celebration marking the 100th anniversary of the opening of the original Elbert County Courthouse in September.

t

for three

HAVE AN EVENT? To submit a calendar listing, send information to calendar@ ourcoloradonews.com or by fax to 303-566-4098.

ELBERT COUNTY NEWS

(USPS 171-100) OFFICE: 9137 S. Ridgeline Blvd., Suite 210, Highlands Ranch, CO 80129 PHONE: 303-566-4100 A legal newspaper of general circulation in Elizabeth, Colorado, the Elbert County News is published weekly on Thursday by Colorado Community Media. PERIODICALS POSTAGE PAID AT ELIZABETH, COLORADO and additional mailing offices. POSTMASTER: Send address change to: 9137 S. Ridgeline Blvd., Suite 210, Highlands Ranch, CO 80129 DEADLINES:

Display advertising: Thurs. 11 a.m. Legal advertising: Thurs. 11 a.m. Classified advertising: Mon. 12 p.m.

The June 1 PRCA Xtreme Bulls event at the Elizabeth Stampede drew contestants from 11 states.


6 Elbert County News

January 3, 2013

OPINIONS/YOURS AND OURS

‘This ship will carry us safe to shore’ The votes for song of the year are in. Actually there was only one vote and it was mine. Let’s see if you can figure out what I voted for. In a year of Sandy and Sandy Hook, with a big problem in an Aurora movie theater, the acrimony of an election year, the fiscal cliff, unemployment, and you name it, one of the few things we have had to antidote all of it was a tall girl who swam for us, and smiled all the way, safe to shore. If Missy Franklin was Hope, so was my song. The green light at the end of the dock. With hope comes optimism. Sometimes we hope that things will happen that don’t or can’t. It might be best to have little hopes, instead of big ones. But who hasn’t had the big hopes? Unconditional love, wealth, success, and Porsches are big ones. Making it home safely on a snowy day is a little hope. Then along comes life and there’s an old voice in my head that’s holding me back. We’re torn apart and the smiles go away. My smiles come and go just about every day,

except when my lap dog is on my lap. If you are considering a dog, I recommend them. Back to my song. The group is from Iceland, if that helps. The five members of the band have unpronounceable and unspellable names. So you’ll never hear someone in the audience yell out “Marry me, Nanna Bryndis Hilmasdottir!” There, that’s a big clue. Nanna is one of the two lead singers. She usually wears a hat on the back of her head. One late night I caught the video for the song. It’s brilliant. It was directed by Mihai Wilson and

Marcella Moser. “The video follows five sky-sailors played by the male members of the band, venturing across a fantasy land with a lost mythical female creature, all the while continuously running into nightmarish creatures. With the aid of the mystical creature played by Nanna Bryndis Hilmarsdottir, they survive it all and return her to her people.” The first time I saw it I thought I wasn’t awake. The creatures are very chimerical and very memorable. None of that would matter if the song was a stinker, but it’s not. If you are still in the dark, ask one of your kids. Group from Iceland, fantastic video, and band member names you can’t spell. Gee whiz: Arnar Rosenkranz Hilmarsson, who needs a haircut bad. The hope in the song comes in the chorus, which audiences have learned and sing along with at the group’s behest. “Though the truth may vary, this ship will carry our bodies safe to shore.” Watch the live version of the song on YouTube.

The group is most commonly compared to Mumford & Sons and Arcade Fire, and they are referred to as an “indie folk, indie pop” band. I dare you to download the song on a bad day and not feel better. I also know that my song of the year might be your least favorite song of the year. If you don’t like it, you don’t like it. But at least you have heard me out this far, and maybe I have helped you form an opinion about a favorite song of yours. Music can reach several different organs all at once — or none at all. “Little Talks” by Of Monsters and Men made my days better in 2013, and on those days when “I feel like I’m wrong when I am right,” I will remember the night when I was in rush hour, on the way to my art opening, grumbling and it took my grumble away. Craig Marshall Smith is an artist, educator and Highlands Ranch resident. He can be reached at craigmarshallsmith@comcast. net

QUESTION OF THE WEEK

What is your New Year’s resolution? In the final weeks of each year, many ponder how they might improve their lives and the lives of those around them. Some view the beginning of a new year

as a fresh start. Some shoppers and employees at The Parker Shoppes were asked Dec. 21 what their New Year’s resolutions are for 2013.

My friend recently started working as a sign-language specialist and I want to find a career that allows me to help people. And make more money. — Tawnya Farris, Castle Rock

I don’t really have a resolution yet, but in the past I have promised myself that I would get more organized, so that will probably be my goal in 2013. — Courtney Xavier, Parker

Careful — attitudes are transparent The other day I was speaking with my friend Otto up in Beaver Creek, and since it was the night before my first day of skiing for the year, Otto was sharing his experiences as he had already been on the hill a few times. Now Otto is one of those guys who is always smiling and in a good mood; he makes my day every time I just run into him. As he was telling me about how the mountain changed with the recently fallen snow and how much the ski conditions had improved, his eyes became brighter and his smile even bigger. In a ski town snow changes everything, including and maybe even especially attitudes. Jimmy Buffett sings about it right, “It’s these changes in latitudes, changes in attitudes, nothing remains quite the same. With all of our running and all of our cunning, if we couldn’t laugh we would all go insane.” So what changes your attitude for the better? Is it the snow? Is it your latitude or location? Is it another person? The funny thing about attitudes is that they are so transparent. People think they can do a good job of hiding their feelings or try and put on their very best poker face, but the reality is that our attitudes are seen in our faces, noticed in our body language, and heard in the tone of our voice. And I think what I enjoy most about this is when someone approaches me and says, “You look like you are having a good day.” Has that ever happened to you? I am sure it has and I am sure you beamed even brighter and continued with a positive attitude and great day. Now there are those things that change our attitude for the worse. And the problem with this is that it is not only our good attitudes that are transparent; when we are wearing an angry, upset, envious, or selfish attitude, others will see that immediately too. And when this happens, the whole dynamic of a room, conversation, or a relationship can change. So what does this all mean? Obviously we are all influenced at some level by out-

I want to be a great husband and a great father. I have been married for 12 years and 2013 will be my first full year with my new adopted son. — Bryan Ahern, Parker

side forces like snow and vacations or locations that bring out our positive side. And we are also hurt or disappointed by things outside of our control that bring out the negative attitude. So we have to find that inner strength, that inner solace and peace, and an internal positive attitude that we can rely on in any circumstance or during any change. I am fairly certain that if I met Otto anywhere, in the market, at a coffee shop, on the mountain, in the gym, or while he was working I would always see him smiling. He has a superb inner positive attitude. In a ski town snow changes everything, even for people who already have an optimistic outlook and positive attitude. We first need to recognize the important role that attitudes play in our own health and well-being as well as the impact that our attitude will have on others. Then we must identify what gives us our unflappable inner strength and resolve to maintain the right frame of mind and positive outlook. And lastly, we should allow ourselves to find and embrace those things in life that take our attitudes to an even higher level. I would love to hear how you manage your inner attitudes and all of the things that change your attitude for the better at gotonorton@gmail.com. And trust me, a positive outlook and attitude will certainly make this a better than good week. Michael Norton, a resident of Highlands Ranch, is the former president of the Zig Ziglar organization and CEO and founder of www.candogo.com

I have several resolutions, the first of which is to praise God more. I want to spend more time with my family. Leonard, my husband of 43 years, narrowly survived a heart attack earlier this year and I want to let him know how blessed I am to have him in my life. — Joan Schmierer, Elizabeth

Elbert County News 9137 S. Ridgeline Blvd., Suite 210, Highlands Ranch, CO 80129

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Columnists and guest commentaries The Elbert County News features a limited number of regular columnists, found on these pages and elsewhere in the paper, depending on the typical subject the columnist covers. Their opinions are not necessarily those of the Elbert County News. Want your own chance to bring an issue to our readers’ attention, to highlight something great in our community, or just to make people laugh? Why not write a letter of 300 words or fewer. After all, the News is your paper.

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7COLOR

January 3, 2013

Elbert County News 7

East Coast deaths bring familiar pain to Colorado Stomach ailment outbreaks Sandy Hook tragedy resonates in area hurt by Columbine

WHAT TO DO IF FACED WITH AN ACTIVE SHOOTER 1. Evacuate • Have an escape route and plan in mind. • Leave your belongings behind. • Keep your hands visible. 2. Hide out • Hide in an area out of the shooter’s view. • Block entry to your hiding place and lock the doors. • Silence your cell phone and/or pager. 3. Take action • As a last resort and only when your life is in imminent danger. • Attempt to incapacitate the shooter. • Act with physical aggression and throw items at the active shooter. What to do when police arrive: • Remain calm and follow instructions. • Put down any items in your hands (i.e., bags, jackets). • Raise hands and spread fingers. • Keep hands visible at all times. • Avoid quick movements toward officers such as holding on to them for safety. • Avoid pointing, screaming or yelling. • Do not stop to ask officers for help or direction when evacuating. Source: Arapahoe County Sheriff ’s Office

By Jennifer Smith

jsmith@ourcoloradonews.com Upon the tragic news coming from Newtown, Conn., a collective clutch of familiar grief gripped the south-metro community. Residents know what lies ahead for that community in the coming days, weeks and years, having lived through April 20, 1999. That’s when Eric Harris and Dylan Klebold killed 12 of their fellow Columbine High School students, a teacher and themselves. At Sandy Hook Elementary School on Dec. 14, Adam Lanza killed twice as many people plus himself, and most of his victims were first-graders. Each time a similar tragedy occurs, Columbine is on the lips of the nation. As support from the country flooded into the community after the massacre, regional leaders formed the Greater Littleton Youth Initiative to keep it from happening again. “Amazingly, at our last meeting, we just spoke about how the GLYI needs to be prepared to provide outreach and information on our own experience to help other communities in tragic situations like Columbine,” said program manager Kay Wilmesher. “Unfortunately, the time has come already.” GLYI and city officials are sending a letter to Connecticut’s Sandy Hook Elementary School expressing condolences and mentioning how this community has been working toward healthy changes. After every school shooting, the face of the south-metro area reflects the grief it now shares with more and

more communities. Littleton Public Schools Superintendent Scott Murphy felt compelled to send a letter home with students. “There are no words to express our sadness and our sympathies to those impacted,” writes Murphy. “There is nothing more important to us than your child’s safety.” All LPS schools have been on heightened alert since last Friday, he said, and security personnel are making extra patrols. More information about school safety and resources for talking to children about tragic events are available

Western: Dancing horses are scheduled to appear Western continues from Page 1

can Rodeo Extravaganzas, three Professional Bull Riders events, two Wild West shows, the Grand Prix horse jumping show, two SuperDogs shows, two performances of An Evening of Dancing Horses and the Martin Luther King Jr. African-American Heritage Rodeo. There are also 23 rodeo performances during the first stop of the year for members of the Professional Rodeo Cowboys Association. At the other end of the National Western com-

plex, the Events Center will be equally busy as the site of shows and competitions as well as activities that include the Grand Prix jumping event, an evening of dancing horses and a daily schedule of riding and performance competitions. The Equestrian Center is also the site of the Wild West Show, an event fashioned after the turn-of-the-century performances produced by Buffalo Bill Cody. For information on the full schedule of events, ticket prices and directions to the facilities, visit www. nationalwestern.com

on the LPS website, www.littletonpublicschools.net. “Please know that our protocols are some of the very best in the nation, but there is always more that could be done,” said Murphy. “These conversations are currently taking place.” City officials, too, have acknowledged the tragedy, posting tips for helping kids feel safe at www.littletongov.org. “The magnitude of death and destruction in traumatic events require special attention and communication with children,” it says. Additionally, in the wake of its theater tragedy, the city of Aurora launched a self-help trauma-recovery website at www.aurorastrong.bluesunsupport.com. “One of the many things we have learned about trauma recovery since July 20 is the extent to which additional events — whether another tragic event such as last Friday’s shooting at Sandy Hook Elementary, or simply the stress of the holiday season — can trigger retraumatization,” said Karen Morales, spokesperson for the 7/20 Recovery Committee. “This site will help people make sense of what they are feeling and empower them to take positive steps toward managing their own recovery.” And in what seems an unimaginable necessity, Arapahoe County Sheriff Grayson Robinson shared steps to take when faced with an active shooter. First among them is, “Quickly determine the most reasonable way to protect your own life.” Murphy encourages the community to keep working together to help ensure LPS children stay out of harm’s way. “The vigilance of our parents, students, staff and neighbors is the very best safety measure there is,” he said.

widespread in Colorado Associated Press

Colorado health officials are reporting nearly twice as many outbreaks of a gastrointestinal illness as normal for this time of year. Alicia Cronquist of the Department of Public Health and Environment said that 54 outbreaks of norovirus have been reported since Nov. 1. The average for the previous five years was 33 outbreaks in November and December. An outbreak is defined as a group of people in the same school, nursing home or other facility who contract an illness. The state doesn’t track individual cases of norovirus. Norovirus symptoms include nausea, vomiting, diarrhea and stomach cramping. People can contract the virus by direct contact with an ill person, eating food prepared by an ill person or touching touching a contaminated surface and then placing their hands in their mouths.

It’s Time ! to B uy That Boat

Deputy: Neighbors pull together to help Deputy continues from Page 1

Heap was treated for smoke inhalation. “This is a story of a neighborhood pulling together,” said Markham. “This particular cul-de-sac has seen a couple of fires in recent years, and everyone just pulled together to help, so there’s lots of folks to share in the red cape in this case.” McKnight told local television stations she was grateful for the deputy’s quick thinking. “Everybody just pulled

together to help,” said Heap. “There was even a UPS driver, who went around knocking on doors to make sure everyone made it to safety. There were just too many coincidences — it was truly God at work.” Heap is the brother of Elbert County Sheriff Shayne Heap. Markham estimates damage from the fire at $174,000. The cause of the fire is believed to be accidental, originating from several electrical components in the garage.

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8 Elbert County News January 3, 2013

8LIFECOLOR

South MetroLIFE Fiddler set to entertain Katie Glassman of Denver will sing and play her fiddle in styles ranging from Western swing to vintage jazz and bluegrass at 7:30 p.m. Jan. 11 at Englewood’s Hampden Hall, part of a new Friday night concert series called “Starlight Rhythms.” The series hopes to draw a somewhat younger audience for folk, blues and jazz and is presented in a cabaret style in Hampden Hall. Glassman’s original music is recorded on her recent release, “Snapshot.” Hampden Hall is at 1000 Englewood Parkway in the Englewood Civic Center. Tickets: at the door or 303-860-8196. Englewoodarts.org.

Learn about herbs

“Hold Steady” by Jill Soukup is the 2013 featured artwork of the Coors Western Art Exhibit and Sale. Courtesy image

A Western treasure Stock show art sale begins with reception

“RETHINKING WESTERN” Gallery 1261 at 1261 Delaware St. hosts a related exhibit, “Rethinking Western,” from Jan. 11 to Feb. 23. The gallery features contemporary realist artists, including Jill Soukup, Coors Western’s featured artist. She once studied architecture and transfers her interest in textures of animals to paintings of buildings. Other artists include Gordon Brown, Mark Daily, Floyd Dewitt, Ulrich Gleiter, Quang Ho, Michael Lynch (who in years past had a Main Street Littleton gallery), Mike Malm, Jim Morgan, Grant Redden, Matt Smith and Michael Workman. These artists provide a relief from overdone romanticism in art about the West. Opening reception: 5-8 p.m. Jan. 11. Gallery hours: 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. Tuesdays through Saturdays. 303-571-1261.

By Sonya Ellingboe

sellingboe@ourcoloradonews.com Beginning in 1993, with support from Coors Brewing Co., in particular the late Swede Johnson, the Coors Western Art Exhibit and Sale has become a feature at Denver’s 107-year-old National Western Stock Show. It celebrates Western heritage in new ways each year. Mary Belle Grant, who lived on Littleton’s Grant Ranch before it was a subdivision, was also instrumental in creating this strong show. A Mary Belle Grant Award has been given in her name each year to a person who embodies the Western way of life and symbolizes the passion for the West through art. Prominent artists from across the nation submit entries and a number are chosen for the exhibit, which opens with a Red Carpet Reception

Lakewood artist Jill Soukup is the 2013 featured artist of the Coors exhibit at the National Western Stock Show in Denver. Courtesy photo ($200, by reservation) on Jan. 8. Collectors will purchase many of the works on that night, then the sale will open to the public during stock show hours Jan. 12 through 27, exhibiting today’s visions of the West. Works tend to exhibit the most skilled techniques in painting, drawing and sculpture and are primarily, though not entirely, representational. Painter Jill Soukup, who recently was the juror for Lone

Tree’s annual art show, is honored as the 2013 featured artist of the Coors Western show. Her painting, “Hold Steady,” is reproduced on a poster available for sale at the show, and the original will become part of the permanent collection. It shows a close-up of a horse and rider at attention. The horse’s neck is arched and the cowboy’s body, shown from the waist down, is tense and in command. Soukup, who exhibits her work locally and nationally, moved to Colorado as a child and soon developed an affinity for horses, creating drawings first, then paintings. She graduated from Colorado State University with a bachelor’s of fine arts and worked in graphic de-

sign for 11 years before becoming a full-time painter. Denver’s popular stock show will attract over half a million visitors in its 16-day run, featuring rodeos, a trade show with 900 vendors, exhibits of about 15,000 animals ranging from pampered rabbits and chickens shown by proud 4-H owners to huge championship bulls, and more. It will honor a Citizen of the West and award 74 scholarships to CSU, University of Wyoming and many other schools to young participants. In addition to agricultural professionals, young doctors and nurses who will go into rural practices are supported. For information: nationalwestern.com/coorswestern-art.

“Growing Herbs” will be master gardener Therese Revitte’s topic when she speaks to the Littleton Garden Club at 6:30 p.m. on Jan. 9. (Note that this is the second Wednesday instead of the usual first Wednesday.) Learn about growing culinary herbs and ways to preserve them. The longtime Littleton club meets at the lunchroom at the Educational Services Building, 5776 S. Crocker St., Littleton. Guests and new members are welcome. Social time is at 6 p.m.

Genealogy get-togethers

The Columbine Genealogical and Historical Society announced January meetings: 1 p.m. Jan. 8 — “Blogging: Telling the Story Behind Your Research” with Jen Baldwin, owner of Ancestral Journeys and genealogy blogger. 1 p.m. Jan. 15 —Program by Dave Hensley, owner of Scangaroo, a mobile photo scanning company. The group meets on the second Tuesday of each month, except summer and December, at the Lutheran Church of the Holy Spirit, 6400 S. University Blvd., Centennial. Genealogy workshop programs are on the third Tuesday. For information: C. J. Backus, 303355-0731.

Tenor time

Lyric tenor Jonathan Hodel will perform the Franz Schubert masterwork “Der Winterreise” at 2 p.m. Jan. 6 at Holy Cross Lutheran Church, 9770 Foothills Canyon Blvd., Highlands Ranch. Also on the free program: arias of J.S. Bach. 303-683-1300.

Classics at Lone Tree

“Giants of Classicism” will be featured in a program at 8 p.m. Jan. 11 at Lone Tree Arts Center, 10075 Commons St., Lone Tree. The Colorado Symphony Orchestra will perform Mozart’s well-known “Symphony No. 40” as well as works by Haydn and Bach. Tickets: 720-509-1010, lonetreeartscenter.org.

Visit Pompeii

Study: Spending time in nature helps creativity

Extended hours are announced for the Denver Museum of Nature & Science’s exhibit, “A Day in Pompeii,” which runs until Jan. 13. The exhibit will be open until 7 p.m. each day except Jan. 10, with the last timed ticket issued at 5:30 p.m. The DMNS is at 2001 Colorado Blvd., Denver. Information: Dmns.org/Pompeii.

Associated Press

At the SSPR galleries

If you’re looking to spark your creativity, leave your smartphone, laptop and tablet at home and go for a hike. That’s the finding of a recent study by psychologists at the University of Utah and University of Kansas. The study of 56 people found that backpackers scored 50 percent better on a creativity test after being in nature for four days, disconnected from electronic devices. The results may seem obvious, but study co-author David Strayer of the University of

Utah said the study is important because it proves that interacting with nature has measurable benefits. The study focused on 56 people who went on four- or six-day hiking trips with the Outward Bound expedition school in Alaska, Maine, Colorado and Washington. The participants, who averaged 28 years old, were not allowed to bring electronic devices. Their scores in the creativity test were higher after they spent time in the wilderness. The study proves that the effect of being in front of a computer all day, every day can

be offset a bit by spending time in nature, researchers said. The study’s participants were about evenly divided between men and women. Earlier studies have shown that children spend only 15 to 25 minutes outdoors daily and that outdoor recreation has declined over the past 30 years. People ages 8 to 18 spent more than 7.5 hours daily watching TV or using cellphones or computers. Researchers say this study was unique in that it tested people in nature after prolonged periods outdoors rather than testing them in a lab after a short time in nature.

Sue Shehan’s exhibit, “The Journey,” includes paintings in pastels. They are at the Goodson Recreation Center, 6315 S. University Blvd., Centennial, through Jan. 30. Daffy and Al Knoblock’s underwater photography, “Below the H2O,” and glass exhibit are at the Lone Tree Recreation Center, 10249 Ridgegate Circle, Lone Tree, through Jan. 30. The Paint Box Guild is displaying “Artists of Littleton” at the Douglas H. Buck Recreation Center, 2004 W. Powers Ave., Littleton through Jan. 30.


9

January 3, 2013

Kirkland looks at design, Colorado art Reception introduces two new exhibits

Crafts style and served as a meeting place for museum organizers until 1922. In 1929, artist Vance Kirkland founded the Chappell School of Art at the University of Denver, housed at Chappell House, 1300 Logan (razed in 1970), which was also used by the start-up Denver Art Museum. In 1932, Kirkland leased Read’s Pearl Street property, which he later purchased. He parted company with the University of Denver, because it wasn’t granting full credit to his students, and opened the Kirkland School of Art. It was also his working studio until he died in 1981. (He returned to DU in 1946, with many students in tow, directing an on-campus School of Art.) Before Kirkland died, he willed his property to current director Hugh Grant, who started a nonprofit foundation and added nearly 11,000 square feet of space in a compatible design to house Kirkland’s already extensive collection of decorative art, Kirkland’s paintings and a start on the works of Colorado artists — a collection Grant increases today. The collection does not illustrate any particular style, but is sought out based on artists who were born here, who worked here and whose style ranges from representational to abstract. The cumulative result is a colorful, richly furnished museum, unlike any other in the area. It also retains Kirkland’s original studio with tools, table and the unique sling he devised to suspend himself above his large canvases while at work. It’s a “don’t miss” for art lovers.

By Sonya Ellingboe

sellingboe@ourcoloradonews.com With an opening reception on Jan. 10, the Kirkland Museum introduces a pair of new exhibits: “New Explorations in International Design” and “Colorado Art Survey VIII.” Both will contain new pieces that haven’t been exhibited before, plus items IF YOU GO from the museum’s The Kirkland Museum of deep collection. Fine and Decorative Art is This small gem located at 1311 Pearl St., of a museum has an Denver. Hours: 11 a.m. to extraordinary collec5 p.m. Tuesdays through tion, started by Vance Sundays. Admission: $7. Kirkland, of internaThere is a small parking tional decorative art lot across the street to the from the last quarter south plus available street of the 19th century parking. Because of the through the 20th fragile nature of the colleccentury. tion, children under 13 are Thousands of not admitted. Kirklandmutreasures are exhibseum.org. 303-832-8576. ited in a salon style — vignettes of related furniture, accessories and art pieces, rotated with some regularity. Major new acquisitions from 1875 to 2000 will be exhibited in those salon settings, representing eight (out of eleven) decorative art movements: Arts and Crafts, Art Nouveau, Glasgow Style, Wiener Werk-

Castle Rock

The Kirkland Museum Modern room vignette features designer furniture from the collection and paintings by Colorado artists. Courtesy photo statte, De Stijl, Art Deco, Modern and PostModern. The “Colorado Art Survey VIII” continues to showcase a selection of works by Colorado’s important artists dating from 1875 to 1980 — drawn from the collection of 4,870 works by 505 artists — a collection director Hugh Grant continues to build.

Greenwood Village

Highlands Ranch

The Kirkland Museum, which is a member of the Historic Artists’ Homes and Studios program of the National Trust for Historic Preservation, began when Henry Read built it at 1311 Pearl St. in 1910. Read, who had a teaching studio there, was one of the originators of the Denver Art Museum. The building was built in Arts and

Highlands Ranch

Abiding Word Lutheran Church Open hearts. Open minds. Open doors.

Open and Welcoming

Sunday Worship 8:00 am Chapel Service 9:00 & 10:30 am

Little Blessings Day Care www.littleblessingspdo.com

CENTER FOR SPIRITUAL LIVING Affiliated with United Church of Religious Science

Sunday Services 10 a.m.

Castle Rock Recreation Center 2301 Woodlands Blvd, Castle Rock www.OurCenterforSpiritualLiving.org 720-851-0265

Sunday School 9:00 & 10:30 am

Sunday Worship 8:30 am |10:45 am Adult and youth education 9:40 am

Sunday Worship 10:30 4825 North Crowfoot Valley Rd. Castle Rock • canyonscc.org 303-663-5751 CHRISTMAS AT CANYON’S December 9th 6:30pm Christmas Eve Service 6:30pm

  

“The earth is but one country, and mankind its citizens.”

 children’s classes, devotions and study Weekly ColoradoBahais.org • 303 947 7540



  

Franktown

Trinity Lutheran Church & School

303-794-2683 Preschool: 303-794-0510 9203 S. University Blvd. Highlands Ranch, 80126

Worship Services Sundays at 9:00am

303-791-3315

pastor@awlc.org www.awlc.org

Littleton

First Presbyterian Church of Littleton

Sunday Worship: 10:45AM & 6PM Bible Study: 9:30AM Children, Young People & Adults 4391 E Mainstreet, Parker, Colorado 80134 Church Office – (303) 841-3836

www.parkerbiblechurch.org

You are invited to worship with us:

8:30 a.m. 11:00 a.m.

1609 W. Littleton Blvd. (303) 798-1389 • www.fpcl.org

303-798-8485

Horizon Community Church

A Christian Reformed Ministry

Sunday Worship 10am 2121 E. Dad Clark Drive Highlands Ranch, 80126

Trinity Lutheran School & ELC (Ages 3-5, Grades K-8)

www.horizoncommunity.org

303-791-2143

www.SpiritofHopeLCMC.org

at the Parker Mainstreet Center

Visit our website for details of classes & upcoming events.

303.805.9890

www.P a r k er C C R S.org P.O. Box 2945—Parker CO 80134-2945

Looking For  a  N  ew  Beginning  ?    

Join Us   A  Friendly   Place  to   Worship  

New Beginning Community Church

10550 S.  Progress  Way  &  Longs  Way   Parker,  CO  80134    

Sunday School  for  All  Ages     Coffee  and  Fellowship     Praise  and  Worship  Service     Wed  Evening  Youth  Fellowship  

Lone Tree

5755 Valley Hi Drive Parker, CO 303-941-0668

Sunday services held in the historic Ruth Memorial Chapel

Sundays at 9:00 & 10:45 am Grace is on the NE Corner of Santa Fe Dr. & Highlands Ranch Pkwy. (Across from Murdochs)

Fellowship & Worship: 9:00 am Sunday School: 10:45 am

Parker

...19650 E. Mainstreet, Parker 80138

Sunday

Pastor David Fisher

Community Church of Religious Science

& Children’s Church 10:00 a.m.

Sunday Worship 8:00 & 10:45 a.m.

 303-841-4660 www.tlcas.org 

(Next to RTD lot @470 & University)

Parker

Where people are excited about God’s Word.

Sunday Service

www.gracecolorado.com

9300 E. Belleview Ave. Greenwood Village, CO 80111 303.770.9300

8391 S. Burnley Ct., Highlands Ranch

Parker

New Thought...Ancient Wisdom

Alongside One Another On Life’s Journey

The Bahá’í Faith



www.st-andrew-umc.com

GRACE PRESBYTERIAN

An Evangelical Presbyterian Church



Elbert County News 9

 9:00AM   10:00AM   10:30AM      7:00PM  

Joy LUTHERAN CHURCH, ELCA

SERVICES:

SATURDAY 5:30pm

SUNDAY 8:00 & 10:3Oam

EDUCATION Sunday 9:15am

Joyful Mission Preschool 303-841-3770 7051 East Parker Hills Ct. • Parker, CO 303-841-3739 www.joylutheran-parker.org

Parker evangelical Presbyterian church Connect – Grow – Serve – Love

New Sunday Worship Services

8:45 am & 10:30 am 9030 MILLER ROAD PARKER, CO 80138 3038412125 www.pepc.org Orthodox Mission Church 11550 Club Dr Parker Co Divine Liturgy December 9, 9:30am Luncheon after services More info call: Don: 720-851-5212 Mark: 720-870-5210


10 Elbert County News January 3, 2013

10SPORTSB&W

Elbert CountySPORTS

12 Colorado Community Media All-Star Teams All-Stars McCaffrey amazed all year Valor Christian junior was dominant presence By Daniel P. Johnson

djohnson@ourcoloradonews. com Statistics don’t always tell the complete story. Take Valor Christian’s Christian McCaffrey as a prime example of that. The junior running back gained 1,390 rushing yards in the 2012 season. Great numbers, for sure, but there were other running backs in the state that accumulated more. Now, when you begin to factor in the fact that McCaffrey, in addition to his rushing prowess, led his team in receptions (55), receiving yards (675), punt return yards (261) and scored a total of 43 touchdowns, the picture of McCaffrey’s dominance on the gridiron becomes clearer. The junior was recently named Colorado Community Media’s 2012 Offensive Player of the Year for his performance in the 2012 season. “On defense, we just had no answer for No. 5,” Arapahoe coach Mike Campbell said of McCaffrey after his 295 rushing yards, 108 re-

ceiving yards and six-touchdown performance against the Warriors in a 48-31 state quarterfinal victory. “That guy is awesome.” McCaffrey did some of his best work in the postseason, highlighted by a two-week stretch over the quarterfinal and semifinal rounds, where he would score a total of 11 touchdowns. In the first-ever Valor ChristianThunderRidge contest, which was played in the 5A semifinals at a raucous Shea Stadium, McCaffrey scored five touchdowns as the Eagles rolled the Grizzlies, 49-3. “He’s really special. I wish I could say it’s all coaching,” Valor Christian coach Brent Vieselmeyer said. “You just look at the things he does; he scored on a punt return, he runs back kickoffs, plays defense and throws passes. You name it, he can really do it. That’s what makes him really special. He’s an outstanding receiver when he needs to be. “From a defensive perspective, you’re asking ... what are they going to do with him now? I’m just really proud of him, and he’s the kind of kid to be honest with you, we have to slow him down because that’s how he practices and does everything in his life, and that’s why he’s such a great kid.” McCaffrey, while he didn’t have his best statistical game in the Class 5A state title contest against

Cherokee Trail (he still gained over 100 yards rushing), was able to affect the game’s outcome simply by being on the field. With Cherokee Trail refusing to punt the ball in his direction, McCaffrey’s presence helped give the Eagles prime field position early in the fourth quarter of what was a scoreless game at the time. McCaffrey finished off what turned out to be the game-winning drive with a 1-yard touchdown run, as the Eagles won their first-ever 5A state championship, and fourthstraight overall, 9-3 over the Cougars. “We knew Cherokee Trail was an amazing football team and that they were going to make some plays,” said McCaffrey, who made up for his two lost fumbles with the touchdown run. He finished the game with 114 rushing yards and 52 receiving yards. “We played extremely sloppy, especially on my part, so I apologize to the team for that. But, a win’s a win and we’re going to take it and soak it in and really enjoy this one.” McCaffrey’s wide array of talent is best summed up by teammate and quarterback, Luke Del Rio, who recently announced he would be walking on at the University of Alabama. “Christian is amazing,” said Del Rio, who completed 70 percent of his passes and threw for 2,275

Christian McCaffrey runs the ball Dec. 1. McCaffrey scored Valor’s lone touchdown in the state final game. Photo by Paul DiSalvo |PaulDiSalvoPhotography.com yards with 28 touchdowns and four interceptions. “Every time he

touches the ball he has the ability to score.”

Ralston Valley’s Svejcar dubbed CCM Defensive Player of Year The jack-of-all trades may trade in pads for hardwood ... or glove By Daniel Williams

dwilliams@ourcoloradonews.com ARVADA - You ever know one of those guys that are just really good at anything he tries? If you don’t, there is one in Arvada who goes by the name of Spencer Svejcar. The Ralston Valley senior is currently the leader of Mustangs varsity basketball team, but his extraordinary efforts on the football field earned him Colorado Community Media’s 2012 Defensive Player of the Year Award, announced this week. “It’s awesome and a great honor but we had a great defense and I was just a part of that. It’s easy to make plays when you play with a bunch of real talented guys,” Svejcar said. Svejcar, a 6-foot-3, 185-pound safety/

receiver/running back/return man, was a three-way leader for Ralston Valley who fell just one win shy of a meeting with Valor Christian in the 5A state championship. Although he shined as numerous positions on the football field, he was the best safety in 5A football intercepting five balls and accumulating 108 tackles. “He’s just a great football player, a great athlete,” Ralston Valley coach Matt Loyd said. “He was not only one of our most talented guys but one our hardest workers.” And while some teenager’s biggest choices are Taco Bell or McDonalds, or which mall they will go to, Svejcar has to decide which sport he is going to play in college. Svejcar initially thought he would play basketball in college but his tremendous season as a safety put him on the radar of multiple college football programs, both D-I and D-II. He also has the option to play baseball in college as a shortstop. “It’s 50-50 if I’ll play football or basketball (in college). I talked to New Mexico (recently) and I am just trying to be patient

Ralston Valley senior running back Spencer Svejcar runs up field in this year’s semifinal against Cherokee Trail. Photo by Andy Carpenean and make the right decision,” Svejcar said. Whatever decision Svejcar makes, where

it’s to play safety, guard, shortstop, or Taco Bell, he is sure to get it right.

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11COLOR

January 3, 2013

Elbert County News 11

Colorado Community Media All-Star Football Team 2012 sports@ourcoloradonews. com

FIRST TEAM OFFENSE

QB Luke Del Rio, Valor Christian, Sr. 2,275 yards passing, 28 touchdowns, 4 interceptions RB Christian McCaffrey, Valor Christian, Jr. 1,390 yards rushing, 675 yards receiving, 37 touchdowns, 8.91 yards per carry RB Keynan Huguley, Thornton, Sr. 2,161 yards rushing, 30 total touchdowns, 501 yards rushing in single game FB Jake Hand, ThunderRidge, Sr. 1,002 yards rushing, 472 yards receiving, 17 touchdowns WR Connor Skelton, D’Evelyn, Sr. 1,254 yards receiving, 14 touchdowns, 572 kick return yards WR Mitch Colin, Pomona, Sr. 946 yards receiving, 8 touchdowns WR Brandon Malone, Chaparral, Jr. 724 yards receiving, 10 touchdowns TE Mitch Parsons, Chaparral, Sr. 754 yards receiving, 7 touchdowns TE Ethan Brunhofer, Arapahoe, Jr. 750 yards receiving, 9 touchdowns OL Daniel Skipper, bilityRalston Valley, Sr. Dominating force, headed to University of Tennessee OL Blake Nowland, Douglas County, Sr. Committed to Colorado State

FIRST TEAM DEFENSE DE Austin Balbin, D’Evelyn, Sr. 82 tackles, 55 solo, 12 sacks DE John Adam, ThunderRidge, Jr. 36 tackles, 9 sacks DL Skylar McWee, Legacy, Sr. 48 tackles, 7 sacks DL Zack Anderson, Pomona, Sr. 48 tackles, 9 sacks LB Derek Landis, Lakewood, Sr. 193 tackles, 2 fumble recoveries, 2 interceptions LB Justin Falls, Valor Christian, Jr. 100 tackles, 43 solo, 3 fumble recoveries, 2 interceptions LB Carlos Aviles, Valor Christian, Sr. 3 forced fumbles, 2 fumble recoveries, 5 pass defenses LB Justin Escue, Arapahoe, Sr. 64 tackles, 5 sacks DB Spencer Svejcar, Ralston Valley, Sr.

108 tackles, 79 solo, 5 interceptions DB Will Halligan, Pomona, Sr. 51 tackles, 5 interceptions DB Dustin Rivas, Horizon, Sr. 41 tackles, 6 interceptions, 7 pass defenses DB Preston DeHerrera, Mountain Range, Sr. 90 tackles, Front Range defensive player of the year K Daniel Carlson, The Classical Academy, Sr. 54 touchbacks, 10 field goals, 35 PATs, named to All-American Bowl P Brendan McGowan, Castle View, Sr. 42 yard average, 6 inside 20 yard line Offensive Player of the Year: Christian McCaffrey, Valor Christian Defensive Player of the Year: Spencer Svejcar, Ralston Valley Coach of the Year: Brent Vieselmeyer, Valor Christian

SECOND TEAM Offense

QB Jacob Knipp, Ralston Valley RB Jaden Franklin, Kent Denver RB Corry Williams, Ponderosa FB Daryl Hawkins, Valor Christian WR Taylor Vaughn, Arvada WR Hunter Burton, Cherry Creek WR Eddie Franco, Northglenn TE Joshua Clausen, Lutheran OL Tyler Andrejewski, Cherry Creek OL Daniel Kubistek, Holy Family OL Leuluai Io, Valor Christian OL Anthony Ochiato, Standley Lake OL Kevin Clark, Chaparral KR Tanner Townsend, Castle View

For the complete list of Colorado Community Media’s All-Star teams, go to ourcoloradonews.com or visit our Facebook page, CCM Sports.

Tell Your Story!

WESTMINSTER

Michele Apodaca • 303.566.4073 mapodaca@ourcoloradonews.com

CASTLE ROCK, DOUGLAS COUNTY Jennie Herbert • 303.566.4092 jherbert@ourcoloradonews.com

GOLDEN, LAKEWOOD

Janice Holmes • 303.566.4119 jholmes@ourcoloradonews.com

NORTHGLENN, THORNTON, FEDERAL HEIGHTS Linda Nuccio • 303.566.4152 lnuccio@ourcoloradonews.com

CENTENNIAL, ENGLEWOOD, LITTLETON

Mark Hill • 303.566.4124 mhill@ourcoloradonews.com

HIGHLANDS RANCH, LONE TREE Jim Boucher • 303.566.4078 jboucher@ourcoloradonews.com

Notice to Creditors PUBLIC NOTICE

Theodore Leroy Berens A/K/A Theodore L. Berens, Deceased Case Number: 2012PR41 All persons having claims against the above-named estate are required to present them to the Personal Representative or to the District Court of Elbert County, Colorado on or before May 3, 2013 or the claims may be forever barred. Linda S. Peters Personal Representative 2861 North Velarde Dr. Thousand Oaks, CA 91360 (805) 492-1484

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Concrete/Paving

Legal Notice No: 927863 First Publication: January 3, 2013 Last Publication: January 17, 2013 Publisher: Elbert County News

Government Legals Public Notice NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING Notice is hereby given that on Thursday, January 10, 2013, at 7:00 P.M., or as soon as possible thereafter, the Elbert County Planning Commission will conduct a public hearing in the Exhibit Hall at the Elbert County Fairgrounds in Kiowa, Colorado, and on Wednesday, January 23, 2013, at 9:00 A.M., or as soon as possible thereafter, the Board of County Commissioners will conduct a public hearing in the Exhibit Hall at the Elbert County Fairgrounds in Kiowa, Colorado, or at such other time and place as these hearings may be adjourned, for a proposed amendment to the Elbert County Zoning Regulations, a proposed new Section 26, Oil and/or Gas Operations – Special Use Permit, with the “Definitions” becoming Section 27, and a proposed Memorandum of Understanding for oil and/or gas facilities in Elbert County, on file with the Elbert County Community and Development Services Office, 215 Comanche Street, Kiowa, Colorado 80117, telephone: 303.621.3141. Legal Notice No.: 927852 First Publication: December 20, 2012 Last Publication: January 17, 2013 Publisher: The Elbert County News PUBLIC NOTICE

N ew Y ear

PARKER, DOUGLAS COUNTY, ELBERT COUNTY

Erin Addenbrooke • 303.566.4074 eaddenbrooke@ourcoloradonews.com

Ray, ThunderRidge; Peyton Remy, Legend; Easton Robbins, Horizon; Ryan Rubley, Mountain Vista; Alec Ruth, Valor Christian; Jantzen Ryals, The Classical Academy; Tommy Saager, Arapahoe; Paris Salas, Golden; Jack Sale, Pomona; Mitch Schafer, Green Mountain; David Sommers, Holy Family; Austin Sonju, Littleton; Jackson Spalding, Discovery Canyon; Taven Sparks, Arapahoe; Garret Swartzendruber, Green Mountain; David Sweat, Green Mountain; Steven Sumey, Horizon; Deion Trejo, Wheat Ridge; Joey Trese, The Classical Academy; Lucas Videtich, Standley Lake; Kaleb Whiting, Arvada West; Eric Williams, Rock Canyon; Tahj Willingham, Cherry Creek; Jon Wilson, Heritage; Alec Wirtjes, Discovery Canyon; John Wood, ThunderRidge; Roman Yancey, Chaparral; Steven Yoshihara, Legacy.

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Michelle Patrick • 303.566.4126 mpatrick@ourcoloradonews.com

tain Range; Nate Conner, Lewis-Palmer; Chris Cruz, Castle View; Marcus Culhane, Arvada West; Damasjae Currington, Englewood; Jarred DeHerrera, Holy Family; Spencer Elliott, Horizon; Matthew Evans, Arvada West; Nick Evdos, Legend; Tommy Fitsimmons, D’Evelyn; Danny Flanagan, Bear Creek; Caelan Garner, Woodland Park; Bobby Glandon, Lutheran; Greg Gonzales, Horizon; Sean Grundman, Lewis-Palmer; Trevon Hamlet, Kent Denver; Drew Hebel, Legacy; Dan Hollar, Ralston Valley; Paul Holden, Littleton; Isaiah Holland, Valor Christian; Ryan Hommel, Rock Canyon; Mark Hopper, ThunderRidge; Trey Jarvis, Standley Lake; Devyn Johnston, Standley Lake; Jordan Jones, Wheat Ridge; Jalen Kittrell, Highhlands Ranch; Taylor Knestis, Lakewood; Sam Kozan, Valor Christian; Tyler Kubasta, Wheat Ridge; Max Kuhns, Chaparral; Damian Lockhart, Pomona; Adrian Mack, Discovery Canyon; Chris Marquez, Pomona; Cody Marvel, D’Evelyn; John Martinez, Arvada; Sione Maumau, Valor Christian; Mitch McCall, Legacy; Alex McClure, Lutheran; Justin Miller, The Classical Academy; Aaron Montoya, Legacy; Keenan Oby, Lewis-Palmer; Jack Palmer, Discovery Canyon; Rocco Palumbo, Mountain Vista; Phydell Paris, Legacy; Greg Pearson, Englewood; Matt Pettyjohn, Kent Denver; Connor Pierson, Pomona; Hunter Price, Ralston Valley; Steve

NOTICE TO CREDITORS In the Matter of the Estate of

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LAKEWOOD, WHEAT RIDGE

Jordan Anderson, Ralston Valley; Tyler Andrejewski, Cherry Creek; Michael Babb, Arapahoe; Michael Barela, Golden; Travis Baum, Legacy; Chandler Bibo, Chaparral; Austin Beane, Rock Canyon; Luke Behrends, Legend; Jake Bennett, Bear Creek; Andrew Bergner, Legend; Michael Beiswenger, Discovery Canyon; Joe Bozeman, Regis Jesuit; Antonio Broadus, Regis Jesuit; Andrew Brown, Lewis-Palmer; Jakob Buys, Ralston Valley; Jose Cancanon, Arapahoe; Thomas Caracena, The Classical Academy; Kyle Carpenter, Ralston Valley; Elijah Cherrington, Legend; Riley Collins, Lakewood; Tom Commander, Moun-

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Michelle Johnston • 303.566.4125 mjohnston@ourcoloradonews.com

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ARVADA

DL/DE Gunnar Campbell, Horizon DL/DE Dylan Cassagnol, Cherry Creek DL/DE Brian Boatman, Kent Denver DL/DE Zayne Anderson, Pomona LB Colton Fries, Legend LB Cameron Gray, Valor Christian LB Chantz Tanner, Kent Denver LB Jake Bublitz, Legacy DB Ryan Belearde, Westminster DB Drew Stephon, Ponderosa DB Thomas Trotman, Arapahoe DB Connor Durant, Standley Lake P Connor Orgill, Legend K Sawyer Edwards, Chaparral

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Defense

Service Directory

Staff report

OL Connor Warren, Regis Jesuit, Sr. Unanimous selection to Continental all-conference team OL Chris Fox, Ponderosa, Sr. Arguably top college prospect in state, committed to Michigan OL Sam Jones, ThunderRidge, Jr. First-team All-Continental League KR Trey Smith, Douglas County, Jr. 19.6 yards per kick return, 40.5 yards per punt return, 2,200 yards of total offense ATHLETE Jordan Radebaugh, Northglenn, Sr. 2,720 yards passing, 366 yards rushing, 3,106 yards total offense, 35 touchdowns

Rentals

McCaffrey, Svejcar lead selections

NOTICE OF INTENT TO RELEASE FUNDS

Tile

Notice to all interested parties, groups, persons, and agencies that on January 9, 2013, the Elbert County Board of County Commissioners will make final payment to Schmidt Construction Company for the paving project on Kiowa Bennett. The Elbert County Board of County Commissioners will accept objections to such release of funds. Objections must be submitted in writing on or before January 7, 2013, and shall be submitted to Elbert County Road and Bridge Department, Attn: Lynne Eschbach, P.O. Box 116, Kiowa, Colorado, 80117. No objection received after January 13, 2013, will be considered by the Elbert County Board of County Commissioners. Legal Notice No.: 927859 First Publication: December 27, 2012 Last Publication: January 3, 2013 Publisher: The Elbert County News


12COLOR

12 Elbert County News

CURTAIN TIME

RFK revisited

“RFK — A Portrait of Robert Kennedy” by Jack Holmes plays Jan. 4-27 at Vintage Theatre, 1468 Dayton St., Aurora. James O’Hagen Murphy portrays RFK after the assassination of his brother, the president. What should his role be? What is his relationship to Lyndon Johnson? Performances: 7:30 p.m. Fridays and Saturdays; 2:30 p.m. Sundays. Tickets: $25 ($20 advance). 303-856-7830, vintagetheatre.com.

Heavenly boy group

“Forever Plaid” by Stewart Ross plays Jan. 11 to Feb 10 at Town Hall Arts Center,

2450 W. Main St., in downtown Littleton. Nick Sugar directs. Performances: 7:30 p.m. Thursdays, Fridays, Saturdays; 2 p.m. Sundays and Saturdays, Jan. 26; 6:30 p.m. Sundays, Jan. 27. Tickets: 303-794-2787, townhallartscenter.com.

Is it 1955?

“Maple and Vine” by Jordan Harrison plays Jan. 12 to Feb. 23 at Curious Theatre, 1080 Acoma St., Denver. Chip Walton directs a new play about a town where it is perpetually 1955. Performances: 8 p.m. Thursdays, Fridays, Saturdays; 2 p.m. Sundays. Tickets: $18-$44, curioustheatre.org.

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Contact your CCM Sales Representative to take part in this exciting advertising opportunity Highlands Ranch • Lone Tree Jim Boucher • 303-566-4078 jboucher@ourcoloradonews.com Castle Rock • Douglas County Jennie Herbert • 303-566-4092 jherbert@ourcoloradonews.com

Parker • Douglas County • Elbert County Ron (Mitch) Mitchell • 303-566-4075 rmitchell@ourcoloradonews.com

Centennial • Englewood • Littleton Michele Apodaca • 303-566-4073 mapodaca@ourcoloradonews.com

National Market Erin Addenbrooke • 303-566-4074 eaddenbrooke@ourcoloradonews.com

January 3, 2013

THINGS TO DO JAN. 10

html, or contact Dave Peontek at 303-646-5456.

BUSINESS AFTER hours. The Elizabeth Area Chamber of Commerce invites you to a Business After Hours from 5-7 p.m. Jan. 10 at Kat Eyes Optical in the Safeway shopping Center in Elizabeth. Come meet Kathy at the only eye specialist in Elbert County. Enjoy visiting a local business and meeting other area business people. Great networking tool. Refreshments provided by the local business.

THE ELIZABETH Food Bank, 381 S. Banner in Elizabeth (next door to Elizabeth Presbyterian Church) needs to let the public know that we are available to help anyone who needs food. The hours are Friday 12:30-3 p.m. and Saturdays from 9-11:30 a.m. Other times by appointment.

FEB. 14 FRONTIER FUNDRAISING. Frontier High School students will make reindeer and snowmen to sells at the EMS craft fair Nov. 17 and the local craft fair on Dec. 1. A spaghetti dinner, sponsored by students and staff, is planned for Feb. 14. Call the school at 303-646-1798 or email its director, Rob McMullen, at rmcmullen@esdk12.org to make a donation. Frontier High School is at 589 S. Banner St., Elizabeth. THE OUTBACK Express is a public transit service provided through the East Central Council of Local Governments is open and available to all residents of Cheyenne, Elbert, Kit Carson and Lincoln counties and provides an economical and efficient means of travel for the four-county region. Call Kay Campbell, Kiowa, at 719- 541-4275. You may also call the ECCOG office at 1-800-825-0208 to make reservations for any of the trips. You may also visit http://outbackexpress.tripod.com. SIMLA, MATHESON TO LIMON, DEC. 27 DIVORCE AND Post-Decree Clinic. Elbert and Lincoln County Pro Se Divorce Clinic is offered from 9 a.m. to noon the third Friday of each month at the Elbert County Justice Center, 751 Ute St., in Kiowa. For information, call 303-520-6088 or email morgan@hayday.org. The clinic is free for parties who have no attorney and who are going through dissolution of marriage, legal separation, or post-decree cases. All walk-ins are welcome, and will be assisted on a first-come, first-served basis. THE ELBERT County Sheriffs Posse is a nonprofit volunteer organization that is part of the Elbert County Sheriffs Office. As volunteers we support the Elbert County Sheriffs Office, all law enforcement in our county, and the community at large. Membership is open to anyone without a criminal record. It meets the last Monday of the month at the Elbert County Sheriffs Office at 7 p.m. For more information or a membership application, go to http://www.elbertcountysheriff.com/posse.

ELIZABETH GUITAR Group. Elizabeth guitar circle will meet on the first and second Wednesday of each month at the Elizabeth Library. Traditional protocol/courtesy. Country, pop, bluegrass, cowboy, Beatles, 50s, 60s, 70s, blues, jazz and more. We who play for pleasure would love to meet more of same. Acoustic or power down. Come prepared to share a few songs, perform, play along, sing along with others. Enjoy new guitar friends to jam with. Gerry Vinson hosts on the first Wednesday from 6:30-9 p.m., and Laurie Smith hosts on the second Wednesday from 6-9 p.m. Uncertain? Drop by and observe. Banjo, ukelele, mandolin welcome. Call Laurie at 720-3633531. LAWYERS AT the Library, a free legal clinic for parties who have no attorney, will be featured from 6-9 p.m. the third Tuesday of every other month in Elizabeth. Volunteer attorneys will answer questions, help fill out forms and explain the process and procedure for the areas of family law, civil litigation, criminal defense, property law, probate law, collections, appeals, landlord-tenant law and civil protection orders. Walk-ins are welcome. Everyone will be helped on a first-come, first-served basis. SATURDAY GENEALOGY Fun meets at the Elbert Public Library at 1 p.m. on the seocnd Saturday of each month. Beginning to advanced genealogy enthusiasts are invited to attend. The Elbert Public Library is in the Elbert School library at 24489 Main Street in Elbert. Call 303-648-3533 for more information. SENIORS MEET in Elizabeth every Monday at 11 a.m. for food, fun and fellowship at Elizabeth Senior Center, 823 S. Banner St. Bring a dish for potluck on the first Monday of each month. Other Mondays, bring a sack lunch. Bingo, games and socializing. New leadership. Call Agnes at 303-883-7881 or Carol at 303-646-3425 for information EDITOR’S NOTE: Calendar submissions must be received by noon Wednesday for publication the following week. Send information to calendar@ourcoloradonews.com, attn: Elbert County News. No attachments. Listings are free and run on a space-available basis.

HAVE AN EVENT? To submit a calendar listing, send information to calendar@ourcoloradonews.com or by fax to 303-566-4098.

Elbert County News 010313  

Elbert County News published by Colorado Community Media

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