Canyon Courier 041422

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The mountain area’s newspaper since 1958

est. 1958

WEEK OF APRIL 14, 2022

N VOLUME 63 ISSUE 23

NOW SERVING EVERGREEN, CONIFER, BAILEY AND PINE

75 CENTS

Morrison elects new mayor, trustees plus retail marijuana tax BY OLIVIA JEWELL LOVE OLOVE@COLORADOCOMMUNITYMEDIA.COM

Troy Peden of Evergreen took this photo of Ukrainian refugees while volunteering in the war-torn country.

COURTESY OF TROY PEDEN

‘While I’m on the phone, I hear the explosions, I hear the rockets, I hear the bombs’:

How the war is affecting Evergreen residents 2 Evergreen locals are providing aid for those in Ukraine BY OLIVIA JEWELL LOVE OLOVE@COLORADOCOMMUNITYMEDIA.COM

Scared to sleep, worried with every call, guilty with any comfort for herself. That’s the new normal for 32-year-old Ukrainian-born Karina Tsedik, who is forced to watch the horrors of war through her phone screen while her parents live amidst the turmoil. SEE UKRAINE, P4

Brother Georgiy Tsedik, left, father Mykhailk Tsedik, mother Natalia Tsedik and daughCOURTESY OF KARINA TSEDIK ter Karina Tsedik in Ukraine 2017.

Morrison residents voted Tuesday to elect a new mayor and four new Board of Trustees positions and to decide on ordinances pertaining to retail marijuana. Results supported a retail marijuana store east of the Dakota Hogback Formation, as well as a retail marijuana tax of 6.25%, which also allows the Board of Trustees to increase or decrease the tax rate without a vote as long as it does not exceed 11.25%. According to the unofficial results posted by the Town of Morrison, these two ballot questions both passed with large margins, indicating the public’s support for the retail marijuana business in town. Four positions were open on the six-person Board of Trustees in Morrison, plus the position of mayor. Paul Sutton, whose seat was up for reelection, was able to secure his spot on the board once again. He will serve three more years. “I will continue to serve the town as best I can….Keep development slow, promote wellbeing, keep Morrison a great place to live,” Sutton SEE ELECTION, P3

INSIDE THIS ISSUE Obits Coffee

2 Ukrainian eggs 11 Conifer baseball

5 Opinion 13 Dog park

8 Home show 14 Sheriff’s Calls

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2 Canyon Courier

April 14, 2022

OBITUARIES LEFLAR

TUCK

James (Jimmy) L. Leflar May 4, 1953 - April 5, 2022

James (Jimmy) L. Leflar, our beloved Papa, is now enjoying a heavenly welcome. He passed away peacefully on April 5, 2022 at the age of 68 with his loving family in his Englewood home. He loved his family very much and considered them his greatest accomplishment. Jim was retired from the Colorado Rockies Baseball Club, a job that he absolutely loved. We will miss his jokes, sarcastic humor, and his big bear hugs. Jim is survived by his wife, Jeannie, of 48 years; two sons, Steve (Misty) and David (Antonette); and five grandsons, MESSLER

Max, Ethan, Ryan, Jacob and Dylan. His surviving siblings are Susi Banchor (Jed), Ron Miller (Mary), Teresa Knight and Linda Leflar. Our family also has many nieces and nephews who will miss their Uncle Jimmy. His parents, James J. and Freda Leflar preceded him in death, as well as two brothers, Jerry Leflar and Rick Miller. Jimmy’s wishes were to have no services so we will be having private celebrations of his life in our hearts.

Robert Scott “Scott” Messler February 19, 1963 - March 28, 2022

Robert Scott Messler was born in Omaha, Nebraska to Robert and Marilyn Messler. He attended the local schools in Hastings and after graduation he studied at The University of Nebraska-Lincoln. Scott majored in music at UNL and became the drum line director for the Nebraska Cornhusker’s Marching Band. Scott was a gifted drummer and musician. His band, Open Space, brought the joy of music to Evergreen CO by playing at many local events and establishments. Scott produced the Evergreen Lake House Summer Concert Series for seven years. He also produced the sound for the annual Summer Fest. He volunteered for many community events such as Polar Plunge,

Special Olympics, and the Evergreen Symphony. He was always willing to lend a hand to anyone in need. He was the “Sound Guy” of Evergreen. Another passion of Scott’s was his love of sailing. He had a boat for several years on Y-Dock in Long Beach, CA. His infectious smile brought comfort to many. He is survived by his wife, Karen, his son, Jack, and daughter, Jordan. He is preceded in death by his father Robert, and survived by his mother, Marilyn Messler, brother, Curtis Messler, sister Kris Twitchell, her husband David, and nephew, Noah. Scott may no longer be with us but his music and passion will forever play in the hearts of those who loved him.

Shirlie Rae (Sampson) Tuck July 7, 1946 - March 28, 2022

It is with deep sorrow and much love that we mourn the passing of Shirlie H Tuck 75 of Naples Fla & Evergreen Colo. Her departure was on March 28th, 2022, after a valiant struggle with cancer. She was born July 7th, 1946, to Ray and Shirlie Sampson in Bellingham Wash.

As a nursing graduate of Long Beach City College in 1966 she focused on becoming a registered nurse. In 1972, Shirlie moved to Evergreen Colo. Continuing her career by acquiring a bachelor’s degree from Metro State College and a master’s degree from University of Colo. Shirlie’s hospice career spanned over 40 years with Mt. Evans Hospice, Hospice of Metro Denver then LUCKINBILL

retiring with Avow Hospice of Naples Fla. In 2011.She enjoyed life, family, and friends. Shirlie was always there to brighten the lives of others, lend a hand, offer a shoulder to lean on or be a compassionate listener and advisor.

A devoted wife, graceful mother and loving sister Shirlie is survived by her husband of 32 years Robert Tuck, brother Greg Sampson, son Nathan Houser as well as numerous extended family members. life so beautifully lived deserves to be beautifully remembered. She will be deeply missed. The family welcomes donations to Mt Evans Hospice mtevans.org as an expression of sympathy in lieu of flowers.

Willard Ray “Lucky” Luckinbill October 6, 1938 - March 27, 2022

Willard “Lucky” Ray Luckinbill died peacefully in his home on March 27, 2022 at the age of 83. Lucky is survived by his daughter and grandchildren. He was a true cowboy who would help anyone in need. He was kind, compassionate, patriotic and tough. He was part of a generation of men who embodied resiliency during hard times and always provided for his family. Lucky loved the mountains and refused to live anywhere else. He and his family lived in Bailey for 50 years and he also was in the area as a child. He had a lot of knowledge and loved to talk

about the history of the area. Lucky was an Army veteran who served for 8 years and was a mechanic and truck driver by trade. Lucky could build anything from nothing and missed doing these things most at the end of his life. Lucky always found a way to accept what life brought and was a dignified man through it all. He would come to the aid of neighbors and friends whenever asked and was never a man to complain. He will be greatly missed. Lucky requested no services.

Memory In Loving

Place an Obituary for Your Loved One. 303-566-4100 obituaries@coloradocommunitymedia.com Self placement available online at CanyonCourier.com


Canyon Courier 3

April 14, 2022

Morrison Town Hall was the polling place for the April 5th municipal election.

ELECTION FROM PAGE 1

said. David Wirtz, who was appointed to the board last year, was elected Tuesday as well. He also will serve three years on the board. “I’m really looking forward to being on the board and looking

PHOTO BY OLIVIA JEWELL LOVE

forward to serving the town,” Wirtz said. Adam Way, a 30-year resident of Morrison, is excited to provide a fresh perspective to the board, according to his comments at the candidate forum. He joins the board with a three-year term. Former mayor Sean Forey, whose eight-year term as mayor was term limited, ran for a position on the Board of Trustees. He will be serv-

ing a two-year term. Forey said he’s “looking forward to getting some things done in Morrison.” The three Board of Trustees candidates who got the most votes will serve three-year terms, while the candidate who gets the next highest number of votes will serve a one-year term. The reason for the difference in terms is because two trustees were appointed in 2021,

and those positions are required to be on the next ballot. The different terms will allow the town to return to three trustees elected every two years. Chris Wolfe, who spent 10 years in the past as a member of the Board of Trustees, was elected as the town’s mayor. During the candidate forum, he indicated that he hopes to “keep Morrison Morrison” and not change to be like other towns.

Candidates for

Evergreen Fire Protection District Board of Directors

Partners for a Safer Evergreen

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Vote May 3rd! EFPD Board Election Bergen Park Fire Station

Strengthen the health and viability of our volunteer fire department by providing balanced fiscal and organizational support. Ensure a more prepared department and wildfire ready community by prioritizing high impact projects. Improve communications with the Evergreen Community by increasing collaboration and transparency. Provide a taxpayer-centered fiduciary voice.

BALLINGER

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PUTT

Paid for by Ballinger, Courim & Putt (candidates)


4 Canyon Courier

April 14, 2022

UKRAINE FROM PAGE 1

Tsedik was born and raised in Sumy, Ukraine, which shares a north-eastern border with Russia. When she was 18, she moved to the US. She currently lives in Evergreen, CO with her partner and daughter. Tsedik’s parents still live in her childhood home, the same one her mother grew up in. Things look different now at home in Sumy. What used to be a hallway through the apartment is now a bomb shelter for residents to take cover from air raids. Tsedik said her mother tries to make it more comfortable by bringing pillows and cushions along. “The shelter is a hallway…just laying down all day long in a hallway,” Tsedik said. Tsedik talks to her parents on the phone everyday, but the calls are anything but easy. “While I’m on the phone, I hear the explosions, I hear the rockets, I hear the bombs,” Tsedik said. Talking to her brother, Georgiy, on the phone everyday was also a comfort for Tsedik. She described him as someone who was building something for his life. When he decided to help his country, Tsedik was worried but proud. “He was a patriot, he loved Ukraine,” she said. “He was never in the army, but he chose to be in the territorial defense.” Those fighting in the territorial defense are civilians defending the Ukrainian border, often without suf-

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Volunteers loading the van with supplies while providing aid for Ukraine.

ficient military or tactical gear. Tsedik could not sleep at night, but kept exercising at the gym as an outlet for her stress. One day while she was working out, she got an un-

expected call from her parents and her heart sank. “I was in the gym and got a phone call from my mom,” she said. “In a second, I’m thinking to myself: please tell me you lost the house,

h m COURTESY OF TROY PEDEN

p that the rocket, the missile hit the U house and we don’t have the roof b anymore.” That’s when her mother told her, c a m SEE UKRAINE, P5

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Karina Tsedik models one of her her WOW Colorado beanies.

COURTESY OF KARINA TSEDIK

a r t


Canyon Courier 5

April 14, 2022

UKRAINE FROM PAGE 4

“We only have you.” Tsedik’s brother had been killed in combat along with his best friends. “It took them two days to actually see my brother and confirm it was him,” Tsedik said, through tears. The active conflict zone made it so that the bodies of the fallen had to be left until the fighting dispersed and they could safely be retrieved and identified. Tsedik, racked with grief, also feels great pride for what her brother and his friends did for their country. “Ukraine is standing because of people like that,” she said. As of right now, Tsedik’s parents are still living at home in Sumy. They have no family or friends in Poland or surrounding countries, and evacuation routes can be unsafe. Tsedik and her partner, Brady Bell, are doing everything they can to get the appropriate documents to be able to bring her parents to the US. The process is slow and full of uncertainties. Bell does his best to be there for Tsedik however he can. “I’m her support system, but it’s hard,” he said. “I’m trying to keep my emotional side out.” Tsedik has begun to channel her pain into aid for the country of Ukraine. In October 2020, she began her business selling handmade beanies, called WOW Colorado. The beanies are made by hand by Tsedik and her mother in Ukraine. Once the war in Ukraine started and her brother was killed in combat, Tsedik decided to use 100% of the profits from her business to fund the territorial defense in Ukraine. With the money she’s raised so far, she’s been able to help purchase a drone, medications, tactical vests and other military supplies. As of April 3, Tsedik had raised over $3,000 dollars through selling her beanies and over $5,000 through her Gofundme fundraiser. She now has such an interest in her products that there is a waiting list for her hats; but she likes to keep busy. “Every beanie is a project for me,” she said. “The beanies keep me away from the news, they keep me busy.” Everyday is filled with guilt and worry for Tsedik, who feels helpless across the world from her parents. “I wake up, I know I’m under calm skies…but it’s a guilt,” Tsedik said. “I will never be the same, my life will never be the same.” Another Evergreen resident and father of eight, Troy Peden, is doing what he can to help the situation in Ukraine as well. He connected with Tsedik on Facebook while he was actively volunteering in Ukraine. Peden went to Ukraine for one month at the beginning of March with his son, and has plans to go back again. His goal was to offer help that wasn’t currently available. His group decided to work on helping refugees get out of Ukraine and into other living situations. “It took some time to purchase a passenger van, get it properly registered and vetted for Humanitarian work so that we could get

into Ukraine. In the meantime, we worked at the border taking refugees who had family or friends in Poland, Slovakia and Germany straight to their families. Most of these families, consisting of a mother and children, had endured epic journeys to get out of Ukraine. Often walking for days, hiding in sewers and subways during the day.= Some took trains part of the way waiting for up to three days on a crowded platform with their children for a train that was overfull to 4-5 times capacity. The stories were heartbreaking and painful,” Peden said. Peden and other volunteers were able to establish a few reliable routes for evacuations and volunteers to access. Besides staying up to date on information, Peden urges people to think beyond the present and ponder the future effects this will have on Ukrainian people. “I also think that while Ukraine is in the news cycle we will see the images and feel empathy, but even if the fighting ended today there is a generation of suffering ahead when the headlines change. There is death, loss, and mental health challenges. The physical cost of war including rebuilding homes, towns and lives will go on for years,” he said. To contribute to Karina Tsedik’s Gofundme fundraiser, visit https:// www.gofundme.com/f/4-bestfriends-gone-too-soonand to buy a beanie visit @wow_colorado on Instagram. For information on volunteering abroad, visit Peden’s organization www.goabroad.com

Egg-cellent Ukrainian eggs

From left, Gwendolyn Morgan and Amy Marsh, both of Bailey, create intricately designed eggs with wax and dye during a class at the Bailey library. They were using techniques traditionally used to create what are known as Ukrainian eggs. PHOTO BY DEB HURLEY BROBST

Class at Bailey library teaches techniques to make intricate designs BY DEB HURLEY BROBST DBROBST@COLORADOCOMMUNITYMEDIA.COM

Feeling close to another culture takes immersion into that culture. Ten women did that on April 2 when they attended a class at the Bailey library to learn to create

VOTE FOR

Ukrainian Easter eggs. Called pysanka, which means “to write,” the intricately decorated eggs are created with wax and dyes. The participants said they enjoyed learning a new art skill in addition to understanding more about Ukrainian culture. Instructor Marily Charles of Bailey collected donations to use to provide children’s clothing to families in Ukraine displaced by the war. SEE EGGS, P6

PETER EGGERS

EPRD Board of Directors •

VOTE

WAYNE HAZELDINE FOR EVERGREEN FIRE PROTECTION DISTRICT BOARD • To maintain strong & healthy relations between the paid EFR. As well as the volunteer EVFD which is extremely important to the community. Making sure all departments are accountable to the Evergreen tax payers. • I’m a local HVAC/plumbing contractor. • Previously 15 year veteran, President of the Evergreen Volunteer Fire Department.

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Prior EPRD Board experience Consensus builder Solution oriented Proven leader

“Smart leadership means listening to the public, EPRD staff and Board to craft responsible solutions consistent with the Mission of EPRD”

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• My main concern is the Wildland Fire Protection Program & finding federal & state grants to help with these programs for EFD. • Would like to oversee the new Fire Station Construction. • Being in the construction business make sure the new fire station will allow for the next 12-20 years of expansion. Paid for by Wizard Plumbing-Wayne Hazeldine

Paid for by Peter Eggers for EPRD Board


6 Canyon Courier

April 14, 2022

Joni Havens of Evergreen and Marian Phillips of Shawnee work on their Ukrainian eggs. PHOTOS BY DEB HURLEY BROBST

EGGS FROM PAGE 5

It takes concentration to heat the wax, carefully apply it to a hardboiled egg and then dip it into a dye. The process repeats itself with progressively darker dyes used to color the eggs. Then a candle is used to melt the wax so it can be wiped off the eggs. Ukrainian eggs date back to an-

cient times, decorated with nature symbols to become an integral part of spring rituals. Participants called the process therapeutic as they chatted among themselves. For Judith Rowland of Bailey, the class was a chance to learn something new, while Bailey resident Susan Rogers said she liked how cool the eggs looked as they transformed through the wax-and-dye process. Amy Marsh of Bailey added that while she liked the fun Easter

Amy Marsh shows the design she put on an egg before putting it into the dye.

activity, “the Ukrainian connection touched my heart.” Marsh’s egg started out with more intentional designs like those in provided examples, “but the egg had other ideas,” she said. “Now it’s more free form.” Creating the eggs took Evergreen resident Joni Havens back to her childhood, when she had a book about Ukrainian eggs. “That beauty stayed with me all these years,” she said, adding, “besides the fact that we are making

donations for Ukraine.” Merrie Yule, who put flowers and leaves on one of her eggs, said she tried making Ukrainian eggs as a child, and now she was learning the proper techniques. Katja Pinkepank-Maxwell, originally from Germany, said she grew up with Ukrainian eggs. “The women of Ukraine would be making these eggs now,” she said. “They can’t do it, so we are painting the eggs for them.”

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Canyon Courier 7

April 14, 2022

Thinking outside the fox

Dear Davis Schilken, I have recently started a company with one of my best friends. We have a product we want to develop, along with a service we want to offer. What else do we need to help ensure a long and successful journey with our business? Sincerely, Eric Entrepreneur Dear Eric Entrepreneur, Congratulations on achieving what many define as the American Dream! Few things are as exciting as becoming your own boss and developing a company that is completely yours. Starting a new business, no matter the type, can be a difficult yet rewarding journey. Much like Estate Planning, effective (or ineffective) business planning can certainly make or break your endeavors. There are quite a few things you want to make sure are in order throughout the life of the business. The following list are just a few things you should consider •

Have you developed, or sought out an Attorney to assist you with your Articles of Organization? What type of entity have you established? Here is a short list to name a few o Sole Proprietorship o General Partnership o Family Limited Partnership o Limited Liability Corporation o S Corporation o C Corporation Do you have an Operating Agreement in place? Have you defined the roles of manager and/or member within the company? Have you had a conversation about finances? If property ownership is involved, how is that property owned? Do you have a succession plan in place? Have you considered some sort of Buy/Sell Agreement?

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8 Canyon Courier

LOCAL

April 14, 2022

VOICES Know the process, solve the problem

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here were maybe 20 or so of us in the room. We had gathered for a small regional business meeting a few years ago. We shared strategies, stories, and came up with new ideas and identified some things that we needed to change about our businesses. Whenever we would gather for a day or two, we would usually try and build in some exercises and activities to keep it fun and engaging. We had someone come in to teach us strategy. One of the exercises they used was trying to teach us and coach us on how to solve Rubik’s Cube. It generated a lot of laughs, some of us got it, some of us didn’t and some gave up trying. Then the owner of the business who was hosting us brought in his two young sons, and they had learned how to solve it. They came around the room offering help. It was a bit humbling. More of us got it, a few more didn’t, and well, even a few more gave up. The world record for solving Rubik’s Cube is 3.47 seconds. Did you catch that? 3.47 seconds. The

old record was 4.22 seconds. The key to solving a problem or a puzzle is to know the system and apply the process. As I watch some of the cooking shows, I am always amazed at the dishes that are served in such a short Michael Norton time frame. Fivestar quality dishes created and made in sometimes as quickly as 20 minutes. The winners know the process, they have a system. They are given the ingredients, but more often than not, they must use their knowledge to know just how much of each ingredient needs to be used and for exactly how long it should be cooked. There is a great book that has been out for a few years, “Atomic” Habits by James Clear. It is an incredible book by the way, I encourage anyone looking to make a change in productivity or make improvements in life to check it out. In his book, James

WINNING WORDS

Clear talks about goals and processes. And if given the opportunity to choose if he could only pick one, he would choose having the right process or system over a setting a goal. The goal is the destination, the process is how you get there. In business, many companies will often talk about people, process and technology as the requirements and ingredients for success. The people are the business, take care of your people and they will take care of your business. Technology and innovation are necessary in any business regardless of industry. That leaves us with process. When we can give our people the right care and attention, provide them with the right skills and technology, and then couple that by teaching them the processes that will help them perform at their very best, we have a winning combination. Show me people who disagree, and cannot get past the disagreement, and I will show you people who were never taught the process or system of effective communication. Show me a professional team that is losing

by a large margin, and I will show you a team that didn’t have a way or process to stop their opponent. Show me a salesperson who lost an opportunity to a competitor, and I will show you a salesperson who didn’t align their selling process with the buyer’s decisioning journey. It doesn’t matter if it is a puzzle, conundrum, game, business, human interaction and dynamics, sports or sales, when we can learn to apply the right process to anything that we do, we will always increase our chances for success. Is there a process or system that you need to learn? Is there something that you are doing where you would like to make improvements? I would love to hear your story at mnorton@xinnix.com, and when we can learn to solve the conundrums and puzzles of life using a proven process, it really will be a better than good year. Michael Norton is the grateful president of XINNIX, a personal and professional coach, and a consultant, trainer, encourager and motivator to businesses of all sizes.

LETTER TO THE EDITOR In response to Nate Marshall’s March 17 letter to the editor Of course, a larger, more modern fire station at El Rancho is a good idea, but the cost is too high. By cost, I mean the building of more commercial enterprises across the street from those already functioning — namely the hotel and gas station. More retail and hotel space will not increase the demand for it, because it’s already there. It won’t bring more revenue; it will take revenue from the existing businesses. Lakewood is a nice place, but most of us are here because we don’t want to live in Lakewood. We may need more housing as more people want to live here, but we have to be careful and thoughtful about how we want our living space to look and function. Growth for growth’s sake doesn’t make

much sense if it ruins the appeal to prospective residents of what we like to call the mountain community. I don’t know that another hotel, gas station and convenience store translate to economic security. Joanne Greenberg, Golden Ukraine and America Ukraine’s powerful determination to preserve its democracy and its way of life no matter what has drawn a sharp contrast to what is going on here in America where a polarizing pull to drag us backward is distorting the very core of “One Nation Indivisible, with liberty and justice for all.” A well financed move to limit our right to vote, to secure the integrity of the vote, to place limitations on what and how we educate our

children, banning books, our freedom of women’s right to choose. Horrific harassment of all kinds of minorities that aren’t “white” and the LGBTQ population in many ways, are frightening reminders of everything that Ukraine is fighting against! We have a clear reminder every day that Ukrainians are dying to preserve their rights, that we must stand up for everything that America stands for and remember all the souls lost in our history, died to preserve what America stands for, and realize that once more we are being tested in a way that threatens our way of life and is dividing our country. What has happened there can happen here if we don’t take seriously our SEE LETTERS, P9

ABOUT LETTERS TO THE EDITOR Colorado Community Media welcomes letters to the editor. Please note the following rules: • Email your letter to kfiore@coloradocommunitymedia.com. Do not send via postal mail. Put the words “letter to the editor” in the email subject line. • Submit your letter by 5 p.m. on Wednesday in order to have it considered for publication in the following week’s newspaper. • Letters must be no longer than 400 words. • Letters should be exclusively submitted to Colorado Community Media and should not be submitted to other outlets or previously posted on websites or social media. Submitted letters become the property of CCM and should not be republished elsewhere. • Letters advocating for a political candidate should focus on that candidate’s qualifications for office. We cannot publish letters that contain unverified negative information about a candidate’s opponent. Letters advocating for or against a political candidate or ballot issue will not be published later than 12 days before an election. • Publication of any given letter is at our discretion. Letters are published as space is available. • We will edit letters for clarity, grammar, punctuation and length and write headlines (titles) for letters at our discretion. • Please don’t send us more than one letter per month. First priority for publication will be given to writers who have not submitted letters to us recently. • Submit your letter in a Word document or in the body of an email. No PDFs or Google Docs, please. • Include your full name, address and phone number. We will publish only your name and city or town of residence, but all of the information requested is needed for us to verify you are who you say you are.

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OLIVIA JEWELL LOVE Canyon Courier Reporter

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LINDSAY NICOLETTI Operations/ Circulation Manager lnicoletti@coloradocommunitymedia.com

DONNA REARDON Marketing Consultant dreardon@coloradocommunitymedia.com

olove@coloradocommunitymedia.com

DEB HURLEY BROBST News Editor/Reporter dbrobst@coloradocommunitymedia.com

RUTH DANIELS Classified Sales rdaniels@coloradocommunitymedia.com

Columnists & Guest Commentaries Columnist opinions are not necessarily those of the Courier. We welcome letters to the editor. Please include your full name, address and the best number to reach you by telephone. Email letters to kfiore@coloradocommunitymedia.com Deadline Wed. for the following week’s paper.

Canyon Courier (USPS 88940) A legal newspaper of general circulation in Evergreen, Colorado, Canyon Courier is published weekly on Thursday by Colorado Community Media, 27972 Meadow Dr., Ste. 320, Evergreen CO 80439. . PERIODICAL POSTAGE PAID AT Evergreen and additional mailing offices. POSTMASTER: Send address change to: Canyon Courier, 750 W. Hampden Ave., Suite 225, Englewood, CO 80110


Canyon Courier 9

April 14, 2022

LETTERS

lose downtown, we will have lost so much of our community. Peter Anderson, Evergreen

FROM PAGE 8

responsibility and know we have to be a part of the work it takes to make our voices heard. Suzi Badrena, Conifer Protecting the community from fires After listening to the EFPD candidates’ forum, I got the impression that some of them did not understand the basic reason for replacing Station 1. The department has a risk assessment for structure fires. It is based on life safety, cultural/ historic impacts, economic impacts and the threat to infrastructure. The downtown area hits high on all of these factors. It has a historical structure fire history, with one quarter of the town burning down in 1926 and a good stop by the department at the Evergreen Hotel fire in 1997. In this incident, it was fortunate that the wind was not blowing as it was in the first. Downtown needs to be protected by an aerial device. It needs to be the first-on-scene apparatus to be able to rescue trapped victims and to shoot the heavy streams into the base of the fire for a quick knock down. The department has the apparatus at the station in Bergen Park and its abilities need to be close to downtown. The present station will not accommodate this size of apparatus. If we

Two candidates who will make Evergreen better Evergreen can stand still, or keep getting better. In the upcoming election for the Evergreen Park & Recreation District, I know of two candidates who will keep making it better. One is Peter Eggers, who knows parks and recreation well because he has served in the past — for 16 years— on the EPRD board. It was with his leadership that Evergreen got better, from building the Lake House to laying out Buchanan Park, from creating the turf field at Marshdale Elementary School to the grass playing fields at Bergen Valley. The other is Betsy Hays, who knows it equally well because her family has been involved in every sport EPRD oversees. But I know her in a different context. As president, she took the Evergreen Area Chamber of Commerce to a new and better level. Now, as head of fundraising for Mount Evans Home Health Care & Hospice, she has helped it successfully navigate through the challenging and costly period of the pandemic. I hope you’ll write down these two names and endorse them on your ballot. They are both candidates who care about the lives we lead. That’s why I am convinced they will keep making our lives better.

Local company, Veteran owned, Integrity focused

Greg Dobbs, Evergreen Thank you, Lisa Cutter I am so proud of Lisa Cutter, my representative in House District 25, for sponsoring and helping to pass the Reproductive Health Equity Act. This bill, signed April 4 by Gov. Polis, will protect women’s abortion rights in Colorado, even if the Supreme Court reverses Roe v. Wade. We know a large majority of Coloradans support access to abortion, but we cannot depend on the federal government to protect that right. Faced with losing federal protections, states must safeguard women’s freedom to make their own decisions. Colorado is leading the way, as it led the way 55 years ago by becoming the first state to decriminalize abortion. Conservative Coloradan legislators have tried dozens of times to introduce laws that would turn women seeking abortions and doctors helping them into criminals. Lisa Cutter joined the majority in preventing that from happening. Grisly images are typically part of conservatives’ arguments to limit women’s ability to make health care and family decisions, when in reality, 70% of Colorado abortions are by chemical means. Thank you, Lisa Cutter, for bringing compassion and nuance to this highly charged issue. I look forward to your being elected as our state senator in District 20 in November 2022. Cheri Rubin, Evergreen

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10 Canyon Courier

April 14, 2022

Preparing for home projects this summer — and more

Kylee Reini, left, and Audrey Kram, juniors and members of the Interact service club at Conifer High School, were among the ferns and spider plants as they helped at a booth at the Foothills Home, Garden & Lifestyle Show on Sunday at CHS. PHOTOS BY DEB HURLEY BROBST

Chari Pashman of Evergreen explains hydroponic tower gardens to customers. Pashman is with Tower Gardens by Juice Plus+.

Foothills Home, Garden & Lifestyle show a hit with vendors BY DEB HURLEY BROBST DBROBST@COLORADOCOMMUNITYMEDIA.COM

Whether you’re considering a home project this year, looking for ideas or just wanting to get out on a beautiful weekend, the Foothills Home, Garden & Lifestyle Show was the place to be. Attendees browsed rows of vendors at Conifer High School who were providing information about windows, siding, roofs and gutters, talking about the area’s housing market and selling food, home décor

and clothing vendors. The show, which has been sponsored by Conifer and Evergreen Rotary clubs since 2005, not only exposes the community to a variety of businesses, but its proceeds are given to charitable causes. In fact, the show has provided $250,000 in grants in the last 17 years. Attendees could pay the $5 entry fee or bring non-perishable food items from the Mountain Resource Center food bank or the 285 Backpack Project. The show also featured classes on adapting your home as we age, preparing for wildfire and making a hammock. Holly Simon of Conifer, owner of Phox Photos, stood among her photos as she spoke to admirers. A veteran of the show, Simon said friends originally thought she was crazy to

Tirzah Washington of Conifer, owner of LoveMyShawls.com, was a vendor at the Foothills Home, Garden & Lifestyle Show.

spend time at a home, garden and lifestyle show. “I get a lot of customers from the show,” she said. “There are a lot of people moving to the area who are new, and they want things on their walls.” She called the event a show with steady clientele coming through the door rather than a busy show, and she likes it that way because she has time to provide more individual attention to attendees. Chari Pashman of Evergreen explained the benefits of hydroponic tower gardening —a specially made tall indoor garden to grow vegetables. She explained that she was passionate about tower gardens because it means growing fresh vegetables year-round. Her first time as a vendor at the

foothills show, Pashman said the tower garden was so easy that users didn’t need a green thumb. A lot of people have stopped to talk about tower gardens and how they work. Kylee Reini and Audrey Kram, juniors and members of the Interact service club at Conifer High School, volunteered to work at a plant booth where indoor plants were for sale. They said it was one of several service projects that Interact does each year. Tirzah Washington of Conifer, who has been operating LoveMyShawl.com for nine years, sells the colorful shawls online and at various shows. This was her first time at the foothills show. “I’m glad to see people out and attending events,” she said.

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April 14, 2022

Canyon Courier 11

Coffee & a

PAPER Mudslingers Drive-Thru Coffee

A Bailey coffee drive-thru offers unique drinks and boasts multiple merits BY OLIVIA JEWELL LOVE OLOVE@COLORADOCOMMUNITYMEDIA.COM

Editor’s Note: This is the tenth in an ongoing series about coffee shops in the foothills. An award winning coffee shop with award winning baristas; that’s just one claim to fame at Mudslingers Drive Thru Coffee in Bailey. Mudslingers won the Fairplay Flume’s People’s Choice Award for best coffee shop from 2019-2022, and best barista from 2020-2022. Manager Kate Molieri has been working at Mudslingers since 2018 when her father, Mark Linne bought it. The shop has taken on a family business environment. Molieri says Mudslingers is unique because of its manual machines and double sided drive thru. While you can’t sit down at the shop, there are plenty of options for getting a drink on the go. One of the popular coffee drinks is called “The Canyon” and features vanilla and caramel syrups. The menu also offers hot teas, dairy-free, no sugar added smooth-

ies, italian sodas, RedBull infusions and more. Mudslingers has six baristas on staff, not including Molieri, and they all take the art of coffee seriously. “We have to control tamping, and putting portafilters into the machine and monitoring the shots,” Molieri said. Basically, the baristas pay attention to the details that make their coffee taste good every time. When she’s behind bar, Molieri likes to make matcha drinks, but on the other side she enjoys drinking an iced “shot in the dark.” This summer, the shop is doing a passport series with drink flavors inspired by different destinations around the world. Molieri hopes to transport people’s pallets across the globe. Molieri said the best part about Mudslingers is the customers and the local community rallying around them in Bailey. “We have some of the best customers….the locals are the best I’ve ever had; we wouldn’t be here without community,” she said. Mudslingers is located at 144 Bulldogger Drive in Bailey, CO 80421. The current hours are 6 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday-Friday and 7 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturdays and Sundays. In May the shop will be switching to sum-

Mudslingers in Bailey is a double-sided drive-thru coffee shop.

mer hours, check out

The Dutch House

COURTESY OF KATE MOLIERI

mudslingersco.com for details.

by Julianne Seifert

by Ann Patchett, 2019

Fiction dealing with tense familial relationships has been popular for centuries. It holds an understandable fascination: even though every family looks different, every person can relate to some aspect of a family drama, whether we know our family members too well or not well enough. Reading a story about a dysfunctional family provides a point of comparison; each one can become a new lens through which readers can view their own family problems. If this style of fiction appeals to you for that reason, you can’t go wrong with a book like The Dutch House. It follows a pair of siblings, a brother and sister, whose obsessive love for each other and for their childhood home carries them through the twists and turns of their lives. Intricate details of these characters’ day-to-day existence – work and home, health and personality – are woven for the reader, only to fade into the background when they’re together. As they grow older, they return over and over to a house they can never reenter, their longing for it and the past it represents constantly distancing them from the realities of the present. Slow-moving and inexorable, the story evolves from a study of family complications into a brutal exploration of nostalgia, as the protagonists’ illusions of their childhood stand firm and continue to dictate their every life decision, even in the face of proof that those illusions are false. Though the initial draw may be apparent, what makes a book like this really work? How has a genre with so few happy endings stayed so popular for so long? Is there something about characters who refuse to change when given the opportunity that motivates us as readers to examine our own convictions and ask ourselves if we, too, are stubbornly holding ourselves back from life? Or is it a more morbid

preoccupation – the desire to reassure ourselves that, no matter how broken our families are or how unfulfilled our ambitions have been, at least we’re still doing better than these characters? Then again, there could be another, less cynical explanation. Perhaps by reading about the mistakes and regrets of characters who have been wounded by circumstance, we learn to view them – and, by extension, the real people in our lives – with greater understanding and acceptance; and perhaps when we see the consequences of unresolved conflicts and unhealed hurts play out in narrative form, it inspires us to seek resolutions to similar difficulties in the real world. If this is the case, it’s no wonder that books like this one continue to be in high demand.


12 Canyon Courier

April 14, 2022

SUMMER CAMP LISTINGS

Presents

Summer Camps & Programs 2022 Audience of One Youth Theater Camp: Audience of One is a music theater company committed to developing character, integrity, teamwork and leadership in our youth through the theatrical and arts experience. These skills will enable them to succeed and joyfully serve their community. Camps are available to children ages 5 through 18. Camps include: • • • • • •

Seussical Kids Fame Jr. Kitty Cat Capers Rock your Callback Audition prep Dance

Children’s Museum of Denver Summer Camp: The summer workshops at the Children’s Museum of Denver are designed to offer a little something extra with extended fun and learning in the museum’s most popular exhibits. For information, www.MyChildMuseum.org

Tackle 11 Man 2022: The youth tackle program is for youth between third and eighth grades. Early registration continues through April 30. Regular registration for the program will be between May 1 and June 30. The program will be held this fall between July 25 and Nov. 30.

Code Ninja: These camps are slated to spark a child’s inner ninja and transform their love of technology and video games into new skills. The camp is for children ages 5 and 15. Code Ninja camps are available across the Denver metro area. For information, visit:

For information, visit www.AO1Theater.org

• Castle Rock: www.codeninjas.com/cocastle-rock/camps

Avid4 Adventure:

• Highlands Ranch: www.codeninjas.com/ co-highlands-ranch-wildcat-reserve/ camps

The Castle Rock summer day camps teach kindergarten through 12th graders of every ability level a range of outdoor adventures, introducing them to the parks, trails and mountains in the surrounding area and getting them excited to stay active. The program has several day camp options in Castle Rock plus resident overnight camp options less than 2 hours from Castle Rock and expedition camp options leaving from Louisville. For information, visit https://avid4.com/ castle-rock-colorado-summer-camps. Chatfield Stables: With a variety of summer camp programs, Chatfield Stables offers programs to children 7 and older. This is a hands-on only horse camp. Each child is assigned a horse to take care of for the entire week. They learn safety and horse care from the ground up including grooming, saddling For information, visit http://www.chatfieldstables.com/horse-camps.html

Mountain Youth Football Association: The Mountain Youth Football Association is preparing for the 2022 seasons with two camps for youth between kindergarten and eighth grade. There is no registration fee for players who are new to the Mountain Youth Football program.

• Parker: www.codeninjas.com/locationslist/us/co/parker • Lone Tree: www.codeninjas.com/locations-list/us/co/lone%20tree • Thornton: www.codeninjas.com/locations-list/us/co/thornton • Arvada: www.codeninjas.com/locationslist/us/co/arvada Denver Zoo Summer Camps: The zoo’s safari camps are aimed at children with a drive and desire to discover the world of animals. Camps feature: • • • •

Animal experiences Zoo expeditions Engineering authentic solutions Real-world challenges

For information, visit www.DenverZoo.org/safari-camps/

The program details include:

Rookie Tackle 8 Man 2022: The program for kindergarten through second grade will be a developmental league with modified rules for first and second grade players. An early bird special will continue through April 30. Regular registration will be held between May 1 and June 30. Late registration options are also available. The Mountain Youth Football program is located at Marshdale IOscelot Field) East – 26663 N. Turkey Creek Rd. in Evergreen. For information, visit www.mountainyouthfootball.org Downtown Aquarium Summer Camps: Throughout the summer, the Denver aquarium hosts a variety of programs for children of all ages. Some programs include: • • • •

World Oceans Day Sea safari summer camp Zoologist for a day Marine biologist for a day

For information, visit www.AquariumRestaurants.com Evergreen Country Day Summer Camp: Evergreen Country Day’s Summer Camp offers opportunities for children to continue learning, growing, honing their skills, amplifying their interests, and making friends. With a range of classes designed for early childhood, elementary, and middle-school students, Evergreen Country Day’s Summer Camp sparks imaginations and energizes learning of children ages 2 to 15. For information, visit https://evergreencountryday.org/programs/summer-camp/ Evergreen Parks and Recreation District: There are a variety of summer programs and camps available in 2022. For information, visit www.evergreenrecreation.com/201/Camps Some of this year’s camps include: • • • • • •

Summer adventure camp Outdoor climbing camp Gymnastics camp Outdoor adventure camp Boating camp Summer sports camp

KidzArt: These camps offer curriculum geared to stretch minds, exercise imaginations, and introduce new idea-generating techniques, all while having fun and building confidence. For information, visit: • www.kidzart.com/franchise/castle-rock/

• www.kidzart.com/franchise/highlandsranch • www.kidzart.com/franchise/lone-tree Performing Arts Academy: Performing Arts Academy has a selection of both one-week and two-week programs. The choices range in half-day or full-day musical theater options for elementary, middle and high school age groups. Camp options include: • Performing arts mini camps • Musical theater show camps For information, visit www.paacolorado.org/ theatre-summer-camp/ School of Rock Golden/Lakewood: Looking for something unique for kids this summer? Music has become increasingly popular through the years, and the Golden/ Lakewood locations for School of Rock have plenty of offer, including: • • • • • •

Guitar lessons Drum lessons Singing/vocal lessons Keyboard lessons Bass lessons Songwriting

For information, visit https://bit. ly/3Mwwnmx. Talk to the Camera Video & Movie: Learn to make videos and movies through a program that includes video and movie making camps, theater and acting camps through STEAM-Based, hands-on curriculum. The summer program is for children ages 6 and 16. For information, visit talktothecamera.com.

SUMMER CAMP PAGES


LOCAL

April 14, 2022

SPORTS

Canyon Courier 13

Conifer baseball has positive start to the season

Junior Mason Pratt, 5, bats against Holy Family on March 28. He currently has 7 runs PHOTOS BY CORA SPENCE this season. BY ARIANA PENSY CONIFER HIGH SCHOOL

The Conifer baseball team is off to a good start this season with a 4-2 record. After winning their first two games against Jefferson Academy and Holy Family on March 15 and March 28, the Lobos lost their next two games to Castle View and Bear Creek on April 2 and April 4, respectively. They were able to rebound with wins against Alameda on April 5 with a score of 13-1

and April 7 with a score of 19-0. They are currently first in the Jefferson County 4A League with the Evergreen Cougars in second with a 5-2 record. Their season-opener against Jefferson Academy was Conifer’s lowest-scoring game of the season with only three runs and five hits. Playing Holy Family nearly two weeks later, the team performed better in every way. It scored more runs, had more hits and recorded an on-base percentage of 0.444; this was an increase from 0.333 in

Senior Gauge Womack, 1, goes up to bat against Holy Family on March 28. This game was played at Coors Field. Womack is currently tied for first on the team in runs this season with 8.

the opener. However, its loss to Castle Rock on April 2 was actually one of its best games of the season. In that game, the Lobos recorded their first home run, scored by junior Evan Clark. Furthermore, the team had its second-highest on-base percentage of the season thus far with 0.488 and recorded 10 hits, a season-high thus far. The game against Bear Creek on April 4 was the team’s worst performance of the year with season lows in hits and batting average. It

also lost by its largest margin in a 16-4 rout. Going against Alameda on April 5 was a nice recovery for the Lobos as they scored 13 runs and doubled their batting average from the previous game. They continued their dominance over Alameda on April 7, scoring a season-high 19 runs and recording their highest on-base percentage of the season at 0.576. Furthermore, the Lobos recorded their second home-run of the season, scored again by Clark.


14 Canyon Courier

April 14, 2022

FEDP ask county commissioners to find a dog-park location for Evergreen Stagecoach location was closed five years ago BY DEB HURLEY BROBST DBROBST@COLORADOCOMMUNITYMEDIA.COM

On the fifth anniversary of the Evergreen off-leash dog park closing, a group of residents asked the Jefferson County commissioners to fast-track finding a new location, saying they believe the county has been dragging its feet. Four members of Friends of Evergreen Dog Park plus another resident discussed Jeffco Open Space closing the 107-acre park on Stagecoach Boulevard in April 2017, how they operated in good faith to find a new location in the last five years, and every idea was shot down for one reason or another. They said other communities in the nation successfully operate dog parks and asked why that couldn’t happen again in Evergreen. County Manager Don Davis said the county commissioners would get an update on the Evergreen dog park during their study session on May 10. Matt Robbins, spokesman for Jeffco Open Space, said in an interview that Open Space officials want to meet with representatives of Friends of Evergreen Dog Park and Evergreen Park & Recreation District before the May 10 meeting. Jeffco asked EPRD in August to determine whether it would consider operating a dog park, but discussion slowed after Executive Director Ellen O’Connor resigned in November. EPRD hired its new director on April 6. Jeffco Open Space closed the dog park on April 4, 2017, over health and safety issues, citing dog waste, overcrowding, illegal parking along the road outside the park, vegetation loss and contaminated water in a stream that runs through the property. The closure caused an uproar in Evergreen. Friends of Evergreen Dog Park said it cleaned up the dog waste, the water wasn’t contaminated, and it was ready to operate the park. Since then, FEDP and Jeffco Open Space looked at other locations, but FEDP said Jeffco Open Space put up roadblocks. Jeffco Open Space has said there were other barriers

g tin s a r br a le 1 Ye e C 4

Evergreen residents asked the Jefferson County commissioners to fast-track finding a new location for a dog park. It has been five SHUTTERSTOCK years since the Evergreen off-leash dog park closed.

to finding a dog-park location. In January, an Evergreen resident suggested that an off-leash dog park could be located in Elk Meadow. Robbins said Jeffco Open Space was constantly trying to find a location for an off-leash dog park in Evergreen, noting, “We always have an ear to the ground looking for an opportunity.” FEDP members didn’t mince words as they told the county commissioners to live up to promises county officials made to provide Evergreen about an off-leash dog park. “The real problem at the former park was the overwhelming public demand for an off-leash hiking area,” FEDP president Dale Glover said. “It seems ironic that we chose to meet overwhelming public demand with closure versus solutions, particularly when the public was already stepping up to address the concerns raised. Other communities have found solutions

to the issues we faced, and we can as well.” Options are available, he said, including reopening the former park with modifications, and leveraging FEDP and community involvement to assure proper park management and maintenance. Another possibility would be designating specific parks and trails for off-leash dogs on certain days and times. “Or we could acquire new land for a dedicated park, but this option is slipping away as development of the Evergreen area is rapidly reducing available parcels, and land cost is escalating,” Glover said. FEDP member Jody Kirkpatrick added: “New residents regularly ask why our community doesn’t have an off-leash dog park. … What they hear on social media is that dog owners were irresponsible and didn’t take care of their park. That’s just not true. Hundreds of us participated in monthly clean-

Conifer Podcast presents: Dr. Tracy Hofeditz

MEET MIS S MOLLY !

with our new STRIDE Community Health Center at the Mountain Resource Center Wednesday August 20, 2022 at 5 pm

Calling all Terrier lovers! Meet Miss Molly! This smart little cookie is roughly 6-months-old and weighs 16 pounds. She’s a bit shy at first but warms up quickly. Molly gets along fine with all other pets in the home. She is currently working on crate & potty training, but she is very intelligent and a fast learner.

ups and educational programs that worked. But Open Space … created a false narrative and a publichealth scare to justify their desire to close the dog park.” Her plea to the commissioners was echoed by the other speakers: “We need you to help us. We need you to make this right. We need you to keep your promise to the people of Evergreen.” In the meantime, Robbins said Jeffco Open Space has made great headway with rehabbing the former dog park, which will be reopened as an extension of Elk Meadow Open Space Park, not as an off-leash dog park. “It’s been a really good effort in that area, so we’re excited about the progress,” Robbins said. “We hope folks will enjoy the landscape and the revitalization. We continue to try to do the right thing.”

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Canyon Courier 15

April 14, 2022

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16 Canyon Courier

April 14, 2022

Vander Veen expected to take the helm of EPRD Board offers the Aspen rec director a contract

“I do coffee talks, and I go to a lot of events to stay in touch with the community,” he explained. He called fiscal responsibility key for the district, knowing the board would direct the team’s priorities. He also called himself a huge advocate of teamwork. “One of the biggest lessons is being able to understand how teams work and making them better – making them functional so we can all work together,” he said. “Being able to adapt is such a core part of the team dynamics.” He wants to focus on the district’s current assets to keep them in good shape, while looking at the community’s needs and wants to determine how to move forward. “At the end of the day, we have to be fiscally responsibe to make decisions on cost recovery and the fees we charge,” he said. “All those decisions are very methodical. We have to have a good base of data, so we can set goals for the year. Then we work with the community, so they understand what we’re doing.” He explained that a strong part of the rec district’s mission should be to communicate with the public that play was important to their daily lives. “That’s why I love this industry,” he said. “Play is everything and makes a community that much better.”

BY DEB HURLEY BROBST DBROBST@COLORADOCOMMUNITYMEDIA.COM

It appears that Cory Vander Veen will be the new executive director of the Evergreen Park & Recreation District. Vander Veen, the recreation director in Aspen, was offered a contract on April 6 that he still needs to sign, and his first day on the job has not been determined yet. He was named the only finalist for the position on March 7. Vander Veen’s wife works in hospice and home care, and they have two children ages 7 and 4. Vander Veen talked about his management style at the March 29 EPRD board meeting, allowing the board to learn more about him and to ask questions. He said he has been working in parks and recreation for 17 years, starting as a swim instructor, which is when he fell in love with the industry. “I saw the difference I could make by teaching kids to swim,” he explained, and he noted that creativity was one of his strengths. He called himself an active executive director who likes to support his team, though he is not a micromanager. He likes to get out to meet the community.

Cory Vander Veen

MORRISON BRIEFS

Police department gears up for service, clean up days coming and sidewalk service for local restaurant BY OLIVIA JEWELL LOVE OLOVE@COLORADOCOMMUNITYMEDIA.COM

Police department The new Morrison Police Department will officially start responding to calls on May 1. Chief Bill Vinelli has put together a patrol schedule to make sure the town is covered throughout the day and night by his new force. The police department was also approved for the purchase of 10 new tasers. Once they arrive, the force will complete taser training. The

department has completed or has plans to complete CPR training, radar training, motorcycle/driving training and more. Clean up days Public works is planning to hold the annual “Clean up days” on April 30 and May 1. Morrison residents can put out limbs, metal and other larger trash items for pickup on these days.

Center Stage, Evergreen

Morrison Inn The Morrison Inn requested the addition of five tables to the front sidewalk of the business to help maintain overflow. The board voted to allow the restaurant to begin sidewalk service.

April 22 - May 1, 2022 presents

Tickets at www.EvergreenChildrensChorale.com


Canyon Courier 17

April 14, 2022

Evergreen’s Got Talent, Hops Drops festival and 9Health Fair return Saturday, June 25, at the Buchanan Fields. It is replacing the Evergreen Music Festival, which had been on July 4 for decades. The festival will feature national and local musical acts alongside a beer festival showcasing a variety of Colorado craft breweries. There will be specialty food vendors, kids’ activities and more. Ten percent of the proceeds will be donated to Rocky Mountain Academy of Evergreen. Ticket to the music festival start at $30, tickets to the music and beer festival start at $55, and VIP tickets start at $150. Parking is also available for a fee. For more information and to purchase tickets, visit hopsdropsevergreen.com.

Evergreen’s Got Talent is back Evergreen’s Got Talent is returning this year with a new location and a new beneficiary. The event — a talent show for area youth 25 and younger — will be from 6-9 p.m. April 23 at Center for the Arts Evergreen. Fifteen acts will perform, and people can vote for their favorite acts through donations to Resilience1220, which provides free counseling to 12- to 20-year-olds, plus speakers on mental health topics and group sessions. Evergreen’s Got Talent has been on a two-year hiatus, but before the pandemic, it was a fundraiser for Operation Home Front. Schaunon Winter Gilman, coproducer of the event, said she was excited that the area’s youth will be able to showcase their talent. Mark Swaim, Jim Christie, Peter Lindquist and Jim Sherwood will be the judges and emcee, and the judges’ decisions plus donations fac-

tor into who wins. The four winners of Evergreen’s Got Talent plus the two winners of 285’s Got Talent have been invited to perform as the opening acts at this summer’s Evergreen Lake Concerts. The concerts are Wednesdays, June 22, July 20 and Aug. 10, and the opening acts will perform from 4:30-5 p.m. and 5:30-6 p.m. before the headliners take the stage. “This will allow for more music to be enjoyed as well as the opportunity for our younger musicians to showcase their talent on a professional stage in front of a large hometown crowd,” said Pam Lindquist, the Lake House’s facility specialist.

Crank call CONIFER — Cleaning up a Conifer Road parking lot on the morning of March 15, the workman came upon a dubious bit of debris. It was a small plastic bag labeled “Gucci” containing a “small amount” of a suspiciously “clear crystal substance.” Workman summoned JCSO deputies, who performed a test presumptively pegging the problematic powder as methamphetamine. Officers conveyed the fashionably packaged contraband to Golden for fiery and ultimate disposal.

over again.” Most recently the Debtors had been receiving calls from a “mean” man in California who “sarcastically” identified himself as “Jim.” The snotty note holder had called them at least seven times in the last seven days and, beginning to feel harassed, Dan and Debbie asked the officer to intercede. After letting the deputy cool his heels on hold for a while, Jim interrupted the officer’s introduction to say he “didn’t believe I was a law enforcement officer.” “You’re probably a friend of (Dan and Debbie),” Jim sneered with unconcealed sarcasm. The deputy told Jim he was just trying to establish Jim’s credentials. Jim provided the name of his company and told the deputy to never call again. The deputy told the Debtors there was little else he could do to keep debt collectors from calling and suggested they simply stop answering Jim’s calls.

JCSO on the afternoon of March 15 to complain that his neighbor, Tim, had dumped “a large amount of dirt” in Wilson’s driveway. Deputies scanning the scene observed that the disputed dirt was “potting soil” containing “perlite,” and that Tim had scraped most of it off of Wilson’s driveway right before they arrived. Tim told deputies that he’d dug the dirt out of the ground beneath his house to make room for foundation repairs, which appeared unlikely, particularly in view of the overpowering aroma of hothouse ganja emanating from Tim’s digs and the pile of “about 100 large empty planter pots” jumbled in his yard. Seeing as how Tim had already de-dirted his driveway, Wilson was willing to forgive and forget. Slightly suspicious of Tim’s sensimilla-scented shanty, officers forwarded their report to the West Metro Drug Task Force for review.

Smell this house! EVERGREEN — Wilson called

Slick trick EVERGREEN — Is there such a

Dun deal CONIFER — Seemingly trapped on a roller coaster of collection agencies, the discouraged debtors hoped JCSO could help them get off of it. They’d been sitting on “large debts” for four years, Dan and Debbie Debtor told a JCSO deputy, and every time they reached a workable arrangement for repayment, “one company sells the loan to another company and the phone calls start all

Music, beer festival at Buchanan Park The Evergreen Music Festival has morphed into a new festival that will debut this summer. Hops Drops, a music and craft beer festival, is set for noon-9 p.m.

9Health Fair at Rockland Community Church 9Health Fair: 365 at Rockland Community Church in Genesee will provide health screenings and more

at low or no cost to residents. It will be from 7-10:30 a.m. Saturday, April 23, at the church, 317 S. Mount Vernon Country Club Road, and it is a collaboration between the church and the Highland Rescue Team Ambulance District. Those wishing to attend the fair are encouraged to preregister online at www.9HealthFair.org, though walk-ins are welcome. Those who preregister will be able to skip the line to fill out forms, and they will get their test results online. Those who walk in will have their results mailed to them. Free screenings will be available for blood pressure, height and weight, plus participants can talk with health professionals. A basic blood chemistry test costs $45, plus for additional fees, participants can get tests that include Vitamin D, hemoglobin, testosterone, blood type, Vitamin B-12 and more. It is not necessary to fast before the blood draw.

thing as wrongful re-parking? The complainant thought so, and called JCSO to declare herself a victim of rogue relocation. The previous evening, she explained to deputies, she’d parked her car at the top of her steep and icy driveway. Come the morning, it was parked at the bottom of her steep and icy driveway with its fanny sticking out into the snow-covered road. Her theory was that a villainous valet unknown, and for reasons unknown, had re-oriented her ride by dark of night. The deputies’ theory was that treacherous surface conditions and relentless gravity had conspired to play a little prank on her. In any case, the car was still securely locked and apparently undamaged, so deputies let it slide. Sheriff’s Calls is intended as a humorous take on some of the incident call records of the Jefferson County Sheriff’s Office for the mountain communities. Names and identifying details have been changed. All individuals are innocent until proven guilty.

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18 Canyon Courier

April 14, 2022

Worship

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April 14, 2022

Canyon Courier 19

Worship

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Celebrating the joy of Easter Palm / Passion of our Lord Service: April 10 at 10 am Easter Sunday Service: April 17 at 10am A church to call home. Open for in-person and online worship

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Evergreen Lutheran Church 5980 Highway 73, Evergreen, CO 80439 Rev. Sara Wirth www.EvergreenLutheran.org YouTube: www.YouTube.com/c/EvergreenLutheranChurch

This is our hope... AN EMPTY TOMB! Join us to celebrate the resurrection of Jesus. April 17th, 10:00 AM, 1036 El Rancho Rd, in Evergreen www.lomcc.org


20 Canyon Courier

April 14, 2022

A poetic March Madness EHS hosts competition akin to college basketball championship The famous poet Robert Frost once said, “Poetry is when an emotion has found its thought and the thought has found words.” Fostering more poetry writing was the impetus for Evergreen High School English teacher Bernadine Shimon to revive an old poetry tradition at the school by tying it into March Madness. The March Madness poetry competition for freshmen finished last month, with Liam Kelly’s “War” winning as the best poem, making it through the Sweet Sixteen, Elite Eight and the Final Four. He received a trophy and his name engraved on a plaque that now hangs in the school. The other three in the Final Four were “Addicted” by Avery Schraad, “Chambers” by Connor Geddes and “An Unfortunate Space” by Ben Head. Shimon said she decided to make the competition for freshmen only so they had something at the school that was solely theirs, and she hopes it will build a reputation and the community can get involved in future years.

Evergreen High School’s Final Four in the poetry March Madness, from left, Avery Schraad, Ben Head, Liam Kelly and Connor GedPHOTO BY DEB HURLEY BROBST des.

The winning poet Winning poet Liam enjoys writing poetry, and the idea for “War”

came as he was watching a “Star Wars” movie. He thought about how sad war was for families when they

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THE WINNING POEM War By Liam Kelly Who truly wins in war? Is it the little boy Who is now without a father The only thing to remind him of his dad Is a picture and a flag Is it the brave soldier? Who died for a country That didn’t care for him And now he’s laying in the ground An obstacle for others Is it a widowed wife? Her husband 6 feet under Left with only her kids And meaningless hope Who truly wins in war? After death takes its toll After the mourning is over After a nation is destroyed The answer is . . . nobody. could lose their loved ones. The poem begins with a boy who lost his father in war and only has a picture and a flag to remember him and moves to a widow who is left raising their children alone. “No one really wins in war,” explained Liam, who is also a lacrosse player. “Even for the country that wins, there are still lasting effects.” Liam said poetry was his favorite type of writing, something he figured out in an English class at Evergreen Middle School. He explained

that when he has trouble sleeping, he reads poetry on poetry websites. Movies are an inspiration, and his favorite topic to wax poetic about is love. “Love makes me happy,” Liam said. “Love can help you through the tough times. Love is everything.”

The rest of the Final Four Avery, Connor and Ben said while writing poetry was not a passion, they still enjoyed writing the poetry they entered as part of class assignments. Avery, a gymnast and a member of the EHS poms team, wrote a poem about being an athlete and being judged in those sports, making the topic relatable to many high school students. She likes that poetry can be subjective. Connor, a mountain biker and swimmer, said he entered because many can relate to his poem about the feeling when you don’t know the answer to a problem and work on finding it. Once his poem reached the Final Four, he said he has started contemplating writing more poetry. Ben, a swimmer, found inspiration for his poem after watching “Don’t Look Up,” writing about what it would be like to be in space and watch the Earth blow up. He said he prefers writing formal papers over poetry, though the assignment to write a poem was enjoyable.

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Canyon Courier 21

April 14, 2022

HAPPENINGS We’d like to know about events or activities of interest to the community. Visit www.canyoncourier.com/ calendar/ and post your event online for free. Email dbrobst@coloradocommunitymedia.com to get items in the print version of the paper. Items will appear in print on a space-available basis. THURSDAY Evergreen chamber business unplugged mixer: The Evergreen Area Chamber of Commerce will host its monthly business unplugged mixer at 5 p.m. April 14 at RPM Agency Insurance. For more information and to register, visit evergreenchamber.org. Monthly pop-up market: Sweet Hayden clothing store in downtown Evergreen is hosting a pop-up market from 4-8 p.m. the second Thursday of the month featuring local makers and small business owners. The markets will be April 14, May 12, June 9 and July 14.

THURSDAY — SUNDAY Easter services: Church of the Cross, 28253 Meadow Drive, will host Easter events: April 14: Maundy Thursday service at 7 p.m.; April 15: Good Friday Service at 7 p.m.; and April 17: Easter Sunday services at 8:30 and 10:30 a.m. FRIDAY Poms clinic for middle schoolers: The Evergreen High School varsity poms team will host a day skills clinic for sixth, seventh and eighth graders from 3:45-6:15 p.m. April 15 at EHS. Attendees will review basic skills and learn a dance routine. Cost is $35. Visit www.ehspoms. weebly.com to register.

EPRD Easter egg hunt: The Evergreen Park & Recreation District will host an Easter egg hunt from 4-5:30 p.m. April 15 at Buchanan Park. Cost is $5 per child and preregistration is required, and opens March 31. Visit the candy shop and the Easter bunny, and participate in the dog costume competition and the egg and spoon race. For more information, visit evergreenrecreation.com. SATURDAY Bailey Eggstravaganza: An Easter egg hunt, face painting, a goat petting zoo and the Easter bunny will be at the Eggstravaganza on April 16 at the Bailey library. The egg hunt for children 4 and under starts at 11 a.m., for 5- to 8-year-olds at 11:30 a.m. and for children 9 and older at noon.

TUESDAY Evergreen chamber’s benefits & breakfast: The Evergreen Area Chamber of Commerce will host a virtual benefits & breakfast at 8:30 a.m. April 19. For more information and to register, visit evergreenchamber.org. UPCOMING “Race to Nowhere” film viewing: Resilience1220 will host a viewing of the documentary “Race to Nowhere” from 5-7:15 p.m. April 21 at Evergreen Country Day School in El Rancho. The documentary discusses student cheating, disengagement from school, depression and young people arriving at college unprepared and uninspired. For more information and to register, visit Resilience1220.org. World Tai Chi & Quigong Day: World Tai Chi & Qigong Day will be celebrated at 10 a.m. April 23 at the Buchanan ponds. Contact Ellen at ellenarnold26@gmail.com for more information. 9Health Fair: Highland Rescue Team Ambulance District is hosting a 9Health Fair from 7-10:30 a.m. April 23 at Rockland Community Church, 17 S. Mount Vernon Country Club Road, Genesee. Learn more at 9health365.org/health-fairs. Open air market: An open-air market will be April 23-24 at Kings Emporium along U.S. 285 in King’s Valley. Art, antiques, crafts, live music and more will be part of the market that will run from 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Saturday and 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Sunday. Reserve a spot by texting 928-301-231 for more information. EMD candidates forum: The Evergreen Metro District will host a candidates forum at 5:30 p.m. April 28 at the Evergreen Elks Lodge. Evergreen chamber President Nancy Judge will moderate. The Art of the Egg: Entries in the 14th annual Art of the Egg, Evergreen’s egg-cellent egg design contest, will be displayed at Go Paint! through April 28 with the finale party from 4-7:30 p.m. April 28. Building inclusion for LGBTQIA+ youth: Resilience1220 will host a panel discussing building inclusion for LGBTQIA+ youth from 4-7 p.m. April 30 in the Clear Creek High School auditorium. To register, visit Resilience1220.org. “Wildlife in the Rockies” at Shadow Mountain Gallery: Enjoy up-close viewing of Colorado wildlife at Shadow Mountain Gallery’s new exhibit, “Wildlife in the Rockies” in May. Local artists display one-of-a-kind pieces. The gallery is located on in downtown Evergreen between Java Groove and Beau Jo’s. It is open daily from 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Free legal clinic: A free legal clinic for people with no attorney will be from 2 to 5 p.m. May 7. By telephone or video, volunteer attorneys will answer questions, help fill out forms, and explain the process and procedure for all areas SEE HAPPENINGS, P22

All-State Football Player Stephen King Trades Grid-Iron for Mines Playing sports was a place where I could forget about school and relieve the stress of the day. Not only did it bring many admirable memories, but sports were also arguably one of the most important keys to developing my character. I began playing football in second grade. During middle school I participated in track, basketball, and baseball. In high school I set many school records in track and qualified for the All-state Football Game. During which, I was able to play with an extremely talented group of young individuals that truly shared the same passion for the sport. Those bonding relationships are still with me today. Being recognized and chosen for the All-State Football Game by a multitude of coaches around the state gave me a satisfactory end to high school sports. Academically, I was a member, and eventually President, of both Interact Club and National Honor Society. Throughout my high school career, I developed an aptitude for science and math which highly influenced my choice to go to the Colorado School of Mines for college. I knew that a degree from Mines would keep doors open for me. Many individuals that I look up

to have told me about the value of such a degree and its benefits. One of those people I looked up to is Heather Newman, my Gilpin County High School (GCHS) chemistry teacher. She was someone who always had a smile and a positive attitude no matter what happened. There was always a bright side to a situation. Newman sparked my aptitude for science and luckily, she kept my passion for learning science strong. Her class was always somewhere I could stop by in my free hour, talk, and get the help I needed. Gilpin’s staff and administration made sure I stayed on track to achieve my goal. If I ever needed individualized help, the teachers were always able to help and answer any of my questions. Though a small school, GCHS was a place where I always had support when I needed it. GCHS school taught me much about the world of Academia. I am still very early in my academic career at Mines, but as of now, I am planning to get my chemical engineering degree and go into the renewable energy resources field to develop cutting edge renewable technologies for the future. I am Gilpin County School!


22 Canyon Courier

April 14, 2022

HAPPENINGS FROM PAGE 21

of civil litigation. Pre-registration for individual 15-minute appointments is available by calling 303235-5275 or visiting jeffcolibrary. bibliocommons.com/events/search/ q=free%20legal%20clinic. Community Wildfire Preparedness Day: Community Wildfire Preparedness Day will be Saturday, May 7: from 8:30-11:30 a.m. at Elk Creek Fire Station 1, 11993 Blackfoot Road, and from 1:30-4:30 p.m. at Evergreen Fire Rescue Station 2, 1802 Bergen Parkway. The event is sponsored by Elk Cree and Evergreen fire departments, and Rotary Wildfire Ready. Exhibit at CAE: Center for the Arts Evergreen is hosting (Re) Collection through May 7 featuring nearly 50 original 2-D and 3-D works by more than 40 primarily mountain and metro area artists. This memory-themed exhibit also includes an audio component of recorded personal accounts that will be added to by patrons throughout the exhibition’s run. For more information, visit evergreenarts.org. Women in Business luncheon:

The Evergreen Area Chamber of Commerce will host its Women in Business luncheon and Hall of Fame induction at 11 a.m. Thursday, May 12, at the Mount Vernon Canyon Club. Register at evergreenchamber.org. Evergreen farmers market: The Evergreen farmers market will be from 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Tuesdays from May 31-Sept. 27 at Boone Mountain Sports, 2962 Evergreen Parkway. Thirty-five vendors will offer food, drinks, wellness and crafts. Lake Concert Series: EPRD Summer Concert Series at the Evergreen Lake House will be from 4:30-8:30 p.m. June 22, July 20 and Aug. 10. The lineup of performers will be announced soon. For more information, contact Pam Lindquist, Lake House facility specialist, at 720-8801310 or visit evergreenrecreation. com. ONGOING Caregiver support groups: Mount Evans Home Health Care & Hospice offers two monthly groups to provide emotional support services for caregivers helping ill, disabled or elderly loved ones. An inperson support group meets every third Monday from 4-6 p.m. at 3081 Bergen Peak Road, Evergreen, and

a virtual support group meets every first Tuesday from 10 a.m.-noon via Zoom. Call 303-674-6400 to learn how to connect to the group virtual call. For more information visit mtevans. org/services/emotional-support/. Yoga mindfulness group for ages 13-17: Resilience1220 offers a Santosha-Yoga Mindfulness Group from 4-5 p.m. Mondays at 6949 Highway 73, Suite 3, Evergreen. Register at Resilience1220.org. Parkinson’s disease support group: A Parkinson’s disease support group meets the first Friday of the month from 1-3 p.m. at Evergreen Christian Church, 27772 Iris Drive, Evergreen. For more information, email esears@parkinsonrockies.org. Mountain Foothills Rotary meetings: Mountain Foothills Rotary meets at 6:30 p.m. Wednesdays both in person at Mount Vernon Canyon Club at 24933 Club House Circle, Genesee, and via Zoom. Join the Zoom meeting at https:// us02web.zoom.us/j/81389224272, meeting ID 813 8922 4272, phone 346248-7799. College Age Community: Resilience1220 has started a support group called College Age Commu-

nity that meets from 5:30 to 6:30 p.m. Wednesdays. For information and the Zoom link, email lior@wisetreewellness.com. Beyond the Rainbow: Resilience1220 offers Beyond the Rainbow, which is two support groups that meet from 7-8:30 p.m. the second Wednesday of the month. One is a safe group for those 12-20 and the other is group for parents and caregivers wanting support for raising an LGBTQ child. To RSVP, contact Lior Alon at lior@wisetreewellness. com. Hiwan Museum tours available: The Hiwan Museum is open for tours of the historic log house, 28473 Meadow Drive in Evergreen, from noon-4 p.m. Tuesday through Friday and noon-4:30 p.m. on weekends. Tour guides will share the history of the house and its occupants. Reservations for house tours are encouraged at www.jeffco. us/1251/ and can be scheduled on the half hour. Outdoor self-guided tours are available at any time. LGBTQIA+ Movie Night: Resilience1220 offers movie night every other Thursday night. For more information for dates and movies, visit Resilience1220.org.

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Canyon Courier 23

April 14, 2022

Evergreen girls soccer ends busy week with win over Green Mountain BY DENNIS PLEUSS JEFFCO PUBLIC SCHOOLS

LAKEWOOD — Evergreen’s girls soccer team got a well-deserved rest this past weekend. The Cougars — No. 1 in the CHSAANow.com Class 4A girls soccer rankings last week — played three games in four days. Evergreen wrapped up the busy stretch with a big 4-1 victory over 4A Jeffco League rival Green Mountain on April 8 at Lakewood Memorial Field. “It’s a really hard week to play three times,” Evergreen coach Peter Jeans said. “Mentally we were super sharp in all three games. Our mentally was spot on today. That was awesome.” Evergreen dominated Bear Creek 10-0 on April 5, but suffered a 3-1 loss to 5A Jeffco’s Columbine on April 6. It was the Cougars’ first regular-season loss since the 2019 season. The COVID-19 pandemic cancelled the 2020 season and Evergreen’s lone loss last year came in the 4A state championship game. “That’s the ultimate goal. That’s a big motivator,” Evergreen senior Catherine Rapp said of Evergreen losing 2-1 to Holy Family in the 4A state title game in Colorado Springs last June. “I felt last year we could have won it, but didn’t have the right mindset in that last game. This year we have really refocused and tried to be really close as a team.” The Cougars (5-1, 3-0 in league) have already proved they are one of the most potent offenses in 4A. Evergreen already has four players — Catherine

Evergreen senior Rami Rapp (10) and Green Mountain freshman Sasha Calanni (19) battle for control of the ball during the Class 4A Jeffco League game April 8 at Lakewood Memorial Field. Rapp’s goal in the 35th minute helped the Cougars to a 4-1 victory over the Rams. PHOTOS BY DENNIS PLEUSS/JEFFCO PUBLIC SCHOOLS

Rapp (6 goals), Lindsay Jeans (6 goals), Rami Rapp (5 goals) and Mary Cox (4 goals) — with at least four goals on the season. Lindsay Jeans — daughter of Coach Jeans — got the scoring started against Green Mountain (3-2, 1-1) with a penalty kick in the 16th minute. Catherine — one of the three Rapp triplets — added to the lead with a goal a minute later. “We wanted to control the field and we had a goal of winning 75 percent of (50/50) balls,” Catherine said. “We wanted to stay together as a team and play our game.” Green Mountain battled back with a

Green Mountain junior Chelsea Young (22) goes down after a tackle by Evergreen senior Elizabeth Rapp (7) during the first half April 8 at Lakewood Memorial Field. The Cougars won 4-1 to remain undefeated in conference play.

goal by senior Avery Kroeger off a corner kick in the 23rd minute. However, the Cougars responded with Rami Rapp putting in a goal five minutes before halftime. “The third goal was huge and we wanted to keep going forward,” Coach Jeans said. “We are always trying to get that next goal.” Evergreen got the final goal with the lone tally in the second half. Lindsay Jeans put in her second goal of the game on a shot from distance against the wind that sailed over leaping Green Mountain goalie Taya Olguin. The win leaves Evergreen tied with Golden (5-2-1, 3-0) atop the conference

standings. The Cougars and Demons have a big showdown scheduled for April 19 at the North Area Athletic Complex that should play a huge roll in determining the league champion. “We would like to win our league and it’s a really hard league to win,” Coach Jeans said. “We don’t take anything for granted. We have to play hard every time out because if you lose one game you aren’t going to win the league. I’ve put it as a focal point. You get to hang a banner.” Dennis Pleuss is the Sports Information Director for Jeffco Public Schools. For more Jeffco coverage, go to CHSAANow.com.

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24 Canyon Courier

Hobby takes hold across Denver metro area and beyond BY BOB WOOLEY BWOOLEY@COLORADOCOMMUNITYMEDIA.COM

B

eekeeping has seen its popularity grow in many places across the country in recent years, and the Denver metro area is no exception. From community gardens to backyard hives, more and more people are keeping honey bees and often selling the luscious, golden liquid reward that comes from this hip hobby. Honey bees have become the main beneficiaries of the “save the bees” movement. According to researchers, there are around 25,000 different types of bees, but for obvious reasons, the honey bee is the most beneficial for hobbyists

LOCAL

April 14, 2022

LIFE

to raise. Not native to North America, honey bees came to the continent with the earliest European immigrants. In recent years, a cottage industry has sprung up around honey bees, with several fullservice shops in the Denver area offering nascent beekeepers with all of the supplies and advice they would need to start managing their own hives. But first, new beekeepers might want to consult one of the many educational organizations that exist locally. The Denver Bee and the Mile High Bee clubs provide support and education to the Front Range beekeeping community, and the Butterfly Pavilion in Westminster offers a Beekeeping Bootcamp, a program with sessions running throughout the year. People can sign up for the whole series or attend individual classes. Biologist Lorna McCallister manages the Butterfly Pavilion’s hives and serves as the

Beekeeping Bootcamp instructor. She said spreading out the course over five sessions allows her to guide students through the entire beekeeping process. She said the pavilion also has five apiaries — collections of beehives — in community gardens across the metro area. They serve as great educational tools while also helping pollination around the Denver area. Beekeeping Bootcamp is certified through the Colorado Beekeepers Association, which McCallister said allows SEE BUZZ, P25

FROM TOP: Aspiring beekeepers learn about the craft from environmental interpreter Susan Bennett at Happiness Gardens in Wheat Ridge. Aspiring beekeepers get up close and personal with residents of a Happiness Gardens hive in Wheat Ridge. Susan Bennett gives an introductory beekeeping lesson at Happiness Gardens in Wheat Ridge.

PHOTO SBY BOB WOOLEY


Canyon Courier 25

April 14, 2022

BUZZ FROM PAGE 24

students who complete the course to become an apprentice beekeeper if they wish to take their hobby to the next level. Those interested in the program still have time to join. McCallister said the first class was archived, so catching up via video would be easy and the live bees used in upcoming courses won’t actually be delivered until the end of April. “Beekeeping is really big in Colorado — especially around Denver,” McCallister said. In fact, beekeeping has become so popular that some cities have gotten involved. Susan Bennett is an environmental interpreter for the City of Wheat Ridge and resident bee expert at Happiness Gardens, a community resource that allows gardening enthusiasts to register for full- or half-sized plots to grow fruits, vegetables and flowers. As a “science nerd,” Bennett said she loves

practically everything about the buzzing insects. Some conservationists have recently begun questioning whether the proliferation of honey bees might in fact be harmful to native bee populations that have to compete for resources with an ever-increasing honey bee population. Bennett said there are many scientific papers on the subject, and she’s keeping an eye on them to see what is ultimately discovered. But for now, she thinks adhering to best practices can go a long way to benefitting all pollinators. She said if people are interested in bees, the best thing they can do is plant a native garden that includes plant varieties that will flower through as much of the season as possible. “If you do something to support the honey bees, it’s probably going to support the native bees too,” Bennett said. “Because the things that you’re going to be doing for honey bees — planting more plants that have a variety of blooming times, reducing your use of pesticides — those things are going to help all of the pollinators.” She advises people to be aware of pests, such as the varroa destructor

mite, which can have a devastating effect on the honey bee population. Another way to be a good steward of the ecosystem is to make sure diseases don’t transfer over to the native bee population. For those who want to participate in the process of contributing to pollination and getting their own supply of honey without the work, fear not. There’s a way to get in on the experience of owning a hive without risking the stings or undertaking the learning curve. Best Bees is a company with professional beekeepers who will come to a person’s home or office, do the work for them to set up a hive and let them keep the honey. Noah Wilson-Rich founded the company while pursuing his doctorate in honey bee immunology, and Best Bees now operates in the Denver metro area as well as more than a dozen other cities across the U.S. The company employs more than 50 professional beekeepers who manage hives for corporate and residential clients. Wilson-Rich said the colony collapse phenomenon that occurred around 2006 raised awareness about the plight

of bees. “By having this beekeeping service that’s connected to research, we’re able to make maps of people’s home gardens, beehives and rooftop beehives in downtown Denver and Boulder and say ‘OK, where are hot spots for bee health? Where are bees doing really well?’” Wilson-Rich said. “And then ask, ‘why? Why is that? What flowers are around there? What’s the pesticide use? What diseases are we seeing?’ So, it’s been a really fun approach. We call it citizen science.” Wilson-Rich said the data his company collects is helpful in several ways. One is connected to NASA’s Earth observation program that utilizes satellites aimed at Earth to collect information about things like weather patterns and land use. The partnership allows Best Bees to use that data to create maps that factor in things like climate change in relation to the health of their clients’ hive health. Best Bees also recently launched The Urban Beekeeping Lab, a nonprofit that uses genomics — think 23andMe — to further its mission to improve bee health.

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26 Canyon Courier

April 14, 2022

How Coloradans can prepare for a wildfire emergency BY CORBETT STEVENSON ROCKY MOUNTAIN PBS

Late last year when the Marshall Fire ravaged parts of Boulder County and over 1,000 homes across the City of Louisville and the Town of Superior, Colorado residents were left worried about the future of the state if fires like this continue. Climate experts have weighed in and said that as the climate continues to change and water dries up, more fires can be expected. In addition, traditional notions of “fire season” could be a thing of the past as fires become a year-round problem. After the NCAR Fire in March of 2022 in Boulder, chief of the Boulder Fire Rescue Wildland Division Brian Oliver said, “the concern is that any time there’s not snow, it’s fire.” While a warming and drying climate is a significant part of the picture, there are myriad other factors to consider including a century of state and federal forestry policy and the building of homes in disaster-prone areas. Still the most important thing you can do now as fire season becomes longer is keep yourself and your family safe in case of an emergency. We’ve compiled a list of tips, resources and advice to make sure you and your family are prepared. Before a fire Before there is any threat of a fire, everyone should have some basics prepared in case of emergency. Build an emergency kit - take an afternoon to have everyone in the family gather some important items that can all be kept in a safe and secure location in case the need for evacuation arises. These items should be kept in easy-to-carry containers like backpacks and kept close to an exit so they can be retrieved upon evacuation. • Water - The Red Cross suggests one gallon of water per person per day for three days in case of evacuation. • Food - non-perishable and easy to prepare. • A first aid kit with enough supplies for each person in the household. • Flashlight and extra batteries. • Hand crank or battery-powered radio. • A multitool. • A seven-day supply of necessary medications. • Some personal hygiene items like soap, deodorant, diapers etc. • Family and emergency contact information. • A map of the area. • Copies of important personal documents such as land deeds, birth

In the aftermath of the Marshal Fire, experts are recommending ways to prepare for tragedy. COURTESY OF THE COLORADO SUN

certificates, etc. (Original copies of these documents should be kept in a fireproof safe in the home.) Make an emergency plan - before disaster strikes, take the time to have a plan of action for yourself and your family. Your plan will vary based on many factors, but here are some things to consider while getting started. Consider your unique needs - take into account special accommodations for any family members who are senior citizens, disabled, young children or babies. Make sure to include pets as well. • Plan a place to go - in case of wildfire evacuation, make sure you have a safe place to go such as a family member or friend’s house or hotels along your evacuation route, as well as a plan for how to get there. • Have a plan of communication with your family. This should include an outside emergency contact everyone can stay connected with

and a plan for how to receive important information, such as a radio. • Make arrangements for large livestock and farm animals in case of evacuation. • Make sure everyone knows the emergency plan, especially young children. Stay informed Sign up for emergency alerts and familiarize yourself with emergency services in your county through this list. • Check for any existing emergency plans from your place of work, school or anywhere else you may find yourself in an emergency. • Read through Colorado’s Division of Homeland Security and Emergency Management wildfire safety page. In case of a fire emergency In an emergency, the first thing to do is to remain calm and follow your previously made preparedness plans. Here is a list of important things to keep in mind if the need to evacuate arises. Follow instructions - If an evacuation notice is issued or if you feel evacuation is necessary, always evacuate. Stay informed - As the emergency will be ongoing, make sure you have a reliable way to receive information such as where you should be evacuating to and how quickly. Pack emergency kits - With your emergency kit already packed, it should be easy and fast to grab

what you need and leave as soon as possible. Make sure to grab any last-minute items not packed in the bag such as wallet, keys, phone and chargers. Prepare all pets and animals Make sure all pets are packed and ready to go in a safe and secure way such as a crate or small carrier tank. For large livestock or farm animals, make sure to prepare them for transport. Prepare your home for evacuation - Assuming there is enough time, try and prepare your home as much as possible for fire. Close all windows and doors but leave them unlocked. Leave lights on so your house can be seen in smoky conditions. Remove all lightweight and flammable curtains. Turn off your gas at the meter if possible. Shut off the air conditioning/heat. If you cannot evacuate - CAL FIRE recommends the following: Call 911 and inform authorities of your location. • Fill sinks and tubs with cold water. • Keep doors and windows closed but unlocked. • Stay inside your house. • Stay away from outside walls and windows. This story is from Rocky Mountain PBS, a nonprofit public broadcaster providing community stories across Colorado over the air and online. Used by permission. For more, and to support Rocky Mountain PBS, visit rmpbs.org.


Canyon Courier 27

April 14, 2022

The 32nd Annual

Good News Breakfast April 19, 2022

7 a.m. Jefferson County Fairgrounds

Shining Stars: Youth Shaping a Bright Future for our Community Good News Breakfast Program Welcome ....................................................................................................................................... Sara Spaulding, Chair, Good News Coalition Invocation ...................................................................................................................Father Tim Phenna, Calvary Episcopal Church, Golden Honor Guard ....................................................................................................................................................... Jefferson County Sheriff’s Office Pledge of Allegiance..................................................................................................................................................................... Sara Spaulding National Anthem ............................................................... Lily Kate and Quinn Shroder, Summit Ridge Middle and Dakota Ridge students Speaker Introduction ................................................................................................................................. Neal Browne, Master of Ceremonies Keynote Speaker...............................................................................................................Yul Moldauer, Olympian and Golden High alumnus 2022 Honorees............................................................................................................................................ Neal Browne, Master of Ceremonies 2022 Hall of Fame Recipient .............................................................................................................................................................Gary Messick

Keynote Speaker Yul Moldauer is a Golden High School graduate and award-winning gymnast who participated in the 2020 Tokyo Olympics, winning fifth for team and sixth for floor.

2022 Hall of Fame Gary Messick has volunteered on the Good News Breakfast Steering Committee for nine years and chairs the Decorations Committee, creating a fun, festive environment at each breakfast.

2022 Honorees Burro Patrol of Jeffco Open Space is a volunteer organization of youth and their burros in Jeffco Open Space Parks. Compass Montessori fourth through sixth graders Spread the Love project in collaboration with the Wheat Ridge Police Department helps neighbors in need every year on Valentine’s Day. Julie Dalrymple, Golden High School, started and runs “Need for Clean,” a nonprofit that collects hygiene products and clothing items for students around the community. Rhys Hanson, Conifer High School, has completed over 200 hours of community service during high school. His volunteer activities include Colorado Ovarian Cancer Alliance, LifeBridge Food Pantry, Conifer Chamber of Commerce and National Honor Society. Chrisly Kelly, a junior at Jefferson Academy, has overcome incredible hardships through his spirit and determination. He has worked at the City of Westminster summer camp, plays varsity soccer and last year won the 3A state title in the long jump. Payton Kruse, a senior at Golden High School and Student Council member, hosted a senior Friendsgiving event and helped pair seniors with staff members to develop special relationships. Joseph Osgood, a junior at Lakewood High School, recently started a nonprofit, WHYHO, We Help You Help Others, to obtain furniture donations and deliver them to families in need, many of whom are recent refugees. Mason Rosser, a Conifer High School senior, volunteers every Wednesday after school at the Mountain Resource Center food pantry. He is also captain of the football team and a member of the marching band.

2022 Sponsors Silver Sponsors:

• City of Arvada • City of Lakewood • City of Wheat Ridge • The Family Tree

Bronze Sponsors:

• Jefferson County Library Foundation • CO American Association of University Women (AAUW) • Jefferson County Office of Workforce Development • Jefferson County Human Services

2022 Good News Steering Committee Sara Spaulding, City of Wheat Ridge/WRPD, chair • Neal Browne, Touchpoint Video • Christopher Edmunds, City of Westminster Tawney Eisenbraun, The Action Center • Amanda Gallatin, Jefferson County Human Services • Emily Gedeon, City of Golden Johanna Glover, Family Tree • Brady Johnson, Arvada Fire Protection District • Andrea McDermott, Westerra Credit Union Tori Merritts, Community volunteer • Gary Messick, Action Center Volunteer • Audyn Quintana, PRMG Mortgage Group Dana Rinderknecht, Dino Ridge • Marilyn Saltzman, Community volunteer • Jo Schantz, Jefferson County Library Foundation Dave Snelling Arvada Police Department • Karlyn Tilley, Jefferson County Sheriff’s Office • Rev. Jack Van Ens, Creative Growth Ministries Brooke Williams, Jefferson County Education Association

Special thanks to: Applewood Kiwanis • Jefferson County Sheriff’s and City of Golden Police • Jefferson County Sheriff’s Honor Guard Jefferson County Fairgrounds staff • Steamers Catering • Warren Tech AV Students

Tickets are $15 pp, $20 for two. Available online at goodnewsjeffco.org or at the door on April 19, 2022.


28 Canyon Courier

April 14, 2022

Advocates want to create a statewide recycling program And charge companies to do it BY MICHAEL BOOTH AND JESSE PAUL THE COLORADO SUN

State Sen. Kevin Priola had his recycling epiphany while staring at an empty pizza box. The grease stains on the lid spelled it out for the Henderson Republican: Colorado recycles only about 15% of its waste because recycling is too hard. Even a dedicated recycler like Priola was surprised to learn that cardboard with food stains is not welcome in the paper bin. He’s learned to rip the post-pepperoni top off the pizza box and recycle the rest. And Priola’s doubled down on recycling by being a co-prime sponsor on one of the most ambitious recent attempts at improving Colorado’s abysmal recycling rates. Priola and two Democrats are leading the “Producers Responsibility” bill in the legislature, which would require the companies whose brand is on the packaging to charge themselves a fee to fund improved local recycling services across Colorado. Cities or counties without their own recycling services could take the fees to start up a program. Places like Denver or Boulder who run or contract for extensive recycling could use the fees to expand — many apartment dwellers don’t get recycling services, for example. Or they could turn recycling programs over to nonprofits and private companies likely to enter the market. Giving recycling access to all Colorado consumers and making the sort-and-return systems easier to use would cut deeply into trash across the state, Priola said. “If you can get 60, 70, 80% of the people to start doing the right thing, that’ll mean less resources being wasted. Less water being wasted. Less air pollution. A more vibrant local economy,” he said. One reason a Republican like Priola got on board was the effort to be business-friendly: Recycling

Single-stream recyclables are pictured in a nearly full Boulder County Recycling Center bin on Wednesday, April 21, 2021.

PHOTO BY ANDY COLWELL/SPECIAL TO THE COLORADO SUN

advocates say a steadier stream of packaging materials like aluminum, glass and cardboard will eventually ease the supply chain woes and inflation plaguing many American companies. Also, the businesses creating and delivering packaging are in charge of the proposed program. House Bill 1355 would create an industry council to study how much money is needed for a statewide recycling plan and would let the council set the rates needed to raise that money. “So many of these businesses are getting hit with real disruptions in their ability to get materials, which is directly connected to the fact that we’re throwing so many materials away,” said Kate Bailey, research and policy director at the nonprofit recycler Eco-Cycle. Businesses who use lots of packaging have gone along with similar programs in Canada and a couple of U.S. states, Bailey said, proving a comprehensive, producer-funded system can work. Businesses with less than $5 million in revenue will be exempt. And closer to home, Bailey said, putting all paint recycling in Colorado under a similar duesfunded nonprofit called Paint Care has increased paint recycling while saving local governments money.

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It’s possible the bill is a nohoper this late in a session already crammed with complex issues like how to refund surplus revenue to taxpayers and how to regulate toxic emissions. Advocates, including cities such as Westminster and nonprofits like Eco-Cycle and CoPIRG, expect mofd opposition from small to medium businesses worried about costs and bureaucracy than from giants like Coca-Cola and Molson Coors. And Gov. Jared Polis has been wary of increasing costs for Colorado residents and businesses given recent inflation pressure. “It will not be a noticeable price increase to consumers,” Priola said in introducing the bill, along with co-prime sponsors Rep. Lisa Cutter, D-Morrison, and Sen. Julie Gonzales, D-Denver. Advocates say the dues usually amount to fractions of a penny for each package and result in steep increases in recycling. Bailey said average dues in similar Canadian programs are three cents per pound for aluminum cans, with a pound of aluminum making about 30 cans in a pound. Hearings starting April 7 are likely to be packed with both supporters and business representatives concerned about the potential require-

ments. Local governments also plan to raise voices on the bill, many of them in support of a more robust state recycling effort. “In Clear Creek County and other rural parts of the state, higher costs for recycling services and transportation are forcing hard decisions,” said George Marlin, a Clear Creek County Commissioner and president of Colorado Communities for Climate Action. “Why should communities have to choose between housing, childcare and recycling, when so much of the business community wants to be part of the solution?” The bill “makes recycling as easy to access as trash pickup,” said Jefferson County Commissioner Andy Kerr. Including those who produce and deliver the packaging, he said, ties the cost of recycling back to the original materials. “My constituents across the county want to have good recycling options.” This story is from The Colorado Sun, a journalist-owned news outlet based in Denver and covering the state. For more, and to support The Colorado Sun, visit coloradosun.com. The Colorado Sun is a partner in the Colorado News Conservancy, owner of Colorado Community Media.

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Canyon Courier 29

April 14, 2022

Diana DeGette and other lawmakers grill oil executives BY CAITLYN KIM COLORADO PUBLIC RADIO

In Washington, it was a contentious time on Capitol Hill April 6, as six oil and gas executives faced questions from lawmakers about the high cost of gasoline. Democrats focused on the fact companies are making record profits, while Republicans took aim at President Joe Biden’s energy policies. Colorado Congresswoman Diana DeGette chairs the House Energy and Commerce Committee’s oversight panel, which held the hearing. She said high gas prices are constraining “constituents’ budgets and their patience.” As she spoke, DeGette displayed a chart behind her showing the price of crude oil going up and down, even as the price of gas has risen and stayed high, despite crude prices starting to drop. “If the price of gas is driven by the global market, why is the price of oil coming down but the price at the pump is still near record highs? If it’s an issue of supply and demand, wouldn’t that be reflected in the global price of oil as well?” DeGette asked. “Something doesn’t add up.” Oil executives and Democrats, including DeGette, spar over the reason why prices are so high The oil executives argued it’s not as simple as comparing global prices on any given day to gas station prices. “Oil that’s entering a refinery could have been purchased at a higher price, and therefore that price then flows through all the way to the station. It’s not necessarily an instantaneous market,” explained David Lawler, head of BP America. Chevron CEO Michael Wirth added, “these things do correlate over the long term but in the short term, they don’t always go up and down.” But many Democrats questioned whether companies are giving the full picture about the ongoing high prices. “While I understand that you simply cannot flip the switch or turn on the spigot, you must be honest

about the main reason that some companies are choosing to ramp up production slowly,” said Democratic Rep. Debbie Dingell. “A survey of oil company executives by the Dallas Federal Reserve found that nearly 60 percent of oil companies are restraining growth because of investor pressure.” The oil executives did acknowledge that their companies earned billions last year, after losing billions in 2020 when the pandemic tanked demand. And many of the CEOs said they would not stop paying stock dividends or pursuing buybacks this year. They also pushed back on the accusation of price gouging, noting many of the companies did not own the gas stations. “I want to be absolutely clear: We do not control the market price of crude oil or natural gas, nor of refined products like gasoline and diesel fuel, and we have no tolerance for price gouging,” Wirth said during his opening remarks. Meanwhile, Republicans try to take advantage of what they see as midterm elections talking point Republicans dismissed this line of questioning from Democrats. Ranking member Rep. Morgan Griffith used part of his time to ask if oil companies were taking advantage of the situation in Ukraine to keep prices artificially high. The oil executives all said no. Energy and Commerce Committee Ranking Cathy McMorris Rodgers described the hearing as “a distraction.” “Today is purely political. President Biden needs cover for his war on American energy,” she said in her opening statement. Republicans also see a political advantage in energy prices, believing it’s an issue that could hurt Democrats entering the midterm elections. They used their time to talk about the Biden Administration’s moratorium on new drilling leases on federal lands and regulations they claim impede production. “Does this whole mountain of red tape by President [Biden] make it harder for you to produce more energy in America?” Rep. Steve Scalise asked.

A gas pump at a station in Littleton. Gasoline prices have spiked in 2022. PHOTO BY ROBERT TANN

Most of the oil executives said yes. Republicans also criticized Democrats’ focus on expanding America’s supply of green energy, arguing it has resulted in less investment in fossil fuel production. DeGette said this debate around more drilling and more lease sales indicates to her that the country needs a long-term energy plan. “The things that Republicans were suggesting — more permitting, more pipelines, “drill, baby drill” — the executives told me when I talked to them before the hearing today, there is no switch to flip. It’s not like any of those things would help us get more supply today,” she said. She said the people who could were the executives testifying and they “refused to say what they would do.” Executives maintain that gas prices are complex, but DeGette argues they could take a cut in profits to reduce prices If there was a theme that the oil executives tried to emphasize — when they got a chance to answer more than a yes or no during the questioning — it was that gas pricing is complex. “Demand has recovered and is

now surpassing pre-pandemic levels for many transportation fuels,” Chevron President Gretchen Watkins noted in her written testimony. “But refinery throughput has not yet caught up with the post-pandemic surge in demand. The loss of Russian supply from the global market has only added pressure on an already strained refining industry that has yet to fully catch up with increasing demand.” There have been a number of proposals on both sides of the aisle floated to help reduce the price of oil, from a windfall tax for these producers to a gas tax holiday to easing the regulatory burden. DeGette asked the executives to go back to their boards and see what they could do to reduce prices at the pumps now, even if it meant a smaller profit for them. House Speaker Nancy Pelosi said last week that her caucus wanted to wait and hear what the oil executives had to say before moving forward on any legislation. This story is from Colorado Public Radio, a nonprofit news source. Used by permission. For more, and to support CPR News, visit cpr.org. FROM

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30 Canyon Courier

April 14, 2022

Climate bills have drawn most lobbying in legislature Spending continues to rise, with Xcel Energy topping list BY SANDRA FISH THE COLORADO SUN

Efforts to address climate change are among the most lobbied measures at the Capitol this year as a host of businesses and nonprofits seek to pass, block or amend them. Five of the top 10 lobbied bills this year at the General Assembly address greenhouse gas emissions, according to a Colorado Sun analysis of lobbying disclosures. Others on the top 10 list include measures seeking to prohibit employers from punishing employees who use cannabis when they aren’t working, which was rejected last week, and to ban flavored nicotine and tobacco products. Nearly 600 individual lobbyists and lobbying firms are representing more than 1,100 clients before the legislature and state agencies this year. And spending by those clients to influence government continues to rise as the legislature enters the home stretch of its 2022 lawmaking term. Spending from July 2021 through the end of February totaled $29.4 million. That’s up from $26.2 million during the same period of the 2020-21 fiscal year and $24.5 million in 2019-20.

Lawmakers and lobbyists are seen at the Capitol on Jan. 12 in Denver at the start of Colorado’s General Assembly’s 2022 sesPHOTO BY OLIVIA SUN/THE COLORADO SUN sion.

Most-lobbied bills not always most publicized It’s not always the case that the most-lobbied bills at the Capitol are the ones that garner the most public attention. Take the measure to affirm abortion access in Colorado and prevent local governments from hindering access to abortion or birth control. It drew late-night public hearings and a 24-hour House floor debate, yet only 53 lobbyists registered to represent 31 clients on the legislation, House Bill 1279. (It’s now awaiting Gov. Jared Polis’ signature.) Senate Bill 153, which seeks to block insider threats to Colorado’s

THE COLORADO SUN

election system, prompted plenty of emails and phone calls from opponents who believe false claims that the 2020 presidential election was stolen. But the measure has drawn only 36 lobbyists representing 17 clients. None of those clients opposed the bill. That’s considerably fewer than the 116 clients trying to influence the top two bills in The Sun’s lobbying analysis: Senate Bill 138, which sought to limit the sale of of gas-powered lawn equipment, and House Bill 1152, which would have prevented employers from taking action against workers who use cannabis products on their own time. (The former was amended, and the latter was voted down last week by a

House committee.) And 141 lobbyists are representing 87 clients on House Bill 1064, a measure aimed at keeping flavored nicotine products away from young people. Some of the most lobbied bills this year didn’t make it very far in the legislative process. In fact, three of the top 10 lobbied measures never made it past their first committee. House Bill 1138 would have given employers an income-tax credit to encourage employees to use alternative transportation to and from work but failed 9-1 in the House Finance Committee. Senate Bill 131 sought to restrict the use of pesticides in SEE CLIMATE, P31

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Canyon Courier 31

April 14, 2022

CLIMATE FROM PAGE 30

certain places in an effort to “protect pollinators,” but it failed 6-1 in the Senate Agriculture and Natural Resources Committee. And March 24, a House committee rejected the measure allowing employees to use marijuana on their own time. All but one of the other top 10 bills are still going through the legislative process. A measure to protect whistleblowers in public health emergencies awaits action on the Senate floor. Top spenders often lobbying on top bills Xcel Energy is signed up to lobby on seven of the 10 most-lobbied bills at the Capitol this year. The company is also the top spender on lobbying in the first eight months of the fiscal year, which began on July 1. Spending nearly $286,000, Xcel pays eight lobbyists, three of whom are employees and the rest contractors. The American Association of Retired Persons, or AARP, was second in lobbying spending, paying two employees nearly $144,000 to lobby on more than 70 bills, including two in the top 10. The Colorado Association of Home Builders lobbied on eight of the top 10 measures, while paying four individual lobbyists a total of $132,000. The Colorado Contractors Association and Colorado Retail Council each lobbied on six of the top 10 bills. The contractors came in third

THE COLORADO SUN

in spending, paying David Foster $133,000, while the retail council came in eighth in spending, paying The Howes Group nearly $128,000. COPIC, the state’s primary medical malpractice insurer, didn’t lobby on any of the top 10 bills. It paid Nexus Policy Group $131,000 to lobby on six other measures. Several groups spending to influence public on issues Reaching out to lawmakers or regulators isn’t the only way lobbyists or their clients try to influence public policy. Some also report spending to get the public to lobby lawmakers on issues. Advance Colorado Action lobbyist Michael Fields, for example, reported spending $300,000 on lobbying so far this year. Of that, $200,000 went

to digital ads on fentanyl penalties, several of which target Democratic lawmakers running in competitive state Senate contests this year. Another $100,000 went to digital ads and direct mail opposing a measure to allow government employees to bargain for pay raises. Advance Colorado Action is a nonprofit that doesn’t report its donors and changed its name earlier this year after operating as Unite for Colorado. Jesse Mallory, executive director of Americans for Prosperity’s Colorado branch, reported spending nearly $89,000 on digital ads, door hangers and canvassing to encourage lawmakers to enact tax refunds. Some of the spending also encouraged opposition to Senate Bill 138 on lawnmowers and other measures.

And Liz Welch, a lobbyist for the national American Civil Liberties Union, reported spending nearly $51,000 on polling and lobbying research. But those amounts pale compared to the million-dollar ad campaigns of recent years by the Partnership for America’s Health Care Future, last year’s top lobbying spender. That group opposed a measure aimed at reducing health care costs through a dramatic increase in insurance regulations. That group paid a lobbyist $20,000 in August, and ended its Colorado lobbying activities after that. How we did this analysis The Colorado Sun received data on lobbying income and bills lobbied by lobbyists and their clients from the Secretary of State’s Office. It analyzed the data using Python programming, making best efforts to standardize client names, and removing income paid by lobbying firms to lobbyists, which can result in double counting. In Excel, additional records are removed that report income from clients instead of the lobbying firms paying the lobbyists. In identifying the most-lobbied measures, we identified the top measures lobbied by clients and lobbyists. Then data on individual bills was downloaded, cleaned and analyzed. This story is from The Colorado Sun, a journalist-owned news outlet based in Denver and covering the state. For more, and to support The Colorado Sun, visit coloradosun.com. The Colorado Sun is a partner in the Colorado News Conservancy, owner of Colorado Community Media.

WORSHIP DIRECTORY ASCENT CHURCH “Real people pursuing a real God” All are Welcome Sundays at 10am In-person or Online www.ascentchurch.co 29823 Troutdale Scenic Drive, Evergreen BERGEN PARK CHURCH Bergen Park Church is a group of regular people who strive to improve ourselves and our community by studying the Bible and sharing our lives with each other. On Sunday mornings you can expect contemporary live music, Children’s Ministry that seeks to love and care for your kids, teaching from the Bible, and a community of real people who are imperfect, but seek to honor God in their lives. We hope to welcome you soon to either our 9:30AM or 11:00AM Sunday service. Search Bergen Park Church on YouTube for Livestream service at 9:30am 31919 Rocky Village Dr. 303-674-5484 info@bergenparkchurch.org / www.BergenParkChurch.org CALVARY CHAPEL EVERGREEN Teaching the Bible verse by verse 32214 Ellingwood Trail Evergreen, CO 80439 (lower level, next to Tuscany Tavern) Join us for our Sunday Worship Service at 10am 303-408-7993 Email: info@calvarychapelevergreen.com Website: calvarychapelevergreen.com CHRISTIAN SCIENCE CHURCH SERVICES 28244 Harebell Lane Sunday Service & Sunday School 10am Wednesday Evening ZOOM Meeting 7:30pm Contact: clerk@christianscienceevergreen.com for ZOOM link Reading Room 4602 Pletner Lane, Unit 2E, Evergreen OPEN TUE-SAT 12PM - 3PM

CHURCH OF THE CROSS Please join us for Sunday worship at 28253 Meadow Drive, Evergreen or visit www.churchotc.com 8:30am Traditional Service 10:30am Contemporary Service Communion is served every Sunday at both services. All are welcome! Visit our website at www.churchotc.com for info on church activities. 28253 Meadow Drive, Evergreen • 303-674-4130 • office@churchotc.com CHURCH OF THE HILLS PRESBYTERIAN (USA) Serving the mountain community from the heart of Evergreen Worship 10:00 a.m. Office Hours: Tu-Thur 9:00 - 4:00; Fri 9:00 - noon Buffalo Park Road and Hwy 73 www.churchofthehills.com

EVERGREEN CHRISTIAN CHURCH (DISCIPLES OF CHRIST) 27772 Iris Drive, Evergreen - 303-674-3413 www.EvergreenChristianChurch.org - eccdoc01@gmail.com Sunday Worship 10:00 a.m., with communion every Sunday We are an inclusive faith community and welcome you to join us in our new ministry journey. EVERGREEN LUTHERAN CHURCH 5980 Highway 73 + 303-674-4654 Rev Sara Wirth, Interim Pastor Join us for Virtual Worship on our YouTube Channel: https://www.youtube.com/c/EvergreenLutheranChurch Sunday Worship uploaded by 10am. www.evergreenlutheran.org + All Are Welcome!

ROCKLAND COMMUNITY CHURCH “Connecting all generations to Jesus” Please check our website, www.Rockland.church, for updated service times ¼ mile north of I-70 at exit 254 17 S Mt. Vernon Country Club Rd., Golden, CO 80401 303-526-0668 TIMBER RIDGE CHURCH Location: The Village at Aspen Park 25587 Conifer Rd. Unit 5A201 (2nd floor - above the UPS Store) Sunday Worship 10:00 am www.timberridgechurchconifer.org • 303-834-3577

UNITED METHODIST CHURCH OF EVERGREEN LOOKOUT MOUNTAIN COMMUNITY CHURCH – EPC Rev. Sarah Clark • 303.674.4810 • www.evergreenumc.org CHURCH OF THE TRANSFIGURATION EPISCOPAL 1036 El Rancho Rd, Evergreen – (303) 526-9287 3757 Ponderosa Dr. across Hwy 74 from Safeway in Evergreen www.lomcc.org – office@lomcc.org In-Church Sunday Communion Quiet Service 8:00 am & with Music 10:00 am Join us in person every Sunday at 8:30am and 10:30am for live worship Sunday Worship 10:00 a.m., with communion every Sunday 10:00 am only Zoom: https://us02web.zoom.us/j/8601726656 Please join us online every Sunday at 9am “Real Church In An UnReal World” Evensong 7:00 Wednesdays March 9 through April 6 at our website for a new worship experience. A community empowered by the Holy Spirit which seeks authentic relationships 27640 Highway 74 - ¼ mile east of downtown “Open Hearts, Open Doors, Open Minds” with God and others to share the good news of Jesus with Evergreen, the Front Evergreen at the Historic Bell Tower Range and the world. Come as you are, all are welcome! www.transfigurationevergreen.org CONGREGATION BETH EVERGREEN (SYNAGOGUE) Reconstructionist Synagogue Rabbi Jamie Arnold www.BethEvergreen.org / (303) 670-4294 2981 Bergen Peak Drive (behind Life Care) CONIFER CHURCH OF CHRIST “Doing Bible Things in Bible Ways” 11825 U.S. Hwy. 285, Conifer, CO 80433 Sun: 9:00a.m. Bible Study-10:00a.m. Worship; Wed: Bible Study 7:00p.m.

MOUNT HOPE LUTHERAN CHURCH - LCMS 30571 Chestnut Drive ~ (303)670-1387 Sunday Worship 9:00am • Education for All 10:30am Rev. Carl Frank, Pastor www.mounthopelutheranlcms.org PLATTE CANYON COMMUNITY CHURCH Located: 4954 County Road 64 in Bailey. Office hours MWF 8am-1pm 303-838-4409, Worship & Children’s Church at 10am Small group studies for all ages at 9am Transitional Pastor: Mark Chadwick Youth Pastor: Jay Vonesh Other activities: Youth groups, Men’s/Women’s ministries, Bible studies, VBS, MOPS, Cub/Boy Scouts.

To place your listing in the Worship Directory call Donna, 303-566-4114


32 Canyon Courier

April 14, 2022

C R O S SWO R D P U Z Z L E

© 2016 King Features Synd., Inc.

Solution

TRIVIA 1. HUMAN ANATOMY: How many miles of blood vessels does the average human have? 2. GEOGRAPHY: What degree is assigned to the International Date Line? 3. MOVIES: Which Looney Tunes character’s catchphrase is “You’re despicable”? 4. ADVERTISING: What was the name of the grocery owner in the Charmin bath tissue ads of the 1960s-80s?

10. TELEVISION: Which musical TV drama takes place at William McKinley High School?

Answers 1. 60,000 miles 2. 180 degrees longitude 3. Daffy Duck

5. U.S. STATES: What is the only state to have one syllable in its name?

4. Mr. Whipple

6. CHEMISTRY: What is the only letter that doesn’t appear in the periodic table?

6. J

5. Maine

7. 12

7. MYTHOLOGY: How many gods and goddesses were said to live on Mount Olympus?

8. Harry Truman

8. U.S. PRESIDENTS: Which president was the last to serve without a college degree?

10. “Glee”

9. LITERATURE: Celie is a character in which 1982 novel?

9. “The Color Purple”

(c) 2022 King Features Synd., Inc.

Crossword Solution


Canyon Courier 33

April 14, 2022

Public Notices Jefferson County Press Listing Expenditures for 03/25/2022-03/31/2022 Colleen & Matthew Puckett Diane L Bullock Emilie Thomas Erin Nichole Erickson Gregg Orr Extreme Chevrolet James Edsel Stanley Jonathan D Fein King Systems LLC Larry Richard Klone and Colleen Stabolepszy Lichtsinn RV Lori K La Brie Marilyn Henson San Marcos Chrysler Dodge Jeep Schwab Conrete Inc Space Age Federal Credit Union Stevinson Lexus of Lakewood Tiffany Mustonen Clerk & Recorder Custodial Fund Total

Motor Vehicle Overpayments Motor Vehicle Overpayments Motor Vehicle Overpayments Motor Vehicle Overpayments Motor Vehicle Overpayments Motor Vehicle Overpayments Motor Vehicle Overpayments Motor Vehicle Overpayments

178.41 74.91 8.20 938.65 598.17 68.06 133.72 103.98

Motor Vehicle Overpayments Motor Vehicle Overpayments Motor Vehicle Overpayments Motor Vehicle Overpayments Motor Vehicle Overpayments Motor Vehicle Overpayments Motor Vehicle Overpayments Motor Vehicle Overpayments Motor Vehicle Overpayments

198.20 1,776.30 309.21 51.81 732.00 8.20 10.07 14.40 87.72 5,292.01

ADAM S WALTZMAN ALICIA A GAMBRELL Allegiant Receivables Solutions ALPINE ROOFING COMPANY INC ANALEMMA ENTERPRISES LLC

Telephone Services 88.79 Telephone Services 88.79 Service of Process Fee Returns 15.00 Building Maintenance 677.00 Miscellaneous Contract Services 487.50 Telephone Services 88.79 Telephone Services 88.79 Miscellaneous Contract Services 280.00

Andy Corbett APRIL L MARTINEZ AQUA SERVE ARAMARK CORRECTIONAL SERVICES LLC ARAMARK CORRECTIONAL SERVICES LLC BARBARA MOREY BC Services Inc Bill GERNERT BLAIN ANDREW ATKINSON BLINDSMITH INC BOB BARKER COMPANY INC Bob Dean Cornell Bradley Devitt Haas & Watkins PC BRITTANY GOODLEY CALLI BROOME CARVER, JOHN D CENTURYLINK CENTURYLINK CHRISTINA SCOHY CHRISTOPHER DANIEL OLDS CHRISTOPHER JOHN CASSIDY CLIENT PAYMENT COLORADO COMMUNITY MEDIA COLORADO COMMUNITY MEDIA COLORADO NONPROFIT DEVELOPMENT CENTER COMMISSION ON ACCREDITATION FOR LAW COMPUTER SITES INC CONVERGEONE INC CORECIVIC OF TENNESSEE LLC CROWLEY COUNTY SHERIFF CURBSIDE INC DANIEL M COLLINS DIANE J BALTZELL DORINDA D GOOD Edward Wax Elliott Legal Investigations, Inc EMPLOYEE LOAN SOLUTION LLC ERIC A GARCIA EVERGREEN METRO DISTRICT FOOTHILLS ANIMAL SHELTER Francy Law Firm PC FRONT RANGE LEGAL PROCESS SERVICE LLC GALLS LLC Gina R Sanchez GPS Servers LLC GREGORY BOGGS HASELDEN CONSTRUCTION LLC HEATHER L BUTVIDAS HILL PETROLEUM HOBART SERVICE Hobbie Regan Holst Boettcher & Tehrani LLP Hometowne Studios LLC IAIN R C MANNIX INSPIRE EVENT TECHNOLOGIES LLC INTERVENTION COMMUNITY CORRECTIONS SVC INTERVENTION INC INTERVENTION INC JANET K GARBRECHT JANICE KAY HOLLENBECK JEFFREY L STADIG JEREMY A FLEMING JOB STORE INC, THE JOHNSON CONTROLS FIRE PROTECTION LP JONATHAN A GOODALE JONATHAN R MILLER JS Ingebrigtsen JULIE M FIELD KARA N DOROBEK KAREN PATE KATHRYN F JOHNSON Kelly Beckton Ken Dold KEVIN J BOLLINGER KIMBERLY ANNE ADAMS-BAKKE KIMBERLY B DINAPOLI KIRSTIN L BROWN KLEEN TECH SERVICES CORP KLEEN TECH SERVICES CORP KRONOS INC KUBAT EQUIPMENT AND SERVICE COMPANY KYAW Z THAN LABCORP Law Offices of Brandon R Ceglian Law Offices of Nelson & Kennard LEGALSHIELD LIFESIZE INC Machol & Janson MARK ALAN CARR MARLIN MCDANIEL MARRIOTT HOTEL SERVICE INC MARTIN D HARTLEY MATTHEW S KYLE MELISSA ANN RUMMINGS METLIFE Natalie Norcutt NETEO INC

Revenue Refunds

360.00

Kitchen Supplies 4,544.06 Telephone Services 88.79 Service of Process Fee Returns 30.00 Telephone Services 88.79 Telephone Services 88.79 Furniture & Equipment - Non Capital 12,420.07 Hygiene Supplies 1,392.20 Service of Process Fee Returns 88.50 Service of Process Fee Returns 50.50 Telephone Services 88.79 Telephone Services 88.79 Autopsy Services 33,600.00 Telephone Services 11,954.93 Traffic Signal Services 745.81 Telephone Services 88.79 Telephone Services 88.79 Telephone Services 88.79 Trial Expense 8,232.39 Public Notices 829.56 Deed Advertising Clearing 141.00 Contracts Intergovernmental 9,375.00 Professional Dues & Memberships 5,630.00 Miscellaneous Contract Services 523.00 Maintenance Agreement 299.34 Services & Charges (Other) 330.00 Legal Services 83.00 Miscellaneous Contract Services 135.00 Telephone Services 88.79 Telephone Services 88.79 Telephone Services 88.79 Telephone Services 88.79 Service of Process Fee Returns 15.00 True Connect Loans 526.11 Telephone Services 88.79 Water& Sanitation Services 97.76 Due to Pet Data -Animal Licenses 320.00 Service of Process Fee Returns 45.00 Litigation Support Services 45.00 Police Supplies 6,739.37 Service of Process Fee Returns 15.00 Service of Process Fee Returns 45.50 Telephone Services 88.79 Building Maintenance 12,499.63 Telephone Services 88.79 Fuel 48,646.61 Equipment Maintenance 1,939.48 Telephone Services 88.79 Service of Process Fee Returns 15.00 Service of Process Fee Returns 86.00 Telephone Services 88.79 Recognition/Appreciation 8,399.00 Services & Charges (Other) 490,418.04 Laboratory Services 2,595.00 Miscellaneous Contract Services 29,856.00 Telephone Services 88.79 Telephone Services 88.79 Telephone Services 88.79 Telephone Services 153.00 Temporary Agencies 4,602.37 Maintenance Agreement 5,650.54 County Travel 20.00 Telephone Services 88.79 Service of Process Fee Returns 8.50 Telephone Services 88.79 Telephone Services 88.79 Telephone Services 88.79 Telephone Services 88.79 Service of Process Fee Returns 15.00 Telephone Services 88.79 Telephone Services 88.79 Telephone Services 88.79 Telephone Services 88.79 Uniforms Allowance 100.00 Janitorial Services 11,367.74 Miscellaneous Contract Services 5,124.35 Miscellaneous Contract Services 180.00 Maintenance Agreement 694.00 Telephone Services 88.79 Legal Services 189.75 Service of Process Fee Returns 86.50 Service of Process Fee Returns 15.00 Employee Legal Services 1,198.38 Telephone Services 52,178.49 Service of Process Fee Returns 15.00 Telephone Services 88.79 Telephone Services 88.79 Recognition/Appreciation 12,687.50 Telephone Services 88.79 County Travel 172.50 Telephone Services 88.79 Home and Auto Insurance 1,501.47 Service of Process Fee Returns 90.50 Telephone Services 400.00

One Serve Legal PAMELA M HARDEN PITNEY BOWES INC Precious Butler Provest LLC PTS OF AMERICA LLC PUEBLO COUNTY ATTORNEYS OFFICE QUADIENT LEASING USA INC QUICKSILVER EXPRESS COURIER INC OF CO RACHELLE ANN LAO EISENHAUER REBECCA J HASCALL RESERVE ACCOUNT Richard A Chavez Jr RICK A HELLICKSON Rob Budraitis Robert Higgins RONDA L FRAZIER RPS PLAN ADMINISTRATORS INC RPS PLAN ADMINISTRATORS INC RPS PLAN ADMINISTRATORS INC SCL HEALTH SHERI L OUELLETTE SHIRLEY SEPTIC PUMPING INC SIDWELL COMPANY, THE Smith Martin Powers & Knier PC SOURCE OFFICE PRODUCTS SOURCE OFFICE PRODUCTS Springman Braden Wilson & Pontius PC STACI L POTTS STATE OF COLO STATE OF COLO SUMMIT LABORATORIES INC SWEEP STAKES UNLIMITED T MOBILE Taryn Minter Law Torbet Tuft & McConkie LLC TRANSCORE ITS LLC TRAVIS E PRINCE TRAVIS J MOON TROY OUGHTON Tschetter Sulzer PC TWIN CITY SECURITY INC Vinci Law Office LLC VISION GRAPHICS INC VTI SECURITY WASHINGTON COUNTY SHERIFF WESTERN PAPER DISTRIBUTORS INC WESTERN PAPER DISTRIBUTORS INC WESTERN PAPER DISTRIBUTORS INC WESTERN PAPER DISTRIBUTORS INC XCEL ENERGY ZACHARY M FULTZ General Fund Total AED EVERYWHERE INC LEGALSHIELD RPS PLAN ADMINISTRATORS INC Insurance Fund Total

Public Notice

Service of Process Fee Returns 26.50 Telephone Services 88.79 Equipment Rental 3,773.37 Service of Process Fee Returns 15.00 Service of Process Fee Returns 15.00 Extradition Travel 21,538.00 Litigation Support Services 470.00 Equipment Rental 191.13

Postage 775.08 Telephone Services 88.79 Telephone Services 88.79 Postage Inventory 95,000.00 Service of Process Fee Returns 15.00 Telephone Services 88.79 Telephone Services 88.79 Telephone Services 88.79 Telephone Services 88.79 Flex Child Care 4,489.72 Flex Medical Insurance 18,034.24 Flex Transportation 140.00 Medical Services 336.60 Telephone Services 88.79 Water& Sanitation Services 595.00 Maintenance Agreement 18,811.10 Service of Process Fee Returns 15.00 Office Supplies 433.06 Copier Clearing 7,008.90 Service of Process Fee Returns 174.50 Office Supplies 23.27 Postal Fees 14,480.40 Printing Services 4,915.96 Miscellaneous Contract Services 700.00 Legal Services 120.00 Telephone Services 435.89 Service of Process Fee Returns 15.00 Service of Process Fee Returns 40.00 Software Maintenance Agreement 18,375.00 Telephone Services 88.79 Telephone Services 88.79 Revenue Refunds 500.00 Service of Process Fee Returns 1,309.50 Security Services 12,279.24 Service of Process Fee Returns 12.50 Printing Services 634.36 Life Safety Maintenance 18,194.68 Legal Services 28.40 Janitorial Supplies 7,586.00 Office Supplies 169.16 Hygiene Supplies 285.66 Medical Supplies/Drugs 3,646.20 Heat & Power 65,027.79 Telephone Services 88.79 1,115,964.87 Equipment Maintenance Employee Legal Services Flex Medical Insurance

ON THE MEND OCCUPATIONAL MEDICINE PLLC Medical Services ROCKY MOUNTAIN CPR AND FIRST AID Medical Services TRISTAR INSURANCE GROUP Workers Compensation Self-Insured Claims Worker’s Compensation Fund Total Aaron Friedland ALEXANDER M SMILEY Amara J Meier AMY LAURA GATES ANDREA F KEPPERS ANDREW DUBOIS Angela McTammany ANNE L FRIANT ANTHONY J AUCIELLO ANTHONY J MASSARO Becca Brenner Bradley Grear Breagan Shoquist BRIAN J CALLAHAN BROCK G MESSNER BUGS AND BEYOND LLC Carli Stazick CHELSEA KAY BEEBE Chris Lincoln CHRISTINE ELIZABETH STRICKLAND CHRISTOPHER A BARKER CHRISTOPHER J SMITH Christy Bouchard CODY J EVANS COLLIN S BROWN COLUMBIA SANITARY SERVICE INC CONCRETE EXPRESS INC CORE ELECTRIC COOPERATIVE D & K PRINTING INC DANIEL FERRIS RUBENSTEIN DAWN L ROY DUKE R ROWLAND ELIZABETH OBRIEN ELIZABETH S SWIECH EMILY A CAMP ERIC A KRAUSE Erica M Duvic EVERGREEN METRO DISTRICT George Robb GERALD J BADER Ginny Holcomb GRADY T HALL HILLARY MUSICK KING IAN M FRANCESCATO JANA L JOHNS JANA L JOHNS JASON D HAMBURG JENNEE B HANCOCK Jeremiah Brockopp Jesse Wooten JOHN S HADUCK JOSEPH A JOSLEYN JOSHUA LYLE HANSEN JOY A LUCISANO KALEB O ANZICK KELLY J KING KRISTINA N DUFF LEGALSHIELD LILLY P BOCK-BROWNSTEIN LPJ ENTERTAINMENT LLC MATHEW R MARTINEZ Matthew Chamberlin MATTHEW ROY SVEJNOHA MEGAN E KREUTZER METLIFE MICHELLE A DESROSIERS NATHAN JAMES MCBRIDE Nathan McCarty NEIL D MCNUTT PAUL D GOULD Peter Baum Ventresca

975.00 15.76 237.50 1,228.26 80.00 882.00 34,290.80 35,252.80

Telephone Services 60.00 Telephone Services 60.00 Telephone Services 60.00 Telephone Services 60.00 Telephone Services 60.00 Telephone Services 60.00 Telephone Services 60.00 Telephone Services 60.00 Telephone Services 60.00 Telephone Services 60.00 Heat & Power 78.00 60.00 Telephone Services Telephone Services 60.00 Telephone Services 60.00 Telephone Services 60.00 Building Maintenance 1,010.00 Telephone Services 40.00 Telephone Services 60.00 Telephone Services 60.00 Telephone Services 20.00 Telephone Services 60.00 Telephone Services 60.00 Telephone Services 60.00 Telephone Services 60.00 Telephone Services 60.00 Miscellaneous Contract Services 620.00 Trail Improvements 104,514.80 Heat & Power 1,124.98 Printing Services 6,331.00 Telephone Services 60.00 Telephone Services 60.00 Telephone Services 60.00 Telephone Services 60.00 Telephone Services 60.00 Telephone Services 60.00 County Travel 36.00 Telephone Services 60.00 Water& Sanitation Services 249.00 Telephone Services 40.00 Telephone Services 60.00 Telephone Services 60.00 Telephone Services 60.00 Telephone Services 60.00 Telephone Services 60.00 Telephone Services 60.00 Business Meals 66.00 Heat & Power 78.00 Telephone Services 60.00 Building Maintenance 38.72 Telephone Services 60.00 Telephone Services 60.00 Telephone Services 60.00 Telephone Services 60.00 Telephone Services 60.00 Telephone Services 60.00 Telephone Services 60.00 Telephone Services 60.00 Employee Legal Services 157.60 Telephone Services 60.00 Meetings & Seminars 800.00 Telephone Services 60.00 Telephone Services 60.00 Telephone Services 60.00 Telephone Services 60.00 Home and Auto Insurance 92.83 Telephone Services 60.00 Telephone Services 60.00 Telephone Services 60.00 Heat & Power 78.00 Telephone Services 60.00 Telephone Services 40.00

QAHWAH LLC DBA VILLAGE ROASTER Rachel Brenna ROCKY LYNN STURGEON ROXANE Cara GARCIA RPS PLAN ADMINISTRATORS INC RPS PLAN ADMINISTRATORS INC SHAWN M A EMBRY STACY R ROMERO STEPHEN S GERMAINE STEVEN M MURDOCK TANNER C MARSHALL THEOPHANE A NEWMAN UNIFIRST CORPORATION VERIZON WIRELESS WENDY RIDDLE XCEL ENERGY Open Space Fund Total

Meetings & Seminars Telephone Services Telephone Services Heat & Power Flex Child Care Flex Medical Insurance Telephone Services Telephone Services Telephone Services Telephone Services Telephone Services Telephone Services Safety Supplies Telephone Services Telephone Services Heat & Power

375.00 60.00 60.00 78.00 541.66 1,284.42 60.00 60.00 60.00 60.00 60.00 60.00 89.10 8,723.64 60.00 509.60 130,676.35

CONCRETE EXPRESS INC Open Space Fund Grants Total

Trail Improvements

156,127.69 156,127.69

AGGREGATE INDUSTRIES ALBERT FREI AND SONS INC ALSCO DENVER INDUSTRIAL BRUCE G SMITH CENTURYLINK COBITCO INCORPORATED ENVIROTECH SERVICES INC FASTENAL COMPANY HAMILTON LINEN & UNIFORM LAWRENCE G TODD LEGALSHIELD MARTIN MARIETTA MATERIALS INC MARTIN MARIETTA MATERIALS INC METLIFE OXFORD RECYCLING INC OXFORD RECYCLING INC RORY L GONZALES RORY L GONZALES RPS PLAN ADMINISTRATORS INC RPS PLAN ADMINISTRATORS INC TY A BURR WASTE MANAGEMENT OF COLO INC XCEL ENERGY Road & Bridge Fund Total

Sand & Gravel 3,859.94 Salt Sand & De-Icers 5,121.46 Janitorial Services 206.69 Clothing Supplies 42.41 Telephone Services 180.00 Pavement Mgt Materials 2,601.55 Salt Sand & De-Icers 25,936.96 Life Safety Supplies 81.50 Janitorial Services 127.65 Clothing Supplies 97.14 Employee Legal Services 220.64 Asphalt Supplies 1,594.52 Concrete Supplies 2,722.00 Home and Auto Insurance 56.92 Sand & Gravel 255.20 Disposal of Construction Spoils 180.00 Life Safety Supplies 162.35 Clothing Supplies 120.00 Flex Child Care 208.33 Flex Medical Insurance 835.50 Life Safety Supplies 195.20 Trash Removal Services 678.37 Irrigation Water Services 181.68 45,666.01

A&A LANGUAGES LLC

HS-Miscellaneous Contract Services 318.63 HS-Miscellaneous Contract Services 51,722.12 ALLISON A PEARCE HS-Food & Beverages 10.99 ALLISON A PEARCE HS-County Travel 127.92 ANYSSA L VELA HS-Mileage 254.18 BRITTANY MARLENE ZABEL HS-Mileage 163.22 CLIENT PAYMENT HS-Assistance Payments Other 9,881.05 CLIENT PAYMENT HS-Assistance Payments County Paid 1,000.00 CLIENT PAYMENT HS-Refund Assistance Payment-State 9,453.00 CLIENT PAYMENT HS-Assistance Payments Rent 261,822.23 DAPHNE KAE WILLIAMS HS-Mileage 212.94 EMILY N ROUNDS HS-Mileage 238.10 EMPLOYEE LOAN SOLUTION LLC True Connect Loans 307.22 FREMONT COUNTY SHERIFF HS-Process Of Service 76.72 HEATHER M BREEST HS-Mileage 318.42 JENNA KELLEY HS-Office Supplies 19.98 JORDAN L DIERKS HS-Mileage 233.77 KATIE MEREDITH DROESSLER HS-Mileage 392.13 LEGALSHIELD Employee Legal Services 189.12 LORI E PALUCK HS-Mileage 443.49 MAC COUNSELING AND CONSULTING HS-Miscellaneous Contract Services 368.00 MEGAN KENNEY DORSAM HS-Mileage 227.10 METLIFE Home and Auto Insurance 267.19 MOLLY A HEGGE HS-Food & Beverages 19.87 MOLLY A HEGGE HS-Mileage 269.10 RANDI AMBER SHAMPINE HS-Mileage 339.18 RPS PLAN ADMINISTRATORS INC Flex Child Care 2,665.81 RPS PLAN ADMINISTRATORS INC Flex Medical Insurance 7,402.74 SALVATION ARMY HS-Miscellaneous Contract Services 65,025.51 STEPHANIE I BRINKMAN HS-Mileage 212.36 THOMSON WEST INFORMATION CHARGES HS-Contract Services 1,960.44 VERIZON WIRELESS HS-Telephone Services 7,924.94 Social Services Fund Total 423,867.47 ACTION CENTER, THE

COMPUTER SYSTEMS DESIGN COMPANY LLC LEGALSHIELD RPS PLAN ADMINISTRATORS INC Workforce Development Fund Total

HS-Miscellaneous Contract Services Employee Legal Services Flex Medical Insurance

ECOLAB CENTER EMPLOYEE LOAN SOLUTION LLC LEGALSHIELD RPS PLAN ADMINISTRATORS INC RPS PLAN ADMINISTRATORS INC Head Start Fund Total

HS-General Supplies (Other) True Connect Loans Employee Legal Services Flex Child Care Flex Medical Insurance

Roxanne Nicole Dunaway Social Service Fund Grants Total

HS-Office Supplies

3,750.00 47.28 638.00 4,435.28 659.54 131.62 15.76 208.33 496.67 1,511.92 109.49 109.49

BLIP OPERATIONS BOSTON MARKET CORPORATION CLIENT PAYMENT CLIENT PAYMENT EXPRESS SERVICES INC

HS-Job Skills Training 2,121.21 HS-Job Skills Training 1,715.84 HS-Competency Assistance 9,735.00 HS-Fingerprints Assistance 275.00 HS-Miscellaneous Contract Services 4,762.54 RPS PLAN ADMINISTRATORS INC Flex Medical Insurance 25.00 Workforce Development Fund Grants Total 18,634.59 HILL PETROLEUM LEGALSHIELD OJ WATSON COMPANY INC QUICK SET AUTO GLASS REDBURN TIRE COMPANY REDBURN TIRE COMPANY RPS PLAN ADMINISTRATORS INC SILL-TERHAR MOTORS INC Fleet Services Fund Total

Fuel 54,992.19 Employee Legal Services 31.52 Vehicles 59,850.00 Equipment Maintenance 2,880.00 Tires 5,501.18 Equipment Maintenance 1,715.50 Flex Medical Insurance 62.50 Vehicles 115,005.00 240,037.89

AED EVERYWHERE INC ALISON A MCCOMBE AMAZON CAPITAL SERVICES INC

Equipment Maintenance Mileage Computer Supplies/ Software/Equipment Furniture & Equipment - Non Capital Recognition/Appreciation General Supplies (Other) Special Events Supplies Food Supplies

AMAZON CAPITAL SERVICES INC AMAZON CAPITAL SERVICES INC AMAZON CAPITAL SERVICES INC AMAZON CAPITAL SERVICES INC AMAZON CAPITAL SERVICES INC ANIMAL & PEST CONTROL SPECIALISTS ANN LINCOLN AT&T MOBILITY BAKER & TAYLOR COMPANY INC BAKER & TAYLOR COMPANY INC

195.00 14.04 26.99 31.80 106.44 159.54 421.46 135.54

Pest/Weed Control Services 120.00 Programs 500.00 Telephone Services 2,265.00 Library Books & Materials-Digital 26,200.15 Library Books & Materials-VAS 7,073.10

BAKER & TAYLOR COMPANY INC BATTERIES PLUS, LLC BEAR CREEK LANDSCAPE CO LLC CHARLES R CANDELARIA COCAL LANDSCAPE SERVICES INC CONFLICT CENTER, THE CONSERVE A WATT LIGHTING INC CREATIVE FINANCIAL STAFFING LLC DEBRA WALSH KEANE DH PACE DOOR SERVICES EMPLOYEE LOAN SOLUTION LLC ERIN M PEPMEYER EVEREST MECHANICAL EVERGREEN METRO DISTRICT EXPRESS SERVICES INC FEDEX GROUND INC FRANCOTYP POSTALIA INC HAYNES MECHANICAL SYSTEMS HOLLENBECK, REUBEN INGRAM LIBRARY SERVICES INGRAM LIBRARY SERVICES INTERMOUNTAIN LOCK AND SUPPLY JCPL FOUNDATION JENNIFER A READING JILL K HINN KATHLEEN M SIMPSON LEGALSHIELD LEWIS PAPER INTERNATIONAL INC Lisa Marie Smith Lisa Marie Smith METLIFE MIDWEST TAPE MIDWEST TAPE MILAN, KELLY OVERDRIVE INC PADMA POLEPEDDI PAOLA ANDREA VILAXA ARAYA PEPPERDINES MARKING PRODUCTS PERSONAL ACHIEVEMENT MARTIAL ARTS INC ROSEN PUBLISHING GROUP INC RPS PLAN ADMINISTRATORS INC RPS PLAN ADMINISTRATORS INC RPS PLAN ADMINISTRATORS INC SENTINEL TECHNOLOGIES INC STEVEN D CHESTNUT T MOBILE UNITED PARCEL SERVICE INC VERIZON WIRELESS WAXIE SANITARY SUPPLY XCEL ENERGY Library Fund Total

Library Books & Materials-Print 31,688.86 Electrical Supplies 45.63 Snow Removal Services 9,050.00 Telephone Services 156.69 Snow Removal Services 13,152.53 Programs 150.00 Electrical Supplies 200.40 Temporary Agencies 1,505.00 Conferences/Trade Shows 407.00 Equipment Maintenance 711.99 True Connect Loans 87.75 County Travel 774.21 Professional & Technical Services (Other) 180.00 Water & Sanitation Services 194.60 Temporary Agencies 104.12 Courier Charges 123.98 Equipment Maintenance 123.00 HVAC Services 812.37 Programs 400.00 Library Books & Materials-VAS 124.25 Library Books & Materials-Print 1,757.16 Building Supplies 24.56 Undistributed Receipts Library Foundation 2,666.30 County Travel 389.00 Mileage 87.87 Mileage 115.13 Employee Legal Services 189.12 Photocopy Supplies 224.20 Telephone Services 156.69 Mileage 4.80 Home and Auto Insurance 275.72 Library Books & Materials-DVD 7,218.24 Library Books & Materials-Audio Book 5,332.82 Programs 400.00 Library Books & Materials-Digital 13,529.28 County Travel 505.02 County Travel 333.00 General Supplies (Other) 106.00 Programs Library Books & Materials-Print Flex Child Care Flex Medical Insurance Flex Transportation Software as a Services (SaaS) County Travel Telephone Services Courier Charges Telephone Services Janitorial Supplies Heat & Power

350.00 1,773.04 516.66 4,134.10 65.00 603.00 54.85 952.00 67.93 6.60 550.07 32,807.53 172,437.13

DELTA DENTAL OF COLO

Delta Dental Insurance Claims

EMPLOYEE LOAN SOLUTION LLC LEGALSHIELD OPTUM BANK INC

True Connect Loans 0.43 Employee Legal Services 7.88 Miscellaneous Contract Services 155.40 Flex Medical Insurance 118.75 UHC Medical Claims 276,932.37 314,656.53

RPS PLAN ADMINISTRATORS INC UNITED HEALTHCARE Benefit Plan Fund Total

37,441.70

RPS PLAN ADMINISTRATORS INC RPS PLAN ADMINISTRATORS INC American Rescue Plan Total

Flex Medical Insurance Flex Transportation

CENTURA HEALTH GALLS LLC LEGALSHIELD METLIFE NET TRANSCRIPTS INC PF COMAC RODNEY A PARKER RPS PLAN ADMINISTRATORS INC RPS PLAN ADMINISTRATORS INC SAFARILAND LLC SAFARILAND LLC SOURCE OFFICE PRODUCTS Patrol Fund Total

Laboratory Services Police Supplies Employee Legal Services Home and Auto Insurance Investigation Expense Police Supplies County Travel Flex Child Care Flex Medical Insurance Police Supplies Freight Office Supplies

3,300.00 5,428.62 494.66 50.75 109.50 320.00 150.50 1,026.17 3,195.75 86.00 53.44 475.36 14,690.75

General Supplies (Other) Employee Legal Services

31.62 7.98 39.60

ARAMARK CORRECTIONAL SERVICES LLC LEGALSHIELD Inmate Welfare Fund Total VERIZON WIRELESS WPC TRIAD LLC Forfeiture Fund Total COLO DEPT OF PUBLIC HEALTH & ENVIRONMENT EMPLOYEE LOAN SOLUTION LLC GILPIN COUNTY PUBLIC HEALTH AGENCY LEGALSHIELD QUALITY OFFICE PRODUCTS RPS PLAN ADMINISTRATORS INC RPS PLAN ADMINISTRATORS INC SHELLIE L LAWS Public Health Fund Total

237.50 8.33 245.83

Wireless Service Building Rent

322.52 18,111.90 18,434.42

Intergovernmental To State 81,229.00 True Connect Loans 131.71 Revenue Refunds Employee Legal Services Office Supplies Flex Child Care Flex Medical Insurance General Supplies (Other)

7,308.00 118.20 162.50 1,929.23 2,572.44 75.64 93,526.72

GFL ENVIRONMENTAL R&S NORTHEAST LLC Public Health Fund Grants Total

Trash Removal Services Medical Supplies/Drugs

CENTURYLINK HILL PETROLEUM LEGALSHIELD RPS PLAN ADMINISTRATORS INC RPS PLAN ADMINISTRATORS INC US CUSTOMS & BORDER PROTECTION

Telephone Services 217.29 Fuel 8,499.22 Employee Legal Services 23.64 Flex Child Care 566.66 Flex Medical Insurance 45.00 Miscellaneous Contract Services 48,927.81 58,279.62

Airport Fund Total

SOUDER MILLER & ASSOCIATES Contract Services Solid Waste Emergency Reserve Fund Total CLIENT PAYMENT CLIENT PAYMENT MOUNTAIN RESOURCE CENTER INC

24.20 79.83 104.03

4,291.25 4,291.25

HS-Assistance Payments Other 21,897.39 HS-Assistance Payments Rent 1,919.84 HS-Grants to Other Entities 73,240.73

Community Development Fund Grants Total GRAND TOTAL

97,057.96 2,952,568.47

Legal Notice No.: CC830 First Publication: April 14, 2022 Last Publication: April 14, 2022 Publisher: Canyon Courier

Canyon Courier Legals 4.14.22 * 1


34 Canyon Courier

April 14, 2022

Public Notices Legals City and County Public Notice Jefferson County Assessor's Public Notice The Jefferson County Colorado Assessor will hear any appeals concerning the valuation of taxable real property for tax year 2022 beginning May 2, 2022. Property owners who wish to file an appeal may do so online at assessor.jeffco.us The website not only contains a link and information to file an appeal for all property types, but includes information on the assessment process, a sales search tool, and answers to Frequently Asked Questions. Appeals that are mailed for real property must be postmarked by June 1, 2022. If you file online, please do not also file by mail. The Assessor's Office is located at Jefferson County Government Center, #2500, 100 Jefferson County Parkway, Golden, CO 80419. Normal office hours are Monday thru Thursday 7:30 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. Appeals concerning the valuation of taxable personal property (business equipment) will be heard beginning June 15, 2022. Written objections for personal property valuations must be postmarked by June 30, 2022. Appeals which are filed online will be considered timely up until 11:59 p.m. MST. on June 1, 2022, for Real Property, and June 30, 2022, for Personal Property. Legal Notice No. CC821 First Publication: April 7, 2022 Last Publication: April 14, 2022 Publisher: Canyon Courier Public Notice TOWN OF MORRISON, COLORADO NOTICE OF CONSIDERATION OF ANNEXATION ORDINANCE PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to Section 10-9-1 of the Morrison Municipal Code and CRS 31-12-106, the Board of Trustees is considering adoption of an ordinance annexing real property which is proposed to become Townowned land, located adjacent to the existing town water treatment plant. Said ordinance may be considered at the May 17, 2022 regular meeting of the Board of Trustees, or at any meeting thereafter.

Location 3: 8500 Niwot Road, Niwot 80544 Location 4: 2701 S. Indiana Street, Superior 80027 Location 5: 50 Bonanza Drive, Erie 80516 Location 6: 161 Perry Lane, Dacono 80514 Location 7: 4390 Eldorado Springs Drive, Boulder 80303 Location 8: 5748 Flagstaff Road, Boulder 80302

Public Notice NOTICE OF MAIL BALLOT ELECTION §1-13.5-1105(2)(d), 1-13.5-502 TO WHOM IT MAY CONCERN and particularly to the electors of the Indian Hills Water District of Jefferson County, State of Colorado:

At said election, the electors of the District shall vote for Directors to serve the following terms of office on the Board of Directors of the District: BOARD OF DIRECTOR CANDIDATE(S) (Two Position with a One-Year Term) Candidates: Office: Term Suzanne DeVenny: Director: 1-Year Alan Bloom: Director: 1-Year

At said election, the electors of the District shall vote for three (3) Directors to serve THREE-Year terms of office on the Board of Directors of the District. The names of persons nominated as Director for a THREEYear term are:

BOARD OF DIRECTOR CANDIDATE(S) (Two Positions with a Three-Year Term each) Candidates: Office: Term Colleen Whitlow: Director: 3-Year Laura McConnell: Director: 3-Year Cole Lathrop: Director: 3-Year Debra Brodhead: Director: 3-Year NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN that applications for absentee voter ballots may be filed with, and replacement ballots may be received from Kammy K. Tinney, the Designated Election Official of the District, at 550 W. Eisenhower Blvd., Loveland, Colorado 80537 between the hours of 8:30 a.m. and 5:00 p.m., until the close of business on Tuesday, April 26, 2022. By:/s/ Kammy K. Tinney Designated Election Official Legal Notice No. CC831 First Publication: April 14, 2022 Last Publication: April 14, 2022 Publisher: Canyon Courier

Indian Hills Water District Kristin Waters, Designated Election Official 303-697-8810

NOTICE OF CANCELLATION AND CERTIFIED STATEMENT OF RESULTS

Legal Notice No. CC833 First Publication: April 14, 2022 Last Publication: April 14, 2022 Publisher: Canyon Courier

Mountain Water and Sanitation District County of Jefferson, Colorado NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN by the Mountain Water and Sanitation District, County of Jefferson, State of Colorado, that at the close of business on the sixty-third day before the election, there were not more candidates for the office of board of director than the offices to be filled, including candidates filing affidavits of intent to be write-in candidates. Therefore, the election to be held on May 3, 2022 is hereby canceled pursuant to section 1-13.5-513(6), C.R.S. The following candidates are hereby declared elected to the Board of Directors of the Mountain Water and Sanitation District: Name: Andrew Mark Carter: Elected to Serve a Term of: 3 years: Until: May, 2025

Ariana Neverdahl, Town Clerk

Name: Robert A. Wade: Elected to Serve a Te r m o f : 3 y e a r s : U n t i l : M a y, 2025

Metropolitan Districts Public Notice REVISED NOTICE OF ELECTION POLLING PLACE TO WHOM IT MAY CONCERN, and particularly to the electors of the Mountain View Fire Protection District, Weld County, Colorado: NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that an election will be held on Tuesday, the 3rd day of May 2022, between the hours of 7:00 a.m. and 7:00 p.m. The Board of Directors of the District have designated the following polling locations: Location 1: 7700 Baseline Road, Boulder 80303 Location 2: 441 3rd Street, Mead 80542

Name: Richard M. Swanson: Elected to Serve a Term of: 3 years: Until: May, 2025

By: Designated Election Official Catherine T. Bright Designated Election Official Contact Person for the District: Jeffrey E. Erb, Esq. Address of the District: 7400 East Orchard Road, Suite 3300 Greenwood Village, CO 80111 Telephone Number of District: 303) 770-2700 Email of the District: jerb@svwpc.com Legal Notice No. CC832 First Publication: April 14, 2022 Last Publication: April 14, 2022 Publisher: Canyon Courier

The District office at 4491 Parmalee Gulch Rd., Indian Hills, CO 80454 will be open from 9 a.m. to 12 p.m., Monday through Friday, beginning at least 22 days prior to the Election (April 11, 2022), and from 7:00 a.m. to 7:00 p.m. on Election Day (May 3, 2022) for eligible electors to drop-off voted ballots, request replacement ballots, or apply for a mail ballot.

Ballots must be received by 7:00 pm on May 3, 2022 (Election Day).

Public Notice

Name: June McKenzie: Elected to Serve a Term of: 1 year: Until: May, 2023

Dave Mosby Carl Frank Scott Ryplewski Samantha August

Ballots may be mailed to P.O. Box 710, Indian Hills, CO 80454.

GIVEN AND POSTED in the office of the Town Clerk this 14th day of April, 2022.

Legal Notice No. CC834 First Publication: April 14, 2022 Second Publication: April 21, 2022 Third Publication: April 28, 2022 Fourth / Last Publication: May 5, 2022 Publisher: Canyon Courier

NOTICE IS HEREBY given that a regular election of the Indian Hills Water District shall be held on Tuesday, May 3, 2022, from 7:00 am until 7:00 pm. The election is being conducted as a mail ballot election. Mail ballots are required to be mailed to eligible electors between 22 and 15 days prior to the election date.

Bids and Settlements Public Notice NOTICE OF FINAL PAYMENT NOTICE is hereby given that the Evergreen Metropolitan District (“District”) of Jefferson County, Colorado, will make final payment at the District Administration Office in Evergreen, Colorado, on April 18, 2022, at the hour of 2:00 p.m. to Inland Potable Services LLC. (“Contractor”), of Centennial, Colorado for all work done by Contractor in construction work performed within the District. Any person, co-partnership, association of persons, company or corporation that has furnished labor, materials, team hire, sustenance, provisions, provender, or other supplies used or consumed by Contractor or its subcontractors, in or about the performance of the work contracted to be done or that supplied rental machinery, tools, or equipment to the extent used in the prosecution of the work, and whose claim therefor has not been paid by Contractor or its subcontractors, at any time up to and including the time of final settlement for the work contracted to be done, is required to file a verified statement of the amount due and unpaid and an account of such claim to the District, whose address is 30920 Stagecoach Blvd, on or before April 16, 2022. Failure on the part of any claimant to file such verified statement of claim prior to such final settlement date will release the District, its Board of Directors, officers, agents, and employees, of and from any and all liability for such claim pursuant to §38-26-107, C.R.S.

Public Notice REQUEST FOR BIDS CLEAR CREEK COUNTY ROAD & BRIDGE DEPARTMENT CLEAR CREEK COUNTY, COLORADO Clear Creek County (Owner) is requesting Bids for the construction of the following Project: PW 22-03 Guardrail Project Bids for the construction of the Project will be accepted electronically with the following exact text in the subject line: Bid for PW 22-03 Guardrail Project. Bids sent by parcel service or U.S.P.S. shall be addressed to the attention of Darin Vashaw and be clearly marked on the front of the envelope with: Bid for PW 22-03 Guardrail Project. All bids must be received via email to pw@clearcreekcounty.us, via courier at the Clear Creek County Road & Bridge Department located at 3549 Stanley Road (CR 312), Dumont, Colorado 80436 or via U.S.P.S at P.O. Box 362, Dumont CO 80436 no later than Thursday May 5th, 2022 at 2:00 PM local time. At said time all bids duly received will be publicly opened and read aloud via Zoom: https://us06web.zoom.us/j/84093774888?pwd=Q 08vUkczWWY1c1pDQ0lLRmd6V2ptUT09 The Project includes the following Work: • Guardrail installation and repair - which includes new installation of approximately 595 linear feet of Type 3 Guardrail – Midwest Guardrail System (MGS) W-Beam 31 Inches and repair of approximately 275 feet of existing, damaged guardrail sections on various roads throughout the county. Obtaining the Bidding Documents Information and Bidding Documents for the Project can be found at the following designated website: https://co-clearcreekcounty2.civicplus.com/Bids. aspx?CatID=17 Bidding Documents may be downloaded from the designated website. The designated website will be updated periodically with addenda, reports, and other information relevant to submitting a Bid for the Project. All official notifications, addenda, and other Bidding Documents will be offered only through the designated website. Owner will not be responsible for Bidding Documents, including addenda, if any, obtained from sources other than the designated website. Instructions to Bidders For all further requirements regarding bid submittal, qualifications, procedures, and contract award, refer to the Request for Bids that is included in the Bidding Documents. Sean Wood, Chairman Board of County Commissioners

base, interior process piping within the lift station; installation of a new Owner supplied harmonic filter, and miscellaneous electrical and controls for the pump. Bids will be received for a single prime Contract. Bids shall be on a lump sum basis, as indicated in the Bid Form. The Issuing Office for the Bidding Documents is: TST Infrastructure, LLC 5655 S. Yosemite St., Suite 101 Greenwood Village, CO 80111 Phone: (303) 799-5197 Bidding Documents will be available on Thursday, April 7th, 2022 and may be obtained from the Issuing Office on Monday through Friday between the hours of 8:00 am and 5:00 pm. Prospective Bidders are required to be listed on the plan holders list to be eligible to bid. The Bidding Documents will be available for download at no cost in PDF format. Bidding Documents download information must be requested by email from Kelli Kavinsky, KKavinsky@TSTInfrastructure.com. Upon TST’s receipt of email requesting Bidding Documents, the Prospective Bidder will be added to the plan holders list and emailed instructions to download Bidding Documents. Partial sets of Bidding Documents will not be available from the Issuing Office. Neither Owner nor Engineer will be responsible for full or partial sets of Bidding Documents, including addenda, if any, obtained from sources other than the Issuing Office. A mandatory pre-bid conference for the Project will be held on Thursday, April 21st, 2022 at 10:00 am local time at the Roxborough Lift Station, 11290 Caretaker Road, Littleton, CO 80125. Bids will not be accepted from Bidders that do not attend the mandatory pre-bid conference. Bid security in the amount of five (5) percent of the total Bid Price must accompany each Bid and shall be furnished in accordance with the Instruction to Bidders. Bidders must be licensed to do business in the State of Colorado. Bids received from Bidders who are not recorded by the Issuing Office as having received the Bidding Documents will not be opened. The Owner reserves the right to award the contract by sections, or reject any or all Bids, and to waive any informalities and irregularities therein. For all further requirements regarding bid submittal, qualifications, procedures, and contract award, refer to the Instructions to Bidders that are included in the Bidding Documents. Owner: Roxborough Water and Sanitation District By: Barbara J. Biggs Title: General Manager Date: April 7, 2022 Legal Notice No. CC 826 First Publication: April 7, 2022 Last Publication: April 14, 2022 Publisher: Canyon Courier

Legal Notice No. CC835 First Publication: April 14, 2022 Last Publication: April 21, 2022 Publisher: Canyon Courier

Storage Liens/Vehicle Titles

Public Notice

Get Involved! BY ORDER OF THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS EVERGREEN METROPOLITAN DISTRICT By: D. Lighthart, General Manager Legal Notice No. CC820 First Publication: April 7, 2022. Last Publication: April 14, 2022. Published in: Canyon Courier

Facts do not cease to exist b ybecause g they are ignored. - Aldous Huxley

SECTION 000111 ADVERTISEMENT FOR BIDS

LEGAL NOTICE

ROXBOROUGH WATER AND SANITATION DISTRICT DOUGLAS COUNTY, COLORADO ROXBOROUGH LIFT STATION PUMP P-201 REPLACEMENT

Under C.R.S. Law §38-21.5-103 Evergreen Self Storage will sell/dispose of Misc. furniture, building supplies, snow blower, and hepa air filter in Unit 346 contracted to Jay Lipson, last known address, 5303 Maggie Lane, Evergreen, CO 80439

Sealed Bids for the construction of the Project will be received at the offices of TST Infrastructure, LLC, located at 5655 S Yosemite St, Suite 101, Greenwood Village, CO 80111, until Thursday, May 5th, 2022 at 11:00 am local time. At that time the Bids received will be publicly opened and read.

The sale will take place April 16, 2022 between 11:00am and 2:00pm at Evergreen Self Storage, 30705 Bryant Drive, Evergreen, CO. For information call 303-674-9911.

The work generally consists of moving a 150 HP dry-pit wastewater pump from position 1 to position 3 and the installation of an Owner supplied 200 HP dry-pit configuration, centrifugal wastewater pump in position 1. The work includes associated demolition and replacement of pump

Legal Notice No. CC828 First Publication: April 7, 2022 Last Publication: April 14, 2022 Publisher: Canyon Courier

Every day, the government makes decisions that can affect your life. Whether they are decisions on zoning, taxes, new businesses or myriad other issues, governments play a big role in your life. Governments have relied on

###

newspapers like this one to publish public notices since the birth of the nation. Local newspapers remain the most trusted source of public notice information. This newspaper publishes the information you need to stay involved in your community.

Notices are meant to be noticed. Read your public notices and get involved!

Canyon Courier Legals 4.14.22 * 2


CLASSIFIEDS

Canyon Courier 35

April 14, 2022

COLORADO COMMUNIT Y MEDIA

CAREERS

MARKETPLACE

REAL ESTATE

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Various Positions Available Distribution and Production Labor, Delivery Drivers, and General Management wanted. Must enjoy working outdoors with plants. $15$20, depending on experience. Contact info: Arbor Valley Nursery, 18539 County Road 4, Brighton, CO 80603, 303-654-1682. Breakfast Attendant needed at The Comfort Suites Golden West on Evergreen Parkway. Prior food and beverage experience is helpful but will train the right person. This is a part-time position 6:30 a.m. to 12:00 p.m., 4 to 5 days/week. Can cross-train in other departments to give full-time hours if desired. Please submit a resume and/or letter of interest to: information@ goldenevergreenhotel.com or stop by to fill out an application— Experience is preferred but we will train the right person. Starting pay $17 to $18 DOE. Gross Dam Security Agents (Coal Creek Canyon) Guards wanted for access control (7) year contract starting pay $20 hr. All shifts available. Call 303-3717873 or online link below https://apsjobs.paperform.com Canning Line Assistant Idaho Springs Tommyknocker Brewery seeks a production assistant for our canning line operation. Min. 21 years of age. Able to lift 50 Lbs. $16.00 -.$20.00/hr. Flexible Hrs. Good Benefits /Perks Contact info: Steve Indrehus steve.i@tommyknocker.com 720-732-2107 Georgetown Loop Photo Co. Photog’s and Sales needed. Facial recognition skills & high energy req’d. Great Pay! Call Erik 4075359275

Real Estate & Rental Real Estate Cemetery Lots

4 Cemetery Plots at Crown Hill Near back, purchased in 1950. Located under trees and all together. Asking $15,000 plus transfer fees for all 4 or best offer. Please call for more information. 303-431-5133

Senior Housing

MOUNTAINTOP Bath Remodeling

Complete custom bathroom remodeling • Tub and tile replacement Tub to shower conversions • Prime Baths acrylic bath systems Remodel in as little as one day! • Authorized Dealer. Licensed, Insured. 303-495-5328 • www.mountaintopbath.com

Career Training

Help Wanted

Sherpa Rocks Landscaping

303.948.2038

DEADLINES CLASSIFIED LINE ADS: MONDAY, 11 A.M. SERVICE DIRECTORY: THURSDAY, 5 P.M. LEGALS: THURSDAY, 3 P.M.

Careers

Home Improvement

METALBUILDING

ERGREEN

Contact Ruth, 303-566-4113 rdaniels@coloradocommunitymedia.com

SERVICE DIRECTORY

Buildings, Metal

E

CLASSIFIED AD SALES & SERVICE DIRECTORY ADS

www.ValorRoofandSolar.com

Senior Subsidized Housing Taking applications. 30% of monthly income equals rent. Castle Rock Colorado. 303-319-9901 or 303-688-3353


36 Canyon Courier

CLASSIFIEDS

April 14, 2022

COLORADO COMMUNIT Y MEDIA

CAREERS

MARKETPLACE

REAL ESTATE

CLASSIFIED AD SALES & SERVICE DIRECTORY ADS

Contact Ruth, 303-566-4113 rdaniels@coloradocommunitymedia.com

SERVICE DIRECTORY

Career Opportunites

Septic Service

DEADLINES CLASSIFIED LINE ADS: MONDAY, 11 A.M. SERVICE DIRECTORY: THURSDAY, 5 P.M. LEGALS: THURSDAY, 3 P.M.

Rentals

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Clear Creek School District RE1, does not unlawfully discriminate on the basis of race, color, creed, sex, sexual orientation, religion, national origin, ancestry, age, genetic information, marital status, or disability in admission or access to, or treatment or employment in, its educational programs or activities. Inquiries may be referred to the Director of Human Resources, Robin Payne, robin.payne@ccsdre1.org 303-567-3851

303.351.1868

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Medical

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Aloe Care Health medical alert system. Most advanced medical alert product on the market. Voiceactivated! No wi-fi needed! Special offer w/code CARE20 for $20 off Mobile Companion. 1-855-521-5138 Eliminate gutter cleaning forever! LeafFilter, the most advanced debris-blocking protection. Schedule free LeafFilter estimate today. 15% off Entire Purchase. 10% Senior & Military Discounts. Call 1-855-9952490


Canyon Courier 37

April 14, 2022

CLASSIFIEDS COLORADO COMMUNIT Y MEDIA

CAREERS

MARKETPLACE

REAL ESTATE

CLASSIFIED AD SALES & SERVICE DIRECTORY ADS

Contact Ruth, 303-566-4113 rdaniels@coloradocommunitymedia.com

SERVICE DIRECTORY

Career Opportunites

Career Opportunites CITY OF CENTRAL PUBLIC WORKS DEPARTMENT

LOOKING FOR A NEW JOB? CLEAR CREEK COUNTY WANTS YOU!!! CLEAR CREEK COUNTY is accepting applications for the following jobs: • Child Protection Caseworker I/II/III: Hiring wage is $47,091.20 - $55,440 annually DOQ • Control Tech: Hiring wage is $20.14 - $22.15/hr DOQ • Deputy Sheriff - Patrol: Hiring wage is $33.94 - $34.96/hr DOQ

Seeking qualified applicants for a full-time Public Works Maintenance Worker. • High School diploma or GED and one year of experience as a construction laborer. • A valid Class B Colorado Driver’s License or be capable of obtaining one within three months of the date of hire.

• Dispatcher: Hiring wage is $24.62 - $25.35/hr DOQ

• Perform a wide variety of unskilled and semi-skilled work in maintenance, construction and repair of the City’s infrastructure and facilities.

• Equipment Operator II for Road and Bridge:

• Operates trucks and light equipment incidental to the work.

• Detentions Deputy: Hiring wage is $29.23 - $30.11/hr DOQ • Digital Evidence Custodian, Sr.: Hiring wage is $23.27 - $25.60/hr DOQ

CDL; Hiring wage is $21.00 - $23.10/hr DOQ • Kitchen Manager: Hiring wage is $22.40 - $24.64/hr DOQ • Mechanic - Senior: Hiring wage is $23.10 - $25.41/hr DOQ • Nurse Confinement: Hiring wage is $77,200 - $84,920 annually DOQ • Trails Technician (Seasonal): Hiring wage is $17.64 - $19.40/hr DOQ • Trails Technician Sr. (Seasonal): Hiring wage is $20.14 - $22.15/hr DOQ Taking applications until positions are filled. See benefits, full job descriptions

• The City provides a comprehensive benefit package that includes medical, dental and vision insurance coverage. Employee insurance fully paid by City. • Hourly rate begins at $18.96 per hour and is dependent on qualifications and experience. A detailed job description can be found on the City’s website

www.centralcity.colorado.gov

and applications at: https://www.clearcreekcounty.us Under “I Want to…” in the left-hand column of the drop down,

Clear Creek County is an ADAAA/EEO employer.

Qualified applicants should submit an employment application which can be found at www.centralcity.colorado.gov to Finance/Human Resources Director arobbins@cityofcentral.co or mail to (P.O. Box 249 Central City, CO 80427).

Dumont

WORK IN

click on “Jobs in Clear Creek County”. This will take you to the job posting site where you can complete an application.

NOW HIRING

Do you enjoy coffee? Do you love to ski or snowboard? Dumont Starbucks is Hiring for full-time and part-time positions! Benefits include: • Vail Resorts Epic Pass • Medical/Dental/ Vision insurance • 401(k) Retirement plan • PTO/Sick pay Pay starts at $15hr plus tips. Apply at www.vailresortscareers.com search Dumont Starbucks

EVERGREEN DOWNTOWN ONLINE AUCTION AGENT

SEO & WEB DEVELOPMENT

Seeking an online auction agent to list jewelry, antiques, collectibles, and other items for sale on various websites. Responsibilities include taking pictures AND writing descriptions of the merchandise we’re selling. Experience with antiques or jewelry is a plus. No criminal records. Working from HOME may be possible.

Do you know and LOVE search engine optimization and content marketing? Do you have very good web development skills and know WordPress well? VERY reliable HIGH SCHOOL STUDENTS are also welcome to apply. No criminal records. Working from HOME may be possible.

Part-Time & Full-Time

Part-Time & Full-Time

FROM

$18.00/hr

More Skills = More Pay

FROM

$18.00/hr

More Skills = More Pay

DEADLINES CLASSIFIED LINE ADS: MONDAY, 11 A.M. SERVICE DIRECTORY: THURSDAY, 5 P.M. LEGALS: THURSDAY, 3 P.M. Miscellaneous

The Generac PWRcell solar plus battery storage system. Save money, reduce reliance on grid, prepare for outages & power your home. Full installation services. $0 down financing option. Request free no obligation quote. 1-855-270-3785

Hero takes stress out of managing medications. Hero sorts & dispenses meds, sends alerts at dose times & handles prescription refill & delivery for you. Starting at $24.99/month. No initiation fee. 90-day risk-free trial! 1-888-684-0280

Paying top cash for men’s sportwatches! Rolex, Breitling, Omega, Patek Philippe, Heuer, Day-tona, GMT, Submariner and Speedmaster. Call 833-603-3236

Put on your TV Ears & hear TV w/ unmatched clarity. TV Ears Original - originally $129.95 - now w/this special offer only $59.95 w/code MCB59! 1-833-530-1955 HughesNet – Finally, super-fast internet no matter where you live. 25 Mbps just $59.99/mo! Unlimited Data is Here. Stream Video. Bundle TV & Internet. Free Installation. Call 866-499-0141

Looking for assisted living, memory care, or independent living? A Place for Mom simplifies the process of finding senior living at no cost to your family. Call 1-833386-1995 today! BATH & SHOWER UPDATES in as little as ONE DAY! Affordable prices - No payments for 18 months! Lifetime warranty & professional installs. Senior & Military Discounts available. Call: 855-761-1725

Donate Your Car to Veterans Today! Help and Support our Veterans. Fast - FREE pick up. 100% tax deductible. Call 1-800245-0398 Become a published author. We want to read your book! Dorrance Publishing trusted since 1920. Consultation, production, promotion & distribution. Call for free author`s guide 833-719-3029 or visit dorranceinfo.com/acp

Wanted to Buy Wants to purchase minerals and other oil and gas interests. Send details to P.O. Box 13557 Denver, Co. 80201

Pets Dogs

Send Cover Letter & Resume To

contact@reDollar.com

To advertise your business, call Ruth at 303-566-4113

Doodle Puppies

Golden Doodles and Bernedoodles Home-Raised Heath Tested and Guaranteed Standard and Mini Size available Schedule a visit today! (970)215-6860 www.puppylovedoodles.com


CLASSIFIEDS

38 Canyon Courier

April 14, 2022

COLORADO COMMUNIT Y MEDIA

CAREERS

MARKETPLACE

REAL ESTATE

CLASSIFIED AD SALES & SERVICE DIRECTORY ADS

Contact Ruth, 303-566-4113 rdaniels@coloradocommunitymedia.com

SERVICE DIRECTORY

Career Opportunites

Service Directory

Miscellaneous

Colorado Statewide

NOW HIRING

Clear Creek Courant Reporter The Clear Creek Courant, which has covered “history as it happens” in Georgetown, Empire, Idaho Springs and surrounding areas, is seeking an experienced reporter to help continue a tradition of excellence by covering government, breaking news, events, features and more. The Courant is a staple of these mountain communities and aims to capture the charm of smalltown mountain living. We’re looking for an ambitious journalist who is passionate about local news and loves to chase down important stories and tell them in a way that connects with readers on multiple platforms. The right candidate must also be able to shoot and edit images and post content to social media platforms. Video skills are a plus.

Responsibilities include: • Generating six stories a week. • Demonstrating effective use of social media tools to source stories and drive traffic to website and print products. • Ensuring accuracy, objectivity, fairness and correct spelling in all reporting. • Meeting deadlines without exception. • Working collaboratively with other reporters on shared editorial projects. • Keeping the Clear Creek Courant website and social media updated.

Qualifications: • A degree in journalism or communications • Two years of experience in reporting • Must be available to work some nights and weekends • Digital photography experience • Must have a current driver’s license or the ability to get one

Details: • Full time with benefits, salary range $16-18/hour

Interested? Email West Region Editor Kristen Fiore: kfiore(at)coloradocommunitymedia.com with a cover letter, links to previously published work and three references.

Real Estate for Rent

BEAR PAW STANBRO

PROPERTY MANAGEMENT, INC.

DO YOU HAVE A HOME TO RENT? DO YOU NEED A HOME TO RENT?? GIVE US A CALL! 303.674.8363

www.BearPawRentals.com

DEADLINES CLASSIFIED LINE ADS: MONDAY, 11 A.M. SERVICE DIRECTORY: THURSDAY, 5 P.M. LEGALS: THURSDAY, 3 P.M.

Cleaning

Network

To place a 25-word COSCAN Network ad in 91 Colorado newspapers for only $300, contact your local newspaper or email Colorado Press Association Network at rtoledo@colopress.net AT&T WIRELESS DIRECTV DIRECTV for $79.99/mo for 12 months with CHOICE Package. Watch your favorite live sports, news & entertainment anywhere. First 3 months of HBO Max, Cinemax, Showtime, Starz and Epix Included! Directv is #1 in Customer Satisfaction (JD Power & Assoc.) Some Restrictions apply.

Great New Offer from AT&T Wireless! Ask how to get the new iPhone 12 mini for as low as $0 with trade in. While supplies last!

Green Roads Pain Relief Cream. Great for backaches, arthritis, muscle aches & more. Get pain relief exactly where you need it most. Use code PAIN to get three FREE Gifts! Visit: http://greencbdtoday.com/colorado

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Spring Cleaning Special 20% off Riley@arrowheadwindowcleaning.com

Lawn/Garden Services DOGS, PETS, LIVESTOCK

Use Happy Jack® mange to treat horse mane dandruff & lice. At Tractor Supply® www.fleabeacon.com

ADOPT a Shelter Pet

Commercial/Residential Services: •Hardscaping- Flagstone/Pavers: patios, walkways, porches, pool decks. Structural retaining walls, Xeriscaping, flower bed walls, outdoor living and entertainment areas, pergolas etc •Concrete- driveways, sidewalks and patios, decorative concrete, concrete demolition & disposal. •Demolition- buildings, sheds, driveways, junk, existing landscape etc. •Drainage solutions- French drains, runoff water from different elevation solutions , gutter water runoff solutions, French drain replacement etc. •Tree & shrub services- tree and shrub trimming, removal, planting new vegetation etc •Annual landscape maintenanceinstallation of river rock, mulch, or any other desired ground cover. We can remove & replace your old steel edging with new, rust proof, edging! •Sod/New Lawn Install-New lawn creation; Replacement of grass damaged by drought, neglect or irrigation systems needing sprinkler repair. •We offer spring and fall cleanups which would include preparing the entire landscape for the upcoming season. (Sprinklers, trimming vegetation, leaf removal, shrub/tree trimming etc) •Sprinkler system/irrigation- new installations, replacements, sprinkler repair, coverage issues etc. Our first priority is always water conservation, we use smart technology to save you water! Check out our reviews on google! We guarantee satisfaction. Call Today! Family owned & operated! Trae Francque

720-653-8379

ttpropertymain@gmail.com • Reasonable rates, Reliable service • Customer satisfaction Guaranteed

AskUs@BearPawRentals.com

Lawn/Garden Services

EVERGREEN • CONIFER • GENESEE • LOOKOUT MTN • MORRISON • BAILEY

Landscape & Garden

28265 Hwy 74, Main St • Evergreen • 303-674-8363

Sod, Rock, Mulch, Retaining Walls, Sprinklers, Sprinkler Repair, Flagstone, Fence Repair, Power Rake, Fertilize, Aeration, Yard Clean-Ups, Shrub Trimming/Removal, Rock Removal, Weed Control, Trash Hauling and Much More! Senior Discounts Year Round!

720-982-9155 lawnservice9155@q.com


Canyon Courier 39

April 14, 2022

TRANSFORM YOUR HOME Enjoy up to 50% more space in your kitchen and better access to your most-used items with our custom pull-out shelves installed in your existing cabinets

12

50% OFF

M O NT H

NO INTEREST NO PAYMENTS

INSTALLATION* *Limit one offer per household.

*On Approved Credit*

Must purchase 5+ Classic/Designer Shelves. EXP 7/31/22. Independently owned and operated franchise. © 2022 ShelfGenie SPV LLC. All rights Reserved.

Schedule Your FREE Design Consultation:

(877) 326-0607

®

FEEL THE SPEED, EVEN AT PEAK TIMES. Based on wired connection to gateway.

AT&T INTERNET 100

45

$

††

/mo*

For 12 mos, plus taxes & equip.fee.$10/mo equip. fee applies. Limited availability in selectareas. *Price after $5/mo Autopay & Paperless bill discount (w/in 2 bills).

Limited availability in select areas. May not be available inyour area. Call or goto att.com/internetto see if you qualify.

Get strong, fast Wi-Fi to work and play throughout your home.^ No annual contract. Power multiple devices at once— everyone can enjoy their own screen. Number of devices depends on screen size/resolution.

Over 99% reliability.

Excludes DSL. Based on network availability.

Contact your local DIRECTV dealer IV Support Holdings

877-381-5080 INTERNET OFFER: Subj. to change and may be discontinued at any time. Price for Internet 100 for new residential customers & is after $5/mo. autopay & paperless bill discount. Pricing for first 12 months only. After 12 mos., then prevailing rate applies. Autopay & Paperless Bill Discount: Discount off the monthly rate when account is active & enrolled in both. Pay full plan cost until discount starts w/in 2 bill cycles. Must maintain autopay/paperless bill and valid email address to continue discount. Additional Fees & Taxes: AT&T one-time transactional fees, $10/mo. equipment fee, and monthly cost recovery surcharges which are not government-required may apply, as well as taxes. See www.att.com/fees for details. Installation: $99 installation for full tech install, plus tax where applicable. Credit restrictions apply. Pricing subject to change. Subj. to Internet Terms of Service at att.com/internet-terms. ^AT&T Smart Wi-Fi requires installation of a BGW210, 5268AC, or NVG599 Wi-Fi Gateway. Standard with Internet plans (12M or higher). Whole home Wi-Fi connectivity may require AT&T Smart Wi-Fi Extender(s) sold separately. ††Internet speed claims represent maximum network service capability speeds and based on wired connection to gateway. Actual customer speeds are not guaranteed and may vary based on several factors. For more information, go to www.att.com/speed101. ©2021 DIRECTV. DIRECTV and all other DIRECTV marks are trademarks of DIRECTV, LLC. AT&T and Globe logo are trademarks of AT&T Intellectual Property.


40 Canyon Courier

April 14, 2022