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MAY 18, 2018

ARAPAHOE COUNTY, COLORADO

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Cherry Creek girls win the state tennis championship P31 ELECTION 2018 Find out what’s next now that the results are in for the South Metro Fire and South Suburban elections PAGES 5-6

WHERE TO GO? Learn how one city is responding to a rise in homelessness on its streets PAGES 7-11

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CentennialCitizen.net

VOLUME 17 | ISSUE 25


2 Centennial Citizen

May 18, 2018M

‘Sully’ soon will headline Centennial Airport’s 50th Renowned pilot to appear at event benefiting local aviation, aerospace programs BY ELLIS ARNOLD EARNOLD@COLORADOCOMMUNITYMEDIA.COM

One of the busiest general-aviation airports in the country will host famed “miracle on the Hudson” pilot Capt. Chesley “Sully” Sullenberger for its 50th anniversary celebration. The gala luncheon May 25 will see Sullenberger share his credo of “leadership by personal example.” Proceeds from the event will go to benefit the Centennial Airport Foundation, a 501(c)(3) organization that supports local STEM education and programs, particularly those with an emphasis on aviation and aerospace. The audience at the Denver Marriott Tech Center will hear an address from Sullenberger about the life lessons that prepared him to handle the historic moment when he saved 155 lives on a flight that landed in the Hudson River. On Jan. 15, 2009, Sullenberger lost thrust in both engines on US Airways Flight 1549 and led his crew to safely execute an emergency water landing on the river in New York. Sullenberger and the crew garnered widespread acclaim for their actions, including the passage of a congressional resolution in their honor. The crisis came

to be known as the “miracle on the Hudson” and inspired the 2016 motion picture “Sully,” in which Tom Hanks portrayed Sullenberger. Coming back to Centennial Airport to talk about leadership seemed natural for Sullenberger, who served as a fighter pilot for the Air Force from 1975-80. Originally the Arapahoe County Airport, it’s a place he became acquainted with nearly five decades ago. “When I entered the U.S. Air Force Academy, I already held a commercialpilot certificate that I had earned while still in high school,” said Sullenberger, a Texas native. “During the Thanksgiving weekend of my freshman year, I traveled to the Arapahoe County Airport to fly a Cessna 172 to get some flight time and maintain my piloting skills. I flew an hour-long flight that day. Over my four years at the academy, I had occasion to fly into (the airport) a few times.” In a changing commercial-aviation industry landscape, Sullenberger’s speech comes at a time when the future of the craft depends heavily on young hopefuls for pilot and technician positions. The nonprofit Centennial Airport Foundation supports local STEM education and programs, particularly with an emphasis on aviation and aerospace. The airport’s executive director, Robert Olislagers, reflected on Centennial Airport’s growth as an influential

IF YOU GO The Centennial Airport 50th-anniversary gala is May 25, from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the Denver Marriott Tech Center at 4900 S. Syracuse St. in Denver. Individual tickets are $250 each. Table sponsorships, beginning at $3,000, are also available. Proceeds go to benefit the Centennial Airport Foundation. Tickets can be purchased at bit.ly/SULLYmedia. For assistance with tickets or sponsorships, contact 720-985-8580 or events@centennialairport.com. Centennial Airport is a general-aviation airport, which means it features flight training and medical evacuation, corporate charter, small cargo and recreational flights, among other uses — but commercialairline flights, like those on United or Southwest airlines, for example, are not part of the mix. It opened in 1968 as Arapahoe County Airport and is owned and operated by the Arapahoe County Public Airport Authority, a governmental body. It is not located in the City of Centennial, which was formed long after the airport in 2001 — the airport changed its name to “Centennial” in 1984. The airport sits at 7800 S. Peoria St., just south of East Arapahoe Road and southeast of the Topgolf entertainment complex, near the middle of Centennial. It sits mostly in unincorporated Arapahoe County but extends south into Douglas County, and it’s one of the busiest general-aviation airports in the country. part of the south Denver metro area. “From humble beginnings in 1968, Centennial Airport has grown to become one of the most respected, premier business airports in the nation,” Olislagers said. It is “an integral part of the economic success of the Denver

Capt. Chesley “Sully” Sullenberger is a former airline and U.S. Air Force pilot who rose to fame for the “miracle on the Hudson,” the 2009 landing of a US Airways flight on the Hudson River in New York. Sullenberger will be the headline speaker at Centennial Airport’s 50th anniversary celebration May 25. COURTESY PHOTO

south metro area, and being able to celebrate 50 years of aviation excellence with Captain Sullenberger, who exemplifies excellence in aviation, is a fitting tribute to not only the airport, but to all who have made our success possible.”

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Centennial Citizen 3

May 18, 2018

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4 Centennial Citizen

May 18, 2018M

Centennial opts into countywide transportation forum Partnership to focus funding on traffic improvement priorities

Putting heads together

BY ELLIS ARNOLD EARNOLD@COLORADOCOMMUNITYMEDIA.COM

TRAINING The Aurora-South Metro SBDC helps existing and new businesses grow and prosper through workshops and consulting.

Afternoon rush-hour traffic on a Monday at East Arapahoe Road and South Havana Street in Centennial near Interstate 25. Traffic on Arapahoe Road is a frequent concern for residents in the city. FILE PHOTO towns in Adams, Arapahoe, Boulder, Denver, Douglas, Jefferson and more counties — for federal transportation money, a city report said. DRCOG, often pronounced “Dr. Cog,” leads urban-planning efforts for the Denver area and acts as the conduit for grant money to flow to local agencies. Under a new proposed model, money would be broken up among counties in the region for local transportation projects. Cities and towns would still

AT TE NT S M E O U I ON T TR OA H BU RE SI NE A SS ES !

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Tired of that thin stretch of East County Line Road between South Broadway and South University Boulevard? How about the intersections on East Arapahoe Road? Ever lament the commute through East Belleview Avenue? Drivers may be in luck. Centennial agreed to enter a partnership between several cities and towns in Arapahoe County at a recent city council meeting, where the city opted into a transportation forum that meets to decide how federal money granted to the county will be spent. If all entities opt in, the agreement would also include the cities of Aurora, Cherry Hills Village, Englewood, Glendale, Greenwood Village, Sheridan and Littleton; the towns of Bennett, Bow Mar, Columbine Valley, Deer Trail and Foxfield; and Arapahoe County. “This is the first agreement of its kind” for the city, said Travis Greiman, public-works director for Centennial. Historically, the city had to compete against the whole region of the Denver Regional Council of Governments — including a multitude of cities and

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compete for 20 percent of the funds for regional projects, like a project on Interstate 70, but 80 percent of the money would be split among each county based on population, vehicle miles traveled and the employment in the counties. Each county would oversee the funds, and the county and its cities and towns would compete for that money. Arapahoe County would receive about $35 million for the 2020-23 cycle of the roadway-project funding under that proposed model. Although different transportation projects have unique requirements that determine cost, for context, $35 million is roughly half the cost of the interchange project at Interstate 25 and Arapahoe Road, Greiman said. To oversee how the dollars are spent, the municipalities in Arapahoe County met to create an intergovernmental agreement, or an IGA, to establish a collaborative forum on transportation — that’s what Centennial City Council approved April 16. The cities and towns will have say in what the best use of the money is. And it’s important to have a seat at the table — the list of priorities in Arapahoe County is long, Greiman said. “It includes projects like a corridor study of Santa Fe (Drive) through Arapahoe County, Hampden/Broadway bridge replacement, I-25/Belleview interchange improvements (and) Parker/Quincy intersection improvements,” Greiman said. The two leading candidates within Centennial limits are County Line Road widening from University Boulevard to Broadway, and intersection improvements on Arapahoe Road from I-25 to South Parker Road, he added. Concrete plans for what the projects would look like haven’t been identified, but the projects would undergo design if grant money is awarded for them, Greiman said. Residents may remember that Centennial announced joining a transportation alliance of similar size in September — the Colorado Smart Cities Alliance, a partnership of public, private and academic institutions

working to make life easier along the central Front Range. The cities of Arvada, Aurora, Denver, Centennial, Greenwood Village, Littleton, Lone Tree, Boulder, Longmont, Westminster, Fort Collins and Colorado Springs are a part of that alliance, which plans to share best practices with its members. The Colorado Innovation Corridor, Colorado Technology Association, University of ColoradoDenver and Arrow Electronics are among the private and public entities also in the partnership. “We’re all in the situation of managing growth,” said Stephanie Piko, mayor of Centennial, in September. Centennial plans to take the technological route and enhance its system of traffic cameras and sensors. Doing so will enable the city to time its traffic lights more accurately to traffic flows, Piko said. Police, fire officers and medical responders would also benefit from getting real-time updates about traffic and accidents. That’s the kind of project that the Smart Cities Alliance aims to share data about among its members. It meets quarterly to discuss challenges, its website said. But that alliance and the Arapahoe County forum are likely to be independent of each other, Greiman said. “The Smart Cities Alliance is focused on advancing technology,” Greiman said. We “don’t expect federal participation in the (alliance) at this moment, whereas the transportation forum is about programming federal transportation dollars within Arapahoe County.” For more information on DRCOG, go to drcog.org.


Centennial Citizen 5

May 18, 2018

Pye, Barrett, Lawful win SSPRD election Parks and recreation district serves large area across south suburbs BY DAVID GILBERT DGILBERT@COLORADOCOMMUNITYMEDIA.COM

South Suburban Parks and Recreation District’s three newly elected board members say they look forward to maintaining and enhancing what they call a beloved and top-tier local amenity. Susan Pye, Pete Barrett and Dave Lawful were elected to the board of South Suburban Parks and Recreation District on May 8. Each will serve a four-year term. Board members John Ostermiller, Mike Anderson and Pam Eller are term-limited and will retire from the

with 841 and Lawful third with 794. South Suburban serves a wide swath of the south metro area, operating parks, recreation centers and league sports.

Pye

Barrett

Lawful

board this month, South Suburban said in a press release. The newly elected board members will join sitting members Scott LaBrash and Jim Taylor. Pye, Barrett and Lawful won over a crowded field of nine, beating Jerry Bakke, Charlie Blosten, Michael Kohut, Jeff Monroe, Dan Purse and Tom Wood. Unofficial results from late on election night show Pye with 1,220 votes, the only candidate to receive more than 1,000. Barrett came in second

Susan Pye Pye is a recently retired international telecommunication technical trainer who trained staff in countries worldwide, according to her candidate profile. She works part-time at IKEA. She is the chair of the Centennial Senior Commission and does outreach for the Mobility Ambassador Program, among other volunteer activities. Pye said she’s optimistic about the district’s future, and that her goal is staying the course. “There’s a good mandate in place in the form of the master plan and strategic plan,” Pye said. “Our task is maintaining and enhancing the assets we’ve got.”

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Pye said residents of the district sometimes take it for granted, and that she’d like to help people engage with it more. “We don’t utilize it as much as we can,” Pye said. “If I can help send that message to children, seniors, and everyone in between, we could increase health awareness of engagement with the assets that are already here.” Maintaining open space expectations will be a challenge going forward, Pye said. “We all want open space and retail tax, but you have to have a balance,” Pye said. “We can’t give up open space that helps us get outdoors.” With seniors living longer, recreational activities are vital to maintaing health and socialization, Pye said. “South Suburban helps us live long and die short,” Pye said. SEE SSPRD, P26


6 Centennial Citizen

May 18, 2018M

Voters in two districts approve fire unification South Metro takes over from Littleton; property taxes to increase

45 opposed. The votes represented only a tiny portion of registered voters in the two districts: Highlands Ranch has more than 63,000 registered voters, and LFPD is home to more than 54,000 registered voters Effective Jan. 1, 2019, the two districts’ fire protection services will be absorbed by South Metro, a large consolidated district that already covers a vast swath of Arapahoe and Douglas counties, providing fire protection to more than a quarter-million residents in Parker, Lone Tree, Greenwood Village, much of Centennial, Cherry Hills Village and several other municipalities. The vote establishes South Metro Fire Rescue as the second-largest firefighting entity in Colorado, after Denver Fire. Littleton Fire Protection District covers a large area surrounding Littleton proper, including Chatfield, Columbine Valley, western Centennial and the

BY DAVID GILBERT DGILBERT@COLORADOCOMMUNITYMEDIA.COM

Littleton Fire Rescue is the last member of the old Littleton fire partnership yet to vote on whether to be fully included in South Metro Fire Rescue, after voters in Highlands Ranch and Littleton Fire Protection District approved inclusion in the large regional district in strongly one-sided votes on May 8. The effort passed in LFPD with 302 votes in favor and 29 opposed, according to unofficial tallies. Voters in Highlands Ranch approved the measure with 1,075 votes in favor and

unincorporated area west of the city. Highlands Ranch Metro District covers a sprawling area south of C-470 and east of Santa Fe Drive, stretching south of the Daniels Park area. The vote is the culmination of efforts started last year by Highlands Ranch and LFPD, both of which announced they were cutting ties with the City of Littleton, with whom they had contracted for fire service for decades. If the vote had failed, the districts would have begun contracting with South Metro for fire service anyway, paying the difference in cost out of their coffers and going before voters in each successive election continuing to seek inclusion. The City of Littleton, now left without its partners, will face a similar vote for inclusion in South Metro’s coverage area this November. Like Highlands Ranch and LFPD, the city will begin contracting with South Metro in 2019

regardless of the vote outcome. Littleton Mayor Debbie Brinkman responded to a phone message for comment with a statement issued through a city spokesperson, praising the outcome of the vote. “It is reassuring to see that voters in Highlands Ranch and the Littleton Fire Protection District recognized the wisdom in unifying with South Metro,” Brinkman’s statement read. “We look forward to working closely with Littleton residents over the summer to provide more information and answer questions about the critical importance of Littleton joining our partners. Besides improved fire and emergency medical response with unification, Littleton will get the added value of redirecting funds towards street and infrastructure improvements. It is a win for everybody.”

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Centennial Citizen 7

May 18, 2018

Greg Curtice, 60, laughs with Giving Heart volunteers as he gets lunch at the homeless-services center in Englewood April 24. Curtice, who is homeless and mostly stays in Englewood, stayed at motels on South Broadway in Englewood and slept in his van in a nearby church parking lot during a three-month stint of homelessness in late 2016. After a foreclosure on his Englewood home about four years ago, he said he lived with a friend but later got kicked out and eventually began staying in his van on and off. ELLIS ARNOLD

No place to call home Homelessness in Englewood has seen growth in recent years, and a new coalition hopes to reverse course BY ELLIS ARNOLD EARNOLD@COLORADOCOMMUNITYMEDIA.COM

D

uring a cleanup along the South Platte River in January, Englewood police counted 21 campsites with about 30 people living on its east banks. Some 25 truckloads of trash, human waste, syringes and needles were hauled out. At a local food pantry, about 20 homeless individuals, most of them new faces, arrive each week seeking help. Businesses along the Broadway corridor are increasingly complaining about homeless people loitering, sleeping on property or showing aggression toward passersby. One owner ended up in a physical altercation with a patron of a nearby homeless-resource center who wouldn’t move from her entrance. And in the 12 months ending in March, the

Englewood Public Library recorded more than 20 incidents involving mostly alcohol and some drugs. A library administrator didn’t directly connect them to the homeless, but said people with drug problems likely need a warm, dry place to use. Bloody tissues and needles, suggestive of drug injections, have been found in the men’s bathroom. Although exact numbers are difficult to come by, police, business owners, city officials and organizations that work with the homeless say a growing homeless population is affecting parts of the fabric of life in Englewood. The challenge has become so great that a community coalition called Change the Trend Network — composed of nonprofits, the Englewood Police Department and area churches — formed to find solutions to the complex social issue that a growing number of suburban areas are facing: How to respond with compassion and create programs that help move people out of homelessness while preserving the community’s safety and economic vitality. Bart Sayyah, executive director at HOPE food pantry on South Broadway, said south metro-area Sayyah homelessness was a problem

The increasing homeless population in Englewood, an issue facing a growing number of suburban areas, has spurred the creation of a community coalition to try to address the complicated social challenge in compassionate but realistic ways. This week, Colorado Community Media publishes the first part in an ongoing series, “No Place to Call Home,” which explores the reasons behind the rise in homelessness in Englewood and its effects on various segments of the community, from businesses and city government to nonprofits, the faith community and schools. The series also reports on the challenges faced by homeless people trying to regain stability in their lives. even when he observed it as a volunteer for a homeless-resource center three decades ago. “We have to decide whether we want to be compassionate,” he said, “or we just want to turn a blind eye to it and hope it becomes someone else’s problem.” SEE HOMELESS, P8


8 Centennial Citizen

May 18, 2018M

‘It’s dirty. It’s messy — it’s hands-on’ Coalition hopes to change the trend of homelessness in Englewood BY ELLIS ARNOLD EARNOLD@COLORADOCOMMUNITYMEDIA.COM

The Englewood Civic Center community room found itself packed to the brim when about 150 community members came to the first public forum by Change the Trend Network, a coalition of nonprofits, faith-based groups, a health-care provider and the Englewood police established to address homelessness in Englewood. The group formed last summer, and after introductory statements to the Englewood City Council, Change the Trend came forward with the March 22 forum, where residents engaged in conversation with the coalition. It’s important to have “safe places for the homeless to go … where they don’t feel threatened, endangered or judged,” said Boo Crosby, a manager at Cafe 180, a restaurant that provides meals in exchange for volunteer service for those who can’t pay. Crosby, along with other network members on the forum’s panel, encouraged people to get involved. Lynn Ann Huizingh, of the Severe Weather Shelter Network, said her organization works with the help of hundreds of volunteers. “Without that kind of effort in any of our communities,” Huizingh said, “there will be no change.” Change the Trend includes representatives from: • Cafe 180, 3315 S. Broadway, whose homeless clientele sometimes makes up a third or more of its customers; • The Englewood Police Department, which wants to ensure homelessness isn’t criminalized and help formulate a response, city officials say; • Giving Heart, 4358 S. Broadway, a resource center where guests can get a hot meal, help with obtaining documentation and birth certificates, and use a computer lab; • The Severe Weather Shelter Network, a nonprofit that works to shelter homeless individuals at local churches in inclement conditions; • The Sacred Grace Englewood, 3220 S. Acoma St., a church just out-

HOMELESS FROM PAGE 7

A complex web of reasons Englewood, a city of about 35,000 residents, borders Denver on the north, Littleton on the south, Sheridan on the west and Cherry Hills Village on the east. The South Platte River winds along the city’s western edge. Its population boomed in the mid-1900s amid a need for new homes as veterans returned from World War II.

Boo Crosby, restaurant manager at Cafe 180, right, stands on March 28 with Tim Hildebrant, a 39-year-old who has been in and out of homelessness since age 17. Hildebrant grew up in Englewood and is a longtime customer at Cafe 180, which provides meals in exchange for volunteer service for those who can’t pay. He’s waiting for low-income housing to open up. “I’m trying to get on the waitlist,” said Hildebrant, who said he struggles with health issues, some of them related to weather exposure, and has trouble getting hired because of how people view him. Crosby is a member of Change the Trend Network, a coalition of leaders working to address homelessness in Englewood. ELLIS ARNOLD

WHEN IS THE NEXT FORUM? Change the Trend Network’s next forum is scheduled for 6:30-8 p.m. June 27 at the Englewood Civic Center, 1000 Englewood Parkway. It will feature more audience involvement than the first event in March, said Boo Crosby, a group member. To share your thoughts with Change the Trend, email homelessenglewood@gmail.com. To ask questions, email Mike Sandgren at mike@wellspringcolorado.com. side the Englewood downtown area; • AllHealth Network, which provides behavioral-health services and has locations in Littleton and the south-metro area; • And Wellspring Anglican Church, 4300 S. Lincoln St., which gives food, medical and social resources to poor and homeless individuals. The former Cinderella City mall, near West Hampden Avenue and South Santa Fe Drive, was a main draw for Englewood in the 1970s. But competition led to a decline, and after a late-1990s demolition, the site was converted into the city’s Walmart, other retail and the buildings that house city-government offices and the Englewood Public Library. The civic-center area also is a midpoint stop for the light-rail line and buses that run on South Broadway from downtown Denver to the outer suburbs. More than half of Englewood’s

Among the Change the Trend representatives is Adam Becker, who spent more than a decade living in places like parks, along highways and under bridges. Today, he works at Denver’s Porter Place Retirement Community and lives in a duplex on the Denver-Englewood border. At the March 22 forum, he found a room filled with people who cared enough about people with stories like his. “A few years ago, I was drunk and homeless, and now, I’m helping drunks and homeless people,” Becker said later. It’s “an opportunity that all of us have — to use the worst parts of our lives to be the biggest gift we can give to others.” Change the Trend members urged those at the forum to understand how they can help and acknowledged the lack of easy solutions. households earn between $25,000 and $99,999, according to a 2018 city survey. The majority of residents are between 25 and 54 years old. The economy includes a multitude of small businesses and industrial companies, such as Stolle Machinery and Braemar Steel Buildings. After a post-2008 recession that left storefronts vacant throughout the city, the downtown area is reinventing itself — businesses from restaurants to a brewery to a yoga studio have opened in recent years. Farther south, a long trail of older businesses, small restaurants, motels and car dealer-

“We don’t have the answer,” Crosby said. “That’s why we’re here.” He encouraged people to get involved, even if just a little. He said Change the Trend wants to work with business leaders, residents and anyone in Englewood. “The woman who started the cafe had a saying,” Crosby said. “‘If everyone does a little, no one has to do a lot.’” Panelists identified a number of problems and realities that day: • Criminal enforcement against homelessness won’t solve the problem, Englewood police Sgt. Reid McGrath said. • People on the street don’t have a safe place to store belongings while they look for jobs, Huizingh said. • Placing a homeless person in housing is thousands of dollars less costly than if they stay on the street, said Nathan Hoag, parish pastor at The Sacred Grace. • Without broad collaboration, change cannot occur, Huizingh said. But a man in the audience challenged the group, questioning what solution members would give to allow homeless individuals to transition away from help they are receiving. “The reality is it’s great we are doing the kumbaya thing,” he said, but what will the group do to “not just give them a handout, but give them a hand up?” In an interview in April, Becker said better understanding the homeless and the challenges they face is key to that distinction. For instance, he said, the process to get a job can start with needing an ID, which requires documentation and an address. But that requires getting to a place with someone who will allow an address to be used. “Pretty soon, your day has gone by,” Becker said, used up looking for a job, but also for food and a place to sleep. “Everywhere you go, you’re pointed in a different direction … lost in the maze.” Communities can ticket people, carry out “sweeps,” ignore the issue or, he said, embrace the problem and be part of the conversation. “It’s dirty. It’s messy — it’s handson,” Becker said, “but it’s really the only way to get through something. You can’t go above it or below it or around it — you’ve gotta go through it.” ships line the gates leading toward the neighboring, newer suburbs of Highlands Ranch and Centennial. To the north, advocates who help the homeless point to a pattern of homeless people moving to the suburbs from Denver, which has the largest concentration of shelters and other resources for the homeless in the metro area. Although the data isn’t exact, voluntary surveys say homelessness decreased by about 13 percent since 2012 in the seven-county Denver SEE HOMELESS, P9

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Centennial Citizen 9

May 18, 2018

HOMELESS

MORE ABOUT HOMELESSNESS

FROM PAGE 8

metro area, which includes rural areas in counties such as Arapahoe and Adams, according to the annual point-in-time survey conducted by the Metro Denver Homeless Initiative. The survey counts how many homeless individuals stay in the area on one night per year. Homelessness nationally has dropped by about 11 percent since 2012, according to similar surveys nationwide. But Englewood’s story, advocates who help the homeless say, has evaded that trend. They, along with police and city officials, point to a complex web of reasons as to why: The city’s easy-access location along the light rail and South Broadway bus corridors may play a role. Rising housing costs in Denver and suburban areas, the opioid epidemic and policies in Denver that push out the homeless likely also are contributing factors. “There are many theories on causality, including the passage of Amendment 64,” City Manager Eric Keck said about the 2012 amendment to the state Constitution that legalized recreational marijuana. But there’s “also the rapidly rising cost of housing in Colorado along the Front Range, which has forced many people to lose their homes. It is too difficult to pinpoint when this issue really started.” One factor may be policies such as Denver’s 2012 ban on camping on private and public property, which may be pushing more homeless into

A bike and other belongings rest May 6 near a campsite on the Denver side of the South Platte River — Englewood is on the east side for a stretch — near West Dartmouth Avenue. At least two people sat at the campsite that evening. One, a middle-aged man who has been homeless and camping on the river for four years, said camper numbers have more than doubled in the past two years. The man, who did not want to be named, has spent time along the river between West Mississippi to Quincy avenues. ELLIS ARNOLD the suburbs, said Cathy Alderman, vice president of communications and public policy at Colorado Coalition for the Homeless, a Denver-based organization that provides housing, health care and other supportive services. When Denver police enforce the camping ban in actions that have become known as “sweeps,” people disperse to surrounding cities for periods of time, Alderman said. “I will say that since the camping ban was passed, we have not seen a decrease in people experiencing homelessness,” she said. “We know that only exacerbates that experience.” Boo Crosby, a manager at Cafe 180, a restaurant that provides meals in exchange for volunteer service for

those who can’t pay and often serves homeless patrons, said homeless individuals also move out of Denver out of fear for their safety. “It seems like a lot of folks are starting to move south into Englewood,” he said. “It’s not a problem that’s decreasing whatsoever.” The homeless who use services in Denver also may prefer to sleep in a place like Englewood — on the river, in alleys, in parks or behind stores — to avoid safety issues at Denver shelters, said Donna Zimmerman, director at Giving Heart, a homeless-services center on South Broadway that began operating in 2011. It moved from its SEE HOMELESS, P10

• The Point-In-Time survey by the Metro Denver Homeless Initiative counted 5,116 homeless people on Jan. 30, 2017 in the seven-county Denver metro area. • The area includes Denver, Arapahoe, Jefferson, Adams, Douglas, Broomfield and Boulder counties. About 65 percent stayed in Denver, 12 percent in Boulder County and 11 percent — or 562 individuals — in Arapahoe County. • The total included 569 veterans and 1,085 chronically homeless individuals. Of the chronically homeless, 236 said they were victims of domestic violence, 501 identified alcohol or drug abuse as a condition, 33 had HIV or AIDS, 616 had a mental illness, 408 had other chronic health problems and 616 were disabled. • About 43 percent of all homeless individuals stayed in transitional housing, while about 38 percent were in emergency shelter, including youth shelters and hotel or motel rooms paid for by a voucher or agency. About 18 percent, or 924 people, were unsheltered. • The count did not include people staying in hotels or motels paid for by themselves or sleeping on couches with friends or family. • The survey is voluntary and is a “snapshot” of the homeless population — actual numbers are likely higher. • The survey is based on the federal Department of Housing and Urban Development’s definition of homelessness, which includes among other factors: people living in shelters, transitional housing or a place not meant for human habitation such as a vehicle or on the street; and people fleeing or attempting to flee domestic violence and who lack the resources to find permanent housing. Sources: 2017 Metro Denver Homeless Initiative Point-In-Time survey, U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development

‘In general, things in life happen’ A former boxer, once homeless, looks to the future BY ELLIS ARNOLD EARNOLD@COLORADOCOMMUNITYMEDIA.COM

The loss of an apartment and a blow to the knee took a former boxer from federally subsidized housing in Englewood to living in a tent on the South Platte River. “I’ve been stuck at a standstill,” said David Morrison, 39, whose knee was injured in July 2016 when a car struck him as he rode his bike to the post office in Englewood. Two months later, mold in his apartment led to a failed inspection. And Morrison, a Montana native who came to Colorado for boxing, had to move out. He had lived in Englewood since 2012 with help from federal subsidies. Morrison nearly secured another apartment. But when he couldn’t get an extension to wait for the current tenant to move out, he lost his housing voucher. Earning less than $800 per month, he said, it was pointless to keep looking. Rent for a onebedroom apartment in Englewood was about $1,175 in mid-2016, according to ApartmentList.com. “It was getting dark, and I was at that moment where I was just like, (forget) it,” said Morrison, a short, lean figure with a goatee. “I need to be somewhere where no one’s gonna mess with me.” He had “heard sketchy stories about shelters,” so he chose to stay by the South Platte River instead. Morrison roamed around and found a quiet spot between West Hampden and Oxford avenues, just outside Englewood’s west edge. He would routinely

wake up at 5 a.m. to leave for work as a cook at an Aramark grill in the Town of Morrison. To get there, he rode his bike more than 10 miles, enduring pain in the knee damaged by the crash. “It was very painful, but I liked my job, so I would just torture myself,” Morrison said. He couldn’t leave his belongings behind, so he would strap everything to his bike. (In December 2016, Morrison had surgery at Porter Adventist Hospital, covered by Medicaid, to repair the knee.) He avoided getting in trouble, returning to set up camp at about 10 p.m. In February 2017, a tax return allowed him to buy a $1,300 used van. But he had run-ins with police, who would wake him to question why he was there and tell him to leave Englewood, he said. In October 2017, Morrison began parking near West Dartmouth Avenue in the river area, near other RVs and vans. Over the next four months, he said he saw an increase in the number of cars parking near him. When he was camping on the river, he said he also had perceived about a 15 percent increase in the number of people staying on the Platte in campsites. Morrison found food and assistance at several homeless-resource centers, including Giving Heart in Englewood and Father Woody’s Haven of Hope in Denver. “You kinda have to travel to find a meal,” Morrison said. He did it by “bicycle, walking, public transportation — however I could get around.” He applied for housing through the Colorado Coalition for the Homeless in late 2016, but it wasn’t until last January that he got an apartment with federal funding in the southwest Denver area. With

David Morrison, 39, stands outside Giving Heart at 4358 S. Broadway in Englewood on April 17. Morrison, a former boxer in Colorado, Montana and other states, was homeless for more than a year in the Englewood area and was housed early this year with the help of a governmentfunded program. ELLIS ARNOLD

the help of a student loan and financial aid, he enrolled at Metropolitan State University of Denver where he’s studying exercise science. He wants to be a personal trainer and boxing coach. His favorite part of having an apartment is being in a warm place. “I don’t have to have a flashlight to do my homework ‘til midnight,” Morrison said. “Before I was housed, I was sitting in a van doing my homework until 11:30 or 12 at night, freezing.” A laid-back man with a wide smile, Morrison said people should be less judgmental about the homeless. “In general, things in life happen,” he said. “So don’t judge a book by its cover ... take the time to smile and say hi.”


10 Centennial Citizen

May 18, 2018M

Long road to change ends in hope, stability Once homeless, he tries to use his experiences to help others BY ELLIS ARNOLD EARNOLD@COLORADOCOMMUNITYMEDIA.COM

At one point, Adam Becker was leaving his belongings under a large rock in the woods in Estes Park, walking to work, washing up in the bathroom, walking into the kitchen to wash dishes and never telling anyone he was homeless. “I was walking miles and miles every day and sleeping under a rock 50 hours a week,” Becker, 33, said. “It was a real crazy time to be pretending like I wasn’t homeless.” At 19, Becker left his hometown in rural Minnesota to drive to Arizona, find a job and start a new life. He dreamed of being a writer and wanted to get “out there” to get experiences to draw from. When he got to Boulder, the money started running out. As a kid out of

HOMELESS FROM PAGE 9

original location in the CityCenter Englewood area, near the civic center, in 2015. But people experiencing homeless in their own communities is also on the rise, Alderman said. In the Denvermetro area, rents climbed 52 percent between 2005 and 2015, according to Apartment List, a rental-listing site that researches industry trends. They also rose sharply in Englewood — one-bedroom rents increased nearly 20 percent since 2014, from $978 to $1,168 this year. “People everywhere are one paycheck away” from homelessness, Alderman said, or “one health condition or one loss of job because housing stability is so insecure right now.” Mike Sandgren, a coordinator at Wellspring Anglican Church at 4300 S. Lincoln St., where a food pantry and medical program offer help on weekends to the homeless and others in need, agrees. “I know a lot of people who ... have lived in Englewood their whole life who either are or have experienced homelessness recently,” said Sandgren, also the network leader for Change the Trend. Sgt. Reid McGrath, who oversees the Impact Team of officers who address specific issues in the city, said police see “a split of people” — many have deep ties to the Englewood community, a portion are from out of state and some have connections to Denver and other Colorado areas. And Sayyah, the director at HOPE food pantry, McGrath said about 10 percent of households — the pantry’s term to categorize clients — that

high school, he hadn’t saved much and ended up unable to pay for gas. He met people staying at the public library and gravitated toward the “street crowd,” he said, where he learned how to panhandle and play guitar on the street to get by. “Eventually, I got kinda swept away in it,” Becker said. He spent a few years hitchhiking on the West Coast and lived homeless almost constantly for a decade. Becker slept in parks and along highways and met many eclectic people. Veterans and people with mental illnesses were among them. From 2012-16, he stayed in Estes Park under the rock and in a storage unit, the back of a truck, a few seasonal cabin rentals and other unsteady places. In 2016, an apartment complex opened up, and his employers helped place him at the top of the list for units. He initially worked at the Stanley Hotel washing dishes and struggled with an alcohol addiction. “When you’re bouncing around and unstable, it was something that

the organization serves are homeless. Some say they’re passing through the area, and most don’t come back a second time. He thinks most stay outdoors. “They’ll come in without socks, haven’t bathed in a month,” Sayyah said. At Giving Heart, Zimmerman said, patrons were mostly aged 18-24, but recently, more people up to about 40 years old — and sometimes older — have come in. More are white than Hispanic Zimmerman or black, and about four times as many men as women come to the center. The national opioid epidemic, which has affected Colorado in recent years, also is cited as a cause for homelessness, according to U.S. Rep. Diana DeGette, who recently spoke to Englewood City Council about the issue. But although drug use can deplete a person’s resources, it’s difficult to make a firm link between public drug use and lacking housing, McGrath said. “We experience drug-use problems across the full spectrum of our residents,” McGrath said. “You would certainly think if they’re using in the library, it’s more likely for someone to be homeless. But the fact of the matter is people might do it there to avoid doing it at home.” McGrath, a member of Change the Trend, also served on the board of directors in 2016-17 for Love INC of Littleton, a nonprofit that works to help the homeless and others in need. He noted that police tend to find a significant amount of co-occurring mental health and substance-use issues among the homeless. But while there is room for debate on the root cause, community members ranging from a formerly homeless man to high-level city officials agree homelessness is on the rise in

Adam Becker, who was homeless for more than a decade, sits in his new house just outside Englewood city limits. ELLIS ARNOLD

was solid and there,” Becker said of the alcohol. “It was comforting.” In search of change, he visited a church, where pastors pointed him toward a Denver rehabilitation center called 180 Ministries. He completed a live-in, 12-month program in 2017. One day, soon after graduating, he walked by an assisted-living home,

Englewood. “Our homeless population has increased significantly in the past four to five years,” said McGrath, who participated in the January cleanup along the Platte and has been with the police department since 1992. “The river is the worst I’ve seen it in my time here.” Safety is a primary concern Take a drive down South Platte River Drive near West Dartmouth Avenue — that’s where dozens set up camps, like David Morrison, who now has an apartment but was homeless in the Englewood area for nearly 1 1/2 years. Morrison’s old home base along the Platte between West Hampden and Oxford avenues, where he stayed from September 2016 to February 2017, is a common one in an area where Denver, Sheridan and Englewood converge. But people also sleep in cars near the 3400 block of South Broadway in the downtown public-parking area, said Rita Russell, Englewood’s mayor pro tem. Camps have left waste in parks such as Cushing, near Dartmouth Avenue and South Santa Fe Drive, Keck said. The effects of homelessness also reach into the heart of the city, as Mike Lindgren, owner of Gekko Vapes in the 4300 block of South Broadway, has complained to Englewood City Council. Members of the business community on his block and near the Englewood Civic Center say homeless individuals near doorways and in shops have driven away potential customers, said Keck, the city manager. Businesses near Lindgren have brought grievances to city council at meetings and through email in recent months. Liquor bottles, cigarette butts, needles, yelling and aggressive interactions — along with a person using a cigarette ashtray as a toilet — have all made appearances near Lindgren’s

Porter Place Retirement Community in Denver at South Downing Street and East Yale Avenue. “I felt something — it was calling me,” Becker said. He told staff there he had restaurant experience and he landed a job. He also found a duplex unit on the Denver-Englewood border to rent. “To me, it’s been a miracle,” Becker said. “I still get hit with this feeling of not being worth it. Why should I do this? What’s the point? Still, sometimes, I see myself as this hungover bum crawling out from underneath a bridge in dirty clothes. It’s something that is a struggle to find ourselves worthwhile.” He volunteers at 180 Ministries and is a member of Change the Trend Network, a coalition of nonprofits, churches and others seeking to address homelessness in Englewood. “We have a choice to dwell in the pain of our situation or use it as a platform to reach other people,” Becker said. “It’s incredible to use the experience I’ve had for good now.”

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s w store next door to Giving Heart, Lind- a gren said in an interview in March. n “I need my customers and employees and yes, even me, to feel safe,” p Lindgren said, “and right now, no one r does.” g At a shop just doors down from Lindgren, Kellie Martinez, owner of Broadway Barbers, was assaulted on Jan. 16 after she asked two patrons of Giving Heart to stop standing near her barbershop’s front door and blocking access, according to a police report. One of them allegedly became angry and struck her. Personnel at Giving Heart told police the individuals had caused problems recently and were no longer welcome. Russell met with business owners in the area around the middle of 2017 to talk about their concerns. She requested the details from Englewood police on Martinez’s assault because “business owners had concerns that were not being addressed,” Russell said. The city has participated with Change the Trend mostly through the police department, Keck said, to “ensure that homelessness is not criminalized but rather to help formulate a response that will help ensure harmonious relations between all citizens.” “The homeless are also human beings and citizens who have a right to exist,” he said. “But in some instances they have driven customers away due to perceptions about these individuals.” At the Englewood Public Library, which sits on the first floor of the civic center, more than 20 incidents with patrons involving mostly alcohol and some drugs were recorded between March 2017 and March 2018, according to Patron Information Tracking System (PITS) reports provided by library manager Jon Solomon following a Colorado Community Media request. Library staff fills out the reports, which are used internally to keep track of incidents, Solomon said. SEE HOMELESS, P11


Centennial Citizen 11

May 18, 2018

HOMELESS FROM PAGE 10

Needles and bloody tissue are sometimes found in the bathroom, Solomon said. Such items are found about a dozen times in a typical year, he added. In one incident in February, patrons said a male urinated on the carpet. When they said something about what he was doing, he started yelling at them, according to the PITS reports. The patrons said he was “shooting up” in the bathroom and left a needle outside the building on the ground. There seemed to be more drug-related incidents this winter than in past years, Solomon said. Solomon said he can’t determine how many drug- and alcohol-related incidents are connected to homeless patrons, but said someone with a drug problem “probably needs a warm, dry place to do that.” He added that finding needles, usually in the men’s restroom, can be common in the winter, but evidence of drug use is uncommon during the summer. “It’s a concern any time,” Solomon said, “because it’s just so dangerous.” Earlier this year, the library added sharps containers in the bathrooms, in which people — including those who are diabetic — can dispose of used needles, Solomon said. Solomon did say patrons who appear to be homeless, a handful of them regulars, use the library. Dorothy Hargrove, director of Englewood’s parks,

recreation and library, maintains that the numbers of those who appear to be homeless at the library aren’t much more pronounced than in previous years. Since the vast majority of all patrons don’t cause problems of any kind, it’s likely that most patrons who appear to be homeless don’t cause incidents either, Solomon said. Homelessness is “definitely a community problem,” he said. “Whatever those solutions are, I think it’s going to take (a community) to resolve that. It’s not unique to Englewood at all.” Looking forward Amid discussion within Change the Trend, the Englewood City Council scheduled a study-session meeting about homelessness for May 14. “This is only the beginning of our discussion on homelessness,” said Russell, the mayor pro tem. First, the council must identify what the problem is, what resources it has, what agencies should be involved and how the city can or should be involved, Russell said. “There are existing entities that can address many of the issues,” she said, “so we need to be careful not to reinvent the wheel.” In a May 4 meeting with DeGette, the U.S. congresswoman who represents Denver, Englewood, Sheridan, Cherry Hills Village, Bow Mar and unincorporated areas west of Littleton, the council talked about its lack of experience with the issue. “We have never had any resources fo-

cused on this at all,” said Councilmember Linda Olson, asking if the state or Arapahoe County could help. DeGette suggested a survey or study to look at the homeless population in Englewood. “Is it people who (deal with) substance abuse?” DeGette asked. “Is it families who can’t afford housing? Is it all of the above?” But Englewood, a city preparing to take on a large financial obligation for infrastructure projects — including road and bridge updates, security cameras, and even police-radio maintenance — doesn’t have the money to adequately address the problem, Olson said. The city also doesn’t have the funding to provide transitional housing, Keck said. Added Olson: “We need a regional approach.” Change the Trend Network members have echoed a call for collaboration. At the first community forum held by the organization in March, members acknowledged they had no easy answers. But the group has urged involvement from residents, businesses, city officials — everyone — saying change won’t happen without entities working together. Nathan Hoag, parish pastor at The Sacred Grace Englewood church, urged those at the forum to play a part in creating accessible resources for addressing homelessness. Because, he said, “Ignoring it and saying there’s nothing we can do — it’s not our fault, it’s not our problem — doesn’t work.”

ABOUT THE REPORTER Ellis Arnold, 23, has spent the past year reporting and writing about the cities of Englewood and Centennial. He graduated from University of Colorado-Boulder in 2017 with degrees in journalism and political Arnold science. The challenges that a seemingly growing presence of homeless people presented kept reappearing during his weekly reporting on the issues, people and places of Englewood. It became apparent that the community wanted to try to resolve the problems in a compassionate and humane way, while preserving the city’s safety and economic vitality. Arnold spent more than a month researching and reporting this first part of the series, “No Place to Call Home,” that will look at how homelessness is affecting the city and the community’s approach to trying to resolve a complex societal issue. “Most people seem to be aware of how prominent homelessness is, but it’s difficult to find a clear picture of the problem — where most people stay, why they became homeless, who they are and what communities can do to help,” Arnold said. “That’s what I hope this series can do — provide a road map of the problem and where the community plans to go from here.”

To get a job, you need ID and an address Getting those is more difficult for the homeless than most people think BY ELLIS ARNOLD EARNOLD@COLORADOCOMMUNITYMEDIA.COM

One of the keys to escaping homelessness — getting a job — isn’t as easy as it might sound, said Adam Becker, a 33-year-old formerly homeless Denver resident. As he discovered, the steps to getting there can be cyclical if a person lacks crucial items. “Let’s start with ID,” Becker said. “First, you have to have transportation to get to a place to get the ID and the documentation to be able to back it up.” Becker had his mother, who lived across the country in Minnesota while he was homeless in states farther west, go to a hospital to get a birth certificate to send him. Then, he needed a Social Security card, and he ended up sending dental records for verification. “But then, to have an address to put on (a state ID) — that’s a huge setback,” Becker said. A homeless person would need a place where he or she knows someone who would allow the address to be used. All the while, Becker said, the homeless person still needs to

find a place to sleep and food to eat. “When someone drives by you and says, ‘Get a job, you bum!’, you have no idea what I’m up against to get that job,” Becker said. Finding a place to store belongings while away at work can be another hurdle, he added. And getting to and from all the necessary places can be taxing in itself. “Two miles, three miles, that’s an hour walk,” Becker said. And “that’s a rough place to be when you’re working full-time but you’re sleeping on the ground and showering in a sink.” A few years ago, Becker was walking from the woods to his job in Estes Park as a dishwasher at the Stanley Hotel. Now living in a house in Denver, he works at Porter Place Retirement Community. For a homeless individual, finding housing could require walking to a library to search listings, walking to a place to look at it, and then getting back to go to sleep and go to work, Becker said. “It ends up being so much to do,” Becker said. A program similar to live-in rehabilitation centers, he said, would solve many of these problems — an address to use on an ID and at which to receive money, to shower and use the internet. It would eliminate much of the unnecessary “back-and-forth” homeless individuals face, Becker said.

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12 Centennial Citizen

LOCAL

May 18, 2018M

VOICES

The funny thing about humor is how often it isn’t funny QUIET DESPERATION

Craig Marshall Smith

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n ice cream truck used to appear every day at the parks where I played when I was a kid. Its infectious little tune made my mouth water. I think now it would drive me to distraction. On each side of the truck it said “Good Humor.” I think I have a good sense of humor. Mine is mine, and it’s sculpted, and it’s not universal. Mine is lean, free of meanness and ribaldry. And that excludes me these days from comedy clubs and White House Correspondents’ Dinners. No more stand-up for Craig. I am too old for Michelle Wolf ’s humor. I was too old for it when I was her age (32). I can’t remember the first time I saw Don Rickles on Carson, but I know I wasn’t crazy

about him. He’d pick at every scab, and then wind up by saying it was all just a joke, and he loved everyone. Joan Rivers did the same thing, but she never said it was all just a joke, or that she loved everyone. Maybe you remember celebrity roasts? I thought they were imbecilic. Now they’re so raunchy they only appear on cable. My father never told a joke in his life, but he was the funniest man I knew. He was witty right now, and he didn’t need a writer. I found out what humor was, or what it was thought to be, when I was in grade school by watching television. These were a few of my choices: Jackie Gleason, Milton Berle and Lucille Ball. For

O Aging of American populace will have impact on economy FINANCIAL STRATEGIES

Patricia Kummer

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e are getting older. This is a fact of life and a world phenomenon. The question for the economy is whether this is a curse or an opportunity. Investors, homeowners and consumers will all be impacted one way or another by the aging population. This in turn affects the economy and how businesses adapt to the changing demographics. Most developed nations are facing the economic challenges of an expanding number

A publication of

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of citizens over the age of 65. Populations are becoming older on all continents and Japan leads the world with the highest percentage of their people, 30 percent, over age 65. It is expected that by 2050, more than 60 countries will have reached that level. ¹ Investors may worry about what happens to the stock market when the number of retirees continues to increase. This can put pressure on pension funds and Social Security. SEE KUMMAR, P13

reasons I could explain if this were a comedy dissertation, I rejected all of them. Along came a curiosity named Ernie Kovacs and I brightened somewhat. Kovacs was off-center, and his humor was constructed piece by piece, not thrown at me in a predictable punch. I haven’t watched situation comedies in 40 years. I will admit, however, to an appreciation for Barney Fife (portrayed, of course, by Mick Jagger). Fife might have been television’s last genuinely amusing, reoccurring character. Fife looked and sounded like they located him in Mayberry, North Carolina, not in a SEE SMITH, P14

Yesterday’s achievement is tomorrow’s success

ne of the greatest pieces of advice that I ever received came from a great friend and mentor earlier in my life. He actually gave me two pieces of advice wrapped up in one life-changing conversation. The two were so connected that even today I consider these words of wisdom a tremendous part of any success that I WINNING have experienced in my life. WORDS I have been paying this forward and have passed along this advice to those whom I know, those whom I work with, and those whom I coach and mentor. And now I want to share it with you, too. Michael Norton The first part is to be diligent in keeping a record of each accomplishment, award, or time that I had been recognized in any way. He told me to buy a binder and keep it handy. My mentor had shared this with me immediately after I had been recognized as the Salesperson of the Month for the first time. He told me that even though there would be only one plaque on my wall and one certificate in my binder, he was confident that over time I would

be filling multiple binders and taking up plenty of wall space too. Twenty-nine years later I am grateful for his confidence in me and for his advice. I say that because I did fill up my binder and other binders with many awards and recognitions, letters of accomplishment, letters and emails provided as a testimonial or reference. Now I am not sharing this with you to brag on myself, I am really bragging on my mentor and the advice and guidance he gave me, because the second part of his advice is where he made all the difference in my life and contributed to my future successes. You see, the second part of the advice is built on the saying that, “Success begets success.” He encouraged me to review my past achievements regularly as a way to continue to believe that I can do great things. The idea was not to get caught up in relying on my past successes, as we know that we are only as good as our last record. And it also wasn’t about someone asking me, “So what have you done for me lately?” No, it’s not about that at all, it’s about you and me, and asking ourselves, “What else is still left inside of me?” Asking ourselves,

JERRY HEALEY President

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Columnists & Guest Commentaries

SEE NORTON, P14

Centennial Citizen A legal newspaper of general circulation in Centennial, Colorado, the Citizen is published weekly on Friday by Colorado Community Media, 750 W. Hampden Ave., Suite 225, Englewood, CO 80110. Send address change to: 750 W. Hampden Ave., Suite 225, Englewood, CO 80110


Centennial Citizen 13

May 18, 2018

T

Looking back, I should have done more

wo years ago at this time I would be exhausted from the end of the legislative session, assessing the wins and losses of bills, and excited s to attend bill signGUEST ings. Now, I have just COLUMN finished midterms and have weeks to go before the end of spring quarter, and I’m struggling with a personal ethical quandary. Although I’m not inside the Capitol now, I’ve been watching. I think many Linda Newell of us have been this year. How could we not? It’s been like a car crash you don’t want to see but can’t help gawking. It was good to see bipartisan compromises on the last day of the session to move beyond impasses like transportation, the Civil Rights Commission, and the “all-important” predicament of alcohol in groceries or liquor stores. However, one huge loss for the state Senate this session is what many of us will remember most of all.

KUMMER FROM PAGE 14

Most fixed income sources have little or no cost of living increases. This may cause retirees to spend down their assets to create income and support long lives and potential elder care costs. Homeowners have already been affected by the low inventory of singlestory or community housing that proevides active living as well as potential y care services. Clients have discovered that it is often more expensive to downsize. If you are forced to stay put in , your two-story house and bring in help, the supply and demand once again drives up the price of care providers available to meet your needs. This is definitely an age group that is supporting the economy as they pay for more goods and services needed to provide for an aging population. Investors and companies can capitalize on new inventions designed to keep you young, active and healthy. As you age, more services are needed from house painting to lawn services and eventually elder care. It will be fascinating to watch what new innovations will be available on anything from self-driving cars to same-day dentures. There is an opportunity for products that allow you to age in place, such as stair climbers, walk-in tubs and meal delivery. This is in addition to health care facilities and retirement communities that are popping up in every zip code. Consumers demand services and products, which in turn impacts how businesses adapt to compete in the areas needed by the current population. We watched the baby boomers impact products and business on everything from Gerber baby food to McDonald’s restaurants as they approached their teenage years. Next it was minivans

It has been painful to watch so I can’t imagine what it felt like from the inside. The pressures the legislators felt (particularly members of leadership) must have been unbearable at times. Through many torrid stories and a cultural survey, the legislators discovered that the sexually harassing culture at the Capitol is much worse than originally thought. However, this was no surprise to some of us. When I first entered orientation as a brand-new senator, I asked for the human resources contact only to find out there was none. When I attended the workplace harassment training in a room full of 100 legislators, I saw how ineffective it was. Over time, it became clear to me, as both a woman and HR professional, that misogyny, sexism and sexual remarks and advances were more common than any workplace I had been in for decades. Even so, long after my freshman year, I said nothing. Other than ensuring my own office was a safe working environment, I did nothing. Although I personally experienced men calling me darlin’ or hugging me a bit tighter and longer than usual, or even suggesting we and mini-mansions. What will this demographic bubble demand in retirement? We are already seeing more crossover vehicle sales for easy access after that hip or knee replacement. The travel industry is pouring big dollars into cruise and riverboat advertising as more people retire and have time to go places. Stores and restaurants offer organic, gluten-free and non-processed foods for those choosing a healthy diet, perhaps in hopes of staving off the aging process. Technology has come to the rescue for home security, texting and typing by voice and tremendous health care advances. You no longer have to go to a sleep study clinic for apnea or even go to the doctor to have your heart monitored. Many health-care needs can be handled remotely through computerized monitoring devices. While many investors may think aging is bad for an economy, it appears that the baby boom generation that grew up with technology and the stock market will continue to surprise us with new advances and financial opportunities. Most analysts agree there may be opportunity in companies that can invent and deliver products and services to meet the growing needs of people potentially spending 40 years in retirement. 1. United Nations: The World’s Ageing Population (English Online). US Census Bureau Patricia Kummer has been a Certified Financial Planner for 31 years and is president of Kummer Financial Strategies LLC, an SEC-registered investment adviser with its physical place of business in the State of Colorado. Registration of an investment adviser does not imply a certain level of skill or training. Please visit www.kummerfinancial.com for more information.

“talk about it over a fun time at dinner,” I fell short. Yes, I said something directly to the men when I felt offended. But no, I didn’t mention anything to anyone else. So this session, although I experienced it as a citizen this time, was one of the most profound for me, and possibly for many. I saw a former colleague get criticized for coming forward, another one expelled from the House for victimizing women, numerous stories of survivors, and no meaningful action taken by Senate Republican leadership against one of their own predators. This is how I learned just how complicit I was in the terror of sexual harassment at the Capitol. If only I had stepped up AT THE TIME, perhaps there would be fewer victims today. Why didn’t I speak up? That’s a whole other column for another day. But today I can plead with anyone

else out there, no matter your gender, that if you see something, please say something. The days are over for all us second-wave feminists who whisper our way out of our harassment dilemmas. It’s time we ALL become conscious of our surroundings, name it when we see it, and admit when we’re complicit with the systems that maintain the abuses of patriarchy. Time’s not only up for the offenders. Time’s up for all of us. And to you fellow survivors at the Capitol, I’m so sorry. Formerly a Colorado state senator and now a seminary student at Iliff School of Theology, Linda Newell, of Littleton, is a filmmaker, writer, speaker, and consultant. She may be reached at senlindanewell@gmail. com, www.lindanewell.org, www. senlindanewell.com, @sennewell on Twitter, Senator Linda Newell or @ TheLastBill on Facebook.

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14 Centennial Citizen

NORTON FROM PAGE 12

“What have I done for myself lately?” Throughout my career I have experienced exhilarating wins, and I have suffered crushing losses. And I have been everywhere in between. There have been times when I have forgotten about my book of records and achievements, and instead of looking on my past successes to motivate me, I found myself wrestling in slumps. A nd then, somewhere deep inside I would hear the voice of my mentor saying, go back and look at your binder. So, I would open it, read a few of them, or more if I was really in a deep slump, and get fired up again about who I am and what I have accomplished in this life personally and professionally. It really doesn’t matter if you are in sales, management, teaching, manufacturing, healthcare, or any other profession or volunteer position. My

May 18, 2018M advice and encouragement is this, that you will create your own “Brag Book,” and that you will go back and read it often to help you stay motivated and to help drive your future success and contributions, and achieve your own goals and dreams. And remember, it may only start with one, but success begets success, and just as my mentor had confidence in me, I am confident that you too will fill your binder and your walls with all of your own rewards, awards, and recognitions. So how about you? Do you remember all the good and great things you have done in your life? Or do you need to be reminded of just how fantastic you really are? I would love to hear your story at gotonorton@gmail.com, and when we can remember that yesterday’s achievement is really tomorrow’s success, it really will be a better than good week. Michael Norton is a resident of Castle Rock, the president of the Zig Ziglar Corporate Training Solutions Team, a strategic consultant and a business and personal coach.

SMITH FROM PAGE 12

script room in southern California. My alma mater’s extension school offers a course I briefly considered. It’s called “Beginning Writing for the Half-Hour Spec I.” You “learn how to identify the unique spin shows put on their stories.” You learn how to spin on Wednesdays from 7 to 10 p.m., and it’s $570. I can tell you how to spin a situation comedy for free. Come up with some quirky characters who have quirky neighbors and quirky bosses. Be sure one of them says crude things, and one of them is stacked. No matter what anyone says, every third line gets a laugh,

provided by a laugh machine. “I went to see my doctor today. I asked him if I needed glasses.” “What did he say?” “He said, `You sure do. This is a bank.’ ” This is where the engineer comes in with a pre-recorded laugh. It’s intended for anyone who doesn’t know if the character was kidding or not. It’s the manipulative equivalent of multiple exclamation marks. Anyone who strings together exclamation marks gets deleted from my will. What do John The Baptist and Winnie The Pooh have in common? The same middle name. But seriously. Craig Marshall Smith is an artist, educator and Highlands Ranch resident. He can be reached at craigmarshallsmith@comcast.net.

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Centennial Citizen 15

May 18, 2018

&

CLASS OF 2018

What’s the one thing you’ve learned that you will carry with you for the rest of your life? Colorado Community Media asks the Class of 2018 about the lessons they take with them as they head into the future. Their responses are as unique as they are. In the next few pages we celebrate the Class of 2018 and wish them great success. Listen to what they have to say about their future.


16 Centennial Citizen

May 18, 2018M

Jarron Lewis

Allie Wennerstrom Arapahoe High School I was part of the unified basketball program that’s been here for over 15 years. I was also a part of the swim team and cross country. My junior year I helped start the unified track team for the specialneeds kids, and I’ve been able to peer intern in the classroom with them. I’m in a teacher cadet class, too. What are your plans after graduation? I’m going to the University of Northern Colorado at Greeley. I’ll be majoring in special education teaching. What profession or career do you want

to pursue? I want to be a special education teacher. I love teaching in the classroom. I love seeing the lights come on when students understand something new, and just spending time with them. What do you hope to accomplish in life? I really like to travel. I’ve been to Europe and Mexico, and I love traveling so I’ve thought about doing mission work. If I could do anything, it would be… To have enough money to travel all the time.

Cherry Creek High School Lewis was student body president and was involved in the student senate, African-American Leadership Council, track and field, Principal’s Advisory Council, Diversity Task Force and other organizations. He plans to go to the University of Kansas to study architecture through the five-year master’s of architecture program.

What profession or career do you want to pursue? Architecture, because I have always loved and appreciated the design of houses. What do you hope to accomplish in life? I hope to be truly happy and not impose on others’ happiness. If I could do anything, it would be to … Eradicate discrimination.

What have you learned that you will carry with you for the rest of your life? I learned at Heritage that it’s incredibly important to stand up for what you believe in, but that it’s even more important to always love one another. No matter what you believe in, the most important thing is to be empathetic and compassionate. — Gabi Ahles, Heritage High School

The biggest thing I’ve learned is to treat people kindly and to have compassion. Other people go through things, and you might not understand it, but you can still respect it. — Aliah Pater, Englewood High School

No matter what you do, whether you like it or not, do it with a smile. — Jack Gore, Littleton High School

Not everything has to be so traditional — school, career, job, family — it doesn’t have to be set in stone, and it’s OK to have your own path and be different. I think that gives people more opportunity. — Leah Terry, Colorado’s Finest High School of Choice

How to work cooperatively with people I don’t necessarily get along with. Definitely my four years in marching band taught me that because you get such a wide variety of people doing it that you have to deal with a lot of personalities and a lot of different people. — Travis Hastings, Englewood High School

Throughout my years at Heritage, I have learned what it means to be part of a community, which has taught me to step up and be there for my fellow classmates when they needed help and also how to ask for help when I needed it. Heritage has taught me how relationships are truly the most important thing in life. — Allie Schuman, Heritage High School

The most important thing I learned in high school is that you should always ask for help because you can’t do everything alone. I always thought I could handle everything by myself. It didn’t take me long to realize that not asking for help can hurt you in the long run. — Harper Finch, Arapahoe High School


Centennial Citizen 17

May 18, 2018

Maria Alsubhi Englewood High School Alsubhi was involved in career and technical student organizations at Englewood High School, including Future Business Leaders of America. She’s also involved in theater in stage management. Alsubhi is part of an organization called YouthRoots that collects money for charity and became a youth commission member for Parks and Recreation for the City of Englewood. She is a recipient of the Boettcher Scholarship. What are your plans after graduation? I’m going to the University of Colorado-Boulder to double-major physiology and business and minor in leadership. For now. I don’t expect to graduate with that. I definitely see myself studying abroad, so maybe that will have an impact. What profession or career do you want to pursue? I really would like to get a physician’s assistant degree because I would like to work in nonprofit health care, something like Doctors Without Borders. I want to work in a nonprofit clinic to help refugees of war in the Denver metro area. I hope it grows

nationally … I want it to be as well known as the Red Cross. What do you hope to accomplish in life? Whenever I go home to the Middle East, there are refugees from Syria. They’re everywhere … Some of them are in wheelchairs because a bomb came in and tore their limbs off. Kids without arms — it’s horrible. We have universal health care in Saudi Arabia, so they get what they need, but it’s still hard because of the influx … You can’t turn a blind eye. You have to do something. I can’t end the wars — yet. But I can help those who managed to escape. If I could do anything, it would be ... Change the world. That’s my goal. It’s a bit big. I want to change the mindset that people have toward refugees and toward war. It’s kind of programmed into us. You can’t really go into war and kill someone without thinking of them as your enemy, as the other. I want to change that. If you make sure people think of each other as humans, they’re never going to kill each other. It’s really hard to kill someone you think of as equal to you.

Brianna Botcher Colorado’s Finest High School of Choice Botcher was involved in cheerleading, choir and theater, playing a lead role in all the musicals she participated in. She plans to go to the University of Northern Colorado in Greeley to major in nursing and minor in psychology and theater. What profession or career do you want to pursue? I want to be an ER trauma nurse. I am always the first person to jump into action. We have a few people here who have seizures — I’ve caught a few friends here. I’ve just always known what to do in that split second. We have to

be CPR-certified to graduate here — that’s how I found that passion. What do you hope to accomplish in life? I just want to be happy. I have dreams … I want a big house, lots of land … it sounds super cliché, but at the end of the day, I want to be happy and for my family to be happy. I want to take everything I’ve ever learned and put it into something and be successful. If I could do anything, it would be to … Honestly, I wish I could surround myself in an art studio with endless supplies and never have to pay for it.

What have you learned that you will carry with you for the rest of your life? My AP Lit teacher, Mr. Feld, taught me that our avocation and vocation should be the same. We should do what we love regardless of the money status it earns us. — Julia Woolley, Cherry Creek High School

I have learned the meaning of true friendship, how to work hard and apply myself, and how to create a family outside of my own.

I learned that change is OK. When I got here I had a list of things I wanted to do and everything changed. I learned to go with the flow.

— CJ Mitchell, Heritage High School

— Stefanie Frederickson, Littleton High School

The people you meet and surround yourself with have a big impact on how you feel and act. It’s important to surround yourself with good people. — Jay Kikkeri, Arapahoe High School

While at Heritage, I’ve gotten to see a wide variety of personalities and values. This has helped me be better prepared to work in groups and accept different viewpoints and outcomes later in life. — Jake Swartout, Heritage High School

I learned that you need to work hard on everything you do, because that’s what it takes to reach your goals. — Sandra Tobon, Littleton High School

One of the biggest takeaways I have is to never give up. Just when things start to seem impossible is right when you should push through if you want to be successful. — Clare Dougherty, Cherry Creek High School


18 Centennial Citizen

May 18, 2018M

Bryson Franck Heritage High School I was on the varsity cheerleading team for three years, and was captain the last year. I was on the Ambassador executive leadership team. We helped out at school events and conferences, and also guided eighth-graders. I was in the health science internship program. We did basic anatomy and physiology first semester, then we went to six-week internships. I did mine with an orthodontist. What are your plans after graduation? This fall I’ll be going to Colorado State University and studying biology. I plan on going to dental school after that. What profession or career do you want to pursue? I plan to go into orthodontics. I

Zach Maguire

chose that because I had braces when I was younger, and I loved the change it gave to my confidence. I want to share that happiness with others. What do you hope to accomplish in life? I hope to make people happy. I want people to be OK with themselves and their smile ... I want people to be able to laugh with their friends. If I could do anything, it would be … To travel the world. That’s always grabbed my attention. I took three years of German because that’s part of my ancestry. I’ve always told my family that I would love for us to go see Europe.

Littleton High School I did soccer all four years. I was the captain of the soccer team. I also did National Honors Society, Greenhouse Club and Ultimate Frisbee. What are your plans after graduation? I’m going to the University of Colorado at Colorado Springs. I plan to major in history so I can become a high school history teacher. I might try out for the soccer team there. What profession or career do you want to pursue? Why? I want to be a teacher because I’m fascinated by history and I’ve had such good history

teachers here. They inspired me to stick with something I love and taught me how to get kids to enjoy a subject that some find boring. What do you hope to accomplish in life? I’m not worried about money or status. I want to be happy with myself. It’s most important to love yourself for who you are and not measure yourself by others’ expectations. If I could do anything, it would be… To be a professional soccer player in Europe or maybe join the Peace Corps.

What have you learned that you will carry with you for the rest of your life? No matter how old you are or what you think you are capable of, you can do a lot more. So if you have something you’re passionate about, don’t waste time doubting yourself. Just do it with your whole heart.

I learned it’s OK to fail. It’s how you get back up and face the next adversity that shapes who you are. — Maddie Cannon, Arapahoe High School

I learned that it never hurts to try new things. If it weren’t for the recommendations and support of my teachers and friends, I wouldn’t have done things like run cross country. — Aidan Price, Arapahoe High School

— Isani Singh, Cherry Creek High School

Yo u ’l l M o v e

M o u n ta i n s !

Of all the places you will go…only one lets you dream big and move moutains.

C o n g r a t ul a t i o n s!

Class of 2018!

MOVE

MOUNTAINS


Centennial Citizen 19

May 18, 2018

Plane crash in northern Douglas County leaves one dead Authorities say aircraft made a ‘high-speed impact’ with the ground STAFF REPORT

One person was killed after a small plane crashed in a residential area of northern Douglas County, east of I-25, the night of May 11. The Douglas County Coroner’s Office identified the pilot of the plane as Robert D. Marquis, 67, of Glade Park, which is west of Grand Junction. He was flying solo. The plane, a Cirrus SR22, went down near RidgeGate Parkway and Pastel Point, an area between Lone Tree and Parker, just west of the Stepping Stone neighborhood. Debris was spread over more than an acre in the vacant field, only several hundred yards from homes, and two blocks from a community park, swimming pool and popular walking trail that wound around the crash area. Resident Baylor Bland was home with his famiy, windows open to enjoy the fresh air, when he heard what he thought was the loud whining and shifting of a motorcycle speeding at abut 8:30 p.m. “It sounded like a (motorcycle) — I thought it was over at Ridge Gate,”

The engine of an SR22 plane that crashed around 8:30 May 11, was propelled several yards and embedded into a home nearby the crash site just West of the Stepping Stone neighborhood. TABATHA STEWART said Bland. “Then all of a sudden, I heard a loud thump, and it sounded like all the air was being let out of a big vacuum. I didn’t really think it could be a plane, because we have so many coming over here that it didn’t seem possible.” The crash, which South Metro Fire Rescue described as a “high-speed impact,” threw a chunk of the engine, approximately 3 feet long, into the side of a home several hundred

yards away, where it was embedded several inches between two windows. None of the neighborhood’s residents were injured. “I don’t know if the pilot was trying to miss the houses, but we were so lucky,” said Bland. “It’s only a couple hundred yards from hitting all of these houses.” The plane had recently taken off from nearby Centennial Airport, according to authorities.

Personnel from South Metro, the Lone Tree Police Department, the Douglas County Sheriff ’s Office, the Parker Police Department, Centennial Airport and the National Transportation Safety Board were on scene after the crash, according to a City of Lone Tree spokeswoman. The Cirrus SR22 has a wingspan of about 38 feet and is 26 feet in length, according to cirrusaircraft.com.

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Pine Lane Elementary South 6475 E Ponderosa Dr. Parker, CO 80138 303-941-0668


20 Centennial Citizen

May 18, 2018M

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Centennial Citizen 21

May 18, 2018

IMAGINE IMAGINE ALL ALL THE THE PLACES PLACES YOU YOU CAN CAN GOGO ONON THE THE LINE LINE RR

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LINCOLN LINCOLN STATION STATION FLORIDA FLORIDA STATION STATION • Charles SchwabSchwab campuscampus • Access• The Access Medical The Medical Center of Center Aurora, of Aurora, EcoTechEcoTech InstituteInstitute• Charles • Many • retail Many and retail residential and residential optionsoptions • Connect • Connect with thewith H Line theto H downtown Line to downtown Denver Denver • Connect • Connect with thewith E orthe F lines E or to F lines downtown to downtown DenverDenver ILIFF STATION ILIFF STATION • Connect • Connect with buswith routes bus 403, routes 483, 403, Lone 483,Tree Lone Tree • Residential • Residential and dining andoptions, dining options, as well as the well as the and Meridian and Meridian Call-n-Rides Call-n-Rides HeatherHeather GardensGardens retirement retirement community community • Connect • Connect with buswith routes bus21, routes 131 21, 131 NINE MILE NINESTATION MILE STATION • Live, work, • Live,shop, work,and shop, access and to access the to the Cherry Creek Cherrybike Creek path bike path • Connect • Connect with thewith H Line theto H downtown Line to downtown Denver Denver • Connect • Connect with buswith routes bus35, routes 83D,35, 83L, 83D, 121, 83L, 121, 130, 131,130, 133,131, 135, 133, 139, 135, 483, 139, AT483, AT

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22 Centennial Citizen

LOCAL

May 18, 2018M

LIFE ADVICE FOR COSPLAY

Shopping for issues missing from a collection is one of the most common activities at Denver Comic Con. FILE PHOTO

A guide for those new to

Comic Con

Advice for the event, cosplaying and collecting BY CLARKE READER CREADER@COLORADOCOMMUNITYMEDIA.COM

For first-timers or the uninitiated in the world of comic conventions, Denver’s annual Comic Con can be an intimidating experience. The sprawling event, which is June 15-17 this year, brings upward of 100,000 nerds, cosplayers and collectors into the Colorado Convention Center for fun, exploration and connection. “There’s a sense of community that comes with these kinds of events, because everyone shares the same passions,” said Tara Hubner, marketing and communications manager with Pop Culture Classroom, which puts on the con every year. “For a lot of people, this is the only time they get to see some of these people, so it’s like a big SEE COMIC, P24

• One of the best parts about Comic Con is seeing the truly exceptional cosplay work so many people are capable of creating. There are the expected super heroes and science fiction leads, but there’s always more than a few surprises. Don’t be shy to ask to take a photo with a particular favorite — most are very friendly and willing to pose. • At the Comic Con website, there are guidelines for what cosplayers are and are not allowed to wear and bring in as props. Hubner said cosplayers need to be covered enough that there’s no risk of “wardrobe malfunctions” and said that as a general rule, if a person isn’t sure about a certain prop or outfit, it’s better to leave it at home. • Littleton’s Reinke Brothers Halloween Costume and Superstore is a great place for cosplayers of all skill levels to suit up, especially as it’s one of the few costume stores open year-round. “We have the latest and greatest costumes, parts and pieces to make a great outfit,” said Greg “Shof” Shofner, general manager of the store, located at 5663 S. Prince St. “Comic Con gives us a great boost every year, and we start our ordering in January to make sure we have enough of all the costumes.” Over the years, the store has built up relationships with reputable manufacturers, so all the costumes they sell are properly licensed. • A big key to the success of many cosplay outfits is the makeup and prosthetics, and Reinke has experts in those areas as well to help provide that movie quality look. • As Shofner tells it, the key is to get started working on outfits as soon as possible, in case there need to be last-minute alterations.

BASICS TO KNOW

• It’s downtown Denver, so parking is always going to be tricky and potentially expensive, Hubner said. Pop Culture’s recommendation is to park farther away and take a Lyft or Uber, or take the light rail, since there is a stop right at the convention center. That same weekend PrideFest and the Denver BBQ Festival will be happening, so expect downtown to be extra busy. • With attendance last year topping about 115,000 people, attendees should be prepared for lines and waiting at the June 15-17 event. June 16, a Saturday, will be the busiest day, so Friday or Sunday would be a good day to visit to deal with fewer people. “The schedule for the con will be announced about two weeks out, and we encourage people to take a look at it and get a game

plan, so they don’t lose time wandering,” Hubner said. “We advise attendees to wear comfortable shoes, brings snacks and water to help them.” • The vast majority of the artists and authors who will be speaking are available for photos and autographs for free, but when it comes to major celebrities, there’s more to consider. Tickets to those events can be bought in advance or at the event, but fans should be prepared for lines. According to Hubner, lines for photo ops or autographs can take 30 minutes to an hour. “We recommend people go to the celebrity summit first thing and get a sense of the times when their celebrity will be making an appearance,” she said. “Then get there early if you don’t want to spend a

lot of time waiting.” • There are plenty of ATMS around the center, but using them usually requires more waiting in lines, so bring cash if possible. • Consider staying after hours. A fun part of the con is all the new people that attendees meet, and there are several after-party events available to keep the good times going. • One of the biggest piece of advice Hubner has is to not be intimidated. There will be volunteers spread all over the con who will be more than willing to answer questions and provide guidance. “We’re a very welcoming place, and there’s always someone willing to help,” she said. “We want everyone to have a good time while they’re here.”

Young actress isn’t just going through a stage

N

ot many people are lucky enough to know what they do with their lives by the time they reach important milestones like graduating from high school. So, I’m not sure if there’s a name for how lucky 10-year-old Arvadan Payton Maynard is — she’s known she wanted to act since she was 2 years old. “When I was 2, my mom started noticCOMING ing I was really good ATTRACTIONS at memorizing stuff, and could do it quickly,” she said. “That was kind of the start, and by the time I was 6, we started looking for an agency.” In the ensuing years Maynard has worked in several independent films Clarke Reader and was recently cast as one of the leads in a new mystery and science fiction TV series called “Frozen Dead” about cryogenics that is filming in Nederland. And she recently took to the stage for the first time in the role of the Young Queen Elizabeth II in Aurora’s Vintage Theatre’s production of “The Audience.” “What I like about the theater is you can react to the audience and they can react to you. When you’re doing film or TV, you don’t get that connection,” she said. “It’s been my favorite acting experience yet. I think it has so much potential to make me grow as actress and person.” As someone who has been acting locally for so much of her life, Maynard has seen more film and TV opportunities become available in the metro area, but still not as many as places like Los Angeles and New York City. “Last summer got to be an extra in a feature film called ‘Unmarked,’ and now this TV series,” she said. “We’ll be continuing work on it through the summer and will start shopping it around in August. I do have a five-year commitment if it gets picked up.” As to what Maynard’s future holds, in addition to acting she loves dance, so she wants to continue her studies in the fields of dance, drama and acting, and may even consider teaching at the Doral Academy in Westminster — the school she currently attends. “When I get on the stage, I get to leave the past behind and make a new future for myself,” she said. “I want the chance to inspire other kids to do what they love and be what they want to be.”


Centennial Citizen 23

May 18, 2018

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24 Centennial Citizen

May 18, 2018M

COMIC

FOR THE COMIC COLLECTORS

FROM PAGE 22

family reunion for so many people.” With so much going on at the con, including hundreds of booths, celebrities signing memorabilia and taking photos, and panels with all manners of creatives, it can be easy, especially for firsttimers, to feel lost and unsure about what is acceptable and allowed by visitors. Pop culture Classroom set up a section of its website at www.denvercomiccon.com/ new-to-the-con/ to answer some basic questions, and we spoke to Hubner and other participants to give advice for those new to the con.

• Despite all the hoopla over celebrities and special events, Denver Comic Con very much still treasures the comic culture that created this cultural movement. Comic stores and dealers from the metro area and beyond will be selling current and classic books, and many stellar artists and writers will be on hand as well. • Andrew Middleton, a comic expert at Colorado Coins, Cards and Comics in Arvada, has attended the Comic Con numerous times, and said he loves meeting the variety of people who show up to share their love of the form. “There’s not one kind of person who loves comic books anymore,” he said. “My favorite part

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of the con is meeting people who you wouldn’t think are into this stuff, but it turns out really love it.” • There are two classes of comic buyers, as Middleton sees it — those who like to read the books and those who want to collect them. Those who want to read them are going to be focused on stories and characters, whereas the collectors are going to be more interested in certain issues and willing to spend more money. Attendees should determine where their interests lie, as that will help guide their shopping. • One of the best things about the con, Middleton said, is meeting

the local and regional artists that most shoppers won’t find online or in stores. Instead, they have the chance to buy them right from the source. • As with most things related to Comic Con, Middleton’s advice is to do research in advance. If a shopper is searching for a particular issue or collectible item, doing some research online will help narrow down the retailers to meet. “Most of these people are experts, so keep in mind the stories or characters you most care about, and they can offer recommendations,” he added. “Some vendors are going to feature the latest books, while others will be looking to highlight the rare stuff.”

Cosplayers dressed as the cast of Marvel’s Guardians of the Galaxy at last year’s Denver Comic Con.

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Centennial Citizen 25

May 18, 2018

South Suburban seeks input on rules, regulations STAFF REPORT

South Suburban Parks and Recreation is asking the public for feedback regarding its proposed general rules and regulations for parks, trails and open space. Those who have comments can attend a public meeting at 6:30 p.m. May 22 at Goodson Recreation Center, 6315 S. University Blvd., Centennial; or provide comments at the bottom of the rules and regulations document at https://docs.google.com/forms/d/ e/1FAIpQLSc234YmsOJfdko_JRQspQMta0foDK2CQMllmn3J5MIPy18kyA/viewform. The document will be available through June 12. The district plans to have the rules and regulations approved and adopted by the board this summer.

FIRE FROM PAGE 6

The unification votes are good news for the firefighters currently stationed in LFPD and Highlands Ranch, said Joel Heinemann, president of the firefighter’s union. “We’ve long said this will result in better service and better safety for our firefighters, because of South Metro’s greater resources and stability,” Heinemann said. “This vote establishes a long-term commitment. We won’t have to go back and revisit this every year.” Firefighters currently stationed in Highlands Ranch and LFPD will become employees of South Metro in 2019, and will retain their current rank and pay. Littleton Fire Rescue Chief Chris Armstrong and LFR spokeswoman Jackie Erwin did not respond to requests for comment. The outcome of the vote is welcome news to Highlands Ranch

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Metro District, said community relations director Sherry Eppers. “We’re looking forward to working with South Metro,” Eppers said. “This is a time of transition and opportunity for us, and in the long run it’s just a great chance to improve how we serve and protect our residents.” The votes mean property tax increases for homeowners in the two districts: South Metro charges 9.25 mills for its services, whereas Highlands Ranch residents currently pay 7 mills toward fire service and LFPD residents pay 7.678 mills. The difference means a monthly property tax increase of $1.35 per $100,000 of assessed home value in Highlands Ranch and 94 cents per month per $100,000 of home value in LFPD, according to documents published by the districts. In return, the districts say, residents will receive long-term cost stability. LFPD’s board said it probably would have had to ask voters to increase property taxes to 10

mills or higher to stay with Littleton, whereas South Metro’s rate of 9.25 is not anticipated to change in the near future. Highlands Ranch said fire rescue services have climbed from 36 percent of its operating budget to 45 percent in 2017, and that unifying with South Metro halts the cost increases. Residents also will receive increased fire services from South Metro, the districts say. Unlike Littleton, South Metro is accredited by the Center for Public Safety Excellence and has an Insurance Services Office rating of 1 to Littleton’s 2. South Metro also plans to build and staff a new fire station in Highlands Ranch. Unification of fire departments makes sense to take advantage of economies of scale, said South Metro Fire Chief Bob Baker. “We’ve seen that unification of fire districts is occurring across the U.S. as it’s a way to improve services and create efficiencies — and this one is no different,” Baker said in a press release.

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26 Centennial Citizen

May 18, 2018M

SSPRD FROM PAGE 5

CALM AFTER THE STORM

Pete Barrett Barrett was an elementary school teacher for four years before going into insurance for 31 years, 25 of which were as an agency owner. He has served on several boards or committees, including acting in multiple volunteer roles for South Suburban. Barrett said he’s looking forward to working on building a proposed new South Suburban facility near David Lorenz Park. “All of us are going to be involved in the new multigenerational facility, that will include an ice rink, pools gyms, indoor lacrosse and soccer fields,” Barrett said. “It’s a huge project. The challenges on any of these roles is what you don’t have control over. Bond issues that were passed five or more years ago have become insufficient because of labor shortages and construction costs. In the short term, three years or less, we don’t see an abatement of that. The availability of quality contractors and quality workers will be very challenging.” Barrett said overall things are going very well for South Suburban. “The big thing for people to know is this is a great parks and recreation district,” Barrett said. “I’m very excited for this opportunity. I don’t take this lightly and I’m really looking forward to this.”

SM

Dave Lawful Lawful is retired from 38 years of program management and system engineering in the aerospace industry. His many volunteer activities include serving as chairman of the Lone Tree

Citizens Recreation Advisory Committee. Lawful said he was an outspoken proponent for ballot measures 4B and 4C in 2017, which helped secure long-term funding for the district. “One of the great things about campaigning is I’ve learned even more about South Suburban,” Lawful said. “One of the things I would like to see our staff and board bring back is the recognition that we’re a Gold Medal caliber organization, as recognized by the National t Recreation and Parks Association.” S Lawful said he’d like to work with the nonprofit South Suburban Park Founda- t m tion to focus on trails. “When we’ve talked to people around t the district, something that often comes a up as a priority is trail connectivity,” Lawful said. “I’d love to see more of that c happen. Another thing is wayfinding on the trails. South Suburban did anexcel- t D lent job with the City of Littleton on signage on the Mary Carter Greenway. a a They’re more than cool because they give you so much info at a glance. The tell you where the nearest restroom or t water fountain or turn onto another trail t is. I’d like to see our signage enhanced.” L Lawful said he hopes people take advantage of the amenities in their midst. d “When you get up in the morning and t wonder what you should do today, think a of South Suburban. There’s probably something fun and healthful you haven’t s tried before.” Lawful said he hopes district residents a s make themselves heard. t “Reach out to the South Suburban staff and board, and let us know what p you think,” Lawful said. “If you believe t u that a change or priority needs to be different, the only way to get it rolling is U o to let us know.”

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Centennial Citizen 27

May 18, 2018

Public art committee seeks member to fill vacancy STAFF REPORT

One person is needed to replace a term-limited member of the South Suburban Public Art Committee. The member’s term ends in July, and the committee is seeking a volunteer member who has an interest or expertise in art. South Suburban wants to encourage a legacy of art to be enjoyed and appreciated by its residents. The committee makes recommendations to the South Suburban Board of Directors on the selection, placement and installation of art in public places, along trails and in facilities. The committee also oversees selection of temporary gallery exhibitions in the recreation centers and at Lone Tree Golf Club & Hotel. Committee members must live in the district and be able to serve a three-year term, beginning mid-summer. The committee now meets from 8:30-10 a.m. the fourth Tuesday of the month. Those who are interested should submit an application by May 30. The application can be found at https:// ssprd.org/Portals/0/Art%20Committee/Application%202018_form_ssprd. pdf. Mail or email completed applications to Lynne Wachter, South Suburban Parks and Recreation, 6631 S. University Blvd., Centennial, CO 80121 or Lynnew@ssprd.org.

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RidgeGate May and June 2018

The RidgeGate calendar of fun starts here.

Yoga in the Park It’s time again for sunset salutations. Join RidgeGate, South Suburban Parks and Recreation and the Lone Tree Recreation Center for free Yoga in the Park classes in Belvedere Park, at the corner of RidgeGate Circle and Belvedere Lane. Please bring your own yoga mat. In case of heavy rain or lightning, class will be cancelled. No need to register—just drop in!

Tuesday, May 29, 6:30-7:30pm Tuesday, June 26, 6:30-7:30pm

Guided Nature Hikes M AY

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Wednesday, June 6th, 7-8:30pm — Sunset Bird Watching Saturday, June 9th, 9-10:30am — Animal Detectives Wednesday, June 20th, 6-7:30pm — Preparing for the Solstice Saturday, June 30th, 8:30-10:30am — Finding the Awe in Nature

RidgeGate Summer Beats Concerts Enjoy these summertime concerts out on the grass with free live music, food trucks and activities for kids. It’s all happening in Prairie Sky Park, just west of the Lone Tree Recreation Center, courtesy of the South Suburban Parks and Recreation District.

JUNE

3

Each year, RidgeGate teams up with the South Suburban Parks and Recreation District to provide free, guided nature hikes. These hikes are led by professional naturalists who offer insight and education into the natural ecosystems within the open space at RidgeGate. Hikes are free and open to the public—see the full schedule and register at ridgegate.com.

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Thursday, June 21, 5-8pm — The Tom Petty Project Thursday, July 19, 5-8pm — Chris Daniels and the Kings; Hazel Miller

Tunes on the Terrace at the Lone Tree Arts Center RidgeGate is again proud to sponsor Lone Tree Art Center’s Tunes on the Terrace—an outdoor evening concert series that will bring your summer nights to life. Performances range from classic rock to big band jazz, and everything in between. The stars are out this summer! Check out the full schedule and buy tickets at www.lonetreeartscenter.org.

Friday, June 8, 8-10pm — Yesterday and Today (Beatles Tribute, Main Stage) Friday, June 22, 8-10pm — H2 Big Band

Experience Historic Schweiger Ranch Among RidgeGate’s cultural facilities is the 38-acre historic Schweiger Ranch, located just east of the RidgeGate Parkway and I-25 interchange. The historic restoration of the ranch, led by the nonprofit Schweiger Ranch Foundation, gives us an important glimpse into the settlers’ lives in the late 1800s. Today, Schweiger Ranch is open to the public for self-guided visits and a variety of events throughout the year. Register or learn more about these events online at SchweigerRanch.org.

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28 Centennial Citizen

THINGS to DO this week’s TOP FIVE

THEATER

Ain’t Misbehavin’: playing May 18 to June 17 at Town Hall Arts Center, 2450 W. Main St., Littleton. Tickets on sale at the box office or online at www.TownHallArtsCenter.org ART/CRAFTS Open Studio: 6:30-8:30 p.m. Thursday, May 24 at the Lone Tree Library, 10055 Library Way, Lone Tree. Work on craft or hobby projects in our studio using libraryprovided supplies, or bring your own. No registration required; contact 303-791-7323 or DCL.org.

MUSIC

A Newsies Musical Revue: auditions at 4 p.m. Friday, May 18 at Spotlight Performing Arts Center, 6328 E. County Line Road, Ste. 102, Highlands Ranch. For ages 6-18. Info: 720-44-DANCE or www.spotlightperformers.com. Great Music from the Arts: 7:30 p.m. Friday, May 18 at Littleton United Methodist Church, 5894 S. Datura St., Littleton. Presented by the Littleton Symphony Orchestra. Go to www.littletonsymphony.org or call 303-933-6824. Ballroom and Latin Potluck Dance Party: 8-9:30 p.m. Friday, June 1 at Adventures in Dance Studio, 1500 W. Littleton Blvd., Ste. 207, Littleton. Ballroom, Latin, swing, salsa and tango dance to DJ ballroom and Latin tunes. Swap your favorite finger food recipes. Go to https://www. adventuresindance.com/ event/ballroomlatin-potluckdance-party/ Trace Adkins Concert: 6-10 p.m. Thursday, June 7 at Parker Days 2018. Adkins’s “Something’s Going On” show kicks off the festival. Information and tickets at www. parkerdaysfestival.com. Parker Days Festival: Friday, June 8 to Sunday, June 10. Parade theme is Hometown Hero, and it begins at 8:45 a.m. Saturday, June 9. Vendors will share information about their businesses, crafts and more. Information: www.parkerdaysfestival.com.

READING/WRITING

DCL Presents: Author Karen Kingsbury: 7-10 p.m. Wednesday, June 6 at CU South Denver, 10035 Peoria St., Parker. Go to https://www.eventbrite.com/e/ dcl-presents-karen-kingsburytickets-44450655106 or DCL.org/ authors-events.

May 18, 2018M

Good Ol’ Fashioned Hoedown: noon to 5 p.m. Saturday, May 19 at Coventry Farms, 7990 S. Santa Fe Drive, Littleton. Fundraiser and open house for The Right Step Inc. Ticket price includes all food, drinks and activities. Go to https://www.therightstepinc. org/store/c1/Featured_Products.html Order and Chaos: 7:30 p.m. Saturday, May 19 at Englewood High School, 3800 S. Logan St., Englewood. A concert of the Arapahoe Philharmonic. Call 303-781-1892 or go to www.arapahoe-phil. org. Kristallnacht Torah: 11 a.m. Sunday, May 20 at Chabad Jewish Center of South Metro Denver, 9950 Lone Tree Parkway, Lone Tree. The Torah was rescued from one of the 1,400 synagogues that were set ablaze on the night of Nov. 9, 1938. Go to www.DenverJewishCenter.com or call 303792-7222.

EVENTS

Pinnacle Park Grand Opening: 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday, May 19 at 2160 Fox Haven Drive, Castle Rock. Go to www.LiveCrystalValley.com. Volkswagens on the Green Car Show: 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. May 20 at Clement Park. Live music, a swap meet, vendors, food and lots of cars. Go to www.vwotg.com. Learn About Scuba: Saturday, May 19 (9 a.m. to 5 p.m.) and Sunday, May 20 (9 a.m. to 3 p.m.) at A-1 Scuba & Travel Aquatic Center, 1603 W. Belleview Ave., Littleton. Try Scuba, hear about travel and equipment, enter to win prizes and more. Go to https://www.facebook.com/ events/215162819069523/ USS Thresher Disaster, Death of a Nuclear-Powered Submarine: 7-8:30 p.m. Monday, May 21 at Southridge Recreation Center, 4800 McArthur Ranch Road, Highlands Ranch. Registration required. Go to http://thehrhs.org/ Play Chess: 7-9 p.m. Wednesday, May 23 at the James H. LaRue Library, 9292 Ridgeline Blvd., Highlands Ranch. Drop in for friendly competition among players of all ages and abilities. Kids and families. No registration required; contact 303-791-7323 or DCL.org. Ms. Colorado Senior America Pageant: 2-5 p.m. Saturday, May 26 at Lone Tree Arts Center, 10075 Commons St., Lone Tree. Info: 720-509-1000 or www.lonetreeartscenter.org.

America’s Role in WWI: Aerial Warfare: 2 p.m. Monday, May 21 at Bemis Public Library, 6014 S. Datura St., Littleton. Learn about the challenges pilots faced in their flimsy, wood and canvas covered aircraft, and the fierce air battles that raged with German warplanes. The program includes the lives of several pilot-heroes illustrating the personal experiences of American airmen. Call 303-795-3961. Brass Band Festival: 5:30 p.m. Saturday, May 26 at PACE Center, 20000 E. Pikes Peak Ave., Parker. Five bands and ensembles perform. Go to www. rockymountainbrassworks.org.

Naturalization Ceremony: 1:303:30 p.m. Saturday, May 26 at the Parker Library, 20105 E. Mainstreet, Parker. Douglas County Libraries in partnership with United States Citizenship and Immigration Services hosts a naturalization ceremony and celebration for new U.S. citizens. The public is welcome. A reception will follow. No registration required; contact 303-791-7323 or DCL.org. Highlands Ranch Field Day and Picnic: 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. Saturday, May 26 at Redstone Park, 3280 Redstone Park Circle, Highlands Ranch. Go to http://HRFD.org. Enjoy iconic games, sports, activities and food trucks. Grist Brewrun: Sunday, May 27 at Grist Brewing, 8470 S. Little Rock Way, Highlands Ranch. Free 30-minute workout with Manic Training is followed by a 4-mil run, walk or ruck. Finish with brew, food and beer Olympic games. Info: https://www.rockymountainbrewruns.com/gristbrewrun/ Proceeds benefit Epic Experience and Vet Expeditions. 2018 Memorial Day Commemoration: 11 a.m. Monday, May 28 at the Elbert/Kiowa Cemetery, 24891 N. Elbert Road, Elbert. Join us in honoring the courage, sacrifice and service of those who fought in America’s wars. Hosted by American Legion Post 181, Kiowa-Elbert. Downtown Walking Tours: 10:30 a.m. the fourth Saturday of the month from June to September. The 45-minute tour begins at

The Courtyard on Perry Street, between Third and Fourth streets, and will conclude at the Castle Rock Museum, 420 Elbert St. Contact 303-814-3164 or museum@ castlerockhistoricalsociety.org. Harmony Horse Expo: noon to 5 p.m. Friday, June 1, and 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday, June 2 at Harmony Equine Center, 5540 E. Highway 86, Franktown. Take guided tours of the property, attend horsemanship workshops and training demonstrations, and meet adoptable horses. Go to harmonyequinecenter.org/harmonyhorse-expo/ Lawn Mower Exchange: 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday, June 2 at Arapahoe Community College, 5900 S. Santa Fe Drive, Littleton. Go to http://www.mowdownpollution.org/residential. Program helps residents get rid of their old gasoline powered mowers and switch to electric mowers. History of Eisenhower-Johnson Memorial Tunnels: 7 p.m. Thursday, June 7 at the Philip S. Miller Library, 100 S. Wilcox St., Castle Rock. 50th anniversary of the first blast to start construction of the tunnels; presented by senior historian Lisa Schoch from CDOT. Go to www.castlerockhistorialsociety.org. Contact 303-814-3164 or museum@castlerockhistorialsociety.org.

HEALTH

Anticoagulation Basics, Through Thick & Thin: Learn to live with Warfarin/Coumadin: 1:30-2:30

p.m. Monday, May 21 at the South Denver Heart Center, 1000 SouthPark Drive, Littleton. Registration required. Call 303-744-1065 or go to www.southdenver.com

Diabetes, Prediabetes and Insulin Resistance: 11 a.m. to noon Monday, May 21 at the South Denver Heart Center, 1000 SouhPark Drive, Littleton. Susan Weitkunat, RD, CDE, teaches the ins and outs of diabetes and how to control blood sugar. Registration required. Call 303-744-1065 or go to www. southdenver.com How to Speak with Teens About Alcohol, Drugs and Mental Health: 5:30-6:50 p.m. Tuesday, May 22 at the James H. LaRue Library, 9292 Ridgeline Blvd., Highlands Ranch; and Thursday, May 24 at the Parker Library, 20105 E. Mainstreet. Presented by the Douglas County Youth Substance Abuse Coalition, in partnership with All Health, Denver Springs, Douglas County Schools, and others are providing resources and support. Mindful Eating and the Power of Pause: 11:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Wednesday, May 23 at the South Denver Heart Center, 1000 SouthPark Drive, Littleton. Presented by Susan Buckley, RD, CDE. Registration required. Call 303-744-1065 or go to www.southdenver.com Apple Cider Vinegar: 10-10:30 a.m. Saturday, May 26 at Natural Grocers by Vitamin Cottage, 11402 S. Parker Road, Parker. Learn how to use apple cider vinegar to support blood sugar regulation, a healthy body weight, heart health and more. Go to http://www. naturalgrocers.com Barre and Bubbles: 6-8 p.m. Friday, June 1 at Northridge Recreation Center, 8801 Broadway, Highlands Ranch. After class, enjoy champagne, apps and mingling. Must be 21-plus. Info: Search for Barre and Bubbles on Facebook.

EDUCATION

Douglas County AAUW Scholarship: Douglas County residents in need of financial support while pursuing an undergraduate or graduate degree should follow instructions and fill out application online at douglascounty-co. aauw.net. Application, transcripts and letters of recommendation are due by July 15. Scholarships awarded for the 2018 academic year may be used for tuition, books or childcare while attending school. Editor’s note: Calendar submissions must be received by noon Wednesday for publication the following week. To place a calendar item, go to eventlink. coloradocommunitymedia.com.


Centennial Citizen 29

May 18, 2018

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30 Centennial Citizen

May 18, 2018M

Marketplace Antiques & Collectibles

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Misc. Notices Asbestos Management Plans Asbestos Management Plans - In compliance with federal guidelines, Jeffco Public Schools make asbestos management plans for schools and other district facilities available for public inspection. Parents, employees or interested citizens may review the management plan for any school facility and have copies made at their own expense. Each school¹s management plan is available at the school, and plans for all district buildings are on file at the Jeffco Public Schools¹ Office of Environmental Services, 809 Quail St., Building 4, Lakewood. Call 303-982-2349. First Publication: May 17, 2018 Last Publication: May 17, 2018 Publisher: Lakewood Sentinel Notice of Stormwater Program Notice of Stormwater Program-Notice is hereby given that Jeffco Public Schools is seeking input on the implementation of their stormwater program as required by the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment. This program requires that the school district implement a program that educates the public and prevents water pollution from our sites. A copy of the current program can be obtained from Environmental Services by calling 303-982-2349. Any input or questions are welcomed and should be communicated by December 31, 2018. First Publication: May 17, 2018 Last Publication: May 17, 2018 Publisher: Lakewood Sentinel Want To Purchase minerals and other oil/gas interests. Send details to: P.O. Box 13557 Denver, CO 80201

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Centennial Citizen 31

LOCAL

May 18, 2018

SPORTS

Golfer demonstrates unpredictability of game

I Cherry Creek, with seven freshman among its 11 players, won its second straight Class 5A state tennis championship and the 34th overall for the program at the two-day tournament, which ended May 11 at the Gates Tennis Center. JIM BENTON

Creek girls capture tennis crown Twin sisters win titles for Bruins BY JIM BENTON JBENTON@COLORADOCOMMUNITYMEDIA.COM

Tennis is in the blood of Cherry Creek’s freshman twin sisters Eliza and Nicole Hill. It’s something natural for them because the family has played and watched a lot of tennis. The sisters helped the Bruins win the Class 5A state championship May 11 at the Gates Tennis Center. Eliza won the No. 2 singles state title when she defeated Alexis Bernthal of Fairview, 6-1, 6-3. Nicole captured the No. 3 singles crown with a 6-3, 6-1 victory over Jenesse John-

son of Denver East. The Bruins easily won their second straight state title and 34th overall with 85 points compared to 38 for runner-up Poudre. ThunderRidge, Regis Jesuit, Rock Canyon and Mountain Vista finished in a four-way tie for sixth place with 15 points each. Eliza and Nicole are the latest in the Hill family to enjoy state tournament success, and neither sister lost a set all season. Their father, Rob, was a state singles champion at Manual. Mother Julie was a double champ at Cherry Creek. Robby, now a freshman at Villanova, was a No. 2 singles champion for Creek in 2016 and brother Drew, a junior, was second at No. 1 doubles last fall. “I’ve been coming here for so long watching my brothers, cheer-

ing them on and now I finally got to play on these courts,” said Eliza. “It’s amazing. I don’t have words to describe how great this is, coming in as a freshman and taking the state championship.” Eliza played at No. 2 singles after beating her sister in two early season challenge matches. “I got lucky,” said Eliza. “I’m not better than her. We usually split wins depending on who has the better day. I just happened to have two better days.” Nicole echoed her sister’s thoughts about winning a state title after watching her brothers and then emphasized there was no pressure about playing in a Cherry Creek program that has had so much success in tennis. SEE TENNIS, P39

Warriors advance to boys lacrosse semifinals STAFF REPORT

Arapahoe was the lone south metro area boys lacrosse team remaining in the state playoffs, and the Warriors were scheduled to play a May 16 semifinal game against a familiar foe in Kent Denver. The Warriors, seeded sixth in the bracket, won their second-round game on May 12, while Chaparral, Cherry Creek and Mountain Vista lost. Here’s a look at area playoff games:

5A quarterfinals Arapahoe 10, Mountain Vista 8: Junior Josh Hall and senior Ryan Carlson each scored three goals in the second-round triumph over the third-seeded Golden Eagles. The Golden Eagles season ended with a 11-6 record. Regis Jesuit 14, Chaparral 7: The top-seed Raiders ended the Wolverines’ six-game winning streak with the quarterfinal playoff win, which ended Chaparral’s season with a 13-4 record.

Columbine 6, Cherry Creek 5: The defending state champion Bruins saw their season end with a 13-4 record following the loss to the Rebels. Creek had downed Columbine 11-9 earlier in the season. 5A first round Mountain Vista 15, Dakota Ridge 6: Cam Hancock scored five goals and Jake Govett four in the victory. SEE LACROSSE, P33

t’s been said many times that golf is an unpredictable sport that requires plenty of mental grit. For myself, golf has always been pretty predictably bad, with a few good shots and holes but very few good rounds. And the mental fortitude has always been missing, since after a good OVERTIME hole, I have myself talked into botching the tee shot on the next hole. Highlands Ranch senior Jenna Chun know all about how golf can be unpredictable, but she has the mental strength to handle it, as Jim Benton she displayed last season at the Class 5A state tournament. After an opening round 83 at The Club at Rolling Hills, she rallied with a 1-under par 71 to tie Grandview’s Amy Chitkoksoong for medalist honors and force a playoff for the individual state title. Chun had a chance to win but missed a putt on the second playoff hole and also couldn’t hole a bogey putt on the third extra hole. Chitkoksoong ran in her bogey putt and was crowned the state champ with a bogey putt. It was a disheartening finish to a very good day but Chun faced the music, acted like a winner and answered question after question following the awards ceremonies. “The best I’ve ever seen Jenna Chun was after the state meet,” said Highlands Ranch coach Jon Cushing. “She took defeat with a lot of grace. Golf is such a mental sport. She has come back this year with a great mental attitude. She doesn’t let one high score on a hole affect her.” Chun, who carded a two-over-par 74 at the Central regional tournament at South Suburban on May 7, won three Continental League tournaments and the league’s Player of the Year. Ralston Valley coach Wendy Davis is another person who can attest to the unpredictability of a two-day state tournament. The Mustangs were five shots off the lead after the opening round but won their first state golf championship by nine shots after a remarkable round in which the average round for the three scoring golfers was 76.3. SEE BENTON, P32


32 Centennial Citizen

May 18, 2018M

Area teams advance in girls soccer playoffs Quarterfinal matches were slated for May 16, with semifinal games set for May 19 at Legacy Stadium in Aurora.

STAFF REPORT

Class 5A second-round highlights Mountain Vista 0, Arapahoe 0 (OT): The defending state champion Golden Eagles, who won two playoff shootouts last season, survived another by outscoring Arapahoe 4-3 on penalty kicks. This was a rematch of last season’s title game that saw Vista down Arapahoe, 3-1. The Warriors’ season ended with a 12-4-1 record. Rock Canyon 1, Castle View 0: Jamie Tatum, off an

Class 5A first-round scores Rock Canyon 4, Fort Collins 1; Mountain Vista 10, Adams City 0; Cherry Creek 4, Prairie View 2; ThunderRidge 5, Lakewood 0; Castle View 5, Brighton 1; Legacy 5, Heritage 0; Broomfield 7, Legend 1

Arapahoe’s Camryn MacMillan (20) heads the ball away from the goal as several Mountain Vista players try to get a piece of it. The Golden Eagles won with in a 4-3 shootout after two overtime periods left the game tied 0-0 on May 11 at Shea Stadium in Highlands Ranch. PAUL DISALVO assist from Catherine Brown, scored the winning goal in the Jaguars’ win. Castle View finished with a 10-5-2 record. Columbine 2, ThunderRidge 1 (OT): Maddie Duren scored for the Grizzlies, but Tessa Barton’s second goal gave the Rebels a secondround overtime win. ThunderRidge saw its season end

BENTON FROM PAGE 31

Wait until next year Next season’s Class 5A girls state tennis tournament could be very interesting because most of the freshman standouts from this year’s tourney will be back and be more experienced and better players. There was definitely a youth movement this season with six of the 12

with a 12-5 record. Cherokee Trail 2, Cherry Creek 1: The Cougars edged Creek for the second time this season and ended the campaign for the Bruins with a 11-6 record. In the 4A playoffs, Littleton and Valor Christian moved on to the quarterfinals with second-round victories.

players in the Class 5A singles semifinals being freshmen. There were 31 freshmen who played in tournament and there are even more sophomores who qualified for the tourney — too many to count. The youth movement cast a tentative feeling over the tournament because of the uncertainty of how the young players would play with the added pressure of playing in an important tournament with many more people watching. “One of the points of focus was just talking about the environment,”

Class 4A second-round highlights Littleton 3, Mullen 1: Sarah Payson scored twice and Anna Newby once in the Lions’ victory. Valor Christian 2, The Classical Academy 1: Jenna Siebert and Kaleigh Kreimeyer scored secondhalf goals in the Eagles’ triumph. Silver Creek 2, Ponderosa 1 (OT): Carolyn Ho got the Mustangs’ goal but Alexa Karsel’s tally in the 87th minute eliminated the Mustangs from the playoffs with an overtime loss. Pondo finished with a 12-5 record.

said Cherry Creek coach Chris Jacob. “Even though we hosted the regionals and some of the girls have been down here to watch state, it’s totally different when you are playing with the pressure of the crowd. So we spent a lot of time talking about that.” Of the 11 players including those on doubles teams that won state 5A championships, there were seven freshman and two sophomores. Soccer shootouts I’m going to get on my soapbox again and claim there needs to be a better way to determine winners of playoff soccer games other than penalty kick shootouts. Soccer is a team game. Determining the winning postseason team with a shootout, which most times is deter-

Class 3A In the Class 3A state playoffs, Lutheran moved into the quarterfinals, while SkyView Academy sustained a second-round loss. Quarterfinals were scheduled for May 16. Lutheran 6, Alamosa 0: The Lions, who drew a firstround bye, used two goals and an assist from Carli Haney and Abigail Justus’ goal and two assists to beat Alamosa in the second round contest on May 12. Colorado Academy 4, SkyView Academy 0: The Hawks lost for the second time this season to Colorado Academy and saw their season end with a 9-8 record. SkyView Academy 4, KIPP Denver Collegiate 0: Olivia Brown’s two goals paced the Hawks, which scored all four goals in the first half of the May 9 match.

mined by luck or an individual’s skill, needs to be altered. The best way would be to let the teams continue to play, but then you get into the problem with fatigue and the chance of injuries. A team’s depth would be tested as more substitute players would need to be used. Shootouts are acceptable during the regular season but not in the playoffs. So suggestions are needed. Maybe let the teams continue to play 9 vs. 9 or even 7 vs. 7 until a team gets that Golden Goal. Jim Benton is a sports writer for Colorado Community Media. He has been covering sports in the Denver area since 1968. He can be reached at jbenton@coloradocommunitymedia.com or at 303-566-4083.

Weekly Carrier Routes Available Solution

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Mountain Vista and Rock Canyon won close secondround matches on May 11 to advance to the quarterfinals of the girls Class 5A soccer playoffs. Quarterfinal matches were scheduled to be held May 16, with the state semifinals slated for May 19 at Echo Park Automotive Stadium in Parker. The championship match is set for May 23 at Dick’s Sporting Goods Park in Commerce City.

Class 4A first-round scores Valor Christian 5, George Washington 0; Ponderosa 2, Skyline 0; Littleton 2, Palmer Ridge 1 (OT)

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Centennial Citizen 33

May 18, 2018

Top teams advance in girls lacrosse playoffs BY TOM MUNDS TMUNDS@COLORADOCOMMUNITYMEDIA.COM

The high school girls lacrosse season is in its home stretch and play has narrowed the field to the eight teams in the May 16 state tournament quarterfinals. The match-ups for the quarterfinal games are top-seeded Cherry Creek facing ninth-seeded Grandview, No. 2-seeded Colorado Academy facing 10th-seeded Arapahoe. The other two games will match third-seeded Columbine against sixth-seeded Denver East, while fourth-seeded Regis plays fifthseeded Chaparral. The first-round games were played May 9 and the secondround games were played May 12. The top seeded teams won all those except one. That exception happened in the second round as 10th ranked Arapahoe defeated seventh-ranked Pine Creek, 17-5. Cherry Creek, Colorado Academy and Denver East are the only teams in the quarterfinals that have played for a state championship. Cherry Creek has played in every state championship game

LACROSSE

the first time in three years that the Eagles have not advanced to the state championship game.

FROM PAGE 31

Cherry Creek 14, Lewis-Palmer 2: The Bruins didn’t have any trouble in posting the win. Chaparral 15, Denver East 9: The Wolverines scored four second-period goals to overcome a 3-2 first-period deficit and went on to record the win. Arapahoe 15, Highlands Ranch 8: Junior Dillon Linhardt tallied four goals and Carlson had three in the Warriors’ victory. The Falcons, under first-year coach Brent Adams, finished with an 11-5 record. Colorado Academy 10, Rock Canyon 7: A scoreless third period was costly for the Jaguars, who were upset by 10th-seeded Colorado Academy in the first round. Justin Hansen and Johnny Schabacker each had two goals for Canyon, which saw its season end with a 12-4 record. Columbine 10, Heritage 4: The Eagles fell behind 3-0 and never recovered. Logan Cox’s two goals paced Heritage, which saw its season halted with a 9-7 record. Regis Jesuit 11, Legend 5: The 16th-seeded Titans ended the campaign with a 7-9 record after the first-round loss to the undefeated Raiders. In the opening round Class 4A playoffs, Valor Christian had an easy win but Ponderosa and Littleton lost. Valor, the two-time defending 4A state champions, was eliminated by Dawson in the quarterfinals on May 11 to mark

since 1990 and has won 10 state titles. Colorado Academy had played and won the championship the last three years. The Angels of Denver East took runner-up in the state in 2010. A lot of girls lacrosse action remains to be played in the state quarterfinals and semifinals. If defending state champion Colorado Academy and 2017 state runner-up Cherry Creek advance through those two rounds of play, they will meet for the state girls lacrosse title for the fourth straight year. Cherry Creek is undefeated coming into the tournament and the Bruin scored double figures in all their wins except the 9-8 victory over the Collegiate High School team of Richmond, Virginia. Colorado Academy was also undefeated with a 16-0 overall record and a 7-0 league record, scoring an average of 18 goals a game. The Mustangs won the state title the last three years and bested Cherry Creek all three years. Columbine, Regis and Chaparral all have 14-2 overall records, while Grandview is 12-4 and Arapahoe is 11-5.

4A quarterfinals Dawson School 12, Valor Christian 9: In a rematch of the past two state championship games, senior Austin Saupe scored three goals while Ian Acheson and Trynor each had tallied two, but it wasn’t enough to notch another win over Dawson. Valor, which ended the season at 12-5, toppled the Mustangs in last season’s 4A title game, 20-12. 4A first round Valor Christian 16, Green Mountain 0: Sean Traynor’s four goals sparked the Eagles’ win that saw eight different players score. Golden 13, Ponderosa 6: The Mustangs’ loss wrapped up a 9-7 season. Cheyenne Mountain 11, Littleton 8: The Lions gave up nine goals in the second period in the loss, which concluded a 10-6 season. Liam O’Malley had three goals and five points in the setback.

SHUTTERSTOCK IMAGE

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May 18, 2018M

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Centennial Citizen 35

May 18, 2018

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36 Centennial Citizen

May 18, 2018M

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ATTORNEY GENERAL, THE FEDERAL CONSUMER FINANCIAL PROTECTION BUREAU (CFPB), OR BOTH. THE FILING OF A COMPLAINT WILL NOT STOP THE FORECLOSURE PROCESS.

May 18, 2018

Public Notices Colorado Attorney General 1300 Broadway, 10th Floor Denver, Colorado 80203 (800) 222-4444 www.coloradoattorneygeneral.gov Federal Consumer Financial Protection Bureau P.O. Box 4503 Iowa City, Iowa 52244 (855) 411-2372 www.consumerfinance.gov

Public Trustees COMBINED NOTICE - PUBLICATION CRS §38-38-103 FORECLOSURE SALE NO. 0103-2018

To Whom It May Concern: This Notice is given with regard to the following described Deed of Trust: On February 23, 2018, the undersigned Public Trustee caused the Notice of Election and Demand relating to the Deed of Trust described below to be recorded in the County of Arapahoe records. Original Grantor(s) BRIAN K MCHUGH AND MELISSA A MCHUGH Original Beneficiary(ies) NATIONAL CITY BANK Current Holder of Evidence of Debt CITIZENS BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION Date of Deed of Trust October 13, 2005 County of Recording Arapahoe Recording Date of Deed of Trust October 25, 2005 Recording Information (Reception No. and/or Book/Page No.) B5160218 Original Principal Amount $65,000.00 Outstanding Principal Balance $54,969.71

Pursuant to CRS §38-38-101(4)(i), you are hereby notified that the covenants of the deed of trust have been violated as follows: failure to pay principal and interest when due together with all other payments provided for in the evidence of debt secured by the deed of trust and other violations thereof. THE LIEN FORECLOSED MAY NOT BE A FIRST LIEN. LOT 6, BLOCK 5, FOUR LAKES SUBDIVISION FILING NO.6, COUNTY OF ARAPAHOE, STATE OF COLORADO. Also known by street and number as: 1732 EAST PHILLIPS AVENUE, CENTENNIAL, CO 80122.

THE PROPERTY DESCRIBED HEREIN IS ALL OF THE PROPERTY CURRENTLY ENCUMBERED BY THE LIEN OF THE DEED OF TRUST. NOTICE OF SALE

The current holder of the Evidence of Debt secured by the Deed of Trust, described herein, has filed Notice of Election and Demand for sale as provided by law and in said Deed of Trust.

THEREFORE, Notice Is Hereby Given that I will at public auction, at 10:00 A.M. on Wednesday, 06/27/2018, at the East Hearing Room, County Administration Building, 5334 South Prince Street, Littleton, Colorado, 80120, sell to the highest and best bidder for cash, the said real property and all interest of the said Grantor(s), Grantor(s)' heirs and assigns therein, for the purpose of paying the indebtedness provided in said Evidence of Debt secured by the Deed of Trust, plus attorneys' fees, the expenses of sale and other items allowed by law, and will issue to the purchaser a Certificate of Purchase, all as provided by law. First Publication: 5/3/2018 Last Publication: 5/31/2018 Name of Publication: Littleton Independent

IF THE SALE DATE IS CONTINUED TO A LATER DATE, THE DEADLINE TO FILE A NOTICE OF INTENT TO CURE BY THOSE PARTIES ENTITLED TO CURE MAY ALSO BE EXTENDED;

IF THE BORROWER BELIEVES THAT A LENDER OR SERVICER HAS VIOLATED THE REQUIREMENTS FOR A SINGLE POINT OF CONTACT IN SECTION 38-38-103.1 OR THE PROHIBITION ON DUAL TRACKING IN SECTION 38-38-103.2, THE BORROWER MAY FILE A COMPLAINT WITH THE COLORADO ATTORNEY GENERAL, THE FEDERAL CONSUMER FINANCIAL PROTECTION BUREAU (CFPB), OR BOTH. THE FILING OF A COMPLAINT WILL NOT STOP THE FORECLOSURE PROCESS. Colorado Attorney General 1300 Broadway, 10th Floor Denver, Colorado 80203 (800) 222-4444 www.coloradoattorneygeneral.gov Federal Consumer Financial Protection Bureau P.O. Box 4503 Iowa City, Iowa 52244 (855) 411-2372 www.consumerfinance.gov DATE: 02/23/2018 Susan K Ryden, Public Trustee in and for the County of Arapahoe, State of Colorado By: Susan K Ryden, Public Trustee The name, address, business telephone number and bar registration number of the

DATE: 02/23/2018 Susan K Ryden, Public Trustee in and for the County of Arapahoe, State of Colorado By: Susan K Ryden, Public Trustee

Public Trustees

The name, address, business telephone number and bar registration number of the attorney(s) representing the legal holder of the indebtedness is: Monica Kadrmas #34904 Randall Chin #31149 Weldon Phillips #31827 Lauren Tew #45041 Nichole Williams #49611 Barrett, Frappier & Weisserman, LLP 1199 Bannock Street, Denver, CO 80204 (303) 350-3711 Attorney File # 00000007253974 The Attorney above is acting as a debt collector and is attempting to collect a debt. Any information provided may be used for that purpose. ©Public Trustees' Association of Colorado Revised 1/2015 Legal Notice No.: 0103-2018 First Publication: 5/3/2018 Last Publication: 5/31/2018 Name of Publication: Littleton Independent COMBINED NOTICE - PUBLICATION CRS §38-38-103 FORECLOSURE SALE NO. 0092-2018 To Whom It May Concern: This Notice is given with regard to the following described Deed of Trust: On February 16, 2018, the undersigned Public Trustee caused the Notice of Election and Demand relating to the Deed of Trust described below to be recorded in the County of Arapahoe records. Original Grantor(s) Robert W Attleson Original Beneficiary(ies) JPMorgan Chase Bank, N.A. Current Holder of Evidence of Debt JPMorgan Chase Bank, National Association Date of Deed of Trust October 16, 2006 County of Recording Arapahoe Recording Date of Deed of Trust November 06, 2006 Recording Information (Reception No. and/or Book/Page No.) B6158433 Original Principal Amount $162,220.00 Outstanding Principal Balance $127,072.15 Pursuant to CRS §38-38-101(4)(i), you are hereby notified that the covenants of the deed of trust have been violated as follows: failure to pay principal and interest when due together with all other payments provided for in the evidence of debt secured by the deed of trust and other violations thereof. THE LIEN FORECLOSED MAY NOT BE A FIRST LIEN. LOT 3, BLOCK 1, WINDEMERE HOMES, TRACT NO 1, COUNTY OF ARAPAHOE, STATE OF COLORADO. Also known by street and number as: 6529 S Windermere St, Littleton, CO 80120. THE PROPERTY DESCRIBED HEREIN IS ALL OF THE PROPERTY CURRENTLY ENCUMBERED BY THE LIEN OF THE DEED OF TRUST. NOTICE OF SALE The current holder of the Evidence of Debt secured by the Deed of Trust, described herein, has filed Notice of Election and Demand for sale as provided by law and in said Deed of Trust. THEREFORE, Notice Is Hereby Given that I will at public auction, at 10:00 A.M. on Wednesday, 06/20/2018, at the East Hearing Room, County Administration Building, 5334 South Prince Street, Littleton, Colorado, 80120, sell to the highest and best bidder for cash, the said real property and all interest of the said Grantor(s), Grantor(s)' heirs and assigns therein, for the purpose of paying the indebtedness provided in said Evidence of Debt secured by the Deed of Trust, plus attorneys' fees, the expenses of sale and other items allowed by law, and will issue to the purchaser a Certificate of Purchase, all as provided by law. First Publication: 4/26/2018 Last Publication: 5/24/2018 Name of Publication: Littleton Independent IF THE SALE DATE IS CONTINUED TO A LATER DATE, THE DEADLINE TO FILE A NOTICE OF INTENT TO CURE BY THOSE PARTIES ENTITLED TO CURE MAY ALSO BE EXTENDED; IF THE BORROWER BELIEVES THAT A LENDER OR SERVICER HAS VIOLATED THE REQUIREMENTS FOR A SINGLE POINT OF CONTACT IN SECTION 38-38-103.1 OR THE PROHIBITION ON DUAL TRACKING IN SECTION 38-38-103.2, THE BORROWER MAY FILE A COMPLAINT WITH THE COLORADO ATTORNEY GENERAL, THE FEDERAL CON-

Notices

Grantor(s)' heirs and assigns therein, for the purpose of paying the indebtedness provided in said Evidence of Debt secured by the Deed of Trust, plus attorneys' fees, the expenses of sale and other items allowed by law, and will issue to the purchaser a Certificate of Purchase, all as provided by law.

First Publication: 4/26/2018 Last Publication: 5/24/2018 Name of Publication: Littleton Independent

IF THE SALE DATE IS CONTINUED TO A LATER DATE, THE DEADLINE TO FILE A NOTICE OF INTENT TO CURE BY THOSE PARTIES ENTITLED TO CURE MAY ALSO BE EXTENDED;

IF THE BORROWER BELIEVES THAT A LENDER OR SERVICER HAS VIOLATED THE REQUIREMENTS FOR A SINGLE POINT OF CONTACT IN SECTION 38-38-103.1 OR THE PROHIBITION ON DUAL TRACKING IN SECTION 38-38-103.2, THE BORROWER MAY FILE A COMPLAINT WITH THE COLORADO ATTORNEY GENERAL, THE FEDERAL CONSUMER FINANCIAL PROTECTION BUREAU (CFPB), OR BOTH. THE FILING OF A COMPLAINT WILL NOT STOP THE FORECLOSURE PROCESS.

Public Trustees

Colorado Attorney General 1300 Broadway, 10th Floor Denver, Colorado 80203 (800) 222-4444 www.coloradoattorneygeneral.gov Federal Consumer Financial Protection Bureau P.O. Box 4503 Iowa City, Iowa 52244 (855) 411-2372 www.consumerfinance.gov DATE: 02/16/2018 Susan K Ryden, Public Trustee in and for the County of Arapahoe, State of Colorado By: Susan K Ryden, Public Trustee The name, address, business telephone number and bar registration number of the attorney(s) representing the legal holder of the indebtedness is: Susan Hendrick #33196 Marcello G. Rojas #46396 Nigel G Tibbles #43177 THE SAYER LAW GROUP, P.C. 9745 E. Hampden Ave., Suite 400, Denver, CO 80231 (303) 353-2965 Attorney File # CO180027 The Attorney above is acting as a debt collector and is attempting to collect a debt. Any information provided may be used for that purpose. ©Public Trustees' Association of Colorado Revised 1/2015 Legal Notice NO.: 0092-2018 First Publication: 4/26/2018 Last Publication: 5/24/2018 Name of Publication: Littleton Independent COMBINED NOTICE - PUBLICATION CRS §38-38-103 FORECLOSURE SALE NO. 0071-2018 To Whom It May Concern: This Notice is given with regard to the following described Deed of Trust: On February 9, 2018, the undersigned Public Trustee caused the Notice of Election and Demand relating to the Deed of Trust described below to be recorded in the County of Arapahoe records. Original Grantor(s) A. Denise Tautfest Original Beneficiary(ies) Ameriquest Mortgage Company Current Holder of Evidence of Debt LSF10 Master Participation Trust Date of Deed of Trust January 16, 2004 County of Recording Arapahoe Recording Date of Deed of Trust February 09, 2004 Recording Information (Reception No. and/or Book/Page No.) B4024216 Original Principal Amount $144,600.00 Outstanding Principal Balance $106,562.10 Pursuant to CRS §38-38-101(4)(i), you are hereby notified that the covenants of the deed of trust have been violated as follows: failure to pay principal and interest when due together with all other payments provided for in the evidence of debt secured by the deed of trust and other violations thereof. THE LIEN FORECLOSED MAY NOT BE A FIRST LIEN. THE EAST 150 FEET OF OT 24, BLOCK 1, BOULEVARD GARDENS ANNEX, COUNTY OF ARAPAHOE, STATE OF COLORADO Also known by street and number as: 3325 S Clay St, Englewood, CO 80110. THE PROPERTY DESCRIBED HEREIN IS ALL OF THE PROPERTY CURRENTLY ENCUMBERED BY THE LIEN OF THE DEED OF TRUST. NOTICE OF SALE The current holder of the Evidence of Debt secured by the Deed of Trust, described herein, has filed Notice of Election and Demand for sale as provided by law and in said Deed of Trust. THEREFORE, Notice Is Hereby Given that I will at public auction, at 10:00 A.M. on Wednesday, 06/13/2018, at the East Hearing Room, County Administration Building, 5334 South Prince Street, Littleton, Colorado, 80120, sell to the highest and best bidder for cash, the said real property and all interest of the said Grantor(s), Grantor(s)' heirs and assigns therein, for the purpose of paying the indebtedness provided in

Current Holder of Evidence of Debt DEUTSCHE BANK NATIONAL TRUST COMPANY, AS TRUSTEE FOR SOUNDVIEW HOME LOAN TRUST 2006-OPT5, ASSET-BACKED CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2006-OPT5 THE PROPERTY DESCRIBED HEREIN IS ALL Date of Deed of Trust OF THE PROPERTY CURRENTLY ENMarch 27, 2006 CUMBERED BY THE LIEN OF THE DEED OF County of Recording TRUST. Arapahoe Recording Date of Deed of Trust NOTICE OF SALE April 03, 2006 Recording Information (Reception No. The current holder of the Evidence of Debt seand/or Book/Page No.) cured by the Deed of Trust, described herein, B6050739 has filed Notice of Election and Demand for sale advertise publicPrincipal notices call 303-566-4100 Amount as provided by law and in saidTo Deed of Trust. yourOriginal $277,000.00 Outstanding Principal Balance THEREFORE, Notice Is Hereby Given that I will $210,275.47 at public auction, at 10:00 A.M. on Wednesday, 06/13/2018, at the East Hearing Room, County Pursuant to CRS §38-38-101(4)(i), you are Administration Building, 5334 South Prince hereby notified that the covenants of the deed of Street, Littleton, Colorado, 80120, sell to the trust have been violated as follows: failure to highest and best bidder for cash, the said real pay principal and interest when due together property and all interest of the said Grantor(s), with all other payments provided for in the evidGrantor(s)' heirs and assigns therein, for the ence of debt secured by the deed of trust and purpose of paying the indebtedness provided in other violations thereof. said Evidence of Debt secured by the Deed of Trust, plus attorneys' fees, the expenses of sale THE LIEN FORECLOSED MAY NOT BE A and other items allowed by law, and will issue to FIRST LIEN. the purchaser a Certificate of Purchase, all as provided by law. LOT 10, BLOCK 7, STARK BROTHERS WOODLAWN ADDITION, COUNTY OF ARFirst Publication: 4/19/2018 APAHOE, STATE OF COLORADO. Last Publication: 5/17/2018 Name of Publication: Littleton Independent Also known by street and number as: 5596 S ELMWOOD ST, IF THE SALE DATE IS CONTINUED TO A LITTLETON, CO 80120. LATER DATE, THE DEADLINE TO FILE A NOTICE OF INTENT TO CURE BY THOSE THE PROPERTY DESCRIBED HEREIN IS ALL PARTIES ENTITLED TO CURE MAY ALSO BE OF THE PROPERTY CURRENTLY ENEXTENDED; CUMBERED BY THE LIEN OF THE DEED OF TRUST. IF THE BORROWER BELIEVES THAT A LENDER OR SERVICER HAS VIOLATED THE NOTICE OF SALE REQUIREMENTS FOR A SINGLE POINT OF CONTACT IN SECTION 38-38-103.1 OR THE The current holder of the Evidence of Debt sePROHIBITION ON DUAL TRACKING IN SECcured by the Deed of Trust, described herein, TION 38-38-103.2, THE BORROWER MAY has filed Notice of Election and Demand for sale FILE A COMPLAINT WITH THE COLORADO as provided by law and in said Deed of Trust. ATTORNEY GENERAL, THE FEDERAL CONSUMER FINANCIAL PROTECTION BUREAU THEREFORE, Notice Is Hereby Given that I will (CFPB), OR BOTH. THE FILING OF A COMat public auction, at 10:00 A.M. on Wednesday, PLAINT WILL NOT STOP THE FORECLOS06/13/2018, at the East Hearing Room, County URE PROCESS. Administration Building, 5334 South Prince Street, Littleton, Colorado, 80120, sell to the Colorado Attorney General highest and best bidder for cash, the said real 1300 Broadway, 10th Floor property and all interest of the said Grantor(s), Denver, Colorado 80203 Grantor(s)' heirs and assigns therein, for the (800) 222-4444 purpose of paying the indebtedness provided in www.coloradoattorneygeneral.gov said Evidence of Debt secured by the Deed of Trust, plus attorneys' fees, the expenses of sale Federal Consumer Financial and other items allowed by law, and will issue to Protection Bureau the purchaser a Certificate of Purchase, all as P.O. Box 4503 provided by law. Iowa City, Iowa 52244 (855) 411-2372 First Publication: 4/19/2018 www.consumerfinance.gov Last Publication: 5/17/2018 Name of Publication: Littleton Independent DATE: 02/09/2018 Susan K Ryden, Public Trustee in and for the IF THE SALE DATE IS CONTINUED TO A County of Arapahoe, State of Colorado LATER DATE, THE DEADLINE TO FILE A NOBy: Susan K Ryden, Public Trustee TICE OF INTENT TO CURE BY THOSE PARTIES ENTITLED TO CURE MAY ALSO BE The name, address, business telephone numEXTENDED; ber and bar registration number of the attorney(s) representing the legal holder of the IF THE BORROWER BELIEVES THAT A indebtedness is: LENDER OR SERVICER HAS VIOLATED THE REQUIREMENTS FOR A SINGLE POINT OF Eve Grina #43658 CONTACT IN SECTION 38-38-103.1 OR THE Jennifer Cruseturner #44452 PROHIBITION ON DUAL TRACKING IN SECHolly Shilliday #24423 TION 38-38-103.2, THE BORROWER MAY Courtney Wright #45482 FILE A COMPLAINT WITH THE COLORADO Erin Croke #46557 ATTORNEY GENERAL, THE FEDERAL CONJennifer Rogers #34682 SUMER FINANCIAL PROTECTION BUREAU McCarthy & Holthus LLP 7700 E Arapahoe (CFPB), OR BOTH. THE FILING OF A COMRoad, Suite 230, Centennial, CO 80112 (877) PLAINT WILL NOT STOP THE FORECLOS369-6122 URE PROCESS. Attorney File # CO-17-802098-LL OF ARAPAHOE, STATE OF COLORADO

Also known by street and number as: 3325 S Clay St, Englewood, CO 80110.

Public Trustees

The Attorney above is acting as a debt collector and is attempting to collect a debt. Any information provided may be used for that purpose. ©Public Trustees' Association of Colorado Revised 1/2015 Legal Notice NO.: 0071-2018 First Publication: 4/19/2018 Last Publication: 5/17/2018 Name of Publication: Littleton Independent COMBINED NOTICE - PUBLICATION CRS §38-38-103 FORECLOSURE SALE NO. 0072-2018 To Whom It May Concern: This Notice is given with regard to the following described Deed of Trust: On February 9, 2018, the undersigned Public Trustee caused the Notice of Election and Demand relating to the Deed of Trust described below to be recorded in the County of Arapahoe records. Original Grantor(s) KENT B. MORRISON AND KATHY A. MORRISON Original Beneficiary(ies) OPTION ONE MORTGAGE CORPORATION Current Holder of Evidence of Debt DEUTSCHE BANK NATIONAL TRUST COMPANY, AS TRUSTEE FOR SOUNDVIEW HOME LOAN TRUST 2006-OPT5, ASSET-BACKED CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2006-OPT5 Date of Deed of Trust March 27, 2006 County of Recording Arapahoe Recording Date of Deed of Trust April 03, 2006 Recording Information (Reception No. and/or Book/Page No.) B6050739 Original Principal Amount $277,000.00 Outstanding Principal Balance $210,275.47 Pursuant to CRS §38-38-101(4)(i), you are hereby notified that the covenants of the deed of trust have been violated as follows: failure to pay principal and interest when due together with all other payments provided for in the evidence of debt secured by the deed of trust and

Centennial Citizen 37

Public Trustees

Colorado Attorney General 1300 Broadway, 10th Floor Denver, Colorado 80203 (800) 222-4444 www.coloradoattorneygeneral.gov Federal Consumer Financial Protection Bureau P.O. Box 4503 Iowa City, Iowa 52244 (855) 411-2372 www.consumerfinance.gov

DATE: 02/09/2018 Susan K Ryden, Public Trustee in and for the County of Arapahoe, State of Colorado By: Susan K Ryden, Public Trustee

The name, address, business telephone number and bar registration number of the attorney(s) representing the legal holder of the indebtedness is:

Monica Kadrmas #34904 Randall Chin #31149 Weldon Phillips #31827 Lauren Tew #45041 Nichole Williams #49611 Barrett, Frappier & Weisserman, LLP 1199 Bannock Street, Denver, CO 80204 (303) 350-3711 Attorney File # 00000007276926

The Attorney above is acting as a debt collector and is attempting to collect a debt. Any information provided may be used for that purpose. ©Public Trustees' Association of Colorado Revised 1/2015 Legal Notice NO.: 0072-2018 First Publication: 4/19/2018 Last Publication: 5/17/2018 Name of Publication: Littleton Independent COMBINED NOTICE - PUBLICATION CRS §38-38-103 FORECLOSURE SALE NO. 0095-2018

To Whom It May Concern: This Notice is given with regard to the following described Deed of Trust: On February 20, 2018, the undersigned Public Trustee caused the Notice of Election and Demand relating to the Deed of Trust described below to be recorded in the County of Arapahoe records.

Centennial * 1


CRS §38-38-103 38FORECLOSURE Centennial Citizen SALE NO. 0095-2018

To Whom It May Concern: This Notice is given with regard to the following described Deed of Trust:

Public Trustees

On February 20, 2018, the undersigned Public Trustee caused the Notice of Election and Demand relating to the Deed of Trust described below to be recorded in the County of Arapahoe records. Original Grantor(s) IMOGENE MANUELITO Original Beneficiary(ies) Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. as nominee for First Choice Loan Services, Inc. Current Holder of Evidence of Debt BANK2 Date of Deed of Trust May 09, 2013 County of Recording Arapahoe Recording Date of Deed of Trust May 20, 2013 Recording Information (Reception No. and/or Book/Page No.) D3062857 Original Principal Amount $270,414.00 Outstanding Principal Balance $249,496.27 Pursuant to CRS §38-38-101(4)(i), you are hereby notified that the covenants of the deed of trust have been violated as follows: failure to pay principal and interest when due together with all other payments provided for in the evidence of debt secured by the deed of trust and other violations thereof. THE LIEN FORECLOSED MAY NOT BE A FIRST LIEN. LOT 15, BLOCK 18, BROADWAY ESTATES, FILING NO. ONE, COUNTY OF ARAPAHOE, STATE OF COLORADO. Also known by street and number as: 6673 South Washington Street, Centennial, CO 80121. THE PROPERTY DESCRIBED HEREIN IS ALL OF THE PROPERTY CURRENTLY ENCUMBERED BY THE LIEN OF THE DEED OF TRUST. NOTICE OF SALE The current holder of the Evidence of Debt secured by the Deed of Trust, described herein, has filed Notice of Election and Demand for sale as provided by law and in said Deed of Trust. THEREFORE, Notice Is Hereby Given that I will at public auction, at 10:00 A.M. on Wednesday, 06/20/2018, at the East Hearing Room, County Administration Building, 5334 South Prince Street, Littleton, Colorado, 80120, sell to the highest and best bidder for cash, the said real property and all interest of the said Grantor(s), Grantor(s)' heirs and assigns therein, for the purpose of paying the indebtedness provided in said Evidence of Debt secured by the Deed of Trust, plus attorneys' fees, the expenses of sale and other items allowed by law, and will issue to the purchaser a Certificate of Purchase, all as provided by law. First Publication: 4/26/2018 Last Publication: 5/24/2018 Name of Publication: Littleton Independent IF THE SALE DATE IS CONTINUED TO A LATER DATE, THE DEADLINE TO FILE A NOTICE OF INTENT TO CURE BY THOSE PARTIES ENTITLED TO CURE MAY ALSO BE EXTENDED; IF THE BORROWER BELIEVES THAT A LENDER OR SERVICER HAS VIOLATED THE REQUIREMENTS FOR A SINGLE POINT OF CONTACT IN SECTION 38-38-103.1 OR THE PROHIBITION ON DUAL TRACKING IN SECTION 38-38-103.2, THE BORROWER MAY FILE A COMPLAINT WITH THE COLORADO ATTORNEY GENERAL, THE FEDERAL CONSUMER FINANCIAL PROTECTION BUREAU (CFPB), OR BOTH. THE FILING OF A COMPLAINT WILL NOT STOP THE FORECLOSURE PROCESS. Colorado Attorney General 1300 Broadway, 10th Floor Denver, Colorado 80203 (800) 222-4444 www.coloradoattorneygeneral.gov Federal Consumer Financial Protection Bureau P.O. Box 4503 Iowa City, Iowa 52244 (855) 411-2372 www.consumerfinance.gov DATE: 02/20/2018 Susan K Ryden, Public Trustee in and for the County of Arapahoe, State of Colorado By: Susan K Ryden, Public Trustee The name, address, business telephone number and bar registration number of the attorney(s) representing the legal holder of the indebtedness is: Deanne R Stodden #33214 Alex M Beltz #43310 Torben M. Welch #34282 Matthew Ryan Sullivan #39728 Messner & Reeves LLC 1430 Wynkoop Street, Suite 300, Denver, CO 80202 (303) 623-1800 Attorney File # 7729.0121 The Attorney above is acting as a debt collector and is attempting to collect a debt. Any information provided may be used for that purpose. ©Public Trustees' Association of Colorado Revised 1/2015 Legal Notice NO.: 0095-2018 First Publication: 4/26/2018 Last Publication: 5/24/2018 Name of Publication: Littleton Independent

Lyndsay S. Ressler #37015 Ressler Law 30 East Kiowa Street, Suite 101, Colorado Springs, CO 80903 (719) 578-0200 Attorney File # 6909 S HOLLY

Public Trustees COMBINED NOTICE - PUBLICATION CRS §38-38-103 FORECLOSURE SALE NO. 0117-2018 To Whom It May Concern: This Notice is given with regard to the following described Deed of Trust: On March 2, 2018, the undersigned Public Trustee caused the Notice of Election and Demand relating to the Deed of Trust described below to be recorded in the County of Arapahoe records. Original Grantor(s) Aaron Baca Original Beneficiary(ies) Northstar Bank of Colorado Current Holder of Evidence of Debt Independent Bank f/k/a Northstar Bank of Colorado Date of Deed of Trust May 12, 2015 County of Recording Arapahoe Recording Date of Deed of Trust May 22, 2015 Recording Information (Reception No. and/or Book/Page No.) D5052453 Original Principal Amount $91,884.00 Outstanding Principal Balance $85,301.90 Pursuant to CRS §38-38-101(4)(i), you are hereby notified that the covenants of the deed of trust have been violated as follows: failure to pay principal and interest when due together with all other payments provided for in the evidence of debt secured by the deed of trust and other violations thereof. THE LIEN FORECLOSED MAY NOT BE A FIRST LIEN. SEE EXHIBIT A ATTACHED. Also known by street and number as: 6909 S. Holly Circle #302 and #306, Centennial, CO 80112. THE PROPERTY DESCRIBED HEREIN IS ALL OF THE PROPERTY CURRENTLY ENCUMBERED BY THE LIEN OF THE DEED OF TRUST. NOTICE OF SALE The current holder of the Evidence of Debt secured by the Deed of Trust, described herein, has filed Notice of Election and Demand for sale as provided by law and in said Deed of Trust. THEREFORE, Notice Is Hereby Given that I will at public auction, at 10:00 A.M. on Wednesday, 06/27/2018, at the East Hearing Room, County Administration Building, 5334 South Prince Street, Littleton, Colorado, 80120, sell to the highest and best bidder for cash, the said real property and all interest of the said Grantor(s), Grantor(s)' heirs and assigns therein, for the purpose of paying the indebtedness provided in said Evidence of Debt secured by the Deed of Trust, plus attorneys' fees, the expenses of sale and other items allowed by law, and will issue to the purchaser a Certificate of Purchase, all as provided by law. First Publication: 5/3/2018 Last Publication: 5/31/2018 Name of Publication: Littleton Independent IF THE SALE DATE IS CONTINUED TO A LATER DATE, THE DEADLINE TO FILE A NOTICE OF INTENT TO CURE BY THOSE PARTIES ENTITLED TO CURE MAY ALSO BE EXTENDED; IF THE BORROWER BELIEVES THAT A LENDER OR SERVICER HAS VIOLATED THE REQUIREMENTS FOR A SINGLE POINT OF CONTACT IN SECTION 38-38-103.1 OR THE PROHIBITION ON DUAL TRACKING IN SECTION 38-38-103.2, THE BORROWER MAY FILE A COMPLAINT WITH THE COLORADO ATTORNEY GENERAL, THE FEDERAL CONSUMER FINANCIAL PROTECTION BUREAU (CFPB), OR BOTH. THE FILING OF A COMPLAINT WILL NOT STOP THE FORECLOSURE PROCESS. Colorado Attorney General 1300 Broadway, 10th Floor Denver, Colorado 80203 (800) 222-4444 www.coloradoattorneygeneral.gov Federal Consumer Financial Protection Bureau P.O. Box 4503 Iowa City, Iowa 52244 (855) 411-2372 www.consumerfinance.gov DATE: 03/02/2018 Susan K Ryden, Public Trustee in and for the County of Arapahoe, State of Colorado By: Susan K Ryden, Public Trustee

Public Trustees

The Attorney above is acting as a debt collector and is attempting to collect a debt. Any information provided may be used for that purpose. ©Public Trustees' Association of Colorado Revised 1/2015 0117-2018 EXHIBIT A PARCEL A: CONDOMINIUM UNIT 302, HOMESTEAD PROFESSIONAL PLAZA, ACCORDING TO THE CONDOMINIUM MAP THEREOF RECORDED MAY 27, 2004 AT RECEPTION NO. B4096343 AND ACCORDING TO THE FIRST AMENDMENT THERETO RECORDED FEBRUARY 1, 2007 AT RECEPTION NO. B7014259 AND ACCORDING TO THE SECOND AMENDMENT THERETO RECORDED DECEMBER 10, 2013 AT RECEPTION NO. D3147279 AND AS SET FORTH AND DEFINED IN THE DECLARATION OF PROTECTIVE COVENANTS, CONDITIONS AND RESTRICTIONS AND GRANT OF EASEMENTS FOR HOMESTEAD PROFESSIONAL PLAZA RECORDED MAY 27, 2004 AT RECEPTION NO. B4096342 AS AMENDED BY INSTRUMENT RECORDED FEBRUARY 1, 2007 AT RECEPTION NO. B7014260, AND AS AMENDED BY INSTRUMENT RECORDED DECEMBER 10, 2013 AT RECEPTION NO D3147278, COUNTY OF ARAPAHOE, STATE OF COLORADO. PARCEL B: CONDOMINIUM UNIT 306, HOMESTEAD PROFESSIONAL PLAZA, ACCORDING TO THE CONDOMINIUM MAP THEREOF RECORDED MAY 27, 2004 AT RECEPTION NO. B4096343 AND ACCORDING TO THE FIRST AMENDMENT THERETO RECORDED FEBRUARY 1, 2007 AT RECEPTION NO. B7014259 AND ACCORDING TO THE SECOND AMENDMENT THERETO RECORDED DECEMBER 10, 2013 AT RECEPTION NO. D3147279 AND AS SET FORTH AND DEFINED IN THE DECLARATION OF PROTECTIVE COVENANTS, CONDITIONS AND RESTRICTIONS AND GRANT OF EASEMENTS FOR HOMESTEAD PROFESSIONAL PLAZA RECORDED MAY 27, 2004 AT RECEPTION NO. B4096342 AS AMENDED BY INSTRUMENT RECORDED FEBRUARY 1, 2007 AT RECEPTION NO. B7014260, AND AS AMENDED BY INSTRUMENT RECORDED DECEMBER 10, 2013 AT RECEPTION NO D3147278, COUNTY OF ARAPAHOE, STATE OF COLORADO. Legal Notice NO.: 0117-2018 First Publication: 5/3/2018 Last Publication: 5/31/2018 Name of Publication: Littleton Independent

COMBINED NOTICE - PUBLICATION CRS §38-38-103 FORECLOSURE SALE NO. 0121-2018 To Whom It May Concern: This Notice is given with regard to the following described Deed of Trust: On March 6, 2018, the undersigned Public Trustee caused the Notice of Election and Demand relating to the Deed of Trust described below to be recorded in the County of Arapahoe records. Original Grantor(s) Ashley A Frerk Original Beneficiary(ies) Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., as nominee for FBC Mortgage, LLC Current Holder of Evidence of Debt Pingora Loan Servicing, LLC Date of Deed of Trust August 31, 2016 County of Recording Arapahoe Recording Date of Deed of Trust September 01, 2016 Recording Information (Reception No. and/or Book/Page No.) D6098159 Book: n/a Page: Original Principal Amount $254,308.00 Outstanding Principal Balance $249,216.49 Pursuant to CRS §38-38-101(4)(i), you are hereby notified that the covenants of the deed of trust have been violated as follows: failure to pay principal and interest when due together with all other payments provided for in the evidence of debt secured by the deed of trust and other violations thereof. THE LIEN FORECLOSED MAY NOT BE A FIRST LIEN. LOT 53, BLOCK 3, WOLHURST LANDING, COUNTY OF ARAPAHOE, STATE OF COLORADO Also known by street and number as: 2885 W Bryant Pl, Littleton, CO 80120. THE PROPERTY DESCRIBED HEREIN IS ALL OF THE PROPERTY CURRENTLY ENCUMBERED BY THE LIEN OF THE DEED OF TRUST. NOTICE OF SALE

The name, address, business telephone number and bar registration number of the attorney(s) representing the legal holder of the indebtedness is:

The current holder of the Evidence of Debt secured by the Deed of Trust, described herein, has filed Notice of Election and Demand for sale as provided by law and in said Deed of Trust.

Lyndsay S. Ressler #37015 Ressler Law 30 East Kiowa Street, Suite 101, Colorado Springs, CO 80903 (719) 578-0200 Attorney File # 6909 S HOLLY

THEREFORE, Notice Is Hereby Given that I will at public auction, at 10:00 A.M. on Wednesday, 06/27/2018, at the East Hearing Room, County Administration Building, 5334 South Prince Street, Littleton, Colorado, 80120, sell to the highest and best bidder for cash, the said real property and all interest of the said Grantor(s), Grantor(s)' heirs and assigns therein, for the purpose of paying the indebtedness provided in said Evidence of Debt secured by the Deed of Trust, plus attorneys' fees, the expenses of sale and other items allowed by law, and will issue to

The Attorney above is acting as a debt collector and is attempting to collect a debt. Any information provided may be used for that purpose. ©Public Trustees' Association of Colorado Revised 1/2015

THEREFORE, Notice Is Hereby Given that I will at public auction, at 10:00 A.M. on Wednesday, 06/27/2018, at the East Hearing Room, County Administration Building, 5334 South Prince Street, Littleton, Colorado, 80120, sell to the highest and best bidder for cash, the said real property and all interest of the said Grantor(s), Grantor(s)' heirs and assigns therein, for the purpose of paying the indebtedness provided in said Evidence of Debt secured by the Deed of Trust, plus attorneys' fees, the expenses of sale and other items allowed by law, and will issue to the purchaser a Certificate of Purchase, all as provided by law.

Public Trustees

First Publication: 5/3/2018 Last Publication: 5/31/2018 Name of Publication: Littleton Independent IF THE SALE DATE IS CONTINUED TO A LATER DATE, THE DEADLINE TO FILE A NOTICE OF INTENT TO CURE BY THOSE PARTIES ENTITLED TO CURE MAY ALSO BE EXTENDED; IF THE BORROWER BELIEVES THAT A LENDER OR SERVICER HAS VIOLATED THE REQUIREMENTS FOR A SINGLE POINT OF CONTACT IN SECTION 38-38-103.1 OR THE PROHIBITION ON DUAL TRACKING IN SECTION 38-38-103.2, THE BORROWER MAY FILE A COMPLAINT WITH THE COLORADO ATTORNEY GENERAL, THE FEDERAL CONSUMER FINANCIAL PROTECTION BUREAU (CFPB), OR BOTH. THE FILING OF A COMPLAINT WILL NOT STOP THE FORECLOSURE PROCESS. Colorado Attorney General 1300 Broadway, 10th Floor Denver, Colorado 80203 (800) 222-4444 www.coloradoattorneygeneral.gov Federal Consumer Financial Protection Bureau P.O. Box 4503 Iowa City, Iowa 52244 (855) 411-2372 www.consumerfinance.gov DATE: 03/06/2018 Susan K Ryden, Public Trustee in and for the County of Arapahoe, State of Colorado By: Susan K Ryden, Public Trustee The name, address, business telephone number and bar registration number of the attorney(s) representing the legal holder of the indebtedness is: David W Drake #43315 Scott D. Toebben #19011 Randall S. Miller & Associates PC 216 16th Street, Suite 1210, Denver, CO 80202 (720) 259-6710 Attorney File # 18CO00100-1 The Attorney above is acting as a debt collector and is attempting to collect a debt. Any information provided may be used for that purpose. ©Public Trustees' Association of Colorado Revised 1/2015 Legal Notice NO.: 0121-2018 First Publication: 5/3/2018 Last Publication: 5/31/2018 Name of Publication: Littleton Independent COMBINED NOTICE - PUBLICATION CRS §38-38-103 FORECLOSURE SALE NO. 0130-2018 To Whom It May Concern: This Notice is given with regard to the following described Deed of Trust: On March 9, 2018, the undersigned Public Trustee caused the Notice of Election and Demand relating to the Deed of Trust described below to be recorded in the County of Arapahoe records. Original Grantor(s) Scott A. Dressen Original Beneficiary(ies) Level 1 Mortgage Llc Current Holder of Evidence of Debt Bayview Loan Servicing, LLC Date of Deed of Trust July 11, 2007 County of Recording Arapahoe Recording Date of Deed of Trust July 13, 2007 Recording Information (Reception No. and/or Book/Page No.) B7089911 Original Principal Amount $154,050.00 Outstanding Principal Balance $151,744.29 Pursuant to CRS §38-38-101(4)(i), you are hereby notified that the covenants of the deed of trust have been violated as follows: failure to pay principal and interest when due together with all other payments provided for in the evidence of debt secured by the deed of trust and other violations thereof. THE LIEN FORECLOSED MAY NOT BE A FIRST LIEN. Lot 31 and 32, Block 19, Speer’s Broadway Addition, County of Arapahoe, State of Colorado Also known by street and number as: 2965 S Bannock St., Englewood, CO 80110. THE PROPERTY DESCRIBED HEREIN IS ALL OF THE PROPERTY CURRENTLY ENCUMBERED BY THE LIEN OF THE DEED OF TRUST. NOTICE OF SALE The current holder of the Evidence of Debt secured by the Deed of Trust, described herein, has filed Notice of Election and Demand for sale as provided by law and in said Deed of Trust. THEREFORE, Notice Is Hereby Given that I will

THE PROPERTY DESCRIBED HEREIN IS ALL OF THE PROPERTY CURRENTLY ENCUMBERED BY THE LIEN OF THE DEED OF TRUST.

May 18, 2018M

NOTICE OF SALE

Public Trustees

The current holder of the Evidence of Debt secured by the Deed of Trust, described herein, has filed Notice of Election and Demand for sale as provided by law and in said Deed of Trust.

THEREFORE, Notice Is Hereby Given that I will at public auction, at 10:00 A.M. on Wednesday, 07/11/2018, at the East Hearing Room, County Administration Building, 5334 South Prince Street, Littleton, Colorado, 80120, sell to the highest and best bidder for cash, the said real property and all interest of the said Grantor(s), Grantor(s)' heirs and assigns therein, for the purpose of paying the indebtedness provided in said Evidence of Debt secured by the Deed of Trust, plus attorneys' fees, the expenses of sale and other items allowed by law, and will issue to the purchaser a Certificate of Purchase, all as provided by law. First Publication: 5/17/2018 Last Publication: 6/14/2018 Name of Publication: Littleton Independent

IF THE SALE DATE IS CONTINUED TO A LATER DATE, THE DEADLINE TO FILE A NOTICE OF INTENT TO CURE BY THOSE PARTIES ENTITLED TO CURE MAY ALSO BE EXTENDED;

IF THE BORROWER BELIEVES THAT A LENDER OR SERVICER HAS VIOLATED THE REQUIREMENTS FOR A SINGLE POINT OF CONTACT IN SECTION 38-38-103.1 OR THE PROHIBITION ON DUAL TRACKING IN SECTION 38-38-103.2, THE BORROWER MAY FILE A COMPLAINT WITH THE COLORADO ATTORNEY GENERAL, THE FEDERAL CONSUMER FINANCIAL PROTECTION BUREAU (CFPB), OR BOTH. THE FILING OF A COMPLAINT WILL NOT STOP THE FORECLOSURE PROCESS. Colorado Attorney General 1300 Broadway, 10th Floor Denver, Colorado 80203 (800) 222-4444 www.coloradoattorneygeneral.gov Federal Consumer Financial Protection Bureau P.O. Box 4503 Iowa City, Iowa 52244 (855) 411-2372 www.consumerfinance.gov

DATE: 03/09/2018 Susan K Ryden, Public Trustee in and for the County of Arapahoe, State of Colorado By: Susan K Ryden, Public Trustee

The name, address, business telephone number and bar registration number of the attorney(s) representing the legal holder of the indebtedness is:

Jonathan A. Goodman, Esq. #15015 Karen J. Radakovich, Esq. #11649 Frascona Joiner Goodman and Greenstein PC 4750 Table Mesa Drive, Boulder, CO 803055500 (303) 494-3000 Attorney File # 7192-11540

The Attorney above is acting as a debt collector and is attempting to collect a debt. Any information provided may be used for that purpose. ©Public Trustees' Association of Colorado Revised 1/2015 Legal Notice NO.: 0130-2018 First Publication: 5/17/2018 Last Publication: 6/14/2018 Name of Publication: Littleton Independent COMBINED NOTICE - PUBLICATION CRS §38-38-103 FORECLOSURE SALE NO. 0132-2018

To Whom It May Concern: This Notice is given with regard to the following described Deed of Trust: On March 9, 2018, the undersigned Public Trustee caused the Notice of Election and Demand relating to the Deed of Trust described below to be recorded in the County of Arapahoe records.

Original Grantor(s) STEPHANIE GARCIA Original Beneficiary(ies) MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC. AS NOMINEE FOR CAPITOL COMMERCE MORTGAGE CO., ITS SUCCESSORS AND ASSIGNS Current Holder of Evidence of Debt SPECIALIZED LOAN SERVICING LLC Date of Deed of Trust July 16, 2001 County of Recording Arapahoe Recording Date of Deed of Trust July 27, 2001 Recording Information (Reception No. and/or Book/Page No.) B1122784 Original Principal Amount $104,000.00 Outstanding Principal Balance $128,565.13

Pursuant to CRS §38-38-101(4)(i), you are hereby notified that the covenants of the deed of trust have been violated as follows: failure to pay principal and interest when due together with all other payments provided for in the evidence of debt secured by the deed of trust and other violations thereof.

THE LIEN FORECLOSED MAY NOT BE A FIRST LIEN.

LOTS 37 AND 38, BLOCK 93, SHERIDAN HEIGHTS, COUNTY OF ARAPAHOE, STATE OF COLORADO Also known by street and number as: 2087 WEST ADRIATIC PLACE,

Centennial * 2


Centennial Citizen 39

May 18, 2018

On March 9, 2018, the undersigned Public Trustee caused the Notice of Election and Demand relating to the Deed of Trust described below to be recorded in the County of Arapahoe records.

State golf features local players

Original Grantor(s) STEPHANIE GARCIA Original Beneficiary(ies) MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC. AS NOMINEE FOR CAPITOL COMMERCE MORTGAGE CO., COMBINED NOTICE - PUBLICATION ITS SUCCESSORS ASSIGNS — Amanda Robert 80;AND Chaparral — are back in the field. Chitkoksoong BY JIM BENTON fied its entire team. CRS §38-38-103 Current Holder of Evidence of Debt SALE NO. 0132-2018 SPECIALIZED LLC Katherine MalcomLOAN 73, SERVICING Kira Petersen won the individual FORECLOSURE state championHighlands Ranch won the Central JBENTON@COLORADOCOMMUNITYMEDIA.COM Date of Deed of Trust Arapahoe ship on the thirdTo playoff hole last May . 87; regional at South Suburban Golf Whom It May Concern: This Notice is given July 16, — 2001Courtney Packer 81, with regard to the following described Deed of County of Recording Samantha Packer 85, Christine Attai Chun had a 2-over-par 74 at the Course in Centennial, while Rock Cherry Creek, Highlands Ranch, Trust: Arapahoe 89; ThunderRidge Taylor Central regional tourney at South Canyon won a playoff with Eaglecrest Rock Canyon and Valor Christian Recording Date — of Deed of TrustTucker On March 9, 2018, the undersigned Public July 27, 2001 77, and Lauren Tucker 84, Hannah Basler, Suburban. Chitkoksoong tied medto gain second place in the Northern were south metro schools that qualiTrustee caused thefor Notice of Election Recording Information (Reception No. Demand relating toregional the Deed of Trust described and/or Book/Page No.) 89. Castle View — Lindsay Taylor 86, alist honors at the Southern regional at Collindale Golf Course in fied four-player teams for the girls below to be recorded in the County of Arapahoe B1122784 Cassie McCord 89. Amount played at the Colorado Fort Collins. state golf tournaments scheduled for records. Springs CounOriginal Principal $104,000.00 try Club with a 7-over-par 79. Valor Christian was champion of May 21 and 22. Original Grantor(s) Outstanding Principal Balance STEPHANIE GARCIA Class 4A the 4A Region 2 qualifying tournaThe 5A tournament was slated to be $128,565.13 Original Beneficiary(ies) Class 5A ment held on the Silver course at the held at the Boulder County Club, with Team qualifi Valor Christianyou(SaMORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION Pursuant ers: to CRS §38-38-101(4)(i), are SYSTEMS, INC. AS NOMINEE FOR CAPITOL hereby notified that the covenants ofYoung the deed of Team qualifiers: Cherry Creek Eisenhower Golf Course at the Air the 4A tourney set for the Country mantha Schoenborn 91, Grace COMMERCE MORTGAGE CO., trust have been violated as follows: failure to Xia 76, ITS Rachel Penzenstadler Force Academy. Club of Colorado in Colorado Springs. 91, Izzy Marchino 95,interest Morgan SUCCESSORS AND ASSIGNS COMBINED NOTICE (Kaylynn - PUBLICATION pay principal and when Hanler due together Holder of Evidence of Debt CRS §38-38-103 with all other payments provided for in the evid76, Payton CanonCurrent 77, Alyssa Chin Teams qualifying for the state tourThe 3A state tournament was schedSPECIALIZED LOAN SERVICING LLC 99) FORECLOSURE SALE NO. 0132-2018 ence of debt secured by the deed of trust and Date of Deed of TrustKim 73, other violations 78); Highlands Ranch (Haena nament can play all four golfers, with uled for the Elmwood Golf Club in Individual qualifithereof. ers: Ponderosa — July 16, 2001 To Whom It May Concern: This Notice is given Jenna Chun 74, Claire the top three each day counting thefollowing Pueblo. Halle Holmes 95;FORECLOSED Littleton — Sydney County ofHendee Recording 89, Alaiwith regardin to the described Deed of THE LIEN MAY NOT BE A Arapahoe Trust: FIRST LIEN. na OIscai 90); Rock Canyon (Ashley team scoring. Schools that individuElder 99, Sarah Young 113. Creek won the Western regional Recording Date of Deed of Trust July 27, 2001 77, Brandy McClain 77, Mia ally qualify three golfers On canMarch compete tournament for the second year in 9, 2018, the Kozlowski undersigned Public LOTS 37 AND 38, BLOCK 93, SHERIDAN Recording Information (Reception No. Trustee caused the Notice of Election and COUNTY OF ARAPAHOE, STATE Kliner 98, Annalise Hildebrand for team points. Class 3A HEIGHTS, a row on May 7 at Fox Hollow Golf and/or Book/Page No.) 99). Demand relating to the Deed of Trust described OF COLORADO B1122784 below to be recorded of Arapahoe Individual qualifi ers: Legend — Grandview’s Amy Chitkoksoong andin the County Individual qualifi ers: SkyView Course in Lakewood. Original Principal Amount records. Also known by street and number as: Maddy Dunkle, 83, Melia Buckton, 85 Jenna Chun of Highlands Ranch, who Academy —WEST Megan RooPLACE, 103; Lutheran Defending state champion Ralston $104,000.00 2087 ADRIATIC Outstanding Principal Balance Original Grantor(s) ENGLEWOOD, CO 80110. Clara Hosman, 88; Douglas County tied for medalist honors last season, — Renesh Heaps 115 Valley finished second and also quali$128,565.13 STEPHANIE GARCIA Original Beneficiary(ies) THE PROPERTY DESCRIBED HEREIN IS ALL Pursuant to CRS §38-38-101(4)(i), you are MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION OF THE PROPERTY CURRENTLY ENhereby notified that the covenants of the deed of SYSTEMS, INC. AS NOMINEE FOR CAPITOL CUMBERED BY THE LIEN OF THE DEED OF trust have been violated as follows: failure to COMMERCE MORTGAGE CO., TRUST. pay principal and interest when due together ITS SUCCESSORS AND ASSIGNS COMBINED NOTICE - PUBLICATION 12, but change didn’t stop Rock Cherry Creek coach with all other payments provided for in the evidCurrent Holder of Evidence of Debt NOTICE OF SALE CRSthe §38-38-103 ence of debt secured by the deed of trust and SPECIALIZED LOAN SERVICING LLC FORECLOSURE SALE NO. 0132-2018 Canyon sophomore MeghnaDate ChowdChris Jacob talks with other violations thereof. of Deed of Trust The current holder of the Evidence of Debt seJuly 16, 2001 cured by the Deed of Trust, described herein, To Whomhury It May Concern: This Noticeschool is given history from making . freshman twins Nicole THE LIEN FORECLOSED MAY NOT BE A County of Recording has filed Notice of Election and Demand for sale with regard to the following described Deed of She became the first RockArapahoe Canyon (center) Hill FROM PAGE 31 FIRST LIEN. as provided by law and and in saidEliza Deed of Trust. Trust: Recording Date of Deed of Trust player to advance to the state finals. after their semifinal LOTS 37 AND 38, BLOCK 93, SHERIDAN July 27, 2001 THEREFORE, Notice Is Hereby Given that I will On March 9, 2018, the undersigned Public HEIGHTS, COUNTY OF ARAPAHOE, STATE lost 6-4 the No. matches at A.M. theon Class 5A Besides the Hills, the Bruins won Recording Information (Reception No. at public auction, at 10:00 Wednesday, Trustee She caused the 6-4, Notice of in Election and 1 singles OF COLORADO 07/11/2018, at the East Hearing Room, County Demand relating to the Deed of Trust described finale toinPoudre’s Eaton,and/or whoBook/Page No.) stateBuilding, tennis5334 tournament three doubles titles as Micha Han-below B1122784 Administration South Prince to be recorded the County ofKy Arapahoe Also known by street and number as: Original Principal Amount records. won her second straight championStreet, Littleton, Colorado, 80120, sell to the on May 11 at the Gates dler and Miranda Kawula were first 2087 WEST ADRIATIC PLACE, $104,000.00 highest and best bidder for cash, the said real ship. Tennis Center. won in No. 1 doubles, Anna Fusaris and ENGLEWOOD, CO 80110. Outstanding Principal Balance Original Grantor(s) property and all interest of the Eliza said Grantor(s), $128,565.13 STEPHANIE“When GARCIA I first got on the court, Grantor(s)'the heirs and2assigns therein, for the it No. singles state Halley Mackiernan at No. 2 doubles, THE PROPERTY DESCRIBED HEREIN IS ALL purpose of paying the indebtedness provided in Original Beneficiary(ies) of Debt securedand by theNicole Deed of MORTGAGE REGISTRATION wasELECTRONIC nerve-racking, with so Pursuant many to CRS §38-38-101(4)(i), you are OF THE PROPERTY CURRENTLY EN- said Evidence championship and Emily Wilkins and Dahlia RapCUMBERED BY THE LIEN OF THE DEED OF notified that the covenants of the deed of Trust, plus attorneys' fees, the expenses of sale INC. AS NOMINEE FOR CAPITOL people with CO., cameras,” said hereby Chowwasallowed the No. 3 single paport captured the No. 4 doublesSYSTEMS, TRUST. trust have been violated as follows: failure to and other items by law, and will issue to COMMERCE MORTGAGE COMBINED NOTICE - PUBLICATION pay principal and interest when due together the purchaser a Certificate of Purchase, all as ITS SUCCESSORS AND ASSIGNS dhury , who didn’t qualify for the champ. crown. JIM BENTON CRS §38-38-103 NOTICE OF SALE with all other payments provided for in the evidprovided by law. Current Holder of Evidence of Debt FORECLOSURE SALE NO. 0132-2018 state tournament last season. The tournament was condensedSPECIALIZED ence“But of debt secured by the deed of trust and LOAN SERVICING LLC The current holder of the Evidence of Debt seother violations thereof. First Publication: 5/17/2018 Date of Deed of Trust this was the first time anybody from to Whom two days from three because To It May Concern: This Notice is given ofJuly 16, 2001 cured by the Deed of Trust, described herein, Last Publication: 6/14/2018 with regard to the following described Deed of has filed Notice of Election and Demand for sale THE LIEN“ FORECLOSED MAY NOT BE A Name of Publication: Littleton Independent County ofRock Recording Canyon has made the fi nals. the threat of rainy weather on May Trust: as provided by law and in said Deed of Trust. FIRST LIEN. Arapahoe IF THE SALE DATE IS CONTINUED TO A Recording Date of Deed of Trust On March 9, 2018, the undersigned Public THEREFORE, Notice Is Hereby Given that I will LOTS 37 AND 38, BLOCK 93, SHERIDAN LATER DATE, THE DEADLINE TO FILE A NOJuly 27, 2001 Trustee caused the Notice of Election and at public auction, at 10:00 A.M. on Wednesday, HEIGHTS, COUNTY OF ARAPAHOE, STATE TICE OF INTENT TO CURE BY THOSE Recording Information (Reception No. Demand relating to the Deed of Trust described 07/11/2018, at the East Hearing Room, County OF COLORADO PARTIES ENTITLED TO CURE MAY ALSO BE and/or Book/Page No.) below to be recorded in the County of Arapahoe Administration Building, 5334 South Prince EXTENDED; B1122784 records. Street, Littleton, Colorado, 80120, sell to the Also known by street and number as: Original Principal Amount highest and best bidder for cash, the said real 2087 WEST ADRIATIC PLACE, IF THE BORROWER BELIEVES THAT A $104,000.00 Original Grantor(s) property and all interest of the said Grantor(s), ENGLEWOOD, CO 80110. LENDER OR SERVICER HAS VIOLATED THE Outstanding Principal Balance STEPHANIE GARCIA Grantor(s)' heirs and assigns therein, for the REQUIREMENTS FOR A SINGLE POINT OF $128,565.13 Original Beneficiary(ies) purpose of paying the indebtedness provided in Historic Littleton OR THE THE PROPERTY DESCRIBED HEREIN IS ALL CONTACTDowntown IN SECTION 38-38-103.1 MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION said Evidence of Debt secured by the Deed of OF THE PROPERTY CURRENTLY ENPROHIBITION ON DUAL TRACKING IN SECPursuant to CRS §38-38-101(4)(i), you are 2450 West Main SYSTEMS, INC. AS NOMINEE FOR CAPITOL Trust, plus attorneys' fees, the expenses of sale CUMBERED BY THE LIEN OF THE DEED OF TION 38-38-103.2, THEStreet BORROWER MAY hereby notified that the covenants of the deed of COMMERCE MORTGAGE CO., and other items allowed by law, and will issue to TRUST. FILE A COMPLAINT WITH THE COLORADO trust have been violated as follows: failure to ITS SUCCESSORS AND ASSIGNS the purchaser a Certificate of Purchase, all as ATTORNEY GENERAL, THE FEDERAL CONpay principal and interest when due together Current Holder of Evidence of Debt provided by law. NOTICE OF SALE SUMER FINANCIAL PROTECTION BUREAU with all other payments provided for in the evidSPECIALIZED LOAN SERVICING LLC Presented byOR BOTH. THE FILING OF A COM(CFPB), ence of debt secured by the deed of trust and Date of Deed of Trust First Publication: 5/17/2018 The current holder of the Evidence of Debt sePLAINT WILL NOT STOP THE FORECLOSother violations thereof. July 16, 2001 Last Publication: 6/14/2018 cured by the Deed of Trust, described herein, URE PROCESS. County of Recording Name of Publication: Littleton Independent has filed Notice of Election and Demand for sale THE LIEN FORECLOSED MAY NOT BE A Arapahoe as provided by law and in said Deed of Trust. FIRST LIEN. Colorado Attorney General Recording Date of Deed of Trust IF THE SALE DATE IS CONTINUED TO A 1300 Broadway, 10th Floor July 27, 2001 LATER DATE, THE DEADLINE TO FILE A NOTHEREFORE, Notice Is Hereby Given that I will Denver, Colorado 80203 LOTS 37 AND 38, BLOCK 93, SHERIDAN Recording Information (Reception No. TICE OF INTENT TO CURE BY THOSE at public auction, at 10:00 A.M. on Wednesday, (800) 222-4444 HEIGHTS, COUNTY OF ARAPAHOE, STATE and/or Book/Page No.) PARTIES ENTITLED TO CURE MAY ALSO BE 07/11/2018, at the East Hearing Room, County www.coloradoattorneygeneral.gov OF COLORADO B1122784 EXTENDED; Administration Building, 5334 South Prince Original Principal Amount Street, Littleton, Colorado, 80120, sell to the Federal Consumer Financial Also known by street and number as: (across from Goodson Rec Center) $104,000.00 IF THE BORROWER BELIEVES THAT A highest and best bidder for cash, the said real Protection Bureau 2087 WEST ADRIATIC PLACE, Outstanding Principal Balance LENDER OR SERVICER HAS VIOLATED THE property and all interest of the said Grantor(s), P.O. Box 4503 ENGLEWOOD, CO 80110. $128,565.13 REQUIREMENTS FOR A SINGLE POINT OF Grantor(s)' heirs and assigns therein, for the Iowa City, Iowa 52244 CONTACT IN SECTION 38-38-103.1 OR THE purpose of paying the indebtedness provided in (855) 411-2372 THE PROPERTY DESCRIBED HEREIN IS ALL Pursuant to CRS §38-38-101(4)(i), you are PROHIBITION ON DUAL TRACKING IN SECsaid Evidence of Debt secured by the Deed of www.consumerfinance.gov OF THE PROPERTY CURRENTLY ENhereby notified that the covenants of the deed of TION 38-38-103.2, THE BORROWER MAY Trust, plus attorneys' fees, the expenses of sale CUMBERED BY THE LIEN OF THE DEED OF trust have been violated as follows: failure to FILE A COMPLAINT WITH THE COLORADO and other items allowed by law, and will issue to DATE: 03/09/2018 TRUST. pay principal and interest when due together ATTORNEY GENERAL, THE FEDERAL CONthe purchaser a Certificate of Purchase, all as Susan K Ryden, Public Trustee in and for the with all other payments provided for in the evidSUMER FINANCIAL PROTECTION BUREAU provided by law. County of Arapahoe, State of Colorado NOTICE OF SALE ence of debt secured by the deed of trust and (CFPB), OR BOTH. THE FILING OF A COMBy: Susan K Ryden, Public Trustee other violations thereof. PLAINT WILL NOT STOP THE FORECLOSFirst Publication: 5/17/2018 The current holder of the Evidence of Debt seURE PROCESS. Last Publication: 6/14/2018 The name, address, business telephone numcured by the Deed of Trust, described herein, THE LIEN FORECLOSED MAY NOT BE A Name of Publication: Littleton Independent ber and bar registration number of the has filed Notice of Election and Demand for sale FIRST LIEN. Colorado Attorney General attorney(s) representing the legal holder of the as provided by law and in said Deed of Trust. 1300 Broadway, 10th Floor IF THE SALE DATE IS CONTINUED TO A indebtedness is: LOTS 37 AND 38, BLOCK 93, SHERIDAN Denver, Colorado 80203 LATER DATE, THE DEADLINE TO FILE A NOTHEREFORE, Notice Is Hereby Given that I will HEIGHTS, COUNTY OF ARAPAHOE, STATE (800) 222-4444 TICE OF INTENT TO CURE BY THOSE Lynn M. Janeway #15592 at public auction, at 10:00 A.M. on Wednesday, OF COLORADO www.coloradoattorneygeneral.gov PARTIES ENTITLED TO CURE MAY ALSO BE Alison L Berry #34531 07/11/2018, at the East Hearing Room, County EXTENDED; David R. Doughty #40042 Administration Building, 5334 South Prince Also known by street and number as: Federal Consumer Financial Nicholas H. Santarelli #46592 Street, Littleton, Colorado, 80120, sell to the 2087 WEST ADRIATIC PLACE, Protection Bureau IF THE BORROWER BELIEVES THAT A Elizabeth S. Marcus #16092 highest and best bidder for cash, the said real ENGLEWOOD, CO 80110. P.O. Box 4503 LENDER OR SERVICER HAS VIOLATED THE property and all interest of the said Grantor(s), Iowa City, Iowa 52244 REQUIREMENTS FOR A SINGLE POINT OF Janeway Law Firm, P.C. 9800 S. Meridian Blvd., Grantor(s)' heirs and assigns therein, for the THE PROPERTY DESCRIBED HEREIN IS ALL (855) 411-2372 CONTACT IN SECTION 38-38-103.1 OR THE purpose of paying the indebtedness provided in Suite 400, Englewood, CO 80112 (303) 706OF THE PROPERTY CURRENTLY ENwww.consumerfinance.gov PROHIBITION ON DUAL TRACKING IN SECsaid Evidence of Debt secured by the Deed of 9990 CUMBERED BY THE LIEN OF THE DEED OF TION 38-38-103.2, THE BORROWER MAY Trust, plus attorneys' fees, the expenses of sale Attorney File # 18-017897 TRUST. DATE: 03/09/2018 FILE A COMPLAINT WITH THE COLORADO and other items allowed by law, and will issue to Susan K Ryden, Public Trustee in and for the ATTORNEY GENERAL, THE FEDERAL CONThe Attorney above is acting as a debt collector the purchaser a Certificate of Purchase, all as NOTICE OF SALE County of Arapahoe, State of Colorado SUMER FINANCIAL PROTECTION BUREAU and is attempting to collect a debt. Any informaprovided by law. By: Susan K Ryden, Public Trustee (CFPB), OR BOTH. THE FILING OF A COMtion provided may be used for that purpose. The current holder of the Evidence of Debt sePLAINT WILL NOT STOP THE FORECLOSFirst Publication: 5/17/2018 cured by the Deed of Trust, described herein, The name, address, business telephone numURE PROCESS. ©Public Trustees' Association Last Publication: 6/14/2018 has filed Notice of Election and Demand for sale ber and bar registration number of the of Colorado Revised 1/2015 Name of Publication: Littleton Independent as provided by law and in said Deed of Trust. attorney(s) representing the legal holder of the Colorado Attorney General indebtedness is: 1300 Broadway, 10th Floor Legal Notice NO.: 0132-2018 IF THE SALE DATE IS CONTINUED TO A THEREFORE, Notice Is Hereby Given that I will Denver, Colorado 80203 First Publication: 5/17/2018 LATER DATE, THE DEADLINE TO FILE A NOat public auction, at 10:00 A.M. on Wednesday, Lynn M. Janeway #15592 (800) 222-4444 Last Publication: 6/14/2018 TICE OF INTENT TO CURE BY THOSE 07/11/2018, at the East Hearing Room, County Alison L Berry #34531 www.coloradoattorneygeneral.gov Name of Publication: Littleton Independent PARTIES ENTITLED TO CURE MAY ALSO BE Administration Building, 5334 South Prince David R. Doughty #40042 EXTENDED; Street, Littleton, Colorado, 80120, sell to the Nicholas H. Santarelli #46592 Federal Consumer Financial highest and best bidder for cash, the said real Elizabeth S. Marcus #16092 Protection Bureau IF THE BORROWER BELIEVES THAT A

TENNIS

May 18 - June 17, 2018

South University Farmers Market Fridays 10am-2pm -- NOW through October

Tickets $24-44 TownHallArtsCenter.org 303.794.2787

6400 S. University Blvd. Lutheran Church parking lot

Local farmers, artisans, crafters and food related entrepreneurs

Bring this ad to Todd’s Heirloom Tomatoes & Produce and share your email address to get $3 TOWARD ANY PURCHASE with any vendor Public Trustees

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Centennial * 3


40 Centennial Citizen

May 18, 2018M

Crazy fast fiber Internet is coming to Centennial. Construction has started!

A great town deserves great Internet. That’s why we’re building a fiber network here in Centennial. We’re talking the fastest Internet available with symmetrical gigabit speeds, 1000 Mbps download and 1000 Mbps upload.

Centennial, CO Fiber Network Fiber has huge benefits for businesses, schools, professionals who work from home and busy families.

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Phase 1 - Willow Creek 1 and 2 Phase 2 and beyond (to be announced)

Construction has started in Willow Creek 1 and 2

E Arapahoe Rd. S Quebec St.

This is just the beginning of our network build here in Centennial and our goal is to wire the entire city with blazing-fast, economy-driving, job-creating fiber.

S Yosemite St.

We’ll be announcing future neighborhoods and the Centennial, next phases ofCO our build in early 2018.

E Dry Creek Rd.

Fiber Network

Willow Creek 1

Phase 1 - Willow Creek 1 and 2 Phase 2 and beyond (to be announced)

E County Line Rd.

Willow Creek 2

E Arapahoe Rd. S Quebec St.

Yosemite St. You decide. Where Sto next?

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E County Line Rd.

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Centennial Citizen 0518  
Centennial Citizen 0518