Page 1

The Banner

45¢

Brighton news for Brighton readers

Volume 6, No. 1

January 2, 2014

8 pages

Chamber will add, expand

By Elena Guerrero Townsend for The Banner After a month as the new president of the Brighton Chamber of Commerce, Holly Hansen says the new challenge has been “fantastic.” She announced that in 2014 one role on the chamber staff will expand and one position is being added. Members of the Chamber warmly welcomed her. “I am enjoying getting a deeper perspective of Chamber operations and the opportunities and challenges currently facing the Chamber,” she said. Hansen thinks it’s important “that there is as much continuity as possible. Much thought, preparation, and groundwork has already been laid for the strategic vision of the Chamber for 2014, so I plan to support the initiatives, events, and programs associated with those goals and make appropriate changes as necessary,” she said. One of her goals is to continue to engage local businesses in order to increase membership, while looking for ways to support the needs of current members. She announced that Karah Reygers’ role as the membership services manager is expanding in 2014. The new role will allow her and Reygers to spend more time recruiting new members from both smallbusiness and service-industry sectors. Chamber staffers also will explore new

Power of music

People gathered to play and sing their favorite religious songs on Sunday during the Fifth Sunday Sing, hosted by Brighton United Methodist Church and Bev Bucci. At top, Muriel Bennett of St. Augustine with pianist Sharon Timmerman of Our Lady Mother of the Church; at right, Kirsten, Richard and Kiyanna Andrews of Calvary Evangelical Free Church; below, song leader Randy Morris of First Presbyterian Church, singing a solo. Banner Press photos

See Chamber, Page 7

‘New tradition’ peeps up Friday for kids By Michelle Boyer for The Banner Winter weather doesn’t keep the birds away from Barr Lake. It’s time for the Second Annual Christmas Bird Count for Kids at the Rocky Mountain Bird Observatory, 14500 Lark Bunting Lane, 9 a.m- 2 p.m. on Friday. “This new RMBO tradition is part

of a Christmas Bird Count for Kids movement that was started by Tom Rusert of Sonoma Birding, and is modeled after the long-standing tradition of Audubon’s Christmas Bird Count, which is celebrating it’s 114th year, and is the longest-running citizen-science survey in the world; providing critical data on population

trends,” said Tyler Edmondson, community education coordinator for Rocky Mountain Bird Observatory. For more information about the traditional CBC, go to www.birds.audubon .org/christmas -bird-count. Edmondson said the half-day CBC4Kids is modeled partly on the traditional Christmas Bird Count,

Inside The Banner this week Sister City photos

Photos from Brighton’s Sister City, Ziebice, Poland, will go on display Satuday at the Armory. – Page 2

Word: Resolutions

Nine local residents, including some high school athletes and faculty mem-

bers, offered their New Year’s resolutions for 2014. – Page 5

Also:

Brighton Banter ................... 2 Calendar ................................. 4 Movies ................................... 6 Obituaries ............................. 7 Sports ..................................... 8

Don’t miss: Christmas Bird Count for Kids – See story, above

Passion for hoops is a Heidt advantage. – Page 8

which is geared largely toward adults and birding clubs. (The adult count is planned for Jan. 7.) “Compared to the traditional CBC, the CBC4Kids is a less rigorous citizen-science adventure, designed more like a game for kids ages 7 to 18,” he said. See Bird, Page 3


2

The Banner

Brighton Banner (USPS 290), January 2, 2014, Volume 6, No. 1, published weekly by Banner Press, 315 Strong St., Brighton, CO 80601 Subscription price $27 a year. Periodicals Postage Paid at Brighton, CO Postmaster: Please send address changes (Form 3579) to Brighton Banner, P.O. Box 1006, Brighton, CO 80601. © 2014 Banner Press Publisher, ad sales representative .... Mark Humbert News inquiries, call 303-654-1155 or e-mail ask@brightonbanner.com. Advertising inquries: 720-937-6064

Help desk

Community efforts where you can lend a hand. E-mail ask@brightonbanner.com

Add an exchange student to family

Ever wonder what goes on beneath the news you hear on television and radio or read in the newspaper or online? Would you like to know more about what people are really like from another country? What they think and why? You can host an exchange student. It is amazing what you learn about another culture, what their views really are, what they really think, why they feel what they do ... even more amazing is being able to teach them what America is really like, what we believe and why. NW Services is a nonprofit international student exchange. It is approved by the Department of State and we firmly believe we are an asset to American diplomacy. By matching high school students ages 15-18 with American families and helping both to have a successful exchange of 5 to 10 months, we become a piece to the success of diplomacy! Lifelong friendships develop through such an experience. Many times a host family’s child will return overseas with the student to experience their own exchange. It’s French exchange student Jules Guillon, poses with the Sheridan family, Dennis, Sherry, Natalie and Madeline (not pictured: Drake), who have hosted several foreign exchange students through NW Services. While attending Brighton High School, Jules also is playing basketball. Michelle Boyer photo

nice to have a connection overseas and know the family your child will be with. Attending the wedding of your “son” or “daughter” in another country is indescribable! Anyone who has a heart for kids can host – retired couples, single people, single parents, or young couples. You provide a bed (they can share a room with a child who is 10 or older), three meals, and a loving, caring home. The students pay for their own clothing, toiletries, anything they want or need. They have medical insurance. Your student would attend your local high school, enriching the lives of the student body as well as the local community! Want to help make a dream come true and reap benefits of a lifetime? Host an International Exchange student. To learn more about NW Services, check out the web page at www.nw-services.com, email: TeresaK@nwservices.com, or call: 1-866846-3977 TODAY! Teresa Knapp NW Services, Inc. PEACE Program Call 866-846-3977

Brighton Banner

January 2, 2014

Brighton Banter

Guest commentary about our city

Emergency manager’s career waited for her By Stephanie Hackett Despite what my title suggests, I have learned emergency management isn’t really a job, but please don’t tell my boss. As the city of Brighton and Brighton Fire Rescue District emergency manager, I’m privileged to work on a wide variety of projects and programs related to emergency preparedness, response, recovery and mitigation. One day I’m cleaning fake blood from a teenager’s hair during a disaster exercise, the next I’m presenting information on ways the city is improving response capabilities, and on another I am working with families on creating an emergency plan to help keep Fido the lizard safe. It is never boring, there is always more work to be done, and, increasingly, work in preparedness and response is providing people with tools that have proved to save lives in Colorado. Sometimes I’m asked how I got into this “emergency management thing,” and I have replied with superficial responses such as, “It just kind of happened.” But as I get older and continue to gain professional emergency management experience, I have come to realize I have been a manager of emergencies since before I was aware the job title existed, and certainly before the title followed my name. At 18 years old, I lived in Brooklyn, and on Sept. 11, 2001, I sat in silence – as quiet as New York has ever been or may ever be – with thousands of neighbors on the promenade overlooking the East River and downtown Manhattan. Front-row seats to a raging fire and then to what followed – an experience that even today is as inexplicable and as quieting as it was then. I remember mostly the ash: breathing it, brushing it off my bare skin and it collecting in asymmetric clumps on my windowsill. I remember thinking that this was an experience that will change me and that – while I didn’t have to rush to figure it out – I would have a choice as to how it defined me. In the following days, we took college students from Manhattan into our apartments, shared our cheap beer and took turns waiting in

Brighton Banter is a frequent column by members of local government, education, commerce and public safety and the community on a subject they choose. The opinions expressed are those of the individual writers. We invite reader comment.

lines at pay phones. I look back at that time as my first real disaster response. Although, at the time, we were just a Stephanie bunch of Hackett talks to kids who the City Council. had trouble calling our families for the support we were used to. Community resilience was not yet a buzz phrase, nor was it the end to which our means were driven, it just was. In graduate school, it now seems obvious, I never really made a conscious choice to focus on social work and security – it just would’ve been impossible to put a genuine effort into anything else. As irritatingly expensive as grad school is and as professions with embarrassingly low returns on investment, it simply was what I was supposed to do. I started working in Emergency Management when I was offered a fellowship to consult with longterm-care facilities in emergency and security planning. I met amazing people, and their passion for community – their understanding of and commitment to this intangible resilience thing was so intriguing. I had to learn more, and I came to find out that is what emergency mangers essentially work toward – this “community resilience.” I just completed my first year serving as Brighton’s emergency manager, and what a challenging, interesting, enlightening and humanizing year it has been. Over the course of 2013, so much has happened – our first Emergency Operations Plan has been adopted by the City Council, many participated in the Black Forest wildfire response, our county received a FEMA disaster declaration for flooding, and city employees and residents worked together to mitigate the

effects of a nearly 72-hour citywide Water Boil Advisory during the Fourth of July holiiday. Did I mention I also got married to the man I met during my three-week hiatus from college following 9/11? After nearly 12 years of dating, and a year and a half engagement (which I insisted upon to perfect every detail of an elaborate Estes Park wedding), I was reminded of a Woody Allen quote that begins with “If you want to make God laugh …” Planned for the weekend of Sept. 14, the wedding we had imagined was washed away, right down Elkhorn Avenue, complete with a presidential disaster declaration. The irony was not lost on anyone. Having spent a good part of my life understanding resilience as the ability to share a drink and a laugh, to come together within an unspoken compromise, and to create traditions within a “new normal,” I was again reminded that community resilience isn’t simply an empty phrase used in grant writing. Resilience is the ability to accept change for what it is, and to find yourself within a community willing to move mountains without being asked. It is discovering you are in the presence of people who will always do whatever they can to help. Friends, family and strangers worked to help make sure that although we had no remnants of our carefully laid plans, there was a wedding, and it was beautiful, meaningful and … um … unique. I’m told someday I might even find it humorous. As I look toward the coming years in Brighton working for and with Brighton residents, employees and community partners, I am inspired to believe I have a small understanding of a shared vision for the future. While we have little control over the disasters and tragedies that may affect us personally or as a community, we do have the tools to plan, prepare, and respond to what happens to us with a commitment to help each other be resilient. As an emergency manager, I am excited to play even a small role in promoting that resilience and in knowing this will never be encapsulated within a job description.


Brighton Banner

January 2, 2014

3

Christmas tree recycling open

Flanked by County Commissioners Erik Hansen, Chaz Tedesco, and Eva Henry on the left and Judges Michael Goodbee and Leroy Kirby on the right, Chief Judge Vincent Phelps holds the County Board’s certificate recognizing and supporting the 17th Judicial District Problem Solving Court Programs.

Banner Press photo

Problem Solving Court Programs recognized

The Adams County Board of Commissioners formally adopted a proclamation declaring its support of the 17th Judicial District Problem Solving Court Programs. Chief Judge Vince Phelps, Judge Michael Goodbee and Judge Leroy Kirby each spoke briefly about the specialty courts that are successfully serving Adams Couny communities: Family Integrated Drug Court (established in 2004), Adolescent Mental Health Court (established in 2009), Adult Drug Treatment Court

(established in 2011) and the newest program, Veterans Treatment Court, which will begin serving clients in February. Problem Solving Court Programs were developed in Adams County to offer innovative and nontraditional approaches that integrate treatment and criminal justice case processing, with outcomes ultimayely improving public safety and to preventing repeat criminal behavior, saving thousands of taxpayer dollars.

Brighton and Adams County have announced their annual Christmas tree recycling programs, which began Dec. 26. The city of Brighton, with help from Ironwood Earthcare, offers free Christmas tree recycling through Jan. 12. Residents may drop off Christmas trees at the following locations: • Brighton Park south parking lot, Ninth Avenue and Midland Street; • Brighton Sports Complex parking lot, 1111 Judicial Center Drive; • Ken Mitchell Park parking lot, 889 Kinglet Court. Curbside pickup of Christmas trees will take place Jan. 13 for residents who need additional assistance. Trees will be chipped and mulch will be available Jan. 17 on a first-come, first-serve basis at the Brighton Park south parking lot off Midland Street. The Christmas tree recycling program is sponsored

by the City of Brighton Parks, Trails and Open Space Division and Ironwood Earthcare. Call 303-655-2089 for more information. The county will accept trees from Adams County residents for recycling through Jan. 13, at the Adams County Regional Park and Fairgrounds, 9755 Henderson Road, one mile west of U.S. 85 on 124th Avenue. The Regional Park will accept trees daily from sunrise until sunset. City and county sites will accept Christmas trees only (the county site limits dropoff to two trees per family. Ornaments, tinsel, garlands, flock, nails and stands must be removed before dropping the trees off. Absolutely no tree limbs, wreaths or yard waste will be accepted and at the Regional Park, no or trees from commercial operations will be accepted. For additional information, call the county Parks Department at 303-637-8000 or go to www.adcogov.org.

Pre-registration required for youth bird count Bird, from Page 1

“Children accompanied by parents and/or other adults join birding team leaders in the fun of celebrating nature and the outdoors. After participants arrive, they are divided into teams and pass through a brief orientation regarding bird identification and the use of binoculars and field guides. “These small working teams then head out with a short local winter bird list and bird guide in hand. Teams have about 90 minutes and a specific birding route to record the species and count the total individual birds.” Edmondson said teams will gain enthusiasm after returning for lunch and the much anticipated tabulation celebration. The compiler of the team tallies the overall results on a computer and kids from each team present their story to the assembled crowd of family members and friends. “The final results are reviewed by experienced birders and then entered into the eBird database,” Edmondson said. “This experience introduces hundreds of families to the value of and participation in citizen science.” Edmondson said last year’s event at RMBO didn’t have record-setting numbers of

Snowshoe outing planned

Rocky Mountain Bird Observatory invites homeschool students and their families on a snowshoe outing at Brainard Lake Recreation Area west of Boulder. This year, RMBO will host two outings of the Exploring Alpine Habitat with Snowshoes program. Both outings are appropriate for home-school students ages 7 and older. The introductory outing will be held from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. on Jan. 13. Participants will meet at REI in the Orchard Town Center in Westminster; then they’ll caravan to Brainard Lake for a hike. The intermediate outing, for homeschool students with snowshoeing experience, will be held from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. on Jan. 16. Participants will meet at the Brainard Lake parking area near Ward. During both outings, students will: • Discover adaptations needed to surparticipants, but they definitely had enough to call it an event, which is also enough to be encouraged about participation in the years to come. Twenty-three people participated in the 2013 event; including 11 children, nine parents, and three team leaders. The event highlights were given with an actual count of 2,900 individual birds counted and 41 different species observed, including bald eagles, a prairie falcon, and barn owls, long-eared owls, a

vive the harsh alpine environment in winter; • Put their skills to the test on a guided snowshoe hike; and • Observe wildlife, enjoy being out in nature and burn some energy. Cost is $10 per child and $15 per adult (includes snowshoe rental), or $5 per person who brings his or her own snowshoes. Scholarships are available for the program. Parents will need to register by Jan. 7 with School Programs Coordinator Emily Snode at 303-659-4348 ext. 11 or emily.snode@rmbo.org. In the voicemail or email, parents should include the names and ages of children participating, their phone number and email, and the number and sizes of snowshoes to rent: MSR Tyker (kids’ shoe size 7.5-13.5), MSR Shift (kids’ shoe size 1+) or MSR Evo Ascent (older kids and adults).

great horned owl, a Townsend’s solitaire and common goldeneye. Teams last year wrote their own press release for the event and were given an opportunity to present highlights and lessons they learned from the day. Edmondson said prizes were given for each team’s achievements, such as counting the most overall birds, the most species, the most individuals of one species and the most unique birds observed. “RMBO naturalists also

informed participants of the importance of citizen science and the various ways they can be involved in this process throughout the year,” he said. “Last year’s event was a great success, and we received a number of followup emails from parents about how much they enjoyed the day, and how positive of an experience it was for their kids. I for one can’t wait to do it again, and grow upon the foundation we laid this year.” Edmondson said the 2014 event has a few exciting addi-

tions. “In addition to the 7-to18-year-olds who participate in the actual count, this year RMBO will have a Baby Birds Camp, in which 3-to-6-yearolds will learn about bird basics, go on a brief bird discovery walk, and participate in other age-appropriate activities. “As part of the closing celebration of this year’s event, after lunch and the result tally, participants will be treated to a special presentation of a live raptor by Nature’s Educators, to get an up-close look at one of the birds they may have seen in the field, and to learn about how these birds survive the harsh winter conditions of Colorado.” The cost of registration is only $1 per person plus a $7per-vehicle state park entrance fee, or annual state parks pass. Families must preregister and all participants under the age of 18 MUST be accompanied by an adult. Since it is a winter event, RMBO also will provide warm drinks and snacks. Loaner binoculars and field guides will be available on a first-come, first-serve basis. Contact Edmondson at 303659-4348 ext. 15, or tyler.edmondson@rmbo.org to register as soon as possible as space is limited.


Brighton Banner

4

Today

January 2, 2014

The week ahead

Yoga, Platte Valley Medical Center Conference Center, 12:15-12:50 p.m.; $6 drop-in rate; certified instructor. Bring your mat, info 303-498-1840.

Brighton Sister Cities members Judy Kreutzer, Bonnie Simcox, and Krystyna Ross prepare a photo for mounting on Thursday at Brighton High School in preparation for the Sister Cities photo show at the Armory, beginning Saturday. Susan Petrocco and Henry Ross are in the background. Photo courtesy of Brigthon Sister Cities

Sister Cities photo exhibit to begin Jan. 4

Brighton Sister Cities announces Images of Ziebice, A pictorial trip to our Sister City, Ziebice, Poland. To celebrate 20 years of friendship between the cities of Brighton and Ziebice, Poland, award-winning photographer and Ziebice resident Stanislaw Popardowski has prepared a pictorial essay of Brighton’s sister city. Get an intimate look at the beautiful architecture, nature, city life and landscape of this 750-year-old historical city and the surrounding area. An opening reception will be held 4-6 p.m. on Jan. 11, and will include a telecast

welcome from Ziebice Mayor Antoni Herbowski. The show itself will run from Jan. 4 through Feb. 17 in the Armory Performing Arts Center, 300 Strong St. The exhibition, prepared exclusively for the citizens of Brighton, is Popardowski’s 10th international show of his works. Many of the photographs will be for sale while on exhibit, some will be reserved for the annual Brighton Sister Cities dinner and auction on Feb. 15 at the Brighton Recreation Center. For more information, call Ken Kreutzer at 303-659-4431.

Rec Center closing for repairs

The Brighton Recreation Center, 555 N. 11th Ave., will be closed Jan. 10- Jan. 12 to address a repair to the center’s boilers. The closure is necessary because water to the entire building must be shut off

during the repairs. All annual and quarterly pass holders will be credited for three additional days of membership. The Brighton Recreation Center will reopen at 5:30 a.m. on Jan. 13.

Pilates Mat Class, Platte Valley Medical Center Conference Center, 5:15-6 p.m.; increase strength and tone, flexibility and stamina, and improve overall fitness and health, taught by licensed physical therapist and certified Pilates instructor, $9 per class;, info or RSVP 303-4981840 Bingo at the VFW, 6 p.m.,161 N. Main St. Progressive last game.

Friday

Christmas Bird Count for Kids, Rocky Mountain Bird Observatory, 9 a.m.-2 p.m.; groups for kids 7-18 and 3-6; all children must be accompanied by an adult; live raptor presentation included, $1 per person plus $7 per vehicle park entry fee (or annual State Park Pass); to register, 303-659-4348 ext. 15 or tyler.edmondson@rmbo.org; see story on Page 1

Saturday

Diabetes Support Group, Platte Valley Medical Center Conference Room C, 10-11:30 a.m.; the perfect forum to experience compassion, support and direction to deal with diabetes, free but must RSVP two days ahead, 303-4981699

Sunday

Breakfast at “the V,” VFW Hall, 161 N. Main St., eggs to order; choice of sausage, ham, bacon; pancakes, English muffin, toast or biscuits and gravy; fruit, juice, coffee, 7-11 a.m. Everyone welcome. $5 for those 55 or older, $5.50 for all others.

Monday

Toddler Tales, Anythink Brighton, 9:3010:15 a.m.; stories, songs and finger plays geared just for toddlers, then have a few minutes of social time with the other caregivers while the children play with toys. For kids ages 2-3. RSVP online, anythinklibraries.org Kindle, Nook and Tablet, Anythink Brighton, 10-11:30 a.m. & Thursday, Jan. 9, 7-8 p.m.; Get a new device for the holiday season? Learn to use library resources with your Nook, Kindle or tablet, learn the differences between tablets and e-readers. Bring your device and cord. Register: anythinklibraries.org

Music and Movement, Anythink Brighton, 10:30-11 a.m.; Sing, dance, and learn how to play some basic instruments. For kids ages 2-6. RSVP online, anythinklibraries.org Free blood-pressure screening, Eagle View Adult Center, 10:30-11:30 a.m.; performed by Brighton firefighters

Stroke Recovery Support Group, Platte Valley Medical Center, 1:30-3 p.m.; Group to help patients and families connect with others while learning about valuable community resources; facilitated by a licensed stroke-rehabilitation therapist; RSVP or info, 303-498-1844

Tuesday

Yoga, Platte Valley Medical Center Conference Center, 4:45-5:20 p.m.; $6 dropin rate; certified instructor. Bring your mat, 303-498-1840.

Pilates Mat Class, Platte Valley Medical Center Conference Center, 5:45-6:30 p.m.; increase strength, tone, flexibility, stamina, overall fitness and health, $9 per class, 303-498-1840

See Movie, Page 5

Wednesday

Baby Bounce, Anythink Brighton, 9:3010:15 a.m.; songs, rhymes and stories

Ken Adkins and Tom Weaver serve up Sunday breakfast at the VFW Hall, 161 N. Main St., on the first three Sundays of the month. Banner Press file photo

p.m.

Events at the Armory Elle Records presents: Syndney Rose and Playing the Saint, Jan. 18, 7 p.m.; Great new bands with young fresh flavor. Tickets $10 online, $15 at the door. Tickets can be purchased at brightonarmory.org

Salsa Night featuring Colorado's HOTTEST Salsa band, Quemando, 8:30 p.m. Jan. 25; Also be ready for free salsa dance lessons. Tickets $7 online, $10 at the door, order online at brightonarmory.org

for babies and their caregivers. For ages birth-23 months. RSVP online, anythinklibraries.org

Journey Stories – Smithsonian Exhibit, Eagle View Adult Center trip, 10 a.m.; compelling traveling exhibit that shows how evolving transportation changed our young nation. Travelers’ accounts express the hope for fresh starts, the grim realities of forced migrations, and journeys that were both difficult and thrilling. At the Platteville Public Library, enjoy interactive displays, as well as artifacts from the Smithsonian archives. After the exhibit, visit Platteville Pioneer Museum. Lunch after at Double Tree for the monthly lunch buffet or choose off the menu. $7 plus meal ($10+); Deadline: noon Jan. 7 Primetime for Preschoolers, Anythink Brighton, 10:30-11 a.m.; stories, finger plays, songs and other fun activities just for preschoolers. For ages 3-5. RSVP online, anythinklibraries.org

After-School Get Together: Shoelace Wednesday, Anythink Brighton, 2:304:30 p.m.; Transform ordinary shoelaces into extraordinary jewelry. For students in grades K-5. Jolly Rancher Lollipops, Anythink Brighton, 2:30 p.m.; Turn a delicious everyday treat into a fun, sweet and creative candy. For students in grades 6-12.

Tour of the Women’s and Newborn Center, Platte Valley Medical Center, 6 p.m.; Meet in the lobby by the fireplace; free by appointment, 303-498-3518

Thursday

Caregivers Support Group, Eagle View Adult Center, 10-11:30 a.m.; join

other caregivers for valuable information and support, all ages welcome, 303-4264408 Yoga, Platte Valley Medical Center Conference Center, 12:15-12:50 p.m.; $6 drop-in rate; certified instructor. Bring your mat, info 303-498-1840.

Bunco, Eagle View Adult Center, 1:153:45 p.m.; Bunco is an easy game, learn it in 5 minutes; fun, refreshments, prizes, $4, deadline Tuesday before Medicaid and Medicare, Eagle View Adult Center, 1:30 p.m.; these are NOT the same government programs; learn the differences, about the eligibility requirement, and hot-button issues surrounding them. An attorney from Dolan & Associates, PC, will lead the program. Deadline Jan. 7

Smoking-cessation classes: Ready. Set. Quit! Platte Valley Medical Center Conference Room C, 4:30-6:30 p.m.; Ready to kick the habit once and for all? Seven-week class. Fresh approach to quitting; physical and emotional benefits of quitting; How to remove roadblocks; About nicotine-replacement therapies and the correct use and potential side effects of prescription quit-smoking medications. Help to quit smoking and begin a new smoke-free life; Session runs Jan.9-Feb. 20. Register with Chris Bowlin at 303-498-2190 or cbowlin@pvmc.org; sessions taught by hospital respiratory therapists; $40. Pilates Mat Class, Platte Valley Medical Center Conference Center, 5:15-6 p.m.; increase strength, tone, flexibility, stamina, overall fitness and health, taught by licensed physical therapist and certified pilates instructor, $9 per class, 303-4981840 Baby Basics, Platte Valley Medical Center, 6-8:30 p.m.; This class helps you set realistic expectations for your baby’s first months and provides information and hands-on practice on feeding, bathing, diapering, care basics, vaccinations, safe sleeping, car-seat use; $40, register at 303-498-3518 Bingo at the VFW, 6 p.m.,161 N. Main St. Progressive last game.

Tell us Send your organization’s public events to mynews@brightonbanner .com, or write to The Banner, 315 Strong St., Brighton, CO 80601


Brighton Banner

4

Today

January 2, 2014

The week ahead

Yoga, Platte Valley Medical Center Conference Center, 12:15-12:50 p.m.; $6 drop-in rate; certified instructor. Bring your mat, info 303-498-1840.

Brighton Sister Cities members Judy Kreutzer, Bonnie Simcox, and Krystyna Ross prepare a photo for mounting on Thursday at Brighton High School in preparation for the Sister Cities photo show at the Armory, beginning Saturday. Susan Petrocco and Henry Ross are in the background. Photo courtesy of Brigthon Sister Cities

Sister Cities photo exhibit to begin Jan. 4

Brighton Sister Cities announces Images of Ziebice, A pictorial trip to our Sister City, Ziebice, Poland. To celebrate 20 years of friendship between the cities of Brighton and Ziebice, Poland, award-winning photographer and Ziebice resident Stanislaw Popardowski has prepared a pictorial essay of Brighton’s sister city. Get an intimate look at the beautiful architecture, nature, city life and landscape of this 750-year-old historical city and the surrounding area. An opening reception will be held 4-6 p.m. on Jan. 11, and will include a telecast

welcome from Ziebice Mayor Antoni Herbowski. The show itself will run from Jan. 4 through Feb. 17 in the Armory Performing Arts Center, 300 Strong St. The exhibition, prepared exclusively for the citizens of Brighton, is Popardowski’s 10th international show of his works. Many of the photographs will be for sale while on exhibit, some will be reserved for the annual Brighton Sister Cities dinner and auction on Feb. 15 at the Brighton Recreation Center. For more information, call Ken Kreutzer at 303-659-4431.

Rec Center closing for repairs

The Brighton Recreation Center, 555 N. 11th Ave., will be closed Jan. 10- Jan. 12 to address a repair to the center’s boilers. The closure is necessary because water to the entire building must be shut off

during the repairs. All annual and quarterly pass holders will be credited for three additional days of membership. The Brighton Recreation Center will reopen at 5:30 a.m. on Jan. 13.

Pilates Mat Class, Platte Valley Medical Center Conference Center, 5:15-6 p.m.; increase strength and tone, flexibility and stamina, and improve overall fitness and health, taught by licensed physical therapist and certified Pilates instructor, $9 per class;, info or RSVP 303-4981840 Bingo at the VFW, 6 p.m.,161 N. Main St. Progressive last game.

Friday

Christmas Bird Count for Kids, Rocky Mountain Bird Observatory, 9 a.m.-2 p.m.; groups for kids 7-18 and 3-6; all children must be accompanied by an adult; live raptor presentation included, $1 per person plus $7 per vehicle park entry fee (or annual State Park Pass); to register, 303-659-4348 ext. 15 or tyler.edmondson@rmbo.org; see story on Page 1

Saturday

Diabetes Support Group, Platte Valley Medical Center Conference Room C, 10-11:30 a.m.; the perfect forum to experience compassion, support and direction to deal with diabetes, free but must RSVP two days ahead, 303-4981699

Sunday

Breakfast at “the V,” VFW Hall, 161 N. Main St., eggs to order; choice of sausage, ham, bacon; pancakes, English muffin, toast or biscuits and gravy; fruit, juice, coffee, 7-11 a.m. Everyone welcome. $5 for those 55 or older, $5.50 for all others.

Monday

Toddler Tales, Anythink Brighton, 9:3010:15 a.m.; stories, songs and finger plays geared just for toddlers, then have a few minutes of social time with the other caregivers while the children play with toys. For kids ages 2-3. RSVP online, anythinklibraries.org Kindle, Nook and Tablet, Anythink Brighton, 10-11:30 a.m. & Thursday, Jan. 9, 7-8 p.m.; Get a new device for the holiday season? Learn to use library resources with your Nook, Kindle or tablet, learn the differences between tablets and e-readers. Bring your device and cord. Register: anythinklibraries.org

Music and Movement, Anythink Brighton, 10:30-11 a.m.; Sing, dance, and learn how to play some basic instruments. For kids ages 2-6. RSVP online, anythinklibraries.org Free blood-pressure screening, Eagle View Adult Center, 10:30-11:30 a.m.; performed by Brighton firefighters

Stroke Recovery Support Group, Platte Valley Medical Center, 1:30-3 p.m.; Group to help patients and families connect with others while learning about valuable community resources; facilitated by a licensed stroke-rehabilitation therapist; RSVP or info, 303-498-1844

Tuesday

Yoga, Platte Valley Medical Center Conference Center, 4:45-5:20 p.m.; $6 dropin rate; certified instructor. Bring your mat, 303-498-1840.

Pilates Mat Class, Platte Valley Medical Center Conference Center, 5:45-6:30 p.m.; increase strength, tone, flexibility, stamina, overall fitness and health, $9 per class, 303-498-1840

Wednesday

Baby Bounce, Anythink Brighton, 9:3010:15 a.m.; songs, rhymes and stories

Ken Adkins and Tom Weaver serve up Sunday breakfast at the VFW Hall, 161 N. Main St., on the first three Sundays of the month. Banner Press file photo

p.m.

Events at the Armory Elle Records presents: Syndney Rose and Playing the Saint, Jan. 18, 7 p.m.; Great new bands with young fresh flavor. Tickets $10 online, $15 at the door. Tickets can be purchased at brightonarmory.org

Salsa Night featuring Colorado's HOTTEST Salsa band, Quemando, 8:30 p.m. Jan. 25; Also be ready for free salsa dance lessons. Tickets $7 online, $10 at the door, order online at brightonarmory.org

for babies and their caregivers. For ages birth-23 months. RSVP online, anythinklibraries.org

Journey Stories – Smithsonian Exhibit, Eagle View Adult Center trip, 10 a.m.; compelling traveling exhibit that shows how evolving transportation changed our young nation. Travelers’ accounts express the hope for fresh starts, the grim realities of forced migrations, and journeys that were both difficult and thrilling. At the Platteville Public Library, enjoy interactive displays, as well as artifacts from the Smithsonian archives. After the exhibit, visit Platteville Pioneer Museum. Lunch after at Double Tree for the monthly lunch buffet or choose off the menu. $7 plus meal ($10+); Deadline: noon Jan. 7 Primetime for Preschoolers, Anythink Brighton, 10:30-11 a.m.; stories, finger plays, songs and other fun activities just for preschoolers. For ages 3-5. RSVP online, anythinklibraries.org

After-School Get Together: Shoelace Wednesday, Anythink Brighton, 2:304:30 p.m.; Transform ordinary shoelaces into extraordinary jewelry. For students in grades K-5. Jolly Rancher Lollipops, Anythink Brighton, 2:30 p.m.; Turn a delicious everyday treat into a fun, sweet and creative candy. For students in grades 6-12.

Tour of the Women’s and Newborn Center, Platte Valley Medical Center, 6 p.m.; Meet in the lobby by the fireplace; free by appointment, 303-498-3518

Thursday

Caregivers Support Group, Eagle View Adult Center, 10-11:30 a.m.; join

other caregivers for valuable information and support, all ages welcome, 303-4264408 Yoga, Platte Valley Medical Center Conference Center, 12:15-12:50 p.m.; $6 drop-in rate; certified instructor. Bring your mat, info 303-498-1840.

Bunco, Eagle View Adult Center, 1:153:45 p.m.; Bunco is an easy game, learn it in 5 minutes; fun, refreshments, prizes, $4, deadline Tuesday before Medicaid and Medicare, Eagle View Adult Center, 1:30 p.m.; these are NOT the same government programs; learn the differences, about the eligibility requirement, and hot-button issues surrounding them. An attorney from Dolan & Associates, PC, will lead the program. Deadline Jan. 7

Smoking-cessation classes: Ready. Set. Quit! Platte Valley Medical Center Conference Room C, 4:30-6:30 p.m.; Ready to kick the habit once and for all? Seven-week class. Fresh approach to quitting; physical and emotional benefits of quitting; How to remove roadblocks; About nicotine-replacement therapies and the correct use and potential side effects of prescription quit-smoking medications. Help to quit smoking and begin a new smoke-free life; Session runs Jan.9-Feb. 20. Register with Chris Bowlin at 303-498-2190 or cbowlin@pvmc.org; sessions taught by hospital respiratory therapists; $40. Pilates Mat Class, Platte Valley Medical Center Conference Center, 5:15-6 p.m.; increase strength, tone, flexibility, stamina, overall fitness and health, taught by licensed physical therapist and certified pilates instructor, $9 per class, 303-4981840 Baby Basics, Platte Valley Medical Center, 6-8:30 p.m.; This class helps you set realistic expectations for your baby’s first months and provides information and hands-on practice on feeding, bathing, diapering, care basics, vaccinations, safe sleeping, car-seat use; $40, register at 303-498-3518 Bingo at the VFW, 6 p.m.,161 N. Main St. Progressive last game.

Tell us Send your organization’s public events to mynews@brightonbanner .com, or write to The Banner, 315 Strong St., Brighton, CO 80601


Brighton Banner

January 2, 2014

Word on the street Question: “What is your New Year’s Resolution for 2014? (Asked at Prairie View Hoops Tournament) – by Michelle Boyer

“Be a better person.” – Augustine Montoya, Commerce City

“Work out more and be “Get prepared for college healthy.” football.” – Connor Simpson, – Michael Ernst, Commerce City Northglenn

“Get better for next year’s “Help out the community “Enjoy the simple football season at Prairie moments more and make more, by attending more View.” extra time for myself.” community events.” – Adam Laubert, – Will Pierce, – Luke Schwindaman, Commerce City Brighton Lochbuie

“Live a happier life and “Continue my health and “Better year for 2014 and maintain a positive attiwellness and enjoy my to do better at my job as tude.” home in Brighton.” a security guard.” – Alonzo Ramirez, – Ana Mendoza, – Keith Sharrai, Brighton Commerce City Lochbuie

Relay for Life kickoff set for Jan. 13

The 2014 Brighton Relay for Life event will mark the 16th year that Brighton has participated in the community fundraiser for the American Cancer Society. Help celebrate the highenergy event that brings the community together for a cause that all agree is important: ending cancer! To kick-start the cancerkicking party, the Brighton Relay Committee will hold its 2014 Kickoff event on Jan. 13, in the Armory, 300 Strong St.,

beginning at 6:30 p.m. Enjoy light refreshments and information about the services ACS provides to cancer patients, and what’s being done to find cures for cancers. Learn what local fundraising dollars make possible, and the many ways you can become part of Brighton’s biggest fundraising and celebration event ever, says a news release from the committee. The 2014 Relay for Life will take place on June 20 at

Carmichael Park. There are many ways that you can participate as an individual, or you can form a fundraising team with neighbors, friends, family, and coworkers. The local committee will help you with suggestions for a variety of fundraising activities. The Jan. 13 event is open to the community. Contact Michele Lussier, 720-641-7733, if you have any questions, or visit www.brightonarea relay.com.

5

Eye for Art show features Wardle work The Eye for Art Program spotlights Brighton artist Kathy Wardle in the Moments to Remember art exhibit. With more than 35 years of experience in graphic arts, photography, sculpting and teaching art at the high school and university level, Wardle now also creates public bronze works of art, which are sculpted into community treasures that speak to the heart of a community. Wardle began her sculpture business in 2009, with a vision of creating public sculptures that communicate to the observer a moment in time that would capture the essence in the collective memory of a community. Since starting her business she has been commissioned by two cities to create large, key public art pieces that visually communicate aspects of their individual story and provide a landmark for each community. Wardle’s first large public piece, The Sandpaper Track, depicting an 1880s penny farthing bicycle race, was completed in 2011 and placed at the Brighton Armory. The piece depicts three figures at the finish line of an historic race along the Platte River, and reminds all citizens of the community goal to establish bicycle trails.

The second commissioned bronze piece was an accurate portrayal of an Arapahoe Warrior, which was placed near Frederick High School. The Warrior also was selected by Southwest Art Magazine as the feature image to promote the 2013 Loveland Sculpture invitational Show in July. The Warrior already has become a source of public pride in Frederick and has appeared in the National Sculpture Society Newsletter and Web page. Wardle’s sculptures have become landmarks that establish pride in the community’s history and reminders for the future. Wardle’s bronze sculpture, Little League Dreamer, is on display in the Eye for Art “Moments to Remember” exhibit, under way through Feb. 7 at Brighton City Hall, 500 S. Fourth Ave. Artwork currently on display is available for purchase. Special tours are also available to groups. To learn more about the Eye for Art Program or take part in future displays, call Laurie Lozano-Maier, program coordinator at 303-6552034. Artwork may include – but is not limited to – paintings, drawings, photos, sculpture and other mixed media.

Baseball boy, a bronze sculpture by Kathy Wardle, is one of the scores of works by local artists in the Eye for Art Moments to Remember art show at City Hall, 500 S. Fourth Ave., on display through Feb. 7.


Brighton Banner

6

January 2, 2014

Sex and drugs and ... more sex and drugs

Wolf of Wall Street can practically be summed up in two words: drugs and sex. There also is some violence, “screwing” customers out of their money, driving cars and flying helicopters under the influence, and other forms of debauchery, but mainly there is drugs and sex. I mean, after the first dozen naked women and first dozen snorts of cocaine, we get it. That’s the story. In director Martin Scorsese’s defense, Wolf of Wall Street is based heavily on Jordan Belfort’s own memoir, a glorification of his heinous, wild lifestyle in the 1990s, which is an illustration of what happens when adult spoiled brats get and do whatever they want with no apparent repercussions. Haven’t heard of Jordan Belfort? He founded Stratton Oakmont, a brokerage firm where he and his employees sold fraudulent “penny stocks” to customers and over time made hundreds of millions of dollars doing so. The mob that encompassed his employees, following his example, lacked ethics as much, feverishly dialing their customers and manipulating them into buying phony shares, and partying just as hard.

Movies Wolf of Wall Street By Abby Wright

Abby Wright and Michael Miller review new films. In the movie, strippers and prostitutes frequently made appearances at the office, and demeaning activities – such as shaving a woman’s head and throwing a person with dwarfism into a target – took place, which is reminiscent of a stunt that would be performed with Wee Man on the MTV series, Jackass. By the way, the person with dwarfism in the movie is referred to as “it,” and the insensitive dehumanization of little people goes too far. Then a tasteless joke about cerebral palsy is employed later in the movie when Belfort starts to feel the effects of Lemmons, an exceptionally

At AMC Theaters in Brighton Pavilions Writers: Terence Winter, Jordan Belfort Director: Martin Scorsese Starring: Leonardo DiCaprio, Jonah Hill, Margot Robbie Genre: Biography, comedy, crime Rating: R for sequences of strong sexual content, graphic nudity, drug use and language throughout, some violence Run time: 3 hours Abby’s grade: 2.5 of 5 potent quaalude (a powerful drug). About half the time, the humor is actually funny, though it is all dark with serious undertones. Belfort, as portrayed by Leonardo DiCaprio, who narrates the story directly to the camera intermittently throughout the movie, is a schmuck from the beginning, bragging about his cocaine and quaaludes addictions, his supermodel wife, prostitutes he sleeps with, his multimillion-dollar salary, and anything else that makes audience members shake their heads and wonder why this antihero is the protagonist. Open-minded, we go along

with it. With a talent for deception and persuasion, plus a void where a conscience should be, Belfort can sell anyone any worthless stock he wants and be the “twisted Robin Hood, taking money from others’ pockets and putting it into his own” that the newspaper says he is. The character is impossible to like but hard to dislike and leaves us feeling torn and slimy. There are plenty of jerks to go around in this movie. Jonah Hill plays an oddball, Donnie Azoff, with phosphorous-white teeth and thickrimmed glasses who married his cousin and has no censor whatsoever for his actions, regardless how crude they are. Azoff, Belfort’s neighbor and best friend, serves as the vice president of Stratton Oakmont and Belfort’s drug buddy. The pair admittedly can be hilarious sometimes when they are on drugs, and I was tempted to bump up the rating of Wolf to a “3” because of it, but didn’t because I didn’t like any of the characters even when they made me laugh. Another jerk, Belfort’s enabling and comedically temperamental father, makes it apparent that Jordan Belfort did not, in fact, “get that way

on his own,” a subtly insulting claim made by “straightas-an-arrow” FBI Agent Patrick Denham (Kyle Chandler), who eventually busts Belfort. Matthew McConaughey plays a small part as the hilarious and eccentric Mark Hanna, Belfort’s first boss, who advises Belfort to masturbate as often as possible and sniff cocaine. Belfort cracks easily, taking Hanna’s words to heart, so Belfort – and the other characters – are static; they never learn any lessons because they were never benevolent in the first place, and despite repeated selfish and criminal offenses, they face no consequences, other than a measly three years in prison at the end of the movie. The worst part is that Wolf of Wall Street makes drugs and prostitution look harmless to someone naïve, so only mature adults should attend. I should also mention that the movie probably qualifies as soft porn. Though the actors and actresses display incredible talent in this film, the characters display nothing admirable. Belfort and his cronies are filthy rich, while their story is filthy, bankrupt of morals, and lacking in character development.

Anythink adds hoopla to its mix Anythink Libraries have announced a partnership with hoopla digital. Since Dec. 16, Anythink customers have had access to thousands of movies, television shows, music and audiobooks, all available for mobile and online streaming. The new service allows customers to easily browse and borrow titles from major

Hollywood studios, record companies and publishers from home or on the go. In addition to popular film and music, the hoopla digital catalog also includes educational programs for homeschooling, test prep and language learning, in addition to exercise and fitness videos. The full catalog is available to all Anythink customers,

At Your Service

For Service Guide

The Banner rates, call

303-654-1155

requiring only an Anythink card and email address. Accessible on most computers, tablets, smartphones and other devices, hoopla digital allows for titles to be either streamed or temporarily downloaded. Hoopla digital joins Anythink’s other econtent offering. With services such as OverDrive, Axis 360 and OneClickdigital, customers can borrow ebooks and audiobooks directly to their device with their Anythink card. Additionally, the latest issues of digital magazines – both local and national – can be browsed using Anythink’s subscription to Zinio. All of those services, including hoopla digital, are accessible at anythinklibraries .org/ebooks-downloads.

Banner Classifieds MANY HOUSES AND APARTMENTS FOR RENT Call Lambert Realty 303-659-1216

Subscribe to The Daily Post, weekdays, free

FREE HELP-WANTED/ POSITIONS-WANTED ADS in The Brighton Banner. Call 303-654-1155 for more information


Brighton Banner

January 2, 2014

7

Concierge funded by lodging tax Chamber, from Page 1

ways to engage businesses that currently are in untapped sectors. Additionally, they will look at ways to add value to their current membership packages to enhance the benefits of chamber membership for members. The Chamber will add a part-time Community Concierge position in 2014. The funding for that position will come from lodging taxes. She envisions that the new face in the Chamber will allow it to accelerate its levels of service and outreach, while fueling the implementation of

new programs. “Addition ally,” Hansen said, “we will be working closely with the Brighton Holly Hansen Economic Development Corp. and the city to support several lodging-tax funded initiatives, including expanding the Brighton visitor experience.” Although Hansen does not live in Brighton, she and her family enjoy visiting Brighton often.

“I reside in the very northern part of Thornton with a Brighton ZIP code. Due to our proximity to Brighton, my family and I spend a lot of time in Brighton shopping, eating, and playing.” “Brighton has succeeded in maintaining its own identity as the metro area has expanded and brushed up against Brighton, which is a huge accomplishment for the business and residential community, “she said. “It’s that sense of community that makes Brighton unique, I’ve talked with numerous young professionals and business owners who

appreciate the small-town environment without having to sacrifice access to a major metropolitan area.” It’s clear that Brighton residents and businesses embrace their identity, and as the Chamber president, that’s a very important and distinguishing factor for Hansen, which makes it very exciting to be a part of, she said. Before joining the Chamber staff, she worked for ITT Technical Institute as the director of career services and, most recently, for Westwood College as a regional director. Before working for

Westwood College, she was a marketing/membership services specialist for CIRSA (a municipal risk-management company serving numerous cities throughout Colorado, including Brighton), and as a writer and editor for Weaver Publications. Visit http://brightonchamber .com to find out about Chamber benefits, events, find a business or to check out Brighton. Brighton Chamber of Commerce’s Office is in Historic City Hall, 22 S. Fourth Ave., Suite 205. The phone number is 303-6590223.

Obituaries/funeral notices Florence H. Woelfle

Florence Helen Woelfle, 86, of Evans, died Dec. 24 in Keenesburg. She was born in Georgetown to Daniel and Florence (Epple) Uncapher. Florence grew up on the Epple farm south of Roggen. She graduated from Keenesburg High School in 1944 and briefly attended Colorado State Teachers College (now UNC). Florence married John Elmer Woelfle Jr. on Sept. 22, 1945, in Denver. He died March 8, 1988. They farmed east of Brighton for many years. They retired from the farm and moved to Evans in 1969. Florence worked at the Red Steer Restaurant at Lucerne from 1969 to 1972. She took an active interest in Evans city government. She served as an election judge in Adams and Weld Counties. She worked as a volunteer for more than 20 years as the curator at the Evans Museum. She was a member of the Weld County Historical Society and volunteered at Centennial Village, where she spoke of the pioneer days and also was able to share that information at many area schools. She enjoyed touring with Evans senior citizens. She enjoyed taking trips to Blackhawk. Florence was honored and chosen as the marshal of the Evans parade in the early 2000s. She enjoyed collecting and crafts. She took many watercolor painting classes and was a very good artist. Above all was her love for her family and their time together. Survivors include daughters Faye (Joe) Elms of Johnstown and Helen (Rodney) Baumgartner of Keenesburg; son John (Garnet) Elmer Woelfle III of Greeley; 12 grandchildren and 16 great-grandchildren. Funeral service, was

Tuesday at Stoddard Funeral Home. Interment followed at Sunset Memorial Gardens. Memorial contributions may be made to Hospice of Northern Colorado in care of Stoddard Funeral Home, 3205 W. 28th St., Greeley, CO 80634.

Shirley J. Dudley

Shirley J. Dudley, 53, of Brighton died Dec. 22. Memorial service, was Monday at Tabor-Rice Funeral Home. She was born in Brighton to Beverly and Leonard Laas. She graduated from Brighton High School in 1978. In 1983, she married Addison Kris Dudley. Shirley’s life revolved around her family. She raised two children, Kristin (Jason) Stockton and Rodrick (Samantha) Dudley and was essential in helping raise her four grandchildren: Cydni, Wyatt, Addison and Jaxon. Nothing could brighten her day more than those little smiling faces. Shirley loved camping and fishing. She was the first one with her fishing pole in the water and the last one to reel hers in. She was an amazing cook but rarely used a recipe. Shirley loved taking care of others and nobody could leave her house hungry or empty handed. Survivors include her mother; husband; children; grandchildren; sister, Beverly (Ron) Zaiss; brothers Norman (Garland) Hogan, Gary Hogan, all of Brighton; Bobby

Hogan of Commerce City, mother-in-law Patsy Dudley; and sisters-in-law Jan Lancaster and Sharon Dudley. Shirley was preceded in death by her father; sister Pat Sack; brother-in-law Rick Dudley; and sister-in-law Pam Dudley-Mosset. Tabor-Rice Funeral Home handled the arrangements.

Mary Jo Bernard

Mary Jo Bernard, 72, died Dec. 25. She was born in Canon City to Joseph and Eva Widhalm. Her family moved to the Brighton area when she was young and she went to the Brighton and Fort Lupton schools. While working as a car hop at the A&W Drive-in in Fort Lupton she caught the eye of her future husband, JD Bernard: “love at first sight.” They were married a short time later on June 22, 1957. They started their family shortly after: Deb (John) Case, Jeff (Bev) Bernard and Becky (Phil) Beckingham. Mary Jo and JD lived in Pearl Mack until 1965 when they built their dream home together in Brighton and have lived there since. They loved traveling and camping. They spent many family trips driving around the country and loved their trips around Colorado in their RV. They enjoyed their antique cars, the tours and gatherings and the many lifelong friends they met. She had many other hobbies: building miniature houses, painting ceramics, scrap-

booking – anything that needed that personal touch, she could do. Mary Jo was a person of strong faith in God. She was very involved with St. Augustine Catholic Church and served on many committees and organizations over the years and made many friends that touched her heart while doing so. Mary Jo died at home with her family at her side. She is survived by her husband, kids, seven grandchildren, seven great-grandchildren, one sister, five brothers and her brother- and sister-inlaws. Services were held earlier this week at St. Augustine Catholic Church. The family requests that memorial contributions may be made in Mary Jo’s name to: Compassionate Hospice, 11935 Quail St., Broomfield, CO 80020, or the memorial garden at Inglenook of Brighton, 2195 Egbert St. Brighton, CO 80601. Tabor-Rice Funeral Home

handled the arrangements.

Cecil J. Anderson

Cecil J. Anderson, 84, of Brighton died Dec. 24 in Thornton. He was born in Healy, Kan., to William Harvey and Pauline (Haverfield) Anderson. He married Ruth Thomas on July 4, 1953, in Lakin, Kan. Cecil has lived in Brighton since 1961 where he was a member of the First Presbyterian Church and the Brighton Elks BPOE Lodge 1586. He owned and operated Brighton Printing for more than 20 years and was a veteran of the Air Force. Survivors include his wife, Ruth, of Brighton; sons Terry Anderson, Gerry Anderson and Jim Anderson, all of Brighton, and Kirk Anderson of Englewood; two grandchildren and two great-grandchildren. Memorial service will be 11 a.m. Monday at the First Presbyterian Church. Tabor-Rice Funeral Home is handling the arrangements.


Brighton Banner

8

January 2, 2014

Dog days of winter spent in training

By Michelle Boyer for The Banner To succeed this spring and summer, the Brighton High School baseball teams are spending their winter days in the gym. During their offseason workouts, the teams at every level (varsity, junior varsity and C-team) are focused on strength/conditioning and plyometric stations, with running/cardio stations for 45 minutes each session. “We condition in the Comprehensive Learning Center gym, which is our best attempt with what we have to work with to provide our players a cardio workout plus conditioning,” Assistant Varsity Coach Todd Reynolds, said. “We work to provide our players the best 11/2-hour workout we can. We’re challenging the players both physically and mentally with the conditioning. Many of our younger players aren’t used to the mental challenge while they’re physically exhausted. Pushing through physical exhaustion and mental fatigue prepares them for much more than baseball next spring.” He said the workouts provide the players the opportunity to realize what they can accomplish if they don’t stop or quit. “They’re learning how to successfully deal with adversity, which occurs in baseball and in life,” he said. “We, as coaches, are learning the personalities of the players, and our team. We are taking this acquired information into our winter coaches meetings so we can begin discussing spring practice plans with a focus building on player/team strengths and weaknesses.” Varsity Assistant Coach Steve Guccione said the teams work out three times a week with a focus on power, strength and explosive conditioning. “We use (BFS) bigger, faster and stronger baseball,” he said. “The workouts are composed of core lifts (bench, squats, hang cleans, dead lifts and single-leg squats); auxiliary lifts (shoulder, back, fore-

BHS outfielder Naldo Medina spots teammate Brandon Pettinger during weight training. Michelle Boyer photo

arms, triceps, single-leg lifts and abdominals). The auxiliary lifts focus on joint strength, balance and stability, core strength and rotary power. The last focus of strength training is on natural lifts (tire flips, mat pulls, sledge hammers, plyos and sandbag carry). The natural lifts focus on strength and explosive endurance.” The winter workouts are open to every baseball student-athlete not involved in a winter sport. “These are non-mandatory workouts, and we normally have 44 players (split into two groups) participating in the weightlifting and conditioning practices,”

The workouts are from 3 to 4:30 p.m., after school on Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays. Fridays are normally non-weightlift days, and all 44 players are brought together into one large group. Assistant Coach Marty Mondragon puts the team through physical and mental toughness drills on Friday. “Mondragon develops a plan that is physically challenging, but more important, one that is really mentally difficult,” Reynolds said. “We put together an obstacle course to physically tire the players out, and then we add mental obstacle stations. The stations are not as physically challenging as the others, but require focus to succeed. The players don’t look forward to the Friday workouts, but yet they do.” Reynolds said the athletes constantly ask him what’s in store for Friday. “They attend Friday’s workouts with anticipation, knowing we are trying to break them, and have them quit but they are all committed to finish the exercise,” he said. “After the Friday workouts, the team is unified (all levels and grades) for coming together and successfully surpassing whatever obstacle we put in front of them. Our post-practice huddle after the players complete the workout is an amazing atmosphere. Players high-fiving each other, everyone congratulating everyone (seniors, juniors, sophomores and freshmen) it doesn’t matter, we’re one team, all working together for a common goal. “Our program is only as strong as our weakest player. These workouts strengthen our team bond in addition to our players’ bodies and minds. Our team motto is: One team, One Goal, One Mission.” Winter weightlifting and conditioning has been offered for three years under Coach Ray Garza’s leadership, and the assistant coaches’ participation has increased each year.

Heidt plays with passion, lives in faith By Michelle Boyer for The Banner Basketball has been a passion for Brighton High School senior Toby Heidt. But, he said his Christian faith and family will always be a higher passion than any sport. “In high school my time’s gone to basketball, and I’ve had to learn a lot since I hadn’t had too much experience,” he said. “I still only play basketball for the fact of getting better and showing up to as many off-season practices as I could.” Heidt began playing basketball at age 6, and only continued playing it recreationally. He played the sport at Zion Lutheran School and in middle school. He said he focused on baseball until he got to high school, where he later put more emphasis back into basketball. The 6-foot-3 athlete plays power forward on the Bulldogs varsity team. “My height is actually pretty small for my position, but I use the height that I do have to get rebounds,” he said. “I pride myself on getting rebounds.”

This season Heidt said his goals are: To make state with his team, to improve each day, to be the leader of the team and talk to his teammates daily to help educate them, and he wants to exit his high school career knowing he gave it his all. When asked about the team’s everchanging coach culture during his high school career, Heidt referenced his experience having three separate coaches in three years. “It’s been difficult, since I’ve had to learn a new system every time,” he said. “My team is really working hard this year, despite our record. We’re buying into Coach (Eli) Haskell’s system, and I can see us improving. It’s tough with a team that has had only two varsity players who have had significant varsity playing minutes before this year. I trust that my coaches are going to make us better and by the time February hits, we’ll be in the state tournament.” Heidt said he’s positive the team will win a game soon. “It’s a huge transition, but the culture’s changing, I can feel it,” he said.

“I can feel the fans getting excited again and it’s great. My team is improving at working well together and, like I said, pretty soon we’ll start clicking.” During his high school career, Heidt made all-state and all-conference academic his sophomore and junior years. He received his first varsity letter his junior year. He’s been accepted to Colorado Christian University and Concordia University in Nebraska, but said he hasn’t made his decision which school he’ll attend yet. He would like to study a pre-seminary or theology degree at either school. He said he would like to work in Christian ministry when he’s older, or maybe be a pastor. Heidt doesn’t expect to play basketball in college, but he said if he has a great Toby Heidt practices against teammate Tabor Jensen. season, he’ll be open to the Michelle Boyer photo for The Banner idea.

Prep sports this week

Friday: PVHS wrestling tournament at Denver East, 3 p.m. BHS girls’ basketball at Broomfield, 6:30 p.m. Saturday: PVHS wrestling tournament at Denver East, 8 a.m. BHS girls’ swimming at Greeley Invitational, TBD

PVHS boys’ basketball vs. Boulder, 11 a.m. Monday: BHS boys’ basketball at Ponderosa, 7 p.m. Tuesday: PVHS boys’ basketball at Heritage, 7 p.m. BHS boys’ basketball vs. Westminster at Pepsi Center, 1:15 p.m.

BHS girls’ basketball vs. Westminster at Pepsi Center, 3 p.m. PVHS girls’ basketball at Pine Creek, 6:30 p.m. Wednesday: PVHS wrestling duals vs. Jefferson, 7 p.m. BHS wrestling duals vs. Pomona, 7 p.m.


Brighton banner january 2, 2014  

Brighton Banner January 2, 2014

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you