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May 22, 2014 Adams County, Colorado | Volume 6, Issue 21 A publication of

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Students garner band awards By Lou Ellen Bromley It was a big night for Prairie View High School’s Music Department. The evening May 12 was divided into two parts, starting off with the music department’s fundraiser dinner, donated by The Olive Garden restaurant in Thornton. After dinner there was a band concert in the auditorium. Dinner was accompanied by music from both the Prairie View Jazz Band and later the Prairie View Jazz Ensemble directed by Music Director Gregory Haan and student teacher Ben Pollack. Haan said he wanted the jazz bands to experience what playing at events in the real world were like, with people eating and chatting. Both bands played a variety of wellknown songs as well as a few new ones, including the song “Skyfall” from a recent James Bond movie, sung by Prairie View High School student Adele Adkins. After dinner everyone moved to the au-

ditorium to watch a dance performance by the Prairie View High school Color Guard, directed by Elizabeth C. Haan, for which they won fourth place in state competition this year. This was followed by musical performances by the Concert Band, the Symphonic Band, the Jazz Band and the Jazz Ensemble directed alternately by Haan and Pollack. Band Awards for the school year 20132014 were awarded during the concerts: First year Letter students; Katy Groover, Jalen Thomas, Adriana Huiras, Sydney Foster, Izzy Pawlak, Wesley Von Axelson, Adyn Yamamoto, Jordan Diekneit, Sierra Holguin, David Vandiver, KJ Wickware, Alicia Garcia, Rachel Smidt, Rochelle White, and Ryan Jabri Zink. Second year Letter students; Navana Britto, Ani Saldivar, Alex Vogel, Saul Saldivar, and Gabi Sanchez Barajas. Third year Letter students; Tyler Knott, Band continues on Page 11

COMPETITION IN FULL SWING

Music Director Gregory Haan conducts the Jazz Band during the fundraiser dinner at Prairie View High School. Courtesy photo

Felony DUI bill dies yet again Bill would have created stiffer drunken-driving penalties By Vic Vela

vvela@coloradocommunitymedia.com An effort that dies every year suffered another death this Legislative session as a Senate committee on May 6 killed a bill that sought to create a felony drunkendriving penalty in Colorado. The bill would have made a person’s third DUI in seven years or fourth in a lifetime a felony punishable with possible prison time. But the Senate Appropriations Committee on May 6 put an end to the bill, which would have resulted in millions of dollars in costs for having to incarcerate more offenders. But that’s a cost worth paying for a safer society, said Republican bill sponsors who blasted Senate Democrats who killed the legislation. “The health and traveling safety is at risk from people who consistently drive under the influence of alcohol,” said Sen. Steve King, R-Grand Junction. “They do have a problem and they’ve gone through treatment and they continue to drive because it’s easy for them. “At what point does justice outweigh treatment?”

The bill had previously passed the House with overwhelming bipartisan support. But Senate Appropriations Committee Chairman Pat Steadman, D-Denver, said the bill would have resulted in an enormous cost to the state. The bill wouldn’t have cost anything for the 2014-2015 fiscal year, but state expenditures over the next three years would have combined for about $20.7 million, according to an updated Legislative Council fiscal analysis. But Rep. Mark Waller, R-Colorado Springs, the bill’s House sponsor, said the state is in much better economic shape than it has been in recent years. That led him to wonder, “If we’re not going to prioritize it this year, with this budget, when are we going to prioritize it? “There is money in the budget to make this happen and we’re never going to have a better circumstance than what we have today to make this happen,” Waller said. Both Waller and King have tried for several years to make a felony DUI law a reality in Colorado. The bill has failed each time. Colorado is one of only a handful of states that does not have a felony DUI law. Senate President Morgan Carroll, DAurora, said she wasn’t opposed to the bill, but understood why it failed. For one thing,

DUI continues on Page 11

Little Britches Rodeo coming up The Brighton Elks are proud to be supporting youth in the great sport of rodeo and bring the fifth annual Little Britches Rodeo to the Brighton community. Rodeo has a long tradition in the history Deziree Lipsett competes in state track shot put competition. See sports on Pages 16-17. Submitted photo of the west, showing the skills of cowboys and cowgirls. It became not just the every day work on ranches and farms, but an entertainment sport of competing against POSTAL ADDRESS each other. These young cowboys and cowgirls are carrying on the great tradition of rodeo while at the same time showing a great respect for each other, their animals, their parents, and us. Printed on recycled newsprint. Come see talented youth show off their Please recycle this copy. skills of calf roping, barrel racing, steer wrestling and bull riding – just to name a few of the 27 events performed at the rodeo. Contestants come from both all over the state of Colorado and out of state, travelling

each weekend to compete to gain points for a spot in the National Little Britches Rodeo held each year in July. But points aren’t the only reason; there is a cash payout for the top contestants in each event. Buckles are handed out to the All-Around Champion and Reserve All-Around Champion for each group: Little Wrangler Boy, Little Wrangler Girl, Junior Boy, Junior Girl, Senior Boy, and Senior Girl. Please come and show your support for these young people who are the future of our great country while enjoying the rodeo with your family and friends. While admission to the rodeo is free, there will be food and beverage available for purchase. The rodeo will be held at the Adams County Fairgrounds Outdoor Rodeo Arena on Saturday, May 31, 10 a.m. to 3 p.m.; and Sunday June 1, 9 a.m. to 2 p.m.


2-Color

2 Brighton Banner

May 22, 2014

Fine reads for journey through summer You made your reservations months ago. This was a vacation you’ve been planning for… well, it seems like forever. One of those once-in-a-lifetime trips is what you’ve always dreamed about, and you’ve bought all new clothes and even a new suitcase for it. So why would you take just any old book on your vacation this summer? Instead, why not look for something new by an author you love?

May So a Memorial Day getaway is in the plans and you can’t wait. Before you go, grab one of these new books released toward the end of the month… Conservative writer Ben Carson has a new book out about America ’s Future. There’s a new book out, co-written by Bill Geist, too. In fact, you’ll find quite a few memoirs out toward the end of May, as well as novels by Terry Hayes, Tom Robbins, Robert Ludlum, and Joseph Finder. And Bob the Street Cat has a new book out, too, and fans will want it.

June Summertime reading bolts out the door like a teenager off curfew with new novels by Mary Alice Monroe, Dorothea Benton Frank, and Jeff Shaara; cookbooks; a busi-

July

ness book by William Poundstone and one on commodities; a book about Sally Ride by Lynn Sherr; and Hillary Rodham Clinton’s much-anticipated biography. And that’s just the first week… Later in June, look for new novels by Diana Gabaldon, Jennifer Weiner, Janet Evanovich, Linda Fairstein, Ridley Pearson, James Patterson, Jude Deveraux, and Dean Koontz. You’ll find a book about a dog that flew during World War II (and why). Learn how to do math in a fun way. Read about Justice Antonin Scalia. Pick up some new Will Shortz puzzle books in June. And learn how to use your manners when you have to swear. For the kids, look for a new Dork Diaries installation; an encyclopedia of animated characters; a few new mysteries for middle-grade readers; a new book about Charlie the Ranch Dog; and a book about farting fish.

Just because summer’s half over doesn’t mean your reading list is! Before the fireworks even begin, look for new novels by Jojo Moyes, Susan Wiggs, J.A. Jance, Jacqueline Winspear, and Amy Sohn. There’s a new book coming out about Marilyn Monroe and Joe DiMaggio; a new book that debunks myths about sex; a new book by Ja Rule; a skinny book about crossword puzzles and why we love them; a self-help book on “wallowing” the right way; and a cool true-crime book about how amateurs have been solving cold cases and bringing killers to justice. Later in July, you’ll find more favorites: novels by Brad Thor, Iris & Roy Johansen, Anne Rivers Siddons, Terry Brooks, Catherine Coulter, Brad Taylor, Conn Igguldon, Stuart Woods, James Lee Burke, Ace Atkins, and Julie Garwood; a new memoir by singer Rick James; a biography on Michelangelo; a new book about families and race; a tell-all about the Clinton’s political life; and a memoir of faith and football. The kidlets will love finding new Guardians of the Galaxy books; new joke books to while away the summer; the latest Fancy Nancy installment; and a new graphic novel by Neil Gaiman.

August

You’re not done yet. There’s still plenty

of summer – and plenty of time to read – left! The first part of August will see a new book by Andrew Cuomo; a new novel by Douglas Preston & Lincoln Child; a new W.E.B. Griffin tome; a new book about crime-scene profilers; and a book about the woman behind the Mona Lisa. Also in August, look for a book about college football conferences; a business book about getting organized and one on prosperity; new cookbooks for backyard and for fall; and new novels by Carl Weber, William Kent Krueger, Debbie Macomber, Kelly Armstrong, Elaine Hussey, Randy Wayne White, Tami Hoag, Paul Coelho and Kathy Reichs. Get the kids in back-to-school mode with a new children’s book by Malala Yousafzai; a new Cupcake Diaries installment; ghost stories; and a kid’s book about paying it forward.

And now the disclaimer Yes, some of these books can be shifted, moved, or cancelled altogether. Titles can change; so can subject matter. If you’ve got a question about your favorite author, Nicely ask your librarian or bookseller – this is why they get paid the big bucks. Seriously, they’re experts at this stuff. Have a great summer and happy reading!

so much inside the bannner this week LIFE: Entertainment aplenty at the Arvada Center. Page 9

SPORTS: Eberly headed to Western Texas. Pages 16

SERIES: Part 1: A look at mental health issues. Page 7

HEALTH: The benefits of dark chocolate. Page 8


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May 22, 2014

Coffman touts military, business background Republican wants to keep CD-6 House seat By Jennifer Smith

jsmith@coloradocommunitymedia.com As U.S. Rep. Mike Coffman lobbies to keep his 6th Congressional District seat for the Republicans, he’s not too worried about the new kid on the block. “Coming from Aurora, I certainly have a background that is more reflective of the community,” he said during a May 17 interview at Bemis Library in Littleton. “He moved into the district not because he wanted to live there, but because he wanted to live in Washington, D.C.” He’s talking about Democratic challenger Andrew Romanoff, new to the district but not to politics. He served in the state House from 2000-08, as speaker from 2005 on. In 2010, he launched an unsuccessful bid to unseat fellow Democrat U.S. Sen. Michael Bennet. Coffman says that’s no replacement for real-world experience like his, including 17 years as an Aurora business owner and a military career that started in 1972. In 2005, he resigned his post as Colorado’s secretary of state to serve a tour with the U.S. Marines in Iraq. “I’m the only member of the Colorado delegation who served in the military during the Persian Gulf War and Iraq,” he said. He says that makes him uniquely qualified in his role as the chair of the Veterans Affairs Subcommittee on Oversight and Investigations, currently looking into the wait-list scandal as whistleblowers emerge around the country.

“I think (VA Secretary Eric Shinseki) should step down or be fired, along with the senior bureaucrats that surrounded him,” said Coffman. “. … At first he denied problems, then, in my view, looked the other way and defended those who were responsible. He’s never said heads are going to roll if this is true.” Coffman points to the VA House Committee as a bastion of bipartisanship. “It’s not a Republican issue or a Democrat issue,” he said. “I really feel they all equally care about meeting our obligations to our veterans. I don’t see any daylight between us.” At one time, Coffman was perhaps most famous for being the owner of Buckley the Treasury Dog, his golden retriever that continued to visit the state Capitol even after Coffman left the office of state treasurer. Buckley died two years ago at the age of 10. But his new goldie, named Atty, livens up the home Coffman shares with his wife, Cynthia. Currently the chief deputy attorney general of Colorado, Cynthia Coffman is a Republican candidate for attorney general. Here are Coffman’s quick takes on a variety of topics:

Rare Earth Caucus in an effort to make that happen. The group worked to convince the World Trade Organization that China is violating WTO rules by restricting export of metals commonly used to make parts for electronics. “I think free trade is important, but it also has to be fair trade,” said Coffman.

Mental health

Coffman would like to see a residential center for the homeless created at the Anschutz Medical Center in Aurora, with an emphasis on mental health. Along with Sen. Mark Udall, D-Colo., he launched a task force to study ways to better serve veterans with post-traumatic stress disorder. “As a nation, we’ve really fallen short on mental-health care,” said Coffman. “I think it has to be a priority, and it’s not just funding, it’s reforming the current system.” He says he’s also working with the African immigrant community to create a connection with the Aurora Mental Health Center. “I want to make sure they get some services that understand their culture,” he said.

Military funding

The economy

In Colorado, relaxing regulations impeding the aerospace industry is one key to a robust economy, said Coffman. He’s working with Bennet on legislation that they hope will help American aerospace companies export their products and technologies to international customers while still protecting national security interests. Encouraging more manufacturing is another of his priorities, and he joined the

“I think I’ve been fairly independent on that, especially because I think Republicans have the same problem that they accuse Democrats of on this. The important metric is the outcome, not how much you spend. I think that there is a lot of waste at the Pentagon. I think we can reduce spending without compromising security.”

Obamacare “I

think

health-insurance

reform,

health-care reform, is very important,” he said. I think there’s no question the system was flawed. But what I disagree with is upending the entire system to fix the parts that were broken.” He notes that when he was in the state Legislature, he supported laws that prohibited discrimination based on gender or preexisting conditions, and he supported insurance portability and spreading out the risk to a larger pool. “But I think we can do better,” he said. “I would support repeal and replace.”

Fracking

“I think there’s been a resurgence in manufacturing jobs due to low-energy costs, which is primarily due to fracking,” said Coffman. He says safety regulations are imperative, but he trusts the states to be better able to create appropriate measures than the federal government. “The citizens have much greater access at the state level than they do to the Environmental Protection Agency,” he said.

Personhood

While there’s been some debate over Coffman’s support of the “personhood” amendment that will appear on Colorado’s 2014 ballot, he says it’s overboard. He notes his support of a ban on federal funding of abortion except for in the case of rape or incest or when the life of the mother is in danger, and says he’s opposed to all abortions after 20 weeks with the same exceptions. “I’m clearly pro-life,” he said. “I would not vote for it the way it is, and I think there are unintended consequences to it.”

ADAMS COUNTY NEWS IN A HURRY E-470 Foundation doles out grants

Programs that promote transportation safety have each been awarded $2,500 grants from the E-470 Transportation Safety Foundation, a total of $20,000 in all. Area programs that received the grants include: Rampart Search and Rescue in Northglenn received a grant to replace and upgrade personal-protection equipment and tools needed during natural disasters, urban search operations, and training. Laradon, a nonprofit organization serving the needs of people with developmental disabilities, was awarded a grant to purchase safety equipment and fund training expenses to ensure developmentally disabled adults remain safe while being transported in a vehicle. Saint

Anthony North Health Foundation will use its grant to provide child car seats to low-income families. The foundation also provided $200 grants to seven high schools along the E-470 corridor for after-prom activities. High schools use this grant money to purchase prizes as an incentive for students to attend the after-prom party in an effort to keep them safe. The grant recipients were Aurora West College Preparatory Academy, Brighton High School, Chaparral High School, Eaglecrest High School, Frederick High School, Grandview High School and Thornton High School. E-470 Transportation Safety Foundation, a nonprofit organization, provides

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donations and grants as a means of promoting transportation safety. The foundation is separate from the E-470 Public Highway Authority and raises its own funds; it is not funded by the authority.

Serving on the foundation’s board of directors are Randy Drennen, president; Paul Tauer, vice president; Jan Pawlowski, secretary/treasurer; and directors Noel Busck, Lynn Myers and Ed Tauer.


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4 Brighton Banner

May 22, 2014

Energy report out by Brighton EDC The Brighton EDC released an economic analysis of Brighton’s Energy and Employment Corridor on May 7. Development Research Partners (DRP) was commissioned to perform the study and report the findings of an extensive analysis into the economics of the approximately 3,000 acre planning area. The area includes Brighton, Fort Lupton and unincorporated areas in Weld County. “We’ve been marketing the area to a variety of primary employers for the past few years,” said Robert Smith, President and CEO of the Brighton EDC. “The Energy and Employment Corridor presents great op-

portunities and with industry anchors like Vestas, Halliburton, Anadarko and Baker Hughes, our success in attracting great primary employers was ready to be quantified. This report does just that and the results speak for themselves.” As Vestas Wind Systems located the first of two advanced manufacturing facilities in Brighton, the Brighton EDC envisioned a growth area called, at that time: the New Energy Corridor and an initial study of the area was completed in 2009. Five years later, Development Research Partners’ analysis reveals the Corridor has shown tremendous growth and in a variety of industries.

Jobs are increasing, real estate investment is rising, development is growing, and the successful leasing of commercial property has led to the need for increased Build-toSuit and speculative development. “This latest report by DRP and the one completed in 2009 are separate, but they feather together to offer a more comprehensive look at this important Brighton development corridor,” Smith said. “About 2,700 people are currently employed in the Corridor, a 41 percent increase since 2009,” said Patty Silverstein of Development Research Partners. “The Corridor is an attractive area for energy busi-

nesses, as this region supports balanced energy growth with a robust workforce, improved infrastructure, and welcoming community partners.” Development Research Partners will present and discuss the Economic Trends in the Energy and Employment Corridor Report, the day after its release, at a Brighton EDC hosted Energy Event. The Brighton Economic Development Corporation (Brighton EDC) is a 501c(6) nonprofit organization representing Brighton’s economic development interests.

Road bill passes House

SCHOOL NOTES New North Elementary principal selected

School District 27J has selected experienced educator Andra Ramsay as the new principal of North Elementary School in Brighton. Ramsay began her educational career as a fifth-grade teacher in the St. Vrain Valley School District in 1990. From 1992 to 2010, she worked as a mathematics teacher at Conrad Ball Middle School in Loveland, part of the Thompson School District. Ramsay served as a K-5 instructional coach school leader and academic interventionist in the Thompson School District from 2010 to 2013. She has spent the past year as assistant principal of Bea Underwood Elementary School in Parachute, Colo., part of the Garfield School District. Ramsay received her bachelor’s degree in elementary education from Mesa State College in 1989 and earned her master’s degree in education administration from Grand Canyon University in 2010. “I’m excited to welcome Andra to North Elementary and the 27J family. I believe her deep instructional background and extensive work in collaboration will make her a great fit for North,” said 27J Superintendent of Schools Dr. Chris Fiedler. Ramsay was selected after a detailed and thorough interview process that involved North staff and parents. The process produced a list of highly-qualified candidates for the principal position. Her official start date for the district is July 17.

NHS students win House App Challenge contest

The House App Challenge was established by the U.S. House of Representatives and is a nationwide event. Congressman Ed Perlmutter sponsored the event held at Northglenn High School. Students competed by creating and exhibiting their software apps for mobile, tablet or computer devices and were judged by experts in the coding field. Northglenn High School students took top honors at the event with their student handbook app. The N.E.R.O. (Northglenn Educational Resource Organizer) app is interactive, contains student handbook information as well as allowing teachers to add assignments that populate into student schedules.

Adams12 students help more than 1,000 families with tax prep

Students from Horizon and Mountain Range High Schools participated in the Tax Help Colorado program through Front Range Community College. Students and their instructors helped more than 1,000 low-income families from Brighton and Westminster claim tax refunds of more than $2 million. This event gave the opportunity for students to learn, earn college credit, and give back to their community.

Measure in response to U.S. 36 construction contracts By Vic Vela

vvela@coloradocommunitymedia.com Private-public road construction partnerships moved one step closer to having greater oversight with a bill that passed the House on May 5. Senate Bill 197 is a response to grumblings over the U.S. 36 road construction process, perceived by some as being too secretive. “This is what we heard loud and clear, that people wanted Report transparency in this project; that people wanted to be informed and involved and they wanted the legislature more involved in the process,” said Rep. Tracy Kraft-Tharp, D-Arvada, a bill sponsor. The bill increases public notice and legislative oversight of public-private partnerships of Colorado Department of Transportation road projects. The legislation also requires a CDOT board to hold public meetings throughout the road project process and keep the Legislature and other local elected officials informed along the way. Under the bill, any road project that exceeds 35 years must be approved by the Legislature. And the bill also requires that CDOT post the terms of the partnership agreement on its website. The bill was spurred by fallout from the $425 million U.S. 36 road project, one that will widen

Capitol

BRIGHTON NEWS IN A HURRY City earns ‘gold’ award for livability

Program promotes teens who make a difference

CenturyLink, Inc.in partnership with the Colorado Rockies, has launched the CenturyLink Teens in Action program to recognize and reward six Colorado teenagers who are making a difference in their community through outstanding volunteer efforts. During the four-month program spanning the summer, CenturyLink and the Colorado Rockies will select six deserving teenagers to receive tickets to a Rockies game and on-field recognition as part of the honor. In addition, $2,000 is donated the nonprofit where the teen volunteers. The “CenturyLink Teens in Action” program will be evaluated on an original 250-word or less essay describing the experience of the student volunteering for a nonprofit organization. Anyone can nominate a teen volunteer between the ages of 13 and 18 by submitting an essay at colorado.rockies.mlb.com.

the lanes of the highway and incorporate toll lanes. Because it is a private-public partnership, much of the road funding will come from private financing. Supporters say that’s important, given the lack of tax payer-backed road funding that is available for all the state’s construction projects. But Rep. Mike Foote, D-Lafayette, said that’s also something that requires some watching. “Out-of-state financiers are not accountable to public,” Foote said. “As the Legislature, we are accountable to the public. They aren’t.” There have been concerns that the public was kept out of the loop along the way. Many residents of communities that rely on U.S. 36 for transport said they didn’t know many of the details of the 50year project. “I think that transparency is really important and I think when the voters in my district tell me they have a strong concern here, I need to follow the voters in my district,” said Rep. Max Tyler, DLakewood, who supported the bill. The bill passed with bipartisan support in the Senate, but a couple of Democrats joined all Republicans in voting against the bill in the House. Critics of the legislation included the Colorado Contractors Association, a group that expressed concerns that the bill would have an adverse impact on road projects. The group and the majority of General Assembly Republicans wondered if the legislation was a knee-jerk reaction to what happened during the U.S. 36 process, and that the response is disproportionate to the problem. “Transparency, yes; absolute control, no,” said Rep. Ray Scott, R-Grand Junction. “We already have many pieces of control within our state statutes.” The bill now heads to the desk of Gov. John Hickenlooper for his signature.

Executive Director of Brighton Housing Joseph Espinosa was present to inform council that the city of Brighton won the DRCOG award for Libretto. The city of Brighton won first place, the “gold” award for working within the community,

making the community more home friendly, increasing livability, working to provide open space areas and improving the quality of life for residents in our city. Mr. Espinosa thanked city manager intern Murphy Robinson for all his work in helping Brighton receive this award.

HAVE A LEGISLATIVE QUESTION? Email Colorado Community Media Legislative Reporter Vic Vela at vvela@coloradocommunitymedia. com or call 303-566-4132.

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When you next eat at McDonald’s, here’s an exercise in consumer choice: Would you choose a Bacon Club House burger with 750 calories, a Big Mac with 550 calories, or the premium McWrap with bacon and grilled chicken giving you 460? You might think twice if you knew that one option gave you 300 calories more than another and, all by itself, provided you with more than one third of the calories you need for the day (based on a 2,000 calorie diet). Beginning in the summer of 2015, you’ll be able to figure it out. That’s when a provision in the Affordable Care Act that requires chain restaurants with 20 or more national outlets to reveal how many calories are in their hamburgers, stuffed burritos and breakfast pastries takes effect. That labeling will allow customers to see how many calories contribute to their daily intake and maybe, just maybe, will help Americans eat healthier foods. While insurance for the uninsured has grabbed most of the headlines, good and bad, insurance coverage may not be the provision in the Affordable Care Act that will have the biggest impact on health. A way to pay for medical care is important, but my vote goes to the calorie labeling provisions. The FDA has also proposed a rule implementing the law that calorie-labeling requirements should also apply to supermarkets and convenience stores serving ready-prepared foods. “I’ve been stunned by how many calories are in popular restaurant foods and how difficult it is to tell the difference between items,” says Margot Wootan, director of nutrition policy at the Center for Science in the Public Interest, a food advocacy group. “There’s a real difference between a regular hamburger at 200 to 300 calories, a bigger hamburger that has 400 to 500 calories and a triple burger with 700.” Without calorie labeling, though, it’s not always apparent which is the healthier choice. Sometimes, Wootan explains, a tuna salad sandwich has 50 percent more calories than one made with roast beef. Why, I asked. A giant scoop of salad, which is all too common in such sandwiches, along with the mayo are the culprits. But only calorie labels will tell you that. Eighteen states and localities have passed labeling requirements. Not all have gone into effect because some jurisdictions have decided to wait for the federal law to

kick in. As a consumer I appreciate the labels that prompt me to buy a banana at the airport instead of a big, fat cinnamon roll when I am waiting for a plane. Over the last decade or so eating out has gone from being a special occasion treat to something families do when they don’t want to cook. As portion sizes in restaurants have gotten much larger, knowing how many calories you are consuming has taken on a new urgency. “The bigger the portion size, the more you eat,” Wootan says. Consumers are sold on the proposition that big servings mean you’re getting more value for your money. A large study evaluating labeling in New York found that one in six people purchased 100 fewer calories after labeling took effect. A Stanford University study looking at labels on products sold at Starbucks found they had no effect on beverage consumption but contributed to a 14 percent decrease in consumption of other foods. In other words, customers were not going to give up on that 470-calorie white chocolate mocha but reconsidered their food choice before buying a 480-calorie old fashioned glazed dougnut. When it comes to beverages, Wootan says, customers had a good sense of the calories they contained, but they got the same thing every day. Habit seemed to trump nutrition. It was a different story with other foods. “They were more flexible with food.” The labeling has prompted sellers to be more aware of their product formulations, too, cutting down calories where they can. A Starbucks store manager told me the company began using 2 percent instead of whole milk in its drinks and took an apple fritter with some 600 calories off the menu when the labeling law took effect. The labels don’t force consumers to do anything or change the way they eat. They simply provide information that lets them know what they are eating and helps signal that too many calories may contribute to serious health conditions. Just knowing that McDonalds Filet-o-Fish has 390 calories while a Southwest salad with grilled chicken has only 290 might lead to healthier choices. But the calorie labels still let you have it your way. Editor’s note: The Rural Health News Service is funded by a grant from The Commonwealth Fund and distributed through the Nebraska Press Association Foundation, the Colorado Press Association and the South Dakota Newspaper Association.

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6-OPINION

6 Brighton Banner

May 22, 2014

opinions / yours and ours

Making a ‘healthy’ promise to myself Have you ever heard the phrase: “If I’d known I was going to live this long, I would have taken better care of myself?” I was reminded of these words last week as a result of my BMI, my BP, and my LDL. That’s because I recently participated in the 9HealthFair at the Apex Center. The health professionals there recommended both better nutrition and more exercise for basic things such as body flexibility, sleeping better, and maintaining a healthy weight. Actually, everything except my LDL – too high – and my overall cholesterol – way too high – was in the acceptable range. In most cases, I’m average for a female in her 50s. A little low here and there, and little high on some scales, but still within defined limits for good health. For example, my BMI (Body Mass Index) is normal and my BP (blood pressure) is excellent. But my cholesterol – what’s up with that? The overall number has been climbing for the last several years and, although

that’s an undesirable trend, it hasn’t been this far out of the defined limits for risk. Cholesterol is an essential blood fat found in nearly every body tissue. Yet, as most of us know, elevated levels of cholesterol are associated with a higher risk of heart disease and clogged blood vessels. I learned a few years ago that there is actually a “good” cholesterol, the high-density lipoproteins (HDL). This conglomeration of blood fats acts as a scavenger, removing excess cholesterol from artery walls. On the other hand, HDL’s evil twin,

LDL (low-density lipoproteins) is lurking in my blood vessels, literally. This is the cholesterol that forms deposits on artery walls, so the high level of my LDL is really concerning to me. More than a science lesson, too, these results have me wondering why my numbers are as high as they are. Some forms of high cholesterol are hereditary, but to our knowledge there is no history of high cholesterol in our family. My diet isn’t extreme in any direction, healthy or unhealthy, and I’ll be interested to learn whether these are numbers that I can change by adjusting what I eat. In any case, more fruits and veggies and lean protein are just right for summer meals anyway. But exercise … my exercise routine is, well, nonexistent. The routine part, that is. And, actually, since I returned from trekking in Nepal around Thanksgiving time, the exercise part itself has largely gone missing as well. This time last year, I was

training for the trek by hiking at altitude at least once a week and I have yet to get back into that groove. And, I wonder, too, could my cholesterol have been this high even while I was getting my exercise by putting down the miles every week for months? Or has it suddenly shot out of control since the holidays? Neither option makes me comfortable, and I’m headed to the doc’s office to figure it out. I owe it to myself to take better care of me. Fortunately, these longer and warmer summer evenings hold the promise of getting out on my bike and now, especially with my results form the 9HealthFair, that’s a promise to myself that I intend to keep. Andrea Doray is a writer who intends to incorporate more of the good stuff and less of the bad stuff into both her diet and her lifestyle. Contact her at a.doray@andreadoray.com.

question of the week

Will the Rockies reach new heights? The Rockies’ winning record is taking many by surprise. We asked folks around town whether those wins will continue to pile up.

“Yes. Their pitching is better, and they’re getting some hits from their outfielders, and I think that’s going to continue to be the case.” Rick Longworth

“No, because they suck.” Ben Clapper

“I don’t know. They’re my team, but they are the Rockies, after all.” Kenny Lobato

“Yes, but there’s still 100 games to go. It’s too early in the season to really know.” George Adsit

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Little acts of kindness Last Saturday our daughter Nancy brought our two little great grandchildren Kayla and Allyson and together they planted our four large flower pots. Yes, in the scheme of things it was a small kindness. But to Bob and I it was a delight to see our little great granddaughters working to make our home look nice. To us it was a big act of kindness. That thought came to me after participating in a very small act of kindness. I was in line at the grocery store while Bob sat near the store doors. The line was long but other customers sensed my nervousness over leaving Bob for that amount of time. Anyway, those in line gave way so I could get back to Bob. One of the line holdups was the guy ahead of me and after paying the $148 bill he was short six cents. Well, the clerk did not offer up the six cents shortage. Of course I took out a quarter and got him on his way. In the process he saved face and I got back to Bob sooner. In short we all paid it forward and it was a happy transaction.

Another kindness

A few months ago I flew home to Minnesota for my needed family respite. Since I don’t fly much anymore I was a little nervous. On the shuttle going back to the airport I voiced my concern and immediately a lovely younger lady said, “Don’t give it a thought, I’ll take care of you since I’m also going back to Denver.” Did she ever take good care of me and my luggage. From the onset we found similarities. She lives in Arvada, works in the school system and comes from a Catholic family in Minnesota. Wow! Was I relieved to receive that kind of assistance. Maybe a small kindness for her but major for me and I thank her from the bottom of my heart.

Another act of kindness

The other evening about 7 p.m. there was a pounding on the door and the ring-

ing of the doorbell. I opened the door and a hysterical young woman told me her dog was engaged in a dog fight with the neighbors big dog. No amount of calling her small dog back across the street was of avail. We were both very frightened when all of a sudden a pickup truck came to a stop, the doors opened and two young men rushed to our aid, separated the dogs and placed the little dog in the arms of the distraught owner. Before we could properly thank them they were gone. In the scary fight I found a new friend, Lucinda, who lives in the area. I’m sure from time to time we will see each other and reflect on those guys who saved us and the dogs from what could have been a disastrous outcome. Just a little act of kindness with a huge outlay of kindness.

More kindness

Two weeks ago my dear friend, Lois, lost her husband. Of course we all are supporting her and will continue to offer support. Even a phone call frequently will help her through this sad time. It’s another opportunity to help someone who needs our love and prayers which are also acts of kindness. This weekend will bring forth a lot of remembering and sadness as we reflect on the loss of so many family and friends. Before the barbecue begins, let’s reflect on those who now are no longer

June continues on Page 7


7-Color Brighton Banner 7

May 22, 2014

Health providers tackle toll of mental illness Behavioral disorders drive up usage of hospitals, ERs By Kristin Jones and Burt Hubbard Rocky Mountain PBS I-News

Editor’s note: This is the first in a threepart series. Call them frequent flyers. Or superutilizers. Or loyal customers. In hospitals across the country, they’re known to doctors and nurses as the people who come back time and again for care. They make up a very small percentage of patients, but they rack up an inordinate share of medical expenses, often preventable. Among Colorado Medicaid enrollees, they spend an average of around eight times as much as their peers. And many of them — nearly threequarters, by an Aurora study’s recent count — have a mental illness. It makes intuitive sense, and research confirms it: A troubled mind can take a toll on the body, and vice versa. This simple fact is leading medical professionals and health officials in Colorado to rethink how to curb high costs in the health-care system. What they have found is that it’s impossible to treat the most expensive customers of emergency rooms and other hospital services without addressing mental health. “You can’t improve the overall health if you’re not treating the whole person,” says Dr. Angela Green, who co-directs an Aurora-based project called Bridges to Care. Health-care costs, many of them preventable, rank among the highest indirect impacts of mental illness, an analysis by Rocky Mountain PBS I-News has found. Medical expenses associated with mental illness reached an estimated $2 billion in Colorado in 2013, according to 2005 figures from the federal Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, updated for growth and inflation. Lost wages cost even more. Workers with mental disorders earn $16,000 less per person per year, according to a 2008 study published in the American Journal of Psychiatry. I-News estimates Colorado’s share of these lost wages at $2.9 billion. The costs keep piling up: $425 million for disability pay in 2012, according to the Social Security Administration; $62 million in state education spending for children with emotional disorders in 2012; $44.7 million to hold inmates with mental illnesses in seven county jails, according to a 2010 City of Denver survey of the metro Denver counties; $28 million budgeted this year to treat state prison inmates. “We’re spending a lot of money on mental health, but in all the wrong places,” says Moe Keller, a former state legislator who is now an advocate with Mental Health America of Colorado. “We’re spending an inordinate amount of money in jails because we’re not treating mental health as a physical health issue, in courts because we’re not treating mental health as a physical health issue, in emergency rooms, in prisons.” Keller believes the money would be more wisely directed to the front end, to screening for depression in primary care offices and treating people for mental and physical health problems in the same place. Around the state, health officials and hospital administrators are coming to the same conclusion. And they’re starting with the frequent flyers.

Treating the whole person

Christina Jackson seemed to sleep only an hour at a time after her sister died in March 2013. Her daughter had to coax her to eat. She cried a lot. And then, in July of

June Continued from Page 6

with us. Stay well, stay involved and stay tuned. P.S. A very big shout out to Sharri Harris for being my “angel” when I needed one.

last year, chest pains punctuated a crying jag. Jackson was having a heart attack. One thing led to another. The heart attack was followed by a stroke that left Jackson, who is 47, blind in one eye. Her hopelessness and anxiety deepened. By last fall, Jackson had visited the emergency room at University of Colorado Hospital in Aurora three times in a span of six months — the tipping point that alerted Bridges to Care to intervene. Bridges to Care, which is run out of Metro Community Provider Network safety-net clinics in Aurora, launched its frequent-flyer program last year. The program, funded by a federal grant, is part of a national movement aimed at stemming health-care costs by improving the way care is given to the most costly consumers in the medical system. In Colorado, this idea is gaining ground in scattershot efforts launched by state Medicaid administrators and hospitals including Denver Health. These efforts diverge in how they flag frequent flyers and facilitate care. But they share a philosophy of coordinating services and giving personalized attention to help people navigate a complex healthcare system more efficiently. Relationships are key. It’s these relationships — between care coordinators and the patients — that can help turn up the undiagnosed and untreated mental illness beneath the surface of a medical crisis. Along with getting a care coordinator, each person who enrolls in Bridges to Care receives a home visit from a therapist and a psychiatric nurse practitioner. The Aurora project has collected detailed profiles of 57 people who have graduated from its two-month program. Around 72 percent of them were diagnosed with one or more mental illnesses. About a quarter of them had depression, 20 percent had anxiety disorder, and 11 percent had bipolar disorder. Bridges to Care’s findings are in line with what health officials and doctors are seeing across Colorado. Mental illnesses collectively make up the most prevalent conditions among Medicaid clients who frequent the ER six times or more in a span of 12 months, according to an I-News survey of the state’s seven regional Medicaid administrators tasked with improving care for low-income Coloradans. Mental illnesses are more common than diabetes, asthma, or any other driver of ER use. Around 33 percent of these frequent flyers have behavioral health claims, but that’s likely an underestimate of the true disease prevalence, Medicaid administrators say. “When you look at the claims data, it doesn’t help paint the picture at all,” says Jenny Nate, community strategist for Rocky Mountain Health Plans, which helps administer Medicaid for much of the western half of the state. “Sometimes behavioral health diagnoses get missed or minimized,” says Nate. “So it’s hard to get the real story.” On top of that, Medicaid clients get

You are wonderful for taking such good care of me. Vi June is past Democratic state representative for House District 35. She is a former mayor of Westminster and a former newspaper publisher. A Westminster resident for more than four decades, she and her husband, Bob, have five grown children and eight grandchildren.

their physical care and their mental health care from separate places, making it harder to track any overlap.

Relationships cut costs

That’s where care coordinators like Alyssa Murphy come in. Murphy, a former AmeriCorps volunteer, was assigned to guide Christina Jackson to a primary care doctor and make sure she could get an appointment when she needed it. The two hit it off immediately. “I really love her,” Jackson beamed at Murphy, who was sitting across the room from her in Jackson’s duplex in east Aurora. Before, she said, she couldn’t seem to get a doctor’s appointment when she needed it and hospital staff didn’t seem to care about her at all. Murphy seemed genuinely interested in her well-being. “She helped me through it.” Along with arranging transportation to the clinic and helping her apply for food stamps, Murphy introduced Jackson to the clinic’s behavioral health team, who taught her breathing techniques to manage stress. On the sofa at home, Jackson demonstrated her breathing exercises. She inhaled, one-two-three, and exhaled. Immediately, her face looked less drawn; she smiled and sat up straighter. Jackson graduated from the two-month

program at the end of January, without going to the hospital once during that time. While her depression hasn’t lifted, Jackson has found that its burden was eased by the personal attention and a sense of empowerment about her health. As time-consuming and resource-intensive as it is to provide care this way, it’s actually expected to cut medical costs, says Green. Six months after graduating from the program, 79 percent of the patients were either visiting the emergency room less frequently or not at all. With an eye toward reducing Medicaid expenses, state government recently launched pilot programs to do similar work in regions with the highest concentration of what they call superutilizers. The state’s intervention targets people who visited the emergency room six times or more in a span of 12 months, or used 30 prescriptions — a population that cost $25,187 per patient in 2013, on average. By comparison, the average Medicaid patient costs just $3,000 a year. Care coordinators — the kind of personal medical assistant that Murphy was to Christina Jackson — will be assigned to these high-cost medical customers in Pueblo and Colorado Springs in order to make their health care more efficient.

Illnesses interact

Behavioral health will be a key part of the approach, says Patrick Fox, deputy director of the Office of Behavioral Health at the Colorado Department of Human Services. “Most of these superutilizers have a physical health problem and behavioral health component,” Fox says. He gives the example of a Medicaid client who was treated for a blood clot in her lung. Afterward, every twinge in her leg or chest would send her, panicked, to the ER. She went every two or three weeks. “She didn’t understand that her risk of this coming back was nonexistent. Health continues on Page 8

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8-Color

8 Brighton Banner

May 22, 2014

Hickenlooper signs bill to help brownfields Visits Wheat Ridge legislators who lead the charge By Clarke Reader

creader@colorado communitymedia.com Gov. Hickenlooper visited Wheat Ridge with Sen. Cheri Jahn and Rep. Cheri Gerou on May 15 to sign a bill that would help revitalize blighted areas all over the state. SB14-073 will help to decontaminate abandoned areas, allowing them to be repurposed, redeveloped, and expanded. Fittingly, the signing was held at the site of the former Ford dealership at 38th Ave. and Wadsworth Boulevard, and the delegates were joined by Mayor Joyce Jay, members of city council and city staff. Representatives from various community organizations as well as developers were also at the signing. “The economic transformation of Wheat Ridge has been a result of partnerships,” Jay said. “The opportunity created by this bill to clean up ‘brownfields’ will really help — we have a lot of properties that need to be renewed.” Hickenlooper said that he was pleased to be joined by Jahn and Gerou, who he described as two of the most pro-business legislators in the congress. Jahn spoke about the positive effects the law will have, since it extends a state tax credit for environmental remediation and redevelopment activities. Jahn was first alerted to the issue when she met with a constituent who told her about a similar program that was available to the public from 2000-2010, but was only available for projects within communities of at least 10,000 people. “This will allow us to do projects so that people don’t have to go outside our communities for these businesses,” Jahn said. “It’s so important for our small business districts that we improve these lands.” Gerou added that the value of redeveloping these sites will be extremely important for local businesses and the community. City manager Patrick Goff invited Bob Turner of Quadrant Properties to speak, who said that this bill will help his company — who is working on redevelopment in Wheat Ridge — further its project. “This site meets all the definitions of a brownfield,” he said. “It takes a commitment from the city, residents and state government to complete a project like this.”

Above, Gov. John Hickenlooper speaks with Mayor Joyce Jay before signing SB14-073 - the Brownfields Tax Credit - into law. At left, Rep. Cheri Gerou, left, and Sen. Cheri Jahn, center, speak before Gov. John Hickenlooper signs SB14-073 into law. Photos by Clarke Reader.

Health Continued from Page 7

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Somebody needed to explain it to her,” says Fox. “It was not a severe persistent mental illness, but in a regular primary care office, there’s not time to look for a behavioral health condition. It doesn’t get diagnosed.” At the same time, it isn’t uncommon for frequent flyers to have a mental illness that’s the main driver of their ER visits. Around 14 percent of the frequent ER users in central Colorado counties, including El Paso, have a primary diagnosis of mental illness. The number is 18 percent in the state’s southeastern counties, including Pueblo. They include people like Fruita resident Agnes Shellabarger, who has schizophrenia. Migraines and suicidal thoughts have led her to the hospital repeatedly, and she now works with a care coordinator based at Mind Springs Health, the community mental health center in Grand Junction. Substance abuse is also a common driver of ER visits. Robin Bingham was a

repeat visitor to the emergency room at St. Mary’s Hospital in Grand Junction, usually for detox from crystal methamphetamine or alcohol. In January, she took an overdose of medication in a suicide attempt, and was referred to a care coordinator at Mind Springs Health who has helped her embark on recovery. “It’s very difficult to find treatment on your own,” Bingham said in March. “I called every treatment center in town and they didn’t call me back.” When Denver Health designed its frequent-flyer program, it specifically targeted people with cooccurring mental illnesses. To qualify for an intensive outpatient intervention, patients had to be admitted to the hospital three times in the past six months — or twice, with a mental illness diagnosis. The reason for this, says Tracy L. Johnson, who directs health-care reform initiatives at Denver Health, is the growing body of research on a national level showing the relationship between preventable hospital readmissions and mental illness. The revolving door is especially likely to ensnare

people with mental illness who are non-compliant with medication, who are discharged into unstable care or who have co-occurring substance abuse disorders, according to recent research reviewed by scholars at George Washington University.

Coordination is challenge

As big as the financial costs of untreated mental illness can be, the personal ones are much greater. Poor mental health can come hand-in-hand with substance abuse, unemployment, homelessness, high rates of smoking and poor access to medical care. In part for these reasons, people with severe mental illnesses die an average of 25 years earlier than others, according to a 2008 study by the National Association of State Mental Health Program Directors. Statistics like this one have convinced many that there are benefits in coordinating physical and mental health care. But the mechanics of doing so are often more difficult. In practice, the two forms of care are in separate silos. Keller, the mental health advocate, ticks off a list of

obstacles that stand in the way of integrating the two types of care. Much of the difficulty has to do with reimbursement. Physicians can’t bill for anything that doesn’t have its own billing code. And the payment model doesn’t account for the lengthier office visits that a mental-health visit requires. There are other barriers, too. Nurses, doctors and psychologists are often unaccustomed to working in a team. And broad interpretations of medical privacy laws prevent the sharing of information. Colorado is applying for a federal grant to integrate its physical and behavioral health care, and Keller believes the Affordable Care Act will go a long way toward reforming payment for mental health. “There are some good things happening,” says Keller. “We’re not there yet.” Colorado Community Media brings you this report in partnership with Rocky Mountain PBS I-News. Learn more at rmpbs.org/ news. Contract Kristin Jones at kristinjones@rmpbs.org.


9-LIFE-Color Brighton Banner 9

May 22, 2014

Metro Creative Connection

M

any people associate healthy eating with foods that may not be so tasty. While desserts are not often considered the healthiest course of a meal, dark chocolate, when enjoyed in moderation, can be healthy. Dark chocolate can benefit the brain, heart and even teeth. Researchers at a meeting of the American Chemical Society in Dallas have discovered just why dark chocolate packs such a healthy punch. Otherwise indigestible portions of the chocolate are converted by microbes in the digestive system. In turn, the chocolate is transformed into anti-inflammatory compounds. Researchers found that digestion in the stomach produces long molecules called polyphenolic polymers. These molecules are too large to cross the walls of the stomach to be used nutritionally. However, when the polyphenolic polymers meet lactic acid and microbes that inhabit the human colon, the polymers ferment and can be broken down further. These smaller molecules are then used by the body. The resulting material is anti-inflammatory and can prevent certain conditions, including cardiovascular disease, from developing.

One of the pitfalls of dark chocolate is the sugar and fat content of a candy bar, which can overshadow the health benefits. But those who consume the majority of their dark chocolate in the form of unsweetened cocoa powder can avoid such consequences. Roughly two tablespoons of cocoa powder per day can produce the desired anti-inflammatory benefits, and cocoa powder can be mixed into drinks, sprinkled over oatmeal and consumed in many other ways. Full-sugar, full-fat dark chocolate bars and pieces should be enjoyed sparingly, although they are better for your health than milk or white chocolate. Interest in dark chocolate for its medical benefits has led researchers to study the efficacy of its anti-inflammatory compounds. A big study is already underway to see if pills containing the nutrients in dark chocolate can replicate the many health benefits, including helping to prevent heart attack and stroke. The pills are so concentrated they would be the equivalent of eating numerous dark chocolate bars, but without the negative side effects. The goal of the study is to see if chocolate can provide significant medical benefits without forcing consumers to eat so much sugar and fat. The study will be sponsored by the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute and Mars Inc., maker of M&M’s and Snickers bars. The candy company has patented a way to

Cocoa powder-derived pills may be used in the future to treat various health ailments. Courtesy photo extract flavonols from cocoa in high concentration and put them in capsules. Mars and some other companies sell cocoa extract capsules, but with less active ingredients than those that will be tested in the study. Someparticipants will get flavorless, coated pills that contain the cocoa flavonols, while others will be given a placebo. Eighteen thousand men and women nationwide are expected to participate.

In addition to anti-inflammatory properties, dark chocolate contains several chemical compounds that have a positive effect on mood and cognitive health. Chocolate contains phenylethylamine, or PEA, the same chemical your brain creates when you feel like you’re falling in love. Taking dark chocolate supplements may help a person’s mind and body.


10-Color

10 Brighton Banner

May 22, 2014

Guidance for parents and grandparents Sometimes advice is so good it’s meant to be posted at eye level on refrigerator. “The 101 Principles of Discipline” by Dr. Katharine Kersey is one of those. Get your scissors and tape out. The list is printed with Dr. Kersey’s permission. Discipline That Works Dr. Kersey quotes J. L. Hymes, ”Discipline is a slow, bit by bit, time-consuming task of helping children to see the sense in acting a certain way.” Here are some selections: Demonstrate Respect Principle — Treat the child the same way you treat other important people in your life — the way you want him to treat you — and others. (How would I want them to say that to me?) Make a Big Deal Principle — Make a big deal over responsible, considerate, appropriate behavior — with attention

(your eyeballs), thanks, praise, thumbs-up, recognition, hugs, special privileges, incentives (NOT food). Incompatible Alternative Principle — Give the child something to do that is incompatible with the inappropriate behavior. “Help me pick out 6 oranges” (instead of running around the grocery store). Choice Principle — Give the child two

Careers

choices, both of which are positive and acceptable to you. “Would you rather tiptoe or hop upstairs to bed?” (“You choose or I’ll choose.”) Timer Says it’s Time Principle — Set a timer to help children make transitions. “When the timer goes off, you will need to put away your books.” It is also a good idea to give the child a chance to choose how long he needs to pull himself together. “It’s okay to be upset, how long do you need?” Then allow him to remove himself from the group and set the timer. You may offer the child a choice (and set the timer) when it’s necessary for him to do something he doesn’t want to do. “Do you want to pick up your toys/let Susan have the toy/take your bath — in one minute or two?” Allow Imperfection Principle — Don’t demand perfection. Remember no one

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likes the “perfect” child, parent or teacher. With perfection as the goal, we are all losers. Anticipation Principle — Think ahead about whether or not the child is capable of handling the situation. If not, don’t take him (an expensive restaurant, long church services with out a special room, shopping, or movies). Apology Principle — Apologize easily — when you goof, or “lose it.” (“I wish I could erase what I just said.” “You must have been scared by my reaction.” “I didn’t mean to hurt your feelings.” “I was wrong.” “I’m sorry.”) Apologize for your child (“I’m sorry he knocked you down”), but DON’T make your child apologize. (You might be making him lie OR think that wrong-doings can be rectified with an apology.) Babysitter Principle — Get one.

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academyfordentalassistingcareers .com Banking FirstBank Safeway in Castle Pines F/T position for Personal Banker, Includes Saturdays, $12.00/hr plus benefits. If interested please apply at www.efirstbank.com and click on the careers link.

LEGITIMATE WORK AT HOME No Sales, no Investment, No Risk, Free training, Free website. Contact Susan at 303-646-4171 or fill out form at www.wisechoice4u.com

Caregivers to provide in-home care to senior citizens who need assistance with activities of daily living. Call Today 303-736-6688 www.visitingangels.com /employment

Commercial Door and Hardware Installer

Must have own tools and transportation Salary Based on Experience Call Roman 720-341-2345

Craftsmen / Remodelers

Experienced craftsmen needed • Work close to home • Set your own hours • Stay independent • $30+/hr. • Immediate openings • Call Mr. Woods today

720-242-7681

for local State Farm Agency in Lakewood/Golden area Insurance Licensing will be required. Career Opportunity Call Dru (303)233-2626 Drivers: $2,000.00 Sign-On Bonus! Local-Home Nightly! Flatbed Runs. CDL-A, 1yr Exp. Req. Estenson Logistics. Apply: www.goelc.com 1-888-399-5856

GAIN 130 LBS!

Savio House needs foster parents to provide temporary care for troubled teens ages 12-18. Training, 24 hour support and $1900/month provided. Must complete precertification training and pass a criminal and motor vehicle background check. Call Michelle 303-225-4073 or visit saviohouse.org. TREE CARE Workers: trimming & spraying. CO DL req. $10-12/hr. 303-431-5885

ENGINEERING Inovant, LLC, a Visa Inc. company, currently has openings in our Highlands Ranch, Colorado location for: - Lead Systems Engineers (Job #141880) to plan, implement, and support highly visible applications with in-depth knowledge of cutting edge technology, and ensuring all technical aspects are taken into consideration. Provide recommendations to improve middleware infrastructure, keeping client and business requirements into consideration. Apply online at www.visa.com & reference Job #141880. EOE

SUMMER WORK!!!

GREAT PAY!!! FT/PT sched. Cust. Sales/Service All Ages 17+ / Cond. apply. Centennial: 303-935-1030 Arvada: 303-426-4480 Lakewood/Littleton: 303-232-3008 Brighton: 303-655-7922 Castle Rock: 720-733-3969 www.summerbreakwork.com

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May 22, 2014

Band Continued from Page 1

Raquel Townsend, Jesse Marston and Gabi Sanchez Barajas Fourth year Letter student; Jordan Thomas Color guard Letter students; Maddie Benton, Chellsey Maestas, Gillian Wolfersberger, Allisa Green, Stephanie Andersen and Emmerry Benson. For Concert Band: Outstanding musician — Gillian Wolfersberger Most improved — Braelynd Dodson For Symphonic Band: Outstanding musician — Grace Cutting Most improved — Chase Johnson For Jazz Band: Outstanding musician — David Vandiver Most improved — Kasie Hudson For Jazz Ensemble: Outstanding musician — Bradly Wolfersberger

Most improved — Saul Saldivar The outstanding classmen for each grade level: Freshman — Dave Vandiver Sophomore — Alex Vogel Junior — Sydney Foster The music department also honored its retiring drum major, Bradley Wolfersberger, and welcomed two new drum majors Ani Saldivar and Saul Saldivar. Inducted into the Music Departments Hall of Fame were; Ryan Jabri Zink, Justin Kreutzer, Jordan Thomas, Bradly Wolfersberger, Tyler Knott, Gabi Sanchez Barajas and Raquel Townsend. Their pictures will be hung inside the music room along with past Hall of Fame winners. Tyler Knott received the Special Recognition award. Emmery Benson won an award for Color Guard Member of the Year. Ryan Jabri won the Louis Armstrong award. Bradley Wolfersberger won the J.P. Suosa award. Jordan Thomas won the Director’s award. Music Director Gregory Hann stated that choosing the winners for each award was very difficult because every student in all the bands have made great contributions to the music department and done outstanding work.

Highlands Ranch Metro District is seeking applicants to fill our Administrative Assistant II position. For details & application, visit http:// highlandsranch.org/how-do-i/jobs/

Hiring for all locations: Team members Minimum 16 yrs old Seeking smiling faces & friendliness Starting $8.50/hr Apply online: www.jackintheboxjobs.com

Must have own tools and experience in various maintenance skills. Apply in person: Castle Rock Apartments 432 S. Gilbert, Castle Rock, CO 80104. 303-688-5062 or email resume castlerockpat@gmail.com

Carroll said the bill would have resulted in $15 million in state costs for prison beds alone. “It might make us feel better, but if you have $15 million to either put in treatment for alcohol abuse or $15 million in prison beds, where are we better off?” Carroll said. “It’s a really good question.” Steadman said that repeat DUI offenders have addictions and that prisons aren’t the ideal place to treat their problems. Steadman also said that being an addict means you are less inclined to be deterred by the prospect of prison time, to begin with. “You can get into a big debate about the deterrent effect of criminal law,” Steadman said. “And when you’re dealing with a behavior that is driven by addiction, those deterrent effects and rational decision-making you kind of have to step back and question.”

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MAINTENANCE POSITION PART-TIME

Continued from Page 1

Careers

Careers Administrative Assistant II

DUI

ColoradoCommunityMedia.com

This institution is an equal opportunity provider, and employer.

Editor/Secretary

Part Time, Franktown area RG 303-380-1500

Sanctuary Golf Course

Maintenance seeks Seasonal Maintenance Workers Must be 18 years or older and physically fit Salary $9/hr. DOE Available immediately Please email Jan @ jlong@sanctuarygolfcourse.com

Kennel Tech:

Indoor/outdoor kennel chores. P/T adult, students after school, weekends, holidays. Indiana & 72nd Ave. area. Call 8am-12 noon weekdays

303-424-7703

STREET MAINTENANCE WORKER I

City of Black Hawk. Hiring Range: $17.59 $20.23 per hour DOQ/E. Unbelievable benefit package and exceptional opportunity to serve in Colorado’s premiere gaming community located 18 miles west of Golden. Requirements: High School Diploma or GED, valid Colorado driver’s license Class R with a safe driving record with the ability to obtain a Class A with P rating within one year of hire, and the ability to lift 80 pounds. To be considered for this limited opportunity, please apply online at www.cityofblackhawk.org/goto/ employee_services. Please note: Applicants are required to upload their resumes during the online application process. Please be sure your resume includes all educational information and reflects the past ten (10) years’ work history. Applicants must apply online and may do so at City Hall which is located at 201 Selak Street in Black Hawk. The City supports its employees and appreciates great service! EOE.

NOW HIRING

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Colorado Community Media, Colorado’s second largest newspaper group and publishers of 22 weekly local community newspapers and 24 websites is seeking to find a Classified Sales Representative & Territory Sales Representative. TERRITORY SALES REPRESENTATIVES

CLASSIFIED SALES REPRESENTATIVE

Candidates will receive: • Unlimited earning potential (no commissions cap) • Salaried Position • Benefits package offered • Sell multiple programs to a wide array of clients – print, digital, direct mail, inserts, special projects and much more! (did we mention no commissions cap?) • Current established accounts Helpful skills include: • Strong outbound contact with new & existing clients • Handle a fast paced environment in an ever changing industry • Be able to multi-task

Candidate will receive: • Unlimited earning potential (no commissions cap) • Hourly pay • Benefits package offered • Sell multiple programs to a wide array of clients • Current established accounts Helpful skills include: • Strong outbound contact with new and existing clients • Handle a fast paced environment in an ever changing industry • Be able to multi-task

Please send cover letter, resume to eaddenbrooke@colowradocommunitymedia.com. Please include job title in subject line. ColoradoCommunityMedia.com

The City of Black Hawk has an opening for an unskilled or semi–skilled position involving horticulture work with specific responsibility for the care and maintenance of flowers, trees, and shrub beds at City’s properties and street lights. Main emphasis will be on maintenance of annual floral displays along with other landscape maintenance duties. Position reports to Street Superintendent. Must be at least 18 years of age. Requires high school diploma or GED; valid Colorado Class R driver’s license with a safe driving record; experience in greenhouse and/or landscape maintenance preferred, any combination of education, training and experience considered. Scheduled work term: Summer 2014. Hours: M-W-F 7:00 AM – 4:00 PM. Wages: $12.00 – $15.00/hour DOQ/E. The City of Black Hawk conducts pre-employment physical exams, drug testing, skills testing and background investigations as a condition of employment. Applicants must apply online at http://www.cityofblackhawk.org/ goto/employee_services by Monday, May 26, 2014. Applicants may apply online at City Hall which is located at 201 Selak Street, Black Hawk, CO. The City supports its employees and appreciates great service! EOE

Local Focus. More News.

22 newspapers & 24 websites. Connecting YOU to your LOCAL community.

ColoradoCommunityMedia.com 303-566-4100


12-Color

12 Brighton Banner

May 22, 2014

Music, movies brighten those summer nights Film on The Rocks is the talk of the town, and not just in Morrison, home of Colorado’s beloved Red Rocks Amphitheatre. The 2014 Film on the Rocks schedule is out and features old favorites, like “Caddyshack” and “The Big Lebowski.” And, of course, each film night features some great bands. Films are on Tuesdays except for June 16, a Monday. The Film on the Rocks 2014 schedule was revealed May 15 on Facebook and here’s the complete schedule (more details at www.facebook.com/filmontherocks): June 3: “Caddyshack” with Ark Life and Covenhoven June 10: “Fight Club” with Flashbulb Fires and Face Man June 16: “Labyrinth” with Grizfolk and Total Ghost June 24: “This is Spinal Tap” with School of Rock USA July 1: “The Fast and the Furious” with Native Daughters July 8: “The Hunger Games: Catching Fire” with Boy & Bear and Inner Oceans July 29: “Pitch Perfect” with Tracksuit Wedding and The Messers Sept. 2: “The Big Lebowski” with The Congress and Tyler Lee Holter

Brown Palace names chef

Chef Daniel Sturm, formerly with the Wynn in Las Vegas, has been named the new executive chef of the storied Brown Palace Hotel.

Sturm has also worn the top toque at Caesar’s Palace in Las Vegas, and he graduated from the University of Nevada-Las Vegas with a degree in hotel administration.

Christina Crawford at Lannie’s

Leave your wire hangers at home. Lannie’s Clocktower Cabaret, at Arapahoe and the 16th Street Mall, has landed the off-Broadway show “Surviving Mommie Dearest — An Evening With Christina Crawford,” a documentary film and talk back, at 8 p.m. June 6 and at 6:30 and 8:45 p.m. June 7. This show covers 100 years of show business and details the turbulent relationship between Christina and her adoptive mother, movie legend, Joan Crawford. Christina’s memoir, “Mommie Dearest,” was the basis for the 1981 film of the same name starring Faye Dunaway as Joan Crawford. There will be a meet and greet on June 6 following the 8 p.m. show and on June 7 before the 6:30 p.m. show. Tickets are $25 each, and available at www.Lannies.com, or by calling the box office 303-293-0075.

Dyer changing duties

Churn, churn, churn. Add 9News morning anchor Kyle Dyer’s name to the growing list of Channel 9 on-air talent leaving their posts. Unlike sports anchor Susie Wargin,

who is trading her microphone for a career in real estate, and entertainment reporter Kirk Montgomery, who took an anchor job in Michigan, Dyer is sticking around the station on the 11 a.m. and noon news show and will be taping pieces that will air on various newscasts. Oh, and don’t forget traffic watcher and meteorologist Amelia Earhart, who departed not long ago. The job switch, which Dyer says was per her request so she could spend mornings and evenings with her husband and two daughters, takes place mid-July. Dyer has been a fixture on the morning news set for 18 years. Dyer explains her reasons for leaving the morning newscast (with its 1 a.m. wake-up call) and her new duties in a video interview at www.9news.com/story/ about-us/2014/05/12/kyle-dyer-9newsmorning-anchor/8982829/.

Colorado rough on moms

Is Colorado selling moms short? The state ranked an embarrassing No. 44 in Wallethub.com’s rating of the Best and Worst States for Working Moms (http:// wallethub.com/edu/best-states-for-working-moms/3565/). For child care, WalletHub ranked Colorado a 42, for professional opportunities a 37, and for work-life balance a 22. You can check out how other states ranked, and the criteria used for the results at the link above.

Hotel Teatro eatery gets update

Prima, the second restaurant inside The Hotel Teatro, helmed by chef Kevin Taylor, closed at the end of March and will reopen in July as The Nickel on the renovated ground floor of the historic hotel. A chef-driven culinary concept, the menu will draw inspiration from its

Rocky Mountain heritage, incorporating locally sourced ingredients into rustic stripped-down Colorado fare. The decor of the space will echo the menu, featuring textiles sourced from the Rocky Mountain region, custom-made furnishings and industrial materials. The restaurant’s name pays homage to the hotel’s storied past. With an original vault dating back to the property’s origins as Denver’s Tramway Building in 1911, the space was once used to collect nickels from customers riding streetcars. Leading The Nickel is chef/restaurateur, Jake Linzinmeir, a certified sommelier and executive chef. Coming from the mountains of Telluride to Denver, Linzinmeir brings an extensive knowledge of homegrown Colorado foods, having personally worked with farmers, ranchers and foragers across the state. For more information, please visit: www.hotelteatro.com/the-nickel.

Overheard

Eavesdropping on a “dude from Wyoming” wearing a camouflage hat talking to a woman in a Capitol Hill bar: “Hi. I think you’re attractive, and I have to leave soon, but I was wondering if you date boys or girls? I noticed you’re not wearing a wedding ring.” “That was an interesting opener.” “I’m told in this neighborhood, you have to ask.” Penny Parker’s “Mile High Life” column gives insights into the best events, restaurants, businesses, parties and people throughout the metro area. Parker also writes for Blacktie-Colorado.com. You can subscribe and read her columns (Monday, Wednesday and Friday) at www.blacktiecolorado.com/pennyparker. She can be reached at penny@blacktie-llc.com or at 303-619-5209.

Creating a life that’s lovable Country recording artist Clay Walker’s song, “If I Could Make a Living Out of Loving You,” is an awesome reminder to think about what it is that we do each and every day. Whether it’s personally or professionally, we should be striving to do what we love and love what we do. The full verse from his song goes like this: “If I could make a livin’ out of lovin’ you, I’d be a millionaire in a week or two, I’d be doing what I love and lovin’ what I do, if I could make a livin’ out of lovin’ you.” One of my favorite conversations to have with someone is when they share their passion for what they do for a living, for themselves, for their family, or even recreation and fun. You can absolutely tell when someone is doing what they love and loving what they do through their body language, tonality of what they are saying and the colorful or powerful words that they actually use while sharing life’s exciting moments. Purpose is so meaningful and passion is so very powerful. My other favorite conversation or discussion to have with someone is when they are not doing what they love and loving what they do. They share stories of discontent, misery, and just plain old unhappiness. They could be unhappy with their job, their family life, and they have not found any time or anything to do that gets where excitement, purpose, or passion would have an opportunity to take root in their lives. Now in the first group, it’s both fun and energizing for me to have conversations with people who share their enthusiasm with such joy. Sometimes their enthusiasm and passion become contagious and I find myself re-energized to pursue my own purpose and passions with even more zeal. The second group is really no different because it provides me with an opportunity to help them selfdiscover behaviors and attitudes that will lead them to a different way of thinking. You see, it’s not about the title we hold or the job we have, and it’s not about our lives compared to the lives of others. It comes down to how we feel about OUR productivity, OUR effort, OUR enjoyment, and OUR attitude that matters. Let

me share an example with you. Years ago when I was visiting a customer on a very regular basis, I could not help but notice how immaculately clean their building was. There was never a piece of paper on the floor, never any dust on the objects or plants in the lobby, and their floors always shined brilliantly as if the fresh coat of wax was just applied. One day as I waited in the lobby for my meeting, I met the man who was responsible for the appearance of the building. He was in his janitorial coveralls, working with precision detail as he worked his broom and dust rag. I decided to have a conversation with him and started by thanking him for the way he made the building look. I shared with him that I believed that the employees and visitors alike must surely feel a sense of pride when they come in because the place was sparkling clean all the time. With a huge smile and warm handshake the man thanked me and told me he had been employed by the company for the past 10 years. And he shared that most people that worked there often thanked him and commented on his ability to make the place shine. When I asked if he liked his job, he smiled again and replied in an instant with, “Man, I love my job and I am grateful for my job.” I have met ski instructors, CEOs, nurses, shoeshine vendors, pizza makers, teachers, police officers, firemen, salespeople, accountants, massage therapists, personal trainers, retailers, business owners and people from all walks of life who do what they love and love what they do. And I have met others who do something they hate and hate what they

Norton continues on Page 13


13-Color Brighton Banner 13

May 22, 2014

Marketplace

Advertise: 303-566-4100

Instruction Former 6th Grade Math, Science, Language Arts Teacher and current GED Tutor with limited weekly availability to Privately Tutor your 4th - 6th Grader or a GED Student Effective and results proven techniques can help make your student an independent problem solver Please call Carolyn Pastore 720-272-5424

Garage Sales Garage Sale /Charity Fundraiser Saturday and Sunday May 24 and May 25 9 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. Shelter Parking Lot 2540 Youngfield St Come Shop for a Cause and Help the Animals We Need Volunteers Angels with Paws 303-274-2264 Parker

Found - Mans watch at Spring Gulch Park. Call Mark to identify 303-506-7221

MOVING SALE May 23 & 24 8am-3pm 21558 Omaha Avenue 73 VW Bug Exercise/Audio/Video Equip. Household Items, Sporting Goods Roll top desk, Quilting Frame, Bunk Bed, Couches, Lots MORE!

Misc. Notices

Estate Sales

Lost and Found

Want To Purchase minerals and other oil/gas interests. Send details to: P.O. Box 13557 Denver, CO 80201

Want To Purchase minerals and other oil/gas interests. Send details to: P.O. Box 13557 Denver, CO 80201

Arvada Estate Sale Everything goes! 55 years of collecting Friday & Saturday May 30-31 8am Tools, Garage Items, Furniture, Kitchenware, Clothing, Beds, Dressers, Handicap Equipment, Everything for sale including the House.

Miscellaneous 17th Annual Winter Park Colorado Craft Fair

Aug. 9th & 10th. Applications available call 970-531-3170 or email jjbeam@hotmail.com FOR SALE: Deluxe zig-zag sewing machine by Singer. Walnut Console, Exc. cond., Has all accessories, professional way with dial settings, speed controller, button holes, zig-zag stitching and more. $150 call 303-770-3576

Wanted to Buy

COINS FOR CASH:

buying individual coins and entire collections.

Call Todd: 303-596-6591

PETS

Bicycles

Farm Products & Produce Grain Finished Buffalo

quartered, halves and whole

719-775-8742

Locally raised, grass fed and grain finished Beef & Pork. Quarters, halves, wholes available. Can deliver 720-434-1322 schmidtfamilyfarms.com

Feed, Seed, Grain, Hay

Well, that does it. As you are reading this, it is quite possible that my oldest daughter is walking up to the podium at the 1st Bank Center to accept her diploma and officially become a high school graduate. With that, Elizabeth Kay Alcorn becomes, well, her own person (which, incidentally, is why I am using her name in a column for the first time ever). And, being her own person, she is now busy figuring out “what’s next?” The thing is, most of those high school seniors walking with her have probably been told what’s expected of them next. Whether overtly, or subtly, they’ve been told that they should go to college, or get a job, or go in the military. But, telling an 18-year old what is expected of them has almost no relation at all to what they want to do, or what they will end up doing. So Lizzie, and others, allow me to give you some food for thought. What you do to earn money to pay bills is one of life’s most important decisions. And, to get to the point where you earn money, some of you will have to spend 2, 4, 7 or even 11 more years in more schools just to get the opportunity to work. And work, it turns out, is hard; but it is infinitely harder when you end up doing something that you hate, no matter how well-paid. So, consider well the path ahead of you. Ask yourself, “Is this what I really want to be doing, or am I just trying to live up to someone else’s expectations for me?”

Norton

ELECTRIC BIKES Adult 2-Wheel Bicycles & & 3 wheel Trikes No Drivers License, Registration or Gas needed 303-257-0164

Continued from Page 12

Horse hay for sale

$11.00 65 lb bales Brome Orchard 303-618-9744 Franktown

Autos for Sale

Garage Sales Littleton

Arapaho Hills Neighborhood garage sale.

SATURDAY, May 24, 8am-3pm. This mid century modern neighborhood is located North of Berry, West of Lowell. 10+ homes participating.Come find your treasures!

Arvada 3 family GARAGE SALE - Fri/Sat, May 23 & 24 - 10874 W. 79th Place, near 80th & Oak. 9 am - 4 pm. Baby stuff, tools, lots of household items and more! Arvada Garage Sale 7930 Noble Ct Arvada CO 80007 Sat. May 24th 9AM-2PM, quality furniture, sports equip, home decor, music equip, tons of toys, kitchen appliances, cash only Castle Rock Masters Club Circle in Plum Creek May 23 & 24 8am-2pm Multi-Family Designer Clothing, Complete Patio Set, Furniture and Misc. Household, Lenox Christmas Dishes, Noritake China, Silver Coffee Service, Pool Table, Miter Saw and Misc. Tools, Books and much more! Lone Tree 9483 Southern Hills Circle Friday & Saturday May 23rd & 24th 9am-1pm Furniture, KitchenAid Refrigerator, Wedding Dress from Bea's Bridal size 10, area rugs, tools - circular saw/sander, step extension ladder, and misc.

Electric bicycles

electric3 Wheel Trikes electric Scooters - ebike conversion No license required No gas required No credit required Easy-Fun-Fitness Call the ebike experts

303-257-0164

Firewood Pine/Fur & Aspen

Split & Delivered $225 Stacking available extra $25 Some delivery charges may apply depending on location. Hauling scrap metal also available (appliances, batteries etc.) Call 303-647-2475 or 720-323-2173

Furniture

1979 Jeep Cherokee Chief 4x4 360 Engine, Less than 82,000 original miles New tires, new tint, new CD player and speakers, Great Condition, $9800 (805)310-4565

do — that is, until we have had a chance to have a conversation where we can focus on purpose, passion, gratitude and attitude. Now I can never say that I have a 100 percent success rate when having these conversations, but even if one out of 100 had some level of self-discovery and

Which bring up the question: How do you know? When my buddy Jay and I wrote on this subject a few years ago, we asked a lot of people, and they told us the way to know if what you’re doing is good for you is that your passion for it drives you out of bed in the morning. It consumes your thoughts on your free time, perhaps it even becomes a distraction for you when you’re trying to get other things done. True passion is the fuel of great achievement. Think about the things that cause you to lose track of time, that will push you to work through your lunch break and through other appointments — that is your passion! Find a way to earn a living at that, and you will never have the sad, desperate lives that ordinary men (and women) lead. It’s possible, of course, that many of you have never found something that Alcorn continues on Page 15

started to do what they love and love what they do personally or professionally, I consider that my purpose and I am extremely passionate about it. Are you doing what you love and loving what you do? I would love to hear all about it at gotonorton@gmail.com. And when we have purpose and live with passion, it will be a better than good week. Michael Norton is a resident of Highlands Ranch, the former president of the Zig Ziglar Corporation and the CEO/ founder of www.candogo.com.

2001 Chevy Impala 83,000 original miles Well maintained Great Condition $5000 (303)763-9975

RV’s and Campers 5th Wheel- 1999 Sunny Brook 24ft. 1 slide, new roof, queen bed. Clean, smoke-free. $7000 303-841-3514

Wanted Italian Furniture. Teak Wood Adam and Eve table. Leather Setee set. The price per each is $1000.00. Please call 303-269-5141.

Cash for all Cars and Trucks Under $1000 Running or not. Any condition

(303)741-0762 bestcashforcars.com

Medical Medical Equipment 4 SALE Alum wheelchair ramp 3 63"x50" platforms, 16' of ramp, 34" high railings $3K cl 303-425-0435

DONATE YOUR CAR, TRUCK, BOAT, RV; Running or not, to www.developmentaldisabled.org Tax deductible! 303-659-8086. 14 years of service

SUMMERTIME MEANS… GARAGE SALE TIME! 8 lines in 18 papers

$

Find a life worth loving

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54th Annual Memorial Day Service Olinger Highland Mortuary and Cemetery, Joseph J. Jacques, Jr., V.F.W. POST 7945 & Ladies Auxiliary, American Legion Post 22 and the Thornton Police Honor Guard are honoring Memorial Day with a service in Olinger Highland Chapel. Please join us for this ceremony honoring our veterans.

Monday, May 26, 2014 10:00 AM

303-566-4091

303-566-4091

A special service presented by the Tri-State Denver Buddhist Temple on Saturday, May 24, 2014 at 9:30 AM in our chapel.

Olinger Highland Mortuary and Cemetery 10201 Grant St. Thornton, Colo. 80229 303-451-6674 OlingerHighland.com


14-Recipe-Color

14 Brighton Banner

May 22, 2014

Tribal lands fraught with injustice Report finds inequities in criminal justice applied to American Indians By Jim Trotter

I-News at Rocky Mountain PBS A 1938 law sweeps American Indian and Alaska native youths into the federal criminal justice system when they commit anything beyond misdemeanor crimes. Although American Indians comprise little more than 1 percent of the nation’s population, one 10-year study found that at any given time, 43 percent to 60 percent of juveniles held in federal custody were American Indian, a wildly disproportionate number. Once there, they serve sentences far longer than other juveniles sentenced locally for similar offenses. These are among the findings of the final report from the national Indian Law and Order Commission, chaired by former U.S. Attorney Troy Eid of Denver. The “Roadmap for Making Native America Safer” turns particularly urgent in its call to reform juvenile justice in Indian country. Constantly exposed to poverty, addictions and all manners of violence from domestic assault to suicide to murder, Native youth experience post-traumatic distress disorder at a rate of 22 percent, equivalent to that among American troops returning from war, the report shows. Juveniles caught up in the federal system effectively “go missing” from their tribes. “Juvenile justice for Native kids has not changed since the 1930s,” Eid said in an interview with I-News at Rocky Mountain PBS. “They’re automatically transferred into federal jurisdiction. It’s just extraordinary no one has reassessed that. There isn’t juvenile justice within the Bureau of Prisons. It doesn’t exist there. There’s no diversion, no drug courts, no education. There are no books, no programs to reintegrate into society, nothing. It’s really very sad. “And it doesn’t square with our Constitution,” Eid said.

Southern Ute Indian police place Gabriel Peabody into custody Thursday evening, March 14, 2013 following a seven-hour standoff at his Cedar Point Ute West home outside of Igancio, Colo. A new report, the “Roadmap for Making Native America Safer,” makes a call to reform juvenile justice on American Indian reservations. Photos by THE DURANGO HERALD

‘A terrible price’

The new report is blunt in its assessment of criminal justice in Indian country, and of the risks posed for public safety. The system “extracts a terrible price: limited law enforcement; delayed prosecutions, too few prosecutions, and other prosecution inefficiencies; trials in distant courthouses; justice systems and players unfamiliar with or hostile to Indians and Tribes; and the exploitation of system failures by criminals, more criminal activity, and further endangerment of everyone living in and near Tribal communities.” The commission, created by the Tribal Law and Order Act of 2010, offers some 40 recommendations for change that would impact and require reorganization in all three branches of the federal government, reallocate millions of dollars, require new spending, and build new criminal justice infrastructure from the ground up on many tribal lands across the U.S. The report challenges the status quo of entrenched bureaucracies, federal and state, at every turn, describing their work as “an indefensible maze of complex, conflicting and illogical commands, layered in over decades via congressional policies and court decisions, and without the consent of tribal nations.” Unlike the U.S. at large, where serious local crimes are investigated and prosecuted by local authorities, all serious crimes on reservations or other tribal lands are federal crimes, subject to federal prosecution, a provision of law that dates back to 1885. (Under a separate law, a handful of states have the authority). Tribal courts are limited to misdemeanor sentences with a maximum of three years. At the heart of the commission’s farreaching document is the premise of restoring local crimes to local jurisdictions, where they would be investigated by tribal police and tried in tribal courts, with all U.S. constitutional protections for defendants. Native youth offenders would be adjudicated locally, as are juveniles everywhere else.

Troy A. Eid, a former U.S. Attorney now in private law practice, is shown during a taping of “Colorado State of Mind” at Rocky Mountain PBS’ studio in Denver on Jan. 15, when he discussed the the national Indian Law and Order Commission, which he chaired. The commission’s nine members, Republican and Democrats, were appointed by President Obama and the majority and minority leaders of both houses of Congress. They worked as volunteers, had no offices, and spent most of their significant time in the field. Their recommendations are unanimous. “We realized that if we’re going to make an impact, we’d have to be honest in addressing the problems as we found them,” said Eid, a Republican who was named Colorado U.S. attorney by President George W. Bush. He is now a partner with the Greenberg Traurig law firm in Denver. “We had the opportunity and we wanted to make the most of it.”

Falling through the cracks

The current system is rife with fundamental inequities, the commission found, including, perhaps foremost, simple access to justice. Federal officers charged with investi-

gating serious Indian country crime, FBI agents or Bureau of Indian Affairs police, can be located hundreds of miles away from distant crime scenes. The federal courthouses and prosecutors are almost always hundreds of miles away. This places enormous logistical burdens on successful prosecution, including every facet from crime scene preservation and evidence gathering on the front end to getting witnesses to the courthouse for trial. Federal prosecutors declined to prosecute half the Indian country cases that came before them, according to a General Accounting Office study of 9,000 cases reported by federal law officers from 200509. And while the declination rate is said to have improved since the advent of the Tribal Law and Order Act, no one disputes that many people suspected of violent crimes are walking free in Indian country. “Too many crimes have fallen through the cracks of this ‘jurisdictional maze,’ ”

said Jill Engel, former chief prosecutor for the Hopi Tribe in Northern Arizona and now with the El Paso County District Attorney’s Office in Colorado Springs, in an interview with I-News. “This leaves dangerous criminals within the community with the opportunity to find new victims.” Much of the report speaks to the need of upgrading criminal justice in Indian country, where police are often undermanned, underequipped, undertrained and often have no access to information sharing or routine crime data that most any other local jurisdiction would take for granted. But the very first recommendation asks Congress to clarify that any tribe that so chooses can “opt out immediately” of federal jurisdiction over local crimes committed on their lands. The provision would also create the United States Court of Indian Appeals, which would function as any Tribal continues on Page 15


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May 22, 2014

Tribal Continued from Page 14

other federal appellate court. Sentencing restrictions on tribal courts would be lifted. Some tribes, including 30 that have been working in a Department of Justice pilot program, are better equipped than others to take on expanded jurisdiction. “This requires resources to support having law trained judges and public defenders,” said Engel. “Isolation of geographic areas and limited financial resources could affect the ability of a tribe to succeed in exercising full jurisdiction.” The commission devotes its second

Alcorn Continued from Page 13

drives your passions like that. And that’s okay — there’s time. But, can I suggest, rather than go off to “find yourself” at a college that you don’t love for the low, low price of $30,000 of debt, that you divert

chapter to Alaska, which, alone among the states, was exempted from the provisions of the Tribal Law and Order Act as well as the Violence Against Women Reauthorization Act of 2013. Although Alaska has 229 of the nation’s federally recognized 566 tribes, the state established a system of Native corporations to own villages and other lands, as opposed to federally recognized Indian reservations or nations. Serious crimes are investigated by Alaska state police, who are often located at great distances from the far-flung native villages that in many cases aren’t connected by road, particularly in winter. “Problems with safety in tribal communities are severe across the United States,” the report states, “but they are systematically the worst in Alaska.” your energies into service for a while? Whether that means the military, or a mission trip, or something like the Peace Corps, it makes no difference: you will learn more about yourself in three months of service to others than you will in four years of directionless college. As for Lizzie, she’s doing all of that (and came up with it all on her own!) and we — her mother and I — could not be prouder! One of her great gifts, perhaps

When the commission paid a site visit to the community of Galena, one resident told members, “Every woman you’ve met today has been raped. All of us. I know they won’t believe that in the lower 48, and the state will deny it, but it’s true.”

What next? The report is multifaceted in tackling deeply complex issues. Is there any chance that its major recommendations will be embraced by Congress, by the White House, by the federal court system? Eid thinks so. “The White House asked for more specific details about how the recommendations could be implemented,” he said. “They’re trying to understand and have even greater than her dancing, is her heart for helping people, for serving them. So, Lizzie is entering the National Guard, with an eye on eventually getting her college degree and becoming a Physician’s Assistant through the Guard. She wants to be one of the first people on the scene after a disaster, to be a part of putting the pieces back together, and that’s what the Guard does. Well played, Sunshine! So, graduates, here it is: life. Live it to

been very gracious. I know people say Congress is broken or this or that. But I don’t believe we can’t get this done.” Said prosecutor Engel, “Indian reservations should not be a safe haven for criminals. This dedication to telling the story in a truthful, unapologetic way will lead to positive changes.” Eid praised the shared vision of his fellow commissioners. “We are going to tell it like it is and we’ll push for the rest of our careers to have the roadmap enacted. I-News is the public service journalism arm of Rocky Mountain PBS. To read more please go to inewsnetwork.org. Contact Jim Trotter at jtrottter@inewsnetwork.org. the fullest! Learn who you are and what drives you, and then use that knowledge to make the world a better place. We’re still here to help — but you have the keys now. Good luck, and God Speed! Michael Alcorn is a music teacher and fitness instructor who lives in Arvada with his wife and three children. He graduated from Alameda High School and the University of Colorado-Boulder.

your week & more Editor’s notE: Calendar submissions must be received by noon Friday for publication the following week. Send listings to calendar@coloradocommunitymedia.com, attn: Brighton Calendar. No attachments, please. Listings are free and run on a space-available basis. Friday and saturday/May 30-31 BluEs Blast Enjoy a weekend of barbecue and blues at the

Brighton Blues Blast, a two-day celebration featuring a variety of the blues from around the country. Blast is at 7 p.m. Friday, May 30, and Saturday, May 31, at the Armory Performing Arts Center, Brighton. Marquise Knox and the Austin Young Band are featured Friday, May 30; Lil’ Ed and the Blues Imperials, and Deltal Sonics are featured Saturday, May 31. To order

tickets, go to https://www.vendini.com/ticket-software.html? t=tix&e=3c10fbe38e00e981043d567a5f7e4175.

saturday/JunE 7 CulturEFEst CElEBration Brighton presents Culturefest 2014, an outdoor celebration of the diverse cultural traditions of the community. Event lasts 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday, June 7, in downtown Brighton. On the main stage will be the Kenny Perkins Band from noon to 1 p.m.; Burnt Lips 1:15-2:15 p.m.; Dr. Izzy Band 2:30-3:30 p.m.; and Chicano Heat Band, from 3:45-4:45 p.m. Go to http://www.brightonco. gov/744/Culturefest for details. saturday/JunE 7

roCkin’ aCapEla The Armory at Brighton presents Face, performing an all-vocal rock concert at 8 p.m. Saturday, June 7. Face is a nationally recognized vocal rock band based out of Boulder. Get tickets at https://www.vendini.com/ticket-software.html?t=tix&e=d3c4d692595cb035bd6903beeb60b71a sunday/JunE 8 History prograM Adams County Historical Museum presents its Salute to Armed Forces day at 2 p.m. Sunday, June 8 in Hoffman Hall at 9601 Henderson Road, Brighton. Admission is free. Exhibit features military posters, uniforms, flags and equipment. Life music. Go to http://www.adamscountymuseum.com.

crossword • sudoku

GALLERY OF GAMES & weekly horoscope

Friday and saturday/JunE 13 -14; JunE 20-21 tHEatEr sHoW The Armory, 300 Strong St., Brighton, presents “Beauty and the Beast Jr.” at 7 p.m. Friday, June 13; at 4 p.m. and 7 p.m. Saturday, June 14; at 7 p.m. Friday, June 21; and at 4 p.m. and 7 p.m. Saturday, June 21. Doors open 30 minutes before showtime. Go to www.brightonarmory.org. saturday/JunE 21 Car sHoW Ye Old Auto Club annual car show is June 21 at Adams County Historical Museum, 9601 Henderson Road, Brighton. Most of the complex will be open for viewing. Refreshments and food will be available. Admission is free. Go to http://www.adamscountymuseum.com.

SALOME’S STARS FOR THE WEEK OF ApRil 28, 2014

ARIES (Mar 21 to Apr 19) You might be tempted to be more assertive when dealing with a job-related matter. But a carefully measured approach works best at getting the cooperation you’re looking for. TAURUS (Apr 20 to May 20) While others urge you to act now, you instinctively recognize that a move at this time is not in your best interests. You should know when to do so by week’s end. GEMINI (May 21 to Jun 20) A busy schedule keeps you on the move for much of the week. But things ease up by the time the weekend arrives, allowing you to reconnect with family and friends.

crossword • sudoku & weekly horoscope

GALLERY OF GAMES

CANCER (Jun 21 to Jul 22) Travel dominates the week, and despite some delays in getting to where you want to go, the overall experience should prove to be a positive one in many ways. LEO (Jul 23 to Aug 22) Your leonine self-confidence comes roaring back after a brief period of doubt and helps you get through a week of demanding challenges and ultimately emerge triumphant. VIRGO (Aug 23 to Sept 22) Virgos who have made a major commitment -- personal or professional -should be able to tap into a renewed reservoir of selfconfidence to help them follow through. LIBRA (Sept 23 to Oct 22) You soon could receive news from a surprising source that could cause you to change your mind about how you had planned to deal with an ongoing job-related problem. SCORPIO (Oct 23 to Nov 21) A surprise move of support from a colleague who has never been part of your circle of admirers helps influence others to take a new look at what you’ve put on the table. SAGITTARIUS (Nov 22 to Dec 21) While a bold decision to take an “i know what i’m doing” approach impresses some colleagues, it also raises the risk of causing resentment among others. CAPRICORN (Dec 22 to Jan 19) A misunderstanding ‘twixt you and a friend might not be your fault at all, despite what he or she suggests. Talk it out to see at what point the confusion might have started. AQUARIUS (Jan 20 to Feb 18) Getting into a community operation fulfills the Aquarian’s need to help people. it also can lead to new contacts that might one day help you with a project. PISCES (Feb 19 to Mar 20) A minor problem could delay the start of a long-anticipated trip for two. Use the time to recheck your travel plans. You might find a better way to get where you’re going. BORN THIS WEEK: You are a dedicated romantic who seeks both excitement and stability in your relationships. © 2014 King Features Synd., inc.


BannerSPORTS 16-Sports

16 Brighton Banner

May 22, 2014

Brighton swimmers set records By Michelle Boyer The State 5A Championship meet for the Bulldogs’ swimming team, was just as Coach Carl Diehl suspected last weekend. “It was kind of flat for us,” he said. “We finished a big meet the week before at leagues, and it’s always hard to come back from that.” The team finished third at the East Metro Athletic Conference meet, Hinkley came out on top by two points over Northglenn and Thornton. Brighton finished 11 points behind Hinkley. Brighton’s Aaron Hewlett was voted Swimmer of the Year. BHS athletes set several league records: the 200 Medley Relay swam by Aaron Hewlett, Chandler Johnson, Chase Zeilstra and Julian Prieto; Julian Preto in the 50 free; Chase Zeilstra in the 100 fly; and Aaron Hewlett in the 100 free. “The times at state were equal or better from what the swimmers had at leagues, but it’s just hard to repeat,” Diehl said. “I was afraid of that.” The team will only lose Brighton senior Aaron Hewlett this year. Diehl looks to have a good year next season. “Unless we get more bodies, we’re going to be kind of thin,” he said. “Next year we’re looking not to taper, rather than focusing so much on the EMAC meet. We’ve always been prepared for leagues, and get up high from it. When we go to state it just seems to be a downer for our swimmers. There’ll be no shave or tapers after leagues, and that should help us a little bit.” First team all-conference: 200 Medley Relay: Aaron Hewlett, Chandler Johnson, Chase Zeilstra and Julian Prieto; 200 free: Sam Kelly; 50 free: Julian Prieto; 100 fly: Chase Zeilstra; 100 free: Aaron Hewlett; 200 free relay: Aaron Hewlett, Chandler Johnson, Sam Kelly, Joseph Prieto. Second team all-conference; 50 free: Aaron Hewlett; 500 free: Sam Kelly; backstroke: Julian Prieto; 400 free relay: Chase Zeilstra, Same Kelly, Joseph Prieto and Julian Prieto; Diving: Jadon Kniss. Honorable Mention: 200 Individual Medley and Breast stroke: Chandler Johnson; 100 free: Joseph Prieto; 100 back: Chase Zeilstra.

Above, Chase Zeilstra swimming his stroke of the 200 Medley relay as he touched the wall, and turned to go back the length of the pool. At left, Aaron Hewlett cooling down after the 200 Medley. Photos by Michelle Boyer]

Eberly headed to Western Texas Volleyball player showed versatility By Michelle Boyer Prairie View High School volleyball player, Ashley Eberly signed her letter of intent to attend Western Texas College last week. She would like to either become a criminal psychologist or an athletic trainer. Eberly has played volleyball since she was in the second grade. “I first went into volleyball because of my sisters,” she said. “I had to be the typical younger sibling, who did everything my sisters, Kristine and Courtney, did. But as soon as I began playing, I knew I loved the game. It’s a high speed game that requires mental and physical stability … every aspect of it appealed to me.” While playing club volleyball she won six tournaments and placed fourth at nationals. “COVA was the best team I’ve played for in my club years,” she said. “It’s a great group of talented girls that became like a family to me, and I had a coach who pushed me to become the player I am now.” “Ashley has been a valued player in our program over the

Pictured is PVHS volleyball player Ashley Eberly with her Coach Amy Grace on the right and parents on the left. Eberly will attend Western College in Texas. Photos by Michelle Boyer] last four years,” Prairie View High School volleyball Coach Amy Grace said. “She’s always been a very shy athlete, one I was to joke with because she always looked

upset on the court. Each year, she grew on the court and off the court. “She has played middle, left and right side for me and has

always been willing to jump in anywhere we needed her to. I’ve grown very fond of her and am confident she’ll do well in Texas.” Eberly said Western Texas Col-

lege appealed to her because ever since she was little she’s wanted to go to school in Texas. “Heaven knows why I’d want to go to a little nowhere town, but I’ve always loved the idea of small town life,” she said. “The school itself has an education program and teachers. The class sizes that work with you, and a volleyball team that works with your schooling, you don’t find that often in collegiate sports.” She hopes to leave behind at PVHS, the idea of supporting one’s team; regardless of playing on the court or not. “You should always be your teammates’ biggest supporter and motivator,” Eberly said. “I was truly blessed to have had such amazing girls as teammates, and a great coach like Amy Grace. I’ll take the sense of family that PVHS has instilled in me to college. I loved every experience I’ve had there and cherish all the people I’ve met.” Attending a school outside of Colorado is beyond nerves for Eberly. “I’ll be 9-and-a-half hours away from my family and friends, but I’m also extremely excited,” she said. I’m excited to begin my new life down in Texas.”


mentation through the lakes, or for exAL. 3.7. Use: The water may be used dirchange from Ken Mitchell Lakes to upectly or by exchange, and to extinction, for stream points, as part of the development all municipal uses, including but not limof Brighton’s integrated municipal water ited to domestic, mechanical manufacturwater right applications and certain system. The first diversion structure is the ing, industrial, fire protection, sewage amendments filed in the Office of the Fulton Lateral Augmentation Station and treatment, street sprinkling, irrigation of Water Clerk during the month of APRIL pipeline outfall into the 148th Avenue parks, lawns and grounds, augmentation 2014 for each County affected. Gravity Pipeline leading to Ken Mitchell. and replacement, substitute supply, adThe second structure is a diversion off of justment and regulation of municipal wa14CW3055 City of Brighton, Attn: Sarah the main branch of the Fulton Ditch that ter systems, including further exchange Borgers, Assistant Director of Utilities, outfalls into the 148th Avenue Gravity with municipal water systems and with 500 S. 4th Street, Brighton, Colorado Pipeline. The last is a diversion structure other water users, within the City of 80601, (303) 655-2033. Please send all off of the Brighton Lateral that is located at Brighton’s service area as it may exist further pleadings to: Brent A. Bartlett, the top of the 148th Avenue Gravity both now in and in the future. Brighton Esq., Sara J.L. Irby, Esq., Fischer, Pipeline. The 148th Avenue Gravity may also use the water for irrigating lawns Brown, Bartlett & Gunn, P.C., 1319 E. Pipeline picks up water from these three and grounds within its municipal service Prospect Road, Fort Collins, CO diversion structures and then outfalls into area as it may exist now and in the future. 80525. APPLICATION FOR FIDING OF Ken Mitchell Lakes, as part of Brighton’s 4. Diligence: 4.1. During the diligence periREASONABLE DILIGENCE AND TO integrated municipal water supply system. od, Brighton completed the design and MAKE A PORTION OF THE WATER The 148th Avenue Pipeline and construction of the diversion structure into Matches RIGHT ABSOLUTE ADAMS to play tennis IN the rightCOUNTY. way, without having ranking is not. are onGravity Fridays, and associated diversion structures were dethe 124th Avenue Reservoir, the 124th 2. Name of Structure(s). 124th Avenue signed constructed an approximAvenuethey’re Pump Stationusually and Gravity Storage Pondall (“124th to worry theAvenue time Reservoir”). about whether goLine, 8 a.m. to and 3 p.m. Lastatyear, the ate cost of $4,000,000. 4.2.3. In addition, and the 124th Avenue Augmentation Sta3. Describe conditional water right: 3.1. winning, or losing. To 14, me, that is thing during this diligence Brighton contionbest off of the Fulton Ditch at a total cost ofagainst Date of Original Decree: April 2008, team played teams likeperiod, Broomfield tinued to develop its conditional water $2,600,000. Brighton also Case No. 2002CW234, District about CARA, it’s fun, butCourt, it also approximately teaches imand rights associated with Ken Mitchell Lakes, spent more than $40,000 on Boulder. maintenance Water Division No. 1, State of Colorado. which is part of Brighton’s integrated murepair to the 124th Avenue Reservoir 3.2. Legal Description/Location of Dam: portant skills, as well as good and sportsmanTheincluding CARA tennis program isn’t just nicipal water system. The Ken Mitchell and associated structures, The 124th Avenue Reservoir is a lined ship. The who belong to thelimitation CARA maintaining the access Lakes project encompasses three main without gravel pit and people no dam exists. In order to about the competitive tennis team. phases designated by Cell 1,It’s Cellalso 2 and road around the perimeter of the 124th provide a legal description a “dam measorganization are also very caring and comCellto 3 of Ken Mitchell Lakes.lessons Cell 3 was Avenue Reservoir, replacing a meter on kids urement point” was selected, which is loca chance for learn through constructed and lined during the diligence the a diversion structure on the reservoir, ated in the individuals, NW1/4 of the SE1/4 of Section mitted which makes big difand completed (Cell 1 and upgrading access theplay pumptheperiod 35, Township 1 South, Range 67 West of howto to sport. Lessonsin early also2014 begin ference.” was completed in the fall of 2004 and a houses. 4.2. The 124th Avenue Reservoir the 6th P.M., in Adams County, 2,400 feet pump station was completed in two 2007). water right also is parton of Brighton’s integfrom the South section lines and 2,095 May 27, and each session runs for is geared towards the individOverall, Applicant has spent a substantial rated municipal water supply system that feet Coaching from the East section lines. The 124th sum,are totalingMonday-Thursday, more than $6,000,000, in enbeing others constructed toweeks. supply waterLessons to the Avenue Reservoir is located in the ual, and participants areNW1/4 pairediswith gineering fees, construction fees and conCity of Brighton for municipal and other of the SE1/4 and the NE1/4 of the SW1/4 8-11 a.m. Beginning, intermediate, and in the same age group and skills level, with sulting fees towards the completion of its purposes. During the diligence period, of Section 35, Township 1 South, Range Ken Mitchell Lakes project. 4.2.4. Brighton Brighton engaged in the following efforts West of the 6th P.M., in Adams a67 low pressure and fun setting. Cost is $65, advanced lessons will be offered. The adalso acquired Erger’s Pond during the dilitowards developing its integrated municipCounty. Both the dam measurement point genceprimarily period, and the obligations associal water supply 4.2.1. Brighton and the location of the 124th Avenue tennis and registrations for CARA are stillsystem: vanced lessons are for the CARA ated with the enlargement of the pond and completed design and construction of diReservoir are shown on the map attached offered through the Brighton Recreation maintaining the water right version and conveyance structures as hereto as Figure 1. 3.3 Source: South players, orpart kids obtaining who’veandalready had some decrees for the pond. Brighton expended of its integrated municipal water system to Platte River. 3.4. Point of Diversion: The Center at www.brighton.co.gov, until the approximatelyEight $3,500,000 in related costs move share water from the Fulton Ditchexperience. water right is diverted from the South high school lessons cost and expenses towards the acquisition of the Brighton Lateral to the North Platte of River via day the Fulton Irrigation end the on May 30.Ditch and $45. Erger’s Pond, as part of its integrated muStorm Drain Outfall. The Brighton Lateral (“Ditch”) for storage in the 124th Avenue nicipal water system. 4.2.5. Brighton also Augmentation Station and associated Practices willofbe on Monday-Thursday, Reservoir. The capacity the Ditch is 230 David Evangelisobtained decrees in Case No. 09CW144 pipeline, which diverts andMarianne carries water Evangelista, cfs. The decreed point of diversion for the 11 a.m. toheadgate 12:30 p.m., withnear the younger kidsLateral to carriage and Case No. 04CW174, District Court, from the Brighton strucFulton Ditch is located ta, Augmentation Marcia Evangelista, Sienna Muniz and Water Division No. 1, on February 1, 2013 tures below the Midland Section 9, between Sections 16 and 17, going on Mondays and Wednesdays, and February 27, 2013 respectively. Both Station, was completed during the dili-willand Township 2 South, Range 67 West of the Ben Randall be the CARA coaches this decrees further develop Brighton’s unified period in 2008. The approximate 6th P.M. The actual location isandgence the older kids headgate on Tuesdays Thursdays. municipal water system and include the cost of the Brighton Lateral Augmentation in the NE1/4 of the SE1/4 of Section 17, summer. There will be a required meeting Practices begin on67May andStation end on right to store water represented by and July carriage pipes was $175,000. Township 2 South, Range West27, of the Brighton’s water rights in the 4.2.2. Brighton also constructed three di-parents, 6th P.M. 3.5.aAppropriation Date: April 2,July for all CARA onchanged Wednesday night, 17, with state tournament 21-25. 124th Avenue Reservoir. Case No. version structures and associated gravity 2002. 3.6. Amount: 1,000 acre feet, Maywater 28,toatKen 6 p.m., at the Brighton 04CW174 also allows BrightonRecreto operate lines that convey CONDITIONAL, with a maximum of eligible, High school playersrateare but share exchanges from 124th Avenue Reservoir. Mitchell Lakes for storage, direct augdiversion for filling of 15 cfs, CONDITIONation N 11th in Brighton. anyone Colorado Associate Brighton alsoAve, participated as an objector mentation through the lakes,Center, or for ex- 555 AL. 3.7. Use:with The water may be usedTennis dirin various Water Court cases to protect its change from Ken Mitchell Lakes to upectly or by exchange, and to extinction, for water rights, including the subject condistream points, as part of the development all municipal uses, including but not limtional water right, from injury by other waof Brighton’s integrated municipal water ited to domestic, mechanical manufacturter users. In total, Brighton spent in exsystem. The first diversion structure is the ing, industrial, fire protection, sewage cess of $3,000,000 obtaining these deFulton Lateral Augmentation Station and treatment, street sprinkling, irrigation of crees and participating as an objector in pipeline outfall into the 148th Avenue parks, lawns and grounds, augmentation Water Court cases. 4.3. Applicant reGravity Pipeline leading to Ken Mitchell. and replacement, substitute supply, adserves the right to assert and demonThe second structure is a diversion off of justment and regulation of municipal wastrate that during the diligence period oththe main branch of the Fulton Ditch that ter systems, including further exchange er or additional activities have been underoutfalls into the 148th Avenue Gravity with municipal water systems and with taken or accomplished toward completion Pipeline. The last is a diversion structure other water users, within the City of of thesome appropriation. 5. Claim to make abof the Brighton that is located at had Kiana Gomez have luckyoffenough toLateral Brighton’s service area as itbeen may exist confident and strong jumps. She solute, in part – water applied to benefithe top of the 148th Avenue Gravity both now in and in the future. Brighton luck astheshe missed have I thinkPipeline. this helped cial use: 5.1. During diligence period, The 148thdidn’t Avenuecatch Gravitybeginner’s may alsobeen use thethere water forbefore. irrigating lawns Applicant storedof and to beneficial Pipeline picks up water from these three and grounds find within its municipal service after the finals by three-fourths anplaced inch. She’ll Katelyn here success finishing use a total of 121.8 acre feet in the 124th diversion structures and then outfalls into area as it may exist now and in the future. to work, andReservoir I expect her to Ditch make Avenue via the Fulton durKen Mitchellthis Lakes, ascontinue part of Brighton’s fifth last 4.1. year, atthe 5’4diligence to finishing fourth 4. Diligence: During periing free river times that occurred from water supply system. od, Brighton completed the design and it down there year12, in2013 more than just year andofmaking careerintobestintegrated of148th 5’5.municipal She Gravity September through September The Avenue Pipeline and next construction the diversionastructure 19, 2013 and September 23, 2013 were dethe 124th Avenue Reservoir, 124th jumping events.” was able to focus onthe her task associated and notdiversion get structures through September 26, 2013. The maximsigned and constructed at an approximAvenue Pump Station and Gravity Line, Some of Brighton best allum flowHigh rate ofSchools diversion for filling the ate cost of $4,000,000. 4.2.3. In addition, caught upAvenue in theAugmentation atmosphere. and the 124th Stareservoir during these free river condiduring this diligence period, Brighton contion off of the Fulton Ditch at a total cost of participate “This was Kiana’s first appearance the its around tions waswill 7.17 also cfs, which occurred on tinued toin develop conditionaltrack water athletes approximately $2,600,000. Brighton also September 15, Invitational 2013. Accordingly,Penpursurights associated Mitchell Lakes, spent more than $40,000 on maintenance in the 2014 Colorado State triple jump after making last year’s appear-with Ken ant to C.R.S. §37-92-301(4) and (5), Apwhich is part of Brighton’s integrated muand repair to the 124th Avenue Reservoir on Wednesday, May 28, at theforhigh plicant claims as ABSOLUTE, all denicipal water system.tathlon The Ken Mitchell ance in the structures, long jump. She had her best and associated including creed uses, 121.8 acre feet at a flow rate Lakes project encompasses three main without limitation maintaining the access track, 8th 2 p.m. Brighton dayaround of thetheseason jumping, struggled to byschool ofS. 7.17 cfs.Ave, 6. Land and Structure Ownerdesignated Cell 1, Cell 2 and 270 road perimeter of the 124thbut phases ship Information. The headgate for filling Cell 3 of Ken Mitchell Lakes. Cell 3 was Avenue Reservoir, replacing a meter on has hosted the event for the past few years. find the board on many of her jumps. She the storage structure is on property owned constructed and lined during the diligence the diversion structure on the reservoir, Various high athletes for school by the Fulton Ditch Company, 25 South completed in early 2014 (Cell 1 school and upgrading access to theand pump caught a tough break, thenperiod theand official 4th Avenue, Brighton, Colorado 80601. All was completed in the fall of 2004 and a houses. 4.2. The 124th Avenue Reservoir throughout the state, will beareinowned attendance, called scratch whatintegI believe would’ve other structures by Applicant, pump station was completed in 2007). water rightaalso is part ofon Brighton’s City of Brighton, Attn: Sarah Borgers, AsOverall, to Applicant spent won’t a substantial rated municipal water supply system necessarily be representing their been her personal best that and close our has but sistant Director of Utilities, 500 S. 4th sum, totaling more than $6,000,000, in enis being constructed to supply water to the schools, but will be more competing as inS t r e e t , B r i g h t o n , C o l o r a d o 8 0 6 01. gineering fees, construction fees and conCity of Brighton for municipal and other school record. WHEREFORE, Brighton respectfully resulting fees towards the completion of its purposes. During the diligence period, dividuals. “Erika White made her first trip to state, quests the Court to enter a decree: A. Ken Mitchell Lakes project. 4.2.4. Brighton Brighton engaged in the following efforts Finding that Brightonwe’ve has proceeded with also acquired Erger’s during the dili-time towards developing is precious, offered and she had itsaintegrated tough municipdraw competing in Pond“Because reasonable diligence toward the complegence period, and the obligations associal water supply system: 4.2.1. Brighton theof the pentathlon after regularof season, tion of thethe appropriations water rights ated with the enlargement pond and completed construction of dithe verydesign firstandeven on Thursday morning conditionally decreed for the storage of obtaining and maintaining the water right version and conveyance structures as part is also why see Reservoir; athletesB. atits8:30. She didn’twater getsystem a chance to take water you in the won’t 124th Avenue decrees for thein pond. which Brighton expended of integrated municipal to Finding that pursuant to C.R.S. §37-92approximately $3,500,000 in related costs move share water from the Fulton Ditch wearing their school jerseys because of the atmosphere before she competed. I 301(4) and (5), Brighton has exercised its and expenses towards the acquisition of and the Brighton Lateral to the North Colorado High conditional School water Activities rights for Associathe 124th AvErger’s Pond, as part of its integrated muStorm Drain for Outfall. The Brighton Lateral thought being her first trip, she handled enue Reservoir storage right in the nicipal water system. 4.2.5. Brighton also Augmentation Station and associated tionNo.rules,” Smidt said.of 121.8 acre feet ABSOLUTE herselfwhich as adiverts mature veteran athlete. She was in Case amount obtained decrees 09CW144 pipeline, and carries water and at a rate of 7.17 cfs ABSOLUTE, for and Case No. 04CW174, District Court, from the Brighton Lateral to carriage strucall decreed uses, as further described Water Division No. 1, on February 1, 2013 tures below the Midland Augmentation herein; and C. Continuing the remaining and February 27, 2013 respectively. Both Station, was completed during the dili878.20 acre feet CONDITIONAL and 7.83 decrees further develop Brighton’s unified gence period in 2008. The approximate cfs CONDITIONAL water rights in full municipal water system and include the cost of the Brighton Lateral Augmentation force and effect for an additional diligence right to store water represented by Station and carriage pipes was $175,000. period. 6 pages. Brighton’s changed water rights in the 4.2.2. Brighton also constructed three di124th Avenue Reservoir. Case No. version structures and associated gravity THE WATER RIGHTS CLAIMED BY 04CW174 also allows Brighton to operate lines that convey share water to Ken THESE APPLICATIONS MAY AFFECT IN exchanges from 124th Avenue Reservoir. Mitchell Lakes for storage, direct augPRIORITY ANY WATER RIGHTS Brighton also participated as an objector mentation through the lakes, or for exCLAIMED OR HERETOFORE ADJUDICin various Water Court cases to protect its change from Ken Mitchell Lakes to upATED WITHIN THIS DIVISION AND water rights, including the subject condistream points, as part of the development OWNERS OF AFFECTED RIGHTS tional water right, from injury by other waof Brighton’s integrated municipal water MUST APPEAR TO OBJECT WITHIN ter users. In total, Brighton spent in exsystem. The first diversion structure is the THE TIME PROVIDED BY STATUTE OR cess of $3,000,000 obtaining these deFulton Lateral Augmentation Station and BE FOREVER BARRED. crees and participating as an objector in pipeline outfall into the 148th Avenue Water Court cases. 4.3. Applicant reGravity Pipeline leading to Ken Mitchell. YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that any serves the right to assert and demonThe second structure is a diversion off of party who wishes to oppose an applicastrate that during the diligence period oththe main branch of the Fulton Ditch that tion, or an amended application, may file er or additional activities have been underoutfalls into the 148th Avenue Gravity with the Water Clerk, P. O. Box 2038, taken or accomplished toward completion Pipeline. The last is a diversion structure Greeley, CO 80632, a verified Statement of the appropriation. 5. Claim to make aboff of the Brighton Lateral that is located at of Opposition, setting forth facts as to why solute, in part – water applied to benefithe top of the 148th Avenue Gravity the application should not be granted, or cial use: 5.1. During the diligence period, Pipeline. The 148th Avenue Gravity why it should be granted only in part or on Applicant stored and placed to beneficial Pipeline picks up water from these three certain conditions. Such Statement of Opuse a total of 121.8 acre feet in the 124th diversion structures and then outfalls into position must be filed by the last day of Avenue Reservoir via the Fulton Ditch durKen Mitchell Lakes, as part of Brighton’s JUNE 2014 (forms available on ing free river times that occurred from integrated municipal water supply system. www.courts.state.co.us or in the Clerk’s September 12, 2013 through September The 148th Avenue Gravity Pipeline and office), and must be filed as an Original 19, 2013 and September 23, 2013 associated diversion structures were deand include $158.00 filing fee. A copy of through September 26, 2013. The maximsigned and constructed at an approximeach Statement of Opposition must also um flow rate of diversion for filling the ate cost of $4,000,000. 4.2.3. In addition, be served upon the Applicant or reservoir during these free river condiduring this diligence period, Brighton conApplicant’s Attorney and an affidavit or tions was 7.17 cfs, which occurred on tinued to develop its conditional water certificate of such service of mailing shall September 15, 2013. Accordingly, pursurights associated with Ken Mitchell Lakes, be filed with the Water Clerk. ant to C.R.S. §37-92-301(4) and (5), Apwhich is part of Brighton’s integrated muplicant claims as ABSOLUTE, for all denicipal water system. The Ken Mitchell Published in the Brighton Banner creed uses, 121.8 acre feet at a flow rate Lakes project encompasses three main May 22, 2014 of 7.17 cfs. 6. Land and Structure Ownerphases designated by Cell 1, Cell 2 and 00071199 ship Information. The headgate for filling Cell 3 of Ken Mitchell Lakes. Cell 3 was the storage structure is on property owned constructed and lined during the diligence by the Fulton Ditch Company, 25 South period and completed in early 2014 (Cell 1 4th Avenue, Brighton, Colorado 80601. All was completed in the fall of 2004 and a other structures are owned by Applicant, pump station was completed in 2007). City of Brighton, Attn: Sarah Borgers, AsOverall, Applicant has spent a substantial sistant Director of Utilities, 500 S. 4th sum, totaling more than $6,000,000, in enCITY OF BRIGHTON Street, Brighton, Colorado 80601. gineering fees, construction fees and conWHEREFORE, Brighton respectfully resulting fees towards the completion of its NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING quests the Court to enter a decree: A. Ken Mitchell Lakes project. 4.2.4. Brighton 3.2% BEER (OFF-PREMISE) Finding that Brighton has proceeded with also acquired Erger’s Pond during the diliLICENSE FOR reasonable diligence toward the complegence period, and the obligations associDILLON COMPANIES INC tion of the appropriations of water rights ated with the enlargement of the pond and KING SOOPERS #136 conditionally decreed for the storage of obtaining and maintaining the water right 100 N. 50TH AVENUE water in the 124th Avenue Reservoir; B. decrees for the pond. Brighton expended DAVID DILLON, DIRECTOR/CEO Finding that pursuant to C.R.S. §37-92approximately $3,500,000 in related costs RUSSELL J. DISPENSE, VP 301(4) and (5), Brighton has exercised its and expenses towards the acquisition of JUNE 2, 2014 AT 6:00 P.M. conditional water rights for the 124th AvErger’s Pond, as part of its integrated muCITY HALL 500 S. 4TH AVENUE enue Reservoir storage right in the nicipal water system. 4.2.5. Brighton also amount of 121.8 acre feet ABSOLUTE obtained decrees in Case No. 09CW144 PURSUANT TO THE LIQUOR LAWS and at a rate of 7.17 cfs ABSOLUTE, for and Case No. 04CW174, District Court, OF THE STATE OF COLORADO, Notice all decreed uses, as further described Water Division No. 1, on February 1, 2013 is hereby given that the Local Liquor herein; and C. Continuing the remaining and February 27, 2013 respectively. Both Licensing Authority of the City of Brighton 878.20 acre feet CONDITIONAL and 7.83 decrees further develop Brighton’s unified will hold a Public Hearing on Monday June cfs CONDITIONAL water rights in full municipal water system and include the 2, 2014 at 6:00 p.m., at City Hall, City force and effect for an additional diligence right to store water represented by Council Chambers, 500 South 4th Ave, period. 6 pages. Brighton’s changed water rights in the Brighton, Colorado 80601. 124th Avenue Reservoir. Case No. The purpose of the public hearing is to THE WATER RIGHTS CLAIMED BY 04CW174 also allows Brighton to operate consider the testimony of any interested THESE APPLICATIONS MAY AFFECT IN exchanges from 124th Avenue Reservoir. persons regarding a new liquor license PRIORITY ANY WATER RIGHTS Brighton also participated as an objector application which was received on March CLAIMED OR HERETOFORE ADJUDICin various Water Court cases to protect its 25, 2014 for Dillon Companies Inc dba ATED WITHIN THIS DIVISION AND water rights, including the subject condiKing Soopers #136, 100 N. 50th Avenue, OWNERS OF AFFECTED RIGHTS tional water right, from injury by other waBrighton Colorado 80601. MUST APPEAR TO OBJECT WITHIN ter users. In total, Brighton spent in exTHE TIME PROVIDED BY STATUTE OR cess of $3,000,000 obtaining these de/s/ Patricia Leyva BE FOREVER BARRED. crees and participating as an objector in Deputy City Clerk Water Court cases. 4.3. Applicant reYOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that any serves the right to assert and demonPublished in the Brighton Banner party who wishes to oppose an applicastrate that during the diligence period othMay 22, 2014 tion, or an amended application, may file er or additional activities have been under00071153 with the Water Clerk, P. O. Box 2038, taken or accomplished toward completion Greeley, CO 80632, a verified Statement of the appropriation. 5. Claim to make abof Opposition, setting forth facts as to why solute, in part – water applied to benefithe application should not be granted, or cial use: 5.1. During the diligence period, why it should be granted only in part or on Applicant stored and placed to beneficial certain conditions. Such Statement of Opuse a total of 121.8 acre feet in the 124th position must be filed by the last day of

Pursuant to C.R.S. 37-92-302, you are 17-Color notified that the following is a resume of all

May 22, 2014

Brighton Banner 17

It’s time for summer tennis By Michelle Boyer If you enjoy tennis or if you need some healthy competition on the courts, it’s time for you to join the Brighton Colorado Association of Recreational Athletics tennis team this summer. CARA tennis coordinator Bob Moulton has worked with the CARA program since 2007, and this will be his eighth and probably final year. “I continue to be involved with CARA because it gives kids a chance to learn how to play team tennis in a low pressure environment, where they can focus on having fun, rather than being worried about winning,” he said. “I also stay involved because of the close relationships I’ve established with the terrific coaches, parents and kids who participate in our program. Finally, I have a good working relationship with John Krumpholz, who oversees our program, and that has also meant a great deal to me. CARA is a terrific program because

Moulton

DISTRICT COURT, WATER DIVISION 1, COLORADO APRIL 2014 WATER RESUME PUBLICATION

ALL PERSONS INTERESTED IN not only is it a TO: very good value, itINalso alWATER APPLICATIONS WATER DIV. 1 lows kids to make friends, and to learn how

Pursuant to C.R.S. 37-92-302, you are notified that the following is a resume of all water right applications and certain amendments filed in the Office of the Water Clerk during the month of APRIL 2014 for each County affected.

High school athletes shine in state track

14CW3055 City of Brighton, Attn: Sarah Borgers, Assistant Director of Utilities, 500 S. 4th Street, Brighton, Colorado 80601, (303) 655-2033. Please send all ery year, and qualifying more each further pleadings to: Brent A. year,” Bartlett, Esq., Sara J.L. Irby, Esq., Fischer, Coach Karen Smidt said. “I’m very Brown, Bartlett & Gunn, P.C.,happy 1319 E. ForttoCollins, CO with where we Prospect are. I’m Road, blessed have the 80525. APPLICATION FOR FIDING OF Brighton High School track sent 11 of its coaching staff aREASONABLE head coach can ask AND for, TO so DILIGENCE MAKE A PORTION OF THE WATER athletes to the 5A State Championship last we have some awesome years of us. RIGHT ABSOLUTE IN ahead ADAMS COUNTY. 2. Name of Structure(s). week at Jeffco Stadium. “Our field events have been 124th our Avenue powStorage Pond (“124th Avenue Reservoir”). In the 4x800 meter relay—15, Rachael erhouse this season, I’m quite 3. Describeso conditional water pleased right: 3.1. Date of Original Decree: April 14, 2008, Lopez, Kaila Green, Aby Smidt and Destiny with my coaching We have Caseselections. No. 2002CW234, District even Court, 1, State gotten of Colorado. Chacon crossed the line in 9 minutes, 49.23 more potentialWater nowDivision that No. they’ve a 3.2. Legal Description/Location of Dam: seconds, setting a new school record. season under their belts, and know iswhere The 124th Avenue Reservoir a lined gravel pit and no dam exists. In order to 100 high hurdles—10, Kiana Gomez, our kids are. (Phil Bandoch) jumps coach, provide a legal description a “dam measurement point” was selected, which is loc15.15, Triple jump—10, Kiana Gomez, along with (Carl Arnold), my throws coach ated in the NW1/4 of the SE1/4 of Section 30-02.75; Long jump—11, Erika White, (Vicki Powell) 35, and my 1pole vault67coach Township South, Range West of the 6th P.M., in Adams County, 2,400 feet 16-03.50; Discus—12, Kevin Lopez, 135- (Christy Capra), we’re going to continue to from the South section lines and 2,095 feet from the EastAthletic section lines.ConferThe 124th 05, Shot put—16, Kevin Lopez, 46-07.50; dominate the East Metro Avenue Reservoir is located in the NW1/4 Discus—3, Deziree Lipsett,128-02; Shot ence League forof both boys girls,” Smidt the SE1/4 and and the NE1/4 of the SW1/4 of Section 35, Township 1 South, Range put—13, Deziree Lipsett, 33-03.75; High said. 67 West of the 6th P.M., in Adams County. the finish dam measurement point jump—4, Katelyn Ellis, 5-05.00; 800 Meter The coach said a Both team in the top and the location of the 124th Avenue run—11, Rachael Lopez, 2:20.90; 100 Meter 10 at state could soonarebecome a map realattached posReservoir shown on the hereto as Figure 1. 3.3 Source: South Dash (Paralympics Special)—2, Brittany sibility. Platte River. 3.4. Point of Diversion: The right is divertedthe fromathletes the South Kane, 15.87; 200 Meter Dash (Paralympics “At the statewater competition, Platte River via the Fulton Irrigation Ditch Special), 33.89. are with the best of the best,”inBHS (Jumps) (“Ditch”) for storage the 124th Avenue Reservoir. The capacity of the Ditch is 230 “We’re getting stronger and stronger ev- Coach Phil Bandoch Ellisfor and cfs. The said. decreed“Katelyn point of diversion the Fulton Ditch headgate is located near Section 9, between Sections 16 and 17, Township 2 South, Range 67 West of the DISTRICT COURT, 6th P.M. The actual headgate location is WATER DIVISION 1, COLORADO in the NE1/4 of the SE1/4 of Section 17, APRIL 2014 Township 2 South, Range 67 West of the WATER RESUME PUBLICATION 6th P.M. 3.5. Appropriation Date: April 2, 2002. 3.6. Amount: 1,000 acre feet, TO: ALL PERSONS INTERESTED IN CONDITIONAL, with a maximum rate of WATER APPLICATIONS IN WATER diversion for filling of 15 cfs, CONDITIONDIV. 1 AL. 3.7. Use: The water may be used directly or by exchange, and to extinction, for Pursuant to C.R.S. 37-92-302, you are all municipal uses, including but not limnotified that the following is a resume of all ited to domestic, mechanical manufacturwater right applications and certain amendments filed in the Office of the ing, industrial, fire protection, sewage Water Clerk during the month of APRIL treatment, street sprinkling, irrigation of 2014 for each County affected. parks, lawns and grounds, augmentation and replacement, substitute supply, adjustment and regulation of municipal wa14CW3055 City of Brighton, Attn: Sarah ter systems, including further exchange Borgers, Assistant Director of Utilities, with municipal water systems and with 500 S. 4th Street, Brighton, Colorado other water users, within the City of 80601, (303) 655-2033. Please send all Brighton’s service area as it may exist further pleadings to: Brent A. Bartlett, both now in and in the future. Brighton Esq., Sara J.L. Irby, Esq., Fischer, may also use the water for irrigating lawns Brown, Bartlett & Gunn, P.C., 1319 E. and grounds within its municipal service Prospect Road, Fort Collins, CO area as it may exist now and in the future. 80525. APPLICATION FOR FIDING OF 4. Diligence: 4.1. During the diligence periREASONABLE DILIGENCE AND TO od, Brighton completed the design and MAKE A PORTION OF THE WATER construction of the diversion structure into RIGHT ABSOLUTE IN ADAMS COUNTY. District Court, Adams County, CO the 124th Avenue Reservoir, the 124th 2. Name of Structure(s). 124th Avenue NOTICE TO CREDITORS Avenue Pump Station and Gravity Line, Storage Pond (“124th Avenue Reservoir”). BY PUBLICATION and the 124th Avenue Augmentation Sta3. Describe conditional water right: 3.1. Case Number: 2014 PR 30163 tion off of the Fulton Ditch at a total cost of Date of Original Decree: April 14, 2008, approximately $2,600,000. Brighton also Case No. 2002CW234, District Court, In the Matter of the Estate of ROBERT K. spent more than $40,000 on maintenance Water Division No. 1, State of Colorado. JACKSON, Deceased and repair to the 124th Avenue Reservoir 3.2. Legal Description/Location of Dam: and associated structures, including The 124th Avenue Reservoir is a lined All persons having claims against the without limitation maintaining the access gravel pit and no dam exists. In order to above-named estate are required to road around the perimeter of the 124th provide a legal description a “dam measpresent them to the Personal RepresentAvenue Reservoir, replacing a meter on urement point” was selected, which is locative or to District Court of Adams County, the diversion structure on the reservoir, ated in the NW1/4 of the SE1/4 of Section Colorado on or before September 15, and upgrading access to the pump 35, Township 1 South, Range 67 West of 2014, or the claims may be forever barred. houses. 4.2. The 124th Avenue Reservoir the 6th P.M., in Adams County, 2,400 feet water right also is part of Brighton’s integfrom the South section lines and 2,095 BOKF, N.A., d/b/a Colorado State rated municipal water supply system that feet from the East section lines. The 124th Bank and Trust is being constructed to supply water to the Avenue Reservoir is located in the NW1/4 Personal Representative City of Brighton for municipal and other of the SE1/4 and the NE1/4 of the SW1/4 c/o Martha L. Fuller, Trust Officer purposes. During the diligence period, of Section 35, Township 1 South, Range 1600 Broadway Brighton engaged in the following efforts 67 West of the 6th P.M., in Adams Denver, CO 80202 towards developing its integrated municipCounty. Both the dam measurement point al water supply system: 4.2.1. Brighton and the location of the 124th Avenue Published in the Brighton Banner completed design and construction of diReservoir are shown on the map attached First publication: May 15, 2014 version and conveyance structures as part hereto as Figure 1. 3.3 Source: South Last publication: May 29, 2014 of its integrated municipal water system to Platte River. 3.4. Point of Diversion: The 00070408 move share water from the Fulton Ditch water right is diverted from the South and the Brighton Lateral to the North Platte River via the Fulton Irrigation Ditch Storm Drain Outfall. The Brighton Lateral (“Ditch”) for storage in the 124th Avenue Augmentation Station and associated Reservoir. The capacity of the Ditch is 230 pipeline, which diverts and carries water cfs. The decreed point of diversion for the from the Brighton Lateral to carriage strucFulton Ditch headgate is located near tures below the Midland Augmentation Section 9, between Sections 16 and 17, Station, was completed during the diliTownship 2 South, Range 67 West of the DISTRICT COURT, gence period in 2008. The approximate 6th P.M. The actual headgate location is WATER DIVISION 1, COLORADO cost of the Brighton Lateral Augmentation in the NE1/4 of the SE1/4 of Section 17, APRIL 2014 Station and carriage pipes was $175,000. Township 2 South, Range 67 West of the WATER RESUME PUBLICATION 4.2.2. Brighton also constructed three di6th P.M. 3.5. Appropriation Date: April 2, version structures and associated gravity 2002. 3.6. Amount: 1,000 acre feet, TO: ALL PERSONS INTERESTED IN lines that convey share water to Ken CONDITIONAL, with a maximum rate of WATER APPLICATIONS IN WATER Mitchell Lakes for storage, direct augdiversion for filling of 15 cfs, CONDITIONDIV. 1 mentation through the lakes, or for exAL. 3.7. Use: The water may be used dirchange from Ken Mitchell Lakes to upectly or by exchange, and to extinction, for Pursuant to C.R.S. 37-92-302, you are stream points, as part of the development all municipal uses, including but not limnotified that the following is a resume of all of Brighton’s integrated municipal water ited to domestic, mechanical manufacturwater right applications and certain system. The first diversion structure is the ing, industrial, fire protection, sewage amendments filed in the Office of the Fulton Lateral Augmentation Station and treatment, street sprinkling, irrigation of Water Clerk during the month of APRIL pipeline outfall into the 148th Avenue parks, lawns and grounds, augmentation 2014 for each County affected. Gravity Pipeline leading to Ken Mitchell. and replacement, substitute supply, adThe second structure is a diversion off of justment and regulation of municipal wa14CW3055 City of Brighton, Attn: Sarah the main branch of the Fulton Ditch that ter systems, including further exchange Borgers, Assistant Director of Utilities, outfalls into the 148th Avenue Gravity with municipal water systems and with 500 S. 4th Street, Brighton, Colorado Pipeline. The last is a diversion structure other water users, within the City of 80601, (303) 655-2033. Please send all off of the Brighton Lateral that is located at Brighton’s service area as it may exist further pleadings to: Brent A. Bartlett, the top of the 148th Avenue Gravity both now in and in the future. Brighton Esq., Sara J.L. Irby, Esq., Fischer, Pipeline. The 148th Avenue Gravity may also use the water for irrigating lawns Brown, Bartlett & Gunn, P.C., 1319 E. Pipeline picks up water from these three and grounds within its municipal service Prospect Road, Fort Collins, CO diversion structures and then outfalls into area as it may exist now and in the future. 80525. APPLICATION FOR FIDING OF

By Michelle Boyer

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• Sprinkler Start Ups $40 • Aerations $40 • Fertilization $30 • Power Rakes $60 & Up • Fence Repair & Painting • Power wash decks & houses • Clean Up / Tree service • Laminate/Hardwood Floors • Licensed Plumber

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DEEDON'S PAINTING 40 years experience Interior & Exterior painting. References 303-466-4752

SWEET’S LANDSCAPING & Lawn Maintenance Mowing, aeration, fertilize, tree & shrub trim. Planting & Spring cleanup. Free estimates 28 yrs exp.

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• Affordable • Quality • Insured • Great Customer Service • Local Colorado Business • Exterior Painting • Interior Painting • Drywall Repair

Plumbing

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F Call Tod

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Butch

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• Wint • Syste • Insta • Servi

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(30 25 Plus

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$AV

30

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15% Off Summer Savings Free Instant Quote Repair or Replace: Faucets, R Sprinklers, Toilets, Sinks, Dispos• als, Water Heaters, Gas Lines, Broken Pipes, Spigots/Hosebibs, •S Water Pressure Regulator, Ice •1 Maker, Drain Cleaning, Dishwasher Instl., westtechplumbing.com Call CALL WEST TECH (720)298-0880

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Mark’s Quality Lawn Mark’s Quality Lawn Care Sod, rock, landscaping, bush trimming, Revive treatments and bug control. Summer fertilizing and weed control. Aerating and mowing in select areas. FREE ESTIMATES AND SENIOR DISCOUNTS

New Ro

Sh R 35

Tony 720-210-4304

Call Greg

Hauling Service

S

Call Frank

Columbine Custom Contracting & Sprinkler Service

303-427-2955

Dirt, Rock, Concrete, Sod & Asphalt

Your Community Connector to Boundless Rewards

LAWN SERVICES

$$Reasonable Rates$$

Alpine Landscape Management

720-203-7385

• Honest pricing • • Free estimates •

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Ba re wat

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We will match any written estimate! Same day service! No job too small or too big!

Insurance

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No Service in Parker or Castle Rock

Please call anytime: Mr. Domingo 720-365-5501

Residential Homes

Free Estimates • Reliable Licensed • Bonded Insured • Senior Discount

Office 303-642-3548 Cell 720-363-5983

COMMERCIAL & RESIDENTIAL INSURED & BONDED FREE ESTIMATE

LAWN AERATIONS

House Cleaning

Carpentry • Painting Tile • Drywall • Roof Repairs Plumbing • Electrical Kitchen • Basements Bath Remodels Property Building Maintenance

All types, licensed & insured. Honest expert service. Free estimates.

• patios • sidewalks • garage floors • • porches • stamped/colored • exposed agregate • lic.& ins. free estimates

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Front Range Handyworks

Reasonable Price & Quality Service Full Landscaping, Fence, Tree, Sod, Rock, Aeration Weekly Mowing, Bush Trimming, Yard Cleanup, Power Rake Low Cost - Experience - References - Dependable

Spring Services: Aeration, Power raking, Fertilization, Spring Cleanup and Gutter Clean out. Other Services: Landscaping, Rock install, Sod Install, Fencing, Small Tree / Bush install and removal, Irrigation start-up, repair and install. Services offered also include Weekly Lawn Maintenance.

Call (303)908-5793

All phases to include

EAGLE CLEANING 3 hour special $57

Lawn Service

Home Improvement

Silva & Sons Carpentry & Remodeling

Call Ed 720-328-5039

Dreiling’s

Serving Most of Northern Colorado

JOHNSON’S

15% Off

Bob’s Home Repairs

Mowing, Aeration, Power Raking, Fertilizing, Sprinkler Start-up and Repairs

Call Terrence @ 303-427-5342

Serving the Front Range Since 1955

Drywall

• Home Renovation and Remodel • 30 years Experience • Insured • Satisfaction Guaranteed

AFFORDABLE HAULING You Call - I Haul Basement, Garages, Houses, Construction, Debris, Small Moves Office - 303-642-3548 Cell 720-363-5983 Ron Massa BBB - Bonded - Insured

Lawn/Garden Services

Sosa Landscaping

HAULING

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Our customers tell us we pay the highest prices in town. D&K Jewelers 303-421-4194

Drywall Repair Specialist

Lawn/Garden Services

$$Reasonable Rates On:$$ *Trash Cleanup*old furniture mattresses*appliances*dirt old fencing*branches*concrete *asphalt*old sod*brick*mortar* House/Garage/Yard clean outs Storm Damage Cleanup Electronics recycling avail. Mark 303.432.3503

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High Impa Free E Your experienced Plumbers.

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Services

19-Color

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May 22, 2014

Services Remodeling

GREENE'S REMODELING

Bathroom/kitchen remodeling, repair work, plumbing leaks, water damage. No job too small Window replacement. Serving Jeffco since 1970 (303)237-3231

Rocky Mountain Contractors

Home Remodeling Specialists, Inc. * Bath * Kitch Remodels * Bsmt Finishes * Vinyl Windows * Patio Covers * Decks 30+ yrs. exp. George (303)252-8874

Sage Remodeling inc

Remodeling for your entire house • Older Homes • Senior Discounts • 20 Years experience • Licensed and Insured

303-589-4095

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Roofing/Gutters

Tree Service JAY WHITE Tree Service Serving with pride since 1975 Tree & shrub trimming & removals Licensed and Insured Firewood For Sale Call Jay (303)278-7119

Majestic Tree Service 720-231-5954

Tree & Shrub Trimming, Tree Removal Stump Grinding Free Estimates Licensed and Insured

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Advertise: 303-566-4100

PROFESSIONAL SERVICES GUIDE Michael’s Handyman Services

A QUALITY HANDYMAN SERVICE Affordable Home Repairs At Your Fingertips FREE ESTIMATES, ALL WORK GUARANTEED

Let Me Help You Beautify Your Home – Quality Workmanship

Custom Bathrooms & Kitchens, Electrical,Plumbing, & General Repairs

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Stump grinding specialist

Most stumps $75.00 $45 Minimum. Free estimates. Licensed & Insured. 33 years experience.

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THE GLASS RACK

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7475 W. 5th Ave., Unit 150H. Lakewood, CO 80226 Automotive • Residential • Commercial Screens • Tabletops • Patio Doors • RV Glass

Quality Work Low Prices Senior Discounts Gary (303)987-2086

We do concrete, sod, decks, sprinklers, outdoor kitchens, fire pits. We can build all of your landscaping needs, please call for a free estimate! 10 years in business. 303-621-0192 • cell 720-338-5275

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Rep

Nancy

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Papers

Sandi

Mile High Classifieds

Complete Home Remodeling Interior - Exterior - Kitchens - Baths - Basements Additions - MasterRSuites E A D >- Decks C O N N-EDoors C T > -L EWindows ARN > LIVE Siding - Roofing

1 A-1 PfStump Removal Advertis Comment Size

QC: _________

Svc Guide

Stump grinding REP: _________specialist

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Pub date

4-12-12

A father and Licensed Bonded - Insured This proof must- be returned to your ad rep at Mile High Newspapers within stated deadline time, or theson team!

will assume the ad is correct as originally produced. Please contact us at 303-279-5541. Office 303-642-3548 Ron MassaPublisher

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ColoradoCommunityMedia.com

To advertise your business here, call Karen at 303-566-4091


20-Color

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May 22, 2014

Indoor waterfalls make science fun How do families encourage children to become scientists? They do it by playing with science from a very early age and carrying on conversations. Science discovery takes very little time and can use materials around the house. Have fun making and discussing indoor waterfalls on a rainy day to help add to the three million words children need to hear before kindergarten according the Great Start. For more fun science check out “Learning Through the Seasons” live on Public Radio 90 WNMUFM Tuesdays at 4:30 and Saturdays at 8:45. Pod casts are available worldwide at wnmufm.org (Listen to PR90) and grandparentsteachtoo.org. Materials: Water, chopping board, kitchen bowls, and a colander What To Do Explain that you’re making indoor waterfalls before you go to see some real

ones in your county. An easy definition is an area of a river or stream where the water flows fast over and around rocks or drops over a ledge. There are many kinds and they can be viewed on Google images. Explain that you need help finding things in the kitchen to make a tower and pour water over it like a waterfall. Look for non-breakable plates, bowls, cutting boards, and a colander used to drain vegetables or spaghetti.

Experiment making the tallest tower. Start with a cake pan to catch the water. Then layer cutting boards, various sizes of upside down bowls, and plates. The flat materials will help prevent the towers from tipping — sometimes. Place a colander on top, if available. Now pour a pitcher of water gently over the tower. The most important part of the process is talking about how the bowls and plates slow down the water much like hard rocks slow down and divert water in a river. Place a sheet of rolled up paper towel between layers of the tower. Does it change the flow of water? Perhaps it does for a short time, but then it will crumble much like very soft sandstone will crumble after years of flow. Notice how the water flows over the cutting board like a ledge waterfall. These waterfalls can be created in the

tub or sink indoors with warm water. They can be created outdoors on hot days with a hose or built at the beach. Some families like to add food coloring in different pitchers and let colors mix in the cake pan pool at the bottom. Others like to recycle the clean water in the cake pan pool and use the water to nourish plants after clean up. No matter what you decide to do, the most important part is conversation. Talk while planning the activity, gathering materials, trying different ways to make the tower, laughing when it falls and reconstructing. All this talking teaches social skills and dealing with emotions. Let the activity guide the quiet conversation. More information, and more science experiment ideas are available at www. grandparentsteachtoo.org, and www. granddparentsteachtoo.blogspot.com.

Summer school food program begins anew By Michelle Boyer It is summertime and your children don’t have to go hungry. Once again this year, School District 27J will once again offer free breakfast and lunch meals to children. Free breakfast and lunch for children ages 1-18 will be served starting May 27, through Aug. 1 at Northeast Elementary, 1605 Longs Peak St., North Elementary, 89 N. Sixth Ave. South Elementary, 305 S. Fifth Ave., Brighton. Breakfast will be served 8-9

a.m., with lunch 11 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. The cost for adult meals is $2.25 for breakfast and $3.75 for lunch. Call 303655-2988 for additional information on the summer food program. In summer of 2013, the program served 5,412 breakfast meals and 15,399 lunch meals to children for free. School District 27J has supported this program for many years. The summer food program is offered through the Nutrition Services Department of SD27J and is funded by the United States Department of Agriculture.

“I hope we can serve more children than we did last year,” Nichole Poppie, nutrition services coordinator, School District 27J said. “Last year we served a combined 20,811 meals, so I hope we can exceed that. In addition we served breakfast and lunch to adults for a small fee. “This program allows us to serve free, nutritious meals to the community when school is out. We would like to see as many families as possible take advantage of this program, as it helps families in need to stretch their food dollar. It’s also available

to all children in the community regardless of income.” Poppie said the menu includes the same healthy foods offered by the school program during the school year, with an emphasis on whole grain rich items, fresh fruits, fresh vegetable and low fat milk. Each summer, Poppie also teaches a short nutrition class to the Funshine program. She said last year the class emphasized the importance of fruits and veggies, with a focus on the colors of the rainbow.

adamS county commiSSionerS on the record The Adams County Board of County Commissioners voted on the following during its May 12 regular meeting:

Housing Authority grant

The commissioners unanimously approved its consent calendar, which included awarding a grant in the amount of $64,920 to Adams County Housing Authority. This money supports its Housing Counseling operations which help prevent foreclosures in Adams County. The operations of this program had a projected net deficit of $229,416 for 2014. The projected loss for the housing counseling program for 2014 is projected to be

$333,143.

Street Paving Project

The commissioners unanimously approved an agreement with Martin Marietta Materials Inc. for the 2014 Street Paving Project in the amount of $5,259,810.20. This project addresses more than 30 lane miles in seven different areas within unincorporated Adams County. The streets identified in this program include the highest priority for rehabilitation.

Traffic signal maintenance

The commissioners unanimously approved an agreement with WL Contractor

Inc. for the 2014 Traffic Signal Maintenance and Emergency Repairs Program in the amount of $98,602. This agreement covers the labor, supervision and equipment necessary to perform traffic signal maintenance and emergency repairs.

Food bank expansion

The commissioners unanimously approved plans for Strasburg Community Church to build a 1,440-square-foot building west of its church at 56155 Sunset Ave. in Strasburg, approximately the same area as the old food bank building. The Strasburg Community Food Bank has been in operation since 2001. The

facility serves approximately 400 families a month, including 1,150 people — nearly 400 children. The current facility is too small to meet the growing demand of the food bank. Commissioners in attendance include Eva Henry, District 1; Chairman Charles “Chaz” Tedesco, District 2; and Erik Hansen, District 3. The next regular board of county commissioners meeting will be at 9:30 a.m. Monday, May 26, in the Public Hearing Room, Adams County Government Center, 4430 S. Adams County Parkway, Brighton. — Compiled by Tammy Kranz

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