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April 10, 2014 Adams County, Colorado | Volume 6, Issue 15 A publication of

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SPRING IN THE AIR

Gov. John Hickenlooper poses with legislative members after signing Senate Bill 004, which authorized community colleges to offer some four-year degrees. Rep. Jenise May (not in picture) was a sponsor of the bill. Courtesy photo

May highlights legislative work Representative focuses on budget, disability issues By Tammy Kranz

tkranz@coloradocommunitymedia.com

Todd LaBarge of Brighton rakes his front yard March 30 near 18th Avenue and Bridge Street and says he will be ready to water the lawn in coming weeks. Photo by Mikkel Kelly

Several of the bills that Rep. Jenise May sponsored this legislative session dealt with the intellectually and developmentally disabled. May, D-District 30, said the bills focused on allowing individuals with developmental disabilities stay independent if they were able. One of those bills, House Bill 14-1338, created the regional centers task force to study matters relating to the state’s regional centers for people with intellectual disabilities and to make recommendations. Another related bill was HB 14-1252, dealt with the funding and increase in system capacity for home- and communitybased services to intellectual and developmental disabilities “Colorado has struggled to provide services in this area and we end up moving them in a highest care because that was what available,” she said. She said that this bill creates different levels of care and allows a person to get the right care at the right level instead of putting them in the highest care possible. She said this is also saving the state money. “This is doing the right thing — which is rare in government — and saving taxpayers’ money, these are good things to me,” May said.

‘Colorado has struggled to provide services in this area and we end up moving them in a highest care because that was what available.’ Rep. Jenise May Gov. John Hickenlooper signed both these bills into law, as well as other related bills that were technical in nature. The governor also signed Senate Bill 14004, which May sponsored. This legislation gives community colleges in the state the right to offer four-year degrees in career Work continues on Page 3

Committee assignment an honor, hard work May works on state budget, holds town hall meetings By Tammy Kranz tkranz@coloradocommunitymedia.com

This legislative session marks the midway mark for Rep. Jenise May’s first term in office. May said she was honored to be appointed to the Joint Budget Committee because generally appointees have much more experience in the Legislature. Being on this committee, which is in charge of

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keeping a balanced budget, has been an all-consuming job, she said. She said though she did not anticipate the exhaustive work — her days start at 7 a.m. and do not end until 7 p.m. and she reviews 200 to 300 pages of budget-related items daily — she says she is honored to be on the committee. “I enjoy it a lot it’s been a great learning experi- May ence,” May said. May also serves on the Appropriations committee. May represents District 30, which spans from northern Aurora to rural Adams County east of Denver International Airport and into parts of Thornton. Because of the large area of the district, May holds

town hall meetings in Thornton, Commerce City and Aurora. For the most part the town halls have been a question-and-answer format. “I ask my constituents how they like the town halls because it’s for them, not me,” May said. “They just want us to be there to answer their questions.” May’s next town halls will be on Saturday, April 26. From 10 to 11:30 a.m. at the Commerce City Civic Center, 7887 E. 60th Ave., she will co-host a town hall with Rep. Dominick Moreno and Sen. Jessie Ulibarri. From 1:30-2:30 p.m., she will co-host a town hall with Sen. Mary Hodge at Wright Farms Anythink Library, 5877 E. 120th Ave. in Thornton. May served more than 25 years in public service before become a legislator. She served as the deputy director of the Colorado Department of Human Services.


3-Color Brighton Banner 3

April 10, 2014

Efforts to stem energy mandates fail Bills mark third attempt to undo new rural energy standards this session By Vic Vela

vvela@coloradocommunitymedia.com Attempts to scale back implementation of increased rural renewable energy mandates suffered another set of defeats at the Capitol this week. Two RepubReport lican-sponsored bills that would have either lowered the bar on new energy standards on rural electric providers or that would have pushed back the implementation start date failed in separate legislative committees. New standards for rural electric providers will require that they generate 20 percent of their energy through renewable sources. The mandate is scheduled to take effect in 2020.

Capitol

Three GOP-backed bills that sought to undo those new standards have been introduced this session — a year removed from the contentious passage of Senate Bill 252, which doubled the former renewable energy standard of 10 percent. But those efforts have failed, most recently as Jan. 30 when the House Transportation and Energy Committee killed a bill that sought to reduce the energy mandate to 15 percent. Rep. Ray Scott, R-Grand Junction, the bill sponsor, told committee members that the new standards are too high, and they will hurt rural economies. “Has our policy been misdirected?” Scott said. “Are we putting too much pressure on different types of energy-related sectors?” Diana Orf of the Colorado Mining Association, speaking in support of Scott’s measure, said last year’s Senate Bill 252 was passed “very hastily” and the new standard “needs a second look.” “We believe the standard can be achieved, but it needs more time,” Orf said. Moffat County commissioner John Kinkaid was more direct in his criticism of SB252, calling it a job killer for coal mining and power production employers in rural

parts of the state. “I’m here today to say that I hope that the war on rural Colorado is over and that we can have a spirit of bipartisanship,” Kinkaid said. Scott’s bill was met with opposition by SB 252 supporters who said that Colorado is the home to great wind and solar energy resources, that those industries are creating new jobs here, and the new standards will be a boon for new energy jobs here. “Coloradoans are with us on this issue,” said Kim Stephens of Environment Colorado, an environmental advocacy group. “They want more clean, renewable energy.” The Democrat-led committee killed Scott’s measure following a party-line vote of 8-5. The day before Scott’s measure died, Rep. Kathleen Conti’s bill that sought to delay the implementation of the new standards until 2025 suffered the same fate. “We’re really not seeking to change much, but simply extend the deadline that was given,” Conti, a Littleton Republican, told the same committee. Rep. Polly Lawrence, a Douglas County Republican, a supporter of Conti’s bill, said even though Senate Bill 252 puts a 2 per-

cent cap on energy rate hikes, any hikes would be a burden on some living in rural parts of the state. “I know 2 percent doesn’t sound like much, but when you have people on fixed incomes who are struggling to coming out of this recession, 2 percent is a lot,” Lawrence said. Democrats on the committee believe the new standards will work. They also rejected a long-held Republican argument that last year’s passage of SB 252 was rushed through the Legislature without enough input from rural Coloradans. “People were brought into the process, and negotiations were long and hard,” said Rep. Cherylin Peniston, D-Westminster. “I just didn’t want the public to be left with the idea that the bill was drafted without participation because I believe that would be a misconception.” That bill also died following a party-line vote of 8-5. The bills became the third effort seeking to undo to the new energy mandate standard to fail this session. On Jan. 15, a Senate committee killed a bill seeking an all-out repeal of the new standards.

helped increase the membership to 970 members, compared to just 300 when she started, elevating the chamber as the seventh largest in the state. She was also part of providing a voice for the community through public policy, promoting smarter business through the development council and encouraging personal and professional growth through the leadership program. The creation of two events — the Taste Obermeyer of the Chamber and the Chamber 5 Challenge — have also provided more opportunities for the community and chamber members. “I am very proud of the board’s commitment to ensure that the MNCC has a facility that serves as a resource for all our members,” she said. “The MNCC office is state-of-the-art and is in constant use by

our members. The board is also committed to keeping the chamber dues affordable for all businesses while increasing services and programs.” Chamber executive board director Troy Whitmore is sad to see Obermeyer go, and credits her for truly rebuilding the chamber. He said he doesn’t think the chamber would have survived without her leadership. “One of her greatest attributes was bridging the gap between the chamber and local governments,” he said. “That is not always the case for chambers, and those relationships really made for a stronger chamber. She will be greatly missed.” For Obermeyer, the best part of being the chamber CEO was the opportunity to interact with a multitude of people and supporting people both professionally and personally. She said to keep a chamber successful, everything boils down to the involvement of people who are committed

to making a difference. “Our chamber partners are a group of highly successful leaders who are committed to the metro north region,” she said. “They invest capital, create jobs and enhance the lifestyle of the communities within this region with quality services and products. The MNCC has been a community staple for 55 years, and that kind of longevity means something.” Matt Barnes, who serves on the chamber’s leadership board, said during Obermeyer’s tenure she led the chamber to new heights through her professionalism, innovation and dedication and through her leadership she has set the foundation for the chamber to thrive and continue to be successful for years to come. “Deborah had the special ability to bring the business community together, promote regional community networks and develop both business and community partnerships,” he said.

CEO says farewell to chamber By Ashley Reimers

areimers@ coloradocommunitymedia.com After almost 14 years, Deborah Obermeyer is stepping down as the Metro North Chamber of Commerce CEO and moving on to other professional opportunities. Her decision will be made effective May 31. “I have been blessed throughout my career with roles in which I have been constantly challenged to learn and grow,” she said. “I believe my versatility coupled with my leadership experience will allow me to jump into a new field and make a difference.” From the moment she interviewed for the CEO position years ago, Obermeyer felt an instant draw to the chamber. She said it was the logical next step in her career, and within weeks she knew undoubtedly that she made the right choice. During her time as CEO, Obermeyer

Work Continued from Page 1

and technical fields. May said prior to this legislation, if a student got an associate degree from a community college, he or she would have to go to a four-year college to expand on that degree. “This now allows community colleges to offer that degree so students can move forward instead of backtracking,” she said. She said this saves the student time and

money. The types of four-year bachelor of applied science degrees that can be offered at community colleges include dental hygiene, culinary arts and water quality management. May said she did not have time to work on a lot of bills because her main focus, since November, has been on the budget. May serves on the Joint Budget Committee, which is tasked with analyzing the management, operations, programs and fiscal needs of the state government. “I spent an enormous amount of time looking at the budget and making sure it passes,” she said.

CORRECTION Numbers were transposed in results of voting during the Adams County Republican Assembly on March 29 in last week’s edition. Former Brighton Mayor Jan Pawlowski had 57 percent of the vote

for District 5 county commissioner, and Neal Mancuso had 41 percent. Both will be on the primary election ballot in June. To report corrections or clarifications, call 303-521-1659.

6950 N. Broadway 303.426.5881 www.mickeystopsirloin.com Hand-cut steaks daily | Homemade Mexican | Italian cuisine | Banquet room available for groups Family owned for over 50 years

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All served with your choice of soup or salad, and a side

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Owner/Broker

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3-Color Brighton Banner 3

April 3, 2014

Efforts to stem energy mandates fail Bills mark third attempt to undo new rural energy standards this session By Vic Vela

vvela@coloradocommunitymedia.com Attempts to scale back implementation of increased rural renewable energy mandates suffered another set of defeats at the Capitol this week. Two RepubReport lican-sponsored bills that would have either lowered the bar on new energy standards on rural electric providers or that would have pushed back the implementation start date failed in separate legislative committees. New standards for rural electric providers will require that they generate 20 percent of their energy through renewable sources. The mandate is scheduled to take effect in 2020.

Capitol

Three GOP-backed bills that sought to undo those new standards have been introduced this session — a year removed from the contentious passage of Senate Bill 252, which doubled the former renewable energy standard of 10 percent. But those efforts have failed, most recently as Jan. 30 when the House Transportation and Energy Committee killed a bill that sought to reduce the energy mandate to 15 percent. Rep. Ray Scott, R-Grand Junction, the bill sponsor, told committee members that the new standards are too high, and they will hurt rural economies. “Has our policy been misdirected?” Scott said. “Are we putting too much pressure on different types of energy-related sectors?” Diana Orf of the Colorado Mining Association, speaking in support of Scott’s measure, said last year’s Senate Bill 252 was passed “very hastily” and the new standard “needs a second look.” “We believe the standard can be achieved, but it needs more time,” Orf said. Moffat County commissioner John Kinkaid was more direct in his criticism of SB252, calling it a job killer for coal mining and power production employers in rural

parts of the state. “I’m here today to say that I hope that the war on rural Colorado is over and that we can have a spirit of bipartisanship,” Kinkaid said. Scott’s bill was met with opposition by SB 252 supporters who said that Colorado is the home to great wind and solar energy resources, that those industries are creating new jobs here, and the new standards will be a boon for new energy jobs here. “Coloradoans are with us on this issue,” said Kim Stephens of Environment Colorado, an environmental advocacy group. “They want more clean, renewable energy.” The Democrat-led committee killed Scott’s measure following a party-line vote of 8-5. The day before Scott’s measure died, Rep. Kathleen Conti’s bill that sought to delay the implementation of the new standards until 2025 suffered the same fate. “We’re really not seeking to change much, but simply extend the deadline that was given,” Conti, a Littleton Republican, told the same committee. Rep. Polly Lawrence, a Douglas County Republican, a supporter of Conti’s bill, said even though Senate Bill 252 puts a 2 per-

cent cap on energy rate hikes, any hikes would be a burden on some living in rural parts of the state. “I know 2 percent doesn’t sound like much, but when you have people on fixed incomes who are struggling to coming out of this recession, 2 percent is a lot,” Lawrence said. Democrats on the committee believe the new standards will work. They also rejected a long-held Republican argument that last year’s passage of SB 252 was rushed through the Legislature without enough input from rural Coloradans. “People were brought into the process, and negotiations were long and hard,” said Rep. Cherylin Peniston, D-Westminster. “I just didn’t want the public to be left with the idea that the bill was drafted without participation because I believe that would be a misconception.” That bill also died following a party-line vote of 8-5. The bills became the third effort seeking to undo to the new energy mandate standard to fail this session. On Jan. 15, a Senate committee killed a bill seeking an all-out repeal of the new standards.

helped increase the membership to 970 members, compared to just 300 when she started, elevating the chamber as the seventh largest in the state. She was also part of providing a voice for the community through public policy, promoting smarter business through the development council and encouraging personal and professional growth through the leadership program. The creation of two events — the Taste Obermeyer of the Chamber and the Chamber 5 Challenge — have also provided more opportunities for the community and chamber members. “I am very proud of the board’s commitment to ensure that the MNCC has a facility that serves as a resource for all our members,” she said. “The MNCC office is state-of-the-art and is in constant use by

our members. The board is also committed to keeping the chamber dues affordable for all businesses while increasing services and programs.” Chamber executive board director Troy Whitmore is sad to see Obermeyer go, and credits her for truly rebuilding the chamber. He said he doesn’t think the chamber would have survived without her leadership. “One of her greatest attributes was bridging the gap between the chamber and local governments,” he said. “That is not always the case for chambers, and those relationships really made for a stronger chamber. She will be greatly missed.” For Obermeyer, the best part of being the chamber CEO was the opportunity to interact with a multitude of people and supporting people both professionally and personally. She said to keep a chamber successful, everything boils down to the involvement of people who are committed

to making a difference. “Our chamber partners are a group of highly successful leaders who are committed to the metro north region,” she said. “They invest capital, create jobs and enhance the lifestyle of the communities within this region with quality services and products. The MNCC has been a community staple for 55 years, and that kind of longevity means something.” Matt Barnes, who serves on the chamber’s leadership board, said during Obermeyer’s tenure she led the chamber to new heights through her professionalism, innovation and dedication and through her leadership she has set the foundation for the chamber to thrive and continue to be successful for years to come. “Deborah had the special ability to bring the business community together, promote regional community networks and develop both business and community partnerships,” he said.

CEO says farewell to chamber By Ashley Reimers

areimers@ coloradocommunitymedia.com After almost 14 years, Deborah Obermeyer is stepping down as the Metro North Chamber of Commerce CEO and moving on to other professional opportunities. Her decision will be made effective May 31. “I have been blessed throughout my career with roles in which I have been constantly challenged to learn and grow,” she said. “I believe my versatility coupled with my leadership experience will allow me to jump into a new field and make a difference.” From the moment she interviewed for the CEO position years ago, Obermeyer felt an instant draw to the chamber. She said it was the logical next step in her career, and within weeks she knew undoubtedly that she made the right choice. During her time as CEO, Obermeyer

Work Continued from Page 1

and technical fields. May said prior to this legislation, if a student got an associate degree from a community college, he or she would have to go to a four-year college to expand on that degree. “This now allows community colleges to offer that degree so students can move forward instead of backtracking,” she said. She said this saves the student time and

money. The types of four-year bachelor of applied science degrees that can be offered at community colleges include dental hygiene, culinary arts and water quality management. May said she did not have time to work on a lot of bills because her main focus, since November, has been on the budget. May serves on the Joint Budget Committee, which is tasked with analyzing the management, operations, programs and fiscal needs of the state government. “I spent an enormous amount of time looking at the budget and making sure it passes,” she said.

CORRECTION Numbers were transposed in results of voting during the Adams County Republican Assembly on March 29 in last week’s edition. Former Brighton Mayor Jan Pawlowski had 57 percent of the vote

for District 5 county commissioner, and Neal Mancuso had 41 percent. Both will be on the primary election ballot in June. To report corrections or clarifications, call 303-521-1659.

6950 N. Broadway 303.426.5881 www.mickeystopsirloin.com Hand-cut steaks daily | Homemade Mexican | Italian cuisine | Banquet room available for groups Family owned for over 50 years

TLY ! H G NI CIALS SP4E- 10 pm

Monday: BBQ Steak & Rib Platter $14.95 Tuesday: Steak Marsala w/Lasagna $14.95 Wednesday: Carne Asada $14.95 Thursday & Sunday: Steak & Shrimp $14.95 Friday & Saturday: Filet & Scallops $17.95

All served with your choice of soup or salad, and a side

Kayla Odom 720.334.6850

Beth Martin 303.859.4973 5 Star Professional Real Estate Agent

Joni Leonard 303.683.3017

to benefit the Adams County Museum

Saturday | April 19 |9am - 4pm

Gifts for all occasions!

• $2 Admission • 14 & under FREE • 200 Booths • FREE Parking

Brenda Smith 303.960.9025

MetRO BROkeRS Of BRigHtOn

Best of Spring 27th Annual Arts & Crafts Bazaar

Joni Pierce 303.668.1360

(303) 654-1900

HeppRealty.com

Adams County Regional Park & Fairground

ce 9755 Henderson Road (124th Ave) r Spa o d n ! Ve 303.659.7103 ABLE AVAIL Sponsored by the Adams County Historical Society

www.adamscountymuseum.com adamscomusum@aol.com

435 S. 4th Ave. • Brighton, CO r Professional ve Sta ne Fi 2011, 2013 agazi ent 2010, M 0 8 g 52 eA Estat l a e R

Jan Hepp-Struck, CRS

Owner/Broker

(303) 520-4340

Elmer Rose Rose Realty 720.289.0538


4-Color

4 Brighton Banner

April 10, 2014

‘Grease’ musical slides into production Prairie View to perform popular musical By Michelle Boyer Grease is the word on stage at Prairie View High School, 12909 East 120th Ave., Henderson starting today at 7 p.m. “I chose Grease because I wanted to do a musical everyone could sing along with,” PVHS Theater Director Jennifer Bryner said. “Grease is timeless and FUN.” The performances are today, April 10, through Saturday at 7 p.m. The cost is $5 for students and seniors, and $9 for adults. All tickets are sold at the door. Lundyn Roybal (Kenickie) shows his bad boy demeanor on stage. He’s the ladies’ man, who’s proud of his car “Greased Lightning.” “I really like playing this role, because it’s not me at all in real life,” he said. “It’s someone different to play and have fun with.” Roybal loves theater and everything it takes in putting together a production. “This musical has to be so fun because the cast is so big,” he said. “We’ve had the time it takes to work with everyone, and to incorporate them into the show more than regular plays. I prefer singing the most, when it comes to productions.” His favorite two shows he’s performed in are Thoroughly Modern Millie, he played (Muzzy Boy), and The Drowsy Chaperone, when playing ( Mr. Feldzieg) was his first lead role. “It was a really good experience and I got to sing by myself,” Roybal said. “I liked ‘Thoroughly Modern Millie,’ because it was a play only about one person, and not a whole ensemble.” This was Roybal’s first year competing at the Thespian Conference and he said it was a great

Students perform “Grease.” Courtesy photos

JodiLyn Richardson and Lundyn Roybal. experience. “I got a superb on the song and performances I did,” he said. “One performance I did was from Seussical The Musical, and I

sang “Alone in the Universe.” In May, Roybal has and audition with the Boulder Dinner Theater. “I’m excited, and I like to

perform,” he said. Senior JodiLyn Richardson said she was one of those children who would stand in front of the mirror with the hair brush and she’d make sure she knew every line to the TV show, but never thought it would be a dream worth having. “I was super exited when I came to Prairie View and they had a theater department,” she said. “I’ve been doing theater since my freshman year.” One of Richardson’s favorite plays was Fools, by Neil Simon. “I loved that cast so much, and my role, (Sofia) was kind of a lead character,” she said. “I also enjoyed playing one of the witches in Macbeth. “Macbeth was intense. It was really fun, because the witches got to add red to their costume while everyone else had to wear black and white. We stood out and tried to make it as creepy as

possible. A lot of people enjoyed our production.” Richardson said she can definitely relate to her current role of (Rizzo) in Grease. “She’s a greaser female version, but stuck in a pink lady body,” she said. “She thinks she’s all cool and everyone thinks she’s trashy, but in reality she’s not. Throughout the show she tries to perform she’s not.” Working on Grease has been so much fun for Richardson. She said the community should come see the production. “It’s a great way to get out and see what the Arts are doing local schools,” she said. “It’s a great way to see what we’re made of.” Richardson is looking into attending the Colorado Film School or the American Musical and Drama Academy in California. She wants to become and actress in film. Grease also has two more actors who’ve shined on the stage: Audrey Meshefski (T-Bird) and Alyse Foster (angel with Teen Angel). “Both young-ladies have been an amazing addition to our cast, and have brought a lot of joy and pride to the students in the show,” Bryner said. “Audrey wanted to do theater, and her most favorite movie ever is Grease, Lori Meshefski said. “Ms. Bryner talked us into having her be in the play. This has been the most incredible thing so far as our transition into high school this year. It’s given her the opportunity to shine a bit. Just because she has Downs Syndrome doesn’t mean she can’t do a lot, and it’s been good for her language development. Also socializing as a part of a group has been important. It’s a wonderful experience to know that she fits in finally.” Meshefski said her daughter has said things like, “Momma this is awesome. I get to dance. I get to sing. I’m a T-Bird.” “She’s really enjoyed it, and it’s been a really good move for us. She wants to continue doing it,” Meshefski said.

Business tax credit bill moves forward Employers given more incentive to create Colorado jobs By Vic Vela vvela@coloradocommunitymedia.com The expansion of a job-growth incentive tax credit is gaining momentum at the Legislature. Under current law, businesses can earn

income tax credits over a five-year period for every job they create in Colorado. The new bill would expand the availability of that credit to eight years and would make other modifications to an effort that received bipartisan support at the Legislature last year. House Minority Leader Brian DelGrosso, R-Loveland, and Rep. Tracy KraftTharp, D-Arvada, said the effort to expand the law is a testament to its popularity. “While our economy is starting to move along, this is a bill that will help us move

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back to that robust state,” Kraft-Tharp said on the House floor on April 4, just before House members gave initial approval to the legislation. The bill was expected to easily pass the House during a final vote, which Report was scheduled for April 7. The changes to the bill are business friendly. In addition to expanding the availability of the credit, the bill reduces a requirement that exists in the current law, which mandates that businesses must offer an employee 110 percent of the average county wage. The new bill lowers that requirement to 100 percent. The bill also alters the “burden of proof” that companies must meet in order to qualify for the credit. Currently, businesses must prove that the jobs likely would not have been located in Colorado had it not been for the credit. According to the bill’s fiscal note, the

Capitol

changes to the bill “require employers to state that, without the credit, the probability of locating the jobs in Colorado would be reduced.” But the tax credit has guardrails because it is performance-based. The new employee must be employed for a full year before the business receives the credit, which is equal to one-half of the amount of what employers pay for a worker’s federal Social Security and Medicare taxes. Aiding the bill’s chances of becoming law is a reduced fiscal impact that was presented to the House Appropriations Committee just hours before it received a full vote in the House. The original version of the bill would have cost the state $55 million through the 2027-2028 fiscal year. But fiscal analysts and bill sponsors managed to lower that amount to $30 million. “It is important to keep Colorado competitive and continue to attract new businesses to the state,” Rep. Kraft-Tharp said in a statement after the House vote. “This bill will create good jobs and help more businesses hire workers.”

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OFFICE: 8703 Yates Dr., Ste. 210, Westminster, CO 80031 | PhOnE: 303-566-4100 A legal newspaper of general circulation in Adams County, Colorado, the Brighton Banner is published weekly on Thursday by Colorado Community Media, 8703 Yates Dr., Ste. 210, Westminster, CO 80031. PERIODICALS POSTAGE PAID AT BRIGHTON, COLORADO. POSTMASTER: Send address change to: 8703 Yates Dr., Ste. 210, Westminster, CO 80031 ADVERTISInG DEADLInES: Display: Fri. 11 a.m. | Legal: Fri. 11 a.m. | Classified: Tues. 12 p.m.


5 Brighton Banner 5

April 10, 2014

Angling on spring breAk

Brian Cox of Brighton gives his nephew Justin Stark a hand with a fishing pole at the Adams County Regional Park March 30. Stark, of Queens, N.Y., was in Brighton to visit family. Photo by Mikkel Kelly

Changes expected to American Indian tuition bill Classification of specific tribes becomes roadblock for tuition bill By Vic Vela

vvela@coloradocommunitymedia.com A bill that seeks to provide tuition relief for out-of-state American Indian students will be scaled back because of difficulties over the cost assessment of the legislation, according to the bill sponsor. The original intention of House Bill 1124 was to allow all students living out of state who have tribal connections to Colorado to receive in-state tuition rates at state colleges and universities. But the legislation is expected to be

amended to apply only to incoming students and not American Indians who are currently enrolled. “What do you say to that person?” said Rep. Joe Salazar, D-Thornton, the bill sponsor. “Maybe that’s something we can work on next year.” Salazar said the changes to Report the bill became necessary after learning more about how colleges and universities count American Indian students. Under the bill, only students who are among one of the 48 federally recognized tribes that have historical ties to Colorado qualify for in-state tuition. But Salazar said

One man dies in fatal traffic accident Thursday, April 3 at about 11:53 a.m. Brighton Police responded to the 1600 block of Southern Street regarding a multivehicle accident in a residential neighborhood. When officers arrived they discovered three vehicles involved in an accident leaving four blocks of debris. William Lemke, 64, was driving west bound in the 1600 block of Southern Street in a Ford Explorer when his vehicle rear ended a silver Dodge pick-up causing the Dodge to rear end a white Volkswagen passenger car. Lemke’s vehicle continued west on Southern Street accelerat-

ing while driving off the left side of the roadway striking a light pole, privacy fence and wooden shed. Lemke’s vehicle was airborne, rotated a quarter turn and landed on its driver’s side. William Lemke, of Brighton, was pronounced deceased at the scene. The Dodge pickup was occupied by one adult male. The Volkswagen was occupied by an adult female and two young children. The occupants of both vehicles were not injured. Lemke’s cause of death has not been determined. The traffic accident is still under investigation.

Capitol

that estimating costs is difficult because schools don’t dig deep into the specific tribal backgrounds of students. The Legislative Council estimates that the bill’s first-year cost to the state will exceed $668,000. Also, state colleges and universities were estimated to lose more than $5 million in tuition revenue under the original version of the bill. However, they are expected to see an increase of students who wouldn’t otherwise attend their schools. But all of those statistics would be difficult to calculate under the current system of American Indian student calculation, which Salazar calls a counting system that results in “pie in the sky numbers.” “They have a bunch of students out there who just check the box and say they’re American Indian, but they don’t

prove which tribe they’re from,” Salazar said. “They can have, as you sometimes hear, a Cherokee Indian princess grandmother, and they mark the box, `American Indian.’” Salazar said the changes to the bill could end up being a good thing because colleges would then have to start classifying the specific tribes from which students belong. He also said that the cost to the state “would be quite minimal, if anything at all,” once the bill is amended. “I did run it past stakeholders and the stakeholders said it’s better to have in-state tuition for American Indian students than not,” Salazar said. “And if it looks like the bill is going to die because of a wrong fiscal note, then we don’t want the bill to die.”

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6-OPINION

6 Brighton Banner

April 10, 2014

opinions / yours and ours

The times — they are a changin’ When Bob Dylan wrote the above song lyrics he probably never grasped how many times op-ed columnists would use his song title. However, it fits the current times. We see it everywhere including most aspects of our lives. Certainly in politics, we are seeing a shift in the public’s increasing preference for Republicans over Democrats. For those of us who follow the “political scene”, we know that it is a forever ebb and flow of change. Catch these partial lyrics from his song — “Come senators, congressmen. Please heed the call. Don’t stand in the doorway. Don’t block up the hall. For he that gets hurt will be he who has stalled…” A LOT OF CANDIDATES ARE UP The latest Associated Press-GfK poll demonstrates the shifting tide toward Republican candidates in the upcoming mid-term Congressional elections. Remember your high school civics class — the entire 435 members of the House of Representatives are up for grabs and 1/3 of the U.S. Senate seats are to be determined this coming November. Plus in Colorado, we have the Governor’s race, State legisla-

tor candidates and county elected officials on the “chopping block.” So, all seven Congressional seats representing different parts of Colorado are to be determined along with U.S. Senator Mark Udall’s re-election bid for another 6 year term. Governor Hickenlooper will face the successful Republican gubernatorial candidate from their primary election. POLL FAVORS GOP The AP-GfK poll shows the GOP gaining ground. Those polled who are registered and are most interested in politics show Republicans favored by a healthy margin of 14 percent, or 51 percent to 37 percent in March. In January, this group was

about evenly split. Also, favorable views of the GOP have improved with 38 percent overall saying they hold a favorable impression of the party. Voters are becoming more disenchanted with the Democratic Party’s “package” as the “new normal” in jobs sets in. However, when it comes to overall Congressional approval, the results show a stagnant and negative picture. A whopping 82 percent disapprove of the job which Congress is doing regardless of party preference. Amen!! UDALL ‘UNDER THE GUN’ Here in Colorado, it would appear that incumbent U.S. Senator Mark Udall will not have a “cake walk” in his bid for re-election. He tied himself too close to President Obama on too many high profile issues. In particular, Udall has lost favor with voters over his strident support of the Obamacare health plan and how existing policyholders could keep their current policy. Plus, the Republicans recently pulled a major coup by “switching dance partners” with Congressman Cory Gardner now running against Udall instead of extremist Ken Buck and others. My gut

tells me that Gardner just might pull off an upset. It would be similar to the UConn Huskies upsetting the University of Florida Gators, the No. 1 seed in the March Madness basketball tournament. CHANGING TIMES FOR ALL That is enough election stuff for now. There are many other examples of our changing times. Just look at the continued demise of printed newspapers; the ever increasing use of technology in so many facets of our lives, more popularity in organically grown foods; more families opting out of traditional public schools; less Christians worshipping in main-stream churches; more toll road and commuter rail lines being financed and operated by private sector companies and on and on and on. Needless to say, Bob Dylan knew what he was singing about way back in the 1960’s when he recorded this popular hit song. Bill Christopher is a former Westminster city manager and RTD board member.

word on the street

What is your most favorite part of spring? “Spring weather means letting the kids go out and ride their bikes and burn off some energy.” Jaci Spencer

‘My favorite definitely is seeing the blooming flowers. I love seeing tulips spring up.’ Michelle Fabela Washington Park, Denver

“I look forward to Mother’s Day because that marks the day for me to start planting flowers. I love tulips and marigolds.” Michelle Jimenez

“For me, it’s planting flowers and getting ready for summer. I like to garden.” Kristen Taylor

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Uncomfortable with business casual at work As I write this, I am pondering what to wear for a business meeting in a few hours. The meeting invitation said “business casual,” which immediately sent a shaft of dread into my chest. That’s because, to my mind, business casual is one of the worst things to happen to women in the workplace. I’m not talking here about a gender-discrimination topic — but this is a gender-based issue. The concept of a relaxed dress code at work started for me in the 1980s with what was known around the office as “California casual.” This term has always had a certain kind of cachet to me, a land-locked Colorado-born girl, that conjured up visions of breezy pastels and topsider boat shoes with jaunty white leather laces. In reality, I wasn’t that far off—lightcolored khaki pants became preferred attire, usually with an open-collared shirt. Topsiders were acceptable, as long as they were worn with socks. Now, you might have noticed here that what I am describing is clothing perfectly suitable for men for California casual, casual Fridays, dress-down days, and, ultimately, business casual. Of course, women were also free to adopt this casual style, but in my experience, women in khakis and a shirt looked less professional than the men (and far less comfortable). And as I’m backpedaling though my mind about what my options are for my meeting, I’m aware of my own discomfort with business casual attire. I usually prefer not to wear pants, un-

less they’re jeans, which do occasionally sneak into a casual dress code if they are “nice.” I’ve also noticed that when said dress code also allows tennis shoes, I have a literal spring in my step and I go about my work with more of a lilt. But tennies are often off the list, and the quandary for me becomes what shoes to wear with pants … I do not like wearing socks. It’s far easier for me to pair flats with a casual skirt, but there’s also a catch to that — for much of my professional career, we women have been required to wear pantyhose. This sort of takes away the whole aspect of going casual! Not only are bare legs more fashionable these days — check out any red carpet — but going without hose is way more comfortable, especially in warmer weather. But this item of women’s wear is so contentious that sometimes whole meetings are dedicated to this decision, and it never seems to be the women who

Doray continues on Page 7


7-Color Brighton Banner 7

April 10, 2014

Inmate death ruled suicide It is unclear how man acquired the cord to hang self By Tammy Kranz tkranz@coloradocommunitymedia.com The district attorney’s office will not be filing charges against any detention personnel for an inmate’s death at the Adams County Jail because it appears to have been suicide. Heath Michael Kennel died late Oct. 5, 2013, or early Oct. 6, 2013, while in custody awaiting sentencing on serious felony charges.

“All the evidence supports the conclusion that Mr. Kennel died as a result of suicide and there is no indication that the detention personnel contributed to his death,” wrote Joseph S. Pacyga, chief trial district attorney with the 17th Judicial District Attorney’s Office, in a letter dated April 3 to Sheriff Doug Darr. However, investigators were not able to determine how Kennel was able to obtain the shoe lace or shoe-lace-like string he used to hang himself in his cell. Investigators interviewed several inmates at the jail and watched surveillance videos. “In the 30 or more hours of video, Mr Kennel was not seen with any string/cord or acquiring any string/cord,” the let-

ADAMS COUNTY NEWS IN A HURRY Three nominated for youth awards

Children & Family Services director named

Adams County Board of Commissioners recognized the three outstanding local youths who will represent unincorporated Adams County as the nominees for this year’s Adams County Mayors and Commissioners Youth Awards (ACMCYA)—an annual, two-tiered awards program that honors Adams County teenagers, ages 13 to 19, who have overcome personal adversity and created positive changes in their lives. The ACMCYA teens are nominated by counselors, parents, coaches and teachers for local and county consideration. This year’s nominees are Roberto Chacon Chacon and Taytiana Anderson from Global Leadership Academy and Fayelene Duran from Regis University. All three students have overcome significant challenges in order to excel in school. The Board of Commissioners presented each nominee with an awards plaque and certificate at a recent public hearing, which was preceded by a reception. “These courageous students are proof that even the greatest obstacles can be overcome with hard work and dedication,” said Board of Commissioners Chair Charles “Chaz” Tedesco. “These young citizens are truly an inspiration to us all.”

Jan James has been named the new director of Children & Family Services. James will begin her new role on April 1. James has an extensive background in child welfare and therapeutic settings serving children and families. An eightyear veteran of Adams County’s Children & Family Services division, James currently serves as the program manager for the Ongoing Child Protection section, where she directly oversees a team of 51 professional and paraprofessional staff. In her new role, James will manage a wide variety of programs designed to protect children and keep struggling families together. “Jan has proven herself time and again to be a strong strategic planner,” Chris Kline, Adams County’s director of Human Services, said. “We look forward to her using her vast experience and expertise to build upon our successes at Adams County.” A resident of Brighton, James has over 21 years of professional experience as a social worker and child welfare advocate. Prior to working for Adams County, James held a variety of positions at the Tennyson Center for Children at Colorado Christian Home, including director of clinical services, admissions discharge coordinator, unit supervisor, and family therapist.

ter states. “It is unknown how Mr. Kennel obtained the cord that he used to commit suicide.” Kennel was found guilty on Oct. 4, 2013, by a jury of three counts of sexual assault on a child as a pattern of abuse and three counts of sexual assault on a child. All these counts are felonies and Kennel was facing a prison sentence of up to life in prison. His sentencing date was on Dec. 2. Kennel did not appear to be depressed or suicidal to jail personnel, however, a detective reported that Kennel’s attorney said his client was “very suicidal.” However, according to the letter, the attorney said he did not tell the deputies this because “most clients don’t want the information passed

on because they end up in the medical unit wearing a suicide suit.” According to surveillance video, Kennel could be seen at his cell door at 9:21 p.m. on Oct. 5. Nobody entered or left that cell until a little after 4 a.m. Oct. 6 when deputies arrived and discovered Kennel with a noose around his neck. The jail’s medical staff attempted cardiopulmonary resuscitation and deployed the automated external defibrillator (AED). Their attempts at resuscitation were taken over by Platte Valley Ambulance and Brighton Fire personnel when they arrived at 4:13 a.m. He was pronounced dead at Platte Valley Medical Center at 4:20 a.m.

City council eyes restoration of building By Lou Ellen Bromley Brighton City Council has applied for a $150,000 energy impact grant to help offset the cost of the restoration needed to restore to use the old senior center at 575 Bush St., based on information at Tuesday’s study session. The 95-year-old building has been home to several different city entities including Brighton City Hall, Brighton Public Library, and Brighton’s Senior Center. City staff is looking into restoring the one-story building and creating a Brighton Community Center. The center would house a community resource center and a multitude of other services that would directly impact Brighton residents by providing support to city youth and families. The center would also allow for rooms and areas to be rented or leased to organizations for work space or other events. Also included in the study session was a discus-

sion about a school that would be an outside resource for students in the 27J school district. The school would provide a place for students and its families to find various resources such as tutoring, mentoring, health and social services as well as other activities. The school would work closely with Brighton’s school district 27J to create support for students and its families both inside and outside the classrooms. City Manager Manuel Esquibel stated that the two projects are like a “hand in glove.”

In other matters

A loss of revenue caused by the use of credit cards and E-Checks to pay utility bills was brought to councils’ attention. Council continues on Page 16

LETTER TO THE EDITOR Too late now Does anyone but me question the reason for legalizing marijuana in Colorado? Other than greed and politics that is. I understand medical reasons, but thought that was already a given. The powers that be are already salivating at the millions of dollars in revenue expected in Colorado from more fun and games tourism, buying, selling, growing, using, experimenting with and trafficking of marijuana. It has been an illegal drug for as long as I can remember ... and suddenly Colorado says it isn’t. So one problem might be solved.

Doray Continued from Page 6

object to a no-hose policy. I’m not really sure why it matters to people who don’t have to wear them ... Granted, there are some months in Colorado when tights or pants are preferable simply because of the temperature. And I found when I worked in health care that wearing hose was non-negotiable,

The overcrowding of prisons, a rapidly expanding problem, could be vastly improved by releasing all prisoners wrongly incarcerated for crimes which in any way involved marijuana, and we could start over. Oh well, too late now. The die is cast as they say, and we must live or die with a big mistake, I fear, one I only hope our beautiful Colorado can survive and not be known only as the drug marijuana mecca of the United States. M. Andersen Brighton

and I accepted that, usually opting for slacks or a suit with pants and regular socks and shoes. But today it’s springtime in the Rockies, and as soon as put down my pen, I’m going to rummage up a swingy skirt and toss on a blazer and greet the world in barelegged beauty. And I’m quite comfortable with that. Andrea Doray is a writer thinks instant tanning lotions are the best thing ever to happen to bare legs. Contact her at a.doray@andreadoray.com.

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8-Color

8 Brighton Banner

April 10, 2014

Youth groups highlights suicide awareness By Lou Ellen Bromley Brighton Youth Commission members along with several city council members wore bright yellow shirts to show support and raise awareness for Suicide Prevention Education Awareness & Knowledge, also known as SPEAK, at Tuesday nights city council meeting. Members of the Brighton Youth Commission were at city council to accept a proclamation declaring April 5-9 SPEAK Week. Austin Bargmann addressed council members explaining that Colorado is eighth in the nation for suicide deaths in people between the ages of 10 to 24. In 2012 Colorado experienced the highest number of suicide deaths in state history, 154 high-school age Colorado youth

died by suicide, that is a rate of 11.3 per 100,000. The Brighton Youth Commission intends to expand citywide prevention efforts by organizing several classes on suicide prevention and also by having a 5k walk/run to increase awareness. They feel suicide prevention efforts should be developed that will encourage individuals “at risk” to seek help. And by raising suicide awareness the Brighton Youth Commission are hoping to eliminate the stigma associated with mental illness and suicides, they hope their efforts will help to decrease the frequency of suicide and provide help and hope for the survivors and their family’s by building a caring and supportive community within our city.

Easter egg hunt scheduled By Michelle Boyer Peter Cottontail is riding into the park just outside the Brighton Recreation Center, 555 N.11th Ave. on Saturday, April 12 at 12:15 p.m. Children ages 3 to 10 years old, bring your own basket to gather plastic, colored eggs. More than 12,000 eggs will be filled with either chocolate inside or a ticket revealing a prize. “Over 40 special gift baskets will be given out,” Valerie Rodriguez, general interest coordinator, Brighton Recreation Center said. “Over 20 prizes for all age groups including bikes will be donated. “Baskets and age appropriate gifts will be handed out to the youngest group of participants, the 0-to-2-year-olds.” Compared to previous years, where each age group went at separate times, this year there will be one whistle and all groups will go at the same time for the eggs. Age groups will be sectioned off in their own grassy areas though, and only children will be allowed in the areas to get eggs. Don’t forget to dress for the weather, and if the weather is inclement the event will be held inside the recreation center. Parents, remember your camera. “All About Eggs” is a family program offered by Barr Lake State Park Nature Center

and held 10-10:30 a.m. Saturday, April 19, before Barr Lake State Park’s Third Annual Easter Egg Hunt. The Nature Center, Barr Lake State Park is located at 13401 Picadilly Road. “With the Bald Eagles of Barr Lake currently incubating and Easter soon upon us, the Rocky Mountain Bird Observatory is offering this highly interactive family program prior to Barr Lake’s Easter Egg Hunt, so that participants can learn more than they ever wanted to know about one of America’s favorite breakfast items,” Tyler Edmondson, RMBO community educator said. “Adults and families with children ages 4-and-up will learn firsthand the importance, fragility and anatomy of eggs through relay races, crafts, experiments and other activities. Participants will even have the opportunity to try their own luck with incubation.” Register for this program by contacting Tyler Edmondson at tyler.edmondson@ rmbo.org or 303-659-4348 ext. 15 and providing the number of names of all participants. All activities during Barr Lake’s Easter Egg Hunt are free with the purchase of a $7/vehicle state park entrance pass or annual state park pass. For more information call 303-659-6005 or go to www.parks. state.co.us.

holiday happenings Brighton United Methodist Church, 625 S. 8th Ave., Sunday, April 20: 9:15 a.m. Elmwood Baptist, 13100 E. 144th Ave, Sunday, April 20: Breakfast 8 a.m., Easter Service 9 a.m. First Presbyterian Church, 510 S. 27th Ave, Sunday, April 13: 8 a.m. and 10:00 a.m., Maundy Thursday, 7 p.m., Good Friday, 7 p.m., Saturday, April 19: Easter Festival for Children 1:00 p.m., Sunday, April 20: Sunrise Service 6 a.m., Breakfast 6:30 a.m., Worship 8 a.m. and 10 a.m. Harvest Fellowship, 11401 E. 160th Ave., Sunday, April 20: 9:30 a.m. and 11 a.m. Northern Hills Christian Church, 5061 E. 160th Ave., Good Friday, 5:30 p.m., Saturday, April 19: 5 p.m. and Sunday, April 20: 8:30 a.m., 10 a.m. and 11:30 a.m. St. Augustine Catholic Church, 675 E. Egbert St., Palm Sunday, April 13: 8 a.m., 10 a.m. and Noon (Palm procession), Holy Thursday 6p.m. (English), 7:30p.m. (Spanish), Good Friday 6 p.m. (English) and 7:30p.m. (Spanish), Saturday, April

19 Easter Vigil 9 p.m., Sunday, April 20: 10a.m. (English) and Noon (Spanish) Zion Lutheran Church, 1400 Skeel St, Maundy Thursday, 10 a.m. and 7 p.m., Good Friday Worship Noon and Tenebrae 7 p.m., Easter Sunday Sunrise Service 6 a.m., Traditional 8 a.m. and 10:45, Easter Breakfast and Egg Hunt. Zion Congregational Church, 401 S. 27th Ave., Sunday, April 10: Sunrise Service 6:30 a.m., Breakfast Fellowship 9 a.m., Easter Worship 10:15 a.m., Easter Egg Hunt 11:45 a.m. St. Elizabeth Episcopal Church, 76 S. 3rd St., Sunday, April 13: 10 a.m. Palm Sunday, Wednesday, April 13, Stations of the Cross 6:15 p.m., Maundy Thursday 7 p.m., Good Friday 12:30 p.m. and 7 p.m., April 20: Easter Paschal Light Service 8 a.m., Easter Brunch 8:30, Easter Service 10 a.m., Easter Egg Hunt 11 a.m. The Orchard Church, Prairie View High School, 12909 East 120th Ave. Henderson: Saturday, April 19: 5:30 p.m. and Sunday, April 20: 8:30 a.m., 9:30 a.m. and 11 a.m.

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9-Color Brighton Banner 9

April 10, 2014

State firefighting fleet cleared for takeoff By Vic Vela

vvela@coloradocommunitymedia.com One way or another, the state will soon free up money to get an unfunded aerial firefighting fleet off the ground. The governor’s office and legislative leaders are on board with a spending plan that would set aside $21 million to purchase or contract planes and helicopters that are equipped to fight fires. The money was approved through an amendment to the annual state budget that was debated in the Senate on April 3. Gov. John Hickenlooper’s office and lawmakers will have to get creative to find where in the budget the fleet funding will be secured. But all sides agree that this will happen this year — much to excitement of the legislator who has been instrumental in driving the creation of the Colorado Firefighting Air Corps. “Quite frankly, this is the most important legislation of my life,” said Sen. Steve King, RGrand Junction. The funding behind King’s effort comes on the heels of a much-anticipated state fire report that was released last week. The Colorado Division of Fire Prevention

and Control found that the state lacks resources in key firefighting areas, including a lack of aerial firefighting capabilities. “Colorado does not have the ability to deliver appropriate aviation resources in a timely fashion to support local suppression response to small fires while they are still small,” states the report, which was authored by CDFPC Director Paul Cooke. The report was mandated through last year’s passage of a bill — sponsored by King and Sen. Cheri Jahn, D-Wheat Ridge — that created the Colorado Firefighting Air Corps, a state-owned firefighting fleet. The “idea” of the fleet became law, but the legislation went unfunded, at least until the state could learn more about the feasibility of having its own fire fleet. Prior to the release of the fire report, Hickenlooper had been non-committal on the idea of undertaking the potentially enormous costs that come with operating a state-owned aerial fleet. However, Hickenlooper had been open to exploring ways of sharing those costs through a multi-state effort. For months, it was uncertain whether the fleet would ever become a reality. That all changed after Cooke released his 103-page fire report on March 28.

Cooke presented the report’s finding to a special legislative committee on April 3. He told lawmakers that Colorado competes with other states for federal resources to fight fires, and that the state doesn’t have the proper amount of tools needed to combat early or late-season wildfires. Cooke also said that the state currently has just two, single-engine air tankers available to deal with the entire state’s firefighting needs. “The state, in terms of being able to help to bring overwhelming force to a wildfire, that’s not the case...” he said. Cooke’s report recommended that the state acquire $33 million worth of firefighting aircraft and other technology. But Cooke later told the governor’s office that it should hold off on acquiring two large, fixed-wing air tankers — as his report recommended — because precipitation from this winter’s weather makes it difficult to determine when those large tankers would even be needed this year. That cuts price tag by $12 million. So the state plans to move forward with the purchase of two multi-mission fixedwing planes and will contract for the use of four Type III rotor wing planes and four single-engine air tankers.

The state will also spend $100,000 to set up a wildfire information management system, which will provide real-time fire information within the statewide fire communications system. The rest of the $21 million will be spent of airport fees, equipment and other related expenses. The Senate set aside the fleet money for this year’s budget in a placeholder funding area, until it is moved to another area within the budget. Henry Sobanet, the state’s budget director, said that the funding is expected to come from the state’s Tax Payer Bill of Rights reserves and through the delaying of paying back certain cash funds. “I think we’ll get the funding from the exact places where we want to see it come from,” Sobanet said. Alan Salazar, Hickenlooper’s chief strategist, said the governor’s office believes this is a large investment worth undertaking. “We don’t throw $20 million around lightly,” Salazar said. “But in the context of the potential costs of the fire and getting ahead of it, the consensus... is that this is a wise new position for the state to take.”

your week & more April 10 CAregivers support Group, Eagle View Adult Center, 10-11:30 a.m.; join other caregivers for valuable information and support, all ages welcome, 303-426-440 Free Blood-pressure Screening, Eagle View Adult Center, 10:30-11:30 a.m.; performed by Brighton Firefighters YogA, plAtte Valley Medical Center Conference Center,

12:15-12:50 p.m.; $6 drop-in rate; certified instructor. Bring your mat, info 303-498-1840.

pilAtes MAt Class, Platte Valley Medical Center Confer-

ence Center, 5:15-6 p.m.; increase strength, tone, flexibility, stamina, overall fitness and health, taught by licensed physical therapist and certified Pilates instructor, $9 per class, 303498-1840

the studio: 3-D Image Design with 123D Design – Part 1,

Anythink Brighton, 7-8 p.m.; Start learning to use 123D Design to create 3-D images; the basics of 3-D design and 3-D printing. Online registration suggested.

11 FridAY’s FeAst, Eagle View Adult Center, noon; zesty bean posole, wrap sandwich and cookies (from Sterling House), entertainment by dancers from Fiesta Colorado, $4, deadline April 9 sounds oF the 50s And 60s, Eagle View Adult Center trip, 4:45 p.m.; the Northland Chorale performs, dinner before at Golden Corral, $15 plus meal ($12+), deadline April 4 stArs oF toMorrow Talent Show, Brighton High School

Auditorium, 7 p.m.; the Brighton Kiwanis Club again hosts the talent show to encourage and showcase the bright, young talent in the community; admission $2 for those 12 and over, free for under 12

MAgiC tree House: Dinosaurs Before Dark, KIDS, Prairie Playhouse production in the Armory, 7 p.m.; an adaptation of the first of Mary Pope Osborne’s award-winning fantasy adventure from the Magic Tree House book series; tickets online $5 12 and under, $6 all others; at the door, $7 and $8. 12 terrY All dog show, Fairgrounds, 8 a.m.-6 p.m. seCond AnnuAl Raptor Run, Barr Lake, 9 a.m. 5k and 10 a.m. Fun Run, Friends of Barr Lake sponsors the event to benefit educational programs at the park. Wear your favorite raptor hat or T-shirt to show your wild side. CAnCer support Group, Platte Valley Medical Center, 11

a.m.-noon; for cancer patients and their families, hosted in the Oncology Clinic, suite 270, refreshments, RSVP 303-498-2200

eggstrAvAgAnzA, Brighton Park near the Rec Center,

12:30 p.m.; activity for kids of all ages.

MAgiC tree House: Dinosaurs Before Dark, KIDS, Prairie

Playhouse production in the Armory, 1 p.m. and 3:30 p.m.; an adaptation of the first of Mary Pope Osborne’s award-winning fantasy adventure from the Magic Tree House book series; tickets online $5 for 12 and under, $6 all others; at the door, $7 and $8.

spirituAls projeCt, in the Armory, 7 p.m.; Songs commonly known as spirituals were created and first sung by enslaved African women and men in America in the 18th and 19th centuries; ticket prices and more details to be announced.

16 united power Annual Meeting & 75th Anniversary Celebration, Adams County Fairgrounds, 4:30-8 p.m. Registration, dinner and entertainment, 4:30-6:30 p.m.; business meeting, director election results, 75th Anniversary Celebration and prizes for registered and present members, 6:30-8 p.m. soMething to Digest: Digestive and Colon Health with Dr.

14

Bruce Walker, Platte Valley Medical Center, 6 p.m.; A FREE event brought to you by Platte Valley Medical Center; Q&A session about taking care of your digestive and colon health, tips for dealing with heartburn and acid reflux, and a tour of PVMC state-of-the-art Endoscopy Center. Seating is limited. RSVP today at 303-498-1481 or pvmc.org/rsvp.

toddler tAles, Anythink Brighton, 9:30-10:15 a.m.; time

tour oF the Women’s and Newborn Center, Platte Valley

13 terrY All Dog Show, Fairgrounds, 8 a.m.-6 p.m.

with your toddler, stories, songs and finger plays, plus a few minutes of social time with other caregivers while children play. For ages 2-3. RSVP online.

BAsiC CoMputers 2, Anythink Brighton, 10-11:30 a.m.;

Sign up for an email address and start learning the basics of using the Internet; how to use a search engine, flash drives and cut, copy and paste. Online registration suggested.

MusiC And Movement, Anythink Brighton, 10:30-11 a.m.; Sing, dance and learn how to play some basic instruments. For ages 2-6. RSVP online. grieF support Group, Eagle View Adult Center, 1-2 p.m., hosted by Halcyon Hospice, drop in. the studio: Teen Time, Anythink Brighton, 4-5 p.m.; Finish up this month’s crafts during open teen time in The Studio. For grades 6-12. relAY For Life Team Rally, Platte Valley Medical center, 6 p.m.; all are welcome, join in to decorate luminaries to support cancer survivors and remember those we have lost. Free, for info, contact Michele Lussier, 720-641-7733 15 FroM Airport and Army to Neighborhood, Eagle View

Adult Center trip, 9:15 a.m.; Stapleton was an airport, Lowry was an Air Force base and Fitzsimons was an Army medical center. All three have been redeveloped as modern neighborhoods with occasional signs of the former uses. Denver History Tours leads this five-hour van tour to show the rebirth. Includes an hour break for lunch. $26 plus meal ($10+), deadline April 4.

Medical Center, 6 p.m.; Meet in the lobby by the fireplace; free by appointment, 303-498-3518

17 storY tiMe at the Firehouse, Fire Station 52, 5 Firehouse Road, 10:30 a.m.; story time and station tour, snack, for children 3-5 with caretaker; free, RSVP required to Dawn, 303-659-4101 heAlthY tips, Eagle View Adult Center, 11 a.m. YogA, Platte Valley Medical Center Conference Center, 12:1512:50 p.m.; $6 drop-in rate; certified instructor. Bring your mat, info 303-498-1840. pilAtes MAt ClAss, Platte Valley Medical Center Conference Center, 5:15-6 p.m.; increase strength, tone, flexibility, stamina, overall fitness and health, taught by licensed physical therapist and certified Pilates instructor, $9 per class, 303498-1840. 18 KutAndArA, eAgle View Adult Center trip, noon; The Longmont Senior Center presents Kutandara – an energetic Zimbabwean marimba band. Kutandara fuses ancient African music traditions with Latin, jazz, gospel and classical music. As much fun to watch as to listen to! Lunch before at Sun Rose Café; $12 plus meal ($8+), deadline: Mon. Apr 14.

a solid understanding of what diabetes is, as well as basic management principles, a healthy meal plan with foods you like. Medicare and most health plans cover all or a portion of the cost. Don’t miss this opportunity; ask your doctor for a referral today. For more information, call Cynthia Foster at 303-498-1699.

eAster egg hunt, Barr Lake, 10 a.m.-1 p.m.; Bring the family and Easter basket to gather eggs and fun nature facts. Reservations required, 303-659-6005; for ages 3 to 10. 1010:30 a.m. – Rocky Mountain Bird Observatory program All About Eggs; 10:45 a.m. – Easter Egg Hunt for kids to find eggs filled with candy and fun nature facts; 11 a.m.-1 p.m. – Face painter and crafts. reMix, dAnCers from Frankfurt, Germany, on stage at the Armory, 7 p.m.; on the heels of a sold-out 1,200-strong standing ovation in Germany, Remix comes to Colorado and the Armory, see video online and buy tickets at brightonarmory. org; $15 online and box office, $20 at the door. 21 FroM Airport and Army to Neighborhood, Eagle View Adult Center trip, 9:15 a.m.; Stapleton was an airport, Lowry was an Air Force base and Fitzsimons was an Army medical center. All three have been redeveloped as modern neighborhoods with occasional signs of the former uses. Denver History Tours leads this five-hour van tour to show the rebirth. Includes an hour break for lunch. $26 plus meal ($10+), deadline April 11. toddler tAles, Anythink Brighton, 9:30-10:15 a.m.; time with your toddler, stories, songs and finger plays, plus a few minutes of social time with other caregivers while children play. For ages 2-3. RSVP online. joB seeKing, Anythink Brighton,10-11:30 a.m.; Come to this class to discuss creating a resume, preparing for job interviews and the overall searching process. Online registration suggested. MusiC And MoveMent, Anythink Brighton, 10:30-11 a.m.; Sing, dance and learn how to play some basic instruments. For ages 2-6. RSVP online.

s.p.e.A.K. 5K Walk

the studio: 3-D Printing, Anythink Brighton, 4-5 p.m.; Experiment with 3-D printing and learn about our incredible printers. For grades 6-12.

Best oF spring Craft Fair, Fairgrounds Exhibit Fall, 9 a.m.-6

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YogA, plAtte Valley Medical Center Conference Center,

p.m.; Adams County Historical Museum event, 200 booths; $1 admission, 14 and under free; free parking

pilAtes MAt Class, Platte Valley Medical Center Conference

the studio: Sewing Circuits, Anythink Brighton, 10-11:30 a.m.; Electronics, sewing and art – create and learn with Beverly Ball, Artist in Residence. All ages. Adult supervision required for children 10 and younger. RSVP online

pilAtes MAt Class, Platte Valley Medical Center Conference Center, 5:45-6:30 p.m.; increase strength, tone, flexibility, stamina, overall fitness and health, taught by licensed physical

diABetes group Education, Platte Valley Medical Center, 10 a.m.-noon; introduction to diabetes will set the stage for

Your Week continues on Page 10

4:45-5:20 p.m.; $6 drop-in rate; certified instructor. Bring your mat, 303-498-1840. Center, 5:45-6:30 p.m.; increase strength, tone, flexibility, stamina, overall fitness and health, taught by licensed physical therapist and certified Pilates instructor, $9 per class, 303498-1840

Did you know... Colorado Community Media was created to connect you to 22 community papers & 23 websites with boundless opportunity and rewards.

YogA, plAtte Valley Medical Center Conference Center, 4:45-5:20 p.m.; $6 drop-in rate; certified instructor. Bring your mat, 303-498-1840.


10-Color

10 Brighton Banner

April 10, 2014

Vacant buildings to become apartments County approves plans for new housing in Welby By Tammy Kranz

tkranz@coloradocommunitymedia.com Two buildings that have sat vacant for years in Welby will be given new breath of life. The Adams County Board of Commissioners unanimously approved during its March 24 regular meeting to rezone the .71 acre parcel at 7650 Washington St. and plans for the buildings to be converted into apartments. The site is along the east side of Washington north of 75th and south of 78th in south Adams County. “The property has suffered from disrepair and disinvestment in recent years,” Case Manager Michael Weaver said. “With new ownership comes an opportunity to revitalize a neglected parcel in Welby. A higher density use is appropriate at this location as indicated in the Adams County Comprehensive Plan.” The two-story brick buildings will feature six apartments — two on each floor, including the walk-out basement — for a total of 12 units. There will be 10 twobedroom units with approximately 900 square feet, one three-bedroom unit with approximately 1,088 square feet and one

one-bedroom unit with approximately 767 square feet. There will be 30 parking spots, outdoor lighting installed on the structures and two access points off Washington. Craig Nelsen, applicant for the rezoning, said that no one has expressed concerns about the plans. However, some people have suggested that property may work better as commercial or office space. “There’s commercial property above and below the property that is vacant as it is, so adding more vacant commercial property or office space to the area I don’t see how that helps,” he said. The Future Land Use map designates this site as mixed use employment, which allows for a mixture of employment uses, including offices, retail, indoor manufacturing, and distribution and warehousing, Weaver said. “The Comprehensive Plan indicates that in the Welby area, additional residential uses may be appropriate in the mixed use employment area,” he said. The board in 2012 rejected plans for the buildings to be used as a halfway house. According to county documents, during the 1980s, 1990s, and 2000s, the site served as an adult correction facility and was a place where services could be provided to people suffering from mental health issues. During the 1970s, the site served as a community boarding house.

The Adams County Board of Commissioners unanimously approved during its March 24 regular meeting to rezone the .71 acre parcel at 7650 Washington St. and plans for the buildings to be converted into apartments. Photo by Tammy Kranz

SportS calendar Thursday: PVHS/BHS girls’ golf at Adams City (Buffalo Run), 10 a.m. PVHS girls’ tennis vs. Northglenn, 4 p.m. PVHS baseball at Aurora Central, 4 p.m. BHS baseball vs. Hinkley, 4 p.m. BHS girls’ tennis vs. Thornton, 4 p.m. BHS boys’ swimming at Hinkley, 4:30 p.m. BHS girls’ soccer at Westminster, 6:30 p.m. Friday: PVHS track at Weld Central, 9 a.m.

BHS track at Roosevelt, 9 a.m. Saturday: PVHS track at Littleton Invitational, 8 a.m. BHS track at Berthoud Invitational, TBD Monday: PVHS lacrosse at Monarch, TBD PVHS/BHS girls’ golf invitational at Northglenn, 9 a.m. PVHS girls’ tennis vs. BHS, 4 p.m. Tuesday: PVHS baseball vs. Gateway, 4 p.m. BHS baseball at Westminster, 4 p.m. PVHS girls’soccer at Northglenn, 7 p.m.

BHS girls’soccer vs. Adams City, 6:30 p.m. PVHS girls’tennis vs. Aurora Central, 4 p.m. PVHS lacrosse vs. St. Mary’s 6:30 p.m. Wednesday: PVHS lacrosse vs. Columbine, 6:30 p.m. BHS golf at Thornton, 10 a.m. BHS track at Adams City, 4 p.m. Scores: Boys’ Baseball- Mountain Vista 5, BHS 4

PVHS 13, Thornton 3

Boulder 6, PVHS 3 Boys’ Lacrosse- Littleton 21, PVHS 1 Girls’ Soccer- PVHS 5, Hinkley 1 Centaurus5, BHS 2 PVHS 10, Westminster 0 Girls’ Tennis- PVHS 5, Adams City 2 BHS 7, Hinkley 0 BHS 7, Gateway 0

your week & more Continued from Page 9

therapist and certified Pilates instructor, $9 per class, 303-498-1840

primetime for presChoolers, Anythink Brighton, 10:30-11 a.m.; stories, finger plays, songs and other activities for ages 3-5. RSVP online

the studio: Book Organizer, Anythink Brighton, 6:30-8

tissue paper flowers, Anythink Brighton, 2:30-4 p.m.; Create tissue-paper flowers. For grades 6-12.

p.m.; Upcycle a book into an accordion file to organize coupons, receipts, favorite quotes and keepsakes. Supplies provided. RSVP online; for adults.

after-sChool Get toGether: Finger Puppets, Anythink Brighton, 2:30-4:30 p.m.; Create the cast for your very own play that can fit right on your fingertips. For grades K-5.

23

adams County Open Space Meeting, Fairgrounds Parks Meeting Rooms, 5-9 p.m.

adams County Quilters, Fairgrounds Parks Meeting Rooms, 9 a.m.-2 p.m.

24

BaBy BounCe, Anythink Brighton, 9:30-10:15 a.m.; songs,

adams County Aging Network Conference, Fairgrounds Waymire Building, 7 a.m.-4 p.m.

rhymes and stories for babies to 23 months and their caregivers. RSVP online

roCkies vs. SF Giants, Eagle View Adult Center trip, 10:30 a.m.; The Colorado Rockies play the San Francisco Giants. Main-level seating on third base side with easy access. Food available at the ballpark – or bring your own. Dress in layers for the weather; $16 plus food) $6+, Deadline: April 9

readers theatre Performance, Eagle View Adult Center,

11 a.m.; free

yoGa, Platte Valley Medical Center Conference Center, 12:1512:50 p.m.; $6 drop-in rate; certified instructor. Bring your mat, info 303-498-1840. pilates mat Class, Platte Valley Medical Center Confer-

ence Center, 5:15-6 p.m.; increase strength, tone, flexibility, stamina, overall fitness and health, taught by licensed physical therapist and certified Pilates instructor, $9 per class, 303498-1840

the studio: 3D Image Design and Printing Part 2, Anythink Brighton, 7-8 p.m.; Continue to work on objects and see how the images can be used to create 3-D prints. Attendees will be able to pick up printed objects in the next week. Online registration suggested. full-moon walk, Barr Lake State Park, 7:30 p.m.; Myth Busters, dispel common myths and misunderstandings about wildlife and nature while on a full moon walk: Are bats really blind? Can owls turn their heads 360 degrees? Do prairie dogs have a vocabulary? and other widespread folklore; for adults and families with children 6 and up, begin at the Nature Center, end there for refreshments, 303-659-6005 26 adams County High School Rodeo, Fairgrounds Arena Grand Stands, 8 a.m.-6 p.m. Colorado Junior Rodeo, Fairgrounds Indoor Arena, 8

a.m.-6 p.m. April 27

Guided Bird walk, Barr Lake State Park, 9 a.m.; grab your field guide and binoculars (or borrow a set from the park) and enjoy a morning of birding, all adult ability levels, 303-6596005 CeleBrate earth Day at Barr Lake, 9 a.m.-2 p.m.; 9 a.m. – Bird walk; 10, 11:30 a.m. and 1 p.m. – Eagle Express rides to the Gazebo and Great Blue Heron rookery. Reservations required; 11 a.m. – Live raptor from the Raptor Education Foundation; noon-2 p.m. – Face painter and Kids’ Crafts, make a kite then take it for a spin here at the park. CanCer support Group, Platte Valley Medical Center, 11 a.m.-noon; for cancer patients and their families, hosted in the Oncology Clinic, suite 270, refreshments, RSVP 303-498-2200 poptastiC the musiCal, in the Armory, 6 p.m.; Kids on Stage teen play; ticket prices and more details to be announced at brightonarmory.org. Your Week continues on Page 18


11-Recipe-Color Brighton Banner 11

April 10, 2014

How to make pizza JUSt a Bit HealtHieR By Metro Creative Connection

P

izza may have had humble beginnings, but today it is one of the most popular foods worldwide. More than five billion pizzas are sold across the globe each year, and pizza accounts for 10 percent of all food-service

sales.

Although pizza has many positive attributes, few consider pizza a healthy meal. Laden with cheese and high-calorie meats, pizza is often referred to as a guilty pleasure. However, there are a variety of ways to make the pizza you love better for your body. • Downplay the cheese. Pizza originated in Naples, Italy, and it has been said the first pizzas were comprised of just dough and sauce and no cheese. Restaurants that favor more authentic pizzas of the past will not rely heavily on cheese when preparing their pizzas. Instead of ordering a pizza with extra cheese, opt for minimal cheese to add just a subtle component of flavor to the pizza. Such an alteration to the recipe can reduce the saturated fat and cholesterol in pizza by a considerable amount. • Savor the tomatoes. Tomatoes provide a bevy of health benefits. The carotenoids, specifically lycopene, found in tomatoes have a number of beneficial

properties, including preventing the oxidation of LDL cholesterol. According to a report from researchers at Athens Medical School that was published in Nutrition Research, a daily 70 gram portion of tomato paste containing roughly 33 mg of lycopene was associated with an improvement in flow-mediated dilation, a measure of a blood vessel’s ability to relax. Tomatoes can help lower blood pressure, and they provide other heart benefits as well. Enjoying extra sauce on pizza and supplementing with sliced, cooked tomatoes can help make pizza healthier. • Choose whole-wheat crust. More restaurants are adding whole-grain pizzas to their menus. By switching to a whole-wheat crust, you can boost your fiber intake by as much as 50 percent. High-fiber foods help to regulate cholesterol levels in the blood and help you to feel fuller longer, reducing the likelihood that you will overeat. Fiber also helps the digestive tract by making a person more regular. Whole-grain foods have a lower glycemic index than processed grains as well, meaning they won’t cause rapid bloodsugar spikes, which can be advantageous to those with diabetes. • Top pizza with vegetables. Instead of salt- and fat-heavy meats like pepperoni, ham or sausage, top your pizza with fresh vegetables. Peppers, tomatoes, olives, broccoli, and spinach each deliver a wealth

of vitamins and minerals, and are a great way to add more fiber to your diet. • Opt for thin-crust. Different areas of the country and the world favor different types of pizza. In the United States, New Yorkers prefer thin-crust pizza while the Windy City is synonymous with deep-dish pizza. While the debate continues as to which type of crust is better, switching to a thinner crust may have certain health benefits. Thick crusts pack more calories into each and every slice. When paired with cheese and other toppings, a slice of deep-dish pizza, while delicious, may contain more calories than is wise to eat in one sitting. Brick-oven pizza parlors generally offer whisper-thin crusts sparingly touched with cheese, sauce and basil to produce the classic Margherita pie, making such pizza a healthier alternative than New York- or Chicago-style pizza. • Pair pizza with salad. One way to make pizza healthier is to avoid overindulging. It is easy to overdo it with pizza, but try to cut your portion size in half, replacing that extra slice of pizza with a salad or side order of steamed vegetables to fill up without overindulging. Pizza is a popular food across the globe. And while pizza may not be the healthiest food, a few simple ingredient changes can make pizza a much more nutritional meal.


12-Color

12 Brighton Banner

April 10, 2014

Advisor Caring

Respecting

Connecting

April 2014

Preserving

ADULT DAY SERVICE RESCUED US!

On any given day during the week, you might find Jane engaged with the staff and clients of The Senior Hub’s Adult Day Program in Northglenn. Her family is able to work, secure in the fact that she is well cared for during the day. A couple of years ago Jane’s family were talking to lawyers about her needs. One of the lawyers contacted a registered nurse looking for op-

tions and care. It just so happened that The Senior Hub and the Adult Day Service was listed in some resource information. Jane was suffering from Alzheimer’s and had developed more risk of falling or wondering off over the last few years. Her need for daytime supervision and companionship brought the family to our program desperate for help. As with all caregivers, the guilt they

had about placing Jane outside the home was weighing heavy on them. Our Program Director advised that, “Many of our clients families experience the Caregivers Guilt Syndrome, making placement difficult. We work with the families to help alleviate their fears and let them know that it is safe and alright to leave a loved one in the care of professionals, as we have here at the Adult Day Service.” Jane and her family are enthusiastic about the services provided at the Adult Day Services program. “The staff are just wonderful. Your program has allowed us to go on with our lives guilt free, knowing that mom is safe and cared for.” And Jane enjoys her time with us contributing to the day’s events and being a part of our circle of friends and staff. She never wants to leave at the end of the day. Jane’s family have advised us that, sometimes she doesn’t remember things very well, like she always thinks she left her purse

at work, but she comes home every day and says, “those people over there sure are nice.” She also appears to be more emotionally happy and feels like she has accomplished something after her visits at ADS. “The Senior Hub’s Adult Day Services program really did rescue us…” “We wanted to take good care of Jane but didn’t know where to

turn until we found your program. Jane’s illness has given us a glimpse of what may be ahead for each of us in the near future. We can only hope that a program as wonderful and caring as yours will still be available to us then. Thank you for your wonderful service.” If you have a loved one who needs care during the day, or possibly someone to come in and help

out in their home, call The Senior Hub. Helping the elderly and their families continues to be the focus of our agency. For Adult Day Services call 303-287-2400 or our main office at 303-426-4408 today… Let us rescue you and ease your guilt by helping you to lovingly care for your aging family members.

Can YOU lend a hand? Please complete this form and mail along with your donation to: The Senior Hub, 2360 W. 90th Ave., Federal Heights, CO 80260 You can also donate online at www.seniorhub.org

Please join us in our mission to care for those who need your helping hands and caring hearts.

YES, I want to help! Donor Name_____________________________________________________________ Address_________________________________City_____________State___Zip_______ e-mail_________________________________________________________________ I would like to donate: ___$1000___$500___$250___$100___$50___$25___Other (amount:______) Pledges for ongoing support can now be made by calling the office at 303-426-4408. Credit cards also accepted.

Please apply my donation to: __General Operations __Adult Day Services__RSVP __Meals On Wheels __ Homecare__Senior Solutions __ Other

303-426-4408

Find great resources and workshops.


13-Color April 10, 2014

Advisor Caring

Respecting

Connecting

Brighton Banner 13 April 2014

Preserving

WHAT DO IRISH, DUCKS AND ALPACA’S HAVE IN COMMON? Nothing but their recent visit to The Senior Hub Adult Day Service in Northglenn. Program Director, Nancy Kingsbury recently brought in her pet duck Alfred to share with the ADS clients. Alfred is friendly and chatty, (sorry, I mean quacky) with everyone he meets and the clients enjoyed the visit. On March 17th The Heritage Irish Step

Dancers came in to help ADS clients celebrate St. Patrick’s Day. “Their costumes are lovely,” noted one of our clients who smiled through the whole performance. We want to thank Ariel Bennett and the students from the school for sharing their talents with our clients here at the Adult Day Service. You brought with you a whole lot of Irish Sunshine and it was sincere-

MARCH FOR MEALS: A BIG SUCCESS We want to thank all our friends and family who participated in this year’s March for Meals events. By eating at one of our sponsoring restaurants, or making additional cash donations, you assisted us in raising money that will continue to put meals on tables for elderly neighbors right here in your communities. And remember… if you’re headed out to eat again in the future, please stop by one of these restaurants, have great meal and thank them for participating in the support of The Senior Hub Meals on Wheels program and our mission to care for older adults. THANK YOU!!!!

ly appreciated. And then came our most unusual visitors ever to The Senior Hub Adult Day Service. Payton and Dasher, two baby alpacas from Annies Alpaca Ranch in Longmont, and their mom Ann Danielson stopped in for a visit which was very exciting, and load of fun. Thanks for sharing information about Alpaca’s and showing us how cute and

cuddly they can be. As you can see, our Adult Day Service is not just a place to sit all day but one of compassion, fun, education, companionship and camaraderie. Thanks to all who provided special moments for those in our care. If you’d like more information about The Senior Hub Adult Day Service, please call 303-287-2400 and speak with Nancy.

LOCAL MAYORS DELIVER MEALS ON WHEELS A special thanks to Mayor Joyce Thomas - Federal Heights, Mayor Joyce Downing – Northglenn and Mayor Heidi Williams from Thornton who joined us in March in

celebration of National March for Meals. Each of them joined our volunteers to deliver meals to clients in their community. Thank you for making a difference and giving each

of these clients something new to share with family and friends. Your participation really is a highlight of this event.

Mayor Joyce Downing with Norma Prew

Shirley Drnovsek, Mayor Joyce Thomas and MOW Director, Amanda deBock

Mayor Heidi Williams with ____

BIG SHOUT OUT TO: ROSITA’S MEXICAN RESTAURANT MICKEY’S TOP SIRLOIN GREAT SCOTT’S JAY’S GRILLE & BAR And WESTY’S CAFÉ Without the support of these great restaurants, their owners, and their staff this event would not have been successful. Their support is sincerely appreciated.

“TOGETHER, WE ARE MAKING A DIFFERENCE!”

FALL PREVENTION TIPS OF THE MONTH (Part 2) By: Mary Thatcher, Homecare Director Some of the best recommendations for older adult injury prevention come from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). They have a Home Fall Prevention Checklist

PLEASE JOIN US FOR THE ANNUAL

ADAMS COUNTY COMMISSIONERS’ GOLF TOURNAMENT

for Older Adults. In addition to having your vision checked regularly and medical checkups, you can go room to room in your home and easily identify ways you can prevent falling. • Make sure all stairs are well lit. Install lights at top and bottom of stairs. Have secure handrails on both sides of all of your stairs. Keep objects off stairs. • On wood or cement steps, paint a contrasting color on the top edge of

Beautiful day on the course at Riverdale Dunes in Henderson, CO All proceeds will support The Senior Hub and the services we provide to older adults throughout Adams County and our service area. For more information visit our website at www.seniorhub.org Call 303-426-4408 or email rdees@seniorhub.org

each step so you can see each step more easily. • Get up slowly after you sit or lie down. • Exercise regularly. It does make you stronger and improve your balance. • Put a phone near the floor in case you fall and can’t get up. Keep emergency numbers in large print near each phone in your home. • If you spill on floors, clean it up quickly-so you avoid slipping and falling. We all want to avoid falls. So try to fix any “fall hazards” within, outside and around your home.

Fall prevention is good for everyone.

Best of Spring 27th Annual Arts & Crafts Bazaar to benefit the Adams County Museum

Saturday | April 19 |9am - 4pm

Gifts for all occasions!

• $2 Admission • 14 & under FREE • 200 Booths • FREE Parking

Adams County Regional Park & Fairground

ce 9755 Henderson Road (124th Ave) r Spa o d n ! Ve 303.659.7103 ABLE AVAIL Sponsored by the Adams County Historical Society

www.adamscountymuseum.com adamscomusum@aol.com


COLORADO COMMUNITY MEDIA

CH058388B

2

14-Color

5.04 x 5”

Help Wanted

Arapahoe County Public Airport Authority Airport, owners of one of the nation’s busiest airports is currently accepting applications for a Business Support Specialist. The candidate must possess an Associate’s Degree in Business, Office Management, or Paralegal fields or related field; have two years of experience involving public contact and one year’s experience at an airport or as a paralegal OR equivalent combination of acceptable training and experience that provides the required knowledge, skills and abilities. This a dual role position which includes providing business support to airport tenants in the areas of compliance, application review, and document preparation; performing a variety of other administrative support & recordkeeping duties as well as special projects in the areas of finance, human resourc3es and employee benefits. Attention to detail and accuracy is a must. Proficiency in Word, Excel, PowerPoint, Access and Outlook software and fluency in both written and spoken English is required. This is a full-time non-exempt position with excellent benefits after 60 days. Starting salary is $19.25 per hour. You may obtain an Application for Employment and full Job Description in person or via our website at http://www.centennialairport.com/Employment. Please hand-deliver, mail or e-mail your completed application to the Arapahoe County Public Airport Authority, 7800 S. Peoria St., Unit G1, Englewood, CO 80112 or contact Gwen at 303-218-2904. EOE

GAIN 130 LBS!

Savio House needs foster parents to provide temporary care for troubled teens ages 12-18. Training, 24 hour support and $1900/month provided. Must complete precertification training and pass a criminal and motor vehicle background check. Call Michelle 303-225-4073 or visit saviohouse.org.

Drivers Class A&B- experience required Operators Laborers

Now Hiring

Our company is an EEO employer and offers competitive pay and excellent benefits package. Please apply in person at

14802 W. 44th Avenue Golden, CO 80403

You can expect a lot from working at Target. An inclusive, energetic team. A company focused on community. A brand that puts guests first. And the fun and flexibility of a job that works for you. TEAM MEMBERS • Deliver excellent service to Target guests • Help keep the Target brand experience consistent, positive and welcoming • Make a difference by responding quickly and responsively to guest and team member needs Requirements • Cheerful and helpful guest service skills • Friendly and upbeat attitude

Benefits: • Target merchandise discount • Competitive pay • Flexible scheduling

To Apply: • Visit Target.com/careers, select hourly stores positions and search for the city of Littleton or zipcode 80123 & Highlands Ranch or zip code 80129. Select the location closest to you. • Apply in person at the Employment Kiosks located near the front of any Target Store.

Target is an equal employment opportunity employer and is a drug-free workplace. ©2014 Target Stores. The Bullseye Design and Target are registered trademarks of Target Brands, Inc.

STREET MAINTENANCE WORKER I

City of Black Hawk. Hiring Range: $17.59 $20.23 per hour DOQ/E. Unbelievable benefit package and exceptional opportunity to serve in Colorado’s premiere gaming community located 18 miles west of Golden. Requirements: High School Diploma or GED, valid Colorado driver’s license Class R with a safe driving record with the ability to obtain a Class A with P rating within one year of hire, and the ability to lift 80 pounds. To be considered for this limited opportunity, please apply online at www.cityofblackhawk.org/goto/ employee_services. Please note: Applicants are required to upload their resumes during the online application process. Please be sure your resume includes all educational information and reflects the past ten (10) years’ work history. Applicants must apply online and may do so at City Hall which is located at 201 Selak Street in Black Hawk. The City supports its employees and appreciates great service! EOE.

The Job Store Staffing is hiring for production and assemblers, multiple shifts, pay 9.80/hr. Call 303.940.9252 for more info.

Foster Care/Host Homes

Needed for Adults with Developmental Disabilities. $1000-$3500 per month tax free depending on client’s care needs, 24 hour support & training provided. Must have spare bedroom, pass criminal background & reference checks. To apply visit www.HostHomeApply.com or call 303-340-0322.

LEGITIMATE WORK AT HOME

Join the Team Colorado Community Media, publishers of 21 weekly newspapers and websites is seeking to fill the following position.

Classified Sales Representative Candidate must be strong with outbound phone calling, handle multiple projects at one time and work in a fast paced deadline oriented environment. Newspaper sales not required. Please send cover letter, resume to eaddenbrooke@coloradocomunitymedia.com. Please include job title in subject line.. Colorado Community Media offers competitive pay and benefits package. No phone calls please. *Not all positions eligible for benefits.

Visit Target.com/careers to apply

Construction Company in Golden looking for Office Help for AP & AR, Monday-Friday 8-5. Please send resumes to 303-425-1191

$2,000.00 Sign-On Bonus! Local-Home Nightly! Flatbed Runs. CDL-A, 1yr Exp. Req. Estenson Logistics. Apply: www.goelc.com 1-888-399-5856

APC Construction CO. now has immediate openings for the following positions:

Target.com/careers

Caregivers to provide in-home care to senior citizens who need assistance with activities of daily living. Call Today 303-736-6688 www.visitingangels.com /employment

Drivers:

Help Wanted

Join our team. Expect the best.

Auto Tech

April 10, 2014

Advertise: 303-566-4100

Help Wanted

Busy shop near Southglenn seeks Diagnostic and Repair Technician $25-$32 per hour. MondayFriday no nights or weekends. Paid Vacation, Health, Dental, Vision and more. Please call 303-927-0491

Local company is looking for drivers to transport railroad crews up to a 200 mile radius from Denver. Must live within 20 minutes of Coors Field & 31st railroad yard, be 21 or older, and pre-employment drug screen required. A company vehicle is provided, paid training, and benefits available. No special license needed. Compensation is $.20 per mile and $9.00 an hour while waiting. Apply at www.renzenberger.com

TARGE0032

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Careers

SALVAREZ

14 Brighton Banner jb/gl

4/10/2014

TREE CARE Workers: trimming & spraying. CO DL req. $10-12/hr. 303-431-5885

Wanted: Heavy Truck & Trailer Mechanic. Fortune Transportation is looking for an experienced diesel mechanic to join our operation. Top pay to qualified applicants plus benefits including: medical insurance and flex plan, company supplied uniforms, paid holidays and vacations, generous 401k retirement planning. Ideal candidates will hold a valid CDL license and the ability to pick-up or deliver local freight on some occasions. Call Curt Langstraat 1-507832-8630

Veterinary Technician/Assistant

and Receptionist,

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Full Time Parker, CO – Due to high demand, we are adding a receptionist and a veterinary technician or assistant. Visit www.parkervet.com/jobs for more information.

Part Time Maintenance Contact Arlene @ 303-424-0324

Please Recycle this Publication when Finished

Local Focus. More News.

We are community.

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Like to write? Take photos? Colorado Community Media is looking for a freelance writer to provide articles on news and events in Elbert County, primarily Elizabeth and Kiowa. This contract position also requires the ability to take digital photographs, so you must have your own camera. Pay is on a per-assignment basis, but we are looking for someone who can become a regular contributor to the Elbert County News. If interested, contact editor Chris Rotar at crotar@coloradocommunitymedia.com.

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BannerSPORTS 13-Sports

Brighton Banner15 April 10, 2014

Pucul leadS HawkS

By Michelle Boyer

Head Coach David Pucul is a new face to the Prairie View Thunderhawks’ lacrosse team this year. Although the Thunderhawks’ season has been off to a rough start, 0-3 record so far, Pucul said this is a transition year for him and his current players. “I’m implementing a lot of changes on the field, and it’ll take time for players to adjust, and buy into the program,” he said. “I’m trying to instill a competitive spirit within the program, and I want the athletes to push themselves and each other both on and off the field.” Pucul said at the teams’ first meeting that he told the boys, that what they lacked in experience, they would make up with hard work, and so far he’s not disappointed. “I continue to be impressed with the work ethic of our athletes, as well as the leadership from the senior class,” he said. The team has nine seniors this year including team captains Cory Patterson, Austin Shepherd and Bryce Robinson. Robinson anchors the defense as the goalkeeper, helped by senior defensemen Avery McLellan, and JR Ramirez. There are three seniors on the midfield. Patterson is the team’s main face-off technician with Andrew Larson taking some face-offs as well. Adam Wiley is a great transition middie and definitely pushes people in practice every day. Austin Shepherd plays mostly crease attack and another senior, Tristian Darnell with a strong left hand on the offensive side of the ball as well. Finally Jonas Lach, an exchange student from Germany, is still learning the game. “Lach is an incredible athlete, he’s very fast, and he has a wonderful sense of humor that keeps us all on our toes,” Pucul said. About one-third of the lacrosse team attends Prairie View, and the rest come from surrounding districts — Brighton, Horizon, Mountain Range, Legacy and Thornton High schools. “The Prairie View High School program hasn’t been all that successful in the past,” he said. “I think one of the biggest reasons we struggle in our division, is our lack of a consistent feeder program. Most players at PV don’t start playing lacrosse until their freshman year, while we’re playing teams with kids that have been playing four to six years before they even get to high school. We haven’t had any youth or middle school programs to get kids playing before they get to high school. Both baseball and football programs have peewee programs in place so that when kids get to high school they al-

David Pucul Photo by Michelle Boyer ready know what’s going on. “That being said, our junior varsity coach Randy Laraca has been running a team called the High Plains Outlaws. It’s a competitive U-15 program, and the athletes at PVHS who have been in this program are showing great success at the high school level. North Denver Lacrosse is another group that is trying to establish a feeder program in the Brighton community.”

Pucul said he’s looking forward to watching some youth games, and seeing what some of the kids can do over the next couple of years. Pucul started coaching when he was in high school. “I coached a team in our youth program,” he said. “I coached several summer camps on the east coast while in college, and spent one season as an assistant coach at Fort Lewis College while finishing

up my graduation requirements. Most recently, I coached the last three seasons in Longmont running their U-13, and U-15 teams before going to Europe to coach. “I found an online ad looking for American coaches in Belgium, and randomly applied not thinking it was a real possibility. A month later, I was contacted by e-main, did an interview over Skype, and the next thing I knew I was on a plane heading to Europe. I coached the men’s club and women’s club teams in the city of Ghent Belgium. The sports there are run very differently from how they work here in the US. Teams are all done through a club, and no sport is connected to the school system. The team at Ghent was mostly college aged men and women, with a few that were older. Lacrosse is still growing as a sport here in the US, and its very small in Europe. There were only 10 teams in Belgium two years ago, although I understand that they’ve grown it to 15 men’s teams and 12 women’s teams now. Because of this, everyone knows everyone on the lacrosse world over there, and I ended up working with several teams, as well as helping with the Belgian Beasts, the men’s national team.” Pucul said the World Games, which is the biggest international lacrosse tournament in the world to date, will be in Denver this year. “This really is a once in a lifetime opportunity for lacrosse fans in the Denver area,” he said. “The Thunderhawks have signed up to host Team Belgium, and I’m looking forward to watching some great lacrosse, seeing old friends, and watching some exchanges of culture during the games.” Pucul started playing lacrosse when he was in the fifth grade in a small town in upstate New York, just south of Syracuse. “I played through high school, and then attended Virginia Wesleyan College where I took advantage of a partial athletic scholarship, as well as an academic scholarship. I later transferred to Fort Lewis College in Durango where I continued to play at the collegiate club level. After graduating I moved to the Denver area and started my teaching career. I continued to play on rec leagues, for the next several years. Although a knee injury forced me to end my playing career much earlier than I would have liked, I have really enjoyed coaching over the last several years, and look forward to passing the game on.” Pucul lives in Denver and works at a charter school called Wyatt Academy. “I’ll say Brighton reminds me of where I grew up, and I really like the community and family spirit in the area,” he said.

Pratt geared into baseball season By Michelle Boyer

The love of baseball has been Caden Pratt of Brighton’s one place to get away without having any stress. His dad started him with the sport, and he’s played it the past 12 years. Pratt plays catcher and first base. He has a .258 batting average with 8 hits and 5 runs. He leads the team with 7 RBI so far this season. With a recent spring break trip to Arizona for the team, Pratt said it was definitely a wake-up call for how they needed to perform the rest of the season. The team went 1-4 during the trip. “We didn’t play the way we would’ve liked to, and anticipated to,” he said. “I love going to Arizona each year. The weather is perfect, and it’s a good time to just hang out and have fun playing baseball in the sun.”

Pratt said the team needs to focus on one game at a time, and eventually they’ll be successful. The senior has played on the team since his freshman year, and has been a member of the American Legion team during the summer. He’s undecided about his studies, but recently signed with Trinidad State junior college. He plans to transfer to a four year college to continue his baseball career. “I want to start playing as a freshman and play the game well so I can transfer,” he said. “I also want to make it to a junior college World Series.” Pratt has made the first team all-conference, was an all-state honorable mention two times and made first team academic all-state during his high school baseball career. Brighton’s current record is 4-6. The team will Hinkley today, April 10, at 4 p.m.

Caden Pratt plays first base on Saturday, April 5, against Mountain Vista. Brighton lost 5-4. Photo by Michelle Boyer


16

16 Brighton Banner

April 10, 2014

Hasty Hewlett enjoys the competition By Michelle Boyer Swimming will forever be the passion of Brighton High School senior Aaron Hewlett. He swims the 50-meter freestyle in 24.1 seconds, 100 freestyle in 52.6, 200 freestyle in 2:03 and the 100 backstroke in 1:03. “My favorite event is the 100 freestyle, because it’s a race filled with adrenaline, second chances and it’s my best race,” he said. “I’ve been swimming for four years now. I started up swimming because all my life I had been told that I should try to swim and after racing some friends at the recreation center I found myself wanting to try out for the sport.” Hewlett used to play football, but quit after his sophomore year, because

he said he enjoyed swimming a lot more and he had invested more time into the Front Range Barracudas swim team to better himself. “Our team is bigger and strong than it have been any year I’ve been on the team,” he said. “We’ve a lot of underclassmen who’ve come to join the team, and they are giving us a bright future for the school’s program.” While swimming for the Bulldogs, Hewlett has received an athlete of the year award, he’s been captain for two years, and he’s won numerous all-state academic awards. Next year, Hewlett will attend the University of Wyoming to study renewable energy resources. He said he’s undecided if he’ll walk onto the swim team..

Aaron Hewlett swims the 200 Medley Relay against Standley Lake Tuesday, April 1. Hewlett’s time was 28.71 seconds and the relay team placed first 1:54.91. Brighton won the meet with 137 points. Photo by Michelle Boyer

SPORTS QUIZ 1) Who were the last teammates before Baltimore’s Manny Machado and Chris Davis in 2013 to lead the A.L. in doubles and home runs in the same season? 2) How many times did New York Yankees legend Joe DiMaggio have seasons of more RBIs than games played? 3) Who holds the Pac-12 record for most touchdown passes in a season? 4) In 2013, San Antonio’s Tim Duncan became the fourth player to play in the NBA Finals during three different decades. Name two of the other three. 5) When was the last time before the 2013-14 season that the Philadelphia Flyers won at least 10 consecutive games at home in regulation? 6) How many times has a Tour de France bicycling champion come from Great Britain?

7) Who gave heavyweight boxer Muhammad Ali his second professional defeat? Answers 1) Lou Gehrig (doubles) and Babe Ruth (home runs) did it for the New York Yankees in 1927. 2) Four seasons (1937, ‘39, ‘40, ‘48). 3) Southern Cal’s Matt Barkley, with 39 in 2011. 4) Elgin Baylor, A.C. Green and John Salley. 5) They won 14 consecutive home games in 1984-85. 6) Twice -- in 2012 (Bradley Wiggins) and 2013 (Chris Froome). 7) Ken Norton beat him in 1973. 2014 King Features Synd., Inc. 303.637.0981

1289 S. 4th Ave., Brighton Brighton’s Hometown Commercial Builder!

Council

ur rate is $12 per column inch. it and how it fits based on different Continued from Page 7

Currently the city of Brighton is absorb1-inch ad. ing the expense of processing fees charged by credit card companies, at loss to the city. Ideas on how to correct this issue fairly are being considered.

Advertise: 303-566-4100

Auctions Auction on 4/8/2014 at 11am Unit 20/21: Car Parts and tools U-Store-It CO 3311 W. 97th Ave Westminster, CO 80031

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Adams County Fairgrounds Brighton, CO To buy or sell call

1 inch, $12 per Instruction week PIANO LESSONS! 970-266-9561

Specialty Auto Auctions www.saaasinc.com

The information on development sign plaza’s license agreement was presented by Assistant City Manager for Development, Marv Falconburg. Multiple development sign kiosks called “wayfinding” signs will be installed throughout Brighton as directional signs. These signs are installed at no cost to Brighton, and in fact, the city will be 303.637.0981 paid and annual fee by the licensee who installs the signs.

1289 S. 4th Ave., Brighton

www.bvgci.com Brighton’s Hometown HAVE A LEGISLATIVE QUESTION? Commercial Builder! Email Colorado Community Media Legislative Reporter Vic Vela at vvela@coloradocommunitymedia.com or call 303-566-4132.

@YOURSERVICE

Marketplace

303.637.0981 1289 S. 4th Ave., Brighton www.bvgci.com Brighton’s Hometown Commercial Builder!

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1 1/2 inches, $18 per week Bridal Salon closed.80+wedding Gowns to sell all at 50% off tag prices.Spread the word to all Brides-to-Be!!! APRIL 25-27, 10:00am - 3:00pm.All proceeds will go to benefit Rosies Ranch in Parker.This is a wonderful organization where children with deafness or other oral language hurdles can expand verbal and reading skills through equine connections. All of these dresses are new or Designer samples and will be selling at 50% off the retail tags. APRIL 25,26,27, 10:00 AM - 3:00 pm at Rosies Ranch, 10556 E Parker Rd. Parker, CO . PLEASE SPREAD THE WORD TO ANY FUTURE BRIDES YOU MAY KNOW AS THIS IS A GREAT SAVINGS!!!

2 inches, $24 per week

Congregation Beth Shalom Chocolate Seder April 12, 2014 www.cbsdenver.org for information

IN THE

GOT INSURANCE? Representing many fine companies Se habla Espa– ol

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420 Court Place Brighton

minerals and other oil/gas interests. Send details to: P.O. Box 13557 Denver, CO 80201

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quartered, halves and whole A publication of

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PETS

Centennial

Estate Sale April 12th 8am - 3pm

7645 S. Cook Way Centennial, CO 80122

Arts & Crafts Spring Craft & Bake Sale

at American Legion Post 21 500 9th St Golden Saturday April 12, 9am-4pm Sloppy Joes, Chips & Soda $3 Crafters needed $15 a table Call Rita at 720-469-4033 Monday-Friday

Dogs

Bicycles

Misc. Notices

Want To Purchase

ADVERTISE

GARAGE & ESTATE SALES

ELECTRIC BIKES Adult 2-Wheel Bicycles & & 3 wheel Trikes No Drivers License, Registration or Gas needed 303-257-0164

TOY POODLE PUPPIES FOR SALE.

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TRANSPORTATION

Firewood Pine/Fur & Aspen

Split & Delivered $225 Stacking available extra $25 Some delivery charges may apply depending on location. Hauling scrap metal also available (appliances, batteries etc.) Call 303-647-2475 or 720-323-2173

Furniture 96"x76"x18" Entertainment Center Beautiful Cherry Finish, Lighted Cabinets, Ample Storage. Bargain Price at $395 303-384-9491 Full size hide a bed Emerald & gray, 2 pillows Made by Lazy-Boy $150 303-875-5918 Kid's Pottery Barn Table w/4 chairs (Honey table, navy chairs) 2 matching navy shelves w/6 baskets, canvas picture all for $500/obo. Light wood kid's table w/4 chairs $40 719-649-3077

Health and Beauty

Autos for Sale 2007 Buick Lucerne CXL 61,000 miles, very clean, silver, $10,500 (303)926-9645 2009 Dodge Ram 3500 SLT Quad cab 4x4, 23,600 miles 6.7 Liter Cummins Turbo Diesel 6 speed automatic, AM/FM Sirus, tow pkg w/5thwheel hitch Dually rear tires, 7 yr warr. (303)470-1620 $38,000 shown by appointment FOR SALE - 1997 Lincoln Towncar - 75,000 miles, leather interior, power everything, sun roof - wellmaintained - great condition $6000 - call 970-356-5608

RV’s and Campers Dont miss this! Why buy new, barely used 2010 Keystone Hideout 27' w/slide out Trvl trailer, over 1k extra accessories incl. $17,900 303-771-1688

Wanted

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17-Color Brighton Banner 17

April 10, 2014

SCORE!

Bulldog Casey Towers, right, scores during a loss Saturday against Mountain Vista. The Bulldogs lost 5-4. Photo by Jerry Healey

crossword • sudoku

GALLERY OF GAMES & weekly horoscope

SALOME’S STARS FOR THE WEEK OF ApRil 7, 2014

ARIES (Mar 21 to Apr 19) A suggestion from a colleague on how to work out a problem might not sit too well with you. But before you suspect his or her motives, why not just accept it as a friendly gesture? TAURUS (Apr 20 to May 20) An associate might seek your counsel on a workplace dispute with another co-worker. listen to what she or he has to say, but withhold advice until you’ve heard the other side of the story. GEMINI (May 21 to Jun 20) Use your Twin gifts for creativity and practicality to score points in landing an opportunity that could open doors to a new career. Someone returns after a long absence.

crossword • sudoku & weekly horoscope

GALLERY OF GAMES

CANCER (Jun 21 to Jul 22) Although things are pretty hectic through much of the week, some quiet time with loved ones helps restore balance. An unexpected visitor brings welcome news about a mutual friend. LEO (Jul 23 to Aug 22) Getting used to change isn’t always easy for the Big Cat. But make the adjustments gradually, and soon you’ll hardly remember when things were any different from how they are now. VIRGO (Aug 23 to Sept 22) Continue to stay the course you’ve chosen, and avoid distractions that could throw you off track. Some knowledgeable folks are happy to provide guidance if you need it. LIBRA (Sept 23 to Oct 22) Although you earned plaudits from most co-workers for your recent stand on a workplace situation, you also raised the envy quotient among others. Tread carefully for now. SCORPIO (Oct 23 to Nov 21) You feel more positive about that delayed project, and you’re ready to pick it up on a moment’s notice. However, you might need to re-motivate those who have since lost interest. SAGITTARIUS (Nov 22 to Dec 21) Some welcome news should be coming your way. in the meantime, use that Sagittarius charm to persuade some stillreluctant colleagues that your ideas have merit. CAPRICORN (Dec 22 to Jan 19) Don’t wait for a misunderstanding to work itself out. instead, ask for a chance to explain the circumstances before those bruised feelings lead to an irreversible break. AQUARIUS (Jan 20 to Feb 18) A physical problem should be checked out in order to avoid it going from just being a nuisance to something more serious. Your social life takes an unexpected but not unwelcome turn. PISCES (Feb 19 to Mar 20) Yours might be the wisest sign in the Zodiac. But you still could benefit from the wisdom of a close friend who has suggestions on how to handle a perplexing personal problem. BORN THIS WEEK: Your passion for doing the right thing inspires others to follow your well-trodden path toward justice. © 2014 King Features Synd., inc.


18-Color

18 Brighton Banner

your week & more Continued from Page 10

27

April 10, 2014

Services Carpentry Carpenter/Handyman:

Semi retired but still ready to work for you! 34 years own business. Prefer any small jobs. Rossi's: 303-233-9581

AdAms County HigH sCHool Rodeo, Fairgrounds Arena Grand Stands, 8

a.m.-6 p.m.

JACkie And me, Eagle View Adult Center trip, UNC Langworthy Theatre in Greeley,

12:45 p.m.; A rare baseball card is Joey’ s ticket for time travel back to 1947 to witness the drama of Jackie Robinson’s historic season with the Brooklyn Dodgers. Joey witnesses Jackie’s courage and dignity during this turbulent time of segregation. Early dinner after at Randy’s All American Grill & Steakhouse. $22 plus meal ($20+) Deadline: April 18

Fine ARts at Four concert featuring Ragtime Orchestra, First Presbyterian Church,

510 S. 27th Ave., 4 p.m.; the Morgan Community College group performs music from 1910-1930s. Free.

28 FRee Blood-pRessuRe Screening, Eagle View Adult Center, 10:30-11:30 a.m.; performed by Brighton Firefighters Hike CAstlewood CAnyon, Eagle View Adult Center trip, 9:30 a.m.; trip to

Cleaning

musiC And movement, Anythink Brighton,10:30-11 a.m.; Sing, dance and learn how to play some basic instruments. For ages 2-6. RSVP online ARt stop on the Go, Anythink Brighton, 4-5 p.m.; Anythink and Boulder Museum

of Contemporary Art have teamed up to bring you an art-making workshop each month! Join a visiting artist and express yourself through a variety of art media, with the emphasis on creativity and fun. For ages 5-12. RSVP online.

tHe studio: Teen Time, Anythink Brighton, 4-5 p.m.; Finish up this month’s crafts during open teen time in The Studio. For grades 6-12. 29 yogA, Platte Valley Medical Center Conference Center, 4:45-5:20 p.m.; $6 drop-in rate; certified instructor. Bring your mat, 303-498-1840. pilAtes mAt ClAss, Platte Valley Medical Center Conference Center, 5:45-6:30

p.m.; increase strength, tone, flexibility, stamina, overall fitness and health, taught by licensed physical therapist and certified Pilates instructor, $9 per class, 303-4981840

tHe studio: Discharge Paste, Anythink Brighton, 6:30-8 p.m.; Create a design

using discharge paste on dark fabric. Supplies provided. RSVP online; for adults.

30

SPECIALIZING IN:

babies to 23 months and their caregivers. RSVP online.

Concrete/Paving

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G& E Concrete • Residential & Commercial Flatwork • Driveways • Patios • Walks • Garages • Foundations • Colored & Stamped Concrete • Tearout/Replace

25+ yrs. Experience Best Rates • References Free Estimates • 303-451-0312 or 303-915-1559 www.gandeconcrete.com

Navarro Concrete, Inc.

Yard Cleaning Commercial/Residential quality work at reasonable prices.

303-423-8175

CRiBBAge touRnAment, Eagle View Adult Center, 12:30 p.m.; prizes, refresh-

diy neCklACe, Anythink Brighton, 2:30-4 p.m.; Make a fun necklace. Supplies provided. For grades 6-12. AFteR-sCHool get Together: Mandalas, Anythink Brighton, 2:30-4:30 p.m.;

color the beautiful patterns of timeless mandalas. For grades K-5.

• patios • sidewalks • garage floors • • porches • stamped/colored • exposed agregate • lic.& ins. free estimates

720-218-8849

Help FoR Homes, Paint-up and fix-up community event.

Letters PoLicy The editor welcomes signed letters on most any subject. Please limit letters to 300 words. We reserve the right to edit for legality, clarity, civility and the paper’s capacity. Only submissions with name, address and telephone number will run.

Free Estimates 17 Years Experience Licensed & Insured Driveways, patios, stamp & colored concrete. All kinds of flat work. Let us do good work for you! (720)217-8022

Residential Concrete Work

303-429-0380 • Best prices • Free estimates References available

MaiL, e-MaiL or fax to:

Colorado Community Media 8703 Yates Drive, Suite 210 Westminster, CO 80031 editor@coloradocommunitymedia.com fax 303-426-4209

AFFORDABLE

HANDYMAN

Affordable Electrician

ELECTRICAL SERVICE WORK

All types, licensed & insured. Honest expert service. Free estimates.

720-203-7385

License #4605

All types of electrical work & repairs 40 Years Experience • Free Estimates Call John Kruse, Master Electrician

303-422-6805 Radiant Lighting Service **

HOME REPAIRS & REMODELING • Drywall • Painting • Tile • Trim • Doors • Painting • Decks • Bath Remodel • Kitchen Remodels • Basements & Much More! Call Today for a FREE ESTIMATE

303-427-2955

HOME REPAIRS INSIDE: *Bath *Kitchen's *Plumbing *Electrical, *Drywall *Paint *Tile & Windows OUTSIDE: *Paint & Repairs *Gutters *Deck's *Fence's *Yard Work *Tree & Shrubbery trimming & clean up Affordable Hauling

Hauling Service

trash hauling

DISCOUNT FENCE CO

Call Bernie 303.347.2303

• Home • Business • Junk & Debris • Furniture • Appliances • Tree Limbs • Moving Trash • Carpet • Garage Clean Out

Sanders Drywall Inc. All phases to include

Acoustic scrape and re-texture Repairs to full basement finishes Water damage repairs Interior paint, door & trim installs 30+ years experience Insured Free estimates

Darrell 303-915-0739

Call NOW to schedule your landscaping project – big or small! Early Bird Discount -10% OFF jobs signed by May 1st.

• Complete Landscape Design & Construction • Retaining Walls, Paver & Natural Stone Patios • Decks & Pergolas • Drainage Solutions • New Plantings • Landscape Lighting • Irrigation Systems and Repairs • Concrete Work • Clean-ups & Plant Pruning COLORADO REGISTERED LANDSCAPE ARCHITECT

Licensed

720.436.6340

Insured

www.arterralandscaping.com

“For all your Lawn Care needs”

• Mowing • Landscaping • Fertilizing •Trimming Sprinkler repair • Spring clean-up

Call 303-596-1234 Lawn/Garden Services

HAULING

$$Reasonable Rates On:$$ *Trash Cleanup*old furniture mattresses*appliances*dirt old fencing*branches*concrete *asphalt*old sod*brick*mortar* House/Garage/Yard clean outs Storm Damage Cleanup Electronics recycling avail. Mark 303.432.3503 AFFORDABLE HAULING You Call - I Haul Basement, Garages, Houses, Construction, Debris, Small Moves Office - 303-642-3548 Cell 720-363-5983 Ron Massa BBB - Bonded - Insured

Trash & Junk Removal We take what your trash man won't. Branches, mattresses, appliances, reasonable rates & prompt service 720-333-6832

Heating/ Air Conditioning

JOHNSON’S

Handyman

Victor’s Handyman Service • carpentry • painting • general home repair • over 30 years experience

Call (720) 541-4625 for a free estimate

• satisfaction guaranteed • No job too big or small

A Home Repair & Remodeling Handyman Large and small repairs 35 yrs exp. Reasonable rates 303-425-0066

Ton

LANDSCAPE

Free estimates 7 days a Week

Serving the Front Range Since 1955

www.mikesgaragedoors.com

Aera Tr

GET A JUMP ON SPRING!

Mowing, Aeration, Power Raking, Fertilizing, Sprinkler Start-up and Repairs

Dreiling’s

Lawn Service Spring Services: Aeration, Power raking, Fertilization, Spring Cleanup and Gutter Clean out. Other Services: Landscaping, Rock install, Sod Install, Fencing, Small Tree / Bush install and removal, Irrigation start-up, repair and install. Services offered also include Weekly Lawn Maintenance.

Call Terrence @ 303-427-5342 Serving Most of Northern Colorado

(303) 646-4499

Week

Colu

Call Rick 720-285-0186

Dirt, Rock, Concrete, Sod & Asphalt

• Springs, Repairs • New Doors and Openers • Barn and Arena Doors • Locally-Owned & Operated • Tom Martino’s Referral List 10 Yrs • BBB Gold Star Member Since 2002

A

info@OlsonLandscapingAndDesign.com

Fence Services

and Remodeling

Drywall

Landscaping/Nurseries

www.OlsonLandscapingAndDesign.com

Instant Trash Hauling

For all your garage door needs!

Hands on Cleaning

Reliable, 25 years in business, personal touch, spring cleaning. Weekly, bi-weekly, once a month Call Gloria 303-456-5861 Servicing the Metro North and Metro West areas

Call Richard 720-297-5470

Electrical Work All types. Honest and reliable, licensed & ins. Free estimates. Craig (303)429-3326

Quality Fencing at a DiscountPrice Wood, Chain Link, Vinyl, Orna-iron, New Install and Repairs. Owner Operated since 1989 Call Now & Compare! 303-450-6604

House Cleaning

Carpentry • Painting Tile • Drywall • Roof Repairs Plumbing • Electrical Kitchen • Basements Bath Remodels Property Building Maintenance

FBM Concrete LLC.

2 And 3 3

All types of repairs. Reasonable rates 30yrs Exp. 303-450-1172

No Service in Parker or Castle Rock

www.delsolconcrete.com

mAy tRAsH BAsH, City of Brighton spring clean up, watch the Daily Post for details.

Bob’s Home Repairs

Office 303-642-3548 Cell 720-363-5983

Garage Doors Driveways Tear Outs & Replace

Handyman

Free Estimates • Reliable Licensed • Bonded Insured • Senior Discount

720-690-7645

All Phases of Flat Work by

Advertise: 303-566-4100

Ron Massa

25 yrs experience Remodel expert, kitchen, basements, & service panel upgrades. No job too small. Senior disc.

pRimetime FoR pResCHooleRs, Anythink Brighton, 10:30-11 a.m.; stories,

ments; $4

Electricians

720-263-2773 herecomesthebroom@gmail.com

tHe studio: Wax Resist, Anythink Brighton, 10-11:30 a.m.; Use a soluble resist to paint a design freehand or with a stencil, then dye the dishcloth to reveal gorgeous results. Supplies provided. RSVP online; for adults. finger plays, songs and other activities for ages 3-5. RSVP online.

• Home Renovation and Remodel • 30 years Experience • Insured • Satisfaction Guaranteed

• High end cleans • Move in/out cleans • Construction cleans new/remodel • Residential and commercial cleans

Registered & Insured in Colorado.

BABy BounCe, Anythink Brighton, 9:30-10:15 a.m.; songs, rhymes and stories for

Drywall Repair Specialist

Call Ed 720-328-5039

toddleR tAles, Anythink Brighton, 9:30-10:15 a.m.; time with your toddler,

windows 8 on Your Laptop, Anythink Brighton, 10-11:30 a.m.; tips to negotiate the new features of Windows 8; how to use the app store, tiles, and feel comfortable with the interface; bring your Windows 8 laptop to class. RSVP online.

A PATCH TO MATCH

Highly rated & screened contractor by Home Advisor & Angies list

the Castlewood Canyon State Park in the Black Forest. Splendid hiking trail, loops of one, two, four and six miles – some are paved. Elevation is 6,000 feet. Bring water, sunscreen, lunch, rain poncho, and good walking shoes. Ice cream stop after. $5 plus snack ($), Deadline April 24 stories, songs and finger plays, plus a few minutes of social time with other caregivers while children play. For ages 2-3. RSVP online.

Drywall

NW

LAWN SERVICES

$$Reasonable Rates$$

*Leaf Cleanup*Lawn Maintenance* Tree & Bush Trimming/Removal* Removal/Replacement Decorative Rock, Sod or Mulch*Storm Damage Cleanup*Gutter cleaning * All of your ground maintenance needs Servicing the West & North areas Mark: 303.432.3503 Refs.avail

LAWN AERATIONS

HEATING & COOLING

Residential Homes

• RepaiR • Replace • install • We will beat all bids • Summer Cooling Specials • Senior Discounts • All Makes and Models

starting at

FREE ESTIMATES

720-327-9214 Home Improvement www.propropservices.com 303.781.4968 – office Complete Home Renovation and Remodels Kitchen and Bath Remodels Basement Finish Outs Interior and Exterior Paint Electrical and Plumbing Repairs General Home Improvement and Repairs Landscape and Irrigation Exterior Decks, Patios, Arbors, Outdoor Kitchens and Bathhouses Property Maintenance

30

$

Call Eric h: 303-424-0017 C: 303-668-1613 Residential Commercial

Now scheduling appointments for… • Spring Aeration • Power Raking • • Weekly Mowing • Yard Clean Up • Sign up for weekly lawn service before May 1st & get your yard aerated this Spring for FREE!!! Call or email us today!

720-201-7561

info@olsonlawncare.com www.olsonlawncare.com

G

Joh


Services

19-Color

Brighton Banner 19

April 10, 2014

Services Lawn/Garden Services

Lawn/Garden Services

NW

Advertise: 303-566-4100

Painting

Mark’s Quality Lawn Alpine Landscape Management

Weekly Mowing, Power Raking Aerate, Fertilize, Spring Clean Up Trim Bushes & Small Trees, Senior Discounts

720-329-9732

Columbine Custom Contracting & Sprinkler Service • Sprinkler Start Ups $40 • Aerations $40 • Fertilization $30 • Power Rakes $60 & Up • Fence Repair & Painting • Power wash decks & houses • Clean Up / Tree service • Laminate/Hardwood Floors • Licensed Plumber

Tony 720-210-4304

Mark’s Quality Lawn Care Spring Aerating, Power Raking, Fertilizing and Lawn Over-seeding, Sod & Rock Work Shrub Trimming and Plantings FREE Fall Aerating and Fertilizing with NEW Mowing Service Mowing in Select Areas Only

303-420-2880

Sosa Landscaping

Reasonable Price & Quality Service Full Landscaping, Fence, Tree, Sod, Rock, Aeration Weekly Mowing, Bush Trimming, Yard Cleanup, Power Rake Low Cost - Experience - References - Dependable COMMERCIAL & RESIDENTIAL INSURED & BONDED FREE ESTIMATE

Please call anytime: Mr. Domingo 720-365-5501

Painting

John • 303-922-2670

• Affordable • Quality • Insured • Great Customer Service • Local Colorado Business • Exterior Painting • Interior Painting • Drywall Repair

“We Specialize In Jus*Painting”

Your experienced Plumbers.

Insured & Bonded

Family Owned & Operated. Low Rates.

Remodeling

303.451.1971

GREENE'S REMODELING

Commercial/Residential

Bathroom/kitchen remodeling, repair work, plumbing leaks, water damage. No job too small Window replacement. Serving Jeffco since 1970 (303)237-3231

For all your plumbing needs

www.frontrangeplumbing.com

Call Frank

WeeklY moWing

303.420.0669

sign up before April 1st for

10% oFF

Your monthlY bill throughout the summer (new customers only) AerAtion, FertilizAtion YArd CleAnup

www.denverlawnser vices.com Established 2000

DEEDON'S PAINTING 40 years experience Interior & Exterior painting. References 303-466-4752

Roofing:

Shingles, Flat Roofs, Roof Leak Repairs. 35 years of experience. Free estimates. Butch Metzler (303)422-8826

OTTO'S REMODELING

Top Quality Craftsmenship 30 years experience Kitchens, Bathrooms, Basements and ALL Finish Work Fully Insured FREE Estimates

Rocky Mountain Contractors

Home Remodeling Specialists, Inc. * Bath * Kitch Remodels * Bsmt Finishes * Vinyl Windows * Patio Covers * Decks 30+ yrs. exp. George (303)252-8874

dirty jobs done dirt cheap Drain Cleaning & Plumbing Repairs

720-308-6696 www.askdirtyjobs.com

Free phone Quotes Residential/Commercial * Water Heaters Drain Cleaning * Remodel * Sump Pumps Toilets * Garbage Disposals

Sage Remodeling inc PLUMBING & SPRINKLERS

15% Off Spring Savings Free Instant Quote Repair or Replace: Faucets, Toilets, Sinks, Disposals, Water Heaters, Gas Lines, Broken Pipes, Spigots/Hosebibs, Water Pressure Regulator, Ice Maker, Drain Cleaning, Dishwasher Instl., westtechplumbing.com CALL WEST TECH (720)298-0880

A-1 Stump Removal Stump grinding specialist

Most stumps $75.00 $45 Minimum. Free estimates. Licensed & Insured. 33 years experience. A father and son team!

Call Terry 303-424-7357

Sprinklers Licensed and Insured

Affordable Rates

Residential /Commercial

• Winterization • System Startup • Install, Repair • Service & Renovations

System Startups $35.00 Free Estimates

A Tree Stump Removal Company

We offer tree removal, brush, mulch and root chasing in addition to stump removal. We also have firewood available! Call today for your Free Estimate. Credit cards accepted • Insured

Senior Discounts

Stephen D. Williams justssprinklers@gmail.com

720-394-1709

(303) 425-6861

www.stumpthumpersdenver.com

25 Plus Years Exp • Family Owned & Operated

720-404-5892

Bob’s Painting, Repairs & Home Improvements 30 yrs experience Free estimates 303-450-1172

www.AnyWeatherRoofing.com • Sales@AnyWEatherRoofing.com

Tree Service

Just Sprinklers Inc

303-960-7665

303.870.8434

JAY WHITE Tree Service Serving with pride since 1975 Tree & shrub trimming & removals Licensed and Insured Firewood For Sale Call Jay (303)278-7119

(303) 234-1539

FRONT RANGE PLUMBING

We will match any written estimate! Same day service! No job too small or too big!

Long lasting Specialty Services interior & exterior Over 40 yrs. experience References and guarantees available.

Tree Service

All Types of Roofing New Roofs, Reroofs, Repairs & Roof Certifications Aluminum Seamless Gutters Family owned/operated since 1980 Call Today for a FREE Estimate • Senior Discounts

Plumbing

SENIOR DISCOUNTS FREE ESTIMATES in the metro area

• Honest pricing • • Free estimates •

Roofing/Gutters

RALPH’S & JOE’S AFFORDABLE

• Water Heaters • Plumbing Parts

Weekly Mowing Aeration Fertilizing Hedge Trim Maintenance Serving Lakewood, Golden, Arvada & Wheatridge

Plumbing

Remodeling for your entire house • Older Homes • Senior Discounts • 20 Years experience • Licensed and Insured

303-589-4095

Sage-remodeling.com

Window Services Professional Installations & Repairs Lifetime Warranty + SOD INSTALLATION

$AVE MONEY AND WATER Fast, friendly service All Work Guaranteed!

303-523-5859

Old Pro Window Cleaning

Tree Service

Bob Bonnet 720-530-7580

Majestic Tree Service 720-231-5954

Tree & Shrub Trimming, Tree Removal Stump Grinding Free Estimates Licensed and Insured

Residential Specialist Over 30 years experience Quality Work

Window Cleaning & Screen Repair

Year-round window cleaning Interiors, Exteriors, Tracks, Slides & Screens Family Owned Since 1993 Free Estimates • Insured

Terry Copper

303-668-8726 www.windowpleasers.com

PROFESSIONAL SERVICES GUIDE A QUALITY HANDYMAN SERVICE Affordable Home Repairs At Your Fingertips FREE ESTIMATES, ALL WORK GUARANTEED

Custom Bathrooms & Kitchens, Electrical,Plumbing, & General Repairs

Senio Discou r nt

Save $25 on any work over $100 Contact Mark at

720-422-2532

Grand ing Open ial! c e p S

Custom Draperies our Specialty

Best Choice Massage Asian Deep Tissue Massage • Relaxation Massage

$5.00 OFF with this ad.

• 1 Hr Swedish Massage Reg $45 • 1 Hr Deep Tissue Massage Reg. $50

Call Today - 720-299-2607

Appointments & Walk-ins Welcome • www.bc-massage.com

5004 W. 92nd Ave - S.E. Corner of 92nd & Sheridan

Bloomin’ Broom QCS, LLC Quality Cleaning Services Residential House Cleaning

Complete Home Remodeling Interior - Exterior - Kitchens - Baths - Basements Additions - Master Suites - Decks - Doors - Windows Siding - Roofing

Ron Massa Owner

Licensed - Bonded - Insured

Office 303-642-3548 Cell 720-363-5983 35 Years Experience

$30 off 1st Cleaning Service

Melaleuca EcoSense Products Bonded & Insured / Work Guaranteed

720-441-5144

www.bloominbroom.com • bloominbroom@msn.com

blinds, shades & shutters

Free control upgrades and rebates on select styles

Shop at Home

303-279-3791

9am-5pm Monday-Friday • 9am-1pm Saturday

A-1 Stump Removal Stump grinding specialist Most stumps $75.00 $45 Minimum. Free estimates. Licensed & Insured. 33 years experience. A father and son team!

Call Terry 303-424-7357

We do concrete, sod, decks, sprinklers, outdoor kitchens, fire pits. We can build all of your landscaping needs, please call for a free estimate! 10 years in business. 303-621-0192 • cell 720-338-5275

To advertise your business here, call Karen 303-566-4091


20-Color

20 Brighton Banner

April 10, 2014

brightonbanner.com All ballots here or online must be received by 11:59pm Wednesday, April 30th, 2014 Your contact information will only be used for clarification purposes only.

Submitter’s Name

Submitter’s Phone number Join our mailing list

Submitter’s Email Mail attn: BEST OF THE BEST or drop them at one of our offices: 9137 Ridgline Blvd., Ste. 210, HIghlands, CO 80129 110 N. Rubey Dr., Ste. 150, Golden, CO 80403 8703 Yates Dr., Ste. 210, Westminister, CO 80031

HOUSE & HOME Electrician_____________________ Garden Landscape Center ______________________________ Hardware Store ________________ Heating & A/C Company ______________________________ Home Repair/Remodeling ______________________________ Hot Tub/Spa Retailer ______________________________ Roofer/Roofing Company ______________________________ Windows ______________________ Maid/Cleaning Services ______________________________ Plumber ______________________ Garage Door Service ______________________________ Kitchen/Bath Contractor ______________________________ Trash Service __________________

AUTOMOTIVE Autobody _____________________ Auto Repair/Service ____________ Carwash/Detailing _____________ Towing _______________________ Auto Dealer ___________________ Tire Dealer ____________________

ENTERTAINMENT/LIFESTYLE PETS & ANIMALS

FOOD/BEVERAGE

Bowling Alley ______________________ Art Gallery ________________________ Family Entertainment Center __________________________________ Golf Course _______________________ Local Theater/Playhouse ____________ Best Place to Meet New People __________________________________ Singles Spot _______________________ Local Morning Radio Show __________________________________ Local Morning TV Show _____________ Live Music Venue ___________________

Pizzeria _________________________ BBQ Restaurant __________________ Asian Restaurant _________________ Greek/Middle Eastern ________________________________ Green Chili ______________________ Seafood ________________________ Breakfast Spot ___________________ Hot Wings _______________________ Sushi ___________________________ Café ____________________________ Steakhouse _____________________ Deli/Sandwich Shop ________________________________ Dessert _________________________ French Fries _____________________ Hamburger Joint _________________ Dessert _________________________ Italian Restaurant ________________ Burrito _________________________ Family Restaurant ________________ Happy Hour _____________________ Margarita _______________________ Sports Bar _______________________ Wine Bar ________________________ Ice Cream _______________________ Mexican Restaurant ________________________________ Bakery _________________________ Brew Pub _______________________ Butcher _________________________ Coffee Shop _____________________ Best Produce ____________________ Indian __________________________ New Restaurant __________________

MEDICAL Audiologist/Hearing Aids __________________________________ Chiropractor_______________________ Cosmetic Dentist ___________________ Cosmetic Surgery __________________ Dentist ___________________________ Eye Care Provider __________________ Hospital __________________________ Urgent Care _______________________ Orthodontist ______________________ Pediatrician _______________________ Physical Therapist __________________ Women’s Healthcare ________________ Wholistic/Naturopathic __________________________________ Acupuncture ______________________ Home Care Assistance_______________

RETAIL Book Store ________________________ Bike Shop _________________________ Clothing Store/Boutique __________________________________ Consignment Thrift Store __________________________________ Dry Cleaner _______________________ Florist ____________________________ Gift Shop _________________________ Sporting Goods Store _______________ Western Store _____________________ Jewelry Store ______________________ Kids Store/Toy Store ________________ Liquor Store _______________________ Music Store _______________________ Antique Store ______________________ Alterations ________________________ Shoe Repair _______________________

Veterinarian ______________________ Groomer _________________________ Boarder __________________________ Pet Supply Store __________________ Dog Park _________________________

REAL ESTATE Agent/Realtor ____________________ Real Estate Company ______________

RETIREMENT Retirement Community ____________

TRAVEL Travel Agency ____________________

PROFESSIONAL Attorney _________________________ Catering Service __________________ Computer Store/Repair_____________ Dance Studio/Company ____________ Funeral Home ____________________ Gymnastics_______________________ Bed & Breakfast ___________________ Nursery/Day Care Facility _________________________________ Photographer ____________________ Best Boss (name company) _________________________________ Hotel ____________________________

COMMUNITY Dog Park _________________________ Hiking/Biking Trail _________________ Public Art Display _________________ Swimming Pool/Waterpark _________________________________ Teacher/School ___________________ Local Non-Profit ___________________ Park _____________________________

BEAUTY/WELLNESS

Day Spa_________________________ Acupuncture ____________________ Haircut/Salon ____________________ Weight Loss Center _______________ Workout/Fitness Center ___________ Martial Arts _____________________ EVENTS Annual Event _____________________ Massage Therapist________________ Nail Salon _______________________ Aestetician ______________________ FINANCE Accountant_______________________ Waxing Services__________________ Bank/Credit Union_________________ Massage Company _______________ Financial Planner __________________ Mortgage Company _______________ Mortgage Agent/Consultant _________________________________

Best of the Best is a promotional contest voted on by the readers of Colorado Community Media publications. No purchase is required to vote or receive votes in this contest. All nominated businesses have an equal opportunity of winning. Contest Rules: Votes may be cast only one time per day, per person, via official paper ballot or on-line voting found at www.ColoradoCommunityMedia.com. Official voting begins at 12:01 a.m. April 1, 2014 and ends at midnight on April 30, 2014. Employees of Colorado Community Media are not eligible to participate. Votes will be calculated by Colorado Community Media via Second Street, an on-line ballot sorting 3rd party. Any business receiving the most votes in their category at the end of the voting period will be declared the winner in that category and receive “Best of the Best” designation from Colorado Community Media. Winners will be notified by Colorado Community Media via phone or e-mail no later than 30 days after the contest ends. To provide the most accurate results by geographical area, Colorado Community Media does not require, but does encourages, readers to vote for businesses in their immediate local community.

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