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COLLEGIAN The MAGAZINE of Brisbane Boys’ College

CHANGING OF THE GUARD

December 2017


COLLEGIAN ISS U E 2 D E C E M BER 2017 UPFRONT

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Headlines A few final words from the Headmaster

BBC NEWS

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Headmaster: the man and his legacy Delve deeper into the life of Mr Graeme McDonald, the man behind the rising success of BBC

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Headmaster elect Introducing Mr Paul Brown, the man set to lead BBC

Published by Brisbane Boys’ College CRICOS Code 00491J Kensington Terrace, Toowong, Queensland 4066 T 07 3309 3569 F 07 3371 2679 W www.bbc.qld.edu.au A SCHOOL OF THE PRESBYTERIAN AND METHODIST SCHOOLS ASSOCIATION

Editor and Art Director Nicole de Vries Graphic Design Tracey Maree Contributors Adele Graves, Natalie Claut, Kelly Edwards, Chris Hartley, Helen Jackson Photography Michael Marston, Jesse Smith

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Critical thinking is critical to education STEM subjects set to further the future of innovation, design and enterprise

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Robotics BBC crowned robotics World SuperTeam Champions in Japan

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Leaders now and in the future Acknowledging the achievements of our dedicated students and teachers

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Male teachers: the endangered species Celebrating our male teachers and their incredibly rewarding careers

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Wired to explore Boys' education and the importance of the early years program at BBC

BBC ARTS

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Because of the wonderful things he does Exploring Emerald City through the Junior School Expressive Arts production of Oz

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It takes a village Prep to Year 12 artists take centre stage at the annual College Art Show

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Oh! The places you'll go! A glimpse into the busy world of our iconic pipers and drummers

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A headstart The Crucible

Uncovering the benefit of LEGO in the classroom. Read more about our interactive learning experiences in the Wired to Explore feature

This year's theatre students explore questions of ethics and survival COLLEGIAN DECEMBER 2017


REGULAR ITEMS

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The experts offer advice to navigate through the journey of parenthood

The ripple effect of sporting connections that tie our Old Collegians

Insight

Flashback

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Snapshots Scenes from the Spring Fashion Parade and other events in the College calendar

BBC SPORT

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Strength in numbers The importance of athletic development in boys' education

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We are the champions GPS premierships in basketball, tennis and track and field

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Sporting short reads The All Blacks train on Miskin

CONNECT

From the Editor

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Acknowledging a life based on hardship and humour in celebration of Jack Bell's centenary year

Celebrating 11 years of service to the College

A century of Bell

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Spotlight on OCA events Snapshots from recent OCA activities

Jarrod Turner

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Where are they now Catch up with Old Collegians

NICOLE DE VRIES

As I review this edition of Collegian, it is clear that the young men and old boys of Brisbane Boys’ College have great character – they are Gentlemen of Honour. But what builds this character? Is it the reliability of being surrounded day-in, day-out by a band of brothers or a global network of success stories which help to define the next generation? Perhaps it’s the one hundred year old traditions which still stand today, honouring the heritage that Barney Rudd first built with a single educational ideology. In my opinion, man makes his own legacy. A legacy whilst still at school, through service, participation, high achievement and relationships with your peers. A legacy beyond the school gates as an Old Collegian, making waves in your chosen field, innovating and breaking records beyond what was imaginable. And the legacy of a man who has led this school to greater strengths as the eighth Headmaster of BBC. Brisbane Boys' College is built on character and faith. Not only in buildings and programs, but in people and connection. A legacy

built on fundamental values, passion for what we do and investment in the future. After all, it is not about notoriety or wealth. We are instead, defined by our accomplishments and the challenges we face, and the happiness we achieve following our own path. At the end of the day, it is up to us to define our own legacy (rather than leaving it up to everyone else). Our community continues to make remarkable contributions to the world, be that in education, politics, elite sports, music, science and engineering, or service. So what is the contribution you are making to this world and what will your legacy be? BBC’s legacy has, is and will be written in the halls of our great campus and heralded in the pages of Collegian.

COLLEGIAN DECEMBER 2017


BBC NEWS | 7

6 | BBC NEWS

BBC NEWS 17 Robotics BBC crowned robotics World SuperTeam Champions in Japan

18 Accolades for dedication to life and studies Year 10 student, Taehwan Kim named Queensland International School Student of the Year

22 Male teachers: the endangered species Celebrating our male teachers and their incredibly rewarding careers

HEADLINES

30 Wired to explore Boys' education and the importance of the early years program at BBC

Graeme McDonald, Headmaster

I bid you adieu As I conclude my final days as Headmaster of Brisbane Boys’ College, I look back on a time filled with so many highlights. At my Farewell Assembly, I saw some of those images flash before my eyes. In each of those memories, I saw a boy or a group of boys achieving a goal, which in many cases, he or they had not believed was possible when they started their journey at BBC. In short, these boys had surpassed their own expectations. When I commenced at BBC in 2002, I made this remark,

It was my dream to become the Headmaster of BBC and my goal now is to fire the enthusiasm of our young men, so that they too can achieve their goals”. I have seen so many young men leave BBC and go on to achieve great things. With a wonderful team of educators, I strove to achieve my goal of enabling each and every boy to develop a powerful sense of self confidence, a real belief in his ability to face the future challenges of adult life. Together, we have imparted a genuine love of learning and a real desire amongst our young men to wrestle with concepts, so that they can grow and become good problem solvers. I have genuinely loved my job and the successes I have achieved with my team are a result of our deep dedication to our mission of enabling boys to realise their dreams. As I leave BBC for the last time as Headmaster, I am proud of what I have achieved, but also grateful for the support I have received from past and present colleagues, parents and friends, and Old Collegians, but most of all from the thousands of young men who have graduated from BBC over the last fifteen years, and I salute them all.

Gentlemen, you have always been my inspiration, because your energy and passion is contagious. As I observed at Speech Night when your time comes to leave our great College, I ask you to use that enthusiasm wisely in looking for a career which you will really enjoy. I want you to remember those wise words of Mark Zuckerberg, CEO of Facebook, “Companies fail in two ways – by not hitting their plan and by hitting a plan that isn’t ambitious enough. If you fail in the second way, you fail before you start”.

So aim high, gentlemen, dream your dream, pursue it with a passion and never let anybody tell you, you can’t do it. Grab every opportunity with both hands and aim to be the best person you can be, a true Gentleman of Honour." In closing, I want to thank the wonderful role models I have had in my life, who urged me to enter the noble teaching profession. I was blessed to have a wonderful mother and father, who believed in me and inspired me to always strive for excellence. I then had the great fortune to fall in love with a wonderful woman, who has given me tireless support throughout my fantastic journey. Chelle, the sacrifices you have made over many years are beyond number. I simply could not have done what I have done without you.

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Time to say goodbye

A fitting send off to the class of 2017 and the changing of the guard

COLLEGIAN DECEMBER 2017


8 | BBC FEATURE

BBC FEATURE | 9

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Headmaster: the man and his legacy So who is Graeme McDonald? On the following pages, we delve deeper into the life of the man behind the rising success of Brisbane Boys’ College, from growing up in Melbourne to his appointment as Headmaster and the things he has learned along the way.

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HIS IS A STORY OF HUMILITY, DEDICATION AND SERVICE. IT’S ONE OF PURPOSE, PASSION AND SURVIVAL. IT IS A STORY OF A MAN WHO HAS SPENT 23 YEARS IN THE TOP JOB, 15 OF WHICH WERE AT BBC. HE HAS ACHIEVED WHAT MANY ONLY DREAM OF.

raeme McDonald’s entry into education came when he was posted to a school he had never heard of, Kerang Technical High School, about 280kms north of Melbourne. “I arrived at the school and the Deputy Head asked what I taught – I said French – and he said ‘oh we don’t offer that’. It was an amazing school experience because it was a high school and a technical school that had come together,” Graeme said. But it was this first post as a fresh faced teacher, where Graeme encountered some serious challenges. The girls in his class had commendable family aspirations – to get married and to have children – yet had no career aspirations whatsoever. This humble beginning was the prelude to a significant and fruitful career that would span decades, across which he held the positions of French Teacher, Head of Year 10, Deputy Headmaster and of course, Headmaster. If you read Gentlemen of Honour, you will find great synergy between the founding Headmaster, Mr Arthur (Barney) Rudd and the eighth Headmaster of Brisbane Boys’ College. Rudd attended Scotch College – so too did McDonald. Rudd studied at Melbourne University – so too did McDonald. Rudd lived at Moonee Ponds, as did McDonald's grandmother. Rudd was drawn to education because he was a man of broad Christian principle, who had a vision that he could mould his students to be worthy leaders and good citizens. So why did Graeme choose education as a career path? “I suppose I was born into it. My mother was Senior Mistress of two schools in Melbourne. One was Penleigh and one was Lowther Hall, both in Essendon,” he recalled.

Graeme was born into a family which valued education, hard work and selflessness. His mother, May was given numerous opportunities to become Principal, but turned the positions down due to her commitment to her family. Her sons had not yet finished school. “In some ways I think she probably regretted not accepting that opportunity, but she was very committed to her sons. In a funny way, I suppose what she didn’t do, I did do, of which of course she was very proud,” Graeme reflected. Proud would be an understatement. Every week for fifteen and a half years, Graeme has written a newsletter article, and his mother, remained his biggest fan. “She used to keep every article and read them because it was her connection with me while she was living in Geelong in Victoria”. Graeme’s brother, Colin, a doctor in Victoria, has always commented at how remarkable it is that Headmasters manage an original newsletter article every week. Graeme’s reply: “The thing is, you’re not getting the inspiration that I’m getting from 1500 young men and I get so many great stories across my desk every week. And that’s what it’s really about – you’ve got to be passionate about trying to make a difference in the lives of young people to do this type of job. If you weren’t interested in that, you’d be overwhelmed,” Graeme said. Suffice to say, Graeme’s involvement in education started with his mother’s own commitment to learning and to family. However it was his father’s tenacity as a Business Manager for Footscray Institute of Technology (now Victoria University) that broadened Graeme’s horizons. “My memories were sitting at the kitchen table at night and my father would actually be using an old calculator. My job was to double

check the figures, mentally – no paper – so I was a really irritating boy who would go into a butcher's shop with my mother and I would add up the prices faster than the butcher.” Graeme saw the commitment his father gave to ensuring thorough financial management of a large organisation. Jim McDonald had such a large impact that he is one of the “90 Legends” of the organisation. Despite living in the Western Suburbs of Melbourne, Graeme’s parents were determined to get their sons into one of Melbourne’s leading schools. With strong will and a reference from the Presbyterian Church, Colin was enrolled at Scotch College and Graeme followed in Year 9. At the end of Year 10, Graeme was interviewed by the school’s Career Counsellor, who urged him to utilise his abilities in mathematics. Yet, Graeme had no real interest and instead followed his true passion, languages. As the only person in his family who speaks French, Graeme asked his mother why he was drawn to this path. His mother pointed out that his grandmother’s maiden name was in fact, Ravaillon. Further research showed that on his father’s side, Graeme’s great grandfather was a lecturer in French and German at the University of Sydney. Another alignment to education. During his brief stint at Kerang Technical High School, Graeme was offered a job in Marseille, France, however he decided to take up a teaching role at Brighton Grammar School as Head of Modern Languages instead. It was a difficult decision between career and the opportunity to travel, but Graeme was passionate about his subject and keen to share it with young people.

COLLEGIAN DECEMBER 2017


10 | BBC FEATURE

BBC FEATURE | 11 Everything that Graeme McDonald has done as Headmaster of Brisbane Boys’ College has been characterised by vision and support. We have greatly benefited from his capacity to unite stakeholders behind a vision and breathe that dream into reality. We have seen this occur so many times throughout the past 15 years.

that you’re challenging the status quo, are really not worth listening to,” Graeme said. Because it’s people who are prepared to take risks who actually effect change. As the famous saying goes: You can have change without progress, but you can’t have progress without change.

always had good musicians in this school, but it’s been exciting to see the ongoing development of recognition”. It hasn’t always been smooth sailing. In Graeme’s early years at BBC, the Year 12 boys would sing the Leaving Song on stage at Speech Night, throw their programs into the air and walk off the stage. Graeme believed that was making a mockery of something that is supposed to be celebrating the achievements of the school. So, he tried to change it and faced huge criticism from the parent and student bodies. “I thought at the time, this is tougher than I expected. The tension was quite profound. How much effort will be required to change the whole school?” But Graeme attributes the success of the change to the importance of listening and a bit of lateral thinking. It took 12 months to make a tradition and years later, our Year 12s stand and turn to face the audience from their seats to sing the Leaving Song.

Effecting change

Facing criticism

We have also experienced Graeme’s ability to link vision to the more earthy aspects of everyday College life with the way in which he has been ever present at so many activities involving the boys. His support of us all has been exemplary. - REVEREND GRAHAM COLE, CHAPLAIN -

“Language has a culture and it gives you an entrance into another way of thinking. The idiomatic expressions that there are in different languages are an entrance into a world that we wouldn’t understand if we were just monolingual. “I was, and always will be, fascinated with language and the connections between things. As a French teacher, some of that passion for language would come across, and I have taught some truly brilliant kids in my time”. It was at Brighton Grammar that Graeme encountered Anton, an incredibly bright boy who studied French, was a brilliant ballet dancer and who was severely emotionally bullied at school. “We’re going back to the late 1970’s and early 80’s and it wasn’t considered particularly cool for a boy to enjoy ballet. So I said ‘why don’t you try to meet the bullies halfway?’ however he wasn’t interested in sport”. As a Hockey coach in the school, and still playing AFL himself, Graeme invited Anton to train with the team one afternoon. Despite Anton not knowing how to play hockey, Graeme had a well formulated plan to prove that Anton's fitness level far exceeded the hockey players. “From there on in, they weren’t prepared to have a go at Anton because they realised he was a pretty special person. It’s these stories that remind you why you’re in the business of education; of trying to make a difference in the life of somebody so they can show their real potential.”

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Earning respect

Graeme has never been one to make waves. Yet he has always been one to work to earn respect and to ensure respect is earned by those around him. In the face of challenge and criticism, Graeme has responded with bravery and calculated risk. When Graeme left Brighton Grammar after 12 years of teaching, someone

described him as a 'pillar of the organisation'. But he wasn’t sure he wanted to be described as 'a piece of concrete' that was still there. That’s a bit like I’ve never gone anywhere else – and brave people are prepared to get out of their comfort zone”. McDonald’s colleagues were perplexed as to why he would go to Clayfield College, a girls’ school… and in Brisbane. “I said, why wouldn’t I? This is an opportunity to work in a girls’ school where I will learn more about how women operate and how they approach administration and leadership – my guess is that I’ll learn things that I would never learn here at Brighton.” And Graeme was right. At that stage, the late Ida Kennedy was Head at Clayfield College who Graeme describes as “a legend of the place, an extraordinary person – she left a lasting impact on me”. Ida used to have pithy sayings that she would deliver at assembly; ‘the best of skills, speed and good judgement’. It was at Clayfield that Graeme learned all three of these characteristics. Graeme makes the obvious statement,

You’ve seen me on the sidelines, I can be fairly passionate and vocal – and I was no different back then.” You’d have to have been living under a rock to not have watched or heard Graeme’s enthusiasm on the sidelines of Saturday sport. As the new Deputy Headmaster, Graeme met with Clayfield College’s Sports Captain, Lisette Brambleby at the Prefects meeting. When asked how Clayfield would perform against St Peter’s for the upcoming weekend of sport, Lisette lowered her head and said “we’re going to get thrashed”. Graeme requested the phone to cancel with St Peter’s, “I wasn’t going over there to watch them play with that attitude. I didn’t mind if they lost, you should always accept defeat graciously,

but they needed to try to win. That’s part of the whole spirit of competition”. The girls lost by 20 points that weekend, but Graeme is adamant they would have lost by 50 with the attitude they had the Thursday prior. Graeme had thought he’d had his own win, affecting change amongst the girls’ attitudes towards sport. Within days there was a rumour going around that the new Deputy was a sports zealot and winning was the only option. But Clayfield never looked back and girls who had never played before, enrolled in sport. Following Ida Kennedy, Graeme then worked with Carolyn Hauff, whom he describes as a larger than life character, who put Clayfield on the map at that time. When Graeme was appointed Principal of Scotch Oakburn College in Tasmania, he leaned on Carolyn for advice, “I said, I can’t do what you can do and she responded with ‘and I can’t do what you can do’. You have a beautifully crafted speech and when I speak I move from here to here. Never try to be someone you’re not”. It is this message that he has tried to pass on to the boys of BBC. Graeme believes that you’re not meant to be good at absolutely everything. In fact, very few people are good at most things. When he was at school, Graeme was hopeless at Art. In Year 3, his teacher asked the class to draw a car. Graeme drew a box with wheels on it and the teacher said “zero out of ten. Didn’t try”. Criticism can be very powerful and very dangerous. Graeme recalls, “with a different personality, that could have destroyed me and I could have stopped trying.” But that boy, strong-willed like his mother, has dedicated his life to making people believe they’re capable of things they never thought possible. That’s why the school’s guiding philosophy, All about the boy is so important. “The opinions of other people, if well founded, are worth listening to. The opinions of people who are ignorant, who tell you things because they don’t actually like the fact

When Graeme arrived at BBC, he recalls it to be a very sport oriented school with a 'them and us' mentality between the Junior and Senior boys. He vowed to change the culture to a more inclusive environment for all achievers.“It was my second year and Barry Dean announced the Dux of the School and the kids started laughing. So I stopped and said "I am mortally offended by what you’ve just done. You would never have dared to do that if that was the First XV Captain. What gives you the right to mock the person who is receiving the greatest honour this school can offer?” This marked a turning point in the College’s culture, acknowledging the academic profile of the boys significantly better and more appropriately. It was important that the profiles of other aspects of school life were also raised, to show that there were other avenues of endeavour in education. In his school days, Graeme was a reserve in the Australian Boys’ Choir and he recalls encountering one of the most inspiring, yet scary, musicians he’d ever met, George Logie Smith. Logie Smith was a coach who had one rule: If you’re in the Firsts, you’re in the choir. Imagine, elite sportsmen in College Hall twice a week for choir practice. A significant cultural change where music was seen as a very important part of school life. At BBC, Graeme has tried to emulate that cultural change so that it is equally valid to be a star in the area of music, as it is to be an elite sportsman. “We now celebrate boys like Julius Lynch (2017) in a way that probably wouldn’t have happened 15 years ago. We’ve

Like any leader, Graeme has had to make some tough decisions in his time. In fact, every single decision he has made – big or small – has been met with some criticism. So how do you deal with it? “I think you can only be the best person you can be. If you’re always focussing on what you believe is in the best interests of the boys and the school, you probably aren’t often going to make bad decisions.” Graeme has seen some amazing successes in the past 15 years, but what many forget, is that they don’t just happen. There are strategic plans in place that take years to be achieved, and that can mean years of vilification for the greater good. “I’ve had to fight some battles along the way that have been unpleasant. The opposition we got regarding the scholarship process at the school is one that I recall. In my time so many boys whose parents could never have afforded to send their sons to BBC got an opportunity to access a first class education. I am proud of that. As an aside, it’s very

interesting how quiet people go when you all of a sudden start winning things. I decided, we’re either in the competition or we’re not; and I decided to compete,” Graeme said. But he makes it clear that it is also important that boys understand how to lose.

Boys are clever, if you don’t draw a line in the sand, boys just keep pushing. That’s when they need someone with strength to say that’s unacceptable.” What he does think about, is the impact of that decision on the boys. “Anybody can criticise the Headmaster anonymously. But there aren’t many people willing to criticise the Headmaster one on one. And if you aren’t prepared to make face to face criticism then my attitude is you’re gutless and not worth listening to.” Some may deem those harsh words, but they are words of survival. Graeme believes that the vast majority of people can identify a person of integrity and they’ll respect that. “If you always behave in a way which is in the best interests of the boys of the school – parents’ most precious asset – and if they can see that you’re absolutely committed to the welfare of their son, sometimes they’ll forgive you for making decisions that they don’t actually agree with.” Wise words from a man, who as a father himself, has tried to develop a resilient and happy young man in his son, Cameron. Cameron started in the Junior School when Graeme was appointed Headmaster in 2002, and would reply to his peers who would question his father’s actions with: “I don’t know, why don’t you go make an appointment with him.” A win in Graeme’s book. “We love winners – I’m a competitor at heart, always have been – but actually it’s more important about the participation and boys learning to accommodate the

In Graeme's 15 years at the school not only has the campus been transformed into an attractive and dynamic place in which to learn but simultaneously we have witnessed a new breed of boys emerge from their time at the school. Their successes are seen on national and world stages as illustrated by groups from tennis to robotics and the Pipe Band. We primarily send our sons to BBC to receive a first class education that sets them up for the rest of their lives and the school's results in this area have been outstanding too. In all this however the Christian values have been upheld and new traditions created. Who hasn't been deeply moved by the Pipe Band piping out the Year 12s in front of the whole school on their last day? No doubt good teamwork has achieved this success, but every good team needs a leader and by any measure there have been great things achieved under Graeme McDonald's watch. - MR SANDY GRANT, CHAIRMAN OF BBC FOUNDATION -

COLLEGIAN DECEMBER 2017


12 | BBC FEATURE I will certainly miss Graeme’s contribution and support to the BBC Parents and Friends’ Association. His enthusiasm and passion for all things Green, White and Black has been immeasurable. I will miss the updates Graeme provided at the P&F meetings as they were always about our boys and never about himself. You could tell from the way he spoke that he was immensely proud of BBC and I think he took great satisfaction from the fact that he had helped our boys become the Gentlemen of Honour he had hoped they would be. - MR PAUL MARTIN, P&F ASSOCIATION PRESIDENT -

weaknesses of the boys in the team”. An approach mirrored by the eight other GPS Heads, who have shown true collegiality and respect for one another’s communities, as well as their own.

Leading to strength

The Head believes that finding synergy in a team is a good training ground for how the world operates in today’s environment. Great leaders can see where strengths and weaknesses lie and ensure that the weaknesses are never fully exposed and the strengths are always praised and very obvious. In a place like BBC with a staff of 250, Graeme says there is an amazing pool of talent. Leaders can be threatened by others who are talented, but Graeme views talented individuals as a strength. “In my early career I might have been able to understand the threat, but particularly in the latter part of my career I’ve taken the approach that the more talent I can have here, the better the school’s going to be”. That’s part of the art form Graeme says he has employed at BBC – to be bold enough to delegate tasks to ensure colleagues grow and improve; to ensure he doesn’t create animosity by never providing the opportunity, to ensure his staff don’t

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BBC FEATURE | 13

become pedestrian in their role and move on. This level of respect for, and by, Graeme’s colleagues and students was reflected at his Farewell Assembly with a standing ovation and a war cry so loud it echoed in Kenmore. But he also understands that you don’t become a Headmaster to be liked. You’re in the position to be respected. “As soon as you start trying to focus on the former of being liked, rather than the latter of being respected, you’ve just lost the battle. Trying to please people all the time creates a conflict of interest. So ultimately you get into this business of shifting from one favour to another,” Graeme said.

You surround yourself with people you hope are aligned with you, but don’t always say yes. But at the same time, at the end of the day you are alone. It's a very lonely job. There is no preparation for a job like this.” Someone once said, "if you don’t stand for something you stand for nothing." And stand by his convictions, Graeme did. “It’s a bit of a death wish sometimes to understand that no matter what you do, you’re going to be wrong. But you’ve also got to be true to yourself. If you honestly believe that the decision you’re making is the right one, not just because you believe it but because you’ve sounded out a range of people and they’re telling you that this is the time to stand up and be counted, then you do exactly that. But they’re the really tough times”.

Vulnerability

The leader has often said he’s got broad shoulders and can handle most things. But everybody’s got their breaking point, because after all, he’s only human. “You’ve got to be human, because if you’re not, you can’t relate to your community. In Australia we tend to cut down tall poppies, yet those same people in this position wouldn’t last one day. I’m not blind, there are some people in this place who will be happy to see me go. But there’s no such thing as a perfect Headmaster; I have strengths and weaknesses and you’ve basically got to cop the good with the bad. “I have to be tough, therefore I have to be distant. I will be friendly, but I can’t be a friend because I compromise my capacity as a Headmaster. Sadly, it remains that way and it’s only when you come to the end of your tenure that some people begin to understand”. The lesson from all of this: "It hurts but you never let them see it. As soon as you do, you’ve made yourself vulnerable." So what made Graeme keep coming back for one of the toughest jobs in the world? He was driven by a true passion to make a difference in the lives of young people. “The one thing I really miss is being a teacher, because that’s where the real interaction happens. I wasn’t the best teacher in the school but I was absolutely passionate about what I did. I went above and beyond because I wanted students to share some of the passion I had for the subject”. But Graeme doesn’t have any regrets about moving into the Executive role all those years ago. “I don’t think I regret it because there have been so many good memories. I regret certain incidents along the way, and there’s no way to solve those, but it’s a very different place from when I first arrived.” Graeme will undoubtedly be remembered as the builder of BBC, something he is indeed proud of, but he would like to be known for more than the campus’ facilities; that concrete pillar that didn’t create change. From the Festival of Leaving for Year 12s and the Indigenous Program, to a school that is genuinely multicultural, significant cultural

HEADMASTER ELECT, MR PAUL BROWN B.A. (ENG/HIST), M.A. (ENG) (MERIT) (UNI SYD), CERT HRM (MGSM), MACEL, MAHRI

changes have taken place at Brisbane Boys’ College. And the central figure of all of these achievements has been Graeme McDonald. “We’re changing lives. When you hear the story of what Rugby League player, Dane Gagai says about his experience at BBC, that actually says something. The College is starting to understand the importance of us living in a society that is multicultural. There are 51 different countries in which boys at this school were born. Our International Student Program, how boys treat and view women in society. The list goes on”. Graeme has been the figurehead for an educational institution, the CEO of a multimillion dollar brand and the leader of an ever-increasing community of thousands of people. But what many forget is that it’s a lonely place at the top and many do not know the man behind the prestigious title of Headmaster of Brisbane Boys’ College. A man who has admirable family priorities, Graeme is fiercely protective of his wife, Michelle and his three children, Becky, Jacqui and Cameron, and the values that he holds. Graeme McDonald has gallantly modelled commitment to the students of Brisbane Boys’ College. Whether it be a music performance, rugby match, debating final or chess championship, Graeme attended everything with enthusiasm. When learning of a new student achievement, Graeme has always reacted like a father learning of his own son’s success. When a boy faced difficult times with a loss, Graeme was giving of his time, compassion and advice. Through everything, he has imbued the College motto ‘Let honour stainless be’. He has no doubt left an indelible mark on Brisbane Boys’ College and will forever bleed Green, White and Black.

A confident communicator and astute storyteller, it’s not surprising that Paul Brown’s teaching area of expertise is English Literature. BBC’s Headmaster Elect is more than qualified for the top job, holding graduate and postgraduate qualifications from the University of Sydney and Macquarie Graduate School of Management and recently having completed a school leadership program at Harvard Graduate School of Education. A father to two daughters with wife, Karen, Mr Brown has more than 20 years experience in top tier high performing independent schools, having been on the Executive at St Ignatius’ College, Riverview (1997-2008), Knox Grammar School, Wahroonga (2009-2015) and most recently at MLC School, Burwood (2015-2017). He has been the Deputy Head at his last three schools and boasts six years at the largest independent day and boarding school for boys in New South Wales. Mr Brown’s strong commitment to education, academic excellence, and to Christian leadership makes him adept at shaping the future of BBC and its community. “I am looking forward to joining a vibrant Brisbane Boys’ College community where the focus is on assisting each and every student to reach their potential and prepare them to take their place in the world as confident, competent and compassionate young men who will contribute to the health, wellbeing and prosperity of their community and the nation at large,” Paul said. He sees BBC graduates as well-rounded young men of wisdom, faith and integrity who “have gained the skills and experience to overcome the inevitable setbacks they will encounter in life, will build positive relationships and have a tenacity to persist and succeed in the face of duress.” Paul not only brings to the College outstanding achievements in the academic arena, but also the business world. As a visionary with a clear sense of purpose, Paul will no doubt influence the College’s future in boys’ education. “At BBC we will encourage boys to participate in a wide range of sporting, intellectual, co-curricular, service and aesthetic pursuits to develop interests that complement their formal studies and which may ignite lifelong interests and passions,” Mr Brown remarked. So what is on the horizon for our community? Paul says he hopes to continue to provide an exciting, challenging and enriching curriculum through

which boys pursue critical thinking and problem solving in a variety of contexts. “We need to foster a student culture in which students readily accept responsibility and value the service of others, enabled through a diversity of leadership experiences. Where we inculcate within students a sense of faith, justice, conscience and compassion.” Whilst preparing students to contribute to their community is a large focus for the incoming Headmaster, Mr Brown also believes that the quality of programs delivered at BBC can only be as good as those delivering them. With significant experience in transformational change and organisational management within an educational environment, Paul is the right man for the job. “I want to develop accomplished, well-resourced and inspirational staff, committed to the students under their care and imbued with a strong sense of service, professional learning and collegiality.” With new leadership, comes change. However Mr Brown also understands the importance of traditions and icons to the Brisbane Boys’ College story; the boater, the Pipe Band, the war cry, the Highlander. The heritage of 116 years will stand strong whilst maintaining high expectations through a clearly defined set of standards, adding to the tone and character of the College and its members. But what about the man behind the title? Born and raised in Sydney, the State of Origin Series will prove very interesting in 2018. As a forward looking, proactive leader, Paul has particular interest in educational research and literature, but is also keen on cricket, cycling and sport in general. Brisbane Boys’ College is delighted to be led in 2018 by an educator of such high calibre and demonstrated achievement. So, when you see Paul around the campus or at a College event, please join us in congratulating Mr Brown on his appointment and warmly welcome him into the Brisbane Boys’ College community. COLLEGIAN DECEMBER 2017


14 | BBC NEWS

BBC NEWS | 15

There are no happy endings. Endings are the saddest part, So just give me a happy middle And a very happy start.” - SHEL SILVERSTEIN, AMERICAN POET

Time to say goodbye The end of an academic year brings with it mixed emotions for our students, parents and staff. Feelings of holiday excitement and term time relief often give way to nostalgia and excited anticipation as students and families transition through the Junior, Middle and Senior School.

For our graduating Senior cohort of 2017, the end of the year, and indeed the end of their time at BBC, provides an opportunity to reflect on the friendships they have made, the experiences they have had, and the opportunities they have been given. While the end may evoke a tinge of sadness, we hope our Seniors look back on their finals days at Brisbane Boys' College with fond memories, knowing that their time in the green, white and black has provided them with all they need to tackle the challenges of life beyond the College gates.

FINAL ASSEMBLY Wednesday 1 November marked the beginning of the end for the Class of 2017. At final assembly for the year, the members of our Senior cohort were welcomed into the Old Collegians' Association and were presented with their OCA cap by Mr Jarrod Turner, Director of Alumni and Community. The event was live streamed, allowing family members, staff, and old boys to share this milestone. Following the event, students were joined by Old Collegians and staff for a celebratory BBQ lunch at the OCA Pavilion. The celebration ended with the College War Cry, brothers in arms, led by Ben Carlyon, College Captain and Pat Jaffe, Vice Captain.

SPEECH NIGHT A night of celebration, reflection, mateship and thanks. Speech Night proved to be an evening of excellence and emotion, as our Years 12s said farewell with honour. As the sound of Highland Cathedral filled the

Concert Hall, many parents were seen to wipe a tear from their eye. Congratulations to all of our prize winners and the members of our Year 12 cohort, who acted with respect and reverence. Your spirit and passion for the College is unmatched. Our Symphonic Band, conducted by Miss Emma Carey, provided the soundtrack to the ‘Year in Review’ presentation, which can be viewed on the College Facebook page. www.facebook.com/BrisBoysCollege

VALEDICTORY DINNER Valedictory Dinner saw our Year 12s, their parents and guardians, join together for an evening of celebration and reflection in honour of their time at BBC. King George Square turned green for the auspicious event, with dinner held in City Hall. The evening provided an opportunity to acknowledge all that these young men are, all that they have achieved and all they will

become, while empowering our Seniors to give thanks and share a special milestone with their biggest supporters, their parents. A video presentation, created by Year 12 student, Simon Kim, accurately portrays a brotherhood that will extend far beyond the College gates – I am, You are, We are Collegians, can also be viewed on the College Facebook page.

LAST DAY AND FINAL GOODBYE Behind you, all your school days, boater, blazer and College memories. Beside you, all your mates, teachers, parents and supporters. Before you, a big wide world of possibilities, limited only by your ability to ignite your imagination and unearth your talents. Within you, a hope-filled heart of green, white, black and all you will ever need to go forth with the confidence and capability to change the world.

Adieu gentlemen. COLLEGIAN DECEMBER 2017


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BBC NEWS | 17

ROBOTICS BBC CROWNED ROBOTICS WORLD SUPERTEAM CHAMPIONS

From SuperTeam to tech start-ups, Brisbane Boys’ College is taking the STEM world by storm.

Critical thinking is critical to education Science. Technology. Engineering. Maths. These are the industries of the future - areas that are responsible for furthering the future of innovation, design and enterprise. From life-altering medical breakthroughs to technology dependency, STEM subjects are at the forefront of the developments that will change our lives – and our children’s lives - for years to come. But in order for the next generation of Gates, Musk, Jobs and Zuckerberg, we must teach our boys how to think, not just what to think, to question the status quo and solve problems to make the world a better place. Australians believe children today should be learning life skills, such as problem solving and critical thinking. That’s the conclusion from a recent online education survey throughout Australia, commissioned by the Commonwealth Bank. The survey asked Australians which skills were important from their time at school as well as what they thought was important for students to learn today, with respondents believing future-focused subjects like communication, relationship building and critical thinking are important. Despite the core subjects of Science and Mathematics making up some areas of STEM, two-thirds of Australians wish

technology, in particular coding, had been taught when they were at school and believe that schools should spend more time on STEM subjects. “The skills students need to succeed in their lives and work have changed dramatically over recent decades,” said Rosemary Conn, CEO of not-for-profit charity Schools Plus. As a school, Brisbane Boys’ College is critical to building these skills. So how do we do it? By using a combination of core subjects, accelerated learning, external courses and projects, and leadership workshops to create inquisitive, wellrounded boys, boys who will grow up and make a difference, not just when they leave school, but now, at Brisbane Boys’ College. The blend of STEM subjects and learning areas enables boys to address problems like climate change, famine and disease. And with 40 percent of the workforce predicted to be replaced by automation and technology over the next 10 years, we want to ensure our boys are part of the solution.

A team of five BBC students has defied the odds and defeated teams from world leading technology giants China, Germany and Japan, to be crowned World SuperTeam Champions at the Robocup 2017 Championships in Nagoya, Japan. Master in Charge, Mr Colin Noy, was incredibly proud that the boys, who also competed alongside the likes of Taiwan and Croatia, impressed the other SuperTeams with their open and logical programming. “Undeniably, our goalie was the best programmed robot in the Lightweight Soccer Competition, responding perfectly every time,” Colin said. In fact, one European University Lecturer commented that the programming level displayed by BBC’s students was of a level higher than many of his Masters students. The BBC team of Lachlan Grant, Nakul Doshi, Samuel Tudor, James Wallington and James Yelland, with support from coach, Steven Lau (2013), initiated a new tactic this year, allowing Bluetooth communication between the robots, making them intuitive of one another as well as the game itself. The boys’ exceptional programming enabled their robots to switch roles mid-game by measuring the distance between them and programming the goalie and striker to swap roles depending which one was closer to the ball. In what is usually a 15 minute interview with two experts in the fields of programming and robotics, Team Australia interviewed for more than an hour, with the students explaining the intricate details of the programming and construction of their robots to the enthralled panel. The competition wasn’t only based on game play, with spirit, presentation, design and a portfolio also assessed. Despite the team from China having the fastest robots and receiving the highest points score for game play, Australia won on accuracy and code.

“Our robots were the most responsive and most accurate in the competition. Even though we didn’t win all our games, the programming was exceptional,” Colin said. This is not the first time a team from BBC has represented Australia at the Robocup World Championships. In 2015, BBC returned with a win in the Junior Heavyweight Soccer competition. Through its Robotics program the College has been harnessing the energy, curiosity and thirst for innovation of its students for more than 30 years and now offers a Robotics Immersion program beginning in Year 3 to complement the co-curricular activity of Robotics offered from Years 4 to 12. 2017 Robotics Captain, Lachlan Grant, has participated in the program since Year 3. In Japan, Lachlan acted as project manager to the team, whilst the other team members played their part as builders, designers and programmers. “Boys from an early age want to build things. When a boy is almost a man, he’s not still building with blocks, instead he’s building life skills like problem solving, manipulative skills, teamwork, interpersonal skills and project management. Our boys are better prepared for the jobs of the future because of it,” Colin said. “It won’t surprise you that the students have great aspirations in the field of STEM, with the majority of them knowing from an early age they wanted to pursue an IT or robotics pathway.” BBC’s Robotics club sits at the core of the school’s philosophy, with a focus on developing boys’ minds to be forward thinking and to foster new world capabilities such as creativity, invention, imagination and problem solving. Several past students of the BBC Robotics program have gone on to highly successful careers in the STEM disciplines, applying the skills learned at school to real world situations.

COLLEGIAN DECEMBER 2017


18 | BBC NEWS

BBC NEWS | 19

TRIAD OF CHANGEMAKERS

LEADERS NOW AND IN THE FUTURE

“PERSONALLY, I BELIEVE IT IS MY PERSISTENT WORK ETHIC AND RELENTLESS HUNGER FOR SUCCESS, DEVELOPED BY MY FAMILY CULTURE, THAT DEFINES MY CHARACTER."

BBC STUDENT RECEIVES ACCOLADES FOR DEDICATION TO LIFE AND STUDIES

Three Year 11 students have been selected for the prestigious University of Queensland Young Scholars Program (YSP), an exciting opportunity for academic extension and enrichment, centred around igniting young change makers’ passions for leadership, academic achievement and community development in today’s global society. Congratulations to Max Kirsch, Thomas Hunt and Riley Bowyer who participated in a five-day Residential Camp in late November. This on-campus experience challenges UQ Young Scholars to think critically about major global issues and exposes them to a wide range of potential study areas and career opportunities. Selection is based on academic excellence, leadership achievements and significant contribution to their school or community.

mindset of developing a strong personal character whilst dedicating myself to provide mentorship, develop relationships and share experiences with others,” Taehwan remarked. Though he embodies a strong sense of social justice, the all-rounder holds a special interest in sport. “My main area of interest is in sports, because I believe in developing physical and mental strength and establishing a competitive mindset. I am a keen footballer, swimmer, runner and played volleyball at State and Regional levels,” Taehwan said. Brisbane Boys’ College Director of Admissions, Bronwyn Mackay-Payne said Taehwan’s nomination was a highly supported choice. “The nomination of Taehwan was strongly endorsed by College staff, including his Housemaster, Laurence Coleman. Taehwan is a scholar, an athlete, a servant leader and reflects a level of compassion and dedication to humanitarianism that is quite extraordinary for someone of his age,” Bronwyn said. This was also strongly supported by the Headmaster, Mr Graeme McDonald who said "Taehwan is a fine young man and a wonderful

The equation for a great and happy educator A humble mathematics genius and all round nice guy has deservedly been nominated for a Queensland College of Teaching Excellence in Teaching Award this year.

Year 10 student, Taehwan Kim has been named Queensland’s International School Student of the Year at a recent IET Excellence Awards ceremony at Customs House. Taehwan, who hails from Korea, was the youngest winner of the evening receiving official recognition from the Queensland Government for his outstanding dedication to life and studies in Australia. The BBC International Student has attended the College since Year 5 and is a high academic achiever, being awarded Dux of Year 10 at Speech Night. As a firm advocate for service and providing for the community, Taehwan is an active member of BBC’s Amnesty International Club and the Coffee for Cambodia fundraising program, regularly supports the annual Red Shield Appeal and enjoys mentoring younger students at the school. “Academically, I am always eager to learn, devote myself to my studies and apply my knowledge in real-world activities. I have represented the school in robotics at Regional, State and National levels. I am also a long term member of BBC’s premier string ensemble, College Strings. “Personally, I believe it is my persistent work ethic and relentless hunger for success, developed by my family culture, that defines my character. I strive to maintain a growth

∑ (commitment + passion) + X factor 10 own time

role model for younger students and peers alike." The accolades extend beyond those within the College, with Rebecca Hall, Executive Director, International Education and Training Unit of Trade Investment Queensland, expressing her congratulations to Taehwan. “Your approach to life and learning and how you apply this knowledge is outstanding. From dedicating your time in rural Australian areas to rebuild communities and assist farmers in the school holiday, to telling your story to international students and teachers in China, Korea and Germany, you exude leadership and the skills of a big thinker,” Rebecca said. As well as receiving official recognition, Taehwan will become an ambassador for Study Queensland to help promote Queensland as a leading international student destination. This recognition follows the recent success of BBC’s international education partner, Global Learner which was a finalist in the Premier of Queensland’s Export Awards 2017, and the launch of the award winning I and I Project in which Brisbane Boys’ College and Global Learner will partner.

A FUTURE IN POLITICS Following in the footsteps of many Old Collegians, Year 11 student, Max Kirsch, has been selected for the 2017 YMCA Queensland Youth Parliament. Max was involved in writing a Bill that tackles organ donation and stem cell research, as a member of the Innovation Science and e-Government Committee. The Bill was debated at Queensland Parliament House when all youth members joined together for a week during the September school holidays. The program provides 15 to 25 year olds from 89 electorates the opportunity to learn about government, politics and the political process, and to find out how to have a say on issues affecting young people.

In his 33 years of teaching at Brisbane Boys’ College, Mr Chicri Maksoud has shown an exceptional commitment to the development of his students, the College, and the community of mathematics teachers across the state and Australia. At BBC, Chicri is known for selflessly giving up his own time to tutor students, holding a weekly lunch time Mathematics Club, and running widely attended Middle School Mathematics Competitions. A passionate coach in the school’s rugby, cricket, athletics and cross country programs, Chicri has a much-loved habit of incorporating mathematics into his conversations with boys on the field, and regularly features sports analogies in his classroom conversations. “Chicri is a compassionate and dedicated teacher who delights in sharing in his students’ successes,” said colleague and BBC mathematics teacher, Catherine Butler. “Parents speak glowingly of the changes Chicri has made to their sons' understanding of mathematics. Students throughout the College praise the impact he has had on their learning,” she said. Chicri now coordinates the BBC Middle School mathematics curriculum and is working diligently to improve and broaden the College’s overall mathematics program, where he finds his true happiness.

“On a scale of 1 to 10 how happy are you? How great is this God of ours, to allow us to have all these experiences; happiness, sadness, laughter, pain, disappointment, love and grief. For without all of these experiences we do not grow. My happiness scale is inversely proportional to the number of assignments I have to mark,” he quips. It is clear that Chicri goes above and beyond to give boys every opportunity to further their engagement with mathematics. The exceptional educator also coordinates the Accelerated Learning Program for mathematics, enabling gifted Senior students to participate in university level courses. Beyond the school gates, Chicri is an active and respected member of Australia’s community of mathematics teachers. He is currently serving as the Queensland Delegate to the Council of the Australian Association of Mathematics Teachers, which works to support and enhance the work of mathematics teachers across the country. The Queensland College of Teaching Excellence in Teaching Awards recognise classroom teachers or school administrators who have taken a leading role in enhancing teaching and learning in their school.

COLLEGIAN DECEMBER 2017


20 | BBC NEWS

BBC NEWS | 21

Oxbridge Engineering Future engineer, Samuel Barrett impressed the academic elite over the June/July holidays whilst completing the prestigious Oxbridge Program, majoring in Engineering. The Year 11 student gained a broad understanding of the different professional paths available in the engineering and engineering science industries. The course combined a number of master and guest lectures with a collection of hands-on, experiential learning. Students also participated in class discussions, conducted experimental work in teams and wrote short assignments about each experiment. On the final day of the Summer course, an 'engineering challenge' was proposed to the students, which consisted of a complex mathematical analysis of an electric circuit. Samuel was described as an enthusiastic learner and a strong team player; in fact, his

experimental working group was the best in the classroom.

Samuel has a natural passion for engineering and shows a special interest in aerospace engineering. He performed above-par in computer programming and exceeded expectations in the technical writing assignment, where he was the only individual to include references and produce a piece that would stand the rigours of an actual research article,” -Arijit Patra, Faculty instructor It seems Samuel already has the right skills and attitude to become a bright engineer.

2017 BIOLOGY SYMPOSIUM YEAR 12 RESEARCH TOPICS

Cutting edge research right here on our doorstep BBC may well be cultivating the next generation of innovators set to cure cancer or unravel the mysteries of Parkinson’s disease, as students team up with accomplished scientists to tackle cutting edge research into social issues. For almost 10 years, the College has run an Extension Biology program that sees students gain hands on experience in institutions such as the Queensland Brain Institute, the UQ Centre for Clinical Research, UQ Food Science, UQ Molecular Biosciences, the Institute for Health and Biomedical Innovation, The Translational Research Institute, the PA Hospital Emergency Department and the UQ Centre for Advanced Imaging. The BBC Student Scientist Partnership Program is a research course which runs over eight months, forms the major Senior Science assessment item and culminates with students presenting their extended experimental investigation at the Year 12 Biology Symposium.

This year the Symposium showcased the findings of 16 Senior biology students -including several of our past and current students. An inspirational keynote address was provided by Associate Professor Dr Dimity Dornan AO, founder of the Hear and Say Centre, a not for profit organisation which helps hearing impaired children learn to use cochlear implants. Designed to extend and challenge enquiring young minds, the BBC Student Scientist Partnership program provides an opportunity to accelerate student learning in an area of interest and provides boys with access to cutting edge technology, innovative research, extensive industry resources and contacts. While their research topics vary, our boys display an unwavering passion and inquisitive commitment to their projects, so it is not surprising that many boys over the years have been invited to continue their research should they choose to pursue an undergraduate degree in this area.

Exercise and brain function in older adults Gert Olivier | Matthew Barnes Galectin-3 as a biomarker for the diagnosis of heart failure Boris Chan | Daniel Chen Renal Carcinoma: risk-stratifying patients with metabolite biomarkers using NMR spectroscopy Evan Kuo | Simon Kim Animal bites, scratches and stings, and cancer patients presenting to the Emergency Department at the Princess Alexandra Hospital Tom Kibble | Joseph Gilmour Effect of neonatal seizures on the chloride co-transporter KCC2 in the hypoxic ischaemc piglet Xavier Vela-Tupuhi | Michael Reynolds The effect of spider venom peptide on nerve transmembrane channels Jack Bates | Lewis Barnwell A measure of the effects, implications and methods of environmental education on primary students James Sexton | Gareth Varnfield 3D printing chocolate Callum Hinwood | Ben Israel

Cracking the code to critical problem solving At BBC we recognise that learning to code fosters creativity, invention, imagination and critical thinking, skills that our boys will require to actively participate in the world which awaits them. In 2017 our students achieved top results in the National Computer Science School (NCSS) Challenge, an international coding competition, which saw our boys dominate the leaderboard with perfect scores. Over a five week period boys learned to code using Python 3.4, a scripting language used by major companies such as Google and Facebook. Almost 20,000 students from around the world participated in the competition which challenged our boys to solve interesting and engaging problems and improve their digital literacy. Pioneers of the STEM field, Steve Jobs, Mark Zuckerberg and Bill Gates have long recognised the benefits associated with learning how to code and the critical skills that come with that knowledge.

Everybody in this country should learn how to program a computer… because it teaches you how to think.” - Steve Jobs At BBC, computer science skills are becoming increasingly critical in teaching students how to think about solving problems, those we face today and those that may impact our future. Whether they want to cure cancer, solve global warming or unlock the secrets of the universe, our boys are learning the skills they need to go forth with the confidence and capability to change the world.

Dimension of learning in action At the core of our curriculum is BBC's Teaching and Learning framework - Dimensions of Learning (DOL). The framework is based on what researchers know about how students learn and it combines teacher-directed and student-directed learning. It focuses on teaching students how to think, not what to think. The DOL framework is comprised of five dimensions: • • • • •

Attitudes and Perceptions Acquire and Integrate Knowledge Extend and Refine Knowledge Use Knowledge Meaningfully Habits of Mind.

The fifth dimension, Habits of Mind, refers to an area of learning, where students develop thinking skills that enhance the connection of learning with their long term memory. In acknowledgement of this dimension in action we congratulate Benjamin Morris,

Year 12, who recently had a mathematics problem and solution published in the Queensland Association of Mathematics Teachers, QAMT Journal, Volume 42, No 3, August 2017. While it is no mean feat for a student to have original material printed in a teaching journal, it is the road that led Benjamin to this outcome that is truly impressive. As a Year 11 student in 2016, Benjamin participated in the Queensland Association of Mathematics Teachers (QAMT) Problem Solving Competition. During the competition he came across a question that he was unable to answer with his current knowledge of the subject. Fast forward a year and Benjamin had not forgotten the question, and had not given up on finding a solution. His persistence has enabled him to retain familiarity with the problem until new information acquired in Year 12 Mathematics C enabled him to achieve the solution. We congratulate Benjamin on his application of this key dimension of learning and his publication in the QAMT Journal.

COLLEGIAN DECEMBER 2017


22 | BBC FEATURE

BBC FEATURE | 23

Male Teachers:

The Endangered Species. BILBIES, PYGMY POSSUMS, SHORT-NOSED SEA SNAKES, SPINY SKINKS AND MALE TEACHERS. WHAT DO THEY HOLD IN COMMON? CRITICAL SHORTAGES HAVE RENDERED THEM ‘ENDANGERED’.

COLLEGIAN DECEMBER 2017


24 | BBC FEATURE

BBC FEATURE | 25

Male Teachers:

The Endangered Species. WHILE THE COMMONALITY STOPS THERE, ENVIRONMENTAL INFLUENCES ARE UNDOUBTEDLY AT PLAY WHEN IT COMES TO THE GENDER IMBALANCE WE SEE EMERGING IN EDUCATION TODAY. FIGURES REVEAL A NATIONWIDE SHORTAGE OF MALE TEACHERS, PARTICULARLY IN THE PRIMARY YEARS, WITH MEN ACCOUNTING FOR A MERE 19 PER CENT OF THE FULL-TIME WORKFORCE ACROSS AUSTRALIA. WHILE NOT THE CASE AT BBC, THE ISSUE REMAINS ONE OF NATIONAL IMPORTANCE, WITH FEWER MALES ALSO CHOOSING TO PURSUE TERTIARY STUDIES IN THE FIELD, A CONCERN JUST AS APPLICABLE TO EDUCATION AS WE HAVE SEEN IT BECOME IN SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING, ALBEIT IN REVERSE. GENDER ASIDE, IN SPEAKING WITH A NUMBER OF OUR MALE TEACHERS, THEIR INSIGHTS STATE THE CASE FOR THE IMPORTANCE OF DIVERSITY, OF BRINGING TOGETHER PEOPLE WHO SHARE THE SAME VALUES, YET HOLD VARIED PERSPECTIVES. THIS IS WHAT MAKES EDUCATION, AND BBC, GREAT. SO RATHER THAN LOOKING AT GENDER ALONE, THE QUESTION THEN BECOMES, "HOW CAN WE ENSURE THAT OUR BRIGHTEST, MOST INDEPENDENT AND DIVERSE THINKERS FIND THEIR WAY INTO OUR CLASSROOMS, IN THE SAME WAY THEY HAVE IN OTHER PROFESSIONS?" EACH OF THOSE INTERVIEWED SPOKE ABOUT THEIR OWN SCHOOL EXPERIENCE AND THE ROLE THIS PLAYED IN CHOOSING EDUCATION. IT IS CLEAR THAT OUR TEACHERS TODAY HAVE AN INFLUENTIAL ROLE TO PLAY WHEN IT COMES TO FOSTERING THE TEACHERS OF TOMORROW. YET THAT’S MERELY ONE SIDE OF THE COIN. PERHAPS IT’S TIME TO CHANGE THE WAY WE TALK ABOUT A CAREER IN TEACHING, TO DISPEL THOSE COMMONLY HELD MYTHS AND CELEBRATE TEACHING FOR WHAT IT IS – AN INCREDIBLY REWARDING CAREER. AND PERHAPS MENTOR AND LIFE COACH WOULD BE FAR BETTER AND ACCURATE DESCRIPTORS FOR OUR TEACHERS TODAY. WITH THAT IN MIND, IN THIS EDITION OF COLLEGIAN, WE CELEBRATE WHAT MAKES NOT ONLY OUR TEACHERS GREAT, BUT TEACHING GREAT.

Mark Pavone

Cameron Williamson

"GROWING UP IN SUGAR CANE COUNTRY, I WAS BROUGHT UP TO BELIEVE MY PATHWAY WOULD LOOK SOMETHING LIKE THIS: FINISH SCHOOL, SECURE A TRADE AND RETURN TO THE FARM. BUT I JUST WASN’T HAPPY, NOR SATISFIED, THAT IT WAS ENOUGH."

"IT’S NOT ABOUT GRADES, IT’S ABOUT IMPROVEMENT, GROWTH, DEVELOPMENT. THE FACE THAT SAYS, ‘WOW, I GET IT, I CAN DO IT’ NEVER GROWS OLD. IT MIGHT NOT HAPPEN ALL OF THE TIME BUT IT’S THESE LIGHT BULB MOMENTS THAT MAKE EDUCATION TRULY SPECIAL."

SPORTSMASTER . DIRECTOR OF ATHLETIC DEVELOPMENT . DIRECTOR OF VOLLEYBALL

“I remember thinking during my time at school, I really don’t want to do that, I’m not really interested in a trade. Halfway through my apprenticeship I realised it wasn’t for me. I haven’t looked back." Reflecting on the journey that has followed, Mark attributes his career choice to his own high school experience. “I had a fantastic PE teacher. He was incredibly inspirational, easy to deal with and I was always excited to get to class,” says Mark. His influence is clearly at play today where Mark finds himself in a position he’s incredibly passionate about – providing students with access to what he calls the ‘Hidden Curriculum’. Since arriving at BBC just over a year ago, Mark has spent considerable time furthering the College’s Athletic Development program. “I believe sport, and you can replace this with any co-curricular activity be it music, art or debating, provides unprecedented opportunities for learning, where students often feel a greater sense of freedom to unearth their authentic selves. “And that’s really important to me. Having been at BBC for only a short amount of time, for the first time in a really long time I’ve felt that what I’m doing is true to who I am, and this is probably one of the most important things we can model as educators, authenticity. “When you’re outside of the classroom, playing sport, you’re able to see the boys in a different light and engage in general conversations with them. It’s truly rewarding to learn more about them and for boys to be able to share these parts of themselves. It’s so incredibly valuable to the learning experience. “Creativity and problem solving are clearly going to be skills required as these boys look to the workforce, and for this reason I think it’s important to foster individual character. You don’t want to stifle it, you want to develop it.”

DIRECTOR OF FOOTBALL

Wayne Molloy HEAD OF MANUAL ARTS

"AS A TEACHER AND A PARENT, I’VE ALWAYS TREATED MY STUDENTS IN THE SAME WAY AS I HAVE DONE MY OWN CHILDREN. I SUPPORT THEM, I WALK BESIDE THEM, BUT NEVER DO I SOLVE PROBLEMS FOR THEM." After 43 years in education, and as Wayne looks to retirement in 2018, beyond impacting so many lives, Wayne’s career has taught him about the importance of reinvention. It’s a theme that has characterised his journey and a lesson he endeavours to impart to those he teaches. “Teaching today is nothing like it was 40 years ago. Change is inevitable and the key to managing any transition has always been to reinvent yourself – either that or get used to standing on the unemployment line,” said Wayne. “You have to improvise and adapt to overcome challenges, these skills are critical, and I can’t tell you how many times I referenced this in the workshop and in working with the boys. “I would always say – don’t just tell me your problem, talk to me about how you’re going to work to solve it.” ‘Firm, but fair’ is reflective of Wayne’s approach and the foundation from which many relationships have been formed and fostered. “Being able to provide the boys with plenty of support while also encouraging independence comes down to establishing a strong rapport with each of them – kids simply don’t learn from people they don’t like.”

While best known as BBC’s Director of Football, what you may not know about Cam is that he spent 10 years in Finance abroad prior to returning to Australia and commencing his career in education, first working with children struggling with learning difficulties, then taking on a teaching role right through to where he finds himself currently – operating as a full-time Sports Administrator. Naturally, when asking Cam to reflect on a point in time from 2017 that has stood out, his thoughts turn to the field, but it’s clear that the sum of his experience continues to play a part in the role he assumes today. “Hearing the Pipe Band lead the First team onto the field for their first home game never fails to deliver. It’s such a unique tradition to this school. I’m no musician but the atmosphere it creates is magic and seeing the pride on the boys’ faces is something truly special – as I’m sure all spectators would agree,” said Cam. While these moments are incredible, it’s clear the greatest rewards for Cam have been delivered over time. “Even though a lot of my work is administrative, the best time for me is when I’m out on the oval and can spend time interacting with the boys. You get to know them better. “When teaching, I always maintained a coaching role. This in itself enabled students to relate through shared interest outside of the classroom and it’s amazing what this can do in terms of breaking down barriers and enhancing the overall school experience. “All through university I had always coached cricket and football and it was this experience, in addition to my mum being a teacher, that really led me down the educational pathway. “Knowing you’ve equipped students with the skills to cope, to tackle challenge with independence and resilience is really what it’s all about for me.”

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y g r e n e f o l l u f s y Classrooms are alwa t n e m n o r i v n e t a e r g and this creates a r o f t u b g in n r a e l not only for . o o t h t w o r g l a n io profess

Shaun Thompson

YEAR 2 TEACHER . MASTER IN CHARGE OF CHESS . MASTER IN CHARGE OF EXPRESSIVE ARTS

"WHENEVER I WENT INTO A CLASSROOM IT ALWAYS STRUCK ME AS SUCH A HAPPY PLACE TO BE – A POSITIVE SPACE FILLED WITH IMMENSE ENERGY."

Shaun comes from a long line of educators. Prior to carrying on the family tradition, Shaun spent much time in the classroom not only as a student but as the son of a Principal, as well as the brother and indeed nephew of teachers. “The benefits and rewards of teaching were clear to me from an early age. Classrooms are always full of energy and this creates a great environment not only for learning but for professional growth too,” says Shaun. As an Early Childhood Specialist, Shaun holds an intuitive understanding of the significance of educating the minds of BBC’s youngest collegians. “The human brain develops more from birth to eight years of age than at any other point in a person’s life. It’s when growth is at its most intense; a time where children are learning how to interpret new pieces of information, communicate with those around them and understand the world they live in.

“That’s why I find teaching this age group so rewarding. The progress you witness in one year alone is immense, significant and symbolic of the joy varied learning experiences can create. “When you’re dealing with early learners, even mundane, everyday things can generate excitement. Boys, for example, will not only watch a science experiment, they’re likely to jump with enthusiasm as something new unfolds in front of their eyes. They’re continually wowed by their world and that’s pretty amazing.” For Shaun, creating an optimum learning environment comes down to positivity, relationships and performance. “I see the classroom as each child’s workplace. The environment has to be positive if everyone is to learn and contribute. Developing strong relationships with each boy is critical to this equation. “I also often liken the role of a teacher to that of a performer. Lessons must be entertaining if students are to derive educational value. You have to engage them if you want them to progress as learners. “Positivity is perhaps the most important. Parents at this age want their child to be happy, to love coming to school and to develop a lifelong love of learning – and rightly so, that’s what you have to create if you want students to experience success in the classroom and in life.”

Nick Barkley

MIDDLE SCHOOL TEACHER . HAMILTON MIDDLE SCHOOL HOUSEMASTER "THE JOURNEY IS THE REWARD. THERE’S SOMETHING SPECIAL ABOUT MEMORIES AND EXPERIENCES ACCUMULATING OVER TIME AND SEEING GREAT YOUNG MEN EMERGE." You need only speak with Nick for a short amount of time to realise his passion for education. Yet perhaps it’s his distinct focus on the boys, and how they form the centre of his long-term goals, that’s most admirable. When looking to the future, Nick speaks not of career progression in terms of position, but rather uses student growth and improvement as his measure of success. “When boys reach Year 12, it not only triggers reflection on an individual level but also among those who have played some role in shaping that journey. It’s so nice to see a boy ready to take on the world and come the last day of school you think, ‘Wow what a wonderful young man you’ve grown to be’,” says Nick. “I hope to stay in this role for a long period of time for this very reason, for it’s the journey that provides the greatest reward.” This philosophy becomes further apparent as Nick speaks of his Housemaster role. “I recently made a personalised wooden pen for each of my Year 9 House students. As they walked across the stage to shake my hand as a symbol of their Middle School experience coming to an end, and their Senior School journey about to commence, it was both an emotional and exciting time. “In these moments, I find myself asking, ‘Have I done enough?’, ‘Are they well prepared?’ Seeing them progress with confidence and being able to support them as they continue to journey through, even if not in an official capacity, provides affirmation of this.”

Chicri Maksoud

COORDINATOR OF MIDDLE SCHOOL MATHEMATICS . SENIOR SCHOOL TEACHER "I TEACH BECAUSE I THINK THAT’S WHAT I’M MEANT TO DO. IT’S HONESTLY THE BEST JOB IN THE WORLD." As the eldest of nine, Chicri essentially adopted the role of teacher long before joining the profession. “My childhood and my own school experience has helped me a great deal,” says Chicri. While his sights were set on Actuary, at the eleventh hour Chicri decided to turn his focus to teaching - an experience he describes as ‘not only as he would have expected, but more’. “For me the rewards are twofold. I enjoy working with young people because they keep you young and I love the idea of helping students to unravel their uniqueness." “I also love mathematics and I think when you’re truly passionate about something you naturally want to share that love with others, and what could be more fun than sharing that with young people. “To see students fall in love with the subject and go head over heels about ideas or solutions to complex problems is incredibly rewarding. “People often ask me, ‘Don’t you get bored?’. But it’s never boring, each year I get to see the subject through new eyes and different lenses and this allows you to see old things as if they were new again. “For me, mathematics mirrors life. It teaches boys to persist in the face of challenge in order to reveal a solution. I know only a small percentage of boys will either explicitly use or remember what I teach so I always try to instil in them life lessons along the way.”

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Alan Cheel

SENIOR SCHOOL TEACHER . CAMPBELL HOUSEMASTER "A CAREER IN EDUCATION HAD ALWAYS APPEALED TO ME. TEACHING CHILDREN LIVING IN THE POOREST PART OF AFRICA MADE ME REALISE THAT AT ITS VERY CORE, TEACHING IS ABOUT CREATING OPPORTUNITIES FOR OTHER PEOPLE IN THE FUTURE AND TRANSFORMING LIVES. IT’S ABSOLUTELY VITAL TO THE FUTURE OF OUR COUNTRY, AND INDEED ALL COUNTRIES, THAT WE HAVE GOOD TEACHERS IN OUR CLASSROOMS." “I first started teaching in South Africa and taught some of the poorest of the poor. It was a vastly different experience to my own schooling with classes containing up to 70 children,” says Alan. “The lunch bell would sound and I’d have 70 sets of eyes staring at me. I’d question, ‘Aren’t you going to go outside?’ and they replied with, ‘Well we have nothing to eat and we want to learn more.’ They were hungry for learning,” he said. “I subsequently arranged for the army to supply bread and milk at lunch time, but the children insisted on staying in the classroom. They wanted to be taught, to learn more, and this experience really cemented my passion for teaching.” For Alan, who also studied Landscape Architecture and Religion prior to commencing a career in education, service remains central to the work he does, to the way in which he teaches, the emphasis he places on encouragement and how he inspires students to create a better world for themselves and others.

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“I make sure that every student I teach knows they’re important to me and I always try to be incredibly passionate about the subjects or activities I guide. I’ve always believed every single human being - no matter what stage of life, or the level they’re at, benefits from the encouragement of others, so I try to inject that into the learning experience.” When commenting on the teaching profession and considering the future, Alan stresses the importance of nurturing the next generation of teachers. “It’s really exciting when boys with incredible talent begin to consider a career in teaching. Every career invariably has its demands, but I see teaching as not only invaluable but vital to the future we’ll all share.”

Laurence Coleman MIDDLE SCHOOL TEACHER . BIRTLES HOUSEMASTER

"I’M NOT OVERTLY PASSIONATE ABOUT ENGLISH, LEGAL STUDIES, HPE OR GEOGRAPHY. THESE ARE THE SUBJECTS I TEACH, BUT THEY'RE NOT WHAT I DO. I’M PASSIONATE ABOUT EDUCATION. I’M PASSIONATE ABOUT RELATIONSHIPS." If Middle School Teacher and Housemaster, Laurance Coleman, was given only three words to describe teaching his choice would be - ‘it’s a profession’. It sounds simple enough, yet perhaps gives weight to the risk we run when thinking of teachers as those people who carry out most of their work in the classroom. This of course is invariably true, teachers spend significant time teaching, but it fails to recognise the

scope of their role and equally the pathways a career in education can provide. “I had a feeling I wanted to pursue a career in education, but tried my hand at banking and information technology first. I just didn’t like them, and that really came down to a lack of human contact. “Prior to studying education I completed a gap year and spent time working with disadvantaged children living in various parts of England. I felt so rewarded by that experience that I headed home to start my degree and completed it in two years by taking on additional units each semester. “Knowing this is where I want to be has enabled me to adopt a more holistic view of what a career in education can look like. I feel it’s incredibly important to stay motivated and engage in new experiences as a way of continually improving your practice. “For some people that journey means staying in the classroom and finding new ways to engage and inspire students. For others it’s leading curriculum change and upskilling their knowledge in a specific subject discipline. For me, it’s helping students to develop emotionally. This is where success occurs on a very human level. “Seeing students improve their grades is fantastic, yet in my mind these milestones simply provide 'point in time' references. Seeing students evolve, mature and work to better themselves in terms of personal characteristics, that’s the real reward. “As a teacher you absolutely have to know your content, but it’s unlikely this is what children will remember. It’s how you interacted with them, or didn’t, that sticks.”

Developing a rich community of united generations Life before the internet; a scary thought for some, and one that is beyond imagination for our youngest learners. At Brisbane Boys’ College, we believe in honouring the past and creating the future. So where do students turn to find answers to life’s questions if they don’t have Google? Senior generations may very well be considered old, but their importance is more than obsolete. A number of our Junior School programs are designed to encourage intergenerational connection to tap into the wealth of knowledge and experience that grandparents, senior friends and Vintage Collegians hold. A Stanford University study shows that ageing adults play critical roles in the lives of young people. Emotional skills needed to succeed in an increasingly complex and technical world are the types of skills and experiences that older generations have in abundance due to their life experiences. The report noted that skills such as critical thinking, problem-solving and social interaction, all influence social connections and sense of purpose. These skills are key to success in school and work and enable people to contribute meaningfully to society. BBC is dedicated to developing a new school of thought with old school values; a community that is rich in storytelling, steeped in tradition and centred on education as the key to human progress. Take for example our Year 3 students who visited College House in August to learn about the school’s history and traditions as they spoke with

our Vintage Collegians (Old Boys of over 65 years of age). Many of our boys were able to pick out their dad or grandad in an old yearbook or school photo. They were also involved in an initiative called Ask Gran Not Google, which coincided with Seniors Week, whereby our eldest Old Collegians answered many prepared questions followed by reading selected Book Week shortlisted books to smaller groups of our early years boys. Year 3 teacher, Mrs Kerry Hatwell said the key is to encourage relationship building between generations. “We are lucky to be able to offer these opportunities to our boys on campus. Events such as Grandparents Day and speaking with our Vintage Collegians honours our most experienced members of society, whilst also providing them with the experience of seeing the world through younger eyes,” said Kerry. "After story time with their newly ‘adopted’ grandfathers, the Year 3 boys returned to class to write a post card to a special senior in their life," said Kerry. It’s these types of experiences which help boys to foster a strong values base and encourage them to live a life of honour and integrity.

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Boys’ education and the importance of the Early Years

Wired to explore BOYS

Driven by a sense of curiosity, every boy wonders ‘what is this world and where is my place?’ He intuitively tries news things, without much intuition at all, asks questions without deliberation and moves... a lot. Fidgets, squirms, jumps, bounces. He lives in and for the moment, his life is one of extremes, seldom in the middle. That’s how boys are wired at this age; wired to explore. The early years of learning (Prep to Year 3) represent a pivotal point in a boy’s life. It’s a time where foundations are laid, new interests are discovered and talents unearthed. Our role at Brisbane Boys’ College is to help boys discover who they are. At BBC we view learning alongside childhood development, drawing on our expertise in boys’ education to deliver exceptional experiences that seek to create independent, resilient, creative thinkers and good human beings. We see life and learning as one and the same, and provide boys with real-world experiences that will enable them to go forth with confidence and capability.

There are many things most boys enjoy doing. Some, no doubt, spring instantly to mind. by Mr Keith Dalleywater, Head of Junior School

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Building Strong Foundations, EArly We have always known literacy is a key indicator of success at school. At BBC, it is in Prep where a boy begins his schooling literacy journey. by Dr Leigh Hobart, Deputy Head of Junior School (Teaching and Learning) Early in the school year, boys in Prep take part in BBC’s Literacy Screening Program. Designed to assess a student’s ability in phonological awareness, comprehension, motor and language skills, the insights gathered from this process enable teachers to identify each boy’s strengths and weaknesses. This is a collaborative effort

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Many boys are bundles of energy; they love running, jumping, chasing. Many enjoy a rumble – some rough and tumble – so if you can run a controlled game involving physical contact, this will go down a treat. Many boys enjoy competition. We know that if we arrange an activity where points are scored, a boy is likely to become passionate and engaged in his learning. Many boys enjoy particular topics and types of books – ones involving action, adventure or fantasy. And we know most boys prefer to learn by doing, rather than by talking and listening. If you combine all the factors above, it makes perfect sense to create a school experience specially tailored to boys. Which is why, at Brisbane Boys’ College, we are All about the boy. We understand boys and we speak boy. We love their energy and passion, and

know how to package learning so that it is boy-friendly. We want our boys to enjoy coming to school each day, because they love the active learning experiences we provide. But there is another powerful reason for boys learning alongside other boys. It gives them the freedom to try everything.

between teaching staff, our resident Speech Language Pathologist, Mrs Evelyn Terry, and an Occupational Therapist. Using this information, we are able to target and tailor the learning experience accordingly. In January 2017, the Australian Government Department for Education and Training announced the establishment of an Expert Advisory Panel to advise on the development and implementation of a Year 1 check in literacy and numeracy. The panel found that large numbers of children in Australia are not meeting the expected learning outcomes and standards in literacy and numeracy in their schooling years. “This has an impact on their future learning and development, and their ability to be productive and participate fully in society. Early success in reading and number

sense is a powerful predictor of later achievement, and is strongly correlated with schooling performance across the curriculum.” Prep to Year 2 students at Brisbane Boys’ College are provided the initial building blocks of literacy by engaging with a cohesive, evidenced-based program of phonic development. "Highly trained specialists work with boys in small groups to engage with learning sounds through oral language, phonological awareness and written form." It is targeted to the boys’ stage of progress and is very interactive as they learn their ‘super speedy sounds’ and strategies for decoding their reading. Instead of boys simply learning a list of words, they learn the various components of language and how to place them together.

EARLY YEARS

By contrast, in co-educational schools, boys from an early age too often learn that certain interests or activities are off-limits. There is gender bias against boys. If you were to attend an eisteddfod, take note of what percentage of boys make up the co-educational choirs. Typically, it’s 10-20 percent. Alternatively, it is not difficult to calculate the percentage of boys in our BBC choirs. Many boys love singing and are very good at it… given the chance.

READ, WRITE, INC.

At BBC we build positive experiences for our boys in the creative and expressive arts from the very beginning of their learning journey. Prep to Year 3 boys engage in the unique Music Every Day program, to build musical skills and confidence, leading to a positive attitude towards music and musicmaking. Every boy in Years 4 to 6 learns a musical instrument, building on the positive foundations laid in the early years. Throughout the College there are numerous choirs, bands and ensembles for our boys to thrive in musically – and very many of them do. We believe that when our boys are involved in music and other expressive arts, this helps them to become interesting, sensitive, passionate and well-rounded men. We believe that our boys learn best in the company of other boys, because at Brisbane Boys’ College, being involved in music is just something that all boys do. This approach provides boys with a framework for understanding language as opposed to just learning individual words. For example, if they are confronted with a word they have never seen before, they are equipped with strategies to unlock it. The delivery of this highly-structured and interactive program allows them to use their understanding of letters and sounds to encode for writing as well. Reading and writing becomes fun and each boy’s success builds confidence. We believe in keeping up, rather than catching up, so our students who require extra time are supported through our PROP program and the assistance of specialist support staff. Boys are also offered reading extension in the early years as part of our holistic program.

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Going their own way

Ready, Steady, Prep!

A trip to the post box can seem like child’s play to the average adult, but for six or seven year old boys it’s an adventure of a lifetime.

Starting school is an important milestone in a child’s life. You can help through reading, routine and relationships.

The Benefits of music to Boys

by Mrs Helen Gardener, Prep teacher

In the Early Years at BBC, boys take part in specialist music lessons every day.

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Prep marks the beginning of formal education and the gateway to lifelong learning. Many parents question whether their son is ready for school and ask what they can do to help prepare their son both academically and socially for Prep. As parents the best thing you can do is read to your son. Read stories together, talk about the stories and talk about the ideas within the stories. Talk with your son. Tell him about your world, what is happening on a day to day basis and answer his questions with honesty. Teach him to be independent, how to dress himself, how to pack and unpack his bag and how to organise his lunch at school. It’s also a good idea to teach your son to ask for help if and when he needs it.

It is important to establish a predictable morning routine, making your son feel safe, in control and organised for the day ahead. The morning routine can begin the night before, with the organisation of uniforms, lunch boxes and school bags. The benefits of a predictable morning routine extend into the school day for most boys, supporting them to be confident, active participators and contributors.

Learn more about preparing to start school with our Kidsmatter resource on page 56.

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by Kathy Chan, Music teacher

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Based on the world-renowned Kodaly philosophy, the Music Every Day program aims to foster a lifelong love of music yet, most importantly, supports literacy and numeracy development through song, syllable work and musical stories. It also assists in building confidence, self esteem and expression through creativity and performance. Emphasis is placed on developing the child as the musician using their voice, and instruments are used to extend and colour their artistry. The program, first introduced in 2011, has positioned BBC as an Australian leader in boys’ music education. Music Every Day is a fun yet academically rigorous program, with the initiative working to strengthen learning in other subject areas.

10 ways music can benefit your son 1.

Inspires creative thinking and problem solving through composing and performing music

2.

Develops greater control of their motor cortex, which directs bodily movements through continuous synchronisation of motor, visual and auditory cortices particularly in performances

3.

4.

5.

Builds persistence, which helps children experience regular improvements and excellence through focus and diligent practice Development of musical literacy and sing aids to improve phonological skills, which can be advantageous to language development Builds confidence, in order to gain a better understanding of self through solo and group performance

PROBLEM SOLVING

6.

Improvisation, performance and composition processes provide children with a positive means of self-expression

7.

Working in an ensemble and presenting performances allows for an increase in children’s control over their emotional states and reactions

8.

Enhances collaborative skills and self-discipline as children work together to create harmonious music

9.

Engenders empathy and social awareness through interpretation and reflection on music works and the performance of others

10. Whether making music through composing, performing or active listening – music is simply wonderful!

Our Year 1 students took their Geography lesson outside of the classroom, making a special trip to the post box on Sherwood Road earlier this year. In the lead up to their post box adventure, the modern day explorers studied their journey on Google Maps, plotted their route and printed a map in readiness for their expedition. With nothing to lose and a world to see, the boys set off on their wild adventure through the College, along Kensington Terrace and down the hill to Sherwood Road. The young learners enjoyed walking past College House – the old Headmaster’s residence - and the Boarding House, and were particularly excited to see the sculpture of our College founder, Mr Barney Rudd, which also happens to be the namesake for their class teddy bear. The travellers also encountered a wild beast along the way; Director of Boarding, Mr McEwen's dog, Basil. Once they reached their destination, one by one, the boys carefully posted their letters with envelopes addressed using their very best handwriting. For some of the boys, this was the very first time they had posted a letter.

At Brisbane Boys’ College, we like to teach our youngest learners to wander often and wonder always, and this Geography lesson did just that. For learning to occur it has to be memorable. Boys won’t always remember the facts and figures but they’ll always remember how something made them feel. Excursions are a great way to take learning outside of the classroom and to connect boys with the world they live in.

LEGO builds understanding This year alone our boys have worked collaboratively to design a new International Space Station, cars of the future and a space village for Space Week.

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At Brisbane Boys’ College we engage boys in their learning through a range of hands-on, practical and interactive learning experiences, delivered with a clear purpose in mind. Year 1 teacher, Ms Elizabeth Gresham has seen the many benefits of LEGO in the classroom, as she encourages the boys to be inquisitive, innovative and curious in Science. “I find LEGO to be incredibly collaborative, fostering great communication between the boys as they work in groups. “It’s also really helpful for developing fine motor skills because those small LEGO pieces can be tricky to pull apart for little fingers,” Elizabeth said. Centered around a philosophy of play, the Early Years are a time for learning how to learn. At this age, it’s how boys interact with

their world; it’s how they socialise and develop as human beings. Research indicates that boys learn better when they move. It helps them to focus and concentrate. Through play fundamental fine, gross and perceptual motor skills are strengthened. Whilst play is the vehicle, Elizabeth and her colleagues seek to provide boys with a wide range of educational experiences. “What may look like a pile of blocks is actually a castle where an astronaut and a ninja are hunting for jewels. Boys at this age explore the world through tactile senses and our program is geared to support them in this stage of their development.” In the Early Years, play paves the way for a focus on formal learning and is one of the most powerful means of teaching boys.

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BBC ARTS

36 It takes a village Prep to Year 12 artists take centre stage at annual College Art Show

37 George stops traffic Public art installation by Year 1 student brightens busy intersection

37 Electric light orchestra Young composer sweeps senior electronic music competition

41 As told by us... The story behind A Grand Concert

Because of the

wonderful things he does

In November, we followed the yellow brick road over the rainbow and into the Brisbane Boys’ College Junior School Expressive Arts production of Oz. It most certainly was lights, camera, action with three wonderful shows featured in Emerald City (The Amphitheatre).

38

Oh! The places you'll go!

A glimpse into the busy world of our iconic pipers and drummers

With nearly one third of the Junior School involved (115 students), one show was particularly special as our boys were transported to Munchkin City and the Land of Oz for a matinee performance by their peers. Congratulations to the amazing students who made this production a huge success. Special mention must go to MIC of Expressive Arts, Mr Shaun Thompson, and his team of teachers and support staff who have worked tirelessly to ensure that this was a show to remember.

- Expressive Arts Showcase -

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GEORGE STOPS TRAFFIC MOST YOUNG BOYS SPEND THEIR HOLIDAYS CLIMBING TREES, RIDING THEIR BIKE, PLAYING WITH LEGO OR SWIMMING IN THE POOL. BUT GEORGE STEWART SPENT HIS SCHOOL HOLIDAYS PAINTING A BRISBANE CITY STREET CABINET. THE BOX IS LOCATED AT THE INTERSECTION OF ENOGGERA ROAD AND ALDERSON STREET, IN ALDERLEY.

George’s two pug dogs, Smudgee and Hunter, inspired the artwork named Pugs at Play. The installation took George approximately seven days to complete and incorporates pugs, paw prints and dog bones. The painting has been published on the Urban Smart Projects’ website. George tells us that he enjoyed every minute and is already planning his next project. The Junior School student was awarded the Principal Award Sticker for his achievement, arriving home with the biggest smile on his face. Photos of the artwork were sent to the team at Red Hill Art Gallery, who were suitably impressed. With incredible exhibitors such as Jamie Boyd featured at the gallery, perhaps one day George will feature to comparable acclaim. What makes this art installation even more impressive is the fact that George is only in Year 1.

ELECTRIC LIGHT ORCHESTRA

IT TAKES A VILLAGE

MONET, VAN GOGH, DALI AND WARHOL: THE ANNUAL COLLEGE ART SHOW WAS HELD IN OCTOBER IN COLLEGE HALL AND FEATURED AN AMAZING COLLECTION FROM OUR STUDENTS, FROM OUR PREPPIES AND THEIR PAINTED TYRE TOTEM, TO OUR MIDDLE SCHOOL BOYS AND THEIR WALL OF SKATEBOARDS AND OUR SENIORS EXPRESSING THEMSELVES THROUGH CERAMICS, CANVAS AND MULTIMEDIA. AS YOU WALKED THROUGH THE GALLERY, IT WAS HARD TO BELIEVE THAT YOU WERE VIEWING STUDENT WORK AND NOT THE WORK OF PROFESSIONALS.

YEAR 10 STUDENT, SEBASTIAN LINGANE HAS BEEN AWARDED BOTH FIRST AND SECOND PRIZE IN THE SENIOR ELECTRONIC MUSIC SECTION OF THE AUSTRALIAN SOCIETY OF MUSIC EDUCATION QUEENSLAND YOUNG COMPOSERS' COMPETITION. This award is an outstanding achievement and is a clear example of how musically driven this young man is. Sebastian’s a dedicated member of Symphonic Band, Stage Band, Pipe Band, classroom music and the rock band program. These musical endeavours all serve to feed his creativity as a composer. He is also a regular fixture in the rock band concerts as well as a member of the winning group in the Darren Middleton Songwriting Competition.

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Oh! The places you'll go! The BBC Pipe Band is a prominent and impressive icon of the College. At every significant moment in the life of BBC, our pipers and drummers are there, reminding us of the brilliant cultural heritage of our great school. The time demands placed on boys in our Pipe Band are significant but deeply appreciated by the College community which consider the Pipe Band the iconic heartbeat of our school. This year has again been a busy year for our Pipe Band with the boys performing at a wide range of school and community events - see the following page for a full calendar of events.

Highlights have included the BBC and Maclean Highland Gatherings, many competitions, Sounds of Scotland concert and Speech Night to name a few. This has all followed the boys being crowned Australian National Champions, as well as preparing for their inaugural performance at the 2018 Royal Edinburgh Military Tattoo.

J A N U A RY

MARCH

M AY

WEDNESDAY 25 JANUARY SCHOLARS' ASSEMBLY

WEDNESDAY 1 MARCH PIPE BAND LEADERS’ ASSEMBLY, GPS SWIMMING TEAM ANNOUNCEMENT

THURSDAY 4 MAY GLEN INNES FESTIVAL

FRIDAY 27 JANUARY LEADERS’ ASSEMBLY

WEDNESDAY 8 MARCH TWILIGHT CONCERT

FRIDAY 5 MAY PIPE BAND FUNDRAISING CONCERT

WEDNESDAY 1 FEBRUARY MCKENZIE HOUSE FAMILY SERVICE

SATURDAY 6 MAY REDLANDS SCOTTISH PIPE BAND COMPETITION (NO. 2 BAND) CELTIC SPECTACULAR - QPAC AND EMPIRE THEATRE (NO. 1 BAND)

FRIDAY 3 FEBRUARY JUNIOR SCHOOL MARCH TO ASSEMBLY

SUNDAY 15 MAY MOTHERS’ DAY FAMILY SERVICE

F E B R U A RY

SATURDAY 10 MARCH QUEENSLAND STATE PIPE BAND CHAMPIONSHIPS

FRIDAY 19 MAY JUNIOR SCHOOL LADIES’ LUNCH

TUESDAY 7 FEBRUARY FLYNN HOUSE FAMILY SERVICE

TUESDAY 28 MARCH BBC CRICKET DINNER

SATURDAY 20 MAY SUNSHINE COAST PIPE BAND CHAMPIONSHIPS

WEDNESDAY 8 FEBRUARY FOUNDER’S DAY SERVICE AND ASSEMBLIES

APRIL

SATURDAY 27 MAY PIPE BAND TRIVIA NIGHT

SUNDAY 5 FEBRUARY BOARDING WORSHIP SERVICE, ANN ST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH

SUNDAY 12 FEBRUARY CAMPBELL HOUSE FAMILY SERVICE

FRIDAY 14 APRIL MACLEAN HIGHLAND GATHERING

FRIDAY 17 FEBRUARY WELCOME TO PIPE BAND FUNCTION

WEDNESDAY 22 FEBRUARY WHELLER HOUSE FAMILY SERVICE

FRIDAY 13 OCTOBER SOUNDS OF SCOTLAND

N OV E M B E R TUESDAY 7 NOVEMBER SPEECH NIGHT

The Tattoo will be held in Scotland from 3 to 25 August 2018, with the boys performing to just over 217,000 people over a 21-day period as part of the Massed Pipes and Drums. The Tattoo is televised in 30 countries to 100 million people worldwide. In Britain the British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC) broadcasts the event annually, and in Australia the Australian Broadcasting Corporation (ABC) traditionally telecasts the Tattoo on the evening of New Year’s Eve. New uniforms have been designed for the Royal Edinburgh Military Tattoo tour and will feature the renowned BBC tartan. The Tattoo is run for charitable causes and over the years has given over £5 million to military and civilian charities and organisations, such as the Army Benevolent Fund. However, the greater

benefit has been that, by independent count, it generates £88 million in revenue for Edinburgh’s economy annually. New £16 million spectator stands and corporate hospitality boxes came into use in 2011, allowing the esplanade to host events at other times of the year. In 2010 the event became the Royal Edinburgh Military Tattoo when HM Queen Elizabeth II awarded the Royal title in celebration of its 60 year anniversary. Brisbane Boys’ College Pipe Band will deploy a contingent of 50 people (two files of piper and drummers), which will include boys and several staff members. Academic staff members will accompany the tour to cover academic classes during school hours, in conjunction with Royal Edinburgh Military Tattoo performance requirements.

THURSDAY 16 NOVEMBER VALEDICTORY DINNER FRIDAY 17 NOVEMBER YEAR 12 LAST DAY

J U LY

SUNDAY 16 JULY BOARDING WORSHIP SERVICE, TOOWONG UNITING CHURCH

WEDNESDAY 15 FEBRUARY KNOX HOUSE FAMILY SERVICE

TUESDAY 21 FEBRUARY WESLEY HOUSE FAMILY SERVICE

OCTOBER

The countdown is on until fifty of our best pipers and drummers head over to Scotland to perform live at Edinburgh Castle. A formal invitation was extended to Brisbane Boys’ College in recognition of the successful performances by our Pipe Band on their 2014 Scotland tour, and their sixth placing at the European Pipe Band Championships.

WEDNESDAY 12 JULY BBC FOOTBALL AWARDS DINNER

TUESDAY 14 FEBRUARY BIRTLES HOUSE FAMILY SERVICE

SUNDAY 19 FEBRUARY ANNUAL ROWERS’ FAMILY SERVICE

MONDAY 18 SEPTEMBER BIG WORKSHOP

Royal Edinburgh Military Tattoo

AU G U S T WEDNESDAY 19 APRIL WATER POLO TEAM ANNOUNCEMENT FRIDAY 21 APRIL WELCOME TO FOOTBALL FUNCTION

SUNDAY 26 FEBRUARY HAMILTON HOUSE FAMILY SERVICE

SATURDAY 22 APRIL AUSTRALIAN SOLO PIPING CHAMPIONSHIPS

MONDAY 27 FEBRUARY QHPS, QUARTETS

SATURDAY 22 APRIL ANZAC DAY

FRIDAY 25 AUGUST GRAND CONCERT

SEPTEMBER SATURDAY 2 SEPTEMBER SCOTS PGC COLLEGE COMPETITION SUNDAY 3 SEPTEMBER FATHER’S DAY SERVICE SATURDAY 16 SEPTEMBER BBC SOLO PIPING AND DRUMMING COMPETITION AND RECITAL WORKSHOP

SUNDAY 26 NOVEMBER SERVICE OF NINE LESSONS AND CAROLS

DECEMBER SATURDAY 2 DECEMBER RUGBY LEAGUE WORLD CUP FRIDAY 1 DECEMBER HEADMASTER'S FAREWELL

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2018 CONCERT CALENDAR

There are few more exciting things for an educator than to see one of his students excel in his chosen field. To see one hundred and seventyfive performers all achieve that distinction on the one night – well, that is indescribable pleasure.”

As told by us... A Friday evening in August saw our musicians step onto the stage to showcase a years worth of early morning rehearsals, late night practices, and most importantly, beautiful storytelling. A full house filled College Hall to enjoy As told by us... A Grand Concert. Every day at BBC we see boys writing their own stories, learning new things and confronting challenges. The dynamic that is the individual and collective crafting of stories is palpable and was no more evident than in the premier music performance of the year. It was a very special occasion for Headmaster, Mr Graeme McDonald, who was treated to his last Grand Concert, having been in the audience for fifteen grand concerts throughout his tenure. “There are few more exciting things for an educator than to see one of his students excel in his chosen field. To see one hundred and seventy-five performers all achieve that distinction on the one night – well, that is indescribable pleasure,” Mr McDonald said. The evening’s performance of Handel’s masterwork Zadok the Priest was dedicated to the retiring Headmaster, where BBC performers were joined by sister school Clayfield College as a fitting tribute to Mr McDonald. This year, students like Music Captain, Julius Lynch were encouraged to explore beyond the sound of their instruments, and delve deeper into the story that is being told so they could share with others. “After all, the sound you hear, at a concert, is not music if there is no unique story told or journey that the audience is taken on,” Julius said. The Concerto Competition Winner delivered a moving performance on violin of Allegro Non Troppo on the evening.

8 MARCH Twilight Concert 6.30pm – College Hall 10 MAY Autumn Sounds 1 5.00pm – College Hall 17 MAY Autumn Sounds 2 5.00pm – College Hall 8 AUGUST Concerto Competition Finals and Middle School Solo Championship 5.00pm – College Hall 16 AUGUST Music Showcase 6.30pm – College Hall 31 AUGUST Grand Concert 7.00pm – College Hall 19 OCTOBER Sounds of Scotland 7.00pm – College Hall 23 OCTOBER Junior Gala Concert 6.30pm – College Hall 1 NOVEMBER Finale Concert 6.30pm – College Hall For any further concert information please contact music@bbc.qld.edu.au or phone 3309 3520.

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BBC SPORT | 43

BBC SPORTS 48 Nothing but net Celebrating our 2017 GPS Basketball premiers

50 Game, BBC Honouring our historic fifth consecutive GPS Tennis premiership

51 100 Years of glory College history created with a convincing consecutive GPS Track and Field Championship

ATHLETIC DEVELOPMENT

STRENGTH IN NUMBERS • NUTRITION AND DIETARY PATTERNS IN A BOY’S ADOLESCENCE HAVE AN INFLUENCE ON THE RISK OF DEVELOPING OSTEOPOROSIS. • GLOBALLY NEARLY 22 MILLION CHILDREN UNDER 5 YEARS OF AGE ARE OVERWEIGHT. • 1 IN 10 – THE NUMBER OF PEOPLE WHO UNDERTAKE THE RECOMMENDED 60 MINUTES OF PHYSICAL ACTIVITY EVERY DAY.

47

We are the champions GPS premierships in basketball, tennis and track and field

There is cause to be alarmed by these statistics. Non-communicable diseases, such as cardiovascular disease, respiratory disease and diabetes, slowly progress over time and are the leading cause of death in the world. In response to the growing burden of non-communicable diseases, and in order to reduce the impact of major risk factors such as unhealthy diet and physical inactivity, the World Health Assembly adopted the Global Strategy on Diet, Physical Activity and Health (DPAS) in May 2004. As one measure, the Global Strategy calls upon Member States to develop and implement school policies and programmes that promote healthy diets and increase levels of physical activity. It’s not surprising that scientific evidence supports the overall conclusion that physical activity provides fundamental health benefits for children and youth. The World Health Organisation recommends children and youth aged 5 to 17 should accumulate at least 60 minutes of moderate to vigorous intensity physical activity daily. Most of the daily physical activity should be aerobic. Moderate to vigorous intensity activities should be incorporated, including those

that strengthen muscle and bone, at least three times per week. There are many benefits to being active: •

Reduced anti-social behaviour, including aggressive and disruptive actions. • Helping to develop cooperation and teamwork skills. • Improved self-esteem and confidence. • Help with management of anxiety and stress. • Improved concentration. • Promotion of healthy development and improved physical fitness. Brisbane Boys’ College aims to be a leader in providing excellence in physical and health programs based on its guiding philosophy - All about the boy. This philosophy and the World Health Organisation recommendations have helped us to develop the BBC Long Term Athletic Development (LTAD) program to operate in parallel with our current sporting programs, and to work in conjunction with other co-curricular activities.

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ATHLETIC DEVELOPMENT PHILOSOPHY The overall education of a BBC student embraces many aspects. Within these aspects, the physical, psychological, communication and strategic learning components of a boy’s education can be fostered and nurtured within the College’s Athletic Development Program. Students are encouraged to enjoy their young physical learning environment, before learning to train specifically for their sport. From here, students are encouraged to be accountable to the wider program and learn to create training strategies that are self-governed and directed to improving their competitive characteristics. Brisbane Boys' College Director of Athletic Development, Mark Pavone has spent considerable time expanding the program. "We don't develop boys only for specific sports, rather we develop pre-adolescent boys into strong young men who are capable of undertaking any co-curricular activity they choose, to the best of their ability." FIGURE 1

BBC SPORT | 45

Youth of all ages, abilities and aspirations should engage in long term athletic development programs that promote both physical fitness and psychological well-being. Lloyd et al (2016)

ALL ABOUT THE BOY The Brisbane Boys’ College Athletic Development pathway has been crafted to fall in line with the latest peer reviewed research and is designed to build students’ strength qualities, identified in the program’s philosophy, gradually over the period of their schooling career, in an enjoyable and challenging environment. LTAD, by design, is fundamentally based on optimising gains in physiological qualities and identifying ‘windows of opportunity’ throughout adolescence in which to maximise gains in these physiological qualities. A combination of factors including maturation, hormonal, anatomical, neurological and musculoskeletal changes all have individual effects on adaptation to training and how the body’s physiological processes adapt over time, as a result of the training stimulus (see Figure 1). Developing talent, on the whole, requires a holistic approach, and must consider much more than physiological quality alone. The BBC LTAD program is structured to achieve the following objectives: 1.

Enhance the overall health and well-being of every boy through a deliberate, well research-based program

2.

Increase the number of boys who are achieving 60 minutes a day of moderate to vigorous physical activity, as recommended by the World Health Organisation and the Australian Government

3.

Ensuring each and every boy has the opportunity to achieve success, both personally and by contributing to a team environment, by reaching or getting as close as possible to their athletic potential, and reducing the risk and severity of injuries

4.

Provide a structured, systematic and routine program, which does not interfere with, but supports current sport programs

5.

Implementation of a scientifically proven model which focuses on the maturation level (where possible) of each boy, as well as engagement of the boys in conditioning exercises which correspond to their chosen activities.

The BBC LTAD program is designed to integrate the following components of Strength and Conditioning, Running Agility Skills Program and Preseason as part of the lineal periodisation plan across the year throughout term time.

Physical activity has been associated with psychological benefits in young people by improving their control over symptoms of anxiety and depression... It has also been suggested that physically active young people more readily adopt other healthy behaviours (e.g. avoidance of tobacco, alcohol and drug use) and demonstrate higher academic performance at school. World Health Organisation (2017)

STRENGTH AND CONDITIONING Strength and Conditioning (S&C) is the physical and physiological development of boys for sport performance, and general athletic development. The role of strength and conditioning is to use exercise prescription specifically to improve performance in athletic competition. It also assists with injury prevention and proper mechanics within an athlete’s sports performances. It encompasses the entire development of the athlete, and what is needed to improve physical performance. This can include plyometric, speed and agility, endurance and core stability with strength and power training being one piece of the jigsaw. BBC’s strength and conditioning program is also aimed at developing fundamentals and optimising physiological gains for each boy according to their maturation level (irrelevant of age), with the main intention of getting our boys closer to their athletic potential, and potentially creating personal and team success for them.

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46 | BBC SPORT

RUNNING AGILITY SKILLS PROGRAM The Running Agility Skills Program (RASP) is aimed at developing a basic technical understanding of speed, agility and acceleration to apply to their selected co-curricular activities. Its focus is on sprints and agility mechanics through the application of basic drills and audio-visual clues for the student to grow and develop into a well-rounded athlete. These sessions encompass three major elements: A. Running style: a symmetrical and efficient running style is the basis to the majority of sports. The program firstly develops each boys style to improve upon running technique, running efficiency, running style with small incremental enhancements over time, through sprint and running drills and techniques. Agility: Defined as the ability to quickly change body position or direction of the body. It is also influenced by body balance, coordination, the position of centre of gravity as well as running speed and skill. B. The second element of this program is to use the development of the athlete's running enhancements and apply these to sport specific contexts which involve acceleration, deceleration and change of direction. C. Anaerobic/Aerobic Conditioning: The third phase of the RASP session is to target specific components of fitness according to the windows of opportunity and accelerated adaptations the body makes at different maturation levels for boys. Aerobic conditioning: is the use of continuous, rhythmic movements of large muscle groups to strengthen the cardiovascular systems. This physical conditioning enhances circulation and respiratory function and efficiency. This part of the program will target the basic form of aerobic fitness which is required for all sports. Anaerobic conditioning: is short duration, near to or maximal effort exercise that is powered primarily by metabolic pathways that don’t use oxygen. This program section will target the lactic acid and ATP-PC energy systems required for the majority of our GPS sports.

PRESEASON Throughout each in-season sport, there are opportunities for boys to be involved with skill development for the upcoming season of sport, preseason (PS). This is based on a student's year and age level and does not interfere with the current in-season sport. It is an opportunity for boys and the sport specific coaches to develop basic skills, team play and patterns.

STUDENT PHYSICAL ASSESSMENT CARD

Students from Years 5 to 12 will be assessed throughout their Health and Physical Education (HPE) classes at least twice per year. This process is critical to obtain information from students in relation to sport selections, fitness assessments and biometrics. The bank of tests provides information for the College to allow for as much individualised programming as possible for each and every boy. Most critical to this process is the measurement of each boy’s height so as we can ascertain the growth quantity over an annual period, which will determine where each boy is in relation to their peak height velocity (PHV). Thus, it will determine where a boy’s program is developed based on their window of opportunity for adaptation to an external stimulus (i.e. speed, skills, stamina, strength or flexibility).

BBC SPORT | 47

10 PILLARS FOR SUCCESSFUL LONG TERM ATHLETIC DEVELOPMENT 1. Long-term athletic development pathways should accommodate for the highly individualised and non-linear nature of the growth and development of youth based on PHV and maturity events in boys 2. Boys of all ages, abilities and aspirations should engage in long-term athletic development programs that promote both physical fitness and psychosocial wellbeing 3. All youth should be encouraged to enhance physical fitness from early childhood, with a primary focus on motor skill and muscular strength development 4. Long-term athletic development pathways should encourage an early sampling approach for youth that promotes and enhances a broad range of motor skills 5. Health and wellbeing of the child should always be the central tenet of long term athletic development programs (All about the boy) 6. Youth should participate in physical conditioning that helps reduce the risk of injury to ensure their on-going participation in long-term athletic development programs

WE ARE THE

CHAMP IONS!

ONE YEAR, THREE GPS CHAMPIONSHIPS, SECOND OVERALL IN THE GPS SPORT RANKING. IT'S BEEN A MAGICAL YEAR FOR SPORT AT BBC.

7. Long-term athletic development programs should provide all youth with a range of training modes to enhance both health and skill related components of fitness 8. Practitioners should use relevant monitoring and assessment tools as part of a long-term athletic development strategy 9. Practitioners working with youth should systematically progress and individualise training programs for successful long term athletic development 10. Qualified professionals and sound pedagogical approaches are fundamental to the success of long-term athletic development programs. (Lloyd et al 2016)

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NOTHING BUT NET

NOT SINCE 2011 HAS BRISBANE BOYS’ COLLEGE SECURED A GPS PREMIERSHIP FOR BASKETBALL. BUT IN EARLY SEPTEMBER, THAT ALL CHANGED WITH AN UNBEATABLE SIDE WHICH WAS DETERMINED, STRONG AND PHILOSOPHICAL IN ITS APPROACH TO THE SEASON. On a balmy Saturday, our Basketball teams arrived at East Brisbane to face a tough round of competition against Churchie. On the court, BBC played well, however Churchie was a stronger foe for most of our teams. That was until our First V delivered an emotional, game-changing match to secure the 2017 GPS Premiership. With technical fouls coming our way and a couple of charge fouls forcing some of our lineup players to the bench earlier than hoped, it wasn't a good start for BBC. The scene was set with an eight point deficit for us in the fourth quarter, but with some mammoth rebounds, strong plays and the inimitable spirit of College supporters, BBC managed a 91-74 victory over the home side, securing the 2017 GPS Basketball Premiership.

Director of Basketball, Mr David Bennett has developed the program for years and has enjoyed watching the BBC basketball community grow, inspire and band together. “Success comes from process. For a decade BBC has been right there to win it – but to actually win is very difficult. It requires some luck, but more importantly a process. Preparation must be consistent, messaging must be consistent, developing a family feeling within the group, team cohesion, chemistry, being accountable to yourself and others. It’s about challenging your mates to maintain the standard,” David said. So what did BBC do differently this season? First V Head Coach, Mr Mike Ayanbadejo said the team’s focus was on constant improvement, rather than the end goal of a premiership win. “We didn’t really do anything different from a philosophical standpoint. We continued to be process driven - we spoke very rarely of winning the premiership and instead we really focused on having a ‘growth mindset’ and making sure we did all the little things every day that would lead to us to having a successful season,” Mike said.

The players remained focused on the everyday commitment to their sport and health, holding one another accountable and seeing the importance of doing their best in every training session. “[The boys] worked extremely hard. My Assistant Coach, Mitch Plysier did a terrific job of getting our players to understand the importance of taking care of their bodies. We focused a lot more this year on mobility and stretching, utilising trigger point balls and foam rollers. We continued to work on improving our mental mindset,” Mike said. “Our catch-cry became ‘back to work’. Once something was passed on the court, it was important for the players to move on and get back to the game. This helped to refocus the boys’ energy for the next play, rather than dwell on previous errors,” Dave said. The journey to a GPS premiership win has been a long and arduous road for the program, with the coaching staff stressing the importance of skill development, strength and conditioning, mobility and mental mindset. And what better way to start than with preseason training and a local Under 23s competition against older athletes. But facing

a team of experienced mature athletes wasn’t the most difficult task ahead of them.

This team is probably one of our most diverse in terms of personality types. While this was a challenge at times we viewed it as a strength as we could tap into each other’s unique attributes.” Though made up of different temperaments, dispositions and traits, the team built on a genuine love and respect for one another - a somewhat uncommon characteristic of many sporting teams. And with a National Squad player and AIS member, and five Queensland team members, it’s clear that this is a very talented group of young players with great future potential and Seniors who have been playing at the top for a number of years. A number of boys from the First V Premiership winning team are now exploring US College pathways.

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100 YEARS OF GLORY Our athletes performed magnificently on a warm Friday evening in October, to win the 100th GPS Track and Field Championship by an impressive 95.5 points.Yes, you read that right - 95.5 points! The win created College history with consecutive championships for the first time.

GAME, BBC IT WAS STANDING ROOM ONLY AT THE GPS TENNIS FINAL AGAINST GREGORY TERRACE IN JUNE WHEN OUR BOYS ACHIEVED HISTORY WITH A FIFTH CONSECUTIVE TENNIS PREMIERSHIP. IT MARKED AN UNDEFEATED 2017 SEASON FOR THE FIRST IV AND THE BEGINNING OF AN EPIC JOURNEY TO NATIONALS. After helping to secure a GPS Tennis premiership for the College, First IV team player, Dane Sweeny was selected in the Junior Davis Cup Tennis team, to represent Australia against the top 16 countries in the world in Budapest. Dane was among the country’s best 16-and-under boys to compete in the event, and had the privilege of being courtside as the Australian Davis Cup team qualified for the Semi-Finals following their win over the USA in Brisbane. The Year 11 student was also nominated for the Wendy Turnbull Most Outstanding Junior Tennis Player at the Queensland Tennis Awards.

This journey around the world culminated in a win at the School Sport Australia Teams Challenge in Albury, following a tough match against The McDonald College of New South Wales. BBC didn’t even need to contest the doubles at the National event, winning three matches to one. This is the second National title for the sport of Tennis at BBC. The Brisbane Boys' College Tennis program itself was also recognised by the Queensland and Australian Tennis governing bodies recently, with the College claiming the Most Outstanding School Award at the State and National Tennis Awards.

As a warm up to the GPS Championship, the College entered a team in the Senior division of the Queensland Athletics Schools Knockout competition at the University of Queensland, surpassing Churchie at the last minute to claim the title. The team included ‘younger guns’ Pat Thygesen, Will Stephen (1500m) and Jay Sahlqvist (high jump), as well as Pat Jaffe and Tom Spicer (100m); Ashley Moloney (110m hurdles, shot put and javelin); Pat Jaffe and James Heading (400m); and Michael Griffiths (long jump). But the calibre of BBC’s athletes was beyond anything we could have imagined at GPS Track and Field. In fact, those who were competing at their first ever GPS Championship, or were injured, performed magnificently, with many boys achieving personal bests on the night, despite the challenges before them. In the 13 Years age group, Ben Woodley, a national level high jumper was unable to compete due to knee issues. Instead, Ben ran a personal best for 2nd place in the 400m. In the 14 Years, Alasdair McAlpine, who was not a member of the team in 2017, placed third in the 200m. In the same field, Dom Plazibat, who placed seventh in the triple jump last year, managed a third in the same event. Matthew Bennett, who recently underwent knee surgery, gutsed it out in the 800m to place sixth, while Flynn

Pumpa ran up an age group in the 1500m and placed fourth with a personal best time. All rounder, Lukas Ripley won the shot put by 1cm, claimed victory in the discus and also ran the 100m (fifth) and 4x100m relay (third). Michael Westerhuis won the triple jump, placed second in the long jump and sixth in the shot put. High jumper, Seb Morris leapt 1.90m for second place while Harry Briggs ran his best GPS race in years, achieving his second personal best in just two weeks, claiming silver in the 1500m. As the replacement for Ashley Moloney in the open high jump, Jono Forbes wowed everyone by placing second, while both open relay teams for BBC took the gold. Ashley is an incredibly talented athlete who hopes to represent Australia at the Olympic Games in Tokyo alongside Cedric Dubler in the Decathlon. But it was the collegiality of our brothers, which started long before Friday evening, that encapsulated the true spirit of BBC. Captain of Track and Field, Pat Jaffe led the team in prayer on Wednesday afternoon at the Captain's Run on Miskin Oval, before the squad was addressed by BBC Old Boys and former professional athletes, Tony Dempsey (1968) and Angus Waddell (1981). Congratulations to all of our athletes, supporters, coaches and community members for an outstanding season.

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INSIGHT | 53

INSIGHT

SPORTING short reads

 RESEARCH

 RESOURCES

 PERSPECTIVE

56 Preparing to start school KidsMatter provides advice as to how parents can support their sons in the transition to and progression through school

57 Get connected Putting parents in touch with resources

BBC GOES ALL BLACK BBC RUGBY GOES INTERNATIONAL BBC CONTINUES TO REMAIN COMPETITIVE IN THE SPORT PLAYED IN HEAVEN, WITH THREE PLAYERS SELECTED FOR THE SCHOOLBOY TRI NATIONS RUGBY TOURNAMENT IN SYDNEY. Cullen Ngamanu (pictured centre), who was selected for the Australian Barbarians, defeated Fiji in a thrilling contest 21-20, while Trevor Hosea (pictured left) and Tom Kibble (pictured right) faced an incredibly tough NZ Schools team as they played for the Australian Schoolboys squad. Australia's Schoolboys long-time coach, Pat Langtry was asked by Fox Sports to pick out some Australian players to watch, and opted for Brisbane Boys' College lock Trevor Hosea, “Trevor has been a sponge in terms of learning and the skill-set he brings is worth a close look." Langtry has seen it all in his time with the schools program and described the 2017 crop as “very determined,” with a “very good work ethic.” Tom was rewarded for a high impact match with an elevated selection into the Australian Schools team to prepare for the final fixtures, which were broadcast live on Foxsports in Australia and on Sky in New Zealand. Meanwhile the depth of the program was showcased with four BBC players selected into the two Under 16 Queensland teams to contest the National Championships. Carter Gordon, Clancy Doe, Jack Bowyer and Jack Gallagher performed well in the tournament, with Queensland Red claiming the National Championship. Eight of our undefeated GPS competition winning 15A team were selected into the three Junior Gold teams. Congratulations to George Gibson (Captain), Jake Tierney, Hugo Perceval, Lukas Ripley, Jake Howarth, Connor Hayes, Jacob Blyton and Will Stevens. As winners of the Northern Conference, Queensland Red played the Sydney Rays, and in a dominant performance won 71–10. Congratulations to all our representative players, and to George as skipper of the winning team. Trevor Hosea was recently selected to play alongside fellow Old Boy, Will Genia (2005) for the Super Rugby side, Melbourne Rebels.

In further exciting news for Brisbane Boys' College, the All Blacks rugby side trained at the College in preparation for the Bledisloe Cup fixture at Suncorp against the Wallabies. The Kiwi team was impressed with BBC’s state of the art facilities, as they completed their on-field training sessions and Captain’s Run on Miskin and P&F Ovals. The international rugby team practised the renowned Haka, and were kind enough to engage with our community, signing merchandise and even capturing a selfie or two. The College then hosted 12 home side ‘extras’ (players outside of the 23 selected to play), who went through a rigorous fitness and skills session under famed coaches Michael Cheika, Stephen Larkham and Nathan Grey.

REPRESENTATIVE CRICKET Four BBC players were selected for the Queensland U17s State Cricket team to play in the Australian Championships earlier this year. The Queensland team, which included Max Clayton (Queensland Captain), James Ward, Matthew Willans and Harry Walker, placed second at the championships, with Harry top-scoring for the baggy maroons. Matthew Willans was later selected for the Australian U17s Cricket team.

54

A new normal

Exploring body, relationships and sexuality in young people with Parent Forum presenter, Melinda Tankard-Reist

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54 | INSIGHT

INSIGHT | 55

PARENT FORUM

A NEW NORMAL BODY, RELATIONSHIPS AND SEXUALITY IN YOUNG PEOPLE

Parenting is difficult at the best of times and is particularly challenging in the cultural landscape in which we are trying to raise our sons. At the final Parents and Friends’ Association Parent Forum for 2017, Melinda Tankard-Reist explored how the proliferation of sexualised images and messages contribute to a distorted view of bodies, relationships and sexuality in young people. Parents of teenagers and young children alike, were invited to discover how they can unpack this toxic culture hampering their son’s healthy physical, emotional and social development, address it and raise happy, healthy and resilient boys. The lives of young people are increasingly socialised, conditioned and informed by exposure to porn-related content online. According to guest speaker, Melinda Tankard-Reist, children are being exposed to a pornified landscape, a new kind of normal, where they ‘act out’ through social media and sexting and put their bodies on display for attention and judgement. In her address to BBC’s Year 9 cohort, followed by a session to parents that evening, Melinda Tankard-Reist unpacked the messages young people receive about themselves, the physical and mental outcomes of their relationship with their body and how parents can act personally and politically to work together to change popular culture before it’s too late. Melinda’s material and research is quite confronting, but she states that young people are rarely shocked by her presentations. It is what they deem normal. The mother of four considers herself a parent who “has struggled to raise healthy, happy, resilient children in a culture which I feel is working against me”. And when it comes to Australia’s culture, Melinda isn’t wrong. The Australian Psychological Society submission in 2008 reported that physical appearance and beauty are intrinsic to self-esteem and social worth. Values in advertising are implicit in today’s culture. And the body image statistics do not lie. More than a quarter of young people have a mental disorder, with 1 in 16 Australians currently experiencing depression. We’ve seen a 90 percent increase in older adolescents deliberately self-harming over the past decade and approximately 28 percent of Australian males aged 11 to 24 are dissatisfied with their appearance. The pervasive influence of the media in how the male body is portrayed, including its increasing slenderness and an emphasis on appearance away from functionality, seems to be a significant factor in the body image phenomenon. If you have a son counting calories, exercising excessively and who makes excuses not to eat with the family, you may need to intervene. Men’s bodies are now sexually objectified in a way that has been identified as a problem for women for many years. Our boys now see photoshopped male models on billboards with six-pack abs, muscular bodies, glistening white teeth, and heads full of hair as normal. Where advertisements used to focus on men’s strength, mateship and handiness, now “men are frequently portrayed in the media sprawled across beds displaying their lean, well-toned torso or enhanced genitals through revealing underwear”. Body image dissatisfaction for Western men has tripled in the last 25

years (Lewis, 2012). In fact, one in three men would trade a year of their life to achieve their ideal body weight and shape (Diedrichs et al, 2011). We are moulding, conditioning and socialising our young boys to think of themselves, and women and girls, in certain ways. Everywhere Melinda goes, without exception, she’s hearing the lament “boys are not treating girls with respect” and she’s not surprised. “Look at the role models in popular culture for our young men. Look at the formative landscape. Mainstream popular culture is lying to our sons about how a man should be,” Melinda says. A review of research in this area found that exposure to this content leads both women and men to have a diminished view of women’s competence, morality and humanity. “We have all these programs to address violence against women but we’re actually not addressing the cultural drivers, permission giving, for that violence which this research rightly shows. It starts with attitudes,” Melinda argues. Video games such as Grand Theft Auto 5 has a scenario where the gamer secures a woman in the sex industry and must kill her to advance in the game. Melinda warns that parents should know what their son is playing, but sometimes it’s unavoidable. And with advertising a very powerful educational force, your son doesn’t have to be looking for pornography – it will find him. Melinda reveals that the average age of first exposure to porn is age 11; that’s the average, not the youngest. “I believe we are engaging in an unprecedented assault on the healthy sexual development of our kids. I don’t know how our young people will be able to form healthy sex-based relationships when pornography is their formative environment.” But she is encouraged that there has been a recent global movement of young people who are resisting pornography because they can see how destructive it can be. “The argument that ‘boys will be boys’ actually carries the profoundly anti-male implication that we should expect bad behaviour from boys and men. The assumption is that they are somehow not capable of acting appropriately, or treating girls and women with respect” (Jackson Katz). Melinda believes that although parents are being forced into having conversations with their children that they would otherwise like to delay, some conversations can help. As parents, you can assist your son to analyse and dissect the cultural landscape that is before him so he can see that it’s harmful. Melinda reminds parents and teachers that it’s not always what you say, it’s what you do; how you treat and talk to one another, what you tolerate. “Do you allow violent music and movies in your own home? Do

you know what your kids are doing online? Are you trying to be friends with your children instead of parents, because you’ve lost control?” She maintains that now is the time to reclaim control of what our sons are exposed to. Eight years ago, Melinda founded Collective Shout, which has gone on to protest and win complaints against big brands such as Cotton On, MTV, Wicked Campers, Zoo Weekly, as well as billboards, video games and inappropriate competitions. “One complaint can make a difference,” she says. In closing Melinda offers the following advice: “Silence is the language of complicity and speaking out is the language of change. We shouldn’t have to shield our kids from everyday life. We can create change personally and politically. Personally, by role modelling what you tolerate. Politically, by complaining and speaking out.” After all, the standard you walk past, is the standard you accept. So what standards are we allowing for our sons?

WHAT CAN PARENTS DO? It all starts with a conversation between you and your son. But where do you begin? Below are some pointers from Melinda on how best to begin that difficult yet meaningful conversation with your son. Explain that the world is unfiltered There are certain things on the internet that are not made for kids; things that are not age appropriate and things you can’t ‘un-see’. Explain what they may see You may see pictures of people without their clothes on, pictures that show people’s private parts. Sometimes these images show people hurting or saying mean things to each other. Explain how they may feel These images can make you feel confused, upset, sick or worried (sometimes even curious). Make them know it’s okay to tell If you ever see something like this, you need to ‘click off’ straight away and come and tell me. You won’t get into trouble and I won’t get cross. Stop and tell an adult If anyone else shows you images, that’s not OK. You need to tell a trusted adult straight away. Make sure he knows that if someone shows him pornographic content (especially an adult or teenager) he must tell you immediately. Think carefully about taking away your son’s internet rights. Many children tell us that the main reason they wouldn’t tell a parent is because they are worried their parent will get angry and take away their technology privileges. Ask questions Reinforce that he can always come to you with questions and if he wants more information, you will find age appropriate materials for him to explore. Don’t share it with other children Remind him that he should never show his friends or siblings the material that he has seen.

RESOURCES Wise Guys. A boy’s guide to life. By Sharon Witt Men of Honour. A young man’s guide to exercise, nutrition, money, drugs and alcohol, sex, pornography and masturbation. By Glen A Gerryn Raising Boys. By Steve Biddulph Sexts, text and selfies. How to keep your children safe in the digital space. By Susan McLean Too sexy too soon. How hypersexualised messages harm kids and what you can do about it. By Melinda Tankard-Reist No means no. By Jayneen Sanders

ABOUT MELINDA Melinda Tankard-Reist is an author, speaker, media commentator, blogger and advocate for women and girls. She is best known for her work addressing sexualisation, objectification, harms of pornography, sexual exploitation, trafficking and violence against women. An opinion writer, Melinda is also a regular on morning television and has appeared on ABC’s Q&A and The Gruen Sessions as well as many other TV and radio programs. Melinda is co-founder of the grassroots campaigning movement, Collective Shout: for a world free of sexploitation, exposing corporations, advertisers and marketers who objectify women and sexualise girls to sell products and services. An ambassador for World Vision Australia, Compassion Australia and the Raise Foundation, Melinda is also the author/editor of five books.

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THE MAIN CHANGES FOR YOUR CHILD Starting school involves a number of changes for children and families. This includes the differences between your child’s current setting (eg home, long day care, preschool) and the primary school they will be attending. When children start school they experience changes in the following areas. Physical environment: For example, the size of the playground, classroom and school buildings, the location and types of toilets, the number of other children and teachers. Rules and procedures: For example, more structured times for attending class, eating and going to the toilet, rules for different places such as the classroom and playground, lining up and putting up a hand to speak. Relationships: For example, meeting new children and adults, responding to children of different ages, leaving an early childhood educator, getting to know a range of teachers for different subjects and from different grades.

Get Connected

Putting parents in touch with resources

Learning: For example, more formal learning experiences, structured times and set tasks, increasing independence.

MANAGING THE TRANSITION

KIDSMATTER RESOURCE

Preparing to start school The following KidsMatter article explores the journey to starting school and how parents, alongside educators, can assist their child to adjust to a new routine, atmosphere and relationships during this important milestone. KidsMatter is a national mental health initiative and BBC is an accredited KidsMatter School. Starting school is not just about the first day. It’s a process that begins when children and families start to prepare in the year before, and continues as children experience their first days, weeks and months of school. The process involves a number of changes for children and families and everyone reacts differently. For some children the change brings excitement about making friends and learning new things, while for others the change can leave them feeling nervous and overwhelmed. You may reflect on your own school experiences and be reminded of the mix of emotions you felt when starting school.

WHAT IS TRANSITION? Transition is a process that happens over time. It begins when families start to think about and prepare for school. This brings about a big change for children and families as they leave familiar settings and the relationships they established with early childhood educators. The process continues as children settle into their new school environment and adjust to new relationships, rules and routines. Some children adjust quickly to school, while others can take many months to adjust. Children will make many transitions during their lives, and supporting them with this important milestone will have long-term benefits.

IMPORTANCE OF TRANSITION Starting school is an important milestone for a child. A positive experience can have long-term benefits for future learning and relationships. Transition often marks the point of first engagement with formal schooling for children and families. Research has identified transition to school as a time of potential challenge and stress for children and their families. It involves children and families negotiating and adjusting to a number of changes including a new physical and learning environment, rules and routines, social status, identity and relationships. The transition often marks a time of great excitement for families and many children settle well into school. Other children may experience some adjustment difficulties during the transition period. Research suggests that approximately one-third of children experience some difficulties as they transition from their early childhood service to school. These issues can have social and academic implications if they are not addressed. In addition, the patterns of behaviour and achievement that are established in the initial stages of school can often remain stable beyond the early years. It is important, therefore, to give children positive social and academic experiences from the outset.

Families play an important role in supporting children to manage the transition to primary school. With the support of your child’s early childhood educator and school teacher, you can help them to cope with the new challenges by developing their social, emotional and learning skills. Supporting your child’s skills in these areas contributes to their mental health and wellbeing. Children who are mentally healthy are better learners, have stronger relationships and are better able to meet life’s challenges. The following provides you with some ideas for helping your child manage change and build on their social and emotional, independence and learning skills. Many of the suggestions will be things that you are already doing, and your child will keep progressing in these areas when they start school. You may like to choose one or two skills to focus on over the next few months. Involve your child in conversations: Talking with your child and involving them in conversations can help them to learn the rules of communication such as waiting for a turn, expressing ideas and listening without interrupting. Promote a sense of responsibility: Encouraging your child to take responsibility for small tasks (eg setting the table for dinner, putting their clothes in the wash basket) will help them feel useful and build their self-confidence. Teach your child to care for their belongings: Encourage your child to care for and respect their belongings (eg tidying up toys, putting pencils back in their pencil case). Help your child to follow instructions: Start by giving your child one instruction to follow (eg get your socks) and walk with them to do it if necessary. You can then build up to giving your child two-step instructions (eg put your dish in the sink and get your socks). Children often have difficulty remembering more than two or three instructions at a time.

TO LEARN MORE ABOUT THE IMPORTANCE OF EARLY YEARS EDUCATION FOR BOYS, READ THE WIRED TO EXPLORE FEATURE ON PAGES 30-33.

AESOPS QUEST This literacy app is a learning game where students must remember the elements of a story to complete a level. At the end of each level, the student is rewarded with puzzle pieces, with the aim to complete the puzzle and move on to the next story. Suitable for boys from Year 2 onwards, this app will be your son’s favourite new game!

RECOMMENDED READ Prince Boofhead Dr Michael Carr-Gregg and Elly Robinson Dr Michael Carr-Gregg believes that too many Australian boys have got it too easy – and the result is a generation of what he deems, ‘boofheads’; boys who think they are too good to stack the dishwasher, expect the world and give little in return. This book, written by child psychologist, Dr Carr-Gregg and researcher Elly Robinson, serves as a rescue manual for parents of teenage boys. It will ask the tough questions and deliver straightforward advice so that parents can take back control.

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CONNECT   O LD COLLEGIAN S

 WH ERE ARE THE Y N O W

2 0 1 8 C O M M U NI T Y A ND O CA CA L E NDA R O F E V E NTS

  EV EN TS

JA NUA RY

60 From the Alumni Office A message from OCA President, Chris Hartley

61 A century of Bell Acknowledging a life based on hardship and humour in celebration of Jack Bell's centenary year

68 Jarrod Turner Celebrating Jarrod Turner's 11 years of service to the College

69 A new direction for the Foundation Introducing new Chairman, Sandy Grant

5 Grandsons and Sons' Event

APRIL

AUGUST

BBC Networking Breakfast

Melbourne Reunion

SEPTEMB ER Sunshine Coast Visit

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Perth Reunion

23 University Orientation F E B RUA RY

24 ANZAC Day Service M AY Young Old Boys' Event

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14 Decade Reunions 15 Old Boys' Day O C TO B ER Young Old Boys' Event

VC Tamborine Luncheon

J U NE

7

Founder's Day

OCA AGM

J U LY

19

BBC Golf Day

13

VC Toowoomba Luncheon

MARCH Singapore Reunion

20

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Spotlight on OCA events

BBC Careers Expo

BBC Long Lunch

NOVEMB ER

25

Nic MacBean Cup

VC Mt Mee Luncheon Hong Kong Community Function

Year 12 Final Assembly

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Pelican Waters Luncheon

Snapshots of recent OCA activities COLLEGIAN DECEMBER 2017


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CONNECT | 61 IMAGES (L-R): JACK BELL CAIRO 1941, BBC ANZAC DAY SERVICE 2015

OCA PRESIDENT

CHRIS HARTLEY

Fostering fellowships In 1920, the OCA was established to foster a strong fellowship between Old Boys and the College, to ensure traditions are maintained and to provide networking opportunities for members through reunions, social functions and BBC activities. It’s vital, therefore, that the OCA continues to remain true to the original values and mission set before us by the men who continue to create and shape it – the Old Collegians themselves. The latter half of 2017 is always the busiest for the OCA with Old Boys’ Weekend playing a major part. On Friday 25 August, we welcomed back more than 250 Old Boys for their decade reunions. Starting off with a lunch for the Class of 1957 and their partners in the BBC Boarders’ Dining Room, which was followed that evening at Wests Bulldogs Rugby Club by the Senior Classes of 2007, 1997, 1987, 1977 and 1967. It was a full house across the board, culminating in one big reunion where the separated rooms were opened up at the end of the night. Special mention and my sincere thanks to each of the decade reunion organisers who played a significant role in coordinating their cohort’s event. On Saturday 26 August, BBC hosted Old Boys’ Day, where we faced Brisbane State High School in Basketball and Rugby. With a new electronic scoreboard on Miskin Oval, the old scoreboard was repurposed and now proudly identifies ‘Old Boys’ Hill’. It was fantastic to see a wide range of alumni perched on the hill and cheer our current students onto success. The final results speak for themselves with Basketball Open V: BBC 97 to BSHS 56 and First XV: BBC 27 to BSHS 21. The OCA continue to see a steady growth with our regional, interstate and overseas reunions with our Melbourne and London reunions continuing the trend. We look forward to future events in early 2018 with visits to Perth and Sydney. In November, we also welcomed our newest members – the Senior Class of 2017 into the OCA fold at the Year 12 Final Assembly. We look forward to catching up with them at the upcoming Young Old Boys’ events next year. Internally, the OCA made some significant changes including upgrading our website, increases in Instagram which now boasts over 700 followers, Facebook accounts,

plus our dedicated OCA LinkedIn account becoming a great networking resource. We continue to watch the BBC Business Directory gain momentum since its launch in early 2017 and look forward to it growing from strength to strength in the coming years. As BBC and the OCA see a new phase from 2018 under the leadership of incoming Headmaster, Paul Brown, we must acknowledge the pivotal role that Graeme McDonald has played in maintaining the strong relationship that exists between the College and the OCA during his 15 year tenure as Headmaster. I would personally like to thank Graeme for enabling the OCA to continue fostering connections between current students and Old Collegians through areas such as Old Boys coaching, networking breakfasts and the OCA Mentoring Program. We wish Graeme all the best in his future endeavours and welcome Paul on-board. It is important to note that the OCA is supported by two full-time BBC staff: Director of Alumni and Community, Jarrod Turner (1999) and Kelly Edwards, OCA Secretary and Development and Events Coordinator. They both provide unrivalled passion and knowledge to the OCA Committee and wider membership. I thank them both wholeheartedly on behalf of the OCA for their excellent service. Sadly, Jarrod will be leaving us at the end of January. His service and commitment to BBC and the OCA during the past 11 years and specifically during his tenure in the Alumni Office since late 2014 should not go unacknowledged. He has proven to be a man of mettle who strives to do the very best in everything he does. We wish Jarrod all the best as he pursues new career opportunities elsewhere but will continue to remain an active member of the Old Collegians’ Association. The OCA is just over two years away from its Centenary Year in 2020 and with that we have some really exciting plans for projects and initiatives to mark that milestone. If 2017 was a year of reinvigoration, 2018 and 2019 will be years of planning, preparation and hard work. As an Old Collegian, should you be in a position to assist the OCA or BBC, I strongly encourage you to become involved in whatever capacity you are able. This will ensure the OCA’s traditions and ethos is continuing into the next century and beyond.

A century of Bell John Robert Bell, or Jack as he is fondly known, has lived a life based on hardship and humour. So after 100 years of surfing, war, family and celebration, what is Jack’s secret to a successful existence? “Give and not take,” he says. Born on the 20 December 1917, at Bronte, Booth Street, Toowong, it is difficult to imagine the significant historical milestones that Jack has witnessed in his lifetime QANTAS was established (1920), Vegemite hit our shelves (1923), the Royal Flying Doctors Service was founded (1928), the Great Depression and the opening of the Sydney Harbour Bridge (1932), the first locally made Australian car, Holden was launched (1948), the first man on the Moon (1969) as well as 18 US Presidents, 26 British Prime Ministers and 23 Australian Prime Ministers. Having been witness to a lot throughout his life, it is best to start at the beginning of Jack’s first engagement with BBC. Jack commenced his education at Toowong State School in 1923 before moving to Brisbane Boys’ College in February 1932, at this stage, a school of 400 to 500 students on its new campus in Toowong. Jack lived a simple existence, and while he will freely admit he wasn’t the best, Jack played Cricket in the Second XI, as well as Rugby and Cross Country at the College. “My period at BBC was happy and free from drama. I loved sport and living so close to the school, often staying till 5.00pm or 5.30pm playing some sort of sport.” After finishing school, Jack secured a job at D&W Murray Ltd, a clothing warehouse in Brisbane, working 44 hours, six days a week. Jack and close mate, Sam Maxwell (also a former BBC boy) joined the Militia in 1936 when they both turned 18 and became part of the 14th Field Battery of the 5th Field Brigade in the Royal Australian Artillery. After approximately three years of service, Jack resigned to continue surfing at Maroochydore. Yet fate had other plans, with Hitler “rattling his sabre” as Jack puts it, and he re-enlisted in early 1939. Training was more intensive, and due to past experience, Jack was

appointed a Bombardier (Corporal) to become the gun layer, assisting the Gun Sergeant to train the recruits. In November 1939, Jack joined the Airforce as an aircrew member thinking he would at the very least be a moving target, so more difficult for the enemy to hit. How prophetic this turned out to be. On 23 January 1942, Jack was reported as ‘missing in action, believed killed’. As Jack recalls, “the day before, we were informed two aircraft, a Bombay and a DH86 Ambulance, would be flying out early in the morning to a rendezvous to pick up some exchange aircrew and staff of General Cunningham, who were in a pocket. Away we flew, but unfortunately there was really heavy ground mist forcing the pilot off course and flying at only 300/500 feet. The result was obvious”. An 88mm shell exploded in the cockpit, peppering the crew forward with shrapnel, killing one crew member and severely damaging the left leg of the pilot. Naturally, Jack thought it was curtains for him. Thankfully, the co-pilot managed to land the plane and the remaining crew exited the burning aircraft. Jack was bleeding mainly from superficial cuts, but his hands and the side of his head had been burned badly. Jack was transported to a field hospital outside Antelat, Libya and was fortunate to have a German abdominal specialist operate on him to remove a splinter and a short section of his small intestine. Many of us keep mementos from our travels far and wide, and some small pieces of shrapnel are still floating around in Jack’s legs and left arm today. Jack’s hands, particularly the right one, didn’t fare as well; his right hand was so badly burned it curled inward with the fingers locking in the cupped position. The very next week, Jack’s mother received a letter from the RAAF advising that Jack was now a Prisoner of War (POW).

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A CENTURY OF BELL

JACK HAS DEVOTED HIS LIFE TO SERVING: HIS COUNTRY, HIS MATES, HIS FAMILY, AND THOSE LESS FORTUNATE THAN HIM... IN RECOGNITION OF THIS SERVICE, JACK WAS AWARDED THE VICTORIA SENIOR CITIZEN ACHIEVING AWARD IN 2017. Now captured, Jack was loaded onto a three tonne truck bound for Tripoli, Libya. At the end of each of the four days of travel, he and the other injured POWs were lifted on their stretchers and carried to a hospital tent. By the time Jack reached the hospital in Tripoli, his stomach wound had re-opened with all the stitches gone. Jack's wound had to heal over time, but he received no further treatment except for bandage changes. Three months later, Jack was moved to Parma Hospital just outside Milan. Following a failed escape plot at the end of May, accused as the main organiser, Jack was sent to a punishment camp, Camp 65, at Gravina. The camp was at the back of Bari in the mountains, with soaring temperatures during the day, yet freezing at night. Jack remained at the camp until the end of July where conditions were “appalling”. Jack described one weekend where the camp received 48 hours’ worth of rations consisting of 14 cabbages, 11 cauliflowers plus four bunches of fennel to feed 700 men. It was “mental cruelty at its worst, and starvation” as Jack describes. They were losing one man per hut per day with more than 500 POWs dying in three months. Jack was transported to camp P.G. 57, in the north east of Italy, just below the Dolomites. Life in this camp was better regulated, with latrines and showers built by Allied engineers. The common belief among the POWs was that they were being kept alive in such a weakened state so as to limit their escapes. The POWs eventually arrived at what would be their camp, Stalag IVB at Muhlberg, approximately 70 miles from Berlin in early October, 1943. By April 1945, everyone except Hitler knew the war was over. Jack recalls he and his fellow POWs trying to predict the date the war would end. “Ten cigarettes per try. I was miles out and the fortunate chap who won the bet finished up with over 1,000 cigarettes for predicting the correct day”. They were liberated on 24 April by Russian Army forces at about 10.00am. The Russians then recaptured Jack and his fellow POWs

IMAGE TOP: MELBOURNE REUNION AND EARLY CENTENARY CELEBRATION WITH FAMILY AND COLLEAGUES 2017 IMAGE BOTTOM: VIP GUEST SPEAKER - BBC ANZAC DAY SERVICE 2015

to ensure the Russians had bargaining power. The POWs eventually arrived in England around the 18 May to an unfortunate welcome where they were stripped of their original clothes and interrogated before being allowed to move into the barracks. Jack sailed for Australia, arriving in Sydney at the end of August, 1945 with approximately 4,000 fellow POWs. Jack was formally discharged in January 1946. Following the war, Jack started working in textiles, commuting between Brisbane and Melbourne where he met his wife, Dolores Cook in March, 1946. They were married in 1954 in Melbourne at Wesley College, and in the following year, Jack and Dolores had their only child, a daughter, Sandra. Jack now has three granddaughters and one great granddaughter due in February 2018. Jack has devoted his life to serving: his country, his mates, his family, and those less fortunate than him. Since 1976, Jack, Dolores and Sandra have committed their time to donating and raising funds for the Returned Serviceman’s League (RSL), former POWs and the disabled. In recognition of this service, Jack was awarded the Victoria Senior Citizen Achieving Award in 2017. Jack has also given back to his old school and was the guest speaker at the Brisbane Boys’ College Commemorative ANZAC Day Service in 2015, sharing his story with 1500 students. Jack worked in the textile trade in Melbourne, before retiring in July 1978, so it was here that BBC Old Boys and members of staff joined Jack and his family for an early centenary celebration at the Toorak RSL Club in November 2017. As a World War II Digger and POW survivor, Jack has experienced the best and worst that life has to offer. He has come out the other side with wisdom, humility and perhaps more importantly, a wicked sense of humour. With friends and family joining to celebrate his 100th birthday in December 2017, how do you summarise 100 years of stories, jokes and memories? The answer is simply, you can’t.

THE HUTCHIES BBC GOLF DAY FRIDAY 20 OCTOBER Once again, the Hutchies BBC Golf Day turned out to be a huge success. This year for the first time, the course was booked out with 32 teams in attendance, including Old Boys, parents and friends of the College. A big thank you must go to Scott Hutchinson (1976) and all the staff from Hutchinson Builders for their continued support of the event. Special thanks go to the hole and prize sponsors, supporters and team captains. Congratulations to the teams and players listed below for their success on the day: • Winners – Scott PDI • Runners Up – Green Options • Best Old Boys Team – Winston Wolfe Capital • Nearest The Pins: • Blue 5 – Don Graham Snr • Blue 7 – Fred Himstedt (1995) • Gold 4 – David Byrne • Gold 8 (Recon Technology cash prize) – Mick Groom (1989) • Longest Drive – Michael Philipson (2003) • Swing Speed – Michael Philipson (2003) • N.A.G.A – Hewlett Legal

IMAGES TOP (L-R): POW JACK BELL, WESTERN DESERT 1941, IMAGES BOTTOM BBC ANZAC DAY SERVICE 2015

The event raised much needed funds for the Old Collegians’ Bursary, which provides financial assistance to sons of BBC Old Boys who otherwise would not be able to attend BBC.

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BBC ALUMNI OFFICE TEAM Should you be in a position to assist the OCA or BBC, or require more information on our programs and events, please contact the Alumni Office team. The office is open Monday to Friday from 8.30am to 4.30pm and is located in College House (off Kensington Terrace, Toowong).

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SPOTLIGHT OCA Events In this edition we recap on a number of events that have taken place across the second half of 2017. These events have seen people from all parts of our community come together to honour all things Green,White, Black.

AUGUST 16

M I S S K E L LY E D W A R D S Development and Events Coordinator Phone 07 3309 3513 or 0416 085 136 Email kedwards@bbc.qld.edu.au

MS HELEN JACKSON College Archivist Phone 07 3309 3629 Email hjackson@bbc.qld.edu.au

Brisbane Boys’ College was proud to host 27 Old Boys at Aquavit, a Michelin Star restaurant in St James’s Market, for the OCA London reunion. BBC’s Director of Alumni and Community, Jarrod Turner (OB 1999), who was on holidays at the time, organised the get together for those travelling through or based in the UK.

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The alumni years of the attendees ranged from James Grady (OB 2014) to Anthony Petrie (OB 1969). Thank you for those who attended the event. We look forward to catching up with our UK based Old Collegians soon.

JULY C H R I S T M A S I N J U LY 26 L U N C H E O N ( M T M E E ) More than 50 Vintage Collegians celebrated Christmas in July at Birches Restaurant in July, following a Chapel Service led by Rev. Graham Cole. The Mount Mee Community Church was host to the Sunshine Coast service, which celebrated the gift of a great foundation in life with a reading from Matthew 7: 24-28, The Wise and Foolish Builders. The eldest Old Collegians almost lifted the roof of the church with their moving rendition of Sons of the College.

LONDON REUNION

AUGUST CONTINUED O L D B O Y S ' D AY

Following the reunions, the College hosted Old Boys' Day where BBC faced a formidable Brisbane State High School. Commencing with tours of the school by key staff, the day was a truly historical one, celebrating 97 years of the Old Collegians’ Association with the GPS Basketball Premiership and our Rugby teams winning 100 percent of the GPS fixtures. To wrap up the event, members of the BBC community were invited to attend a Post-Match function with beverages provided by Michael Conrad (OB 1980) and his team from Newstead Brewery in addition to a sausage sizzle by our Young Old Boys' Committee.

OCTOBER 6

Staff from BBC made their annual trip to Papua New Guinea, hosting a function for current and prospective community members at the Royal Papua Yacht Club in Port Moresby in October. The function was highly attended and involved a presentation by Director of Alumni and Community, Jarrod Turner regarding recent school achievements and the future of the College.

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That evening, we welcomed 250 Old Boys from the Senior classes of 2007, 1997, 1987, 1977 and 1967 in separate rooms at the newly renovated Wests Bulldogs Rugby Club. Upon arrival, guests were greeted with some familiar tunes by OCA Piper, Lachlan McPhee (OB 2013). Special thanks to Matt Berndt (OB 2015) for taking photos on the night.

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17

MELBOURNE REUNION

22

OLD BOYS AND GUESTS CHRISTMAS LUNCH

SEPTEMBER 27

SUNSHINE COAST LUNCHEON The College was delighted to host the second annual Sunshine Coast event at Novotel Twin Waters Resort for 50 current and prospective community members. It was a wonderful evening, with the highlight being 96 year old BBC Old Boy, Bill Bray (1935-1937) sharing stories of his time at BBC, back in the day.

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Once again, the Hutchies BBC Golf Day turned out to be a huge success. This year for the first time, the course was booked out with 32 teams in attendance, including Old Boys, parents and friends of the College.

It was another fantastic turnout for this event south of the border, with more than 40 Old Boys in attendance at the Melbourne reunion. Alumni years ranged from 2011 to 1934. Our sincerest thanks to all who attended in particular the legend himself, BBC Old Boy, Jack Bell who turns 100 in December.

Fifty guests enjoyed a sumptuous two course Christmas lunch with all the trimmings as they farewelled Headmaster, Graeme McDonald and his wife Michelle.

24 HUTCHIES BBC GOLF D AY

YEAR 12 FINAL A S S E M B LY A N D O C A BBQ

The Senior cohort was presented with an OCA cap and letter from Director of Alumni and Community, Jarrod Turner, and Headmaster, Graeme McDonald.

YOUNG OLD BOYS' NIGHT On Saturday 14 October, at Wests Bulldogs Rugby Club, the OCA hosted our second Young Old Boys' event of 2017. Despite the rain, 60 of our youngest members didn't let it dampen what was a spectacular evening. Special thanks to the Young Old Boys' Committee for organising another great event.

DECADE REUNIONS Old Boys' weekend opened with the Class of 1957 and their partners’ luncheon celebrating 60 years since leaving the College. Initially, a smaller group toured the College in the morning, with 30 guests joining the Headmaster, Mr Graeme McDonald, for a two course lunch in the Boarders' Dining Room.

PAPUA NEW GUINEA COMMUNITY VISIT

NOVEMBER

NIC MACBEAN CUP Each year the Nic MacBean Cup is held to raise money for beyondblue in memory of BBC Old Boy, Nic MacBean who sadly passed away in 2015 after a decade-long battle with depression. Nic’s family, friends and Brisbane Boys' College wanted to make a difference. Inspired by the work of beyondblue, the BBC community gathers every year for a day of cricket when our First XI face the All-Stars, in celebration of Nic's life. This year's match proved to be a cracker, with the First XI boys taking home the trophy and the Old Boys left with sore bodies and a few sore heads.

Towards the end of the functions, the doors connecting the rooms were opened with numerous attendees choosing to stay and mingle. COLLEGIAN DECEMBER 2017


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LONDON REUNION

CHRISTMAS IN JULY LUNCHEON Wednesday 26 July

Wednesday 16 August

DECADE REUNIONS

OLD BOYS' DAY

Friday 25 August

Saturday 26 August

YOUNG OLD BOYS' NIGHT Saturday 14 October

MELBOURNE REUNION Friday 17 November

YEAR 12 FINAL ASSEMBLY + OCA BBQ Wednesday 1 November

OLD BOYS' CHRISTMAS LUNCH Wednesday 22 November

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JARROD TURNER

SANDY GRANT

THE MAN CAN TALK. ABOUT SPORT, FAMILY, TRAVELS, GREAT EXPERIENCES AND ANYTHING BRISBANE BOYS’ COLLEGE. HE CAN START A FRIENDSHIP IN FIVE SECONDS AND SHARE STORIES UNTIL THE COWS COME HOME. AND IT IS THIS SENTIMENT THAT HAS MADE JARROD TURNER SO SUCCESSFUL IN HIS VARIOUS ROLES AT BRISBANE BOYS’ COLLEGE THROUGHOUT THE YEARS. Jarrod, a proud BBC Old Boy (1995-1999), has given 11 years of service as a staff member of the College, most recently as Director of Alumni and Community in the Alumni Office. But his willingness to give back to his old school started in 2000, when a fresh faced Old Boy returned to BBC to coach the Under 14A Cricket team, leading them to be BBC’s most successful age group that year, finishing top of the ladder. In the same year, Jarrod was also Assistant Coach for the Under 15D Football, then named Soccer, with the same outcome; an undefeated a top of the ladder season. This initial impact on members of the BBC community was a forecast for what would become Jarrod's decade long career, built on genuine relationships, fierce determination and dedication to the Green, White, Black. Jarrod was appointed Director of Cricket from 2007 to 2009 (in his second year in charge BBC was ranked top performing GPS school in Cricket) and Southern Skies Director from 2011 to 2013. In his time as Senior Boarding Coordinator in 2015, Jarrod was able to effect real change within the Boarding House ensure academic and pastoral care for Senior School Boarders. As the architect of the BBC Community Sports Clinics, Jarrod and his community initiatives have strengthened relationships between the College and families and had a significant impact on boarding enrolments. From sports clinics, community service, tours, BBQ’s or local trade shows, Jarrod’s focus has always been to create connections with the community, through communication, engagement, activity and service. These programs have continued to develop over the past four years with students, staff and friends of the College visiting various areas in Queensland, interstate and overseas, including Roma, Biloela, Sunshine Coast, Barcaldine, Cairns, Moree,

Texas, Condamine, Goondiwindi, Miles, Toowoomba, Bangalow, Coffs Harbour, Longreach, as well as international trips to Hong Kong, Singapore, Macau, Papua New Guinea and Japan. Not only do each of the programs leave the communities in a better place, they also provide all who visit with a greater understanding of life outside the ‘Brisbane bubble’. In his role as Director of Community Relations (2013), Jarrod was recognised by the industry with an award for ‘Best Alumni and Community Event’ for the Moree Rugby Clinic at the Educate Plus International Conference in 2014. Jarrod was invited to present on his initiative at the Conference Breakfast Blitz. Since late 2014, Jarrod has been pivotal in strengthening the reputation of the Old Collegians’ Association as Director of Alumni and Community by ensuring Old Boys remained connected and involved in the school, whether it be at the annual Careers Conference, BBC Mentoring program, networking functions, keynote speaking, international events or community initiatives. With an undeniable passion for enabling a Brisbane Boys’ College education to be more accessible to Old Boys, Jarrod has been a strong advocate for Old Boys’ Bursaries. From Young Old Boys to Vintage Collegians and every Old Boy in between, there wouldn’t be such as vibrant alumni community without the dedication of Jarrod Turner. Jarrod will be moving on to his new role as Donor Relations Manager QLD and NSW at the Edmund Rice Foundation (Australia) in late January 2018. We would particularly like to acknowledge his outstanding efforts in the Community and Alumni areas of the school and his legacy of stronger more meaningful connections. We wish Jarrod all the best in his future career aspirations.

A NEW DIRECTION FOR THE FOUNDATION

Portrait of a Leader It is a College tradition for the departing Headmaster to have his portrait painted and displayed in the Captains’ Room in College Hall. The BBC Foundation presented the Headmaster’s portrait at the final Board meeting of the year in November. Painted by renowned artist, Peter Churcher the portrait captures BBC’s eighth Headmaster, Mr Graeme McDonald in his academic gown and will form part of the Bisset Gallery collection of art. Graeme was very pleased with the portrait by Churcher, who is recognised as one of the leading exponents of figurative painting in Australia. The artist has been a finalist in the Archibald Prize Exhibition eight times. Churcher's work is represented in many major public, corporate and private collections throughout Australia and overseas including the National Gallery of Australia, Canberra, The National Portrait Gallery, Canberra, The Australian War Memorial, Canberra, Parliament House, Victoria, the Collection of Kerry Stokes, Western Australia and the Collection of William S. Lieberman, USA.

Foundation Chairman, Andrew Macarthur (OB 1975) recently stepped down from his leadership role of the BBC Foundation Ltd and will remain on the board as an Executive Director. Andrew has volunteered many years of service, guidance, knowledge and enthusiasm to the College. Under his direction since 2011, the Foundation has undergone a shift to a genuine corporate structure, with a strong future and professional fundraising approach to advance BBC. On behalf of the College community and the Board, we acknowledge and thank him for his support in a role that while rewarding, at times can also be quite challenging. BBC Old Boy and past BBC Parent, Sandy Grant (1977) was unanimously voted in as the new Chairman and oversaw his first meeting in November. Sandy and his extended family have shared a long history with the College spanning multiple generations. He has given many years of service and patronage to the College having served as a Foundation Director since 2013. Sandy is eager to guide the Foundation with a firm vision and a new fundraising plan in 2018. We also welcome current BBC Parent, Mr Scott McMillan to the Foundation. Scott is married to Kerrie and together have three children, with son Lachlan in Year 9 at BBC. With a background in Economics and Accounting, he is Managing Director of Alliance Aviation Services Ltd. We all look forward to his experience, fresh ideas and whole-hearted contribution to the Foundation.

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KEN GOLD (1946 – 1949) Years at BBC Four. House Rudd (at the time all 120 boarders were in School House). Where do you live? Brisbane. Have you travelled? Soon after leaving BBC, I sailed to England for work on an International Farm Youth Exchange experience, culminating in a holiday pushbiking across Denmark, Germany, Holland and Belgium and several trains to Rome. I have worked in India and travelled to both China and Holland for work. Since retiring, my wife and I have embarked on self-drive tours of the British Isles, Europe, Canada, USA and New Zealand in addition to conducted tours of Turkey, Thailand, Spain, Morocco, Finland and Russia. Family status? Married to Glenda Stubbings with two children, Paul (OB 1974) and Jennifer. Current occupation? Retired. Previous occupation/s? For a short time, I worked for the government on a Colombo Plan Dairy Project in India. Upon my return, I landed a job as Assistant Secretary of the Queensland Dairymen’s Organisation. After seven years, I transferred to Stockyard Industries as a designer/ organiser in the construction of modern piggeries, which occasionally involved travel to China for talks on a joint venture piggery and Holland to train in installation and servicing of computer controlled pig feed systems. In our 'spare’ time, Glenda and I became landlords to various city real estate ventures and I was able to retire in 1991 at age 60. Having free time, I joined the Rudd/Hamilton Chapter, now known as the Vinatage Collegians and assisted the collection of College history leading up to our centenary. It was pleasing to be part of the establishment of the historical display at College house and continue that work over a period of 22 years. Did you study after BBC? Yes, after Senior, I returned to our family dairy farm at Samsonvale and attained a Certificate in Animal Husbandry from Gatton College by correspondence. I was active in the

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WHERE ARE THEY NOW? several technological advances of that era and was involved with the founding of the first Artificial Insemination Co-operative in Queensland at Dayboro and became a District Councillor for the East Moreton District of the Queensland Dairymen’s Organisation. Biggest achievement since leaving BBC? Marrying Glenda and raising two great children. What do you aspire to do in the future? Complete my family genealogy and organise thousands of photos and home videos. Favourite pastimes/hobbies? In retirement, I have enjoyed restoration of old vehicles including: 1967 MGB, 1927 Chevrolet Truck, 1954 TE20 Ferguson Tractor, 1964 MF30 tractor and various implements. Since the old Samsonvale district disappeared with the dam, I published a book concerning my time as a third generation dairy farmer in that area. What do you do on a day-off? Suburban retirement includes Church, Probus Club, Neighbourhood watch and general handyman tasks. Attend Vintage Collegians meetings and luncheons, read science and history books. Restore old machines. Favourite holiday destination? My holiday house at Shelly Beach, Caloundra. Fondest memory of BBC? Fellowship with a great bunch of fellow students. Favourite teacher? ‘ Little Bill ‘ Williams.

ANTHONY WILKINSON (1986 – 1990)

JEREMY BRIGGS (2009 – 2014)

Years at BBC Five. House Campbell (Captain). Where do you live? Hong Kong. Have you travelled? Asia (Taiwan, China, Korea, India, Singapore, Vietnam, Thailand); New Zealand; USA (lived in Indiana for a couple of years); Canada and Europe (UK, France, Italy, Germany, Spain) Family status? Single, no children. Current occupation? Regional Medical Director Asia Pacific – BTG International Previous occupation/s? Cook Medical – General Manager Hong Kong/APAC Medical and Compliance Director; Therapeutic Goods Administration (TGA) – Australian Federal Government (Medical Officer); Queensland Health (Medical Officer); Terry White Chemists (pharmacist); Jadin Chemist Group (pharmacist) Did you study after BBC? Bachelor of Pharmacy (BPharm); Bachelor of Medicine and Surgery (MBBS); Bachelor of Laws (LLB) Biggest achievement since leaving BBC? Completing my university degrees. Most recently passing the United States Bar exam and becoming a registered attorney in the USA. What do you aspire to do in the future? Retire to the beach; more cycling holidays in Europe/USA; complete another Ironman triathlon and finish my PhD in regulatory law. Favourite pastimes/hobbies? Cycling, triathlon, watching basketball, soccer. What do you do on your day off? Hike, watch TV, cycle, explore Hong Kong or whatever city I happen to be in. What is playing on your iPod right now? Mercy by Muse. Favourite holiday destination? Italian or French Alps. Fondest memory of BBC? Numerous but playing in the First V Basketball team is a particular highlight. Favourite teacher/s? Steve Mann.

Years at BBC Six. House Wesley. Where do you live? At home with my family. Have you travelled? I did a trip around Africa on safari after finishing school. Family status? Not yet married and no children. Current occupation? Medical Student. Previous occupation/s? Laboratory intern at the UQ skeletal muscle laboratory. Did you study after BBC? Currently entering the Doctor of Medicine course having completed a Bachelor of Science. Biggest achievement since leaving BBC? I have won multiple university awards – the Ray Ladd prize as top of second year pharmacology, the Robert Kennedy prize in Anatomy and the Trevor Appleton first year chemistry prize. What do you aspire to do in the future? I aim to become an endocrinologist and work in a hospital in Europe. Favourite pastimes/hobbies? I am still running competitively and playing tennis. What do you do on a day-off? I mainly use the time to wind down and watch some TV. I also usually run on a day off. What is playing on your iPod right now? Remember the Name by Fort Minor. Favourite holiday destination? Our family beach unit at Currimundi. Fondest memory of BBC? Placing in the Open 3000m in front of a sea of BBC supporters at GPS. Favourite teacher/s? Scott Grice.

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SNAPSHOTS | 73

Male Teachers:

The Endangered Species.

The Next Generation.

WHERE ARE THEY NOW Jano, who is due to complete his Degree in Education at the end of 2018, is set to join Wayne Banks in the Year 6 classroom for nine weeks next year for one of his final internships, an experience he describes as the best type of ‘experience’. “As with anything in life, doing is the best way to learn and as I say to those I coach – if you want to succeed in life you must be prepared to put in the practice,” says Jano. In between studying and playing cricket for the University of Queensland, Jano spends a significant amount of his time coaching young children with the Blues Cricket Academy, helping them to acquire the fundamental skills in one of Australia’s favourite sports. “I’ve been coaching since leaving school and the experience has not only enabled me to build my confidence over time, but has affirmed that working with young people is what it’s all about for me,” he said. “I’ve found that I’m able to connect and communicate most effectively with those aged from around nine to 11 years of age and this has prompted me to specialise in primary education.” When speaking with Jano about the gender imbalance emerging in education, he reflects on his own tertiary experience, noting that while there was a sizeable group of men to begin, although comparatively small, as the end nears it appears only a handful are set to ‘stay the course’.

Jano Coetzee (2008 – 2011)

AS PART OF OUR FEATURE MALE TEACHERS: ENDANGERED SPECIES WE RECENTLY CAUGHT UP WITH JANO COETZEE (2011) TO GAIN HIS PERSPECTIVE AS HE LOOKS TO ENTER THE CLASSROOM AND READY HIMSELF FOR A CAREER IN EDUCATION.

“I’m not entirely sure as to why this has occurred, but for me I feel it’s important to look at teaching as a long-term prospect. Sure there may be times where things feel uncertain, but reminding myself of the influence teachers can have in the classroom and on a child’s life enables me to stay focused. “My mum is also a Vice Principal and my brother and his wife, teachers, so I guess you could say there’s a bit of a teaching thing going on in the family." “Yet as I’ve grown up and reflected on those who have had the biggest influence on my life, family aside, they’ve always been teachers, so for me the choice was clear.” Interestingly enough, it’s not only those who have explicitly ‘taught’ Jano who have made an impact. “David Biggs was always such a positive role model and had quite an influence on me. He wasn’t my teacher but my cricket coach and we still keep in touch today thanks to our coaching roles and involvement with the UQ Cricket Club.” We look forward to welcoming Jano back to BBC in 2018 as he continues his transition from student to teacher.

SPRING FASHION PARADE 8 SEPTEMBER - HILLSTONE, ST LUCIA Hillstone, St Lucia was transformed into the fast-paced world of New York City in September for the annual BBC Spring Fashion Parade. At what is arguably the hottest event on the BBC Parent Connections social calendar, more than 300 ladies of Brisbane Boys’ College gathered for a day of beautiful fashion, amazing food and drink and a whole lot of fun.

TO READ THE FULL FEATURE, MALE TEACHERS: THE ENDANGERED SPECIES, SEE PAGES 22 TO 28.

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SPEECH NIGHT 7 NOVEMBER - QPAC An evening of celebration, reflection, mateship and thanks. A special opportunity for our community to acknowledge the honour, excellence and merit of our boys.

GRANDPARENTS AND FRIENDS' DAY 14 SEPTEMBER - JUNIOR SCHOOL FORECOURT It was an absolute delight to see so many grandparents and grandfriends at the College for the annual Grandparents’ and Friends’ Day. The special guests provided wonderful company for our young learners, who took great delight in sharing their living legends with their peers (despite near gale force winds threatening to blow away the delicious morning tea).

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YEAR 12 MOTHER'S FAREWELL LUNCHEON

MIDDLE SCHOOL AWARDS CEREMONY 29 NOVEMBER - COLLEGE HALL

16 NOVEMBER - BOARDERS' DINING ROOM As our Year 12s don their tie and boater for the last time, we must spare a thought for many of our Senior parents who depart our gates for the final time. We thank them for their contributions to College life and for the support they have given to their sons, our staff and the wider College community.

This special assembly symbolises the graduation of our Year 9 students from Middle School to Senior School. It is also a celebration of the wonderful achievements of our Year 7, 8 and 9 students across academic, co-curricular and service areas.

Milestones

ROBERT BUCK AND KATHLEEN SHOBBROCK

WEDDINGS 13 September Ryley Kleinschmidt (2005) and Sara Brown 1 September Robert Buck (2003) and Kathleen Shobbrock 11 August Nicholas Ferris (1996) and Caroline Petsch

VALE John Henley Martin (1934-1943) passed in November 2017 Stuart James Brand (1991-1994) passed in October 2017 Peter James McInerney (1985-1991) passed in October 2017 Rodney Henry Golding (1950-1951) passed in September 2017 Robert ‘Jock’ Grant (1956-1960) passed in August 2017 Graham ‘Michael’ Atthow (1961-1964) passed in August 2017 John Frederick Barnes (1939-1940) passed in July 2017 Donald Lincoln Hunter (1967-1972) passed in June 2017 Andrew Rodney Harris (1991-1996) passed in May 2017 Bruce Charles Hervey (1956-1959) passed in May 2017 Neal Rees Thomson (1940-1943) passed in May 2017 Doug Cowlishaw (1937-1939) passed in January 2017

SHARE YOUR COMMUNITY ANNOUNCEMENT In each edition of Collegian, we include a number of community announcements including births, weddings and the vale as part of our Milestone section. If you have an announcement you would like to share with us, relating to either yourself or a fellow Old Boy, please inform BBC’s Alumni Office via oca@bbc.qld.edu.au

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the headline: Schoolboy Olympic Hope Smashed Five BBC Records. The newspaper clipping continues: "John Loveday, 17-year-old BBC athlete must be regarded as a future Olympic prospect as a result of his phenomenal all-round display in his College athletics yesterday." The Headmaster Mr PM Hamilton, who won an Athletics Oxford Blue, described Loveday as "the best all round athlete the College has produced. Mr Hamilton is quoted saying, "Loveday scored 34 points in the College’s Open Championship, out of a possible 37. No other competitor reached double figures".

1946 FLASHBACK Helen Jackson, Archivist

THE RIPPLE EFFECT

A RECENT MEETING WITH THE WELL CREDENTIALED LOCAL ATHLETE, TONY BOOTH WAS TIME SPENT TALKING AND REMINISCING OVER SCRAPBOOKS, CUTTINGS AND PHOTOS OF OUTSTANDING BBC ATHLETES OF THE 1930S-1950S. WHAT HAS BEEN EQUALLY ABSORBING HAS BEEN THE SKIPPED STONE RIPPLE EFFECT ACROSS THE BBC WATERS. IMAGES TOP (L-R): COURIER MAIL PHOTO (1946) OF JOHN LOVEDAY HURDLING, JOHN LOVEDAY JUMPING AT THE EKKA IMAGES BELOW (L-R): BROTHERS-IN-LAW - WARWICK ARROWSMITH (LEFT) AND GRAEME WILSON (RIGHT), JOHN LOVEDAY FIRST OVER THE HURDLES IN NEW ZEALAND IMAGE ABOVE WARICK ARROWSMITH WINNING THE HALF MILE AT UQ

LOVEDAY Located in the archives is a stained blue lined exercise book filled with glued newspaper cuttings, which records the life of Tony Booth's good mate, John Loveday (1943-1946). The Courier Mail article dated, Tuesday 10 September 1946, page six has

In the 1946 Interhouse competition, Loveday won the Open 100 yards (10 3/5 secs), 220 yards (33 4/5 secs) and Mile (5mins 10secs). He created records in the following: 440 yards (52secs), 880 yards (2min 2secs), 120 yards, hurdles (16 1/5 secs), broad jump (21ft 4 1/2 ins), and high jump (5ft 9ins) with his own height.

Despite the early newspaper predictions, Loveday did not achieve Olympic selection, however his University of Queensland (UQ) Athletic Club career was illustrious. Loveday was selected in the Australian University team which competed successfully against New Zealand Universities. When he retired at the age of 28, John Loveday held 15 Australian university titles and two records: 120 yards hurdles (14.8 secs) and 220 yards hurdles (24.7 secs). He recorded the same times on other occasions to set the state records for both these events. After gaining a BCom in 1959, the former Queen Street Commercial Bank of Australia employee moved to Sydney where he worked for International Business Machines. From the USA, he gained an MBA Rutgers (NY); Princeton (NJ). John retired in 1985, then worked parttime in a consultancy company, which he formed.

WILSON + ARROWSMITH In the 1946 Courier Mail article, Mr Hamilton comments saying: "Our previous best all-round athlete was GL Wilson (1931-1935). He specialised in high jump, hurdles and sprints. He became a Queensland Rhodes Scholar and later an Australian representative at the Empire Games." 1935 Alumnus, Graeme Wilson and Warwick Arrowsmith were BBC students who excelled in all facets of school life. Both won Open Scholarships to the University of Queensland, where Graeme studied

Agricultural Science and Warwick, Medicine. Both successfully represented UQ in Intervarsity Games and were selected in the Australian team of five, which toured New Zealand in 1940. Similarly, mates, Tony Booth and John Loveday spearheaded UQ athletics during the late 1940s and early 1950s. While on tour, a parochial local newspaper wrote the New Zealand born Warwick Arrowsmith was "the most impressive member of the Australian Universities’ athletic team." The article observed "for an athlete (a half-miler), who has never received the benefit of expert tuition, Arrowsmith runs extraordinarily well. He is quite a stylist. He has good leg action and arm carriage." Graeme Wilson’s leadership and sporting abilities had been acknowledged at BBC by being honoured as College Captain, as well as Captain of Boats, Rugby and Athletics, and although a member of each of these teams, Warwick latently matured as a middle-distance runner at university. A small cutting from The Courier Mail 16 May, 1940, page 12 says: "Warwick Arrowsmith State and Australian University athletic champion, who recently returned from New Zealand with an unbeaten record, gave a brilliant display in winning the first heat of the quarter-mile at the annual championships of the University of Queensland Athletic Club at the Brisbane Cricket Ground." Warwick’s best recorded performances were 50.4secs for 440 yards and 1min 57.4secs for the 880 yards. He was the only recipient of the prestigious AUSA Honour Coat in 1940. Having completed their studies, both Wilson and Arrowsmith enlisted in the Australian Armed Forces in 1941. Lieutenant Graeme Wilson 2/26th Battalion was captured at the fall of Singapore and was a POW who worked on the notorious Burma Railway. Six Old Collegians died as POWs, fortunately Graeme returned home. After completing his deferred Rhodes Scholarship at Oxford University, Graeme became a Lecturer in Botany at UQ, Professor of Agriculture and Dean of the Faculty (1981-1982), retiring as Emeritus Professor in 1982. Captain Warwick Arrowsmith saw active service in the Middle East and in New Guinea. One of those reverberating BBC ripples occurred after the capture of Shaggy Ridge, New Guinea, when Captain Dr W Arrowsmith tended Pte Richard Wills on 6 February 1944. The 20 year old Richard Wills is one of 13 Old Collegians who are remembered in Papua New Guinea. Fortuitously, Dr Arrowsmith returned to work in the public hospital system for three years and then worked as a General Practitioner at Greenslopes. The shared experience of a BBC education echoes globally and is often found in the most unexpected places. The familiar circles and collective support for its athletic heroes are common memories of time spent at Toowong. And it is found scrapbooks which have been the catalyst for seeing the interconnectedness of the BBC family both internationally and across generations.


Boys are natural storytellers. We simply help them master the art of effective communication. Our boys are the protagonists in their own epic tales. At Brisbane Boys’ College, we encourage them to become effective communicators and masterful storytellers. Imagine the cumulative benefit of public speaking and boy-centric literacy programs which start in our Junior School. At BBC, boys as young as six learn to entertain and engage their audience, present a compelling case, and become good listeners who make informed decisions about their own beliefs. It’s programs like these – together with Debating, Theatre, and presenting to a panel of experts at the Biology Symposium – which prepare our boys for a future in law, business strategy or question time. Because if they’re able to master the science of communication, we know it will serve them well for the next chapter of their lives.

Collegian Magazine - December 2017  

The biannual magazine for Brisbane Boys' College.

Collegian Magazine - December 2017  

The biannual magazine for Brisbane Boys' College.