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COLLEGIAN The MAGAZINE of Brisbane Boys’ College

December 2013

D N A T S E W D E T I UN PT E E X T CH A N E H T ; G EGINNIN A NE W B

Also inside:

R

VITAL HEAD START

REDEFINING EDUCATION

FAMILY TREE

ENRICHING THE

THE FLIP SIDE TO

A CONNECTION WITH

CURRICULUM IN THE

RESH APING CL ASSROOM

THE COLLEGE SPANNING

FOUND ATION YE A RS

BOUNDARIES

GENER ATIONS


COLLEGIAN I S S U E 2 D E C E M B E R 2013

12

UPFRONT

6

Walking the path of the Crusade

Headlines A few words from Headmaster Graeme McDonald

The seniors of 2014 look forward to the year ahead

14

BBC NEWS

8

On the other side

From seniors to old colleigans

Middle schooling in focus Meet our new Director of Middle School Student Development

For the full story turn to page 14

Closing the gap BBC riders take part in the Brisbane to Gold Coast bike ride

25 Compass

The journey begins for new students

18

26

BBC Boarders are inspired by Queensland sporting great, Wayne Bennett

Redefining the boundaries of education

Never give up

ON THE COVER

20

Flipside

BBC ARTS

35 Art show

Prep to Year 12 students take us into their world

Published by Brisbane Boys’ College CRICOS Code 00491J Kensington Terrace, Toowong, Queensland 4066 T 07 3309 3571 F 07 3371 2679 W www.bbc.qld.edu.au A MEMBER OF THE PRESBYTERIAN AND METHODIST SCHOOLS ASSOCIATION

Editor and Art Director Adele Graves Graphic Design Alison Baillie Contributors Nicole de Vries, Bren Arkinstall, Kelly Edwards, Helen Jackson, Laura Aguayo Photography Michael Marston, Matt Roberts, Jesse Smith Cover BBC spirit at its best. Photograph by Michael Marston, ePixel Images

38 Smithy

This year's Junior School musical


Collective Excellence THIS Y E A R ’ S SPEECH NIGHT PA ID TR IB U TE TO E A CH B OY ’ S CONTR IB U TION TO THE B B C COMMUNIT Y

COLLEGIAN DECEMBER 2013 2012


BBC SPORT

REGULAR ITEMS

42

49 90 Insight

Flashback

Triple crown win

The experts offer advice to navigate through the journey of parenthood

BBC's Carnegie collection

Tennis trifecta

44

86 91

Launchpad: it's time to move BBC becomes a recognised provider of gymnastics based fundamental movement programs

CONNECT

65 75 80 Places We Go

An interview with old collegian Clint Bizzell

Old Boys Weekend

Vintage Collegians

Old collegians return for the annual premier event

Lineal connections across the decades

Snapshots

Last word

Scenes from the Spring Fashion Parade and other events in the College calendar

The game's afoot


UPFRONT | 5

Not Just Another Cricket Field N A MING JOHN NOB LET OVA L

FROM THE EDITOR WITHOUT DOUBT, THE SCHOOLING JOURNEY FOR EACH AND EVERY ONE OF US HAS THE POWER TO CONJURE UP MEMORIES LONG AFTER WE LEAVE THE SCHOOLYARD AND WELL INTO ADULTHOOD.

For so many it represents a time of prolific self-discovery and a time

From the vital head start we provide boys in Prep, through to our

where friendships are forged, imaginations nurtured, opinions shaped,

strong focus on middle schooling and nurturing young adolescents,

talents unearthed and in essence the very foundation as to how we

to the diverse achievements of our old collegians and equally their

choose to live out our lives today.

recollections of their time at school, I hope the stories in this edition

The schooling journey lends itself however to overt cycles – from the very first day to graduating from primary school, to entering high school and that very last day which represents the end of the line and the start of something new. Or does it? For some, the last day of the final year represents the full completion

provide you with a sense of just how monumental the school journey can be. Thank you to both our readers and those who have shared their stories with us in 2013. We hope you have a relaxing holiday break and look forward to bringing you more insights into life at BBC and

of the schooling cycle. What we see in this edition of Collegian however

beyond in 2014.

is the continuing of this circle of events and a connection with the

ADELE GRAVES

College that lasts for life, as boys cross from students to old collegians,

EDITOR

joining with those who have gone before them.

COLLEGIAN COLLEGIAN DECEMBER AUGUST 2013 2012


6 | UPFRONT

HEADLINES: DEALING IN DREAMS

MY COLLEAGUES AND I DEAL IN DREAMS. WE HELP TO LAY THE FOUNDATION STONES FOR SO MANY YOUNG MEN TO BUILD REWARDING AND EXCITING CAREERS. IN A VERY REAL WAY MY COLLEAGUES AND I ARE PLAYING A PART IN CREATING TOMORROW’S WORLD. WE ARE LIGHTING THE FIRE OF AMBITION IN THE HEARTS OF THE YOUNG MEN ENTRUSTED TO OUR CARE.

world our boys will need to understand

opportunities for our boys to show their real

say that I have never woken up and said,

I really love my job and I can honestly

the importance of using data wisely. I

strength of character.

“I really don’t want to go to school today.”

believe you must become discerning

My job brings new challenges every day

and learn to collect the right data, ask

and although the role is complex and the

and just as they say in the sporting world,

informed questions, plan clinically and then,

demands do tend to keep piling up every

“as you train so shall you play”, this applies

importantly, execute well.

equally in all other forms of endeavour. We

day, it is never boring. The reason I find my work so appealing is

As I mentioned during the event, I cannot

School is like a training ground for life

want our boys to learn that nothing worth

provide a template for success for each of

having ever comes easily. Use your

that every day I get to work with 1570 boys

our boys. Every boy will have to strive for

God-given talents wisely and learn that hard

who believe that nothing is impossible and

success in his own way. However, I do want

work brings its own reward. In the future our

their positive outlook on life is infectious.

every boy to aim to be a man of integrity, a

boys will face many choices and they will

My colleagues and I deal in dreams.

'gentleman of honour' because then he will

shape the men they will become.

We help to lay the foundation stones for

be admired by all those who work with him.

I ask you to remember these powerful

so many young men to build rewarding

School is like a safe haven where boys

words from Wayne Bennett which he shared

and exciting careers. In a very real way

are shielded from the pressures of life, but it

at our recent Boarders’ Dinner, “If you have

my colleagues and I are playing a part in

is also a place where they are encouraged

the courage to make the tough decisions

creating tomorrow’s world. We are lighting

and inspired to become the men they were

each day, when you look in the mirror, you

the fire of ambition in the hearts of the

meant to be. In this environment they are

will see a man of real character.”

young men entrusted to our care.

urged to take some risks and are told that it is okay to make mistakes. We show them

GRAEME McDONALD

celebration, the world our boys are entering

here that they will face disappointments,

HEADMASTER

is changing by the minute and we must

but in life’s journey they must never allow

prepare them to face the challenges that

disappointment to deter them from pursuing

lie ahead. Success, is about strategy

their dream. These disappointments

and to actively participate in tomorrow’s

are simply obstacles, or should I say,

As I observed at our Speech Night


BBC NEWS | 7

BBC NEWS 8 Middle schooling in focus Meet our new Director of Middle School Student Development

11 Vital head start Enriching the curriculum in the Junior School

12 Walking the path of the Crusade The seniors of 2014 look forward to the new year

18 Never give up BBC boarders are inspired by Wayne Bennett

20 Closing the gap BBC riders take part in the Brisbane to Gold Coast bike ride

25 Compass The journey begins for new students

On the other side COLLEGI A N CR OSS OV ER

COLLEGIAN DECEMBER 2013 2012


8 | BBC NEWS

IN FOCUS

MIDDLE SCHOOLING


BBC NEWS | 9

MEET NATASHA. EXPERIENCED, ENERGETIC, ENTHUSIASTIC AND BBC’S DIRECTOR OF MIDDLE SCHOOL STUDENT DEVELOPMENT. Having worked at BBC for over a decade across several positions including Senior Housemaster and Acting Dean of Studies, this newly created role sees Natasha’s focus turn to academics, transition and pastoral care in the all-important Middle School years. Natasha joins a team of educators and Head of Middle School Tony Chittenden, working collaboratively with the College community, connecting the voice of parents, students and teachers and unifying this within Middle School programs. And when it comes to developing a strong rapport with students in particular, Natasha shines. “Working with young adolescents is an extremely rewarding phase of education. The endless amount of enthusiasm of boys at this age is contagious and I wholeheartedly embrace this energy,” she said. Over the past three months, Natasha has worked closely with staff on enhancing the pastoral care experience at BBC to support boys in times of transition. Specifically she has focused on Year 6 students as they move from the Junior to Middle School and orientating students set to join the College community in 2014. According to Natasha, middle schooling represents a time of great change for boys, more so than at any other stage, where the journey from a boy to a young man really starts to take shape and where this transition is most visible. “Students in the Middle School are eager, or borderline impatient, to dramatically increase their level of independence and freedom at this age,” explains Natasha. “At the same time, they also attempt to increase their amount of meaningful interactions with adults other than their parents, to elicit support and encouragement. It’s essential for every educator at BBC to embrace their responsibility and encourage their students to develop a love for learning with the definitive goal of becoming independent learners,” she said. “The transitional environment surrounding the middle years of schooling requires a systematic approach, to ensure a successful progression for boys entering the Middle School and exiting as they move to the Senior School,” she explains. “Our programs are designed to nurture an authentic connection between every one of our Middle School boys and their pastoral carers.” “I spent a considerable amount of time in the Junior School during the last term for 2013, endeavouring to ensure all students were familiar with myself but also my role. It was particularly important for me that they saw me as someone who was

COLLEGIAN DECEMBER 2013 2012


10 | BBC NEWS

“BBC HAS MORE THAN A DECADE WORTH OF EXPERIENCE IN MIDDLE SCHOOLING; TO BE ABLE TO BUILD ON THIS INCREDIBLY RICH FOUNDATION IS EXTREMELY REWARDING AND I’M LOOKING FORWARD TO WHAT THE FUTURE WILL BRING.”

readily accessible, easily approachable and

is the flexibility to effortlessly transform the

opportunity to meet with parents of our

ready to provide support, guidance and

physical and virtual spaces, affording both

Middle School boys to hear their thoughts

encouragement.”

teachers and students the power to readily

and feedback. The success of one’s

govern the pathway of their learning.

educational journey strongly correlates to

Yet transition and pastoral care is merely one component of the role – the ultimate goal

“BBC has more than a decade worth of

the partnership forged between students,

for Natasha lies in creating unified programs

experience in middle schooling; to be able

teachers and parents and for this to be

that foster a holistic educational experience.

to build on this incredibly rich foundation is

effectively accomplished, we all have an

“Ultimately, I’m aspiring to cultivate an

extremely rewarding and I’m looking forward to

instrumental part to play, maintaining open

unabridged approach, unique and distinctive

what the future will bring.”

lines of communication.”

to our College.”

In 2014 the College will be trialing the

At the end of the day for Natasha, ensuring

implementation of one-to-one interviews

the College enables boys to discover who they

Middle School Precinct completed, Natasha’s

between Middle School boys and their

really are and who they dream of becoming sits

appointment represents a strategic focus, as

Housemasters, a program that has been

at the core of her philosophy.

she works directly with staff and students to

received with much success in the Senior

“I strongly encourage our Middle School

enhance the 21st century learning experience

School. Emphasis will also be given to the

boys to adopt the mantra, ‘success is not a

the new precinct provides.

academic curriculum, with Natasha’s focus

destination, it’s a journey’. A journey that we

lying not only in supporting students pastorally,

all must embrace and most importantly find

experiencing significant transformation and

but ensuring teachers have access to data

gratification in.” Natasha likens this to the

a key facet of this development is the capacity

which enables them to track and monitor each

words of Eleanor Roosevelt, one of the most

for students to acquire and interact with

student’s progress.

influential women of the 20th century and

So what’s in store for 2014? With the new

“Education in the 21st century is

knowledge. It is vital that we actively take

As a person who is passionately solutions

the longest serving First Lady of the United

responsibility for preparing our students for

focused and able to draw on her extensive

States, “The purpose of life is to live it, to

life beyond BBC, where digital proficiency

experience in both the academic and pastoral

taste experience to the utmost, to reach

and responsible management are essential,”

fields, Natasha is certainly well equipped for

out eagerly and without fear for newer

explains Natasha.

what lies ahead.

and richer experience.”

“I believe one of the most exciting prospects the Middle School Precinct presents

“My role will continue to evolve as 2014 progresses and I certainly welcome the


BBC NEWS | 11

A VITAL HEAD START

WHERE IT MATTERS MOST JUST AS A GREAT LEADER IS NOTHING WITHOUT PEOPLE, A

GREAT CURRICULUM IS NOTHING WITHOUT A GREAT TEACHER AND IN REAL TERMS CAN EQUATE TO VERY LITTLE WHEN IT COMES TO STUDENT OUTCOMES. In today’s educational environment, gaining traction and success in the classroom is not just driven by content, but more importantly delivery. Teachers must have an understanding of how to support individual students in their learning journey and the tools in place to do so. With this in mind, Brisbane Boys’ College runs a Literacy Screening Program in the Junior School. The program aligns not only with the outcomes and criteria stipulated in the Australian Curriculum but also with child development and the impact this has on learning. The program assesses a student’s functional ability in phonological awareness (a prerequisite for learning literacy), spelling and reading comprehension –– as well as a student’s motor and language comprehension skills. Students from Prep to Year 3 are screened at the beginning of Term 1 and the end of Term 2 with Years 4 to 6 students at the start of the school year. According to BBC's Speech Language Pathologist Evelyn Terry, it’s important to note that these tests simply provide teachers with a benchmark with which to gauge student performance.

“Having access to this data enables teachers to identify each student’s individual strengths and weaknesses and where required to develop targeted intervention strategies to ensure all students are developing the literacy skills required to engage with the Australian Curriculum,” Ms Terry said. “The major benefit of the program is the collaborative feedback process whereby the class teacher meets with myself, a learning support teacher and the Junior School Head of Teaching and Learning. By utilising observations from the class teacher and the data from screening we are able to make recommendations for the implementation of levels of support in the classroom – it’s targeted, timely and tailored,” she said. In Prep the screening program is supported by a literacy teaching program. This program is geared specifically for students in their Foundation Year with a structured process in place for the introduction of sounds and letters that aligns with child development. “It’s funny, as adults we forget all the skills we needed to acquire to be able to read and write. As an adult, trying to read or write an unfamiliar

word such as globijerina is just as daunting as it is for the student in their Foundation Year to be asked to read or write mug.” Designed by Evelyn Terry and Occupational Therapist Fiona Jones, the program is implemented by teachers in the classroom and embedded within the curriculum, making it different from many other schools who operate stand alone programs. The teaching program includes a framework of lesson plans, however these are not prescriptive instead allowing for individual teaching styles and different classroom themes and contexts. The input into the program from the Speech Pathologist and the Occupational Therapist is about providing a value add to enrich the curriculum and to support boys’ learning. “The Foundation Year literacy program is about giving boys a vital head start where it matters most. It ensures teachers are able to support every student in the classroom so that the boys feel confident and empowered to actively engage in their own learning journey.”

COLLEGIAN DECEMBER 2013 2012


12 | BBC NEWS

CRUSA

CRUSADE

WALKING THE PATH OF THE CRUSADE THE SENIORS OF 2014 LOOK WITH GREAT EXCITEMENT TO THE NEW YEAR. WE ASKED EDWARD ZHOU AND JEREMY BRIGGS, OUR 2014 CAPTAIN AND VICE CAPTAIN TO CAPTURE IN WORDS WHAT'S IN STORE FOR THE FUTURE. By Edward Zhou and Jeremy Briggs


BBC NEWS | 13

"THE THEME CRUSADE RECOGNISES THE POTENTIAL FOR SUCCESS ACROSS THE WHOLE SCHOOL, WITH THE ENTIRE STUDENT BODY WORKING TOGETHER TO ACHIEVE GREATNESS."

As Captain and Vice Captain for next year, we look forward to the chance to extend the College to even greater heights than ever before; drawing inspiration from the theme for 2014 - Crusade. The theme Crusade recognises the potential for success across the whole school, with the entire student body working together to achieve greatness. This term does not discriminate between activities, instead it provides every student the opportunity to participate and enjoy improvement in any discipline they choose to pursue. As leaders of the College, our aim is to illustrate every opportunity to crusade; with each student playing an integral role at every BBC event, initiative and challenge in order to achieve school-wide success. With enough emphasis, students will hopefully understand their full potential to make a difference in all aspects of College life. One of our major plans involves securing many of our younger students in the full Brisbane Boys' College experience. Through increased participation and a large emphasis on their success, we hope to inspire further involvement of these younger boys. This essentially encompasses how we intend to inspire the student body; reciprocating their interest in the activities of the older boys with interests in the activities of our youngest learners. In 2014 we hope, with our fellow peers, to take the College to new heights as we walk the path of the Crusade.

COLLEGIAN DECEMBER 2013 2012


14 | BBC NEWS

YEAR 12 LAST DAY

ON THE OTHER

SIDE


BBC NEWS | 15

THE LAST DAY OF SCHOOL IS ONE OF THOSE MOMENTS IN LIFE THAT SEEM TO STICK LONG AFTER THE TIME HAS GONE. AT BBC THE DAY IS ONE OF CELEBRATION WITH A NUMBER OF EVENTS AND CEREMONIES HELD IN RECOGNITION OF THE RITE OF PASSAGE.

COLLEGIAN DECEMBER 2013 2012


16 | BBC NEWS

This year the day commenced with a breakfast, where boys were given the opportunity to thank their parents for their support, followed by walking through the iconic guard of honour, with students from various year levels forming a wall through which seniors were guided by none other than the BBC Pipe Band, which is quite possibly there to signify every major event in the College. According to Head of Senior School Kyle Thompson, the day is one that will forever signify a major milestone in a boy’s life. “We go to a great deal of effort to ensure the last day is as memorable as when they walked through the gates at BBC for the first time,” Mr Thompson said. “The rite of passage pays tribute to the amazing bonds these boys have formed - between each other and our staff - and their invaluable contribution to College life and culture,” he said. “Emotions often run high and it’s hard to adequately encapsulate in words alone the feeling generated on the day.” For the senior cohort the day also represents a significant crossover as they celebrate their time as a student and look to the future as an old collegian of the College. According to Old Collegians’ Association President Alex Persley, the OCA is designed to establish a strong fellowship between old boys and the College, providing invaluable opportunities for past students long after school has finished. “A connection with BBC is one for life; membership of the OCA is free and enables past students to tap into a diverse and strong network of those who have gone before them,” Mr Persley said. In October, the 2013 cohort celebrated its final assembly with a ceremony that officially inducted them into the OCA. “This is a great opportunity for us to connect with our youngest old collegians and each boy was presented with his OCA tie. “Alumni events aren’t often front of mind for new old collegians, however we pride ourselves on providing opportunities for all old boys regardless of their graduation year." Many boys were joined by their fathers who had also attended the College.


BBC NEWS | 17

REFLECTIONS A NUMBER OF DEPARTING SENIORS REFLECT ON THEIR TIME AT THE COLLEGE, SHARING THEIR VIEWS AND PROVIDING INSIGHT INTO THEIR OWN BBC EXPERIENCE.

TRISTAN UNDERHILL

SAM CATLOW

LACHLAN GOODING

LOOKING TO THE FUTURE AS AN OLD COLLEGIAN

MOST STAND OUT EXPERIENCE

MOST MEMORABLE MOMENT

Out of everything I have done and seen at

After six years at the College there are so

I am looking forward to putting all that BBC

BBC the thing that stands out to me most

many great moments, it’s hard to choose

has taught me over my nine years into

are the boys within the College, because

simply one! Personally some of my favourite

action. I feel that they have equipped me

without them it just wouldn't be the same.

moments were at the GPS Gymnastics

with everything possible so I can turn my

As I have gone through the school the sports

Championship at TSS; to nail my high bar

dreams and visions into reality. It is excellent

and other activities have been less about the

dismount in front of a legion of Green, White

to know that as a new old collegian I am

activity, and more about spending time and

and Black meant the world to me. However,

joining an association that has a wealth of

working together with my mates. When we

the greatest moment I have experienced

experience and will support me through

work together and achieve a victory together

came only 11 days before I left the College.

the rest of my life. Having connections to

for the College it is worth more than any

To have the privilege of playing Highland

the old school tie is invaluable in a working

individual victory that I could ever achieve.

Cathedral for my fellow collegians at Speech

environment where networking is the key.

Night is a moment I will never forget. That

I look forward to getting out into the wider

song has so much tradition, emotion and

community and displaying what BBC has

power behind it and I couldn’t help to shed a

taught me and living by the BBC motto 'Sit

tear as I realised my time at the College was

Sine Labe Decus; Let Honour Stainless Be'.

up. I will never forget that tune or how loud the last war cry was that followed.

COLLEGIAN DECEMBER 2013 2012


18 | BBC NEWS

"WAYNE HIGHLIGHTED THAT IF YOU WANT TO BE GOOD AT SOMETHING YOU HAVE TO STICK AT IT AND NEVER GIVE UP."

NEVER GIVE UP AS ONE OF THE MOST ACCOMPLISHED COACHES AND RESPECTED MENTORS, IT'S HARD NOT TO BE INSPIRED BY WAYNE BENNETT, AS BBC BOARDERS FOUND OUT AFTER A PERSONAL ENCOUNTER WITH THE QUEENSLAND SPORTING GREAT. Bennett spoke to the boarders at a formal dinner in October, providing insight into the personal qualities and habits that he deems essential for success in life. According to BBC’s Headmaster Graeme McDonald, the boys were particularly captivated by Wayne’s story and the lessons learnt along the way. “When Wayne was speaking you could have heard a pin drop. The boys were extremely appreciative of Wayne’s message and many of them have continued to speak of the event long after the dinner,” Mr McDonald said. “Wayne spoke about rugby league in passing, but his real focus was on how to become an honourable man,” he said. “Wayne urged our boarders to make commitments rather than promises. Promises he argued are just so easy to break, whilst real commitment is reflected in focused or single-minded action.” For the boys, upon reflection the most imparting messages revealed themes of never give up, commitment and hard work. According to Year 10 boarder Eamon Uhr from Emerald, it was Wayne’s personal journey that was most inspiring. “From very little, Wayne has become one of the most famous people in Australian sport,” Eamon said. “The message that stood out most for me is that everyone has the power to do anything they want but your actions will always speak louder than your words,” he said. For Year 8 boarder Max Reilly from Dalby, similar take-home messages emerged, “Wayne highlighted that if you want to be good at something you have to stick at it and never give up,” he said. These messages will certainly stand the boarders in good stead for the busy year ahead as they take the next steps in their schooling journey and welcome new Director of Boarding Michael Holland, to the BBC community.


BBC NEWS | 19

FARMEReSt Mark

CONQUERING COMPLEXITY BBC’s Mathematics Extension students as well as boys from Years 4 to 6 put their knowledge to the test in the recent Australian Mathematics Competition, taking home six prizes. According to Mathematics Teacher Christopher Blood, this achievement is no mean feat with entrants required to answer 30 questions, with each increasing in complexity, in the space of 75 minutes. “Only one in 300 in each year group is eligible for a prize, the highest award given. To receive six is a fantastic achievement and congratulations go to Chun-Huei Liu, Hainian Yu and Michael Gibson, Andrew Su, Luis Teh and Philip Henderson,” Mr Blood said. “Fifteen boys also received a high distinction, 41 a distinction and 37 a credit,” he said. “The award topped off a stellar run for Year 12 student Philip Henderson who achieved outstanding academic results in Mathematics B and C, studied Mathematics 1051 at the University of Queensland where he received the highest possible score of seven, secured the best result in Year 12 in the ICAS Mathematics Competition run by the University of NSW, as well as claiming first place in the Queensland Association of Mathematics Teachers Problem Solving Competition. “Tom Manderson also secured second prize in the problem solving competition - an extremely difficult and competitive task.”

FROM FARM TO TABLE EARLIER THIS TERM, YEAR 3 STUDENTS HOSTED THEIR VERY OWN FARMERS’ MARKET, FOLLOWING THEIR FARM TO TABLE UNIT. FROM FRESHLY SQUEEZED LEMONADE TO PASSIONFRUIT CORDIAL, BOYS PREPARED A NUMBER OF PRODUCE ITEMS FOR EACH OF THEIR STALLS. USING IPADS AND AN AUGMENTED REALITY APP, STUDENTS ALSO CREATED VIDEO PRESENTATIONS ENCAPSULATING WHAT THEY HAD LEARNT OVER THE TERM TO SHARE WITH PARENTS.

COLLEGIAN DECEMBER 2013 2012


20 | BBC NEWS

CLOSING THE GAP ON SUNDAY 20 OCTOBER, A GROUP OF BBC RIDERS TOOK PART IN THE SANTOS BRISBANE TO GOLD COAST BIKE RIDE, RIDING IN SUPPORT OF BBC’S INDIGENOUS EDUCATION PROGRAM. In an amazing effort, 13 students, joined by staff and parents, pedalled like absolute champions to finish the 105km course, raising an outstanding $18,500. The day brought great weather and apart from some slight head winds, conditions were perfect for riding. According to Director of Development Bren Arkinstall, who drove the fundraising efforts for the team, the boys should be commended for their positive approach to the challenge. “105km is a very, very long way, yet the boys demonstrated a great sense of courage, commitment and enthusiasm in completing the task and were great ambassadors for the College on the day,” Mr Arkinstall said. “Our entire riding team was lucky enough to be invited by old collegian and current parent Sandy Grant, CEO of Wilson HTM, to enjoy the comfort of the Wilson Hospitality tent - all the riders had plenty of great food and drink and free massages after the ride. The boys really enjoyed the VIP treatment,” he said. “We had tremendous support from our parents riding with us, but also from several parents who donated or lent bikes so all students could complete the ride. The whole event was an amazing show of generosity.”


BBC NEWS | 21

COLLEGIAN DECEMBER 2013 2012


22 | BBC NEWS

VOICE OF CHANGE ESTABLISHED TO SAFEGUARD GENERATIONS OF YOUNG PEOPLE BY EMPOWERING THEM TO MAKE CHANGES AND POSITIVE LIFE CHOICES, RED FROGS AUSTRALIA IS A SUPPORT PROGRAM FOR YOUNG PEOPLE AGED BETWEEN 15 TO 25. The organisation has a long-standing relationship with BBC, having presented to students at the College for the past 10 years. This year the team tackled the issue of schoolies, providing boys with information and strategies to ensure they enjoy a safe experience. According to BBC’s Chaplain, Rev Graham Cole, the Red Frog visits create awareness amongst the boys of the very real support the organisation can offer. “This year Red Frogs Australia will recruit 2000 volunteers to serve at ‘schoolies’ locations, university events and festivals. Quite a number of our old boys are currently involved in this invaluable ministry and have been a part of the ‘Red Frogs’ chaplaincy team this year,” Rev Cole said. As a Christian organisation, the group also organised for a number of high profile sporting guests to visit BBC to talk about their faith. “Just prior to the Wallabies verses Springboks meet, Red Frogs arranged for Springbok winger, Bryan Habana to speak with the boys. “Bryan spoke to a bulging chapel at morning tea about how thankful he was for his faith, the opportunities it has enabled and the strength it provides in his life.”

“This year Red Frogs Australia will recruit 2000 volunteers to serve at ‘schoolies’ locations, university events and festivals. Quite a number of our old boys are currently involved in this invaluable ministry and have been a part of the ‘Red Frogs’ chaplaincy team this year.”


BBC NEWS | 23

COLLECTIVE EXCELLENCE MORE THAN SIMPLY AN AWARDS CEREMONY, THIS YEAR’S SPEECH NIGHT PAID TRIBUTE TO EACH BOY’S CONTRIBUTION TO THE BBC COMMUNITY.

COLLEGIAN DECEMBER 2013 2012


24 | BBC NEWS

HELD IN NOVEMBER AT THE QUEENSLAND PERFORMING ARTS CENTRE, SPEECH NIGHT WAS FILLED WITH SPECTACULAR PERFORMANCES FROM VARIOUS COLLEGE ENSEMBLES INCLUDING THE CAMERATA, BBC SINGERS, COLLEGE SYMPHONY, SYMPHONIC BAND AND OF COURSE THE ICONIC PIPE BAND. It was a particularly emotional evening for departing seniors and their families as they reflected on their journey and celebrated the milestones along the way. According to Headmaster Graeme McDonald, the night is very much about recognising the young men boys have become. “Whilst Speech Night is a celebration where awards are given to recognise achievements of individual boys, symbolically it is much more important than that,” Mr McDonald said. “It’s a celebration of the journey boys have made and the turning points over the years which have fired them with ambition to make a difference in our world,” he said. “We at Brisbane Boys' College have been blessed with countless opportunities to make a difference in the lives of hundreds of young men and this year’s Speech Night was testament to how far our boys have come.”


BBC NEWS | 25

COMPASS:

THE JOURNEY BEGINS FOR NEW STUDENTS THE COLLEGE CAMPUS WAS BUZZING ON TUESDAY 3 DECEMBER AS WE WELCOMED OUR NEW STUDENTS FOR 2014 AT THE ANNUAL BBC ORIENTATION DAY. The familiarisation day is designed for all Prep to Year 8 boys new to Brisbane Boys’ College in 2014 to cultivate new friendships and be confident as they join the College as students. The new arrivals to Middle School met their respective House Tutors and Housemasters, and spent the day with their peers, while our younger students joined a Junior School classroom for the day. The full day integration program included a delicious BBQ lunch, cooked by none other than our Senior Prefects for 2014. In addition to the general welcome and assimilation into the College fraternity for students, our newest BBC parents joined College staff for a delightful afternoon tea to round off the day. We would like to welcome our new students and their parents who have started their journey at Brisbane Boys' College for the first time. May it be the first year of many more memories that you will share and build throughout your schooling years at BBC.

COLLEGIAN DECEMBER 2013 2012


26 | BBC FEATURE

AUGMENTED REALITY, SMART PHONES, SMART WATCHES, SMART EVERYTHING. SELF-REVERSING VEHICLES, VOICE ACTIVATION, INSTANT CONTENT CREATION, OVERNIGHT YOUTUBE SENSATIONS. These are no longer futuristic sentiments;

Head of Strategic Planning, Matthew

it’s here and it’s now and with it comes

O’Brien, and Director of Professional

new opportunities in education. Brisbane

Learning, Sean Riordan, has seen three

Boys’ College is paving the way as

main focus areas emerge; the flipped

thought leaders in this 21st century

classroom,

landscape, having been selected as

and creating collaborative professional

one of only 16 schools to receive an

learning communities.

Australian Institute for Teaching and

These initiatives have seen BBC move

School Leadership (AITSL) Innovation

beyond innovation in its simplest form to

Grant. The project, administered by

redefining the boundaries of education.

TURNING EDUCATION UPSIDE DOWN The chalk-and-talk approach to teaching has radically changed. At BBC, teachers are turning education upside down, using a 21st

activating

shift from passive to active learning, giving students more responsibility for their own learning, while personalising education to meet each student at his own level,” said Matthew.

student

voice

AN ACTIVE STUDENT VOICE BBC has strongly advocated and adopted the philosophy that all programs and initiatives need to be supported and driven by data. By using data the College is able

“Students, boys in particular, learn by

to provide an individualised experience

doing and asking questions. With access to

to improve student outcomes. So how

key content prior to class time, students can

does this translate into changes in

is greatly improved and they develop higher

use face-to-face classroom time to further

classroom practice?

order cognitive skills such as problem solving

explore curriculum content and enhance their

and critical thinking.

study skills,” he said.

century flipped classroom model, repurposing class time into a workshop whereby students’ understanding and retention of information

So how does the flipped classroom work?

The flipped classroom concept is not new

According to Matthew O’Brien, at BBC school

to the education sector but its scope has

should not be a spectator sport.

increased considerably with the introduction

“In a traditional class, the teacher engages

and adoption of new technologies.

“Data enables teachers to make sense of student behaviour and achievement patterns. It essentially allows them to see learning through the eyes of their students,” said Matthew. “Too often data in schools can go unused as it’s difficult to read. We have a tailored

with students who ask questions – but it is

"There is always a place for traditional

those who don’t ask questions that tend to

instruction methods - the flipped classroom

and analyse data. As part of the project we

need the most attention. Using the flipped

simply provides an alternative – we are by no

provided instructional videos and sessions

classroom model, teachers produce material

means suggesting that every lesson should

– using the flipped classroom model – to

outside of the classroom (an online video for

be run this way, that would just be crazy.

illustrate to teachers how they can access,

example) for students to watch prior to class,

Rather, it’s just another tool in the kit bag

download, save and analyse the data

thus ensuring higher order thinking inside the

for teachers to achieve the best possible

themselves, to better inform their classroom

classroom during school time. It is a distinct

educational outcomes."

planning and practice.

internal data-profiling tool we use to store


BBC FEATURE | 27

COLLEGIAN DECEMBER 2013


28 | BBC FEATURE

TRADITIONALLY.... A LESSON IS FOLLOWED BY HOMEWORK

THE FLIPPED CLASSROOM Imagine you are the teacher of a Year 9 Science class and are planning a graphing activity for next week. You’ve provided a video which you expect your students to have watched prior to entering the classroom. The data has scaffolded your classroom planning and allows certain efficiency in the classroom, where the lesson unfolds based on students’ skill sets. Your instruction outside of the classroom has now allowed for intervention, relationship building and student/teacher personalised interactions and assistance for 35 minutes of a 45 minute lesson.

“Student voice enables teachers to identify

“The relationship a teacher has with their

particular weaknesses early on, instead of

students, their classroom environment and

later in the year when it’s often too late."

pedagogical practice directly translates to

It is a paradigm shift to responsiveness,

student outcomes. When all the research

where student voice is also central to each

identifies the teacher to be the most important

teacher’s professional learning program with

influence in the learning equation, investing in

staff using data to make informed choices

our staff is imperative."

about professional learning experiences and their own teaching and learning practices.

FLIPPED.... AN ONLINE LESSON IS FOLLOWED BY CLASSROOM ACTIVITIES

COLLABORATIVE PROFESSIONAL LEARNING COMMUNITIES When it comes to education, opportunities for learning should be accessible across the spectrum. BBC has a dedicated Director of Professional Learning, Sean Riordan, to guide this process. By focusing on individual staff and aligning them with the College’s Strategic Plan, personalised professional learning parameters are created and used to shape their teaching journey. “Teachers are able to create a personalised and relevant professional learning program specifically tailored to their needs. At BBC, we offer a matrix of professional learning experiences, from conferences (national and international), to small groups, online training and professional learning communities. Our

THE BIG PICTURE Together these three focus areas form a strong foundation as BBC transforms the classroom experience for both the teacher and the student. Observations and evidence have been used throughout the research project to gauge the overall impact on teaching and learning. “On evaluation we found these models facilitated the effective use of modern technologies in teaching practices, greater student engagement with curriculum content and the learning process and a more personalised and collaborative approach to professional learning,” said Matthew. “If we are to continue to strive towards our vision of ‘Success for every boy’ then we must, as an educational institution, provide personalised support to both our students and our teaching staff. “The AITSL project has given additional

program mirrors best practice and industry

depth to traditional teaching practices.

standards, aligning with the key areas as

Teachers and students alike can now use a

identified by AITSL,” said Sean.

range of tools to facilitate individual learning

“This ties in strongly with listening to the student voice and ensures a more individualised conversation regarding their development as an educator and, as a result, improved outcomes for students.

experiences. It’s taking what we know to be best practice and continuing to innovate to ensure we remain relevant, engaging and at the top of our field.”


BBC FEATURE | 29

AN ACTIVE STUDENT VOICE

CONFIDENT

INTERPRET

SELECT

IMPLEMENT

IMPROVE

Teachers who are able

Data to identify

Professional learning

Intervention strategies

Student outcomes and

to capture and

individual strengths

experiences based

targeted at these

create an environment

generate data on

and weaknesses

on these insights

their students

in each class group

needs at an

where students feel

individual level

safe and supported in their learning

COLLEGIAN DECEMBER 2013


30 | BBC FEATURE

WHAT OUR STAFF THINK LUCAS BROWN

WHAT OUR STUDENTS THINK ABOUT THE FLIPPED CLASSROOM

What made you become involved in the flipped classroom project? I have used this approach previously, and

“IT ALLOWED US TO ACCESS CLASS WORK AND NOTES TO REVISE

saw it can have benefits in certain educational

BEFORE A TEST, WHICH MADE

settings. Boys can view lesson content out

REVISING EASIER.”

of the scheduled class time; either before to prepare, or after if they were absent. Therefore, class time can be used for more meaningful tasks.

“IT WAS A NEW WAY TO LEARN. WHEN I FORGOT SOMETHING I COULD GO BACK AND WATCH IT. THIS WAS HELPFUL BECAUSE I AM A VISUAL

CHARLI FELS

LEARNER.”

What are some of the successes that

“THE VIDEOS COVERED EVERYTHING I

you’ve seen in your classroom?

NEEDED TO KNOW ABOUT THE TOPIC.”

The boys were engaging in online communication as well as face-to-face collaboration within the classroom context. It was exciting to see each week, the building of their confidence as learners, as they engaged in meaningful dialogue during our weekly forums. It was also exciting to see how our weekly forums encouraged meaningful dialogue between students about their own learning and discoveries that were made away from the classroom. They were questioning what

THE GRANT ITSELF – A WORD FROM AITSL The information generated from the project will ideally encourage

they were learning, how they were learning

associations, systems and sectors,

and using each other as mentors.

teachers, school leaders and education groups, to consider

TIM HARRIS Did you have any initial hesitations/ concerns with implementing the

innovative changes that could enhance their existing programs and support teacher improvement. Sixteen groups have been

flipped classroom concept in your

selected to be involved in the

class environment?

project. Seven groups have been

There’s the initial ‘change’ period when you

selected to demonstrate types of

attempt to master new practises. But this is in

professional learning that involve

reality just a learning opportunity, so it’s worth

collaboration. Nine groups have

the effort. I am constantly looking for ways to improve teaching and learning experiences and this seemed like such an opportunity.

been selected to demonstrate different approaches to elements of performance and development included in the framework.


BBC ARTS | 31

BBC ARTS

32 Fun with Shakespeare An amalgamation of some of William Shakespeare's greatest scenes

35 Art show Prep to Year 12 students take us into their world

38 Smithy Year 6 students take to the stage for the Junior School Musical

Musical notes PR EMIER MUSIC A L EV ENTS

COLLEGIAN DECEMBER 2013


32 | BBC ARTS

FUN WITH SHAKESPEARE In the school staff room, Professor Webb is losing his marbles. Students are certainly becoming far cheekier than they used to be and the everyday stresses of modern education are taking their toll. His passionate ‘affair’ with William Shakespeare is the one thing that he feels he still has control over, although at times it appears that even that is failing him as the tenuous line between reality and fiction begins to blur. Staff are whispering, students are starting to look like fairies and some of the great characters are making appearances in the staff room! Students from BBC and St Aidan’s joined forces again this year

“Whilst Shakespeare’s not for everyone, it seemed like a natural

for the Senior Theatre production, receiving great acclaim for their

choice for this year’s production. What many people don’t realise

performance in A Midwinters Night’s Dream.

is that behind the language lie many of the treasures and terrors of

The production was an amalgamation of some of William Shakespeare’s greatest and most loved scenes from Romeo and Juliet, Macbeth, A Midsummer Night’s Dream, Julius Caesar, The

human experience - love, betrayal, gang warfare and self reflection,” she said. “There are libraries written about all aspects of Shakespeare's work,

Taming of the Shrew and Hamlet. According to Director Michelle Carey,

but his plays were never meant to be literature sitting on a shelf, he

moments from these masterpieces were brought to life by a fantastic

wrote plays and there is no coincidence in the use of that word.

crew and in particular the crazy professor, played by Year 10 student Sam Webb. “What linked the scenes together was the professor’s craziness as his conscious mind dipped into the characters and scenes which inhabited his lectures. Sometimes he would make comment on the action, at

“The cast were amazing to work with and they took to the whole show with great passion and a strong conviction to understand not only the meaning of their scenes, but how their actions, interactions and movements enhance the language. “It was wonderful to see a group of young people have such fun

other times he tried to make sense of the characters’ behaviours and

with Shakespeare and everyone involved should be proud of what

at one point he even became the character of Bottom in the famous

was achieved.”

Mechanicals scene from A Midsummer Night’s Dream,” Ms Carey said.


BBC ARTS | 33


34 | BBC ARTS

A BOATER LIKE NO OTHER Middle School Theatre Club

BBC school spirit came to life on the stage in late November when the Middle School presented A Boater Like No Other. With the help of playwright Sikwasa Davis, 17 Middle School students put on a production that celebrated what the BBC motto – Let Honour Stainless Be –

INDIE KINDIE

really means. Set at BBC, the play follows two groups of students working to complete a

From violins and flutes to electric guitar and synthesizers,

drama assignment by making a film that depicts the school motto. The prize?

the Earl Lamar Rehearsal Room in College Hall took on a

The opportunity to have their video shown to potential students at the Brisbane

very different vibe in October, with the return of the Indie

Boys’ College Open Day.

Kindie concert, featuring BBC’s very own rock bands.

One group sets out to make a classic film exploring the history and legacy

Hollow Harmony, Stompin Steve Bash, Pentagon,

of BBC. The other group has more creative (and off-task) plans to make a film

Patrol and The Twelvies teamed together to deliver a

that tells the tale of 'Super Boater' – a giant boater that is a super hero. After

memorable night of rock.

catastrophes, mischief and a dash of sabotage, the boys realise that by working

Year 11 boarder Tim Dury mixed up the pace with a solo

together they can make the best film possible.

set of country and western songs, inspired by his time in

Over two nights on the stage, Middle School students showed off their acting

the Condamine and life on the land.

ability and sense of fun while giving the audience insight into the importance of

The evening featured boys from a range of year levels

BBC values.

and was supported by BBC’s Production Club who assisted with the set up and lighting. According to Head of Music Stuart Quill, these bands add dimension to an already broad program. “From our traditional ensembles and choirs, this program ensures we provide opportunities for boys to explore their musical creativity across the entire spectrum,” Mr

For Alethea Beetson, Director of the play, it was a creative way for the boys to put the school motto into practice. “Being accomplished in academics, sport and the arts is one thing,” says Beetson. “But to get there whilst having respect, empathy and integrity is everything.” The play was met with rave reviews by the audience, including Head of Middle School, Tony Chittenden. “The play was forceful and humorous in projecting a positive image of the

Quill said.

College to the audience,” says Dr Chittenden. “The boys used the ‘Super Boater’

“Students have been writing songs, rehearsing and

as a strong representation of what the College stands for.”

performing throughout the year and our Coordinator Dan

Our Middle School boys proved that ‘Let Honour Stainless Be’ are not just

Pratt, also an outstanding musician, has been a fantastic

words on a page or words stitched onto a blazer, but actions truly seen in the

mentor for these boys,” he said.

day to day life at BBC.


BBC ARTS | 35

INTO OUR WORLD FRESH FROM THE SUCCESS OF LAST YEAR’S INAUGURAL ART SHOW, THE JOURNEY BEGINS, BBC STUDENTS FROM PREP TO YEAR 12 PUT THEIR ARTISTIC TALENT ON DISPLAY IN THE ART SHOW IN OCTOBER.

COLLEGIAN DECEMBER 2013


36 | BBC ARTS

T R I BA L M AS K I N AC RY L I C AN D TEXTI LES ANGUS GANNON, YEAR 4 STUDENT INSIGHT

Year 4 students created a series of tribal masks based on the artwork of the Kwoma people

TAKING INSPIRATION FROM FAMOUS ARTWORK AND

of Papua New Guinea, and each

THE WORLD AROUND THEM, STUDENTS WERE ABLE

mask had its own story. “I started off by weaving a

TO LET THEIR IMAGINATIONS RUN FREE AND CREATE

basket sort of thing. I decided

PERSONAL AND UNIQUE PIECES OF ART, INVITING THE BBC

to use them as earrings for my

COMMUNITY TO SEE LIFE THROUGH THEIR POINT OF VIEW.

mask. I decided to paint it mostly yellow to represent yellow fever, which can be caught in Papua New Guinea. The marks on his

For Junior School Visual Arts Teacher Kim Murray, preparing for the Into Our World show

face are scars that represent a

allowed boys to exercise their creativity and express their vision of the world through their own

great battle he was in, and he

eyes. “Using a variety of mediums, this artistic journey went beyond the classroom and into

yells leading his fellow people

history where our Junior School artists found a variety of inspirations,” Ms Murray said.

into battle.”

“Into Our World was a resounding success, building on the achievements of last year’s art show and providing insight into how BBC students use art to express themselves,” she said. “It was a wonderful night and the students created a body of work that was unique and exciting. Whether it was a self-portrait, a representation of an imaginary hybrid or an element from nature, all got to see it through the minds and eyes of our boys.” Our Middle School students took their artwork another step forward and created art that not only has a limited environmental footprint, but also has a message. Several BBC students share with us the meaning behind their pieces and the creative process along the way.


BBC ARTS | 37

ESCHER BIRDS IN INK AND MARKER JOSHUA DAVIDSON, YEAR 2 Based on the artwork of

S C U L PT U R A L CERAMIC B U ST I N FOOT PAP E R AN D NICHOLAS TOOHEY, YEAR 7 CAR D B OA R D “When I made my artwork I wanted it to show how easy it

After learning about Nuam

is to help the environment and

insect for inspiration, Thomas

how it doesn’t matter who you

Gao made his creation based on

are, you can make a difference.

the first letter of his first name.

To show how you can do this I

The Tarantula Hawk Wasp, made

used the theme of recycling and

from a variety of found items, was

showed what would happen

based on the weird and wonderful

when you do recycle and don’t

creatures seen in the picture book

recycle. This way you could easily

and short animation, The Lost

see what you are aiming for.”

Thing, by Shaun Tan.

2 student, Joshua Davidson,

made sculptures out of metal,

made his own graphic art creation

Year 3 students got to work on

inspired by nature.

sculptures of their own. “We cut out a head and

a number pattern. This is

shoulders shape, and then we

what Escher did. I painted my

stuck a styrofoam head and

background with colours that

shoulder shape in between. Then

make each other stand out. I used

we decorated our portrait with

the colour wheel to choose these.

cardboard.”

I have seen.”

Using an electrical appliance,

NICHOLAS MARSHALL, YEAR 3 Gabo, a Russian artist who

I drew my bird to look like ones

THOMAS GAO, YEAR 9 a mode of transport and an

graphic artist M. C. Escher, Year

“I used my birds to make

TARANTULA HAWK WASP

“I sawed my wooden car into pieces and positioned it so that it was in the shape of a wasp. I then glued it together and then used random unwanted things that were available to me in the art room and added legs (made from cut up paint brushes), stinger (made from part of a liquid soap pump), antenna (made from cut wires) and mandibles (made from a broken comb). My model had to stand up so I made a stand out of floppy disks and a larger paintbrush.”

COLLEGIAN DECEMBER 2013


38 | BBC ARTS

JUNIOR SCHOOL MUSICAL

SMITHY YEAR 6 STUDENTS TOOK TO THE STAGE OVER THREE NIGHTS IN OCTOBER TO PERFORM IN THIS YEAR’S JUNIOR SCHOOL MUSICAL.

“Smithy is the story of Michael Smith, the student all teachers dread, who manages to find himself playing Romeo in the school play," BBC Director, Ms Margery McIntyre explains. “Despite declaring that ‘drama is for wimps’ Smithy, played by the talented Elijah Larsen, has a change of heart when he realises that the delightful Belinda is to play Juliet,” she said. “The boys are to be commended for their convincing and entertaining performances. Luka Boskovic was outstanding as the flamboyant Nigel and Ethan Rose played the role of Miss Byrde, the drama teacher, extremely well. “Sam Braithwaite and Stirling Gallagher starred as Headmaster Mr Thompson and PE Teacher Mr Socks and were excellent in their quest to have drama banned and Michael Smith removed from the school. “It was fantastic to see our Junior School students discover their creative side through performance and slip into the shoes of their characters with such excitement. “The production was a collective effort and so many people worked tirelessly both in practising for performance and behind the scenes to ensure our audiences were entertained on the night.”


BBC ARTS | 39

COLLEGIAN DECEMBER 2013


40 | BBC ARTS

MUSICAL NOTES SOUNDS OF SCOTLAND Held in October, Sounds of Scotland showcased the talents of the College’s most iconic group – the BBC Pipe Band, as well as the Old Collegians Pipe Band, Thistle Highland Dancers, Choral Quartet and the Watkins Academy of Irish Dance. The Pipe Band was originally launched more than 70 years ago, in 1940 when Piper and Lance-Corporal Robert Lawrie introduced his skill to the College community. Today more than 80 boys are involved across two bands. Earlier this year, a sea of Scottish tartan transformed the John Noblet Oval as a large crowd descended on BBC for the second annual Highland Gathering Pipe Band Competition. Bands from across New South Wales and Queensland, including BBC’s Old Collegian Pipe Band came to compete, with the College’s student band taking home first place in the Juvenile Grade and Nicolas Winkley

TWO OF THE COLLEGE’S PREMIER MUSICAL EVENTS, GRAND CONCERT AND SOUNDS OF SCOTLAND, TOOK PLACE IN SECOND SEMESTER THIS YEAR, WITH THEIR PERFORMANCES STRIKING ALL THE RIGHT NOTES.

claiming second place in the Drum Major Competition.

GRAND CONCERT More than 650 people gathered in College Hall to witness a spectacular night of performance at the Grand Concert in August. Pieces from the Pipe Band, Camerata, Collegians, Big Band, Symphonic Band, College Strings and the College Symphony were, as always, of extremely high quality. Concerto Competition winner Julius Lynch was outstanding and the audience even had its turn in musical delivery, singing happy birthday to BBC conductor Brett Holland who turned 40 on the night.


BBC SPORT | 41

BBC SPORTS 42 Tennis trifecta Triple crown win

43 In training BBC's Highlander training program

44 Launchpad: it's time to move Gymnastics at BBC

45 Wallabies front line The Lexus ball kid initiative

46 BBC Robotics sees robust growth The next generation of robotics professionals

In season HIGHLIGHTS FR OM TR A CK A ND FIELD

COLLEGIAN COLLEGIAN DECEMBER AUGUST 2013


42 | BBC SPORT

TENNIS TRIFECTA

1 2 3

BRISBANE INTERNATIONAL PRIMARY SCHOOLS CHALLENGE

GPS PREMIERSHIP

QUEENSLAND SECONDARY SCHOOLS CHAMPIONSHIPS

In what has been dubbed the ‘triple

“Our program is driven by a team

crown win’, this year Brisbane Boys’

of experts with seven Tennis Australia

College secured the Queensland

accredited coaches, a USPTA registered

Primary and Secondary Schools Tennis

coach, sports psychologist and 12

titles as well as the GPS premiership.

academic staff,” he said.

The string of success started with a

“We continue to strive to deliver a

win at this year’s Brisbane International

comprehensive program which appeals to

Primary Schools Challenge. After several

boys on a number of levels, whether they

days of intense competition BBC Tennis

are seeking enjoyment and fun or wanting

players Santokh Bains, Bryn Nahrung,

to improve their technical skills, mental

Max Williams, Lewis Kehl and Mitch

steel and physical development. It’s not

Clarke claimed victory for the second

just about competition or securing victory

year running.

but enjoying the journey along the way.

The consecutive win was followed

“This philosophy has seen us create

by the GPS premiership with BBC’s

a strong culture within the tennis

Open Tennis team defeating The

community which also attributes to our

Southport School 6-2 at the Brisbane

overall success.

Tennis Centre in Tennyson. Success was experienced across the board with 11 teams taking home premierships and 18 of the 20 teams placing either first or second overall. The trifecta was secured after a solid performance at the Queensland Secondary Schools Championships in Rockhampton saw Jie Dong, Jack Jaede, Nick Liddy, Tom Liddy and Captain Harry Such claim the team's title. According to BBC’s Director of Tennis Chris Rolph, BBC is the only school in history to hold, at the same time, all three titles. “It’s been a stellar year for tennis at BBC. I believe our success is a result of a combination of factors, however first and foremost our dedicated coaches and athletes,” Mr Rolph said.

From humble beginnings the BBC Tennis program has continued to grow significantly in the last decade. “Looking back 10 years ago, where participation and success rates were significantly lower, with less than 50 precent of games won, gives evidence to how far we’ve come. “In the last decade we’ve expanded our facilities, adjusted training frequency, introduced flexible training times and specialised squads and these strategies have contributed to the strong program that stands today.” BBC’s state champions went on to contest the nationals in November, placing a commendable third.


BBC SPORT | 43

In training

ONGER... GET FITTER, FASTER, STR

BETTER... Y D TU S R, E TT E B K IN TH MOVE BETTER, RAISE THE BAR.

DESIGNED TO FOSTER BOYS’ PHYSICAL AND PSYCHOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENT, BBC’S HIGHLANDER TRAINING PROGRAM CATERS FOR ALL STUDENTS ACROSS VARIOUS SPORTS. THE PROGRAM HAS BEEN SHAPED TO FIT SEAMLESSLY WITHIN THE COLLEGE’S NEW ATHLETIC DEVELOPMENT FRAMEWORK, WHICH IS BASED ON TAKING A HOLISTIC APPROACH TO SPORT BY PROVIDING EXPERIENCES THAT ARE MEANINGFUL AND RELEVANT IN TERMS OF AGE AND SKILL ACQUISITION.

Highlander Training is driven by a team of coaches, who are experts in physical preparation for young men and are able to

which adolescent boys face throughout their school lives. “The program is as much about instilling

advise on matters relating to sustainable and

a sense of pride and spirit amongst the boys

best practice training, injury and recovery

as it is preparing them physically.

management, nutrition as well as strength and conditioning.

“The Highlander is a symbol of pride and strength of our College, representing our

According to Director of Athletic

culture, ethos, spirit and history. If you look

Development Tim Mosey, the program

back to the Middle Ages, inhabitants of the

adds a unique dimension and additional

Scottish Highlands were considered rugged,

depth to the College’s already extensive

strong and disciplined people. You could

sporting landscape.

almost say that the Highlander represents

“The program has been designed to complement and augment the College’s sporting program, providing opportunities

one’s ability to overcome hardship and to be strong in the face of adversity. “It’s for these reasons that the Highlander

for boys to be successful in their chosen

has been chosen as the mascot to represent

endeavours whilst at BBC,” Mr Mosey said.

the College’s Athletic Development concept

“Highlander Training focuses on improving

and refers to the physical or mental work

overall movement competencies and

completed outside of sport, whether it is

patterns that are considered integral to

resistance training, speed or conditioning

sporting movement and everyday living

work – in the gym, on the track or simply

activities,” he said.

running around the school.”

“Get strong is central to the program’s

Highlander training runs all year, fitting

philosophy and through participation boys

in and around in-term sport timetables.

are able to improve their physical qualities of

Programs have been tailored for each

strength, speed, aerobic condition and agility."

section of the school – Junior, Middle and

The program is also intended to further

Senior – with the Rookie group catering for

the overall development of each boy, looking

Prep to Year 6, Junior for Years 7 to 9 and

to address the psychological considerations

Senior Highlander for Years 10 to 12.

COLLEGIAN COLLEGIAN DECEMBER AUGUST 2013


44 | BBC SPORT

IT’S TIME TO MOVE BBC IS THE FIRST SCHOOL IN QUEENSLAND AND IN FACT AUSTRALIA, TO RECEIVE THE LAUNCHPAD STAMP OF APPROVAL AS A RECOGNISED PROVIDER OF GYMNASTICS BASED FUNDAMENTAL MOVEMENT PROGRAMS.

The College is currently the only school nationwide to have received the accreditation and joins more than 15 member clubs from across the country who are listed as part of the program.

for Junior students, through the GPS competition or at state and national competitions,” Mr Druve said. “Gymnastics is essentially a foundation sport with the skills learnt

An initiative of Gymnastics Australia and the Australian Sports

applicable across codes and within the learning domain. In fact if

Commission, the program was launched earlier this year to increase

you go to the USA you’ll find many colleges based entirely around

participation in physical activity for children up to 12 years of age.

gymnastics, which is seen to be the foundation for schooling,” he said.

According to Minister for Sport Kate Lundy, who spoke at the program launch earlier this year at the Australian Institute of Sport, LaunchPad is about giving kids a strong foundation to support participation in sport for life. “Gymnastics is widely acknowledged, along with swimming and athletics, as a key sport for young Australians,” Senator Lundy said. “For many of our successful Aussie athletes, gymnastics was where

“I recently visited a range of these colleges in the States and a significant number of schools have adopted this approach.” Kate Wadkin, Gymnastics Queensland’s Youth Participation Coordinator said they were very pleased to have a school come on board. “Brisbane Boys’ College embodies the LanchPad philosophies offering programs that are fun yet challenging, provide kids with a

it all started – from junior participation they developed a love of sport

love and passion for sport and recreation, are inclusive of all and

that gave them a strong foundation to achieve international success,”

are positive, encouraging, building on children’s self esteem and

she said.

confidence,” Ms Wadkin said.

Indeed, just ask BBC’s Director of Gymnastics Ashley Druve who has seen the benefits of participation in the sport firsthand. “We have more than 250 students involved in gymnastics at BBC with opportunities provided for all boys from Prep to Year 12 to participate at varying levels, whether it be our gymnastics mini-clinics

“LaunchPad programs are not just a work-out for kids' bodies but also for their brains, with activities designed to benefit learning, concentration and brain development as well as social skills through teamwork and cooperation,” she said.


BBC SPORT | 45

"It was a night that I will never forget, thank you to all the coaches for your support and belief in me and a massive thank you to all the boys who I get to play rugby with at the College who have put in a 100 percent effort all season."

WALLABIES FRONT LINE By Oliver Fitzpatrick

EARLIER THIS YEAR I WAS GIVEN THE AMAZING OPPORTUNITY OF BEING THE BALL BOY FOR THE QANTAS WALLABIES AS PART OF THE LEXUS BALL KID INITIATIVE. IT WAS AN EXPERIENCE THAT I WILL REMEMBER FOR THE REST OF MY LIFE AND I AM EXTREMELY HUMBLED THAT I WAS PICKED FOR THE JOB. My experience began when I sat in on the coaches run. I was given my gear which was a shirt, a pair of shorts, a cap, socks and a jacket. I was then able to be part of the official team photo. Later in the afternoon I helped out James O’Connor, Quade Cooper and Christian Lealiifaano kicking the balls back to them when they were practising their conversions. On the night I made my way to Suncorp Stadium and spirits were high as I met the other ball kids who were all excited but slightly nervous. The highlight of the experience was singing the national anthem with the Wallabies in front of 50,000 people plus the rest of the world watching at home. For the rest of the night I handed the towel to Steven Moore and Bismarck Du Plessis.

COLLEGIAN COLLEGIAN DECEMBER AUGUST 2013


46 | BBC SPORT

BBC ROBOTICS SEES ROBUST GROWTH THE EDUCATION AND TRAINING OF THE NEXT GENERATION OF ROBOTICS

This year has been another one of milestones for Robotics. With a record 160 students participating in Robotics this year, the depth of talent makes the future look promising for the club. Outstanding results in the RoboCup Junior Queensland and RoboCup Junior Australia

PROFESSIONALS IS CRITICAL

Open Championships resulted in two teams being offered the opportunity to represent

TO MAINTAINING AUSTRALIA'S

Australia in the RoboCup Junior World Championships next year. When Brisbane Boys’

PLACE AS A WORLD LEADER IN

Club performed well, returning with nine first, second or third places across the Junior

College competed at the RoboCup Junior Queensland Open Competition in August, the

ROBOTICS RESEARCH.

Rescue, Senior Rescue, Premier Rescue, Lightweight Soccer and Premier Soccer.

THE INCREASED

second and third places across Senior Rescue, Lightweight Soccer and Premier Soccer,

OPPORTUNITIES FOR

with Teams ‘TSR’ and ‘Pi’ crowned the second and third best Robotics teams in School

INVOLVEMENT IN ROBOTICS

World Championships in Brazil next year. Over the Christmas break, the self-directed

At the national competition the following month, Robotics teams produced three

Robotics in Australia. Team ‘Pi’ has qualified to represent Australia in the RoboCup Junior

AT ALL LEVELS AT BRISBANE

team will modify their custom robots, built from components. Master in Charge, Colin

BOYS’ COLLEGE MAKE

Noy, says the outlook for 2014 is promising with a number of senior teams constructing

AUSTRALIA WELL PLACED TO ENSURE THE GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT OF ROBOTICS BOTH TODAY AND TOMORROW.

and programming custom robots from components and the addition of fresh kits to extend the minds of senior members. “Next year we will also introduce the third generation Lego Mindstorms EV3 kits to the more experienced robotics members. These will be phased in over a period of five years.”


BBC SPORT | 47

IN SEASON

HIGHLIGHTS FROM TRACK AND FIELD COLLEGIAN COLLEGIAN DECEMBER AUGUST 2013


48 | BBC SPORT

SHOWING STRENGTH, DETERMINATION AND SHEER ABILITY, OUTSTANDING INDIVIDUAL PERFORMANCES WERE DELIVERED BY MANY OF BBC’S ATHLETES AT THE 96TH ANNUAL GPS TRACK AND FIELD CHAMPIONSHIPS. Three athletes took home gold including Josh Russell, Will Fletcher and Jonty Flottman in the hurdles, triple jump and 100m sprint respectively with eight boys securing silver, including the 4x100 relay team, which narrowly missed out on securing first place. A further six athletes secured third in the high jump, shot put, discus, hurdles, 800m, 400m and 1500m events across varying age divisions. Following on from their performances Year 8 student Josh Russell and Year 10 boy Sam Bennett were selected to represent Queensland at the Australian All School Championships held in Townsville during December. Ryan MacNicol also in Year 10 went on to compete in the Triathlon Queensland All Schools State Championship where he secured second place.


INSIGHT | 49

INSIGHT

R ESE A R CH

R ES OUR CES

PERSPECTIV E

50 Year 13 and beyond Clinical Psychologist Judith Locke provides some tips for living with children after school

54 Climbing the balcony The importance of Arts in education

56 Get connected Putting parents in touch with resources

COLLEGIAN COLLEGIAN DECEMBER AUGUST 2013


50 | INSIGHT

YEAR 13 AND BEYOND TOO OFTEN WE ONLY THINK OF PARENTING AS BEING THE ACT OF CARING FOR A CHILD IN THEIR CHILDHOOD OR ADOLESCENCE. THESE DAYS, BECAUSE OF CHANGES TO LIVING ARRANGEMENTS, OFFSPRING ARE STICKING AROUND MUCH LONGER, WHICH CAN BE CHALLENGING. YET HAVING SOME COMMON HOUSE RULES IN PLACE CAN MAKE ALL THE DIFFERENCE WHEN IT COMES TO MAINTAINING A TRULY GREAT RELATIONSHIP WITH YOUR SON. BY JUDITH LOCKE - CLINICAL PSYCHOLOGIST

For some parents, this month marks the last time their child (no wait… adolescent… hang on, no… now a young adult) attends BBC. For the parents who have their child finishing this year – can you believe time has flown so quickly? For those who are yet to face this moment - can you believe such a day will come? With children staying at home much longer these days, the business of parenting a young adult in the family home can present some challenges. This article contains some ideas of how to make it work for you and also for them. It doesn’t just pertain to parents of ‘Year 13’ boys; it is also for parents getting close to the days of having an adult living under their roof. It is about continuing the work of assisting them to become caring, considerate, well-rounded, independent and capable human beings and ensuring a healthy balance. The tricky part of living with adult children is that typically their role

ACTIVELY CONTRIBUTING TO THE HOUSEHOLD

1

It's important that young adults become responsible for domestic chores, which are part of every adult’s life. Essentially, they need to become part of the team and ideally they should be doing their own washing or on occasion

washing for the whole family. Likewise they should be cooking and cleaning in equal proportions to you, particularly encourage them in this (boys are often a little slow in taking on these tasks and it's an important life skill). Building this sense of responsibility in your child in their adolescent years will make it easier when it comes to adulthood.

2

They should be paying rent in some form, either in the true sense or by simply undertaking more chores to cover it. This teaches them to budget better and prepares them for life outside of the home. It's important that they are not taking

the lifestyle you are providing for them for granted.

in the house should be a combination of them being a flat mate but also still having you as a parent figure in their life. This article gives some ideas about helping your child make the transition to adulthood, under your roof. Having some boundaries and rules in place ensures they are pleasant to be around and somewhat independent. It also gives them a sense of self-respect as a contributing member of a household.

3

Having a part-time job is ideal, even if they are at university. It's important they learn to pay for their things, particularly when it comes to clothing and entertainment. Part-time jobs teach them responsibility and are very good inclusions

on their CV. As a former employer, I always saw it as a good sign


INSIGHT | 51

COLLEGIAN COLLEGIAN DECEMBER AUGUST 2013


52 | INSIGHT

"It is about continuing the work of assisting them to become caring, considerate, well-rounded, independent and capable human beings and ensuring a healthy balance."

that a potential employee had maintained a part-time job while

responsibility for their university life and also, by doing their own work,

they had been at university, because it showed me they already

they are building their confidence in their field. It also provides self-

have experience in a workplace, they were able to manage varying

assurance that the marks they get are the result of their effort only and

responsibilities at once, and that they were likely to have continued to

empowers them to take responsibility if it goes pear-shaped.

do that job at times of great pressure such as exam times - meaning they could manage stress.

4

If they are not at university or TAFE, it's important they seek full time employment. It is also a great idea to get them to get themselves into a part time job in the stage between finishing school and before university, or during their summer

breaks. Many people don’t cope with idleness too well and their mental health suffers, or they involve themselves far too much in their socialising. A job keeps them a on track during that time. Give them an incentive to work by making them accountable for their own finances.

5

If they are pursuing further education make sure they take total responsibility for their academic work. You shouldn't have to remind them about assignments, give them time off from chores during exam time or ring their

lecturers (seriously, some parents do this!). This will help them accept

CONTINUING TO BE A PARENT Continuing to be a parent figure in their life has many benefits. It will ensure that you still are the ultimate authority figure, are in charge of your house and continue to be comfortable in your own home. It will also ensure they keep the house as you would want it, and, (I might whisper this bit) it actually encourages them, at some point, to leave the nest. Some tips‌

1 2

CLEANING Combined spaces (living room, kitchen) should be kept clean by them. If they have friends over they should clean up the dishes and glasses. DINNER Have some rules in place around dinner - when you or they prepare it, when to be home for dinner and the politeness of calling if they are going to be late or not home at all. Be very


INSIGHT | 53

clear on this. You don’t want to be up all night worrying. If they are becoming inconsiderate about this, it's important to bring it to their attention.

3

CHOICES What they do in your house, should it be having a few drinks (if they are of age), bringing their friends over at night, or even having their romantic interest in their room, all have

to be choices that you are comfortable with. Ultimately, you need to make these decisions according to your beliefs, but please ensure that you factor in any younger siblings, as it important to set the tone from the beginning and for when they too reach this situation. I would encourage you to have very clearly defined rules. A glass of wine at dinner? Maybe, but what about when their friends turn up with a few cartons or bottles under their arms? Be very clear on what you consider to be ok so they are clear and are not put in awkward positions.

4

ROMANCE I would strongly encourage that they don't have their romantic interests over too often. If they want to have an adult relationship with their good friend – great – but let it be

under their own roof. If they want some alone time, let them organise dates outside of the home. I would strongly suggest that they don't have their romantic interest over too often or as a semi-permanent member of your house.

MY MAIN TIP? Their actions should show their appreciation. If you are in a position where you constantly feel they don’t seem to respect you or your space, it's time to bring it to their attention and evaluate the situation. Any conversation

JUDITH LOCKE Judith Locke is a registered clinical psychologist, and former teacher and workplace trainer. She is a researcher at QUT, investigating modern parenting, child and parent wellbeing and the school environment. Judith also undertakes clinical work with families. Judith is the director of Confident and

that starts with you stating that their attitude is not appropriate should

Capable ®, an organisation specialising in

end with what will happen if it doesn’t improve. This is not a threatening

delivering dynamic psychological training

statement – it's about maintaining your relationship with them, their respect

solutions. Recent national and international

for you and your space and at the end of the day working towards a

training work includes sessions on parenting,

situation where everyone is happy.

resilience in children and improving staff

I can pretty much guarantee that the quality of the young adult living under your roof will be the result of the actions, and respect demanded by you in their adolescent and child years. The truly loving parent guides their child to be a good and considerate human being. Sort this out now to ensure that their young adult years continue to be pleasant for all, and, representing all of your (and their) hard work in making your parent-child

wellbeing. Judith’s psychological commentary on current events has featured in media, both nationally and internationally. Judith also treats individuals and families, for a range of issues, at her Toowong practice. You can contact her on judithlocke.com

relationship truly great.

COLLEGIAN COLLEGIAN DECEMBER AUGUST 2013


54 | INSIGHT

CLIMBING THE BALCONY THE IMPORTANCE OF THEATRE IN EDUCATION BBC’S MASTER IN CHARGE OF THEATRE AND DRAMA TEACHER, MICHELLE CAREY, SHARES HER THOUGHTS ON THE ARTS AND THEIR ROLE IN EDUCATION.

8.30pm. A Wednesday night in August. It’s cold and

people to embrace their imaginations and practise living

you still have 20 papers to mark before Friday. Why are

aesthetically, to engage in the real world that exists around

you here? Well, there are just those three scene transitions

us and not only the virtual one. There are not many

that aren’t working and you can’t quite put your finger on it.

situations where students are asked to engage mind,

Have another Tim Tam. Let’s start again, from the beginning

body and emotions in their learning but this happens

of the scene… Just a minute – a little problem solving voice

every day in Theatre. The little backstage voice in the

from backstage pipes up, “Miss… we could always enter

prior example was not only problem solving (coming in

from stage right, and if he is climbing the balcony at the

stage right), he was engaging his physical skill (climbing

same time, we never have to even cross paths.”

the balcony) and was also concerned about how the

“All art forms are asking us to look at things in different ways – to open up the way we think about the world and to bring different perspectives to things. They involve us taking risks and shaping things in aesthetic ways.” In the latest edition of the Independent Education Union magazine, Robyn Ewing, University of Sydney Professor of Teacher Education and the Arts talks about the urgent necessity for substantial Arts experiences, not only for young people but for their teachers as well. “We’re talking in all of the policy documents (to do with the new Australian Curriculum) about how important it is for children to nurture their creativity, to be able to solve problems and be flexible if they’re going to cope with all the challenges of the 21st century…” The place of the Arts, and Theatre in particular, is

characters’ relationships would come across to the audience (we wouldn’t even have to cross paths). As well as this, he was reading the scene aesthetically, engaging his understanding of spatial awareness and timing, and he would not have realised he was actually learning – he thought he was just having fun! Many of us, students and teachers, are facing 21st century challenges that are well beyond our past experience and expectations. Engaging in the Arts can be transformative, but only if we face these challenges with openness and intrigue. So be involved in the Arts, advocate for the Arts subjects and encourage young people to find new ways of expressing themselves that don’t rely on social media! As American actor, Alan Alda says, “Be brave enough to live creatively. The creative is the place where no one else has ever been. You have to

perhaps more important now than it ever has been.

leave the city of your comfort and go into the wilderness

Theatre gives young people a voice – a platform from

of your intuition. You can't get there by bus, only by hard

which to express, negotiate and experiment with creative

work, risking, and by not quite knowing what you're doing.

ideas. As educators, we need to encourage young

What you'll discover will be truly wonderful: yourself.”


INSIGHT | 55

COLLEGIAN COLLEGIAN DECEMBER AUGUST 2013


56 | INSIGHT

GET CONNECTED PUTTING PARENTS IN TOUCH WITH RESOURCES

READING EGGS

UP TO TEN

App – available from the Apple App Store and Google Play

www.uptoten.com

readingeggs.com.au

Age: up to 10 years

Age: three to 13 years Developed by ABC, Reading Eggs makes learning to read

As the name suggests, this website is dedicated to online learning for children aged up to 10 years. Uptoten.com is completely

interesting and engaging for kids, with great online reading games

independent; creating all the illustrations, animations, design, music

and activities. Available on iPad and Andriod, the app transports

and dialogues themselves, to make positively reinforcing games in a

children to a unique world that encourages them to take an active

warm and welcoming play-area.

role in learning to read. It supports each child’s learning by offering individual, one-on-one lessons that allow children to progress at their own rate. The program has been developed by a highly experienced team of educational teachers, writers and developers. The interactive program has progressive levels catering for children aged from three to 13 years.

SCHOLASTIC www.scholastic.com/ispy/games/index.htm Age: various Get your binoculars out because it’s time for a spy! Scholastic’s iSpy section is dedicated to all things detective with books, video games and online games the whole family can enjoy. For more than 90 years, Scholastic has been delivering outstanding books, magazines and educational programs directly to schools and families through channels that have become childhood traditions such as the Scholastic Book Fair.


CONNECT | 57

CONNECT OLD COLLEGIANS

WHER E A R E THEY NOW

EV ENTS

58 A message from the OCA OCA President Alex Persley reflects on what has been an outstanding year for the association

59 Thriving through generosity BBC Foundation Focus

68 The pathway to runway We interview BBC Old Collegian Jack Sullivan, to find out about his rise in the global fashion industry

71 Not just another cricket field Naming the John Noblet Oval

75 Old Boys Weekend More than 1500 old boys joined together for the premier old collegian event of the year

Places We Go A N INTER V IEW W ITH OLD COLLEGI A N CLINT BIZZELL

COLLEGIAN COLLEGIAN DECEMBER AUGUST 2013


58 | CONNECT

A MESSAGE FROM...

ALEX PERSLEY As a group I think the old boy community will look back at 2013 fondly and the executive can be proud of what they have achieved. Old Boys Day was the most successful we have seen in some years, with what many believe to be a record crowd watching the BBC First XV make light work of BGS. Perhaps the highlight was the team giving the old boys sitting on ‘Old Boys Hill’ three cheers at the end of the game. This was particularly satisfying as a key objective for the OCA has been to connect with current students and this was supporting evidence that we have had success on this front. The dinner was equally well attended with more than 350 old boys enjoying an evening that had somewhat of a festival atmosphere. Headmaster Graeme McDonald was appointed as Patron of the OCA at the dinner in recognition of his continued support of the Old Collegians’ Association, congratulations Graeme. The Vintage Collegians, headed by the tireless John ‘The Bull’ Stewart, have had another exceptional year as they proved once again that they are the backbone of our old collegiate. Four functions were held from Mt Mee to the Gold Coast, with an average attendance of 60 people. Their continued contribution to the OCA is acknowledged and always appreciated. The Young Old Boy committee was formed this year and under the leadership of Tom Law they have exceeded all expectations. Their commitment and enthusiasm is infectious and was most evident during Old Boys Weekend. It’s encouraging to see the youngest generation of old boys so strongly linked to the school and now the OCA. Having discussed with many of our peers the concept of giving back to the school, financially, it was clear that many were looking for a resonant cause to support. As a result the means tested OCA Bursary was launched this year to assist old boys in educating their sons at BBC. This bursary is the first of its nature in GPS schooling. I thank those who have donated to this worthy cause thus far and we look forward to the bursary being well supported in the future. Finally I would like to thank all the old boys who have volunteered their time over the past 12 months, whether it is mentoring the students, coaching sport, speaking at the school, cooking a BBQ or just turning up with a few mates to watch the footy. It is the selfless gift of your time that adds the real value to BBC and the OCA network and you are owed a great debt of gratitude. I look forward to seeing you all in 2014. Alex Persley OCA PRESIDENT


CONNECT | 59

FOUNDATION FOCUS

Y T I S O R E N E G H THIRVING THROUG THIS YEAR HAS BEEN OUTSTANDING FOR THE BBC FOUNDATION, WITH FANTASTIC SUPPORT RECEIVED FROM THE COLLEGE COMMUNITY. As a result, at a recent function, Foundation Chairman Mr Andrew Macarthur presented a cheque for $750,000 to BBC Headmaster Graeme McDonald. The funds will be utilised for several capital projects including the new Middle School Precinct and Boarding House Reception area. The Foundation's Scholarship and Indigenous Funds have also provided a total of 12 bursaries and scholarships for deserving young men, who may not have been able to experience a BBC education without financial assistance. The Foundation has also been able to place $1.5 million dollars under strategic investment to ensure the greatest value and growth capability for the generous donations received. As the investment continues to grow, it will become a permanent legacy of the community’s support, providing a strong funding stream for hundreds of years to come. Since 2009, the Foundation has contributed just under $4 million dollars towards vital BBC projects, including College Hall, the Amphitheatre, refurbishment of the Tennis Courts, improvements to the Rudd Hamilton wing and refurbishments to the Boarding House including the new reception area.

The BBC Foundation now has 125 members, highlighting the resolve of old collegians and the current BBC family to ensure the financial security and growth of the College. The number of financial members is ever-increasing and we continue to be inspired by the support of the entire community. The Foundation is undoubtedly achieving great things, yet plans for BBC are ambitious and community support will continue to be integral as the College moves forward in this dynamic educational landscape. Establishing strong community ties will remain our focus for 2014, where we hope to increase our membership to 150 and also the number of benefactors. The Foundation has been extremely grateful for and humbled by the continued generosity of the BBC community and it must be said that the Foundation is very appreciative of all donations and bequests, no matter how big or small, and treats them with the dignity and respect they deserve. Bren Arkinstall DIRECTOR OF DEVELOPMENT

+

INTERESTED IN FINDING OUT MORE? To find out more about how you can support BBC, visit www.bbc.qld.edu.au, email foundation@bbc.qld.edu.au

COLLEGIAN COLLEGIAN DECEMBER AUGUST 2013


60 | CONNECT

FACE OF THE FOUNDATION MEET THE POWERHOUSE BEHIND THE BBC FOUNDATION; THE BOARD. Each member brings a specific area of expertise and experience to the team comprised of old collegians, current parents and BBC Headmaster Graeme McDonald, Business Manager Chris Duffy, Director of Development Bren Arkinstall and BBC Chairman Jacqueline McPherson. Responsible for the overarching strategic direction and providing leadership in the Foundation’s financial initiatives, the board is integral to the continual enhancement of the BBC experience.

ANDREW MACARTHUR

ANDREW MACARTHUR

Treasurer of Brisbane Girls Grammar School

Andrew is the current Chairman of the

Parents and Friends’ Association. Bronwyn

BBC Foundation. He attended BBC

has more than 25 years experience in

from 1970 to 1975 and was a Prefect

international wholesale banking, in the

and House Captain. Andrew and his wife Felicity, a Somerville House old girl, sent their three boys Alastair (2008), Fergus (2009) and Callum (2012) to BBC. After leaving BBC Andrew attended the Queensland Agricultural College studying Agribusiness and has a Masters of Business Administration from Bond University. He is also a Fellow of the Australian Institute of Company Directors. Andrew is the Co-founder and Managing Director of the Plasvacc Group of companies, with operations in California and Queensland. He previously held the position of General

FIONA MEAGHER

JACQUELINE MCPHERSON

Manager of Pastoral Operations at Stanbroke Pastoral Company, which at that time was Australia’s largest pastoral

CHRIS DUFFY

markets and wholesale bank resourcing. She graduated from the University of Queensland with a BA (Hons), and gained her M.Comm degree from the University of New South Wales. Bronwyn has also undertaken Japanese language studies at Kochi University, International Christian University Tokyo and the University of Tokyo Japan. A native of Brisbane, she has lived and worked in Sydney, Tokyo and Hong Kong. In 2011, she relocated from Hong Kong to Brisbane with her family. Bronwyn’s son is in Year 11 at BBC and her daughter attends Brisbane Girls Grammar School.

FIONA MEAGHER Fiona has lived in Brisbane all her life and

company, with 27 stations, a staff over

was educated at Brisbane Girls Grammar

1000 and 560,000 head of cattle.

School and the University of Queensland

Andrew is proud of his connection to

from which she holds a Bachelor of Arts

Australia Agribusiness and has owned

and a Bachelor of Law. Fiona worked

and operated several rural properties, is a

as a solicitor for a number of years at

passionate supporter of rural and regional

Morris Fletcher and Cross which merged

business development and is committed to

to become known as Minter Ellison. She

providing opportunities for children from all

then became Group General Counsel and

areas at BBC.

Company Secretary for the Telecom New

BRONWYN MCENTEE

GRAEME MCDONALD

areas of risk management, audit, global

Zealand Australia group of companies. She was also Chief Operating Officer at

Bronwyn McEntee serves as a Director (ex

McCullough Robertson for several years.

officio) on the Board of the BBC Foundation

Fiona now consults part time, particularly

and is also Treasurer of BBC Parents

to professional services firms specialising in

and Friends’ Association and Assistant

change management, partner performance


CONNECT | 61 management and remuneration and

finishing in 1969. His main co-curricular

clear to him that when ‘the Boarding House is

strategy development. She previously

activities at the College were rowing and

strong - BBC is strong’ - a philosophy that he still

served as a Director for the Breast Cancer

athletics. Peter rowed in a Queensland

embraces today. He is President of the Tennis

Association of Queensland. Fiona is the

Champion Lightweight eight in 1963 and

Support Group and a Committee Member on

mother of two children, one of whom is in

coached rowing at BBC at different times

the OCA Executive. He is the National Head of

the Middle School at BBC.

between 1969 and 2009. Peter completed

Construction and Infrastructure at national law firm

his studies in law and was admitted as a

Holding Redlich.

JACQUELINE MCPHERSON

solicitor in 1974. He completed a Graduate

Born in Fiji in 1949, Jackie’s early education

Diploma in Urban and Regional Planning

was in Kenya from 1953 to 1963. She

at QIT in 1984. Peter was appointed to

immigrated with her parents to Brisbane

a committee to review town planning

in 1963 and completed her secondary

legislation in Queensland in 1990 and

and tertiary education at Cavendish Road

to an academic board in NSW to grant

State High School and the University of

degree status to a Marine Biology course

Queensland respectively. Upon completing

offered by the University of New England.

a Law degree, Jackie was admitted to

In the mid-90s Peter was the Queensland

practice as a solicitor in 1973. She was the

representative to the Australian Law Council

first woman to be employed as a solicitor in

to review Commonwealth Environmental

the City Solicitor’s Office of the Brisbane City

Law processes at the time. Peter married

Council. Jackie married Bruce McPherson

Leonie and they have three sons and a

in 1975 and has three sons and two step-

daughter. Their sons, Scott, Samuel and

children. She is a communicant member of

Lachlan all attended BBC.

JOHN STEWART

BRONWYN MCENTEE

PETER MACGREGOR

SANDY GRANT

the Ann Street Presbyterian Church and was appointed to the PMSA in 1992. Jackie is a

SANDY GRANT

Director of the Protection from Harm Division

Sandy attended BBC from 1969 to 1977

of the PMSA’s Education and Pastoral Care

and is a current parent with Peter in

Committee, the inaugural PMSA Equal

Year 10, and another son William having

Opportunity Officer until 2011, and Chairman

completed school in 2009. Many other

of the BBC School Council since 2011.

relatives have also been to BBC beginning with his grandfather who finished in 1919.

JOHN STEWART, AM

He completed a Bachelor of Economics at

John attended BBC from 1946 to 1953

UQ and Graduate Dip in Finance SIA with

and was School Captain in his senior year.

experience since 1980 in financial markets.

He worked in the cattle industry in the

For the last 21 years, Sandy has been with

Kimberley, Northern Territory, Queensland

Wilson HTM in Brisbane where he has been

from Jackeroo, Head Stockman, Manager,

an Institutional Advisor, Portfolio Manager

Pastoral Inspector and General Manager

and now CEO. Sandy has also managed

of Queensland Stations Limited – nine

various parts of the business and has been

properties, 210,000 cattle. From 1986

a main board Director in the past, and is

he operated a consultancy firm Glenlyon

currently a Director of the major subsidiary

Pastoral Management, was a consultant

Pinnacle Investment Management. Sandy

for the Cattle Council of Australia’s Animal

is currently the Investment Manager for

Health and Welfare for 20 years and assisted

the Wilson HTM Foundation which over

in the formation of Animal Health Australia,

its life has grown its corpus to $3.5m

North Australia Beef Research Council and

whilst dispersing $2.8m to its various

Rangelands Australia. Currently, John is the

beneficiaries.

Pastoral Supervisor for Newmont Mining in Queensland and Senior Native Title Officer for AgForce Queensland.

STEPHEN PYMAN Born in NSW, Stephen’s father was in the Australian Air Force and as a child he

PETER MACGREGOR

travelled to many faraway places. He was

Peter was born in Melbourne in 1949

a student at BBC from 1974 to 1978 and

and attended Ironside State School and

played rugby, cricket (First XI) and cross

then completed Years 7 to 12 at BBC

country. In Stephen’s time at BBC it became

STEPHEN PYMAN

BREN ARKINSTALL

COLLEGIAN COLLEGIAN DECEMBER AUGUST 2013


62 | CONNECT

OUR MEMBERS

WE’D LIKE TO FORMALLY ACKNOWLEDGE AND THANK OUR CURRENT MEMBERS FOR THEIR INVALUABLE SUPPORT OF THE BBC FOUNDATION.

MR AND MRS J APEL Member

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MR D R GORE Fellow

MR R MCLEAN Member

THE GRIMMETT FAMILY Fellow

MRS J MCPHERSON Member

MR M A HUGGINS Fellow

MR M MCVEIGH Member

MR P J HUNT-SHARP Fellow

MR T AND MRS F MEAGHER Member

MR AND MRS R J KEMPNICH Fellow

MRS B MOORE Member

MR I C MACPHERSON Fellow

MR D C O'RORKE Member

MR D K H MOFFATT Fellow

MR W M & MRS J PATTERSON Member

MR J R NICOL Fellow

*We also have many generous donors who

MR J S PAVLETICH Member

MR M B PARKER Fellow

wish to remain anonymous. We thank them

MR D A PETERSON Member

MR AND MRS G G PIPER Fellow

very much for their valued support.

MR J B PRICE Member

MR S J PYMAN Fellow

MR AND MRS P C ROSSI Member

MR D ROBINSON Fellow

MR J S HUTCHINSON Patron MR AND MRS C K JEN Patron KENSINGTON TERRACE LIMITED Patron MR E H LARMAR Patron MR T C LLOYD Patron MR P R MACGREGOR Patron MRS F ROBERTS Patron Mr BA and Mrs JA Slattery Patron MR J M R WYLIE, AM Patron


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THE YOUNG OLD Having been invited onto the OCA Executive in 2012, a year on BBC now has a Young Old Boys Committee. In this edition of Collegian, President Tom Law provides an insight into the diverse experiences on offer to those collegians new to the old boy scene, urging all boys to make the most of all the OCA has to offer. Earlier this year the BBC Young Old Boys Committee was formed.

The young old boys community has so much to benefit from

The committee operates within the wider scope of the OCA and aims to

participation in the wider OCA community, but it also has so much to

specifically serve younger old boys of the College.

give. The enthusiasm and energy that younger old boys bring to the

The main objectives of the committee are twofold. Firstly, we aim to

OCA has, over the past few years, reinvigorated the association and

maintain close relations amongst younger old boys, and secondly, we

breathed new life into events. This was more apparent than ever at

aim to foster closer relationships between this group and the wider OCA

the OCA Annual Dinner in August this year, when the OCA Pipe Band

community and current students.

marched into the dinner venue to what was surely their most raucous

To the former, it is essential to actively maintain close relationships between younger old boys because finishing school can have a straining

reception; the deafening cheering and standing ovation of over 200 young old boys.

effect on relationships forged during schooling years, as boys may pursue

It is this enthusiasm that we wish for all young old boys to contribute

different study or work options to their friends. Therefore, the convenience

to the workings of our committee, to ensure that we can achieve our aims

of being amongst friends every day at school, which we often take for

and serve this subset of the old boy community to the best of our abilities.

granted, is lost. We aim to restore that convenience by organising social

We will hold our first young old boys social event in March next year.

events at which younger old boys can catch up with one another and

Further details will be forthcoming, and I hope that all will be able to

continue those close relationships, but also enjoy themselves.

come along.

To the latter, the benefits of the OCA as a network cannot be

Joining me on the committee are seven other young old boys;

overstated. Younger old boys stand to benefit greatly from closer

Andrew McDonald (2010), Jonno Katahanas (2011), Hugo Henderson

relations with their older counterparts, whether these benefits come

(2011), Eli Vincent (2011), Henry Cunningham (2011), Jordy White

in the form of formal work experience or employment in their chosen

(2012) and Cam Wallace (2012).

field of study, informal mentoring, or merely the receiving of advice

If you would like to become more involved in the young old boys

and insight into a particular industry. However, young old boys do

community, or the wider OCA group, please do so! You can contact me

not only have the opportunity to be the recipient of such networking

or any of the other committee members either directly or through the

opportunities, they can also have an significant positive impact in the

BBC Development Office.

lives of current students, by giving advice on certain areas of study at university or work experience. Such advice can assist current students in making a more informed decision in which option they wish to pursue

Remember not just what you stand to gain, but also what you stand to give.

upon leaving school.

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CLASS OF 2012 FIRST REUNION FRIDAY 6 DECEMBER

Brisbane Boys’ College welcomed back 70 old collegians from the Class of 2012 to celebrate their first year reunion. The evening was a chance for our young old boys to catch up and discuss their experiences since leaving the College 12 months earlier.


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INTERVIEW

PLACES

WE GO

WITH A LOVE FOR FOOTY AND DRAMA IN HIS SCHOOL DAYS, THE PATH THAT WAS TO FOLLOW FOR OLD BOY CLINT BIZZELL (1993) COMES AS LITTLE SURPRISE. From the footy field to the camera, Clint’s story is one of hard work, pushing the boundaries, sheer determination and simply doing what you love. In fact Confucius’

which spanned 12 years and saw him play

Their success has been driven by a

alongside all time sporting greats Gary Ablett

passion for travel, with the people they meet

Senior, Gary Hocking and David Neitz.

and places they go bringing it all together. We

Yet it wasn’t until his partner Jen invited

recently caught up with Clint to find out more.

him to travel to Africa and Peru whilst producing her TV travel series, Places We Go, that Clint found himself on camera. From here on in the rest is history. Now in their sixth

CAN YOU TELL US A BIT ABOUT YOUR TIME IN THE AFL? To play AFL was a childhood dream come

series, the duo have travelled the world with

true for me. My dad played 226 games locally,

Clint entrenched as a director in the business

so while I grew up in the then predominantly

and co-host of the series. The pair also

non-AFL area of Brisbane, Aussie Rules was

recently launched Places We Go Signature

in my blood. With idols like Peter Daicos and

Tours, offering once in a lifetime experiences

Gary Ablett Senior, I was determined to one

Rules was simply ‘in the blood’ for Clint. In the

and providing personalised tours that tap

day lace up my boots and play on the MCG.

90s he could be found on the field, playing

into their extensive knowledge of some of the

My story was one of pure determination. What I

with Geelong and later Melbourne - a career

most stunning places on the planet.

lacked in size as a young boy (I matured rather

words, “choose a job you love and you will never have to work a day in your life,” certainly springs to mind. Despite his Queensland origin, Aussie

COLLEGIAN COLLEGIAN DECEMBER AUGUST 2013


66 | CONNECT

late!) I believe I made up with my somewhat dogged personality! So you can imagine how I felt when I was picked up by Geelong in the 1995 draft from my local club Kedron Grange in Brisbane as one of the last players picked. I took my opportunity and enjoyed a career spanning 12 years – six years with the Geelong Cats, and six with the Melbourne Demons, playing a total of 163 games.

MOST MEMORABLE MOMENTS FROM YOUR AFL CAREER? The adrenalin of playing finals footy, to the privilege of representing Australia in the International Rules Series against Ireland both quickly come to mind. While I was privileged to play alongside some of the all time great players, like Gary Ablett Senior, Gary Hocking and David Neitz, what I loved most about playing in such a great game was the bond and camaraderie I formed with all of my teammates - it was never felt more strongly than when I was playing for Melbourne against Essendon in round one, 2005, in memory of my teammate and friend Troy Broadbridge who lost his life in the Boxing Day Tsunami in 2004.

ONE OF THE MOST MEMORABLE CHARACTERS YOU’VE MET ON YOUR TRAVELS? What an impossible question! Our tag line for our show was genuinely born out of the fact that when we travel, it really has been the people we meet that have not only brought our TV series alive, but it’s the locals that bring any travel experience alive for us. One of my most memorable characters would have to be Digger in the Kimberley in Western Australia. He was so passionate, he could have taken the reigns there and then and hosted the show all by himeslf. We often reminisce about what a character he was, his name says it all! But then there are the wonderful people from different cultures around the world that I have been lucky enough to not only film and interview, but spend time with – like Kassim who helped me climb Kilimanjaro in Africa, to Tom from the Great Bear Lodge in Canada; I am determined to return there one day with Jen and our daughter Charli!

WHAT’S IT LIKE BEING ABLE TO WORK ALONGSIDE AND SHARE YOUR EXPERIENCES WITH YOUR PARTNER JEN? It’s certainly an adventure! I don’t think either of us know how to be any other way! This is not work for us, it’s really just who we are. We both love a challenge, whether it’s climbing Africa’s highest mountain or dreaming up a new idea for Places We Go. There’s a lot that goes on behind the scenes in running the business, and we both have very different skill sets that compliment each other. I think that is why it works. It’s quite remarkable to think about some of the travel adventures we have shared together – and I know there will be plenty more to come.

HOW HAS THE PLACES WE GO SERIES GROWN OVER THE YEARS? Like all businesses, we have grown and evolved every year. We have really developed from our roots of a simple TV travel series, to an integrated mutli-level travel platform. The media landscape is changing so rapidly, I find it really exciting to be always trying new things. Last year we launched an online travel planner Triphitter where we worked with over 35,000 Australian travel operators, which was a great success. In the same year we chartered a Russian icebreaker ship with one of our travel partners and invited our viewers to come away with us on the ultimate adventure to Antarctica! So if anyone has any more ideas for us – let me know and we are always open to pushing the boundaries!

FAVOURITE TRAVEL DESTINATION? Without doubt Antarctica has touched me like no other travel experience ever has. It was simply unbelievable. Humbling. Never have I felt so insignificant and just in awe of every moment. If you haven’t been – do yourself a favour and take the journey. The wildlife, the landscape – there really are no words except to say go experience it for yourself if you can.

I SEE YOU PRODUCED A SERIES FOCUSING SPECIFICALLY ON AUSTRALIAN ADVENTURES. WHAT DID YOU ENJOY MOST ABOUT THIS?

Now this was an adventure of a lifetime! Our daughter was just 18 months old, and it just seemed like the right time to take on the drive around Australia. We took a crew of eight people, in two caravans, and that included two mothers-in-law! Yes I know what you are thinking? How did that go? It was brilliant. Both of our mothers are as adventurous as we are, if not more! We drove 32,000 kilometres around Australia (even caught the ferry over to Kangaroo Island and Tassie) and spent much of our time in the outback which really blew us all away. We have a photo of our daughter celebrating her second birthday under a rock art painting of a serpent in Arnhem Land. There are so many treasured memories from that trip it’s hard to know where to start and end. Swimming with whale sharks, sleeping under the stars in swags with one of our country's most revered didgeridoo players, camping on a 1.6 million acre cattle station to being welcomed by Traditional Elders while watching some of the biggest sunsets you can imagine. But above all, the feeling of driving on that great open road across Australia is infectious. Australia really is one of the most stunning places we have ever seen.

WHAT ARE SOME OF THE CHALLENGES AND REWARDS THAT COME WITH RUNNING THIS TYPE OF VENTURE? Where do I start? There are many challenges and rewards. A bit like footy really! Above all I believe it’s about having a great

"THIS IS NOT WORK FOR US, IT’S REALLY JUST WHO WE ARE. WE BOTH LOVE A CHALLENGE, WHETHER IT’S CLIMBING AFRICA’S HIGHEST MOUNTAIN OR DREAMING UP A NEW IDEA FOR PLACES WE GO."


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we have been doing! So we have partnered with the travel company, Encore, which specialises in tailoring handcrafted travel experiences. Together, we have all spent considerable time hand crafting our Places We Go Signature Tours, the best of everything we have personally loved and in fact stand for - bringing the countries and cultures alive with the locals and people we meet along the way with the backdrop of stunning destinations.

WHAT WILL MAKE THE SIGNATURE TOUR EXPERIENCE UNIQUE? You will have to come on one and find out! Firstly, we will be hosting them! And by hosting them, I really mean bringing what we do on TV alive in the trip. Hosting special dinners and interviewing local guests, among many other exciting activities. Through our TV series we’ve been privileged to visit some of the most stunning places on the planet. However it’s when locals welcome us into their lives and their amazing cultures that a lasting impression is left on us. That is what Places We Go is all about. Real people. Real travel. Mix that with our travel partner Encore, which is renowned for handcrafting its trips.

WHAT DID YOU ENJOY MOST ABOUT ATTENDING YOUR RECENT BBC REUNION?

team around you, and all having that common

Australia. We are a branded TV model that

core values and we are always trying new things. For example at the moment we are about to launch a competition searching for a guest travel reporter to ‘live the dream’. They (and a friend) will get to travel overseas and host their own travel story that will air in 2014 on Places We Go on Network Ten! Who knows how that will turn out? But gee it will

has extended online, newspaper and now

be a great experience for someone.

purpose. We are all passionate about people and the world. While on the outside it may appear that we are carefree and having a great time traveling around the world, we are a serious travel platform that works closely with some of the biggest brands in

trips. In essence we are content providers and a media marketing platform working in conjunction with our partners, all with the common goal of giving our viewers travel experiences they love to remember. There are always going to be challenges, but I love the adage that if you are not being challenged then you are not pushing the boundaries enough. Our company has strong

WHAT WAS THE CATALYST FOR STARTING SIGNATURE TOURS? Places We Go Signature Tours has been a natural progression for us. Quite simply, we have had thousands of viewers emailing us over the years sharing their stories, telling us they were inspired by our travels, asking for travel advice and wanting to do the trips

I loved it all! Catching up with all of my old friends and hearing about what they are up to today. It was my first reunion since I left the College and I don’t think I stopped talking the entire night! In fact I lost my voice for a few days after it. I have since reignited some old friendships where we had lost touch. It was a brilliant reunion.

WHAT’S ONE OF YOUR MOST VIVID MEMORIES FROM YOUR TIME AT THE COLLEGE? Apart from the friendships that were formed, my really nostalgic memory of the College was actually listening to the Pipe Band, as the members walked down the hill when the First XV was playing. It always made the hairs on the back of my neck stand up. And now, every time I hear bagpipes it takes me back to that same hill at school.

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INTERVIEW

THE PATHWAY TO RUNWAY FROM THE SKI SLOPES TO THE MERCEDES-BENZ FASHION WEEK RUNWAY, BBC OLD COLLEGIAN JACK SULLIVAN (2005) TOOK AN UNLIKELY PATH TO BECOME THE MAN – AND BRIDAL FASHION DESIGNER – HE IS TODAY. NOW WITH A RUNNER UP PLACEMENT IN THE ‘BRIDE NOUVEAU’ SECTION AT THE QUEENSLAND BRIDES DESIGN AWARDS AND HIS GOWNS STOCKED THROUGHOUT AUSTRALIA, NEW ZEALAND AND THE UK, HE HAS OFFICIALLY CEMENTED HIS PLACE IN THE FASHION INDUSTRY. WE CAN’T WAIT TO SEE WHAT’S NEXT FOR THIS BBC OLD BOY.

HOW DID JACK SULLIVAN BRIDAL COME TO FRUITION? Well I always wanted to do something different. I was never going to end up with

WHERE DO YOU SOURCE YOUR INSPIRATION FROM? Most of the time it will be a particular fabric or lace that inspires me; that will trigger ideas.

a boring office job. I am sure a lot of the teachers at BBC would agree that I was not the greatest student if I wasn’t interested in something. I originally came back from instructing in Whistler, British Columbia, as the Winter Olympics were on and it was going to be a crazy season so I didn’t want to be there. My mum and Dad asked me to help out with their label, Brides Desire (formerly Airs and Graces) on the business side of things. One day I was on hold with the courier and drew a sketch on my desk pad. Three From selling shirts to his fellow BBC

weeks went by until my mum saw the sketch,

classmates to helping his parents with

asked who drew it, and said I could put it in

their own bridal label, Brides Desire

her next collection.

(formerly Airs and Graces), Sullivan looks back and is not surprised he followed the path to fashion design. However, it was not until his mother discovered a sketch he drew while on hold with a courier company that his journey really began.

Four months later the gown I sketched on the desk pad was on the cover of Queensland Bride magazine. From there I did some design work with my mother under her label and learned from her. After a while it was obvious that whilst we still get along very well, I had

As Sullivan continues to make his place

a different design style. So I had a little bit of

in the bridal design industry, he takes time

money that I then used to start Jack Sullivan

to reflect on his days as a ski instructor, his

Bridal. That was nearly two years ago, and it

first bridal design, developing his signature

has gone exceptionally quickly.

Jack Sullivan style, and the BBC life lessons that still resonate with him today.

FROM THE FIRST SKETCH TO THE FINAL DESIGN, WHAT GOES INTO CREATING A GOWN? Step one is the lace. My laces are all custom laces that I have made. This can sometimes be a very long, frustrating process, but is one of the little things that I feel adds up to help make my designs different from other designers. The lace for the Gabrielle gown, which was the runner up design at Queensland Brides Design Awards, took about six months and four attempts of sampling before I was happy with the lace. It is often a very ‘chicken or the egg’ process with the gowns. Sometimes I will find fabric or a lace that I love and will design a gown around the idea of exaggerating the qualities I love about the fabric or lace. However, sometimes I will have an idea for a gown and select a lace or fabric that is appropriate for look I am trying to achieve. The next step is the base gown. This is a term I use for the empty gown. I like to have the base gown and then apply detailing after, as sometimes is very hard to imagine what the detail will look like until you apply it. Often it


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IMAGE COURTESY OF JOHN DOWNS

COLLEGIAN DECEMBER 2013


70 | CONNECT ends up going in a different direction to what I thought originally. I then craft the bodice and the skirt, and apply the beadwork. The beads for the Gabrielle were actually sewn on to motifs of lace, then appliquéd onto the gown on top of the base lace. I like to do this as I feel the layering of the motifs gives the gowns a more dimensional look. My method might not be the quickest, and it might not be the most technologically advanced, but it’s how I like to work – with a focus on attention to detail, unique design and quality materials.

HAVING BEEN ACCEPTED INTO THE WHITE GALLERY IN LONDON AND WITH YOUR GOWNS SOLD IN NZ AND THE UK, CAN YOU EXPLAIN THE FEELING THAT COMES FROM BEING RECOGNISED ON A GLOBAL STAGE?

to a dozen or so brides each year. One day I would also like to start doing menswear, but that is a bit of a dream and I have no real plans of doing that right now.

FAVOURITE BBC MEMORY? My first ever business was at BBC. In Year 8 there was a particular type of shirt that was exceptionally popular. My parents were travelling to Hong Kong a lot and buying me some cheap clothes whilst there. I decided that I would start selling these shirts to fellow students. I still remember pulling all the books off the top of my locker and replacing them with these shirts. Probably then I should have realised that I was destined to sell clothes for a living. Your margins are fantastic when your parents are buying these shirts for you. However there was the unfortunate end of my first business. Mum realised something was up when I was putting in an order for their next trip and I asked for three XS and four XL shirts. She didn’t think the school would approve, so I had to stop. Dad pretended he wasn’t happy, but I think he loved it.

Yeah, it is an amazing feeling to have my gowns sold throughout the world. Honestly when I first started my label, I was just happy not be considered an embarrassment. I was My other favorite memory from school happily surprised when people seemed to like was our last basketball game. the first collection and it has grown We had a successful year step by step. Recently finding and our last game was at out I was accepted into the MY FIRST EVER home. Basketball never White Gallery is something BUSINESS WAS AT BBC... brought in huge crowds, that I am absolutely over PROBABLY THEN I SHOULD however hundreds of the moon about. I am students showed up on the youngest designer to HAVE REALISED THAT I WAS this day. The crowd was showcase there and I am DESTINED TO SELL CLOTHES exceptionally loud thanks up against the big UK and FOR A LIVING. to our ‘Spirit Captain’ at the European bridal couturiers. time, Morgan Ruig; he made I am already a little nervous the game a ‘bring something to about the catwalk show in April but bang loudly on and make noise’ day. I it is something I am exceptionally proud will never forget that day. of. The selection process to get into the White Gallery is a tough one, but I was subtly told I should apply by one of the organisers after my last catwalk show in September. It still has not sunk in that I will be showcasing next to some European designers that I have always looked up to.

WHAT’S NEXT FOR JACK SULLIVAN BRIDAL? I am not sure what is next, but I know I really just need to solidify my position in the Australian market whilst being careful not to grow too quickly in the European and New Zealand markets. I would love to start doing some one-off gowns for brides when I am actually in Brisbane, only offering that service

LASTING LESSON THAT YOU HAVE TAKEN FROM YOUR TIME AT BBC? It won’t have anything to do with spelling or maths, as I am still horrible at those (not the school’s fault). It will be more the life lessons at the time you don’t really even realise you are learning. Be it learning how to tie your tie, how to address someone in an appropriate manner, or working in a team; BBC played a huge part in where I am right now. To see more Jack Sullivan Bridal designs, visit: http://www.jacksullivanbridal.com DRESSES FROM WINTER 2013 COLLECTION: TOP - ALI, MIDDLE - AMANDA, BOTTOM - BETTINA


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RENAMING CEREMONY

NOT JUST ANOTHER CRICKET FIELD... COLLEGIAN COLLEGIAN DECEMBER AUGUST 2013


72 | CONNECT

JOHN NOBLET OVAL IT IS, AND ALWAYS HAS BEEN, A KEY ELEMENT TO THE VISTA OF BRISBANE BOYS’ COLLEGE – AN ICON OF THE WESTERN SUBURBS AND FIELD OF SPORTING HISTORY. IN 1931 IT WASN’T CALLED THE JOHN NOBLET OVAL. THAT NAME DID NOT COME UNTIL 2013, IN HONOUR OF A TRULY WORTHY BRISBANE BOYS’ COLLEGE STUDENT WITH A GREAT LOVE OF COLLEGE AND CRICKET. BEFORE THAT, IT WAS JUST BBC MAIN OVAL.

As BBC’s ovals took shape in the thirties, many of the students of

also a member of the BBC Athletic team where he won Colours for

that era helped with the preparation. Punishment for misdemeanours

the half mile and had achieved the status of the First XI Cricket where

included ‘emu parades’ where the whole school congregated on

he was described in the 1940 Portal as a “solid forceful bat, shows

the oval to pick up loose stones. The matter was taken in good part

enterprise, and goes for the bowling. Probably the most improved

by both students and parents as an unfortunate side product of the

member of the team – splendid fast bowler, keeps an excellent length.”

depression. The oval has always held memories of great sporting moments for Brisbane Boys’ College. Although the College sporting fortunes between 1935 and 1939 were mixed, rugby came into its own when BBC won four of their eight matches. We had varied success in both cricket and tennis during these years and by 1939, the Athletic Club had brought home the coveted All Schools trophy, the Sir John Goodwin Cup. Sporting success had truly enhanced the College’s reputation in the community just as World War II began. In 1939, a local boy to the Western Suburbs, Mr F. J. Noblet, was awarded a scholarship to Brisbane Boys’ College. Considering the economic circumstances at the time, including the Depression and

John’s strengths did not only lie on the field, achieving three Bs and four As for his academic results in the same year. His strengths were Geography, English Literacy, Arithmetic and Book-keeping, fitting for a man who would later gain a position at the Commonwealth Bank. As a man of good stead, John joined the Air Force following graduation and served three years for his country. On his return from war, John continued his love of all things cricket, playing with the Manly Club in Sydney and flying up to Brisbane to attend old collegians’ functions. Upon his passing in 2011, John bequeathed his estate to the

World War II, the scholarship was a wonderful opportunity for John, as

Brisbane Boys’ College Foundation with the funds going towards the

he was known, in his senior schooling years.

construction of College Hall and the transformation of Main Oval.

John was a dedicated day student at BBC, taking a keen interest

John led a simple and uncomplicated life. He had his friends and

in sport and creating his own memories on Main Oval. In his first year

his love of cricket, so it was fitting that Main Oval be renamed in

at the College, John’s passion for cricket was ignited when he joined

memory of Mr Frederick John Noblet earlier this year. On Wednesday

the Under 15 Cricket and Hockey teams. By the following year, he was

25 September, BBC welcomed back 55 Vintage Collegians (old boys


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As with John Noblet, many old collegians have left a bequest to the College, playing a lasting role in the education of generations of young men. ‘THE OLD GABBA - 1982’ PAINTED BY BBC OLD COLLEGIAN ED DEVENPORT

over the age of 65) to be part of the momentous ceremony. The newly named John Noblet Oval was officially opened by Brisbane Boys’ College Headmaster, Mr Graeme McDonald, with words from John’s long-time friend and prominent old collegian, Mr Frank Walters - “John was reliable, honourable and a highly moral man and a good friend to all that knew him. He was indeed, what the College would call, a true man of honour.” Today, the John Noblet Oval is a lush, green oval with full-sized cricket pitch and a new irrigation system. The oval has been laser levelled and returfed, and is mowed three times per week. As the most used oval on BBC’s Toowong campus, the John Noblet Oval continues to host matches for cricket, football and rugby, as well as PE classes and lunch time play. Work is set to commence shortly on the continuing improvement of the oval with a new sign with digital capabilities being installed along the Moggill Road fence line and upgraded access via the far stairs. John Noblet, a boy who walked onto the College oval for the first time in 1939, is a name firmly established in BBC history. His passion for all things sport, in particular cricket, will continue to inspire future generations of collegians on the very oval that ignited John’s spark.

ACTS OF GENEROSITY Did you know... In 1927 the daughters of Sir Robert Philp offered property at Toowong for the establishment of a College and seven years later Mr W Ross Munro purchased land for the establishment of the Headmaster’s residence and donated this land to BBC. These acts of generosity led to the establishment of BBC’s Toowong campus. As with John Noblet, many old collegians have left a bequest to the College, playing a lasting role in the education of generations of young men. Another such example is Phil Bisset. As a result of his extremely generous gift to the College, BBC was able to construct the Phil Bisset Gallery, located in College Hall. Phil’s generous gift also included a monetary component, property, as well as a collection of rare coins and stamps. Phil’s legacy gift to Brisbane Boys’ College is a powerful and lasting reminder of his love for art and his desire to enrich the lives of future generations of BBC students. Amongst Phil’s collection and on display in the gallery today you’ll find ‘The Old Gabba - 1982’ painted by BBC Old Collegian Ed Devenport. According to his son Peter, “he would have been chuffed to have this painting, which combined his love of steam trains with Brisbane cityscapes, at the school.”

John Noblet Oval – not just another cricket field, but a field of more than 75 years of memorable moments and sporting history.

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RENAMING CEREMONY WEDNESDAY 25 SEPTEMBER ~ JOHN NOBLET OVAL Main Oval was officially renamed the John Noblet Oval in a formal ceremony, to honour BBC Old Boy and keen cricketer, Frederick John Noblet. Upon his passing in 2011, Mr Noblet bequeathed his estate to the BBC Foundation, assisting with the construction of College Hall and the upgrade of Main Oval. The ceremony was followed by the Vintage Collegians’ annual luncheon.


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OLD BOYS WEEKEND IT’S A SHOWCASE OF PRIDE AND AFFINITY AT ITS BEST. MORE THAN 1500 OLD COLLEGIANS RETURNED TO THE COLLEGE FOR WHAT HAS BECOME THE ANNUAL PREMIER EVENT, OR SHOULD WE SAY WEEKEND, FOR THE YEAR, WITH A SERIES OF REUNIONS HELD ON FRIDAY 23 AUGUST, FOLLOWED BY OLD BOYS DAY ON SATURDAY AND THE ANNUAL DINNER THAT EVENING.

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REUNIONS FRIDAY 23 AUGUST - VARIOUS VENUES


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OLD BOYS DAY SATURDAY 24 AUGUST - BBC

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ANNUAL DINNER SATURDAY 24 AUGUST - MERCURE HOTEL

COLLEGIAN COLLEGIAN DECEMBER AUGUST 2013


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VINTAGE COLLEGIANS

FAMILY TREE BBC 1916-2013


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FROM THE INCEPTION OF MR RUDD’S SCHOOL AT CLAYFIELD, PARENTS HAVE WANTED THEIR SONS TO ATTEND BBC. MANY FAMILIES HAVE HAD LINEAL CONNECTIONS THAT CAN BE TRACED ACROSS THE DECADES. ONE FAMILY, COMPRISING THE MACDONALDS, STEWARTS AND SCHUMANNS ARE LINKED TO THE COLLEGE FROM 1916 UNTIL TODAY. REV MACDONALD BEGAN AS A PART TIME ENGLISH AND LATIN MASTER IN 1916.

JOHN WILLIAM STEWART (1946 - 1953)

MARIAN CHRISTABEL

GEORGE GRANT (July 1925 - 1929)

REV JOHN SCOTT MACDONALD (1916 - 1945) m Mary Ross

In 1892 John Scott Macdonald entered Aberdeen University, where he gained his Master of Arts degree attaining honours

ALEXANDER GILLESPIE STEWART (1973 - 1976, 1978)

in Philosophy and also a gold medal for

IAN SOMERLED

English. After four years studying theology

(1925 - 1930)

PERNEL LOUISE

at New College, Edinburgh, Mr Macdonald and his wife, Mary migrated to Brisbane. He was ordained a minister in 1902, at Scots Church Clayfield where he remained OGILVY JOHN SCOTT

until 1921. Resigning from BBC’s local church,

(1917 - 1919)

Rev Macdonald accepted a full time position on the College staff. He was tolerant and patient, quick to bestow praise where such was merited, ready to offer

Mary Poole clan

encouragement and advice where the effort fell short of literary merit. The Clayfield

Deborah Schumann clan

Collegian continues: The active part he played in Morning Assembly will always be remembered. His scripture readings and inspiring prayers made deep impressions on the boys.

PHOTO: JOHN WILLIAM STEWART ATTENDING A VINTAGE COLLEGIANS FUNCTION

TRISTAN SCHUMANN (2012)

SEBASTIAN SCHUMANN (2012) Great grandsons of Ogilvy John Scott and great, great grandsons of Rev John Scott Macdonald

COLLEGIAN DECEMBER 2013


82 | CONNECT

During WWI, Chaplain, Captain Scott Macdonald spent just over a year at Moascar an isolation camp in Egypt, before being

of public health workers who turned into a first class academic teacher. Gifted teaching, leadership and sporting

transferred to the fifth Light Horse Brigade

genes are evident in this family’s DNA. George

with their headquarters in Baalbek, Syria.

Grant, the second son was a Prefect, who

After returning to Australia, Rev J Scott

won full colours for cricket, rugby and tennis,

Macdonald’s three sons attended BBC.

in 1929. He was a member of the Firsts in

The eldest son, Ogilvy John Scott

cricket and rugby in the 1928-29 seasons.

Macdonald was Prox. Acc. Dux 1917-1920.

George was described as a medium pace

He was made a Prefect in 1918; won the

bowler with a good length. While in rugby, he

Mathematics Prize in 1919 and passed the

was considered a centre, who moved nicely

Scottish Universities Matriculation examination

through openings, and defended consistently

in 1920. Ogilvy rowed in the Head of the River

well. In 1929, as Captain of Tennis he was

crews, 1917-1919. As Captain of Boats, he

remembered as a reliable and steady player.

stroked the First IV to victory for the first time

In the same year, George was Vice Captain of

in 1919. The Champion Open Athlete and

GPS Athletics and runner-up in the Clayfield,

Athletics Captain of 1919 had been selected

Open Athletics Cup after winning both the

as a member of All Schools’ Athletic and

Open 220 yards and the Fred Ryder medal

Swimming Teams in 1918. Ogilvy played

100 yards championships.

senior cricket 1917-19, and football in 1917

The youngest Macdonald, Ian Somerled

and was Vice Captain in 1918, besides being

was a member of both the First IX and XV with

a band corporal.

brother, George in 1929. Cricket and athletics

Embarrassing his mother while his father

1929-30; a left hand all-rounder, bowling a very

climbed into the rafters of the church and

fast ball and batting with style and freedom.

through the gaps in the ceiling rained hundreds

Coupled with the best bowing average in 1930,

and thousands down onto members of the

he was also a member of the Tennis IV and

congregation. A dry wit and a keen sense of

Captain of second rowing crew, earning him

humour were enduring characteristics of this

half colours. Ian’s first placing in the 120 yards

self-effacing, modest, man.

hurdles, high jump, shot put and Fred Ryder

at 18 years, Ogilvy attended Edinburgh University to study medicine. He obtained his MD highly commended in 1927. After working

medal for the Open 100 yards secured him the Open Champion Cup, full colours and the prize

Assam, where he was Principal Medical Officer

Stewart 1946-53. John passed Junior in 1950,

to the tea plantations’ personnel. This was

was made a Pro-Prefect in 1951, a Prefect in

followed by a distinguished Army career in the

1952-53, Captain of Rudd House in 1953 and

Indian Medical Service where he succeeded in

in addition College Captain in 1953. The Bull

controlling malaria in West Africa.

played First XV Rugby 1950-53 and became

Mary (Mrs Poole) was born. In 1959, he was appointed as Assistant Director of the Ross Institute of Tropical Medicine at London University, where he taught preventive medicine to overseas students. In this capacity, he also toured SE Asia and Africa

2

ROWING TEAM 1919 –WINNERS OF HOR FOR THE FIRST TIME. IN 1919 CALLED ALL SCHOOLS’ CHAMPIONSHIP RACE: STANDING: WL BOYD (BOW), JG CAMERON(3), SITTING: OJS MACDONALD (STROKE), DR V MCDOWALL (COACH), AE JUNNER (2), IN FRONT: AP DOUGLAS (COX)

3

TENNIS 1929 GEORGE GRANT: STANDING: FKL HOSSACK, BH ANDERSON, SEATED: GG MACDONALD (CAPTAIN) MR CW HUGHES, SC FOOTE

4

ATHLETICS TEAM 1929: BACK ROW: IJ STEWART, AW GREEN, WR COVER, CH O'REILLY, WJ EMERY, SECOND ROW: RH BENTLEY, PR OXLEY, WAJ WATT, FKL HOSSACK, JM MCINTYRE, SB BUCHANAN, FRONT ROW: SC FOOTE, EM CARR, BR MARTIN,(CAPTAIN), MR A ROBINSON (COACH), GG MCDONALD (VICECAPTAIN), BH ANDERSON, AAF MACKILLOP

6 5

1930 CRICKET STAFF AND PREFECTS 1926: STANDING: WJD SHAW (SENIOR PREFECT) LC CADELL, AJW SCOTT, CH WALTHALL, WAL HYDE, AIF MACKILLOP, SITTING: MR CW HUGHES, MR ECD RINGROSE BSC BA, MR RS PHELAN BE, MR SG KENNEDY MSC, MR AW RUDD LLB MA (PRINCIPAL), REV. J SCOTT MACDONALD MA, MR J EVANS MA, MISS SMITH, MR A DORFELD

7

BBC TEAM FOR GPS ATHLETICS, 1919: STANDING: AB STEWART, FC WAGSTAFF, RL HERTZBERG, EH L'ESTRANGE, JH STEWART, HD MARSHALL, SITTING: V LEWIS, OJS MACDONALD (CAPTAIN), MR SG KENNEDY (COACH), MK GIBSON (VICE-CAPTAIN), JH SIMMONDS, FRONT: GF L'ESTRANGE, AP DOUGLAS, NL GREEN

8

1953 PREFECTS : BACK ROW: DF BULL, G MCINTOSH, EC GROOM, AC PETTIGREW, IJ WALTER, MIDDLE ROW: LNS ELMSLIE, RM SHAW, DC STREET, IR GIBSON, DL STRAHAN, JF BETTS, CN ADERMANN, SEATED; EJ MOWAT, GS CHARLTON, JOHN W STEWART (COLLEGE CAPTAIN), DR MCKENZIE (PINCIPAL), MR HARDY (SENIOR MASTER), CG SHAW, EA THOMPSON

9

TENNIS IST IV, 1930: STANDING: G CARTER, IS MACDONALD, EM CARR, AK CROMMELIN, SEATED: FKL HOSSACK, MR CW HUGHES (COACH), EE QUINLAN

Descended from Ogilvy, George and Ian’s sister, Marian Christabel is John William

Estates Health Association in Ceylon, where

FIRST XV, 1953: DE PALM, G MCINTOSH, BHL GIBSON, CN ADERMANN, CA BERNARD, LNS ELMSLIE, RM SHAW, JOHN STEWART (CAPTAIN), MR GE THOMASON, EA THOMPSON, AO COULTER, EJ MOWAT, C SHAW, P TOMS, GS CHARLTON, AC PETTIGREW, BJ KNOWLES

of Athletics Captain, in 1930.

in Scotland, Ogilvy moved to Malaya then to

After the war, Ogilvy worked in the Planters

1

were Ian’s sports. He won First XI full colours in

was preaching, this talented all-rounder

Leaving family and life-long school friends,

PHOTO CAPTIONS CLOCKWISE

the 1953 Captain winning full colours. Rowing in the third crew 1951-52, he gained half colours, with full colours in 1953, as a member of the First crew. John participated in athletics 1948, the Choir 1947-1952, was a member of the Portal Committee 1952-3 together with being a Cadet Lieutenant in 1952. Today John Stewart AM is President of the

advising on problems of hygiene affecting

Vintage Collegians Association and maintains

industry and inaugurating refresher courses

regular tangible links with BBC. Hunting

for paramedical staff of estates in Malaysia

wild scrubbers in difficult terrain, working

and Borneo. He was considered to have been

as a cattle auctioneer, a pastoral inspector,

the most respected member of a small group

pioneering the use of helicopters in mustering


CONNECT | 83

1

2 3 9 8

4

5

7

6

COLLEGIAN COLLEGIAN DECEMBER AUGUST 2013


84 | CONNECT

cattle, managing tens of thousands of head

the land. John also received his Honorary

of cattle on large company leases, interest

Doctor of Veterinary Science from Queensland

in cattle breeding and pasture research and

University in 2010.

development; all facets of John’s working life

This daunting BBC pedigree was partially

have been inextricably linked to the beef cattle

woven when John’s son, Alexander Gillespie

industry in the capital city board rooms and

Stewart arrived as a boarder in 1973.

the bush of the Kimberleys, the Territory and

According to Rev Ron Holt, the Chaplain and

the Top End.

a Boarding Master at the time, “Alexander

A formidable program implemented and

was not a person, who drew attention to

organised by John was the testing of over

himself.” He continues, “I remember Alex

one million cattle in the successful fight to

being a ‘gentle giant’. There was an instance

eradicate bovine tuberculosis (TB). For his

in the Boarding House on one occasion when

services he was made an honorary member

he was on duty in Prep, where I made a

of the Australian Veterinary Association, in

wrong judgement. Someone was complaining

1999. Intricate practical knowledge of the

to me that he was being unfairly treated by

industry coupled with people management

the senior boarders, but Alex came to me

skills has seen John a member of numerous

and gently pointed out my mistake. I wasn’t

boards, namely: CSIRO’s Division of Tropical

easily convinced but I found out that Alex was

Crops and Pastures Advisory Committee,

right. Alex was always a sincere, honest and

The Queensland Aboriginal Land Tribunal,

kind young man. He reflected in his humble

inaugural Vice-Chairman, in 1997, of

manner ‘Let Honour Stainless Be’.”

Animal Health Australia, and Member of the

This proud, but understated, Clayfield-

Queensland Biosecurity Advisory Council.

Toowong dynasty has included potent

Working for the United Graziers Association

leaders in its local communities following in

(UGA), John witnessed its amalgamation

the long Norse-Gaelic traditions of Somerled

with the Grain Growers Association and

(1113c.-1164), King of the Isles.

The Cattlemans’ Union to form Agforce his current employer. John’s Member of the Order of Australia was given for services to the beef cattle industry. He continues to be a fierce protector of the nation’s beef industry and a fighter for the rights of the man on

The family link with the College continues with Mary Pool’s, daughter to Ogilvie, two grandchildren Tristan and Sebastian currently attending the school today.


CONNECT | 85

BBC VINTAGE COLLEGIANS

ON WEDNESDAY 27 NOVEMBER, 60 VINTAGE COLLEGIANS GATHERED FOR A CHURCH SERVICE AT THE MOUNT MEE COMMUNITY CENTRE TO SING THE ORIGINAL COLLEGE HYMN, LAND OF OUR BIRTH AND THE CURRENT SCHOOL HYMN, SONS OF THE COLLEGE. The day was made even more extraordinary with the familiar sounds of the bagpipes, played by Lachlan Munro (2010). Earlier in September, BBC welcomed back 55 Vintage Collegians and their wives to the annual Vintage Collegians’ Brisbane luncheon in the BBC Boarders Dining Room. BBC former masters Mr Colin Goldburg, Mr David ‘Ted’ Lawson and Mr Ross MacDonald, whose combined years of service to BBC exceeded 100 years, were inducted into the Old Collegians’ Association as Honorary Members for their generous support and outstanding contribution to the BBC Community.

THE VINTAGE COLLEGIANS

NEED YOUR HELP!

THREE OF THE VINTAGE COLLEGIANS’ PROJECTS ARE ESTABLISHING OLD BOYS THAT HAVE RECEIVED AN AUSTRALIAN HONOURS AWARD, IMPERIAL HONOURS AWARD AND JUDGES IN THE FEDERAL COURT OF AUSTRALIA, THE SUPREME COURT OF QUEENSLAND, THE DISTRICT COURT OF QUEENSLAND AND THE SUPREME COURT OF NSW OR ELSEWHERE IN THE COMMONWEALTH. The idea is to acknowledge their awards and in the case of judges to acknowledge their contributions to the Australian legal system. The list as it currently stands can be viewed online at www.oldcollegians.com.au If you know of an old boy that doesn’t appear on our lists, please advise the BBC Development Office via (07) 3309 3513 or development@bbc.qld.edu.au

COLLEGIAN COLLEGIAN DECEMBER AUGUST 2013


86 | SNAPSHOTS

HUTCHIES BBC GOLF DAY FRIDAY 8 NOVEMBER ~ INDOOROOPILLY GOLF CLUB

MORE THAN 100 PEOPLE, REPRESENTING 26 TEAMS, CONVERGED ON THE INDOOROOPILLY GOLF CLUB FOR THE HUTCHIES BBC GOLF DAY. MEMBERS FROM THE COLLEGE COMMUNITY INCLUDING OLD BOYS, PARENTS, STAFF AND COMMERCIAL PARTNERS, WITH HUTCHINSON BUILDERS THE MAJOR EVENT SPONSOR, SUPPORTED THE DAY. THIS YEAR’S TITLE WAS SECURED BY A HUTCHIES TEAM WITH THE OLD BOYS TEAM, FAIRWAY NINJAS, TAKING HOME SECOND PLACE AND WINNING THE PERPETUAL OLD COLLEGIANS’ SHIELD.


SNAPSHOTS | 87

IN TIME FOR SPRING FRIDAY 13 SEPTEMBER ~ HILLSTONE, ST LUCIA THE 24TH ANNUAL SPRING FASHION PARADE WAS EXTREMELY WELL RECEIVED THIS YEAR, WITH MORE THAN 300 GUESTS ENJOYING THEMSELVES IN THE PICTURESQUE SURROUNDINGS OF HILLSTONE ST LUCIA. Ladies enjoyed the opportunity to socialise with other mums and MC Sofie Formica did a superb job of keeping us all in order! We were inspired by the lovely spring fashions in the professionally-styled parade – and very impressed with the brave “Supermodel” mums, dads and old boys, who strutted their stuff on the catwalk. The event was also a success on the fundraising front. Although not specifically a fundraising event, we managed to raise nearly $14,000 through the combination of sponsorship, raffle takings and the exciting Silent Auction. With lots of sponsors this year, there were great bargains to be had! We are delighted that Parent Connections was able to make a substantial donation to our two chosen charities this year – Beyond Blue and the Hope Foundation – and will also be able to support a school project in the coming months. We would like to acknowledge the support of our sponsors – particularly our Platinum Event Sponsor Lexus of Brisbane and our Gold Sponsor Nicole Beasley of itravel. Finally, I would like to acknowledge the Parent Connections team who worked hard on the event – a great team of inspirational ladies. Parent Connections is a small friendly group; we have a lot of fun and we welcome new members.

KATIE FORBES PARENT CONNECTIONS PRESIDENT

COLLEGIAN COLLEGIAN DECEMBER AUGUST 2013


88 | SNAPSHOTS

MILESTONES MAN OF INTEGRITY AHEAD OF HIS TIME JOHN COX, 1941-2013 Family, friends and colleagues gathered in Brisbane at St Augustine���s to farewell Brisbane Boys’ College Old Collegian, School Captain (1958) and beef industry giant, John Cox. We thank the Queensland Country Life and journalist Sally Cripps for allowing us to share the following account of a life characterised by a strong vision, integrity and passion. Many gathered for the funeral of John Cox to farewell a man with a vision who was years before his time. The beef industry giant, best known as the managing director of Stanbroke Pastoral Company from 1989 to 2003, died on 27 September after a battle with cancer. He has been described as calm and effective, and above all, a man of integrity. One of his managers, Bill Scott, who now lives at Thylungra Station near Quilpie, remembers Mr Cox’s words to his managers to “get up in your helicopter and look down at the big picture”, in a metaphorical sense as well as a physical one. “Being there in the yards sweating is one thing, but you’ve got to know what it is you want to achieve – John was a big one for that,” Mr Scott said.

BIRTHS Ben McGeachie (1999) and wife Sarah (pictured above) welcomed their second child Henry Ben on 3 August Frederick Clark (2003) and wife Catherine welcomed their daughter Adelaide Jessica on 3 November

WEDDINGS 12 July Blake Frost (2005) and Bianca Mellon 2 November Adam Rogers (2000) and Lauren Kent 23 November John Crowther (2006) and Emily Powell 23 November James Wilson (1998) and Rachel Malley 30 November Fraser Hemming (2010) and Alexandria Jerrard

VALE John Piper Mackenzie (1964) passed in May Ian Chalmers (1958) passed in August George Watson (1944) passed in August Stewart (Phillip) Kahler (1955) passed in August John Robert Cox (1958) passed in September William John Stewart Lovegrove (1949) passed recently James (Jim) Connolly (1954) passed in October Robert William Lewis (1954) passed in October Roy Samuel Worfold (1934) passed in November Ravi Shankar Das (2010) passed in November Spencer Roy Anderson (1943) passed in November

“I think the industry today is just catching up to where Stanbroke was years ago. He was way ahead of the industry with his ideas for processing and marketing.” The vertical integration of Stanbroke’s operations – lotfeeding, meat processing, retailing and live export as well as its extensive property holdings – could be described as Mr Cox’s crowning industry achievement. He was born in 1941 and lived in the west at a time when the wool industry was doing a roaring trade, growing up in a world of stock commerce. When his family moved to Brisbane he attended school at Brisbane Boys’ College, graduating in 1958. His subsequent career had several phases, beginning as a Scottish Australian Company jackaroo at Coonamble, NSW. He worked with the company for 12 years before heading to North Queensland and a job as assistant manager at The Orient, a Brahman stud at Ingham. After meeting and marrying Sue Hassall, the couple joined Gunn Rural Management (GRM) and went to Goodparla, now a part of Kakadu National Park, running buffalo and feral cattle. He was then sent to Ghana in West Africa to oversee a project to establish that country’s first commercial beef cattle ranch. Mr Cox pioneered the importation of indigenous breeding stock – by sea – from Senegal to Ghana, and spent six years in the country, where two of his three sons, Richard and Andrew were born.


SNAPSHOTS | 89

Upon returning to Brisbane he had the oversight of GRM International’s 11 Northern Territory and Kimberley region properties, while the brucellosistuberculosis eradication campaign was in full swing. It was at this time that his youngest son, Anthony was born. The significant pastoral enterprise of Colinta Holdings, a subsidiary of Mt Isa Mines was Mr Cox’s next step, where he managed 40,000 cattle and 80,000 sheep. In 1989 AMP’s Jim Balderstone employed John Cox to grow its subsidiary company Stanbroke, thus beginning his role of managing the company described as the world’s largest beef producer.

GRANDPARENTS AND FRIENDS' DAY THURSDAY 19 SEPTEMBER ~ JUNIOR SCHOOL GREEN The Junior School Green was a buzz in September as generations of families gathered together to celebrate both family and friends at the annual event. Music performances were delivered by Junior Musicians creating a festive and relaxing atmosphere which was enjoyed by all.

Stanbroke’s 1997 acquisition of the Queensland and Northern Territory Pastoral Company’s aggregation of 25,060sq km and 118,000 head of cattle for a price of about $100m, masterminded by Mr Cox, saw it become the largest individual cattle producer on the planet. In 2001 the total size of the herd on 27 properties was listed as 551,000 head and in 2002 Queensland Country Life reported that the company had recorded “a spectacular 67 percent increase in operating profit before tax of $131 million”. Mr Cox was among the first to perfect live export of cattle from Australia to countries in South-East Asia. He also led Stanbroke to become the industry leader in using composite cattle to improve carcase quality while maintaining environmental adaptability. The implementation of the fully integrated supply chain incorporated traceability using RFID tags and DNA fingerprinting, and he paid attention to certified animal care and handling education programs. Historian Peter Forrest said that as well as making Stanbroke so effective, instigating the Diamantina beef brand and a meat processing subsidiary, Valley Beef, along with the Bottletree feedlot at Chinchilla, Mr Cox introduced several workplace reforms. “He created much bigger and better roles for women, recognising the value of their calm demeanour around animals, and he did a lot to reinforce the place of horses on the properties,” Mr Forrest said. Mr Cox undertook several roles over the next decade, mostly as an industry consultant. In 2002 he was honoured by the federal government with the awarding of the Centenary Medal for Services to the pastoral industry, and was named in the International Stockmen’s Education Foundation Hall of Fame in 2006, recipients of which are described as representing the very best among the world’s livestock leaders. Ken Warriner knew Mr Cox since his school days and said he was one of the more astute people he knew. “He had acquired a lot of knowledge and that meant his views were always sought-after in Canberra. He was politically quite active and well respected,” he said. This was evidenced by his seat on the Cattle Council of Australia, his place on the board of Flinders Group project management firm, and his chairmanship of the North Australia Beef Research Council for five years, a role David Crombie described as invaluable. “Prioritising research is hard work and it was good to have that steady, commercial practical hand on the tiller,” he said.

COLLEGIAN COLLEGIAN DECEMBER AUGUST 2013


90 | FLASHBACK

BBC’S CARNEGIE COLLECTION TO ENCOURAGE A WIDER STUDY AND APPRECIATION OF ART AND THE DEVELOPMENT OF A HIGHER CULTURE WAS THE FAR SIGHTED POLICY OF THE HEADMASTER, MR HAMILTON (19311946). THIS ADOPTED AIM ALIGNED WITH THE SECOND IDEAL OF THE CARNEGIE CORPORATION IN NEW YORK, WHICH IN TRUST, ADMINISTERED ANDREW CARNEGIE’S WEALTH ACCORDING TO THE BENEFACTOR’S WISHES.

Consequently in 1936, as the sole Queensland school, Brisbane Boys’ College was chosen as the recipient of a £700 (today: $41,861.82) grant from the Carnegie Bequest. The Art Library of 10,000 illustrations came from a variety of sources. The shipment of mounted photographs and coloured reproductions was sent by Rudolf Lesch, 225 Fifth Avenue, New York. These prints arrived in excellent condition protected by 21 Solander boxes. The art books came from Erhard Weyhe, 794 Lexington Avenue New York. In addition, there was a portfolio comprising 12 large colour prints, plus a portfolio of Graphic Processes published by Holman’s Print Shop in Boston and also a group of 12 coloured reproductions of American paintings from Raymond and Raymond, of New York. Amid vases of ranunculi, sweet peas and roses, guests were invited to a private display in the library, where they remarked on the value and variety of the collection’s appeal. Brisbane’s ‘glitterati’ of the 1930s’ art world, Prof and Mrs HC Richards, Prof and Mrs Scott Fletcher, and artists William Bustard, who designed our Philp stained glass windows with Daphne Mayo, and Vida Lahey, agreed

unanimously that the collection was the best they had seen. Following the opening by the Honourable, the Premier, Mr Forgan Smith, The Courier Mail headlines read: Valuable Gift to School; Artists’ Inspection of Carnegie Gift, Glowing Tribute Paid; Boys’ College Art Library, Public Exhibition Proposed, Gift for Brisbane College; Treasures in Art, Carnegie Gift for Brisbane, while The Methodist Times headed their story in July 1936 with: Treasures in Art, Carnegie Gift for the Brisbane Boys’ College. In a letter to Dr Keppel (the President of the Carnegie Corporation, who in 1935, had visited and chosen BBC), Mr Hamilton wrote: “I wish to express our warmest thanks to the Carnegie Corporation for this magnificent gift, which in size and comprehensiveness far exceeds our expectations. In a following letter, Mr Hamilton also says, “the set continues to give the greatest pleasure to those who are privileged to view it, and has already provided a great incentive to the study and appreciation of Art in the College.” The books were located in Main Reception, in the Rosenstengel cupboard, which had been especially purchased for them. Today we

know this fine piece of Queensland furniture as the trophy cabinet. The comprehensive scope of the collection encompassed aesthetics and techniques along with volumes on art history from Palaeolithic to Modern times. Architecture, sculpture, painting, textiles, decorative ornaments, photography, mosaics, typography, theatre, ‘arts and crafts’ and furniture were described and illustrated in the 55 English, 29 American, eight French, 35 German, two Dutch and two Austrian books. Furthermore to being accessible and on open display for BBC students, Mr Hamilton said, “he would be glad to arrange to lend portions of the set to other Brisbane secondary schools, so that their technical and cultural benefits may be distributed as widely as possible”. In a sophisticated era of flair and pizazz, when boaters and striped blazers were high fashion, this BBC sanctuary of culture was truly a prize of literary and artistic merit with an inestimable value for its students. Helen Jackson ARCHIVIST


LASTWORD | 91

THE GAME'S AFOOT If we think of education from the perspective of Shakespeare’s characters, rather than in the light of research into pedagogy and the fiscal and political nuances of school funding, we might be able further to sharpen a view that works well for our boys. We can counterpoint Juliet’s

Theodore Roosevelt’s Presidency delivered to us a range of

"What's in a name? That which we call a rose

aspirational ideas and crystalized a view of the world from the 1901 –

By any other name would smell as sweet",

1909 period that resonates still today and should guide our planning

perspective of BBC education, with Macbeth’s “To-morrow, and to-morrow, and to-morrow, Creeps in this petty pace from day to day” in order to question our intentions and the value of our activity. Perhaps we are better served by Hamlet’s “To be, or not to be, that is the question: Whether 'tis nobler in the mind to suffer

and sense of what a BBC education should continue to reflect. We do not need governments to guide us in matters of crafting character in our boys if we implant and develop some of Roosevelt’s ideas – • “The only man who makes no mistakes is the man who never does anything.” • “It is hard to fail, but it is worse never to have tried to succeed.” • “Do what you can, with what you have, where you are.”

The slings and arrows of outrageous fortune,

• “Believe you can and you're halfway there.”

Or to take arms against a sea of troubles

• “Keep your eyes on the stars, and your feet on the ground.”

And by opposing end them,”

• “Courtesy is as much a mark of a gentleman as courage.”

as this reminds us of the choices we are required to make; to commit or to retreat. Prospero’s view that “We are such stuff As dreams are made on”, might reflect and reinforce Henry V’s rhetoric

• “There has never yet been a man in our history who led a life of ease whose name is worth remembering.” • “In any moment of decision, the best thing you can do is the right thing, the next best thing is the wrong thing, and the worst thing you can do is nothing”

“Once more unto the breach, dear friends, once more…

We bear the greatest of responsibilities. We are charged with the

For there is none of you so mean and base,

highest accountabilities and we are honoured to work with the boys

That hath not noble lustre in your eyes.

of BBC as they learn to “dare greatly”. My advice to our boys, in

I see you stand like greyhounds in the slips,

Shakespeare’s words - The game's afoot: Follow your spirit...

Straining upon the start.”

Mark Dwyer BBC HEAD OF CO-CURRICULAR ACTIVITIES

COLLEGIAN COLLEGIAN DECEMBER AUGUST 2013


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Collegian Magazine - December 2013