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City of Toronto

Gerrard-Clonmore Secondary Plan

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City of Toronto Table of Contents Introduction............................................................................................................................................3 Relevant Policy……………………………………..………………….………………………...................3 Vision…………………………………….…………………....…………….……………………………………5 Guiding Principles…………………………………………………………...……………………………...6 1.0 Revitalize Neighbourhoods……………………………………………….…………………………………7 1.1 Affordable Housing ………………………………………………..………………...……………….7 1.2 Mixed Use…………………………………………………………….……….…………………………...9 1.3 Parks and Open Space………………………………………………………..……………………14 1.4 Streetscape……………………………………………..……………………………………………....16 2.0 Stimulate Economy…………………………………………………………….…...…………………………22 2.1 Intensification.…..………………………………………………………..…………………………..22 2.2 Recommended Built Form………………………………………...............…………………..23 3.0 Improve Health and Safety.………………………………………………..…………..……………….…29 3.1 Alternative Transportation …………………………………….…………………….……......29 3.2 Trails and Railway Crossings……...………………………………..………….……………...31 3.3 Crime Prevention Through Environmental Design………………………..………..33 4.0 Manage Environmental Risks…………………………………………………………………………....34 4.1 Brownfield Redevelopment……………………………………………..……………………...34 4.2 Preservation of Natural Features ………………………………………….….…………….34 5.0 Amendments to Official Plan...................................................................................................36 6.0 Implementation………………………………………………………………….......……………………...…39 Appendix...............................................................................................................................................48 References............................................................................................................................................49

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City of Toronto Introduction The proposed secondary plan area (“the area”) is bordered on the left by Victoria Park Avenue. It extends up and across the subway line to include Victoria Park Subway Station, then down Pharmacy Avenue to Danforth Avenue. From there, it extends east to Warden Avenue, down to Clonmore Drive, with Gerrard Street East serving as the southern border. This area has significant potential for revitalization and redevelopment. At present, it is underutilized and appears run down, however it is apparent that significant development pressure is affecting the area. It is imperative that a secondary plan be introduced in order to encourage development which carefully considers the area’s unique characteristics, including responsible redevelopment of the area’s brownfields, and adequate provision of services which meet the needs of present and future residents. Supporting residential intensification that is well integrated with the surrounding neighbourhood will in turn provide a sound economic base for further investment in the area which will contribute to a healthy neighbourhood.

Relevant Policies Provincial Policy Statement The Provincial Policy Statement sets out how to build strong communities in its vision statement: “Ontario’s long-term prosperity, environmental health and social well-being depend on wisely managing change and promoting efficient land use and development patterns. Efficient land use and development patterns support strong, liveable and healthy communities, protect the environment and public health and safety, and facilitate economic growth.” (Provincial Policy Statement, 2005) Danforth Avenue, which serves as the main street and acts as a “center” of our site, will incorporate an appropriate mix of residential and commercial use. The plan will focus on redevelopment and intensification for this area rather than low-level expansion. It will make use of the current zoning designation of mixed use to implement live-work units as a means of providing employment for residents within their own community. Currently the site does not meet the standards of promoting efficient land use as well as long term economic prosperity. The majority of businesses on the main strip of Danforth in the site are old car garages or dealerships. The run-down appearance of these businesses causes an overall appearance that is not inviting to potential users of this commercial strip, driving down sales as a result. The site complies well with section 1.6 of the Provincial Policy Statement regarding infrastructure and public service facilities. (Provincial Policy Statement, 2005) Public transit is efficient and accessible, which suggests that the area has significant potential for economic growth once an effort has been made to revitalize the street. Toronto Official Plan Creating a beautiful streetscape is a vital part of our vision. The City of Toronto Official Plan supports our vision for a more beautiful and functional streetscape. It aims to “create comfortable streets, parks and open spaces for workers and landscaped streetscapes to attract new business ventures”, and values the addition of public art to “grace our streets and open spaces” (Official Plan, 2010). It also maintains that sidewalks should be “animated and attractive people places”, and that a bikeway network should be implemented within the city. We are proposing that on main streets such as Pharmacy and Danforth

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City of Toronto there should be adequate and accessible bike lanes to promote a healthy and sustainable lifestyle for the residents of our community.

Definitions ‘Affordable’ shall be interpreted as it is defined in the Provincial Policy Statement, 2005 (Appendix 2). ’The area’ refers to the secondary plan area as defined in the introduction to this document. ‘Quarry lands’ refers to the land depicted within the ‘Birchcliffe Quarry Boundary’ in Figures 5 and 6. ‘Wetlands’ shall be interpreted as defined by the TRCA (Appendix 2).

Planning Justification The quarry lands situated within the area have been zoned for mixed use development. Because the area is situated proximate to the Bloor-Danforth subway line, there is pressure for intensification in the area, which is comparatively low in density when contrasted with the west end of the line. Residents have expressed concerns regarding a lack of commercial activity in the area. Even along the Danforth, which serves as the main commercial hub for the site, many businesses appear rundown. Many residents are unemployed or underemployed. As outlined in the Quarry Lands Secondary Plan Background Study (Appendix 1), the average education in the area is higher than in Toronto overall, but the average income is lower. The proposed secondary plan aims to intensify the area in order to make better use of the transportation infrastructure in place. The plan will focus on the creation of jobs appropriate for area residents in order to solve the current underemployment problem, as well as provision of additional housing ranging in cost, type, and tenure with the end goal of creating a vibrant, complete community which meets the needs of all residents.

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Vision The proposed secondary plan aims to create a vision for higher density development which fits the character of the existing neighbourhood, meets the needs of residents of diverse backgrounds, and will stimulate economic activity, which in turn will allow for additional investment in neighbourhood revitalization efforts.

Figure 1: New infrastructure such as lighting, trails, and sitting areas will attract people from within the neighbourhood to use the park more frequently (Photo: C. Pang, 2012)

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City of Toronto Guiding Principles The secondary plain aims to achieve its vision through adherence to four main principles: 1. Revitalize Neighbourhoods The proposed secondary plan aims to build a complete community by expanding the variety of services and housing types in the area to accommodate all members of the community and increase pedestrian activity through the revitalization of the streetscape within the Danforth Business Improvement Area. 2. Stimulate Economy The proposed secondary plan aims to stimulate the economy and create jobs in order to enhance the quality of life of area residents. 3. Improve Public Health and Safety The secondary plan aims to improve walkability around the CN Rail line and the quarry area, as well as make the area appear more safe (reword!) through environmental design. Create trails in the park space proposed for the quarry land, as well as along the railway lands west of Victoria Park Ave, including the maintenance of old and/or broken fence barriers. Alternative transportation will also be encouraged through the addition of bike lanes along Victoria Park Ave, Gerrard St. E, and Clonmore Dr., and the addition/maintenance of shelters at TTC bus stops. 4. Manage Environmental Risk As it has remained unused for many years, the quarry land situated in the secondary plan area has become overgrown. As a result, it has become a habitat for various flora and fauna. The secondary plan aims to redevelop the space in order to put it to better use while making as small an impact as possible on the ecosystem.

Figure 2: Shared-bike lanes within the park will cyclists to use the park and improved lighting will improve overall safety issues during nightfall. This will help promote the usage of the park. Photo: (C. Pang, 2012)

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City of Toronto 1.0 Revitalize Neighbourhoods 1.1 Affordable Housing A complete community is one which meets the needs of people from all walks of life. Currently, the secondary plan area does not provide a wide range of housing. Single detached dwellings account for 36% of the total housing stock, a percentage that is 9% higher than the Toronto average. There is only one social housing complex in the area (Byng Tower). It is located at 3330 Danforth Ave. (at Warden Ave.). The tower is managed by Toronto Community Housing (TCH), the second largest social housing organization in North America. It accommodates 164,000 low and moderate income units including those for seniors, families, singles, refugees, immigrants, and people with disabilities. Although the specific annual household income for the residents at Byng Tower cannot be found, the average annual household income of social housing residents is $14,854 (City of Toronto, 2011). As the area contains sizable low income population, more affordable housing is needed to meet community needs. Affordable housing plays a major role in accommodating the needs of those less fortunate and it is a problem that needs to be addressed in local communities in order to serve the greater needs of the society. If the population is currently living in housing that is not affordable to them, the financial resources that are left over for other expenditures such as education, recreation and food will be significantly reduced. This will result in the decline of the overall wellbeing of the community in terms of health of individuals/ families and the safety of the neighbourhood (Greater Victoria Housing Society, 2011). Additionally, investing in the neighbourhood with the construction of more affordable units creates communities that are more vibrant and which would properly accommodate a mixture of income groups. Provision of newly built housing also helps to attract investment to the neighbourhood in the form of new or improved services like schools, parks, and transit.

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According to the 2006 Census data: • The area of the secondary plan has a very high proportion of visible minorities at an average of around 60% compared to city of Toronto’s 45% • The average income of an individual living at our site is $27,330, while for the Toronto CMA it is $40,074 • Around 55% of renters spent 30% or more of their household income on gross rent • Many neighborhoods have seen significant amounts of new housing built but 95 per cent of that is for the private ownership market and not affordable or rental housing. • While the site study area has a low average income, the majority of the housing stock consists of single detached homes. There is likely to be demand for a mixture of housing types geared toward lower-income households. In addition, visible minorities, recent immigrants and single parents are also more prone and in need of basic housing accommodations.

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City of Toronto 1.1 Housing Policies 1.1.1

Provide and maintain a variety of housing forms and tenure for residents in a manner that is appropriate to the area context of the secondary plan

1.1.2

All residential developments shall provide a mix of housing types of varied affordability.

a) All new housing units will be in forms other than single-detached and semidetached houses, such as row housing, triplexes and multi-unit residential buildings 1.1.3

1.1.4

New housing developments situated on the quarry lands should limit environmental impact and give context to the neighbourhood characteristics of Gerrard Street East and Clonmore Drive where appropriate consideration would be taken with regards to the form, scale, and density of the community. All new residential developments must incorporate at least 30 percent of the units to be affordable rental or ownership housing.

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In a mapping study conducted in 2002, the whole East Danforth/Victoria Park area emerged as a priority area because it had a high rate of people with access barriers, low incomes and health needs. Recent community meetings identified important local issues and priorities. The issues raised most frequently include housing cost (affordability) and safety. Additionally, providing more affordable/social housing is in accordance to the Toronto Affordable housing Action Plan which listed the following: “The Toronto Housing Charter – Opportunity for All brings together existing Council policy and sets out Toronto’s aims and purposes in addressing homelessness and housing issues. It contains a formal policy statement to guide maintenance, pest control” (East Danforth/Victoria Park Community Planning Profile, 2008). Both Council decisions and staff actions support the provision of housing services to all Torontonians. It specifically states that “All residents should have a safe, secure, affordable and well maintained home from which to realize their full potential.” This is consistent with the City’s Official Plan which recognizes adequate and affordable housing as a basic requirement for everyone.” Housing Objectives  Develop policies which provide a balance of housing tenure and types  Enourage the development of affordable housing through redevelopment and intensification  Preserve and protect the existing housing stock and neighbourhood character

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City of Toronto 1.2 Mixed Use The area seems at first view perhaps run down, not lively and in general to be lacking some details that would render it more inviting. However, what is not seen at plain sight is that the area has tremendous potential for improvement. One way to encourage investment in the area is to stimulate employment intensification which would in turn sustain any possible investments. This process of intensifying the community can lead to many other upgrades that would contribute to a healthy neighbourhood. This Secondary Plans sets out to provide for an appropriate mix and placement of Commercial, Office, Retail and Residential in the Mixed Uses areas, with a vision for strong economic performance and an emphasis on developing centres that serve as the focal point for the economic activity in the area. The proposed secondary plan aims to provide essential services to residents within walking distance of their homes, and strengthen the local economy by promoting different employment opportunities within the area through the implementation of mixed uses. The area is mostly made up of Residential Uses, mainly Semi-Detached units and a number of Apartment Buildings. Other permitted uses in this location include; Mixed-Use, Institutional uses and Open Spaces. It can also be noted that certain parcels of land have not been classified yet under the new Comprehensive Zoning ByLaw coming into place in Toronto. The main avenues and streets and area around the subway station are all designated as Mixed-Use, this use makes up for a significant part of our area. The areas adjacent to the Quarry Lands have also been zoned for Mixed Uses. An interesting aspect in this community is that the number of properties zoned as Mixed-Use or Commercial-Residential areas is relatively equal to the Residential-Only areas which create the much needed balance between uses. It is not overwhelmingly residential –even when taking into account the surrounding neighbourhoods outside our site boundaries- but there are enough commercial uses, including services, to provide to the residents. This pattern can be observed in Figure 1, a representation of the Land Use designations from the updated Zoning By-Law. (City of Toronto, 2012)

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1.2 Land Use Policies 1.2.1

Protect and maximize the use of designated Mixed Use areas by prohibiting the rezoning of Mixed Use land and encouraging intensification.

1.2.2

Diversify the area’s economic base by developing economic centres with a range of economic uses

1.2.3

Encourage a mix of commercial and retail along with office uses within Mixed Use or lands designated as Mixed Used Areas or Corridors.

1.2.4

Employments opportunities shall be provided for residents with the goal of achieving balance

1.2.6

Create a community which attracts and retains youth and skilled labour and quality employees

1.2.7

Monitor types, locations and characteristics of businesses

1.2.8

Work with public transit providers to support the plan for high quality public transit to encourage more frequent transit services in the mixed use areas

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City of Toronto 1.2.8

Work with public transit providers to support the plan for high quality public transit to encourage more frequent transit services in the mixed use areas

1.2.9

Work with business and other organizations to create business-friendly environments such as: diverse size and mix of lands that provide employment, advanced and sustainable infrastructure and building design, provision of compatible business support services

1.2.10 Home occupations and livework units shall be permitted, where appropriate as per OP policies

A strong, healthy economy is integral to creating a complete community. The local economy is dependent on the businesses located in the area within the designated Mixed Use, commercial and retail lands. The secondary plan aims to improve the employment base for economic purposes, so as to achieve the City’s vision for a stable environment for investment and growth (City of Toronto, 2006). The plan will accommodate the intensification of employment as permitted under the Mixed Use, Commercial and Retail designations and offer suitable locations for a variety of employment. The intensification will take place along avenues and designated areas serviced by existing and proposed public transit. Providing a balanced and diverse range of employment opportunities through commercial, retail and office uses, creates an economy more resilient to downturns and allows it to adapt to change. The Mixed Use areas will serve as a focus of economic activity in support of the Secondary Plan area’s objective of stimulating its economic base.

1.2.11 Work with regional, provincial and federal governments to ensure that the town is considered a high priority location 1.2.12 Establish and promote destinations for tourism and recreation 1.2.13 Encourage employment that generate a higher concentration of workers and consumer traffic such as office, hotel, convention centre and banquet facilities to be located within Mixed Use areas, within walking distance of public transit

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City of Toronto

Figure 3 Draft Zoning By Law, Land Uses (City of Toronto, 2012)

In terms of height, we can appreciate that the majority of the buildings in the area are between 2-4 storeys in height, with a few ranging from 7-10 storeys. These latter ones account for the higher densities in the area, mostly along Danforth Avenue which is a great foundation for intensification. However as depicted in figure 2, most properties do not allow for heights over 9 metres, especially towards the residential areas. The Secondary Plan does not suggest that every pocket of the area should be intensified; this would prove counterproductive and even unhealthy and unsafe for the community. In addition, higher density may be too much of a burden on the existing infrastructure; capacity limits must be given consideration.

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City of Toronto Figure 4 Zoning Height Restrictions (City of Toronto, 2012)

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City of Toronto Figure 4 gives us an idea of what the Lot Coverage Percentages are like in the area. Every property falls within the 33% or 35% of lot coverage. Relatively speaking this percentage may not make full use of the lot area. While the coverage is not likely to ever be 100% it can certainly be permitted for more than 30% to be able to maximize the use of the area but not before carefully reviewing what the effects of higher lot coverage could be.

Figure 5 Zoning Lot Coverage Restrictions (City of Toronto, 2012) These policies reflect the standards set out in the Toronto Official Plan, where communities are encouraged to strive for a strong, competitive economy that creates and sustains well-paid, stable and fulfilling employment opportunities. Diversity of employment is especially important in areas that experience change in economic trends; they are designed to capture new business opportunities. In order for employment areas to be successful the Official Plan states that these should be serviced by convenient and high quality transit, taking advantage of the large concentration of jobs and people and making smoother connections from housing to employment to activities. Additionally, the Official Plan highlights the importance of also offering a mix of uses such as offices, housing, retail and community services, creating a balance between the population and the different elements of the community.

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City of Toronto 1.3 Parks & Open Space

1.3 Parks and Open Space Policies

Parks and open space play an important role as a meeting place for the community. The Secondary Plan Area includes an Open Space and Park Area that is currently being used as golf range on the west end while to the east; there is a large open area of green space and a significant Wetland.

1.3.1 New urban design guidelines will be introduced for the park to create a warm, comfortable, friendly and welcoming atmosphere for residents. The primary method of achieving this will include the addition of well-lit areas and sitting areas to foster an active, social environment. Park benches and lights along newly created trails will provide for the safe enjoyment of the park.

Currently the land use designation for the Quarry zone is labeled as “Mixed Use� and a Park that is situated in the middle within the Official Plan. This provides for a broad range of uses including commercial, residential, or institutional or parks and open space. Refer to Official Plan Land Use Designation Map. There is poor connectivity within the quarry lands or out to adjacent neighbourhoods due to large parking lots found on the South-West corner of the Quarry. The few unmarked pathways that are found from Clonmore Dr are visually unattractive, pose safety hazards, and do not integrate well with other parts of the neighbourhood and the rest of the park. The key aspect for the proposed use of the large open green space will be the intensification of mixed-use areas and residential units within the quarry lands while preserving and conserving existing wetland and park spaces. Through the redevelopment and revitalization process of high quality parks, mixed-use commercial and residential units will be implemented to encourage more social, recreational, and economic activities for those living within the neighbourhood.

1.3.2 Well-connected and marked trails pathway systems in the area will encourage neighbourhood residents them to commute to work, play and travel leading to a healthy community. 1.3.3 Improve accessibility and connectivity will be introduced through the implementation of new urban design guidelines that aid in the creation of a comfortable, welcoming and safe community area. Parks and Open spaces will act as a central node in providing an environment that fosters economic opportunities, as well as social and recreational activities. 1.3.4 New mixed-used commercial and residential developments along Gerrard St E. and Victoria Park Ave will have minimal effects including that of shadows, noises, traffic and wind on existing significant wetlands and green space to preserve the natural heritage of the environment. 1.3.5 Any development taking place shall be required to have 5 per cent of its land dedicated to the usage of park/open space and residential areas, and 2 per cent for all other uses.

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City of Toronto

1.3.6 Redevelopment of parks will apply high quality urban design standards and support the creation of well-connected and marked trails pathway systems that will be universally accessible, safe, and well maintained all year round by providing: a) Public park benches and other sitting areas will be scattered throughout appropriate areas for the comfort of residents and users of the park b) Park directory maps near entrances and signs throughout the park to assist users. These will be placed at the entrances of Victoria Park Ave and Gerrard St E. c) Park lights placed on trails and around poorly lit areas to address the issue of security and safety in the Open Space and Park areas; as well as mixed-used residential and development areas.

Figure 6: Open Space and Parks with existing unmarked trails identified

1.3.7 New trail system will provide: a) Increased accessibility and connectivity to major streets and avenues, mixed-used areas and residential neighbourhoods adjacent to the quarry lands. b) Comfortable, welcoming and safe community walking areas where it will act as a central node in c) Providing an environment that fosters economic opportunities, social and recreational activities.

Figure 7: Open Space and Parks within the Quarry lands

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1.4.1 Danforth Avenue Study 1.4 Streetscapes Vibrant streetscapes play an important role in communities. Many residents spend substantial amounts of time on streets, thus it is imperative that the plan create a streetscape that is inviting and encourages the use of the street as a public space, especially along the Danforth, which serves as the area’s “main street”. The Danforth avenue study was undertaken in cooperation with leading urban design firm Urban Strategies as well as city staff, politicians and interested members of the community. The Danforth avenue study also outlines that the streetscape within our area of study should be improved. The guideline it proposes to follow for improving streetscapes is shown in the sidebar along with other relevant policies.

1.5.2.1 “An attractive, high quality, pedestrian friendly, transit supportive streetscape along the length of the Avenue comprised of a generous, typically 5.5 metre minimum, hard surfaced streetscape with in-ground street trees, street lighting appropriate for the levels of intensification envisioned and permitting various types of retail activity including outdoor dining and outdoor retail displays, appropriate improvements to the side streets aimed at creating safe pedestrian crossings and traffic calming within the district” (Danforth Ave. Study, 2008)

1.4.2 Provincial Policy Statement 1.5.2.2 PUBLIC SPACES, PARKS AND OPEN SPACE 1.5.2.3 Healthy, active communities should be promoted by: a) planning public streets, spaces and facilities to be safe, meet the needs of pedestrians, and facilitate pedestrian and non-motorized movement, including but not limited to, walking and cycling; (Provincial policy statement, 2005)

1.4.3 Official Plan Figure 8: A vision for “strong commercial presence”. Retrieved from the Danforth Avenue Study.

1.5.2.4 PUBLIC SPACES, PARKS AND OPEN SPACE 1.5.2.5 Healthy, active communities should be promoted by: a) Planning public streets, spaces and facilities to be safe, meet the needs of pedestrians and facilitate pedestrian and non-motorized movement, including but not limited to, walking and cycling.

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b)Locating and designing utilities within streets, within building or underground, in a manner that will minimize negative impacts on the natural pedestrian and visual environment and enable the planting and growth of trees to maturity. c) Preserving existing mature trees wherever possible and incorporating them into landscaping designs. d) Improvements to adjacent boulevards and sidewalks respecting sustainable design elements, which may include one or more of the following: trees, shrubs, hedges, plantings or other ground cover, permeable paying materials, street furniture, curb ramps, waste and recycling containers, lighting and bicycle parking facilities

1.4.4 Trees/Planters The Official Plan emphasizes the importance of including foliage in the urban realm. Currently, Danforth Avenue is lacking in beautiful and efficient streetscapes. The sidewalks are decaying and plant life is growing in between the sidewalk cracks. There are currently trees that are planted on Danforth Avenue (Figure 7). This is a crucial step in making the Danforth Avenue more beautiful. By adding planters to these trees as well as cleaning up the sidewalks, a healthy and vibrant community is possible. (See Figure 9) By doing so, the street becomes more attractive and will separate the sidewalk from the road. Thus, it helps to create a vibrant sense of place.

e) Public art, where the developer agrees to provide this, to make the building and its open spaces more attractive and interesting f) Preserving and enhancing the urban forest by: ii) Increasing tree canopy coverage and diversity, especially of long lived native and large shade trees; (Toronto official plan, 2010)

Figure 9: Newly planted trees along Danforth Ave and an illustration of added benches, planters, removal of weeds and overhead wiring (Photo: R. White, 2012)

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1.4.4.1 Urban Foliage Currently there is no street foliage on the streets. On Clonmore Dr. along the quarry site there are trees growing over the sidewalk right at walking level. This pushes people off the sidewalk it is potentially dangerous and inefficient. This plan recommends implementing well-placed and maintained street foliage to bring nature and comfort to the area. Adding planters will separate the sidewalk from the vehicle road, improving safety and making the streets more beautiful. 1.4.5 Overhead Wiring The Official Plan also supports minimizing “negative impacts on the natural pedestrian and visual environment� when locating utilities. Wiring hanging along all the roads in the area is unattractive, potentially dangerous and requires more maintenance then underground wiring. This plan will remove wiring along Danforth and put it underground. This will make the street more beautiful and resistant to the weather. Putting wiring underground requires less maintenance than wiring above ground. 1.4.6 Improved Sidewalks Currently the sidewalks are old and decaying and weeds are growing in between the cracks. This is unattractive and does not provide the space with a sense of cleanliness. This plan recommends repaving the sidewalks to make them more beautiful and appealing to pedestrians. 1.4.7 Street Furniture Currently there is little to no street furniture along the main arterial roads in the area. This is a problem because it doesn’t accommodate for pedestrian movement. The plan implements street furniture along Danforth Avenue. This includes benches which will attract visitors and residents to the area to create a sense of place and vibrancy. See Figure 9 for an example of effective and efficient street furniture that incorporates planters as well as being out of the way

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1.4.4.1.1 Trees/ Planters Planting of trees, shrubs and groundcover in street medians and shoulders should be undertaken in large blocks to maximize the area available for water percolation to root systems of planted trees. Ground cover planting in street medians and shoulders should be undertaken with low maintenance native grasses and shrub. All trees along Danforth Avenue shall have planters surrounding the tree. This will separate the road from the sidewalk, promoting a pedestrian friendly environment.

1.4.5.1 Remove Wiring Wiring shall be removed along major roadways and buried underground.

1.4.6.1 Improving Sidewalks Sidewalks shall be repaved as part of efforts to revitalize Danforth Avenue. This is supported by the Toronto Official plan as well as the Danforth Avenue study.

1.4.7.1 Street Furnishings To promote visually appealing, safe, and pedestrian-oriented experiences development shall be encouraged to provide street furnishings as light-fixtures, landscaped medians, benches, waste containers and transit shelters. This will enhance the character of the existing area.

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City of Toronto 1.4.8 Parking

from the pedestrian walkway

1.4.8.1 Major development shall provide underground parking or, where not feasible due to groundwater constraints, structured parking to the rear or side of the development site, or incorporated within the base of a building. (Richmond Hill) 1.4.8.2 Parking will be located underground where possible and surface parking will be located to the rear of buildings. Safe and barrier-free pedestrian connections between the development and surface parking areas shall be provided. 1.4.8.3 Maintain existing minimum bylaw supply rates for remaining land uses in Oakridge Community Bylaw; 1.4.8.4 Adopt Shared parking Principles similar to City of Mississauga standards to acheive slightly higher office rates during weekday afternoon periods relative to City of Toronto standards 1.4.8.5 Proposed commercial parking supply beyond the minimums identified shall be provided in municipally operated parking. Maximize On-street Paid Parking along Danforth Corridor Implement permit Parking system for residential side streets

1.4.9 Setbacks Adjacent buildings should have a continuous setback at the property line in order to maintain a consistent sidewalk width and give the streetscape a more tidy appearance.

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Figure 10: Roncesvalles’ non-intrusive benches. (Photo: Roncesvalles, 20

1.4.8 Parking The existing grocery store parking in the southern portion of the area is underused. Buildings are set back quite far from the roads and sidewalks and the three competing grocery chains all have customer parking at grade. This causes with dead space that is not used effectively. This area has a poor sense of place and lacks vibrancy. As the area develops and becomes more populated with residence as well as visitors to the area, the need for parking will increase. Underground parking is recommended. Parking guidelines will be implemented as outlined in the Danforth Avenue Study.

1.4.9 Building Set backs The current building set backs are standard along Danforth Avenue. The buildings are at a constant set back from adjacent buildings. This is effective and provides a constant space for people to walk. The potential for this area to be vibrant and efficient is apparent, although more is needed to be done in order to create interesting dynamic spaces that are pedestrian friendly and attract people to the businesses.

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City of Toronto 1.4.10 Public Art Currently on the streets there is little to no public art with the exception of a graffiti piece at Gerrard and Victoria Park shown in figure 10. Public art enhances the pedestrian experience and contributes to place-making. Public art will be a part of the redevelopment of Danforth Avenue. Public art should be incorporated into the landscape adjacent to buildings, along paths and within parks.

1.4.10 Public Art a) Public art, where the developer agrees to provide this, to make the building and its open spaces more attractive and interesting. b) The creation of public art that reflects our cultural diversity and history will be promoted by:

Figure 11: Graffiti at Gerrard St. and Victoria Park Ave (Photo R.White, 2012)

c) Encouraging public art initiatives on properties under the jurisdiction of the City, its agencies, boards and commissions; d) Dedicating one per cent of the capital budget of all major municipal Buildings and structures to public art.

1.4.11 Waste Containers Waste Containers are needed to insure a clean and sustainable environment. The waste containers will be placed in areas of high-traffic as well as transit stations.

Public art should be incorporated into the landscape adjacent to buildings, along paths and within parks. Potential locations for public art installation include: •Danforth Avenue / Victoria Park Ave •Danforth Avenue / Pharmacy Ave •Danforth Avenue / Danforth Rd; •Danforth Avenue /Warden Ave; •Madelaine Park; and •Oakridge Park

1.4.11 Waste Containers

Figure 12: An example of a solar-powered compacting cans.

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Waste containers will be placed in high traffic areas. Innovative technologies will be used such as solar-powered compacting cans in high traffic areas. See figure 13 for an example of waste containers that will be implemented.

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Revitalizing Underutilized Spaces. In this area we would like to have a community center along the street at a constant set back from adjacent buildings, as well as up to the property line so it will be accessible for residents and visitors to the area. This will provide vibrancy and a sense of place to the area, while creating a complete community. Figure 13: New community centre will help in the creation of a vibrant and efficient place for the support of new immigrants (Photo: Seattle Community Centre, 2012)

1.4.3 Implementation Innovation in built form and landscape design is an essential component of building a new kind of urban community. Policies in this section will contribute to the creation of a beautiful, vibrant and efficient streetscape catering to visitors and residents to create an attractive pedestrian environment.

Figure 14: The image above illustrates how the community is with new streetscape infrastructure. This contributes to a sustainable and attractive area (Photo: Bayfront Boulevard, 2009)

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City of Toronto 2.1.1

2.0 Stimulate the Economy 2.1 Intensification

Intensification Policies

a) Zoning by-laws pursuant to section 37 of the Planning Act, may be enacted to permit more height and/or density for a underutilized building that in return for the provision of community benefits in the form of capital facilities to be set out in the Zoning by-law b) A maximum of 2 storeys may be added to existing underutilized pre-WWII, low density buildings along Danforth Avenue;

Figure 15: A vision for an intensified Danforth (Photo: C. Pang, 2012) Low density buildings along Danforth Avenue are designated primarily for commercial uses. These uses consist of automotive services, furniture stores, as well as small scale restaurants and businesses. Currently, there is not a wide range of densities along the avenue and the majority of the existing uses are primarily all one height. Many of these buildings appear to be or are being underutilized, resulting in a lack of pedestrian activity. The intensification policies are to be intended to help achieve the following objectives: The main objective for intensification is to encourage development forms which are compact, to help provide opportunities to relieve pressures for urban expansion, such as higher densities and mixed use along Danforth Avenue. Intensification of these existing low densities will be generated in a manner which ensures the needs of local citizens are met, and in a manner which is compatible with adjacent land uses.

c) Intensification shall be encouraged where the compatibility and geographic relationship with adjacent uses can be ensured, in terms of such matters regarding the built form policies such as building height and massing; d) A broad range of infrastructure densities and heights shall be encouraged through the intensification of structures, so as to enable the area to accommodate an appropriate range of mixed use in the Development Area in correspondence to the P.P.S ; e) Intensification shall be based on: “Densities and a mix of land uses which efficiently use land and resources; Are appropriate for, and effectively use, the infrastructure and public service facilities which are planned or available and avoid the need for their unjustified and/or uneconomical expansion; and A range of uses and opportunities for intensification and redevelopment in accordance with the criteria in policy 2.2.1

The site can benefit from utilizing space more effectively as there is currently no variety of density along the BIA. Increasing the height of these low density structures to appropriate mid-rise building heights can provide for an increase in the number of employment opportunities as well as accommodate the right range of uses along the avenue. This can allow residents the option to live and work in close proximity. The policies which follow are applicable to the intensification of these land use

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City of Toronto Density and Redevelopment Planning authorities shall identify and promote opportunities for intensification and redevelopment where this can be accommodated taking into account existing building stock or areas, including brownfield sites, and the availability of suitable existing or planned infrastructure and public service facilities required to accommodate projected needs.� (Provincial Policy Statement, 2005) 2.2.1 Intensification of buildings should enhance physical appearance and contribute to an appealing streetscape which will in turn raise property values in the neighbourhood.

designations. 2.2 Recommended Built Form In order to create a vibrant and healthy community, two major themes must be implemented to fabricate the necessary modifications. (Etobicoke centre secondary plan, 2010). a) Create a Livable Community b) Stimulate The Economy In The Community a) Create a Livable Community Community Profile

ii. Provision of increasing job opportunities;

Residential units surround majority of the neighbourhood. Single-detached homes are the most common, followed by apartment buildings. On the west side of Victoria Park, redevelopment and revitalization has taken place. This includes new grocery stores, food chains, gas stations and healthcare centres. Revitalization must now move east of Victoria Park to make this side of the community inviting and vibrant for the local residents.

iii. Provision of green buildings;

Vibrancy In The Community

iv. Provision of public parking;

As shown in the images displayed below, both housing tenures have similar exterior appearances throughout the area. Different exterior elevations will be created from the implementations of condominiums and live work units. This will capture and sustain the objective of creating a vibrant community through the creative and unique exterior faces of each building unit.

2.2.2 The impact of intensification shall provide significant public benefits to the area and local residents that may include but are not limited to: i. Provision of needed community facilities;

v. Provision of public transit facilities; vi. Conservation/enhancement/restoration of a significant built heritage feature 2.2.3 It is the intent of this plan that there has to be a clear and measurable public interest served by granting of a height increase. Prior to granting an increase, it shall be satisfied that: 2.2.4 The proposed development will conform with the development policies of the applicable designation of this plan;

Figure 16: This photo demonstrates the large use of old and characterless apartment buildings throughout the community. (Guadagnoli, 2012)

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Figure 17: Similar single detached home structures in the community. (Guadagnoli, 2012)

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City of Toronto Ambition Establish mixed-use residential units in the Quarry Lands where people can live, work and shop. To develop and construct condominiums at the north east corner of Victoria Park and the GO Train line (northwest corner of the quarry lands). As well, to develop live work units facing south, along Gerrard Street East, in between Blantyre Street and Coalport Drive. Such developments will provide a high quality pedestrian oriented environment. Permitted Use The Official Plan Land Use Map illustrates that a mixed-use area with a park and open space is authorized in the quarry lands. The mixed used area allows for a wide range of commercial, residential, institutional and parks and open space uses. (Quarry lands, n.d.). Condominiums A condominium shall be built to cater an active area of the community. The condominium will be placed at the northwest corner of the quarry lands. This active area is a major artery intersection that captures sufficient pedestrian traffic to support the commercial retail establishment. The condominium lot will be catered by two major power centers; one north of the GO Train line and the second south of the GO Train line (directly across lot). Ultimately, condominiums can produce larger feasibility rather than live-work units. This is the reason for establishing condominiums in an active area of the community.

Toronto Official Plan – Mixed Use Mixed-Use developments will: a) Create a balance of high quality commercial, residential, institutional and open space uses that reduces automobile dependency and meets the needs of the local community; b) Provide for new jobs and homes for Toronto’s growing population on underutilized lands in the Downtown, the Central Waterfront, Centres, Avenues, and other lands designated Mixed Use Areas, creating and sustaining wellpaid, stable, safe and fulfilling employment opportunities for all Torontonians; c) Provide an attractive, comfortable and safe pedestrian environment; d) Take advantage of nearby transit services; e) Provide good site access and circulation and an adequate supply of parking for residents and visitors; and f) Provide indoor and outdoor recreation space for building residents in every significant multiunit residential development.” (Toronto official plan, 2010).

Danforth Avenue Study –Built Form 2.2.5: Height at prominent nodes, such as at Danforth Road and at Pharmacy Avenue, should be 10 to 12 storeys. 2.2.6: Height of buildings on adjacent neighbourhood streets and adjacent to Oakridge Park should be 3 to 4 storeys. (Danforth avenue study, 2006)

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City of Toronto Condominium Built Form

Toronto Official Plan- Built Form 2.2.7 New development will be located and organized to fit with its existing and/or planned context. It will frame and support adjacent streets, parks, and open spaces to improve the safety, pedestrian interest and casual views to these spaces from the development by: a) Generally locating buildings parallel to the street or along the edge of a park or open space with consistent front yard setback. On a corner site, the development should be located along both adjacent street frontages and give prominence to the corner. If located at a site that ends a street corridor, development should acknowledge the prominence of that site;

The condominium will be a mid-rise structure; totaling a complete structure of 12 storeys. The Danforth Avenue Study allows for height at prominent nodes to be between 10-12 storeys. (Danforth avenue study, 2006). The ground level will be utilized for commercial space and will have access to surface parking at the rear for the immediate shoppers. The commercial space will comprise of basic neighbourhood amenities. This includes coffee shops, drycleaners, banks, drug stores (Rexall), food chains and retail stores. The upper levels (11 storeys) will support all residential units. Underground parking will be provided for these residents.

b) Locating main building entrances so that they are clearly visible and directly accessible from the public sidewalk; c) Integrating above-ground parking structures, where permitted or appropriate, with building design, and have usable building space at grade facing adjacent streets, parks and open space.

2.2.8 New development will provide amenity for adjacent streets and open spaces to make these areas attractive, interesting, comfortable and functional for pedestrians by providing: a) Improvements to adjacent boulevards and sidewalks respecting sustainable design elements, which may include one or more of the following: trees, shrubs, hedges, plantings or other ground cover, permeable paving materials, street furniture, curb ramps, waste and recycling containers, lighting and bicycle facilities;

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Figure 18: This rendering is a potential example of the condominium structure; addition 2 storeys will be in place (Google Images, 2012) (Fitzpatrick, 2012).

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City of Toronto Live Work Units The purpose of the live work units will be to encourage community engagement. The location predominately consists of single detached homes, which utilize Gerrard Street East to get from point A to point B by car. Live work units shall be established to create a pedestrian traffic flow along the quiet and empty sidewalk.

b) Landscaped open space within the development site;

The lot is within walking distance to bus stops and proposed bike lanes, which should also inspire pedestrians to be more active in this high-density residential neighbourhood.

d) Safe pedestrian routes and tree plantings with surface parking lots.

Live-Work Units Built Form The live work units will be a total of 3 storeys. The main level will be utilized for commercial space, while the upper levels will be used for residential purposes. The exterior structure of the building facing Gerrard Street East will resemble a commercial building, while the back of the exterior building will mirror a townhouse reflection. The back of the lot shall provide surface parking for service uses. Each live work unit will be provided with a garage and one driveway parking space. In regards to parkingPlease see Appendix on Danforth Avenue StudyTransportation and Movement Plan.

c) Landscaped edges of surface parking lots along streets, parks and open spaces to define the street edge and visually screen the parked autos

2.2.9: Every significant new multi-unit residential development will provide indoor and outdoor amenity space for residents of the new development. Each resident of such development will have access to outdoor amenity spaces such as balconies, terraces, courtyards, rooftop gardens and other types of outdoor spaces.

Services For both the condominiums and the live work units, specific service amenities must be installed to cater to the future residents. Utilities hookups shall be installed. This includes, water, hydro, electricity and gas hookups for each residential unit. For the condominium tower, an acoustic noise fence shall be installed along the north side that faces the GO Train line. This will help to reduce sound from the GO Train. After the soil test has been completed, the underground parking for the condominium residents will be constructed. If no complications arise from excavating, no retaining wall will be needed for the underground parking garage. Figure 19 and 20: The images displayed above are an ideal livework unit structure. It shows the diversity between both units, as well as unique textures and colour templates. (Google Maps, 2012).

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Commercial Entrance

Rear Entrance

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City of Toronto

b) Stimulate the Economy In The Community

Income in the Community

Community Profile Presently, the neighbourhood job opportunities predominately caters to the younger generation. These labour placements include local grocery stores, food chains and department stores. However, the neighbourhood seems to be lacking job opportunities appropriate for residents with post-secondary degrees, who make up more than half the population.

Number of Residents

600 500 400 300 200 Total

100

Community Statistics Majority of the residents in the community earned on average between $10,000-$19,000 per year. This data represents a large portion of the community. The second highest household income in the community is close in measures, earning between $1,000-$9,999 per year.

0

Income Value

Figure 21: The above graph displays the household income for the community ((Guadagnoli, 2012)

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Overall, as demonstrated in the chart below, approximately 64.30% of the total population is classified as low-income, earning under $30,000 per year. This indicates that additional employment opportunities would be very valuable for the residents. Both the live work units and condominiums (commercial level) can contribute towards increasing the household income for the community. Providing more job opportunities for the community will generate and produce a higher overall economic benefit for the local economy.

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City of Toronto Income

Total

Percentage

Under $1,000

150

5.90%

$1000-$9999

490

19.40%

$10000-$19999

565

22.40%

$20000-$29999

420

16.60%

$30000-$39999

270

10.70%

$40000-$49999

230

9.10%

$50000-$59999

150

5.90%

Over $60000

245

9.70%

2520

99.70%

Total

Figure 22: Percentage of population in each income category ((Guadagnoli, 2012)

Potential To Succeed The live work units will provide great success to local businesses because it will allow for residents to work in their home environment. Instead of travelling to reach clients, clients will instead reach them. As a result, this will bring more consumers into the community, allowing them to engage and shop in the area. Condominiums will too have an effect on employment opportunities. The commercial space allows for local residents to rent out a space of commercial for potential office use, professional services or even small boutique stores. Since the condominiums are easily accessible to all transportation methods, this makes it convenient for residents to drop by the commercial spaces (dry cleaners/coffee shops) on their way to work. As a result of easy accessibility to transit systems, both the condominiums and live work units will make it simple for consumers to visit their stores.

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City of Toronto 3.0 Improve Public Health & Safety 3.1 Alternative Transportation

The major roads in the area (Danforth Avenue, Victoria Park, Gerrard Street, and Warden Avenue) are currently lacking forms of alternative transit. Pedestrian and cyclist traffic will be strongly encouraged in the area along major roads. Adding bicycle lanes and bicycle parking is a great way to revitalize the neighbourhood and create a vibrant streetscape. The Danforth/Victoria Park area can benefit from cycling infrastructure because:  Cycling is a way to reduce the amount of vehicular congestion on roads in and around the area, including major roadways leading in and out of the city  Makes public transit more accessible and cheaper  It is a great way to preserve the natural environment in and around the city  Reduce the need to own/use a car for short personal trips  Contributes to personal health  Reduces the amount of air pollution and greenhouse gases emitted from transportation  Bicycle parking encourages cycling as well as contributes to a streetscape

Alternative Transportation Policies Increased accessibility to transit and the downtown core will be achieved through the use of bike lanes. The following policies reflect the aims and objections of the Toronto Official Plan, the Toronto Bike plan and the Danforth Avenue Study. The secondary plan aims to: 3.1.1 Provide pedestrian and cyclist links, facilities and infrastructure, where appropriate, to integrate the elements of the Residential and Commercial Land Uses, Transportation, Recreational Open Spaces, to provide comprehensive access to those systems and to serve as a recreational and aesthetic amenity to the community. 3.1.2 Provide these links through or, where this is not possible, along the edge of contiguous open space elements including parks and school sites, where appropriate. Roads may be used as pedestrian/cyclist links. Road allowances may also be utilized and expanded to accommodate necessary linkages where there is no other alternative. 3.1.3 Add pedestrian/cyclist crossings over major roads, subway corridor, and rail way corridors by underpass/overpass or other suitable arrangements where the City does not consider an at-grade pedestrian crossing to be appropriate or practical. 3.1.4 Provide cycling connections to other cycling paths in the City of Toronto along arterial roads, where appropriate.

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City of Toronto

Currently there is no cyclist infrastructure in the area, nor is there sufficient bicycle parking. The area is already well served by public transit with the TTC and GO stations north of Danforth Ave. This means residents can cycle to reach these stations faster. The area is also in close proximity to the downtown, meaning Gerrard St and Danforth Ave offer great straightforward routes to get there. Bicycle lanes and signage is a great way to provide pedestrians with a safe way to commute on bicycle. According to the Toronto Official Plan, Bike Plan and Danforth Avenue study, bike lanes and paths increase pedestrian connectivity and provide greater travel opportunities. Adequate bicycle parking will encourage the community to cycle to work, stores, and public transit.

3.1.5

Implement of bicycle/automobile shared lanes on Gerrard St, as well as Victoria Park Ave

3.1.6

Maintenance of road surfaces to ensure they are properly paved to avoid accidents involving cyclists

3.1.7

Provide signage directing cyclists to nearest bike/shared lane routes for fast travel times

3.1.8

Install bicycle parking rings along Danforth Ave, Victoria Park Ave, Gerrard St, and Clonmore Dr

3.1.9

Integrate off-street bicycle parking with the new proposed streetscape

3.1.10 Provide adequate and secure bicycle parking at transit stations 3.1.11 Encourage businesses promote cycling, through employee incentives and advertisements on bicycle safety courses and classes 3.1.12

Making bicycle safety course more accessible through signs located within community centres in the area, as well as business located within the BIA.

Figure 23 and 24: Danforth Avenue looking east and proposed improvement. There are currently no bike lanes on Danforth Ave. Š Bradley Lediard, Colin Pang

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City of Toronto

3.2 Trails and Railway Policies: 3.2.1

3.2.2

3.2.3

3.2.4

Ensure regularly scheduled maintenance is being performed on railway crossings and bridges New developments and areas should be given consideration for additional crossings over the railway if needed, and determined beneficial for increasing activity Connectivity will be improved through pedestrian accessibility to different areas, and diminishing the bordering effect of the railway by increasing amount of access points to crossover railway Lighting will be installed and maintained in high traffic areas and crossover points to improve public safety

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Figure 25 Proposed Bike Lanes along Victoria Park Ave, Gerrard St. E and Clonmore Dr. Base Š Google maps 2012. 3.2 Trails & Railway Crossings There is a railway underpass that allows street traffic to go underneath the railway at the points intersecting Warden Avenue and Victoria Park. Vehicles and pedestrians can cross underneath the bridges due to a lowered elevation. Maintenance of these bridges is crucial to ensure pedestrian safety from crumbling concrete and improve public appearance. Issues like this as seen currently on the Gardiner Expressway decrease traffic flow, increase safety risks for drivers and pedestrians, and diminish the appearance of the community as a whole. Lighting in these bridges could be a valued feature for pedestrians walking at night as it increases visibility and discourages vandalism, or unwanted behaviour. An additional underpass at the end of Byng Avenue would ensure increased traffic in the redesigned quarry lands and decrease the amount of space between the two current crossover points.

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City of Toronto

Pedestrian connections are important because they link neighbourhoods. They create safe access across major streets or servicing corridors such as railway lines. Improving connectivity also increases access to Victoria Park Subway station and can improve transit use and discourage personal vehicles. This is a goal that reflects section 1.6 of the Provincial Policy Statement: Infrastructure and Public Service Facilities.

3.2.5

Efforts shall include each level of government and applicable stakeholders such as CN in construction and revitalization to ensure bridge height, width, load bearing capacity are up to safety standards

3.2.6

All proposed development adjacent to the railway corridor will be required to undertake noise and vibration studies, to the satisfaction of the City Toronto and the Ministry of the Environment in consultation with the appropriate railway, and shall undertake appropriate measures to mitigate any adverse noise and vibration that have been identified. This study shall be done in accordance with Official Plan Section 3.4 (Policy 21).

3.2.7

Development adjacent to railways shall ensure that appropriate safety measures such as setbacks, berms and security fencing are provided, to the satisfaction of the City in consultation with the appropriate railway authority.

The connectivity objectives -Increase pedestrian flow into and through the quarry lands -Diminish “bordering” effect of railway that divides the neighbourhood into two parts -Maintain and improve structure of bridges and crossings

Figure 26 The Railway Corridor Boundary Map. Base © Google Maps 2012

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City of Toronto 3.3 Crime Prevention Through Environmental Design 3.2.8 Improving Safety–Through crime prevention program and environmental design a) Lighting shall be implemented along Clonmore Dr. beside the Quarry site, to promote safety.

There is adequate lighting on Danforth Ave and Victoria Park Avenue. There is no lighting on Clonmore Drive beside the quarry lands. Lighting is needed to ensure safety for drivers but also for pedestrians beside the quarry site. See Figure 26 as an example.

b) Add midway crossways along sidewalks (not sure if this applies/ is worth writing out locations and such

c) Public art should be sited in a manner, which does not jeopardize other design objectives such as providing clear site lines, barrier-free access

d) Clearly defined walkways to guide people though spaces to intended destination

e) Ensure shrub material is maintained to a maximum height of 0.9 meters for clear visibility.

f) Provide a forum for residents/ tenants to report vandalism and graffiti and perpetrators thereof (anonymously if necessary). g) Ensure clear site lines, and barrier-free access to promote personal safety and security.

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Figure 27 : Improved lighting and bus shelter on Clonmore Dr will provide safe. accessibility to the park for residents. There is currently no lighting at the Clonmore bus stops. Lighting will help safer transportation options and thus promote the usage of public transit more frequently. (Guadagnoli, 2012).

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City of Toronto 4.0 Manage Environmental Risk 4.1 Brownfield Redevelopment The Quarry site is regarded as a Brownfield due to previous industrial and landfill usage that accumulated toxic metals, methane emissions and other hazardous substance (Figure 27). Redevelopment is encouraged in order to prevent further deterioration of the land, remediate contaminated land and maximize use of land and resources.

4.2 Preservation of Natural Features There is a wetland area on the southern portion of the Quarry Lands, which consists of a cattail and reed marsh and thicket swamp. The Quarry lands are not identified as a natural heritage site within the Official Plan, nevertheless it is stated in the Official Plan that there are other areas with natural heritage value that are not shown on the map, which will have to be identified and protected in the future. The Quarry site has been used as a natural covering area for bird migration, a mix of vegetation species (white Oak, bluestem grass etc.) have been identified and are in need of conservation assessment (Figure 28).

4.0 Environmental Risk Policies 4.1.1 Risk Assessment •Necessary Environmental Risk Assessment should be undertaken, which shall be in accordance with Ministry of Environment guidelines, Toronto Official Plan, policies and other related regulations. Any contaminated lands and substances should be identified and dealt with as outlined in the Provincial Policy Statement. •Remediation of the site should be conducted, including clean-up of contaminated soils, sediment, and ground water where applicable. All level of governments’ grants and subsidies and other assistance should be considered. 4.1.2 Community Involvement •Adjacent residents, developers, business owners, the City and other parties involved in the redevelopment should be fully informed of the details, process and outcome. Land owners are encouraged to provide information regarding the environmental condition of their property. 4.1.3 Redevelopment •A wide range of environmentally sustainable approaches and technologies for the design and construction of development and infrastructure are encouraged, in order to reduce automobile use, achieve energy efficiency, improve storm water and wastewater management, preserve and enhance the urban forest, and reduce the urban heat island. 

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A venting system that collects and dilutes any toxic gases escaping from the site is required for the redevelopment process.

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City of Toronto

•A review is necessary in conjunction with the Environmental Risk Assessment, on the Environmental Site Assessment (2007) and the report done by the AiMs Environmental requested by Ministry of Environment (2010). •An in-depth study of the wetland (marsh area) is required, focusing on biodiversity, vegetation and unknown substances. Any further degradation of the marsh area is prohibited. •Storm sewers, water mains have been identified on the site and will need to be considered before any redevelopment. •A development permit shall be sought from both Provincial and Regional authorities, according to the Conservation Authorities Act. Ontario Regulation 97/04: Development, Interference with Wetlands and Alterations to Shorelines and Watercourses. And Ontario Regulation 166/06: Toronto Region and Conservation Authority, Development, Interference with Wetlands and Alterations to Shorelines and Watercourses.

Figure 28: Former Landfills and Burrow Pits (AiMS Environmental, 2010).

Figure 29: Natural Environment Vegetation Communities and Species (City of Toronto, 2006).

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City of Toronto 5.0 Amendments to the Official Plan Current Toronto Official Plan Policies

Proposed Policies

There is currently no policy regarding planters around urban trees

Planting of trees, shrubs and groundcover in street medians and shoulders should be undertaken in large blocks to maximize the area available for water percolation to root systems of planted trees. Ground cover planting in street medians and shoulders should be undertaken with low maintenance native grasses and shrub. All trees along Danforth Avenue shall have planters surrounding the tree. This will separate the road from the sidewalk, promoting a pedestrian friendly environment.

There is currently no policy regarding removing wiring from major roadways

Wiring shall be removed along major roadways and buried underground

Prior to development occurring on known or potentially contaminated sites, or on sites on or within 500 metres (or within a previously determined area of influence) of a known or suspected former waste disposal site, potential adverse impacts will be identified and assessed through a study, and any measures needed to remediate or mitigate the contamination will be identified and implemented

Prior to development occurring on known or potentially contaminated sites, or on sites on or within 300 metres (or within a previously determined area of influence) of a known or suspected former waste disposal site, potential adverse impacts will be identified and assessed through a study, and any measures needed to remediate or mitigate the contamination will be identified and implemented

Large residential developments provide an opportunity to achieve a mix of housing in terms of types and affordability. On large sites, generally greater than 5 hectares in size:

All residential developments need to provide an opportunity to achieve a mix of housing in terms of types and affordability.

a) a minimum of 30 percent of the new housing units will be in forms other than single-detached and semi-detached houses, such as row housing, triplexes and multi-unit residential buildings; and

a) all new housing units will be in the forms other than single-detached and semi-detached houses, such as row housing, triplexes and multi-unit residential buildings

b) in accordance with and subject to Section 5.1.1 of this Plan where an increase in height and/or density is sought, the first priority community benefit will be the provision of 20 percent of the additional residential units as affordable housing constructed on-site or the conveyance of land in the development to the City for the purpose of affordable housing, or, at the discretion of the city.

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b) in accordance with and subject to Section 5.1.1 of this Plan where an increase in height and/or density is sought, the first priority community benefit will be the provision of 35 percent of the additional residential units as affordable housing constructed on-site

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City of Toronto There is currently no policy regarding the requirement of affordable rental or ownership units within new residential developments without subject to Section 5.1.1 of this plan.

All new residential developments must incorporate at least 30 percent of the units to be affordable rental or ownership housing.

No current policy regarding a definition for Live Work Units

Live Work Units shall mean a dwelling unit which may be used for work purposes by residents of the units and which may also be used for work purposes by persons not residing the unit;

No policy regarding Live Work Unit activities

Work activities in a Live Work Unit are prohibited to: 1. Drinking and dinning establishments 2. Take-out food shops 3. Animal hospitals, kennels and pounds 4. Medical facilities 5. Auto showrooms 6. Banks 7. Courthouses 8. Civic administration 9.Dry cleaners/ Laundromats 10. Fire and police stations 11. Post Offices Permitted uses in a Live Work Unit are limited to: 1. Profession, financial and office support services 2. Profession health and medical services 3. Specialty stores Zoning by-laws pursuant to section 37 of the Planning Act, may be enacted to permit more height and/or density for a use than is otherwise permitted by the Zoning By-law for that use in return for the provision of community benefits in the form of capital faclilies to be set out in the Zoning By-law together with the related increase in height and/or density.

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Zoning by-laws pursuant to section 37 of the Planning Act, may be enacted to permit more height and/or density for a underutilized building that in return for the provision of community benefits in the form of capital facilities to be set out in the Zoning by-law

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City of Toronto There is currently no policy regarding the maximum height limits on existing pre-war buildings

A maximum of 2 storeys may be added to existing underutilized pre-war, low density buildings

There is currently no policy regarding prior requirements for granting of a height increase

It is the intent of this plan that there has to be a clear and measurable public interest served by granting of a height increase. Prior to granting an increase, it shall be satisfied that: i. The proposed development will conform with the development policies of the applicable designation of this plan; ii. The built form will contribute to the urban design policies; iii. The use will be a positive addiction to the urban landscape; iv. The development of the use will potentially facilitate the development or establishment of other uses in the area Intensification of buildings should enhance good appearance and contribute to an appealing streetscape further contributing to property values in the neighbourhood to generate higher tax revenue

There is currently no policy on intensification contributing to an appealing streetscape and increasing property values

There is currently no policy on intensification generating a wide range of densities and heights to accommodate mixed use

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A broad range of infrastructure densities and heights shall be encouraged through the intensification of structures, so as to enable the area to accommodate an appropriate range of mixed use in the Development Area in correspondence to the P.P.S

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City of Toronto 6.0 Implementation This Secondary Plan will be for a period of 20 years from 2012 -2032 and be subject to 5-year reviews. This is to conform with the City of Toronto’s Official Plan 5 year review and any amendments made to the Official Plan shall be Development permits will be submitted for the new residential units. From application submission to approval, the time frame will be 18 months. Policies will be adopted as part of this plan with respect to the passing of by-laws to implement a development permit system in order for new residential developments to take place within the Birchcliff Quarry. Necessary municipal services including: utility services (electricity, gas, water, sewer), transportation links shall be implemented as necessary and existing services shall be maintained and upgraded to meet the requirements set by the City of Toronto’s Official Plan. Development charges from the newly approved residential units will be saved and used to revitalize the various public realm features within the neighbourhood. Section 37 of P.A provides a means by which the City can achieve responsible, balanced growth. City can pass a by-law to grant a height or density increase for a particular project that is greater than the zoning by law would permit in return for community benefits. Section 37 can be used for new business centre developments or redevelopments that come into the area. Holding By-Laws, where the intended use and zoning is known for lands but development should not take place until specific facilities are in place and conditions are met. Council may pass a Holding By-Law that puts a hold and spells out the conditions that must be met before the Holding is removed and the lands can be developed. Site Plan Control is not only about the review of individual buildings, etc., but about the relationship of the organization and design of buildings, structures and exterior open spaces on a site with its surrounding to ensure a good fit between new development and existing or planned context. City will review plans thoroughly. Development Charges is another means for the City to achieve responsible growth. The Development Charges Act allows the collection of development charges on new development in order to meet growth related infrastructure requirements. This ensures that new development pays for itself and that additional capital costs do not fall on existing residents in the form of higher property taxation and user fees. These charges are used to mitigate the City’s capital pressures and to assist in providing the infrastructure required by future development of the city. These charges should be fair and equitable to all. Zoning By-Laws that will permit the implementation of secondary plan, unless Council determines the development is to proceed by Site specific zoning.

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City of Toronto NEXT STEPS The following are a few things that require attention going forward:   

  

Locate and justify possible sites for intensification or redevelopment (with schedule) Specify how Zoning By-laws and other tools will help implement the proposal Evaluate different infrastructure:  Roads: Capacity, connections and improvements  Sewage: capacity and availability, improvements  Transit: demand or lack there of Evaluate Environmental Impacts of intensification and redevelopment Evaluate if there is currently enough demand for more services or if demand needs to increase Consider what other factors we may be overlooking or not understanding

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City of Toronto Phase 1 An environmental risk assessment will be conducted before actual development for the condominium residential units within the Quarry takes place. Noise and vibration study report will also be done to eliminate excessive contamination. This will be done within a given timeframe of 2 years from 2012 - 2014. Public consultation with the residents will need to be conducted after the environmental risk assessment. All the Official Plan amendments and rezoning applications will be filed. Innovative technology Sustainable techniques will be used to decontaminate the soil, reuse site materials such as heavy metals and chemicals. There are several methods that are recommended: 1. Bioremediation, meaning using living organisms to clean up toxics, in order to avoid traditional “dig and dump� remediation process and to save budget cost. Depending on budget, another solution is to excavate the contaminated soil and transported to a treatment plant, and then returned to the area where the redevelopment would take place. 3. Although there is no evidence showing the ground water is used as drinking water, innovative technology will be installed to prevent further contamination of ground water, soil and emission of greenhouse gas. 4. In the central, eastern and western parts of the area, organic vapour and methane gas collection systems will be introduced to eliminate combustible gas migrating to residential areas.

Figure 30: Phase 1-Mid Rise residential condominium on the Quarry Land

Traffic analysis studies also need to be conducted in the first phase in order to examine in impact of potential residential developments on the Quarry lands with regard to the adjacent neighbourhood.

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Phase 2 Medium-rise (12 storey) condominiums to be built on the North-West side of the Birchcliff Quarry with inclusion of affordable housing units. Ground level utilized for commercial use with residential units above. Access to underground parking for residents and surface parking for shoppers. Easy access to all transportation methods. Close proximately to neighbourhood amenities. Project time line after the acceptance of all permits and installation of all municipal service hookups: 2 years.

Figure 31: Phase 2-Mid Rise condominium on the Quarry Land

residential

Phase 3 Live Work Units (3 storeys) facing south along Gerrard Street East. Ground level utilized for commercial space with residential units above. Surface parking provided for service users and a garage and driveway space provided for residents. are enforced. Single-detached homes and parklands surround the lot predominantly. Nearby access to all transportation methods. Project time line after the acceptance of all permits and installation of all municipal service hookups: 18-24 months. Figure 32: Phase 3-Live Work units on Gerrard Street

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City of Toronto Phase 4 Phase 4 will include the creation of park infrastructure including new marked trails for increased accessibility, new benches for sitting areas, street lighting along new created trails to guide the public and address safety issues, public art displays from the local community, and a farmer’s market. The timeline for this phase will be approximately from (Input year) (1) The Secondary Plan will be consulted with the community residents regarding reconfiguration of the park space for new park infrastructure and for the usage of recreational activities and entertainment before Phase 4 is began. (2) Secondary Planning areas will identify and address the following: a) opportunities and constraints posed by unique environmental, economic heritage, cultural other features. b) necessary infrastructure investment related to environmental services, community and social facilities, and parks and recreation services. c) urban design guidelines, objectives and parameters.

32: Phase Phase46--Sidewalks and pathwaysare within Figure 33: Streetscape amenities to be the Quarry Land added.

(3) Campaigns and campaign projects will engage community groups, business and industry, nongovernment organizations, universities and colleges, cultural community centres, council, and other level of government representatives to achieve the progress of: a) creating beautiful places that improve public spaces and streetscapes b) protecting natural areas and greening of Toronto (4)Proposed parks, roads, services or infrastructure within policy or on Plan maps including this Secondary Plan map will not be interpreted as being the sole or specific roles of the City of provide, finance or implement.

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City of Toronto Phase 5 Phase 5 will include intensification of underutilized and vacant lots along Danforth Avenue to generate more mixed uses in the area, generate more opportunities for employment, provide a positive impact on the public realm, help attract more visitors to the Avenue, and overall contribute to a vibrant area to live, work, and play. (1) The Secondary plan will ensure that the implementing Zoning By-law is regularly reviewed and amended to include standards that reflect the objectives and policies of this plan. (2) The Secondary Plan will be evaluated based on the development criteria for the respective designation area, strategic official plan objectives, and the built, human and natural environmental policies. (3) The Secondary Plan will consult with residents/ owners regarding the intensification of underutilized buildings to generate more mixed uses in the area. (4) The Secondary Plan will consult with residents/ owners of local businesses on Danforth Avenue, and the City, to generate and determine an appropriate composition of retail/commercial space by role, function, form and format relating to a hierarchy of retail/commercial land uses.

Figure 34: Phase 5 Intensification Along Danforth Avenue

Some affordable housing units shall be incorporated into the redevelopment along Danforth Avenue. (1) The Secondary Plan will be consulted with the community residents regarding reconfiguration of the park space for new park infrastructure and for the usage of recreational activities and entertainment.

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Phase 6

Phase 6 deals with implementing streetscapes to improve the overall visual appearance of the community. To achieve this positive and vibrant imagine for the community, several features must be implemented. The application of these features include: • Trees/planters/urban foliage/landscaping • Street furnishings • Sidewalk improvements • Wiring removal • Underground parking • Proper setbacks for developments • Safety improvements • Public art • Waste containers The ideal timeframe for implementing these beneficial features into the community is estimated at 24 months.

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Figure 35: Phase 6: Public Realm amenities added

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Phase 7 Implementation of Shared Bicycle Lanes An important factor to revitalizing the neighbourhood is the implementation of bicycle lanes. The lanes provide pedestrian-safe routes to cycle on which will encourage cycling in the area. This will lead to a reduction in vehicular congestion as well as create a more vibrant atmosphere. It will also reduce the amount of air pollution and greenhouse gases and promote personal health. The plan will implement: 1. Bicycle/car shared lanes on Gerrard St, Clonmore Dr, and Victoria Park Ave

Figure 36: Phase 7 Bike Lanes Added

2. Bicycle parking rings will be installed along Danforth Ave, Victoria Park Ave, and Clonmore Dr 3. Signage in the area directing cyclists to the nearest route which provides bicycle lanes for safer travel

Phase 8 Connectivity and safety will be enhanced in phase 8. Lighting shall be installed through above and below grade crossings. 1)Connectivity shall be improved by creating an underpass from Byng Avenue to the Quarry lands to improve connectivity from the North side of the train tracks to the South side of the train tracks.

Figure: Phase 8 Railway crossing added

Figure 37: Phase 8 Railway crossing added

2) The plan will also reinforce this underpass to ensure it is up to the current safety standards from the Ministry of Transportation.

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Financing / budgeting An important aspect to implementing this secondary plan is the ability to finance the envisioned infrastructure and other changes necessary to accomplish the future goals for the community. The secondary plan for this area has been planned comprehensively to guide development in this area. The implementation of this plan will rely heavily on capital to carry out the proposed planning interventions to the community. This will be accomplished through: Phases The secondary plan sets out a series of phases in which the plan will be implemented. The phasing strategy allows the plan to move forward incrementally as funds become available. Phase 1: The Estimated expense will be around $500,000. Funding is expected to come from Federation of Canadian municipalities’ Green Municipal Fund and the City of Toronto in the form of tax incremental incentives. Phase 2: The estimated cost will occur in the form of reducing development charges for the developer, in order to make sure at least 30 percent of the units to be affordable. Phase 3: The estimated cost will occur in the form of reducing development charges for the developer. Phase 4: The timeline for this phase will be approximately from 2016 to 2018. The estimated cost will range from 800,000 to 1 million dollars depending on the market conditions. Phase 5: The City of Toronto should provide incentives to residents and business owners for the purpose of fully utilize vacant spaces Phase 6: The estimated funding would range from 200,000 to 400,000 dollars, including planting, maintenance and protection Phase 7: The estimated cost will be around 2 million dollars. Phase 8: The estimate cost will be determined as discussions between the City of Toronto and interested developers.

Public, Private Partnerships The implementation of this secondary plan will cooperatively accept public private partnerships as a source for financing the envisioned plan. This will be done by collaborating with private developers and community stakeholders to reach an understanding on how each can work together to generate a financial climate capable of moving forward with the secondary plan Provincial / Federal Investment The provincial and federal governments have potential to play an important role in the funding of key infrastructure such as community centers or housing. The secondary plan will strongly pursue intergovernmental cooperation in key projects.

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Appendix 2 - Definitions The Provincial Policy Statement (2005) provides the following definition of ‘affordable’: a) In the case of ownership housing, the least expensive of: 1. Housing for which the purchase price results in annual accommodation costs which do not exceed 30 percent of gross annual household income for low and moderate income households; or 2. Housing for which the purchase price is at least 10 percent below the average purchase price of a resale unit in the regional market area; b) In the case of rental housing, the least expensive of: 1. A unit for which the rent does not exceed 30 percent of gross annual household income for low and moderate income households; or 2. A unit for which the rent is at or below the average market rent of a unit in the regional market area. The TRCA defines ‘wetland’ as follows: wetlands include shallow marsh, meadow marsh, shallow aquatic systems, swamps, bogs and fens. Aquatic and wetland sites where water is known to be 2 m or less in depth are considered to be marsh or shallow water, according to the mnr wetland and elc definitions. where water depth is thought to be deeper than 2 m or unknown, only the perimeter marsh vegetation is mapped as wetland and the remaining area if large enough is classified as open water. meadow marsh is often indistinguishable from ordinary meadow on aerial photographs and cannot always be accurately mapped as wetland unless a wet meadow is known to exist there. Swamp communities are dominated either by shrubs or trees. thicket swamps (shrub-dominated wetlands) are easier to discern than treed swamps when remotely sensed and are usually mapped as wetland polygons. no limit was set on the size of wetlands to be mapped, since they often naturally occur as small pockets in the landscape. If a wetland habitat is discernable at a scale of 1:4000, it is mapped.

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City of Toronto Mount Pleasant Secondary Plan. (2012). Welcome to the City of Brampton. Retrieved on September 25, 2012 from http://www.brampton.ca/en/Business/planning-development/projectsstudies/MountPleasantSecondaryPlan/Pages/Mount-Pleasant-Secondary-Plan.aspx Official Plan Document. (2006, July). City of Sarnia. Retrieved September 25, 2012, from http://www.city.sarnia.on.ca/visit.asp?sectionid=364 Poverty, Housing, and Homelessness in Toronto. (2011, January). toronto.ca | Official website for the City of Toronto. Retrieved September 25, 2012, from http://www.toronto.ca/affordablehousing/pdf/poverty-factsheet.pdf Provincial Policy Statement, 2005. (2005, March 1). Ministry of Municipal Affairs and Housing / Ministère des affaires municipales et du logement. Retrieved September 25, 2012, from http://www.mah.gov.on.ca/Page1485.aspx Statistics Canada. (2006). CHASS Canadian Census Analyzer. Retrieved on September 25, 2012 from http://www.dc1.chass.utoronto.ca.ezproxy.lib.ryerson.ca/cgibin/census/2006/displayCensusCT.cgi?lang=&c=lab&p=&l=&geot=s&ct= Toronto Official Plan. (2010, December). toronto.ca | Official website for the City of Toronto. Retrieved September 25, 2012, from http://www.toronto.ca/planning/official_plan/introduction.htm Toronto Social Housing by the Numbers. (2011, May). toronto.ca | Official website for the City of Toronto. Retrieved September 25, 2012, from http://www.toronto.ca/housing/social_housing/pdf/shbynumbers.pdf Yesler community center project fact sheet. (2012). [Web Photo]. Retrieved on December 2 from http://www.seattle.gov/parks/centers/current/Yesler_Community_Center.htm

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