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CONTENTS

October 2020

FEATURES 22

Making Sense of the Market

42

The Defining Decade

84

Heifer Genetics

Business as Usual May Not Be Best for Beef Producers

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Looking at the Success of Simmental

Making Sense of the Market

Testing for Early Puberty and Fertility Yields Great Benefits

MEMBER NEWS 6 Association Update 18 Beef Checkoff News 36 County News Heifer Genetics

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COLUMNS 8

MCA President’s Perspective Moving Forward

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CattleWomen’s Corner

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Straight Talk: Mike Deering

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What’s Cookin’ at the Beef House

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Patient Decisions

What We’re For

Beef Bucks

On the Edge of Common Sense: Baxter Black Religious Reflections

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Capitol Update New & Exciting

The Missouri Beef Cattleman is an official publication of the Missouri Cattlemen’s Association.


MISSOURI

BEEF CATTLEMAN

OFFICIAL PUBLICATION OF THE MISSOURI CATTLEMEN’S ASSOCIATION

Volume 49 - Issue 10 (USPS 890-240 • ISSN 0192-3056) Magazine Publishing Office 2306 Bluff Creek Drive, #100, Columbia, MO 65201 Phone: 573-499-9162 • Fax: 573-499-9167 Andy Atzenweiler: Editor/Production/Ad Sales P.O. Box 480977 • Kansas City, Missouri 64148 816-210-7713 • E-mail: mobeef@sbcglobal.net

Missouri Cattlemen’s Association MCA Website: www.mocattle.com

DEPARTMENTS 7

New MCA Members

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NCBA News

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American Royal News/Schedule

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Angus News

68

MCF Golf Tournament

76

USMEF News

90 106

2020 MCA Youth Industry Tour Advertisers Index

Missouri’s Cattlemen Foundation www.mocattlemenfoundation.org

Missouri’s CattleWomen

http://mocattle.com/missouricattlewomen.aspx

2020 MCA Officers

Marvin Dieckman, President 660-596-4163 • 28998 Hwy JJ, Cole Camp, MO 65325 Patty Wood, President-Elect 660-287-7701 • 16075 Wood Road, La Monte, MO 65337 Bruce Mershon, Vice President 816-525-1954 • 31107 Lake City Buckner Rd., Buckner, MO 64016 Matt Hardecke, Treasurer 573-846-6614 • 19102 Skymeadows Dr., Wildwood, MO 63069 David Dick, Secretary 660-826-0031 • 23529 Anderson School Rd., Sedalia, MO 65301

2020 MCA Regional Vice Presidents

Region 1: Eric Greenley, 61998 Pleasant Valley Rd. Knox City, MO 63446 660-341-8750 Region 2: Chuck Miller, 393 Spring Garden Road Olean, MO 65064 • 573-881-3589 Region 3: Charlie Besher, RR 5, Box 2402 Patton, MO 63662 • 573-866-2846 Region 4: Deb Thummel, 12601 Hwy. 46 Sheridan, MO 64486 • 660-541-2606 Region 5: John Shipman, 34266 Hwy KK Mora, MO 65345 • 660-221-1013 Region 6: Clay Doeden, 14555 S. Hwy A Stockton, MO 65785 • 417-808-0415 Region 7: Traves Merrick, 1956 Hwy 97 Miller, MO 65707 • 417-536-8080

OCTOBER 2020

Missouri Beef Cattleman, (USPS 890-240 • ISSN 0192-3056) is published monthly (12 times a year) and is the official publication of the Missouri Cattlemen’s Association, 2306 Bluff Creek Drive, #100, Columbia, Missouri, 65201. PERIODICALS postage paid at Columbia, Missouri and additional mailing offices. Subscription price is included as a part of the minimum membership dues of $70.00 per year in Missouri Cattlemen’s Association. Postmaster: Send address changes to: Missouri Beef Cattleman, P.O. Box 480977, Kansas City, Missouri 64148

Mike Deering • Executive Vice President - Ext 230 Mike@mocattle.com Sydney Thummel • Manager of Membership - Ext 231 Sydney@mocattle.com Candace Bergesch • MBC Editor/Production Artist Candace@mocattle.com Lisa Stockhorst, Administrative Assistant – Ext 234 Lisa@mocattle.com

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OCTOBER 2020

New Location: Margaritaville Lake Resort

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Lydia Althoff, Hannibal, MO Hannah Anderson, Ionia, MO Brooke Anderson, Ionia, MO Robert Barron, Washington, MO Doyle Boehs, Versailles, MO MaryAnn Boro, Buffalo, MO J. Micah Bristow, Circle 5 School for Cattlemen, Marble Hill, MO Christina Cochran, Williamstown, MO Ronnie Combs, Albany, MO Jakob Cordell, Poverty Point Cattle Company Inc., Skidmore, MO W. John Cramer, Cramer Farms, Ludlow, MO Troy & Susan Faulkner, Buffalo, MO Jim Hansen, Hansen Farms, Warsaw, MO Kevin Hays, Hays Farm, California, MO Chad Headings, Circle H Cattle, Buffalo, MO Albert Job, Job Angus Farms, Cape Girardeau, MO Scott Kirchhuff, Citizens Memorial, Bolivar, MO Gracie LaFoe, Hannibal, MO Adam McGee, Ash Grove, MO

Rachel McNamara, St Genevieve, MO Nick Mertz, Bland, MO Darrin & Vickie Nadler, Callao, MO Bradin Nadler, Callao, MO Lane Pence, Memphis, MO Beau Powell, Palmyra, MO Esther Reams, Brookfield, MO Todd Reinerd, Sturgeon, MO Tim Saunders, Saunders Cattle Company,Inc., Rea, MO Sadie Spratt, Ewing, MO Andrew Stegmann, Stegmanns Brookside Farm, Bismark, MO Jimmy & Cindy Stivers, Stivers Farm, Macon, MO Ben Strahan, Fork Creek Ranch, LLC, Ash Grove, MO Ken Teague, Springfield, MO Neal Trower, Fair Play, MO Randall Wheeler, Stover, MO Larry Wheeler, Elsberry, MO See the MCA Membership Form on page 101

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Straight

Talk

with Mike Deering What We’re For I am for standing your ground. I am for having faith in something that hasn’t happened yet. I’m for the underrated and the shy kid in the corner. I’m for loyalty and would drive 10,000 miles to help a friend. I am for soaking up wisdom when an old man speaks his mind. I am for the innocence of a child. That is a snippet of what I am for as a person. Notice how I never once mentioned what I am against. Give it a try. People are generally quick to take a stand against something. Just take a look at Facebook. It is so easy to be against something and it gives a certain satisfaction to blow off some steam in a feisty rant. I get it. I am guilty. It is not as easy to take a stand for something. It is sometimes difficult to go against the grain and to stand for what you believe is right even if you are standing alone. It is one thing to say you are opposed, but it is uphill when you have to fight for what you are for. It takes courage.

OCTOBER 2020

We need to spend more time talking about what we stand for than we do ranting about what we are against. If people know what we are for then they will never have to guess what we are against. It will be made abundantly clear. That is the point of the policy survey on pages 9394, which will also be distributed electronically. We need feedback to ensure this organization is functioning as a member-driven organization. The grassroots process is a fairytale without your voice.

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I understand it is easier to sit back and not engage in the policy process by filling out the survey, sending in ideas

Executive Vice President for resolutions or attending the policy and resolutions session at our annual convention. It is easier to complain about a policy position taken by this association when it is too late than to ensure your voice is heard during the process. I am not being critical as we are all guilty of being silent until something happens that causes us to react. With that said, silence is compliance and I sincerely urge you to engage and to take ownership of our policy positions and of this association. If you or your respective affiliate have ideas for new policy or amendments to existing policy, please send those to the MCA office or to your regional vice president. All expiring policies and new policy proposals will go through the association’s policy and legislative affairs committee and then sent to the general membership at the annual convention on January 8 for consideration. Speaking of convention, yes is the answer. We are absolutely, positively hosting the 53rd Annual Missouri Cattle Industry Convention and Trade Show January 8-10. To learn more, visit pages 96-98. Together, we will navigate the future and make clear what we are for as an association.


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NCBA & PLC Hail Legislation To Modernize ESA WASHINGTON (Sept. 17, 2020) – The National Cattlemen’s Beef Association (NCBA) and the Public Lands Council (PLC), this week celebrated the introduction of critical legislation that will modernize the Endangered Species Act (ESA) for the first time in close to 30 years. Introduced by Senator and Chairman of the U.S. Senate Committee on Environment and Public Works (EPW), John Barrasso (R – Wyo), the Endangered Species Act Amendments of 2020 will improve the existing law by strengthening state and local partnerships, incentivizing voluntary conservation efforts undertaken by ranchers and other land owners, and defend the ESA’s delisting process for animals that have successfully recovered and no longer need protection. Through these changes and with targeted increases for specific areas of the ESA, the bill will improve species conservation and address key failures in the Act. “This legislation is about improving an outdated law so that it meets current needs. It is about helping every American cattle producer that has lost a calf to a federally-protected bear or wolf, and for landowners who face stringent regulation that doesn’t meet the habitat needs on the ground,” said NCBA President Marty Smith. “Thank you to Senator Barrasso for taking on the big task of updating a law that is almost three decades old. I am glad to see a bill recognize that the best conservationists are the ranchers and farmers on their operations everyday taking care of the land and feeding the country.” “For too long, ranchers have been forced to deal with an antiquated law that does not recognize the expertise or the conservation done by those who actually live, work, and manage our rangeland,” said PLC President Bob

CENTRAL MISSOURI SALES CO. 3503 S. Limit • Sedalia, MO

OCTOBER 2020

Your Reliable Market In Mid-Missouri Certified Special VACC Calf Sales the 1st and 3rd Mondays at 2:00 p.m.

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Sale Every Monday at 11:00 a.m.

660-826-8286

Jay Fowler Cary Brodersen E.H. Fowler 660-473-1562 660-473-6373 660-473-1048

Skinner. “Ranchers are the original conservationists, and nowhere is that more true than in the West where millions of acres are managed primarily by ranchers whose daily presence on the landscape allows them to sound the alarm when species need additional help. This bill values the contributions of ranchers and other state experts who will develop stronger recovery plans together. Thank you to Chairman Barrasso for all the work he has done to fix a bill that was in dire need of updated tools.” Background The Endangered Species Act Amendments of 2020 empowers states to lead recovery planning, implementation planning, recovery teams, and implementation teams if states determine they have the appropriate capacity. The bill also requires negotiation with states prior to releasing an experimental population of a species and to give input from state experts “full and fair consideration” as the federal agencies implement ESA protection measures. Voluntary conservation measures are key to the success of ESA recovery efforts, and the bill allows federal agencies to consider certain voluntary conservation measures as regulatory mechanisms under the ESA. This means that voluntary conservation measures undertaken by ranchers and landowners will be factored in to ESA determinations and recovery plans. It includes provisions to enhance the federal-state conservation partnership, and to encourage conservation through regulatory certainty, increased transparency, and resource prioritization. The bill also codifies a prioritization system developed and implemented by the Obama Administration that has generally received broad support across the political spectrum. The prioritization system addresses listing petitions, status reviews, and proposed and final determinations, based on the urgency of a species’ circumstances, conservation efforts, and available data and information in order to determine which species are the most imperiled and should be prioritized higher. Notably, the bill also reauthorizes the ESA for the first time in almost thirty years. It increases the authorization of appropriations by approximately 15 percent over currently appropriated levels which have largely been adjusted only for inflation, and focuses funding on recovery plan implementation and voluntary conservation efforts by private landowners.


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Young Cattle Producers Can Get More Out of 2021 Cattle Industry Convention in Nashville Students can interact, gain experience through internships CENTENNIAL, CO (September 9, 2020) – A fun, rewarding and engaging opportunity is available for college students wanting to attend the 2021 Cattle Industry Convention and NCBA Trade Show in Nashville, Tennessee, Feb. 1 – 5, 2021. A team of interns – vital to the success of the largest annual meeting in the U.S. beef cattle industry – will gain first-hand experience and be able to interact with leaders of every segment of the cattle and beef industry.

Up to 18 interns will be selected for this opportunity. They will be assigned to help many different staff members and attendees with meetings and events and should be prepared to handle a wide range of responsibilities, from setting up the indoor arena, assisting at committee meetings and Cattlemen’s College to posting on social media and contributing in the NCBA booth. NCBA will strive to provide students time to maximize industry networking. Students must be able to work January 31 – February 5, 2021 in Nashville. They must be at least a juniorlevel college student at an accredited university at the time of application. Preferably they will have a background in, or working knowledge of, the cattle and/or beef industry, and must have a minimum 3.0 GPA. Students should be well-versed in all areas of social media.

OCTOBER 2020

Interested students must complete a Student Internship Application and send college transcripts, two letters of recommendation and a resume. Deadline for applying is Oct. 23, 2020.

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Your

BEEF CHECKOFF NEWS How Imports Add Value to American Beef Reprinted with permission from Drovers. By Greg Henderson, Editor Without imported lean trimmings, cow slaughter would need to double The U.S. is the fourth-largest global exporter of beef in volume, with the past two years producing total export revenues, in excess of $8 billion per year. That ads $320 to the value of every U.S. fed steer and heifer. The U.S. is also the global leader in beef imports. Those two facts seem incompatible to many. Why, critics ask, does the U.S. import beef? The coronavirus disruption caused historic slowdowns at packing plants leaving thousands of cattle without a final home, abruptly ending the import of beef, however, is not a remedy for the disruption caused by COVID- 19 and would only further reduce the value of U.S. cattle. Gregg Doud, chief agricultural negotiator in the Office of the U.S. Trade Representative, offered his perspective on imports during a webinar sponsored by the Oklahoma Cattlemen’s Association.

OCTOBER 2020

“Advocates claim that if you decrease imports that decreases the supply of beef in the U.S., which raises the price of cattle. That’s a fair point,” Doud says, “except, name me another industry that gets ahead by shrinking their industry. If you shrink your industry, how are you

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Hwy 42 West • Vienna Missouri 65582 45 Miles South of Jefferson City Selling All classes of Cattle Wednesday • 10:00 a.m. Featuring ‘Star-Vac Program’ Cattle Weekly DVAuction Service for convenient online viewing & bidding For More Information Call… David Patton Office Ross Patton Bill Patton 573-308-6655 573-422-3305 573-308-6657 573-308-6658 Visit our website: www.scrsvienna.com or E-mail us: scrsvienna@gmail.com “Make South Central your Livestock Market”

going to compete with (other proteins)? Shrink your industry, and you will need fewer packing plants, not more.” Indeed, analysts say beef imports actually add value to U.S. beef. “To understand beef imports in the U.S. you have to understand the hamburger market,” says Oklahoma State University agricultural economist Derrell Peel, speaking during the May webinar. “Ground beef consumption in the U.S. is about 26 lb. per capita, which is about 45% of our total beef consumption.” Satisfying America’s taste for hamburger requires the import of beef trimmings. “Despite the common mischaracterization around beef imports, the bulk of imported beef consists primarily of lean beef and/or trimmings,” says Nevil Spear, an analyst and consultant based in Bowling Green, Ky. “Those imports aren’t competitive (apples to apples); they’re complementary (apples and oranges), being blended with 50/50 trim to make salable ground beef.” Peel notes fed steers and heifers produce about 140 lb. of trimmings, which is about 64% lean. To that, processors will add about 190 lb. of lean trim. The domestic source of that lean is primarily cull cows and slaughter bulls. Imports are the other source of lean trimmings that make up the U.S. total, producing about 334 lb. of ground beef per carcass for an average 79% lean ground. “Put it all together, ground beef production represents a little bit over 30% of total beef production in the US. Imported beef makes up about 26% of that total ground beef production,” Peel says. Yet, without imported lean, Peel said the U.S. would need to double domestic cow slaughter to generate enough lean trim to satisfy domestic demand for hamburger.


“So, out of the total beef imports, lean trimmings represent somewhere between 70% and 75% of total beef imports,” he says. There are options to the current system, Peel says, though they’re not preferable. “We could decrease ground beef production by 45%, simply because we don’t have enough lean. Those fatty trimmings from fed cattle would go into rendering and be sold as tallow prices rather than hamburger prices.” A second option would be to grind more whole muscle cuts.

in California,” where they are turned into hamburger, he says. The U.S. also sells nearly $1 billion of beef to Canada each year, and logistics represent much of the rationale. The majority of Canada’s population is in the east, and Grand Island, Neb., is 1,000 miles closer to Toronto than Calgary, location of the nearest Canadian packer. “During the past 10 years, the beef industry’s cumulative trade balance is nearly $13.5 billion to the positive; export value exceeds import value,” Spear says. “The benefit is self-explanatory.”

“We could grind more chucks and rounds and products we currently use other ways because they have more value,” Peel says. “We could also take 10% to 15% of our cattle and let them run on range until they’re two years of age and sell them like cull cows to get some additional 90% lean.” The U.S. beef industry could do those things, but “All of those options would result in lower value for the cattle industry. Imported beef makes fed cattle worth more because it gives us the ability to sell more fat in the form of ground beef,” Peel says. Ambassador Doud emphasizes trade is a two-way street that generates a $2 billion trade surplus. “My favorite topic involving beef trade is tongue,” Doud says. “We can sell beef tongue in the U.S. for 30¢ a pound, or we can sell it to Japan for $7 a pound.”

OCTOBER 2020

Doud also says the beef trade with Canada is more than just feeder cattle and fed cattle coming across the border. “Half of the imports from Canada, generally speaking, are either cull cows or bulls or 50/50 trim. The largest share of that goes to processors

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What’s Cookin’ at the

Missouri Beef House By Pat & Patty Wood, MCA Beef House Managers

Beef Bucks The 2020 Missouri State Fair in August looked a little different due to the COVID-19 pandemic. While our Missouri Beef House was not open, our support and encouragement for the youth showing cattle was important to us as well as celebrating the core mission and roots of the Missouri State Fair’s focus on agriculture. The Beef House Committee voted to show our support through an opportunity called Beef Bucks The Beef Bucks concept was to offer the youth and their family a $1 coupon each to be used for use on beef products only during the fair which were valid at participating vendors: Trucks Place, Lil’Trucks, Westmoreland Concessions, and the Hacienda. The coupon was for use only at the 2020 Missouri Youth Livestock Show but in the case families were not able to use their $1 Beef Buck, leftover tickets can be redeemed at the 2021 Missouri State Fair at the Beef House.

Callaway Livestock Center, Inc.

On I-70, 4 miles east of Kingdom City, MO on outer road

573-642-7486 Every Monday:

OCTOBER 2020

Slaughter Cattle 12:00 p.m. Selling All Classes of Cattle 12:30 p.m.

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1st Thursday Nite of Each Month: 6:00 p.m. Bred Cows and Breeding Bull Sale

John P. Harrison 573-386-5150 Jack Harrison 573-386-2186 David Bell 660-327-5633

As the MCA staff, President Marvin Dieckman, and President-Elect Patty Wood visited in the cattle barns throughout the 11-day fair, we took the opportunity to thank the 4-H and FFA exhibitors for their hard work, commitment, and appreciation during unprecedented times. In handing out the $1 Beef Buck, we wanted to not only promote beef but also to congratulate every one of the young individuals who adapted and overcame the obstacles to get into the show ring this year. Thanks to Mike Deering and our great MCA staff for coming up with this awesome idea of Beef Bucks. We are already looking forward to a great fair August 12-22, 2021! Thought for the month: “Seven days without beef makes one weak!”


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2020 American Royal Livestock Show October 14 - October 25 Kansas City, Missouri

9th Annual American Royal Steak Contest The 9th Annual American Royal Steak Competition gives beef producers the opportunity to put their best steak forward in two categories; Grass Finished and Grain Finished. The 2020 Steak Competition will be held on November 3, 2020 with the help of our educational partner, Kansas State University – Olathe. Parties interested in competing in the Steak Competition were required to complete an online entry form and submit 3 frozen rib-eye steaks for judging. For a

Junior Premium Livestock Auction

OCTOBER 2020

Has moved to Saturday, October 17, 7:00 p.m. Event location moved to Hale Arena to provide additional space for exhibitors and JPLA attendees (event will be in the dirt)

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complete list of entry guidelines, please read the Steak Competition Entry & Judging Guidelines online at: https://www.americanroyal.com/our-royal-events/steakcompetition/. For more information, please contact steakcontest@ americanroyal.com. Congratulations to the 2019 Winners: 2019 Grass Fed Grand Champion: Gladhour Farm Reserve Grand Champion: Stemple Creek Ranch 2019 Grain Fed Grand Champion: Valley Oaks Steak Company Reserve Grand Champion: Vermont Wagyu at SpringRock Farm


2020 American Royal Livestock Show Changes & Reminders Breeding Animals • Breeding shows marked with an (*) in the tentative schedule will begin at posted time or 30 minutes following the conclusion of the Livestock Judging competition, whichever is first. Eligibility • All market exhibitors are required to complete a Quality Assurance program. Examples include: Youth for the Quality Care of Animals, Quality Counts, Beef Quality Assurance, Pork Quality Assurance, or other programs approved by the American Royal. The program name and certificate number will be required on all market entry forms. Exhibitors failing to submit this information will have entries returned as incomplete and will be accessed the $10 re-processing fee.

VIP Vehicle Pass • A limited number of VIP passes will be available for purchase for $100 each. This VIP pass authorizes exhibitors to park on the South side of the facility (Lot A). Entry gates will be monitored at all times. There will be a limited quantity of VIP passes available for purchase. Miscellaneous • Outside alcohol is prohibited at all times within the American Royal Center per City lease agreement. • All exhibitors will be required to wear an American Royal shirt during showmanship. • Please wear your exhibitor badge at all times or have it readily available.

Quality Livestock Equipment Since 1961 Panels, Headgates, Calf Tables, Calving Pens, Manual Chutes, Hydraulic Chutes, Tip Chutes, Tubs & Alley Systems

Inspection • All livestock are subject to inspection upon arrival. Junior Premium Livestock Auction Changes • All market animal exhibitors that qualify for the Junior Premium Livestock Auction, will be required to complete an Animal Husbandry form, which can be found at www.americanroyal.com. All medications, vaccinations, injections, medical treatments and any foreign substances administered, in any form or manner, from the ownership deadline (Saturday, August 15, 2020) through Junior Premium Livestock Auction must be recorded. • Auction moved to Saturday, October 17, 7:00 p.m. • Virtual Auction will be available • Event Location moved to Hale Arena to provide additional space for exhibitors and JPLA attendees (event will be in the dirt) • RSVP for all guests that plan on being in attendance to ensure proper distancing designed in event layout/ operations • Formal Invite (electronic) with RSVP & Guest information will be provided in early October

Swine • Federal 840 ID tags will be used as official identification for swine. Ear notches will only be utilized as a secondary form of identification.

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Steers • Federal 840 ID tags will be used as the official identification for steers.

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2020 American Royal Livestock Show Tentative Schedule Tuesday, October 13 10:00 a.m. - 11:00 p.m. Market Barrow and Breeding Gilt Move-In Wednesday, October 14 7:00 a.m. Market Steers, American Aberdeen, Black Hereford, Braunvieh, Gelbvieh, Miniature Herefords, Salers Move-In 8:00 a.m. - 11:00 p.m. Market Lamb/Goat Move-In – Upper Ex 6:00 a.m. - 8:30 a.m. Market Barrow and Breeding Gilt Move-In Continues 9:00 a.m. Breeding Gilt Check-In followed by Market Barrow Check-In (Weight cards due by 2:00 p.m.) – Governors 5:00 p.m. Swine Showmanship – Governors

OCTOBER 2020

Thursday, October 15 8:00 a.m. Market Steer Check-In (Weight cards due by 11:00 a.m.) – Lower Ex 9:00 a.m. Breeding Gilt Show (Pedigreed followed by Crossbred) – Governors

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6:00 a.m. - 8:30 a.m. Market Lamb/Goat Move-In Continues 9:00 a.m. Market Lamb/Goat Weight Card Turn In (Weight cards due by noon) – Upper Ex 1:00 p.m. Black Hereford Sale – Wagstaff Sale Center 1:00 p.m. Market Beef/Junior Heifer Showmanship – Hale Arena 2:00 p.m. Lamb Showmanship – Hale Arena 3:00 p.m. Goat Showmanship – Hale Arena Friday, October 16 8:00 a.m. Market Barrow Show (Pedigreed followed by Crossbred) – Governors 8:00 a.m. Market Lamb Show – Hale Arena 9:00 a.m. Market Goat Show – Hale Arena 9:00 a.m. Market Steer Show – Hale Arena 6:00 p.m. Salers Junior/Open Show – North Side Hale Arena 6:00 p.m. Miniature Hereford Junior Show/Open Show – South Side Hale Arena Saturday, October 17 8:00 a.m. American Aberdeen Open Show – South Side Hale Arena 8:00 a.m. Black Hereford Open Show – North Side Hale Arena 1:00 p.m. Gelbvieh Junior/Open Show – South Side Hale Arena


1:00 p.m. Braunvieh Junior/Open Show – North Side Hale Arena 7:00 p.m. - Junior Premium Livestock Auction Time is tentative. Sunday, October 18 6:00 a.m. Intercollegiate Meat Judging ContestsNebraska Beef – Omaha, NE 10:00 a.m. Limousin and Red Angus Move-In Monday, October 19 8:00 a.m. Collegiate Livestock Judging Contest – Hale Arena 1:00 p.m. Junior Heifer Showmanship (Limousin and Red Angus) – South Side Hale Arena 7:00 p.m. Collegiate Livestock Judging Banquet – North Side Hale Arena Tuesday, October 20 7:00 a.m. National 4-H Meat Judging Contest – Manhattan, KS 1:00 p.m. Limousin Junior/Open Show – North Side Hale Arena 1:00 p.m. Red Angus – South Side Hale Arena 6:00 p.m. Angus, AOB, Charolais, Hereford, MaineAnjou, Shorthorn, & Simmental Move-In Wednesday, October 21 7:00 a.m. Angus, AOB, Charolais, Hereford, MaineAnjou, Shorthorn, & Simmental Move-In 8:00 a.m. National 4-H Meat Judging Contest Awards Breakfast – American Royal Complex

Friday, October 23 8:00 a.m. Charolais Royal Breeders Bull Classic – North Side Hale Arena 8:00 a.m. Maine-Anjou Junior/Open Show – South Side Hale Arena 1:30 p.m. Royal Charolais Sale – Wagstaff Sale Center 12:30 p.m. Angus Junior Heifer Show – North Side Hale Arena Saturday, October 24 8:00 a.m. Angus ROV Show – South Side Hale Arena 8:00 a.m. Charolais Junior Heifer Show followed by National Roll of Excellence Charolais Show – North Side Hale Arena 2:00 p.m. Ladies of the Royal Hereford Sale – Wagstaff Sale Center 4:00 p.m. Hereford Junior Heifer Show – South Side Hale Arena 5:00 p.m. Simmental PTP Bull Show – North Side Hale Arena Sunday, October 25 8:00 a.m. National Hereford Show – South Side Hale Arena 8:00 a.m. Simmental Junior Heifer Show followed by PTP Female Show – North Side Hale Arena 12:00 p.m. Supreme Champion Jr Heifer Show – Hale Arena The American Royal Management reserves the right to cancel events or change scheduling when necessary.

Thursday, October 22 9:00 a.m. Shorthorn Junior/Open Show – South Side Hale Arena 9:00 a.m. Junior Heifer Showmanship – North Side Hale Arena 2:00 p.m. AOB/Commercial Junior Heifer Show – North Side Hale Arena

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COUNTY NEWS Barton County The Barton County Cattlemen were finally able to get together the evening of Tuesday, September 15 at the Memorial Hall basement in Lamar, Missouri. The meeting started with an invocation by Rex Frieden and a great meal sponsored by Waltz Hay and Cattle Co. and cooked by Scott Nolting and his daughter, Paydon.

OCTOBER 2020

After the meal, Tonya Amen with the American Gelbvieh Association gave a very informative presentation on feet and leg structure/health of cattle. Tonya advised that we all study birth weights, weaning weights etc., but what determines how long the cow stays in the herd or how well the bull is able to preform depends a lot on their foot and hock condition. She stated that the Red Angus, Simmental and Gelbvieh Associations have come together to develop a foot scoring system. For instance, if a bovine has the front foot with the medial claw and the lateral claw pointing like the letter V the score would be a one and if the two parts were crossed over like a pair of scissors this would be a nine. The optimum foot would be in the range of between four and six. Take the hock, if the bovine appears like it is standing on its tip toes the score would be a one one. If the hock is very close to the ground this would be scored a nine. Again, the optimum would be between four and six. To evaluate bovine, they need to be between 270 to 540 days old. A group is needed to develop an evaluation. Single animals cannot be used. Do not evaluate in the chute. The animals need to be standing still on a clear surface. To contact Tonya Amen she can be reached at tonya@beefcenter.org or (816) 652-2220.

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See What’s Happening in Your County

positions are Vice President, Jade Morgan; Secretary, Joan Wilson; Treasurer, Derenda Gariss. The board members are Tony Morgan, Brad Waltz, Kyle Fast, Judy Moore, Matt Cook and the alternate is Tre Cofield. Congratulations to all the officers and board members. Pictures will be in next month’s report. The next meeting will be October 12 at Memorial Hall in Lamar, with the MoKan Livestock Auction discussing their services and programs, also the Missouri Beef Industry Council will give a brief presentation. To become a member of the Barton County Cattlemen’s, go to: mocattle.org.

Lafayette County The Lafayette County Cattlemen again sponsored the Champion Rate of Gain award at the Lafayette County 4-H/FFA Fair. This year the winning entry was shown by Isabella Limback, daughter of Kurt and Michelle Limback of Waverly. Isabella is a member of the Alma 4-H Club and attends Santa Fe High School. Her bred and owned steer weighed in at 1,419 lbs. and gained 3.88 lbs. per day. The Lafayette County Cattlemen are proud to support the youth of Lafayette County and were glad 4-H and FFA members were able to participate in the annual event this year.

After Tonya’s presentation, we voted for leadership. Taking the place of the retiring Daryl Kentner, who has done a tremendous job over the years of securing appropriate speakers, keeping the cattlemen involved in community activities, and getting appropriate training for the members when new laws affected the cattlemen is new president is Brett Faubion. Brett is ready and able to fill the shoes left by Daryl. Rounding out the

Isabella Limback, Waverly, with her Champion Rate of Gain winner at the Lafayette County 4-H and FFA Fair.


Dallas County It’s not every day that the Dallas County Cattlemen’s Association has the honor of cooking lunch for a U.S. Representative. However, such was the case as Vicky Hartzler of District 4 spoke at noon on August 24 at the Dallas County Fairgrounds in Buffalo. Hartzler and her staff were traveling through the area as part of her farm tour in southwest Missouri. Around 45 people including DCCA members enjoyed lunch before Hartzler spoke to the group. She was introduced by State Senator Sandy Crawford. Hartzler is a life-long farmer and former teacher. She said that cattlemen have a special place in her heart. She and her husband, Lowell, reside on a working farm in the Harrisonville/Archie area in Cass County. Hartzler sympathized with cattlemen in that this has been a rough year with prices tanking and packing plants shutting down. She talked about what the USDA has done to help as well as various government programs. Missouri has received $20 million in grant money through the CARES Act that went to local meat packers statewide. Vicky Hartzler.

Most of the events that DCCA cooks at this fall have been cancelled. However, as of this writing the Ozarks Farmfest is still going to be held. So DCCA members will be helping in the Ozarks Beef House. Things will certainly look different, but we look forward to promoting beef during the three-day event.

Vicky Hartzler talking to DCCA members and guests Dallas County photos courtesy of the Buffalo Reflex. OCTOBER 2020 37


St. Clair County St. Clair County Cattlemen cooked Ribeye Steak Sandwich meals at the Osceola Rodeo on Thursday, Sept. 3 to Sunday, Sept 6. The cattlemen also drew on Sunday, September 6 for the winner of their beef raffle. Josh Munsterman of Montrose was the winner of the half a beef. The cattlemen successfully raised enough selling steak sandwiches and from their beef raffle for two $2,000 scholarships. Thanks to everyone that came to the rodeo and supported the beef raffle or bought a sandwich meal! The cattlemen have been successful in raising funds for the Mo Beef for Mo Kids Program. Bill Creek, Phillip Johnston, John and Megan Swaters, Legacy Bank, Community First Bank, Jim Falk Motors, OakStar Bank, Hawthorne Bank, Dull and Heany, and Gregg Smith Ford have donated so far for 20-21 school year. A big thank you to our donors for supporting the St. Clair County Cattlemen as they support the youth in our county! Our next meeting is scheduled for October 13, 2020, at 7 p.m. at Osceola School District and the sponsor will be Boehringer Ingelheim and Patrick Davis will discuss cattle nutrition and forage testing and Jeff Schoen will discuss cattle health management.

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Macey Hurst to Join MCA Staff

Macey Hurst will begin her career journey with the Missouri Cattlemen’s Association on October 5, 2020. In addition to serving as the manager of strategic solutions, responsible for non-dues revenue, she will also serve the Missouri Beef Cattleman publication and manage overall association communications. According to MCA Executive Vice President Mike Deering, Hurst is well equipped to excel at the position. “Her education, experience and understanding of our industry makes her uniquely qualified to hit the ground

running for the members of this association,” said Deering. “She understands the people we represent and believes in our mission. Macey is passionate about Missouri agriculture and will take her role very seriously.” Hurst is a longtime member of MCA and previously served as the 2017 Missouri Beef Queen. She is a 2019 graduate of Missouri State University where she majored in agricultural communications and agribusiness. Hurst most recently served as the Missouri Grown Marketing Specialist for the Missouri Department of Agriculture where she coordinated all social media efforts; developed promotional material; and organized educational events.

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Hurst said she is ready for the new career.

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“I couldn’t be more excited to come home to the beef industry and work on behalf of the individuals who make it so great,” said Hurst. “I was blessed to grow up in this community, and my passion for the cattlemen way of life and the rights of those who live it make me eager to begin this new role. I appreciate this important opportunity and look forward to meeting members, communicating their message and ensuring the continuation of our beloved industry.”


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On the Edge of

Common Sense with Baxter Black Religious Reflections I was sittin’ in the back row of a beautiful little church in a mountain town in the Rockies. I was there for the wedding of a daughter of good friends. As the service progressed, my attention was drawn to a banner that hung on the wall. It was handmade, cut from cloth and intended to be inspiring. It read, Mount Up With Winos. Many thoughts went through my mind as I tried to absorb the full meaning of this elaborate banner. I had come to realize over the years that many Protestant churches have become more liberal in their teachings. Acceptance of alternative lifestyles, less moral browbeating, less blatant emphasis on money, more convenient schedules and greater tolerance of lesser sins; i.e. fall football, alcohol, sex and non-Christian religions. And there is something to be said for that religious creed. After all, Jesus himself never discriminated.

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Bein’ a thinker myself, I began to concoct other potential banner slogans that might be acceptable in this New Age congregation; Ride with the Risque, Sail with Sinners, Lie Down with the Licentious, Commune with the Immoral, Huddle with the Homeless, Do Lunch with the Offender.

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The wedding audience was mostly ranch people, men with sunburned faces wearin’ new jeans and uncomfortable in their ties. The women wore their best dresses and the kids were glad to be anywhere off the ranch. We all squirmed quietly in our pews as the

preacher read the vows, told them marriage was forever and lent dignity and tradition to what we all hoped would be a union made in Heaven. We were happy for the parents and appreciated the page turning in their life. We’d all been there or soon would be. I’d come with my family to pay tribute to the parents... my friends. But I admit my distraction with the banner had consumed a good part of my attention during the service. I began to think that it was inappropriate. When the soloist rose and sang the final George Strait love song while the bride and groom escaped, she was positioned right below the banner. Poor planning, I thought, or at least in poor taste. As we were filing out I asked my daughter what she thought of the banner. “Which one?” she asked. “The one right above the singer,” I answered. She studied it and read aloud, “Mount up with Wings. Kinda cool, I guess. Why?” “Oh,” I said, vowing silently to start wearing my glasses more often, “Just curious.”


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Brand Specifications Evolve Source: CAB - Kylee Kohls “Meat heads” by education and experience, scientists and number crunchers gather to analyze the latest scatter plot. Coffee fuels the banter as they discuss where the figures point toward progress. It’s Friday morning: analysis day for the Certified Angus Beef ® (CAB®) brand packing team. Meat scientist Daniel Clark brings a new scatter plot each week, along with a fresh perspective to answer last week’s questions. More than 2.6 million points fill the screen, each dot measuring how carcasses meet the 10 brand quality specifications — providing insight for possible improvement. How could adjustments help a premium supply meet the growing demand? Changes don’t happen overnight. The brand’s integrity is tied to these specifications, so they don’t evolve without careful consideration. “The first question we ask,” Clark says, “is how it will affect our partners up and down the supply chain.” Beyond the grading stand On September 9, 2020, CAB will implement two changes to its “G1 schedule” specifications. The first, a subtle rewording, adjusts the fat thickness limit from “less than 1 inch” to read “1 inch or less.” It might sound the same, but that precise language allows USDA graders more accurate measurements. Camera grading calculates fat thickness to several decimal places and that provides consistency and clarity when dealing with fractions of an inch. The second change allows packers with an “extended licensing agreement” to box beef from some primals that met all quality specifications, but exceed the ribeye area, up to 19-square inches.

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Ribs, ribeyes, strip loins and short loins from these carcasses will be excluded from the brand.

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“This is not an expansion of the ribeye area to 19-square inches, but rather capitalizing on other parts of the carcass that are practically unaffected by that limit,” says Clint Walenciak, CAB director of packing. The move allows foodservice and retail partners to

access CAB briskets, tenderloins, short ribs and end meats for roasts and ground beef from those carcasses that fall in the 16- to 19-square include ribeye. The exclusion of larger ribeyes, ribs, strip and short loins, maintains brand-quality plate presentations and thicker cuts for the key middle-meat items. Box quality, consistency and center-of-the-plate steak presentation standards remain the same. “I don’t want to overstate the magnitude of the expanded specification, but it is one small step in one big direction,” Clark says. “This is exciting for the future of the brand and for our partners on all fronts.” Their research shows the size differentiation of cuts entering the box from the carcasses with a larger ribeye will have little to no impact on the size or weight of the box. “The expanded product specification is voluntary for packers, and may be incorporated when timing is right to satisfy customer demand on a plant-by-plant basis,” Walenciak says. Until a packer implements this change, its impact on premiums and discounts is uncertain. Cattlemen should not take their eye off of ribeye size, Walenciak says. While this innovation creates potential access to additional high-quality cattle, demand pressure for 10 to 16 square-inch ribeyes remains. Next Friday, the packing team will evaluate data again, searching for new clues on how to make the best even better. It’s a team effort to crunch the numbers, balance the science and calculate the scope of possible adjustments. Never sacrificing quality, the ongoing process can evolve the specifications if that raises the standard, says Bruce Cobb, CAB executive vice president of production. “Making those cattle more valuable, these specification expansions help the brand gain strength and footprint on the market path to two billion pounds of supply annually,” he says. The focus remains on fulfilling demand and creating economic incentives for cattlemen and all supply chain partners. “We are working toward a vision where this brand supplies more of the best that Angus cattlemen create,” (Continue on page 58)


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Cobb says. “This is one small step forward to creating an ever-better beef production system.” Progress is a process that happens one dataset, conversation and cup of coffee at a time. The 10 Science-based Specifications: To earn the Certified Angus Beef ® logo, Angusinfluenced cattle with a predominantly solid black coat must pass its 10 quality standards: Marbling 1. Modest or higher marbling – the single largest barrier to CAB acceptance, this ensures superior flavor and juiciness. 2. Medium or fine marbling texture – many small flecks of fat as opposed to larger, coarser characteristics. Creates consistency in every bite. Maturity 3. 30 months of age or younger – ensures superior color, texture and tenderness

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Consistent sizing Three specifications ensure thicker steaks and consistent plate presentations:

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4. 10- to 16-square-inch ribeye area* 5. 1,050-pound or less hot carcass weight 6. 1 inch or less fat thickness Plate presentation 7. Superior muscling limits light-muscled cattle – reduces influence of dairy-type cattle with inconsistent yields and plate presentation Quality appearance and tenderness 8. Practically free of capillary rupture – ensures quality appearance 9. No dark cutters – ensures consistent appearance and flavor 10. No neck hump exceeding 2 inches – safeguards against Brahman-influence cattle, which have more variation in tenderness *Up to 19 square inches for ribeye area is acceptable for tenderloin, brisket, thin meat, chuck and round cuts at approved plants. Rib, ribeye, strip loin and short loin are excluded from this option.


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The Market Demands More Demand Source: CAB - Miranda Reiman Demand drivers. Even without a worldwide pandemic, economic shutdowns and disruptions in food processing, Dan Basse would have covered demand drivers at the 15th annual Feeding Quality Forum. The president of Chicago-based AgResource Company had charts to back up his point: “Going back maybe to the Civil War, it’s those demand drivers that give opportunity to the market.” Basse kicked off the on-line forum hosted by the Certified Angus Beef ® brand last month. Grain markets typically lead market direction. Supply is no problem, with a 2.7% increase in global grain yields in the last decade compared to the previous. “There’s been $87 billion spent looking for technology for farmers to help produce more—more beef, more pork, more grain,” Basse said. “I would really like to get agriculture behind a platform that we think about not only spending on ways to help us farmers produce more, but help consumers consume more, because as

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the end of the day, that will be the key to terms of our profitability.” This year, however, those demand drivers are even more lackluster than anyone could have predicted at the start of 2020. More than 3 million small businesses have shut down since COVID-19 came to the U.S. and that could reach 6 to 8 million by the end of the year. “It’s the heart of the U.S. agricultural and economic outlook,” he said. Last year was the first time more Americans—51% of them—spent most of their food dollar outside the home, “so it’s a big change to have that [food service] industry crippled as it is,” he said. Restaurants are operating at about 40% of normal, and it could be a year or more before they’re back to 100%, Basse said, noting the development of a vaccine or a strong therapeutic seems to be the key. “The food service industry has been very important to the U.S. cattle industry. We’re still believing that it will struggle until we get to next spring,” he said. “I wish I could be more bullish in the cattle market.” Trade is not in the domestic beef industry’s favor either, as the U.S. has been importing more food than it’s been exporting the last four months. Beef industry exports are down 15.2%. “To really get health in the agricultural economy, we need to start the export market kicking off a little more robustly. We need to see high-value goods leaving this country to other nations,” Basse said. “Principally beef, meats and some of the DDGs and ethanol products we now produce.”

(Continued on page 62)


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He suggested Live Cattle futures are overvalued, and cattlemen should consider hedging at $112 to $114 during the last quarter of 2020, and at $116 to $118 into the first part of 2021. “There is some risk in feed prices based on the lateseason dryness, Chinese demand and things of that nature, but also based on the broad commodity markets, which are starting to turn around here just a little bit,” Basse said. Following the Midwest derecho storm, AgResource predicted yields to slip from record highs, down to around 179 bushels/acre, which is still nearly “on trend.” Yet, he expects the lows to come later this fall. “Don’t get bullish and chase this market as a feed user today. Step back and allow the market to come to you in October and November,” he advised. Economic wild cards include political outcomes and continued stimulus measures.

OCTOBER 2020

“Never before did I think we’d see a U.S. debt level for government at $26.8 trillion and still growing,” Basse said. “These debt levels are something that I believe will

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be a drag on the U.S. in the world economy for many, many years to come.” Growth across the globe has slowed, too, but India and China are still expected to become the No. 1 and 2 largest economies, overtaking the U.S. by 2025 or 2026. Government support plays a big role in overall farm income, accounting for 40% to 45% of net farm revenue this year. “That is something I never thought I would see in my career,” said the 41-year veteran. Net farm income is down 47% from 2012, and has been flat for a number of years. Basse looks each morning for signs of everything from new export demand to product innovations. “We need to see a new demand driver for you to get this all changed around,” he said. Feeding Quality Forum sponsors include Diamond V, Feed-Lot Magazine, Micronutrients, Zoetis and AngusLink. For more information or to watch full presentations, visit www.FeedingQualityForum.com.


Top Dollar Angus Announces Search for New General Manager Source: Top Dollar Angus Denver – Top Dollar Angus, Inc. is in search of a new general manager, following the departure of Jared Wareham of Deepwater, Missouri. Wareham’s tenure saw the business grow at a rate greater than 60% annually. “Jared greatly enhanced industry awareness of the Top Dollar Angus brand, and helped producers in all segments of the beef business understand the value of genetic verification at the feeder calf level of the market,” said Tom Brink, CEO of the Red Angus Association of America and founder of Top Dollar Angus. “He traveled extensively from coast-to-coast and established relationships that will continue for years to come, while also shaping our strategy in multiple ways. Top Dollar Angus is much closer to being a household name among cattle producers in large part due to Jared’s efforts and networking ability. We appreciate everything he did and wish him and his family the best in the new employment opportunity he plans to pursue. We’re also excited to find the next rising talent that will continue to propel the industry’s fastest growing genetic verification business forward.” Top Dollar Angus president Richard Tokach from St. Anthony, North Dakota states that, “Jared’s work

ethic and in-depth knowledge about all facets of beef cattle production helped Top Dollar Angus advance in numerous ways. While Jared will be serving the cattle industry in a different capacity, Top Dollar Angus looks forward to providing an opportunity for a knowledgeable, passionate and hardworking leader to assist in further expanding our seedstock partnership and feeder cattle programs.” The general manager position oversees and implements day-to-day operations and manages a growing team of professional employees. This position requires 50% to 70% travel, strong self-motivation and ability to work effectively with all beef industry segments. Interested persons may inquire at info@topdollarangus.com. Top Dollar Angus, Inc. was founded in 2014 with the purpose of bringing differentiated identity and market recognition to Angus- and Red Angus-influenced feeder cattle and calves that objectively rank in the top 25% of the population for growth and carcass traits. In 2019, Top Dollar Angus conducted business in 26 states and Canada and continues to expand its core business by encouraging cow-calf producers to produce superior genetics and through helping them get rewarded on sale day.

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The Show Must Go On!

2020 MSF Angus Steer Carcass Contest Looks a Little Different Source: The Word is Out - Brenda Black Photo Credit to Pearl’s Pics. With no Missouri State Fair (MSF) On-Foot Carcass Show or Carcass Contest, youth exhibitors were left with finished livestock and no end point for their steer projects. But, Missouri Junior Angus steer exhibitors had an advocate who arranged for an outlet.

“Since there was no on-foot carcass show, I recruited steers from the 4-H and the FFA show before and during the fair,” said David Warfield, Butler, Missouri. “And I only wanted 4-H and FFA Angus steers.” The list of youth Angus Market Steer contenders at the 2020 MSF Youth Livestock Show included Lane Bollinger, Grace Bush, Hannah Epple, Sean Houston, Samuel Jordan, Clara Warfield and Luke Warfield. On Aug. 18, 2020, Chris Mullinix, Kansas State University Animal Sciences Instructor and head Livestock Judging Team Coach, evaluated the 4-H and FFA Angus steers. Jordan, from Savannah, Mo., and representing Andrew County, took top honors and earned $300.00 for his Champion 4-H Steer. Clara Warfield of Butler, Mo., in Bates County garnered the Reserve title and won $200 for her 4-H steer. In the FFA Steer Show, the Championship went to Houston of Savannah, Mo., who received $300. Bush from St. James, Mo., stood in the Reserve Champion slot with her Angus calf who earned her $200.

Samuel Jordan, Savannah, Mo., exhibits the Grand Champion 4-H Angus Market Steer at the 2020 Missouri State Fair Youth Livestock Show.

To Advertise in Missouri Beef Cattleman magazine or Prime Cuts e-newsletter Please Contact: Andy Atzenweiler

OCTOBER 2020

Phone 816-210-7713 E-mail: mobeef@sbcglobal.net

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Rates are available online at mocattle.com under the publications tab. Magazine deadline is the 15th of the month before an issue.


Clara Warfield, Butler, Mo., wins Reserve Champion Angus in the 4-H Market Steer at the 2020 Missouri State Fair Youth Livestock Show, and secures Grand Champion Angus Carcass with her 1,391 pound steer, who dressed at 817 pounds, graded Low Prime with a YG of 2.9 and REA 13.5.

Sean Houston of Savannah, Mo., wins the Grand Champion Angus in the FFA Market Steer Show at the 2020 Missouri State Fair Youth Livestock Show. Sean exhibited a 1,365 pound steer, that ultimately dressed at 64%.

In order for a subsequent carcass contest to take place, David Warfield reached out to Creekstone Farms Premium Beef, LLC. During the pandemic, meat lockers in general were overrun with additional slaughter requests, creating a backlog of booking dates through next spring. Creekstone worked with Warfield to accommodate the immediate need. Warfield volunteered to truck the steers to Creekstone’s facility in Arkansas, Ks. On the way, he picked up another calf from a junior Angus member so that his steer could be included in the contest. A total of six steers were individually tagged and killed Aug. 20, with carcass data compiled.

(Continued on page 66)

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Missouri Angus Association (MAA) General Manager Julie Conover separately assessed the carcass data, declaring Champion Angus Carcass as Clara Warfield’s 1,390 pound steer, who dressed at 817 pounds, graded

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Payton Frank of Wentzville, Mo., took home the Reserve Champion title and $300 for his 1,210 pound steer that dressed at 744 pounds and graded High Choice with YG 2.6 and REA 13.72. Dr. Curtis Long of Briarwood Angus Farms, Butler, Mo., instituted the Angus Carcass Contest over two decades ago, and annually provides prize money through the MAA Foundation. Dr. Long was on hand to award embroidered championship garment bags to the top 4-H and FFA exhibitors during the live show. Participants will subsequently receive their monetary awards from Dr. Long and the MAA during the 2021 Annual Banquet in February. Grace Busch of St. James, takes Reserve Champion Angus in the FFA Market Steer Show at the 2020 Missouri State Fair Youth Livestock Show and was the only exhibitor to take two steers to Creekstone for the carcass contest.

Low Prime with a YG of 2.9 and REA 13.5. Clara received $500 in prize money and a Quality Premium of $122.55, more than $100 over all other contenders as a result of grading Prime.

Four participants who competed in both the Carcass and 4-H or FFA shows will additionally receive $200 Participation Awards. They are: Bush, Houston, Clara Warfield, and Luke Warfield. For more information about the annual State Fair Carcass Contest, visit https://www.mostatefair.com/ or contact Briarwood Farms at 660-679-3459. And to learn more about the Missouri Junior Angus program, go to http://www.missouriangus.org/

OCTOBER 2020

New Location: Margaritaville Lake Resort

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Wareham Joins ABS Source: ABS ABS Global is pleased to welcome Jared Wareham as the North America NuEra Business Development Manager on September 21. In his new role, Wareham will grow the NuEra Genetics™ program as part of a whole-herd genetic solution for commercial beef customers. His role will focus on sales of NuEra genetics and expanding the existing NuEra Connect Program to support calf marketing opportunities for ABS customers. The goal of the NuEra Genetics program is to deliver genetics that are more profitable across the beef supply chain. As part of a whole herd genetic solution, including an AI program, NuEra Genetics are designed to meet customer needs by creating a calf that is more valuable at marketing. “I am truly humbled each time I stop to consider the scope and scale of what our entire industry strives to do each day, which is to feed people. We love and embrace a lifestyle rooted in production and service, doing our best to raise the next generation of agriculturalists along the way,” Wareham says. “The opportunity to do my part by delivering precision genetic solutions to each segment of the beef value chain and pioneer improvement is an honor.” “ABS has always led with innovation and we are excited to have Wareham on board and leveraging his extensive beef industry experience to drive the NuEra Genetics program to make our customers more profitable,” says ABS Global Beef Product Development Director, Matthew Cleveland.

OCTOBER 2020

Wareham comes to ABS after serving as General Manager of Top Dollar Angus, a company that utilizes third-party genetic verification to remove risk and add precision to cattle procurement. He spent much of his time working with ranches and feedyards across the US linking them together through genetic assisted buying and selling. Wareham has more than two decades of experience in the livestock industry, along with Bachelor’s and Master’s degrees from the University of Central Missouri. Wareham brings considerable knowledge in growing genetics-based companies that serve producers from the ranch to the packer.

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Wareham also enjoys writing thought-provoking pieces about the beef industry for Farm Journal Media with his “New Generation” column that appears in Drovers Magazine. In his spare time, Wareham with his wife Jill, and their three daughters, manage a 100 head cow/calf operation in west central Missouri. Jared Wareham can be reached at Jared.Wareham@ genusplc.com or 660.492.2777.


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July Beef and Pork Exports Rebound, but Still Below Year-Ago Source: USMEF July exports of U.S. beef rebounded from recent lows but remained below 2019 levels, according to data released by USDA and compiled by the U.S. Meat Export Federation (USMEF). U.S. pork exports, which are on a record pace in 2020, were also down from a year ago in July but increased compared to June. July lamb exports increased year-over-year and were the largest of 2020. “With production returning to near-normal levels, we definitely saw an improvement in beef exports, though the recovery was not quite as strong as expected,” said USMEF President and CEO Dan Halstrom. “China’s pork demand has moderated and we are also entering a time when year-over-year gains are not nearly as dramatic, as exports to China began gaining momentum in mid-2019. But pork exports to Mexico showed encouraging signs of recovery in July and we also saw promising growth in several emerging markets, including Vietnam and the Philippines.

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“It is also important to remember that the monthly export data is in the rear-view mirror and that weekly export sales data, along with observations from our USMEF-China team, suggest that China’s demand

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for both U.S. pork and beef will be strong through the balance of the year, including purchases for Chinese New Year. When combined with the rebound in other main markets, growth in emerging markets and the return of the U.S. supply advantage, USMEF remains optimistic about a strong finish for U.S. red meat exports in 2020, despite many challenges related to COVID-19.” July beef exports totaled 107,298 metric tons (mt), up 36% from June but still 9% below last year. Export value was $647.8 million, the highest since March but down 10% from a year ago. July exports to China increased sharply year-over-year and shipments trended higher to Taiwan, Canada and Hong Kong. July exports were lower than a year ago to Japan and South Korea and declined significantly to Mexico. For January through July, beef exports were also 9% below last year’s pace in volume (698,907 mt) and 10% lower in value ($4.28 billion). July pork exports totaled 222,035 mt, down 5% from a year ago, while export value fell 12% to $548.3 million. Exports increased year-over-year to China/Hong Kong, Canada, the Philippines, Vietnam and the Caribbean. Exports to Mexico remained below last year but were the largest since March, while shipments to Japan were also down from a year ago but the largest since April. For January through July, pork exports remained 20% ahead of last year’s record pace in volume (1.78 million mt) and 22% higher in value ($4.6 billion). With Mexico as the main driver, July exports of U.S. lamb exports posted the largest monthly totals of the year in both volume (3,547 mt, up 115% from a year ago) and value ($3.5 million, up 46%). July exports also trended higher to Bermuda and Canada. Through July, lamb exports were 20% higher than a year ago at 11,299 mt, but export value ($13.9 million) still trailed last year by 11%.


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Derrell Peel: Producers have Opportunities to Maximize Returns Source: BioZyme (SAINT JOSEPH, Mo., Sept. 3, 2020) The cattle business is filled with risks. However, for all the uncertainty there are an ample amount of opportunities available for those producers who manage their risks and plan accordingly. With so many external influencers in the cattle market such as the environment, the recession and a pandemic, it might seem daunting to plan for the future. Forecasting the future to gain as much profit as possible takes many factors. With some astute advice from an industry expert and scholar of the markets, producers can try to achieve the profit they are seeking. Derrell Peel, Oklahoma State University Extension Livestock Marketing Specialist, suggests numerous opportunities for cow-calf producers exist, especially as the markets have steadily climbed out of their slump in July and early August. He adds the futures markets are looking good, and with proper planning and reasonable input costs, producers are likely to turn a profit. “We always have some idea based on where the market is at this point and frankly, I’ve been pretty impressed in the last few weeks with the way these markets have improved. We have a consistent signal across the industry right now, which is very good. When you don’t have that you know something is going to change; something is going to give. The outlook for the markets has improved somewhat in the second half of the year. That said, there are a tremendous amount of uncertainties out there. There’s a range of things that could improve or go the other way,” Peel responded when asked to forecast the fall market.

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Peel offers three considerations to the cow-calf producer

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to maximize the profit on their herd this fall. However, before any action is taken, the producer needs to know his or her budget. What are the expenses of the operation? How much does it take to run a cow in a given year? What resources are available? Will you need to buy additional resources before the next calf arrives? Drought Management In parts of the Midwest where drought has been an issue, early weaning is a good option to stretch feed resources. There are both advantages to the cow and the calf, from a nutritional standpoint. Peel explains. “Early weaning is actually one of the first things I would think about because pulling those calves off of the cow reduces her nutritional requirements dramatically. What forage supplies you do have left at that standpoint can go a lot further for the cow by simply removing the calf,” he said. Once the calves are weaned, opportunities exist for some decision making for both the cows and the calves to help increase profits. A producer can better make separate decisions for the cows and the calves post-weaning. Peel said that cull cow prices have been good and will remain positive for a while. He suggests that if you’ve weaned already to sell any cull cows now instead of waiting until later, as the cow market typically hits a seasonal low in late fall. Culling decisions should start with preg checking cows. Then, cull on any physical attributes that might be detrimental to the herd like mouths, feet and udders. Follow the hierarchy of culling factors that includes open cows, older cows and the need to keep replacement heifers. “If you pull calves off now because forage resources are low, it makes sense to do some early culling. Preg check now instead of waiting and use those same factors that would drive culling decisions now in late August or September instead of early November. Producers have the opportunity to improve (Continued on page 80)


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their returns now instead of paying to keep a cull cow around,” Peel said. Decisions about what to do with your calves might take some more planning and following of the markets. Although the markets are steady, and a producer could benefit from selling calves now, according to the futures, there is some potential for further economic gains through retained ownership, even if that entails only a short backgrounding session. Retain Ownership Retaining ownership of calves for a while could lead to some potential increased profits depending on how long you want to feed them and what your resource inventory looks like. If you background them even until they are “normal” weaning weights, you will likely feed them in grain in a confinement or semi-confinement situation, according to Peel, so you will you need adequate grain and feed sources. “Evaluate retained ownership or decide to sell now – short backgrounding could pay off. The markets look pretty positive; the futures are strong right now so here’s an opportunity to do some risk management. Using the futures as an indicator of where markets might end up – regardless if it is this fall of the first quarter of next year, there are lots of opportunities to manage risk,” Peel said. The combination of a positive outlook on cattle prices and the availability of feed makes retaining ownership through heavier weights more appealing than selling now; however, there is always risk. Grain is fairly inexpensive, and there is a big corn crop this year with plenty of supplemental feeds available.

OCTOBER 2020

Even with the hurricane-force winds that took down thousands of acres of corn across Iowa and northern Illinois, that damage will have a local impact rather than a global impact on grain prices. And producers should still have the chance to graze some of those fields

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that are too downed to harvest in traditional ways. In addition to grazing stalks – both harvested and not harvested, grazing wheat through the plains states is another alternative that Peel says looks like a great alternative to help increase profitability. Grazing Wheat With adequate rainfall and moderate temperatures through much of the Wheat Belt, those who want to maximize grazing will start planting wheat by the first week in September. However, hot, dry and windy conditions could be detrimental to any hopes of good wheat pasture. “Physical conditions are good now for planting wheat for forage. We’ve had quite a bit of rain in Central Oklahoma, but even far Western Oklahoma has had some improvement. Calf prices might go up between now and October, when we’d typically start grazing wheat, if we don’t buy until October. But even then, the futures indicate there is some potential for profit when selling those calves next spring,” Peel said. Of course, he indicated that producers have to consider if they are raising wheat for purely grazing or for the dual purpose of grazing and grain production. Early planting can lead to challenges like army worms, however, if using for a forage, the benefits will usually outweigh the challenges. “There are still risks with pandemic, potential problems in meat markets,” Peel said. “There is plenty of risk out there, but plenty of reasons to evaluate opportunities.” Producers should take the time to manage their risks to help maximize their returns. In an era of uncertainty, increasing profitability in your business is a sure bet that everyone can agree on. Know your budget. Calculate your breakeven and manage your herd and follow the best considerations to help you see the most return on your investment.

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Governor Parson Visits Briarwood Angus Farms Source: The Word is Out - Brenda Black Briarwood Angus Farms welcomed Governor Mike Parson and First Lady Teresa Parson on Saturday, August 29. Rainy weather couldn’t dampen the enthusiastic crowd that gathered by special invitation to enjoy a steak and lend their support for the Governor’s campaign.

pandemic, and unprecedented challenges in the midst of the crisis. He went on to emphasize the importance of rural voters to inform their friends, neighbors and urban acquaintances of his extensive and transparent track record in public service. Closing comments focused on a somber appeal to vote in such a way as to preserve a free republic for the sake of our state’s and our nation’s children.

Gov. Parson arrived with his trademark wide grin. In opening remarks, he expressed considerable gratitude for being among “my kind of people.” Dr. Curtis W. Long welcomed his fellow cattleman, esteeming him as “The best governor ever of Missouri!” In a show of support, Long presented a check to Gov. Parson on behalf of the family and employees of Briarwood Angus Farms. MBCSept2014c.qxp_Layout 1 9/24/14 9:59 AM Page 62

In addition to the funds raised by those in attendance, the governor also graciously received a campaign contribution from Missouri Cattleman’s Association, presented by MCA Manager of Membership Sydney Thummel, accompanied by the Bates County Cattlemen officer team of Ryan Grimes, President; Austin Black, Vice President; Dave Warfield, Treasurer; Jesse Porter, Secretary/Reporter; Carl Bettles and Lonny Duckworth, State Directors; and Susie Hockett, Bates County CattleWomen President, who represented the membership at large.

Gov. Mike Parson flashes his signature smile upon arrival to Briarwood Angus Farms, Butler, Mo., for a fundraising luncheon.

“What started as a brief trip turned into an event that raised around $6,000 for our governor,” Thummel said. Parson’s personal and impassioned farm site chat recapped the roller coaster year of 2020, including record breaking lows for unemployment prior to the

Buffalo Livestock Market 1 mile west on Hwy 32 • Buffalo, MO 65622 Barn: 417-345-8122

Dr. Curtis W. Long welcomes Gov. Mike Parson to Briarwood Angus Farms.

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Sale Every Saturday 12:00 Noon

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• Selling 1200 to 1700 head Farm Fresh Cattle weekly • Special Stock Cow and Bull Sale 3rd Tuesday night of each month at 6:30 p.m. • Pre-Vac Feeder Calf Sales 2nd Saturday of every month in conjunction with Regular Sale (Pfizer Pre-Vac, BLM Pre-Vac, Bayer Program, Mo Quality Assurance. LMA-Vac and MFA Health Track)

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Owners… Lyle Caselman Leon Caselman Howard Miller 417-345-7876 H 417-345-4514 H 417-345-8612 H 417-533-2944 cell 417-588-6185 cell

Missouri Cattlemen’s Association Manger of Membership Sydney Thummel presents a contribution on behalf of the MCA to Governor Parson. L-R: MCA members Austin Black, Jesse Porter, Dr. Curtis W. Long, Sydney Thummel, Gov. Mike Parson, Lonny Duckworth and David Warfield.


The Parsons lingered casually, taking time to visit one on one with constituents, before heading out for three more campaign stops that day.

campaign sign purchased, which will be placed on Briarwood’s highway front property in Bates County, Gov. Parson committed to the farm visit.

The governor’s appearance at stop number one at Briarwood came as a result of Long’s purchase of an MCA Pac Auction item during the 17th Annual Cattlemen’s Steak Fry in July. Along with the massive

Guests for the event enjoyed steak sandwiches prepared by the Bates County Cattlemen and served by the Bates County CattleWomen. Other sponsors included Heiman Agri Service at Rockville, and Purina®.

Joining Gov. Parson in securing a campaign banner are Bates County Cattlemen Past President Ivan Fischer, President Ryan Grimes, MCA State Director Carl Bettles and Dr. Curtis W. Long, who placed the highest bid for the campaign sign along and governor’s visit during the MCA PAC Auction in July.

Gov. Mike Parson and First Lady Teresa Parson are joined by the Bates County Cattlemen Officers L-R: Jesse Porter, Secretary/Reporter; State Director, Carl Bettles; President, Mike Grimes; First Lady Teresa Parson; Gov. Mike Parson, Vice President Austin Black, Bates County CattleWomen President Susie Hockett; State Director Lonny Duckworth, Treasurer, David Warfield and Junior Bates County Cattlemen member Luke Warfield.

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New Location: Margaritaville Lake Resort

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New Location: Margaritaville Lake Resort


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New Location: Margaritaville Lake Resort

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SALE CALENDAR

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Oct. 3 Oct. 3 Oct. 3 Oct. 3 Oct. 5 Oct. 9 Oct. 10 Oct. 10 Oct. 10 Oct. 10 Oct. 10 Oct. 10 Oct. 10 Oct. 10 Oct. 10 Oct. 14 Oct. 16 Oct. 17

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Journagan Ranch/MSU Production Sale, Springfield, MO Pinegar Limousin Fall Production Sale, Springfield, MO Jac’s Ranch Production Sale, Bentonville, AR Ozark and Heart of America Beefmaster Fall Roundup Sale, Springfield, MO Express Ranch Fall Bull Sale, Yukon, OK Smith Valley Angus Sale, Salem, MO MLBA Heart of Missouri Limousin Sale, Lebanon, MO Missouri Red Angus Association Fall Bull & Female Sale, Sedalia, MO Bonebrake Herefords Female Production Sale, Buffalo, MO Byergo Angus Sale, Savannah, MO East Central Missouri Angus Association Sale, Cuba, MO Ozark and Heart of America Beefmaster Fall Roundup, Locust Grove, OK Hott Farms Complete Dispersal Sale, Sycamore, IL Big D Ranch’s Building Your Tomorrow Sale, Center Ridge, AR Peterson Farms - The Girls of Fall Sale, Mountain Grove, MO Valley Oaks Angus Sale, Oak Grove, MO THM Land & Cattle Female Sale Vienna, MO Seedstock Plus Fall Bull & Female Sale, JRS - Carthage, MO

Oct. 17 Oct. 17 Oct. 17 Oct. 17 Oct. 17 Oct. 17 Oct. 18 Oct. 18 Oct. 19 Oct. 23 Oct. 23 Oct. 23 Oct. 24 Oct. 24 Oct. 24 Oct. 24 Oct. 25 Oct. 25 Oct. 28 Oct. 31 Oct. 31

Gerloff Farms Sale, Bland, MO BUB Ranch Sale, Koshkonong, MO Angell-Thomas Charolais Bull & Heifer Sale, Paris, MO Aschermann Charolais/Akaushi 31st Edition Bull Sale, Carthage, MO Bradley Cattle Bred Heifer & Bull Sale, Springfield, MO Heart of the Ozarks Angus Ass’n. Sale, West Plains, MO Frank/Hazelrigg Cattle Co. Sale, Fulton, MO Reynolds Herefords Sale, Huntsville, MO Hinkle’s Prime Cut Angus Sale, Nevada, MO Spur Ranch Sale, Vinita, OK Royal Collection Charolais Sale, American Royal Wagstaff Sale Center, Kansas City, MO T Bar S - Focused on the Future Sale, Billings, MO Lacy’s Red Angus Production Sale with MC Livestock, Drexel, MO Mead Angus Farm Fall Production Sale, Barnett, MO Ladies of the Royal National Hereford Sale, Kansas City, MO New Day Genetics Fall Sale, Springfield, MO Baker Angus Sale, Butler, MO Jefferies Red Angus Annual Bull & Female Sale, Checotah, OK Fink Beef Genetics Fall Bull Sale, Randolph, KS McBee Cattle Co. Fall Bull & Female Sale, Fayette, MO Wall Street Cattle Co. Sale, Lebanon, MO


Nov. 1 WMC Cattle Co. and Guests Inaugural Bull and Commercial Female Sale, Springfield, MO Nov. 6-7 GenePlus Brangus Sale at Chimney Rock Cattle Co., Concord, AR Nov. 7 Worthington Angus Sale, Dadeville, MO Nov. 7 Seedstock Plus Red Reward Fall Editon Bull & Female Sale, Osceola, MO Nov. 7 B/F Cattle Co Genes Fit for Fescue Sale, Butler, MO Nov. 7 Red Tie Event, Tina, MO Nov. 14 Gibbs Farms Bull and Replacement Female Sale, Ranburne, AL Nov. 14 2 Sales - Missouri Red Angus Association Show-Me Reds Fall Herd Builder Sale in conjunction with the Greater Midwest Red Angus Breeding Stock Sale, Kirksville, MO Nov. 14 24th Annual Show-Me Plus Gelbvieh & Balancer® Sale, Springfield, MO Nov. 14 Gibbs Farms Bull and Replacement Female Sale, Ranburne, AL Nov. 16 Green Springs Performance Tested Bull & Angus Cow Sale, Nevada, MO Nov. 21 Sydenstricker Angus Sale, Mexico, MO Nov. 21 CompleteDispersion of Roth Herefords, Windsor, MO Nov. 21 Dalebanks Angus Sale, Eureka, KS Nov. 21 Buck Mountain Ranch Wagyu Dispersal Sale, Springfield, MO Nov. 28 Butch’s Angus Sale, Jackson, MO Dec. 5 Missouri Hereford Assn. Opportunity Sale, Sedalia, MO Dec. 5 Wright Charolais 10th Annual Female Sale, Kearney, MO

MBC Classified The MBC Classified column appears monthly. Classified advertising is only 50¢ a word. Send your check with your ad to Missouri Beef Cattleman, 2306 Bluff Creek Drive, #100, Columbia, Mo 65201. Deadline 10th of month before an issue.

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Advertiser Index

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American Angus Association........................................ 57 American Simmental Association...........................50-51 Angell-Thomas Sale...................................................... 76 B/F Cattle Co Sale........................................................ 37 Bradley Cattle Co. Sale................................................ 16 Buck Mountain Wagyu Sale......................................... 81 Buffalo Livestock Market.............................................. 82 Callaway Livestock Center Inc.....................................20 Central Missouri Sales Co............................................ 14 Circle A Angus Ranch.................................................. 61 Classified..................................................................... 105 Clearwater Farm........................................................... 61 Coon Angus Ranch...................................................... 61 Dalebanks Angus Sale.................................................. 63 Durham Simmental Farms...........................................49 F&T Livestock Market.................................................. 78 Feed Train..................................................................... 25 Fink Beef Genetics Sale................................................ 33 Frank and Hazelrigg Angus......................................... 61 Frank and Hazelrigg Angus Sale.................................. 55 Galaxy Beef LLC.......................................................... 61 GDI...............................................................................44 GenePlus Brangus Sale................................................. 79 Gerloff Farms................................................................ 61 Gibbs Farms Sale.......................................................... 53 Green Springs Tested Bull Sale.................................... 77 Green’s Welding & Sales...............................................30 Heart of the Ozarks Angus Sale................................... 62 Hinkle’s Prime Cut Angus............................................ 61 Hinkle’s Prime Cut Angus Sale.................................... 21 HydraBed...................................................................... 26 Irsik & Doll Feed Yards............................................... 108 Jim’s Motors..................................................................80 Joplin Regional Stockyards........................................... 13 Kingsville Livestock Auction........................................60 Lacy’s Red Angus Sale..................................................29 Lucas Cattle Co............................................................49 Marshall & Fenner Farms............................................. 61 MCA - Show-Me-Select Sale Credit............................ 92 MCA Beef Queen.........................................................99 MCA Convention Registration............................... 96-98 MCA Member Benefits.................................................95 MCA Membership Form............................................ 101 MCA Policy Survey.................................................93-94 MCA Presidents Council............................................ 103 MCA Proud Member Signs........................................ 102 MCA Top 100 Profitablity Challenge.......................... 28

McBee Cattle Co. Sale....................................................7 McPherson Concrete Products................................... 105 Mead Cattle Co............................................................ 32 Mead Farms.................................................................. 61 Mead Farms Angus Sale .............................................. 17 Merck Animal Health...................................................89 Merry Meadows Simmental.........................................49 MFA.............................................................................. 39 Missouri Angus Association.......................................... 61 Missouri Angus Breeders.............................................. 61 Missouri Beef Industry Council.................................... 19 Missouri Red Angus Association Sale.......................... 75 Missouri Simmental Association..................................49 Missouri Simmental Breeders.......................................49 New Day Genetics Sale............................................40-41 Oval F Ranch...............................................................49 Red Tie Event Sale....................................................... 74 Reynolds Hereford Sale................................................ 72 Richardson Ranch........................................................ 61 RLE Simmental............................................................49 Roth Farms Dispersal Sale........................................... 73 S&N Partners - JayLor.................................................. 83 Seedstock Plus............................................................. 107 Sellers Feedlot...............................................................80 Shoal Creek Land & Cattle..........................................49 Slayton Farms...............................................................49 South Central Regional Stockyards............................. 18 Spur Ranch Sale........................................................... 59 Square B Ranch/Quality Beef...................................... 61 Steaks Alive...................................................................49 Superior Steel Sales.......................................................58 SW Missouri Performance Tested Bull Sale.................60 Sydenstricker Genetics.................................................. 61 Sydenstricker Genetics Sale............................................3 T Bar S.......................................................................... 67 TransOva...................................................................... 15 Valley Oaks Angus........................................................ 61 Wall Street Cattle Sale.............................................34-35 Wax - Marshall Rye Grass..............................................2 Weiker Angus Ranch.................................................... 61 Westway Feed..................................................................9 Wheeler Auctions & Real Estate................................... 45 Wheeler Livestock Market.......................................... 104 Mike Williams.............................................................. 45 WMC Sale.................................................................... 71 Worthington Angus Sale..............................................65 Zeitlow Distributing...................................................... 31




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