October 2021 - Missouri Beef Cattleman

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CONTENTS

October 2021

FEATURES 30

Grain Bin Safety

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2022 Replacement Heifer Show & Sale

84

Power in the Pricing

Harvest Season Reminders of the Danger Inside the Bin

Show-Me-Select Partners with MJCA to Offer Replacement Heifer Show & Sale

New Legislation Aims to Rebalance Beef Market

30 Grain Bin Safety

COLUMNS

MEMBER NEWS 6 Association Update 20 Beef Checkoff News 50 County News

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2022 Replacement Heifer Show & Sale

MCA President’s Perspective In it Together

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CattleWomen’s Corner

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Straight Talk: Mike Deering

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What’s Cooking at the Beef House

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Happy Fall, Ya’ll!

Stand Together

Thank You to our Volunteers

On the Edge of Common Sense: Baxter Black

OCTOBER 2021

Deer Hunting Cow Lick

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100

Junior Spotlight

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Capitol Update

2021 Youth Industry Tour

New Hire

The Missouri Beef Cattleman is an official publication of the Missouri Cattlemen’s Association.


MISSOURI

BEEF CATTLEMAN

OFFICIAL PUBLICATION OF THE MISSOURI CATTLEMEN’S ASSOCIATION

Volume 50 - Issue 10 (USPS 890-240 • ISSN 0192-3056) Magazine Publishing Office 2306 Bluff Creek Drive, #100, Columbia, MO 65201 Phone: 573-499-9162 • Fax: 573-499-9167 Andy Atzenweiler: Editor/Production/Ad Sales P.O. Box 480977 • Kansas City, Missouri 64148 816-210-7713 • E-mail: mobeef@sbcglobal.net Macey Hurst • Ad Sales • 573-821-6982

Missouri Cattlemen’s Association MCA Website: www.mocattle.com

DEPARTMENTS 7

New MCA Members USMEF News

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American Royal

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MCF Cattlemen’s Classic Golf

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Simmental Highlight

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Obituaries: Chuck Swope, Ned Daggs

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Missouri’s Cattlemen Foundation www.mocattlemenfoundation.org

Missouri’s CattleWomen

http://mocattle.com/missouricattlewomen.aspx

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Mike Deering • Executive Vice President - Ext 230 Mike@mocattle.com Sydney Thummel • Manager of Membership - Ext 231 Sydney@mocattle.com Macey Hurst • Manager of Strategic Solutions – Ext. 235 MBC Editor/Production Artist Macey@mocattle.com Lisa Stockhorst, Administrative Assistant – Ext 234 Lisa@mocattle.com

MCA 2022 Convention Advertisers Index

Patty Wood, President 660-287-7701 • 16075 Wood Road, La Monte, MO 65337 Bruce Mershon, President-Elect 816-525-1954 • 31107 Lake City Buckner Rd., Buckner, MO 64016 David Dick, Vice President 660-826-0031 • 23529 Anderson School Rd., Sedalia, MO 65301 Matt Hardecke, Treasurer 573-846-6614 • 19102 Skymeadows Dr., Wildwood, MO 63069 Charlie Besher, Secretary 573-866-2846 • RR 5, Box 2402, Patton, MO 63662

2021 MCA Regional Vice Presidents

Region 1: Eric Greenley, 61998 Pleasant Valley Rd. Knox City, MO 63446 660-341-8750 Region 2: Chuck Miller, 393 Spring Garden Road Olean, MO 65064 • 573-881-3589 Region 3: Jeff Reed, PO Box 35 Williamsville, MO 63967 • 903-279-8360 Region 4: Deb Thummel, 12601 Hwy. 46 Sheridan, MO 64486 • 660-541-2606 Region 5: John Shipman, 34266 Hwy KK Mora, MO 65345 • 660-221-1013 Region 6: Warren Love, 8381 NE Hwy ZZ Osceola, MO 64776 • 417-830-1950 Region 7: Josh Worthington, P.O. Box 246 Dadeville, MO 65635 • 417-844-2601

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Missouri Beef Cattleman, (USPS 890-240 • ISSN 0192-3056) is published monthly (12 times a year) and is the official publication of the Missouri Cattlemen’s Association, 2306 Bluff Creek Drive, #100, Columbia, Missouri, 65201. PERIODICALS postage paid at Columbia, Missouri and additional mailing offices. Subscription price is included as a part of the minimum membership dues of $70.00 per year in Missouri Cattlemen’s Association. Postmaster: Send address changes to: Missouri Beef Cattleman, P.O. Box 480977, Kansas City, Missouri 64148

2021 MCA Officers

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Abigail Drebenstedt, Philadelphia, MO Alan Glor, Glor Farms, Bolivar, MO Alyssa Love, Buffalo, MO Carly Murphy, Monticello, MO Cathryn McNary, Golden City, MO Christine Puetz, Puetz Family Ranch, Mansfield, MO Dominic Troutman, Hallsville, MO Garrett Mullen, Steelville, MO Geoffrey Bowsher, FCS Financial, Republic, MO Grace Doss, West Plains, MO Greg Cox, JGS Cattle Company, Silex, MO James Hudgens, Maryville Livestock Auction, St. Joseph, MO Jeff Jones, Noel, MO John Troutman, Hallsville, MO John & Dennis Doss, West Plains, MO Kennedy Heil, Norborne, MO Mark Northcutt, Northcutt Cattle, Laddonia, MO

Matthew Barry, Canton, MO Melvin Jackson, Poplar Bluff, MO Morghan Crain, Madison, MO Orland & Rhonda Oesch, Silverleaf Land & Cattle, Mooresville, MO Paul & David Andelin, Andelin Livestock, Pierce City, MO Ray Cunningham, Salem, MO Richard & Jerry Michael, Michael Farm, Nixa, MO Riley Donath, Philadelphia, MO Robert & Kay Hensley, Bolivar, MO Ronnie & Kristie Sanders, Sanders Farm, Carthage, MO Shawn Wright, Springfield, MO Shirley Allison, Fair Grove, MO Tina Wibberg, Wibberg Farms, Jefferson City, MO Travis Dowler, Sedalia, MO See the MCA Membership Form on page 109.

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In it Together I am often asked, “What do you like most about your involvement in the Missouri Cattlemen’s Association?” The answer is easy. It’s about connecting with people. Whether it is across the fence, over coffee at a local restaurant, community events or social media, I truly look forward to every opportunity to exchange thoughts and ideas, meet new friends and learn more each day.

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Anytime we can connect producer to producer or producer to consumer, we’re doing a great thing for the state of Missouri. With agriculture being the number one industry in the state and ranking in the top three for cow calf production, we have an obligation to put a positive face on the industry.

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The Missouri Beef House was designed to give folks a unique food experience and an opportunity for beef producers to connect directly with consumers. As an association, we are so thankful to the individuals who had the vision in the early 1980s to serve premium beef to the crowds during the Missouri State Fair. The MCA Beef House and Beef House Express continue to fulfill its mission to this day and as since 1982. Our sincere appreciation to all the volunteers who were a vital part of the success by freely giving of their time, labor and smiles. A very special thank you to my husband, Pat; John and Kathy Harris; Cheryl McCollester; and all the Beef House staff for their commitment and energy, which allowed me time this year to fulfill my presidency role. Since 1901, the Missouri State Fair continues to provide opportunities for the agricultural community to deepen consumers’ views and knowledge of the role agriculture

plays in their daily lives and the economy of our state. Without a doubt, those of you in the show ring are the future leaders in agriculture. For those who attended the fair, I hope you were able to attend many of the events at the Missouri CattleWomen’s Beef Showcase, various 4H/FFA and open livestock shows, the live carcass contest, or just walk through the cattle barns. It won’t take you long to notice a family-focused foundation centered around instilling good values and hard work. With cooler weather in sight, county fairs and outdoor events may end soon, but community and family celebrations are in sight. Take the opportunity to connect with fellow producers as well as consumers, and let them know you share their values when it comes to topics they care about, like safe food, quality, nutrition, animal care and environmental stewardship. When consumers are happy, producers feel the benefits. You’ve probably heard the phrase “we have more in common than divides us.” Without consumers, beef producers don’t have a market for their product. Without beef producers, consumers would be without a highly nutritious source of protein. We need each other!



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OCTOBER 2021



Straight

Talk

with Mike Deering Stand Together The 54th Annual Missouri Cattle Industry Convention & Trade Show is right around the corner. It seems unbelievable and further solidifies the validity of the old cliché: Time Flies. I know January seems like a way off, but it’s not. Mark your calendar now and make plans to bring the entire family to this annual gathering. This year’s theme is “Cattlemen Stand Together.” A theme is just a theme, but it’s fitting considering the whole purpose of the convention is to unite and collectively set the direction of the organization for the coming year. Cattlemen stand together, and it can’t happen without you. From networking to education to policy priorities, the convention has something for everyone, and we have a seat with your name on it. The convention brings together members from around the state to network, share ideas and establish a sense of community. Networking is essential because, in the grand scheme of things, there really aren’t that many of us. A perfect place to not only network, but to also see the latest and greatest tools and technologies available is the trade show. This is the largest show in the state focused solely on Missouri’s beef cattle industry. Don’t forget about the Cattlemen’s Education Series, sponsored by the National Corn Growers Association.

OCTOBER 2021

The convention is also where the rubber meets the road on our grassroots policy process. We establish policy priorities for the coming year. I assure you that we take

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ORYS 07 RED ANGUS Service age bulls, bred cows, cow/calf pairs, show prospect heifers available.

417-652-3425 417-839-7205 www.oryscircle7.com

Executive Vice President your priorities seriously and fight like hell to get them across the finish-line. We have consistently proven that, and 2022 will be no different. Please take time to fill out the policy questionnaire found on page 105-106. We also add new policy, amend existing policy and scrap outdated policy in the association’s policy book, which is essential to ensuring we have member-driven policies that truly reflect the will of our members. Our industry cannot be strong without the next generation, so we spend an entire evening honoring the best and the brightest young leaders. That’s why we have speaking contests, queen contests, collegiate contests and much more going on throughout convention. Our young leaders are the true renewable resources that we need to move this industry forward, and we must be exhaustive in our efforts to expand their interest in the association and the industry. We want to see you there. We do our level best to make the convention affordable, and it is not at all seen as a profit center for the association. Your presence is so important to the leaders of this association. Please make plans to attend the 54th Annual Missouri Cattle Industry Convention & Trade Show, Jan. 7-9, 2022, at the Holiday Inn Executive Center in Columbia. Early bird registration and sponsorship information is now available and can be found on pages 91-98.


OCTOBER 2021

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Record Value for July Beef Exports Pork Value also Strong Source: USMEF

value increased 8% to $4.98 billion.

U.S. beef exports set another new value record in July, according to data released by USDA and compiled by the U.S. Meat Export Federation (USMEF). July export value climbed 45% from a year ago to $939.1 million, while volume was the third largest of the post-BSE era at 122,743 metric tons (mt), up 14% year-over-year.

“Beef exports were really outstanding in July, especially with COVID-related challenges still impacting global foodservice as well as persistent obstacles in shipping and logistics,” said USMEF President and CEO Dan Halstrom. “Retail demand continues to be tremendous, as evidenced by the new beef value record. On the pork side, the U.S. industry remained focused on market diversity even when China’s import volumes were absolutely off the charts. That philosophy is paying strong dividends now, with exports maintaining a record pace even as muscle cut exports to China trend significantly lower.”

July beef exports to the mainstay Asian markets of Japan, South Korea and Taiwan were relatively steady with last year, but at significantly higher value. Export volume growth was driven by record-large shipments to China and a strong rebound in Western Hemisphere markets compared to year-ago totals. For January through July, U.S. beef exports increased 18% from a year ago to 822,830 mt, with value up 30% to $5.58 billion. Compared to the pace established in 2018, the record year for U.S. beef exports, shipments were up 6% in volume and 17% in value. Pork exports in July were steady with last year at 221,809 mt, but export value jumped 20% to $657.3 million. Pork variety meat exports were especially strong at 49,092 mt, up 54% from the low total posted a year ago and 16% above July 2019. Variety meat export value was the second highest on record at $116.7 million, up 69% from a year ago and 39% above 2019. July pork exports were driven mainly by growth in Mexico, Central America, Colombia and the Philippines, while chilled pork exports continued to strengthen to Japan and South Korea. Total exports to China declined from a year ago, but pork variety meat shipments to China were the second largest on record.

OCTOBER 2021

For January through July, pork exports were 1% above last year’s record pace at just under 1.8 million mt, while

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Halstrom was especially pleased to see pork variety meat exports bolster the July results, climbing back from a labor-related slump in mid-2020. “While the tight labor situation is still very much a challenge for exporters, the variety meat capture rate has certainly improved and it is great to see exports exceed pre-COVID levels,” he said. “This is especially important because China’s demand for pork variety meat remains strong and it is critical that the U.S. industry capitalizes on this opportunity.” Lower demand in leading market Mexico pushed July exports of U.S. lamb below last year, but January-July exports were still 13% above last year’s pace at 7,982 mt, with value up 10% to $10.8 million. A detailed summary of the January-July red meat export results, including market-specific highlights, is available from the USMEF website. For questions, please contact Joe Schuele or call 303547-0030.


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NCBA Slams PCRM Complaint Source: NCBA CENTENNIAL, Colo. (Sept. 14, 2021) – NCBA, working as a contractor to the Beef Checkoff, recently developed a campaign to transparently share the beef industry’s science-based sustainability story and connect consumers with facts about how their beef is raised. Part of this campaign included very successful ads in Wall Street Journal, New York Times and Washington Post. The campaign reached millions of consumers and inspired curious readers to learn more. Unsurprisingly, the campaign also led to mudslinging from animal activist groups who must grasp at straws because they know that less than 5% of the U.S. population claim to be vegetarian. Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine (PCRM) recently petitioned both USDA and the Federal Trade Commission, suggesting our ads downplayed cattle’s role in the environment. PCRM masquerades as medical authorities, despite the fact that fewer than 10% of PCRM’s members are actually physicians. PCRM, which acts as a front for animal rights extremists, has zero expertise in sustainability. Their sole aim is to pedal plant-based diets. More than that, PCRM has been linked with PETA and even with groups that the FBI has designated as domestic terrorists. PCRM’s questionable reputation aside, the facts and science are on beef’s side. Just as the ads cited, beef

cattle only account for 2% of greenhouse gas emissions in the U.S., according to the EPA.1 And according to USDA and the UN FAO, the U.S. has produced the most sustainable beef in the world for decades and has reduced emissions per pound of beef by 40% since the 1960s.2,3 All of this information is scientifically vetted and publicly available. PCRM’s attack on these ads conflates global data with U.S. numbers and ignores the growing body of evidence that beef is not only an important part of a sustainable food system in the U.S., but also nourishes the land it’s raised on through carbon sequestration, wildlife habitat preservation and more.4 Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine’s critiques are not only baseless and inaccurate but also try to scare media from sharing important stories and suppress information that consumers deserve to know. NCBA stands by this campaign and will not be silenced by animal extremists who pretend to be doctors. 1. EPA. 2021. Inventory of U.S. Greenhouse Gas Emissions and Sinks: 1990-2019. U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, D.C.  2. USDA-NASS Quick Stats Tools. Available at: https:// quickstats.nass.usda.gov/results/3AC161F7-F361-3A66-9B6C2E1220FEBF52?pivot=short_desc   3. U.N. Food and Agriculture Organization. FAOSTAT Database – Food and agricultural data. Available at: http://www.fao.org/ faostat/en/#home 4. Taylor, DT, et al. 2019. National and State Economic Values of Cattle Ranching and Farming Based Ecosystem Services in the U.S. University of Wyoming Extension B-1338.

NCBA Statement on BSE Cases Detected in Brazil Source: NCBA

OCTOBER 2021

WASHINGTON (September 7, 2021) – Today, National Cattlemen’s Beef Association Chief Executive Officer Colin Woodall issued the following statement regarding the two atypical cases of bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) detected in Brazil:

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“Over the weekend, the Brazilian Ministry of Agriculture, Livestock, and Food Supply confirmed two atypical cases of BSE. Atypical cases are very rare and are believed to occur spontaneously. These cases occurred outside the United States and do not pose a risk to American consumers—U.S. beef is safe. “Given Brazil’s history of failing to report BSE cases in a timely manner, we must remain vigilant in enforcing

our safeguards and holding them accountable. The U.S. has the highest animal health and food safety standards in the world. We must make sure that all countries wishing to export beef to the U.S. continue to meet our standards—even a country with a small footprint like Brazil. We have full faith and confidence in the abilities of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) and Office of the U.S. Trade Representative (USTR) to enforce our safety standards and trade rules to protect America’s cattle producers and consumers. “NCBA encourages USDA to examine Brazil and to continue implementing science-based safeguards that ensure all imported beef meets the same rigorous science-based food safety and animal health standards as American beef.”


NCBA Puts Pressure on Congress to Protect Family-Owned Businesses Source: NCBA WASHINGTON (September 8, 2021) — As Co-Chair of the Tax Aggie Coalition, NCBA spearheaded a letter to House Ways and Means and Senate Finance Committee leadership urging them to consider the implications that changes to federal tax policy will have on family-owned agricultural businesses. Nearly 330 trade associations representing family-owned food, agriculture and related businesses agree that, when drafting legislation to implement President Biden’s “Build Back Better” agenda, it is critical that the “American Families Plan” must also support family farms and ranches. “Congress must consider the complex structure of family-owned agricultural businesses that serve as the backbone of rural economies; therefore, understand how changes to long-standing provisions in the tax code could be detrimental to the financial viability of these businesses as they transfer to the next generation,” said Senior Executive Director of Government Affairs Danielle Beck. “This is not a partisan issue; in fact, it’s an issue that affects every single American. With more than 370 million acres expected to change hands in the next two

decades, preserving long-standing provisions in the federal tax code is a win-win situation for producers and consumers alike. Whether their family has preserved the land for generations, or they are a beginning, veteran or minority farmer getting their start in the industry – without federal tax policy that supports a viable business climate for the next generation of producers, building on the environmental and economic contributions of today’s producers is impossible and risks compromising our nation’s ability to produce a safe, abundant and affordable food supply. The consequences of taxing family farms and ranches out of business completely undermines the ‘Build Back Better’ agenda.” Some federal tax policy proposals have been accompanied by the promise of purported protections to family-owned businesses. However, signatories on the letter stress that those accommodations may not necessarily apply to the diverse complexity of ownership structures across family-owned agricultural entities. The only way to ensure the future viability of family-owned business, specifically farms and ranches, is to fully preserve critical provisions such as stepped-up basis, like-kind exchanges, the Section 199A small business deduction and maintain the current estate tax code provisions.

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Same Time New City for 2022 Cattle Industry Convention Source: NCBA Annual event is “Gone to Texas” The 2021 Cattle Industry Convention may have just wrapped up after moving to August, but the 2022 event is returning to its regularly scheduled time slot in February. The 2022 Cattle Industry Convention and NCBA Trade Show will be held Feb. 1-3, in Houston, with the theme of “Gone to Texas”. With only a few short months until the next convention, planning is already underway to create a unique experience in a new host city. “This is the first time the convention will be held in Houston, and we are extremely excited about offering new opportunities for attendees,” said Kristin Torres, National Cattlemen’s Beef Association executive director of meetings and events. “The city has amazing facilities, making it convenient for everyone to fully enjoy all activities.” The annual convention continues to be one of the industry’s largest events where thousands of cattlemen

and women gather to learn, conduct business, network and have fun. The 2022 convention marks the 124th anniversary of the legendary event, and one that will offer a variety of activities that are appropriate for all ages. Cattlemen’s College, which immediately precedes convention, will bring thought-provoking, stimulating sessions that provide producers with information they can put to work on their farms and ranches. The convention’s world-class NCBA Trade Show will feature more than seven acres of indoor and outdoor displays as well as live cattle handling demonstrations, educational sessions and entertainment. Trade show booths are already 95 percent sold out and exhibitors will offer products and services such as animal health products, equipment, irrigation technology, software, trailers and so much more. Registration will open on Nov. 1, 2021. Additional information will be available soon at https://convention. ncba.org.

NCBA Secures Extension of Critical Exemption for Livestock Haulers Source: NCBA WASHINGTON (August 31, 2021) — Today, the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) announced an extension of the exemption from hoursof-service (HOS) requirements for livestock haulers. Livestock haulers continue to need this flexibility for the well-being of livestock during hauls, and to keep grocery stores stocked with beef during the continued disruption of COVID-19. This extension comes after consistent advocacy by the National Cattlemen’s Beef Association (NCBA).

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Thanks in part to NCBA’s continued push on this issue, livestock haulers have been operating under an HOS exemption since the beginning of the COVID-19 pandemic while maintaining a strong safety record.

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“We are grateful to FMCSA for the extension of this exemption, which will provide livestock haulers continued flexibilities under hours-of-service regulations. I believe FMCSA’s continuation of this exemption

indicates their confidence in our producers to keep doing their work safely and effectively, while keeping the grocery store shelves stocked with beef. NCBA will continue to work toward additional, more permanent flexibility under HOS, and we appreciate FMCSA’s open dialogue on this issue,” said NCBA Executive Director of Government Affairs Allison Rivera. The most recent extension will continue through midnight on November 30, 2021. Current HOS rules allow for 11 hours of drive time, 14 hours of on-duty time, and then require 10 consecutive hours of rest. When transporting livestock, there is a real need for further flexibility beyond the current hours-ofservice. Unlike drivers moving consumer goods, livestock haulers cannot simply idle or unload their trucks when drive time hours run out without jeopardizing animal health and welfare.


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Your

BEEF CHECKOFF NEWS There are no dog-days of summer when it comes to promoting Beef! The Missouri Beef Industry Council has been busy across the state recently. Fairs, meetings, promotions, schools, teacher meetings and education events keep the staff and partners busy. In addition, MBIC welcomes Hannah Strain as our new Director of Industry Relations and Administration. Hannah served as the MBIC intern since June and has stepped into the new role quickly. Welcome her when you see her!

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This article recaps some of the highlights over the past few months. New promotions and Hannah Strain, Director Industry activities will compliment the Relations and Administration year-round activities that make the checkoff successful.

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FY2022 HOLIDAY E-COMMERCE CAMPAIGN OPPORTUNITY. NCBA has executed a national retail-ecommerce campaign for the upcoming holiday season with Sam’s Club. Missouri has joined in the campaign in five locations in the K.C. metro area. MOeFACS Conference. MBIC attended the MOeFACS Conference in Ozark, Missouri to share a cooking demonstration and information about the Beef in the Classroom program, including a luncheon to interact and network Welwith the teachers and a booth in the lobby of the event. KY3 Beef Bites. Filmed the September and October KY3 Beef Bites segments. Anyone can view the Beef Bites segments on the Missouri Beef Industry Council Facebook, the MBIC website or on YouTube. The Drive. MBIC has been working with CBB and Cattlemen’s News to get “The Drive” inserted into the Cattlemen’s News publication for publishing in the next fiscal year. This quarterly printed newsletter is available to all producers in the state either by mail in subscription and/or monthly e-newsletters. Dent County Beef Days. MBIC attended the Dent County Beef Days in September. There were 167 4th graders who learned more about beef by-products.

“What Your Dollar Does Meeting”. MBIC launched a producer-facing meeting in Nashville at the national cattle industry convention. Staff and board members visited with producers and business people at the National Convention about the Missouri efforts to drive beef demand. Plans are to host in-state regional meetings in the next fiscal year. Buyers Cards. Additional or new buyer’s cards for livestock markets continue to be popular. Please continue to encourage your local markets to contact us for buyer’s card! Recent shipments have included: Wright County Livestock Auction, Maryville Livestock Auction, Callaway Livestock Center, Roberts Livestock Auction and Ozark Regional Stockyards. Missouri EFACs Conference. Staff traveled to Ozark, Missouri to promote the Beef in the Classroom program and provide a touchpoint and resources to family and consumer science instructors at their annual conference. MBIC hosted an afternoon session with instructors to learn about what MBIC does to help teachers and how MBIC can help getting beef into classroom lessons. Beef It’s What’s for Dinner Signs MBIC continues to cost share metal signs across the state with producers, businesses and advocates of beef. Recent signs are headed across the southern part of the state: including South Central MO, Southwestern MO, and on Missouri State University’s campus. Contact the MBIC office or check out the website to get details on the signs. National Cattlemen’s Convention in Nashville Meetings were held looking at the past 35 years of checkoff accomplishments at the summer meeting in August. Proposals for the upcoming year to drive demand for beef were presented to producer committees that made recommendations to the national checkoff operating committee. The three MBIC Federation board members sitting on those committees include Charles Bassett, Mark Harmon and Nathan Martin. Regional Fairs. A static display from MBIC was viewed by fairgoers at the Ozark Empire Fair in August. The ag-centric display provided fair attendees the chance to learn more about the beef industry. Town


and Country, in Washington Missouri utilized our promotion and education grants to educate about beef to their attendees as well.

education/advocacy portion this fall. Students will take home a weekly summary to reinforce objectives learned in the classroom through the MBK.

The Missouri State Fair was well-attended by many board-members. The Missouri Cattle Women engaged more than a thousand fairgoers to the Beef Showcase. A billboard promoting Beef and the Checkoff was in front of the grandstand promoting beef to fairgoers. Certain fair days included the beef mascot (Bennie the Bull) and ambassadors from the Mo Beef Kids program.

Interns for MBK visited Missouri Prime this summer and discussed program partnerships for the coming year. The Mo Beef Kids team also participated in the Missouri State Fair on August 20, providing program information and a scavenger hunt to encourage youth to learn about beef across the fairgrounds. MBK will be hosting a Southeast regional meeting in the fall. Schools on the calendar for presentations include Lewis County, Arcadia Valley and Kennett in the coming weeks.

MOAND Regional Event. Hosted a MOAND event for registered dietitians. Dieticians learned about beef nutrition and had the opportunity to prepare recipes from Beef It’s What’s for Dinner. The Missouri Wine Council also attended and paired Missouri wines with each recipe. Tailgate Time Kansas City Campaign. MBIC is partnering with iHeart Media, Kansas Beef Council, and Kansas City’s Boulevard Brewing in a fall promotion campaign in the KC area promoting beef and beer for tailgating. The campaign includes radio advertisements, in store displays, and also a custom website featuring recipes from Beef it’s What’s for Dinner. Boulevard is offering $6 off a beef purchase when buying beef and beer, and there is also a sweepstakes drawing to win a grilling package. Pasture to Plate Tours for Dietetic Intern. MBIC is partnering with Midwest Dairy to do a pasture to plate tour at the end of September for the collegiate dietetic intern programs in Missouri. This year, it will be a half-day virtual event on and feature one beef and one dairy farm

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Mo Beef Kids Youth Academy. MBIC launched its second youth academy with a checkoff and program overview in July. As part of youth outreach, ambassadors will work to expand programming and lead community outreach efforts. These ambassadors are developing resources for parents/guardians as they launch the

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What’s Cookin’ at the

Missouri Beef House By Beef House Team

Thank You to Our Volunteers Thank you, thank you to all who volunteered at the MCA Beef House during the 2021 Missouri State Fair, August 12-22, in Sedalia, Missouri. The compassion you show to the people we serve is an inspiration for us all. MCA volunteers are the back-bone of our organization. MCA volunteers are the true heroes who are constantly ready and willing to contribute their personal time, talents and energy just to help make our MCA Beef House a success. MCA volunteers make a day run smoother. MCA volunteers showed up this year as requested and made a difference! In fact, 612 individuals from 47 county cattlemen affiliates, 10 FFA chapters, two Mizzou groups, one MSU group, one MCJA group, FCS Financial and MCW each volunteered for a four-hour shift sometime

Buffalo Livestock Market 1 mile west on Hwy 32 • Buffalo, MO 65622 Barn: 417-345-8122

OCTOBER 2021

Sale Every Saturday 12:00 Noon

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• Selling 1200 to 1700 head Farm Fresh Cattle weekly • Special Stock Cow and Bull Sale 3rd Tuesday night of each month at 6:30 p.m. • Pre-Vac Feeder Calf Sales 2nd Saturday of every month in conjunction with Regular Sale (Pfizer Pre-Vac, BLM BPre-Vac, Bayer Program, Mo Quality Assurance. LMA-Vac and MFA Health Track)

Order Buying Service Available

Owners…

Lyle Caselman 417-345-7876 H 417-533-2944 cell

Leon Caselman 417-345-4514 H 417-588-6185 cell

during the 11-day fair. Our incredible volunteers served a total of 14,029 customers at the MCA Beef House and 2,885 customers at the MCA Beef House Express for a total combined average of 1,553 customers per day. A huge thanks goes to everyone who dined with us, Beef House staff members and volunteers who make it possible to serve close to 10,000 pounds of beef. Missouri undoubtedly loves beef! With some sunny days and some rainy days, our covered patio breezeway was considered the prime spot to eat BEEF. Missouri Cattlemen’s Association continues to showcase beef during the Missouri State Fair, as we have since 1982, and we trust that dining with us will be a memorable experience. Thought for the month: “How much beef could a beef cook cook, if a beef cook could cook beef?” Say that 3 times fast!


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Missouri Beef House Thank You to our Volunteers

Lafayette County Boone County

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Appleton City FFA

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Hwy 42 West • Vienna Missouri 65582 45 Miles South of Jefferson City Selling All classes of Cattle Wednesday • 10:00 a.m. Featuring ‘Star-Vac Program’ Cattle Weekly DVAuction Service for convenient online viewing & bidding For More Information Call… David Patton Office Ross Patton Bill Patton 573-308-6655 573-422-3305 573-308-6657 573-308-6658 Visit our website: www.scrsvienna.com or E-mail us: scrsvienna@gmail.com “Make South Central your Livestock Market”

Callaway/Montgomery

Carroll County


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Missouri Beef House Thank You to our Volunteers

Cooper County

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Douglas/Wright County

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Lafayette County Day 2

Lincoln/Pike County

Lockwood FFA


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Missouri Beef House Thank You to our Volunteers

Macon County

Monroe County

Pettis County FFA

St. Charles County

Specializing in Land Equipment and Livestock

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For Upcoming Sale Info:

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Contact: Mike Williams Higginsville, MO 816-797-5450 mwauctions@ctcis.net

www.wheelerauctions.com

Newton/McDonald County


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2021 American Royal Livestock Show October 6 - October 24 Kansas City, Missouri

American Royal Scholarships Available The American Royal is proud to offer scholarships for outstanding leadership and academic excellence as well as competitive events. Throughout the year, more than 100 scholarships will be awarded to individuals or teams through applications or in the show arena. Academic and Leadership scholarships include the Seaboard Royal Scholars Program, Veterinary Scholars Program and through Agriculture Future of America (AFA). All students are pursuing agriculture

Junior Premium Livestock Auction

The 2021 American Royal Junior Premium Livestock Auction will be held October 16 at 7:00 p.m. in Hale Arena. We hope you will join us in celebrating these exhibitors success while playing a part in impacting their future. State Directories Now Available

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Scholarships to individuals and teams participating in the judging competitions, junior and intercollegiate livestock judging contests, 4-H meats and livestock judging contests as well as crops judging contests are awarded throughout the fall season. Equestrian scholarships are offered to riders in the Saddle Horse Show, Hunter/Jumper, Youth and Open, Cutting Horse, and Quarter Horse Show. Scholarships are offered to outstanding agriculture journalism students during the American Royal Livestock Show to serve as media interns during our annual Livestock Show. For more information on the American Royal Scholarships go to the website: www.americanroyal. com/educational-programming/scholarships/

Come to Kansas City for these 2021 American Royal Charolais Events…

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or veterinary degrees and demonstrate academic and leadership excellence in their schools and communities.

Kansas City, MO Shows and Sales!

October 22 • 10:30 a.m. Charolais Breeders Classic, Hale Arena • 1:30 p.m. Charolais Sale October 23 • 8:00 a.m. - Charolais Junior Heifer Show followed by the National Roll of Excellence Charolais Show, East Side Hale Arena Missouri Charolais Breeders Association President Vice-President Chris Peuster Bruce Bradley 816-529-2190 417-848-3457 Check us out on the web @

Treasurer Secretary Annette Bonacker Judy Shaffer 314-974-0551 417-825-4067 www.missouricharolais.com


2021 American Royal Livestock Show Changes & Reminders Eligibility • All market exhibitors are required to complete a Quality Assurance program. Examples include: Youth for the Quality Care of Animals, Quality Counts, Beef Quality Assurance, Pork Quality Assurance, or other programs approved by the American Royal. The program name and certificate number will be required on all market entry forms. Exhibitors failing to submit this information will have entries returned as incomplete and will be accessed the $10 re-processing fee. Inspection • All livestock are subject to inspection upon arrival. Junior Premium Livestock Auction • All market animal exhibitors that qualify for the Junior Premium Livestock Auction will be required to IN A Ecan complete an Animal Husbandry form, which c be AD i M er m found at www.americanroyal.com. All medications, A vaccinations, injections, medical treatments and any foreign substances administered, in any form or manner, from the ownership deadline (August 15, 2021) through Junior Premium Livestock Auction must be recorded. The American Royal strongly advises all exhibitors to maintain this form from time of ownership and bring with them to the American Royal to ensure accuracy in record keeping. si

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Steers • Federal 840 ID tags will be used as the official identification for steers. Swine • Federal 840 ID tags will be used as official identification for swine. Ear notches will only be utilized as a secondary form of identification.

VIP Vehicle Pass • Authorizes exhibitors to park 1 vehicle in parking lot A, located on the South side of the Livestock barns. VIP Parking will allow exhibitors parking closer to their livestock. No campers or trailers are allowed with this pass. Entry gates will be monitored at all times. There will be a limited quantity of VIP passes available for purchase. Miscellaneous • Outside alcohol is prohibited at all times within the American Royal Center per City lease agreement. • All exhibitors will be required to wear an American Royal shirt during showmanship. • Please wear your exhibitor badge at all times or have it readily available. Wether Dam/Wether Doe Show • DNA will not be required for the wether dam and wether doe show in 2021 COVID-19 GUIDELINES • Exhibitors and family members are asked to refrain from attending the show if they have been in contact AmMAD with anyone exhibiting COVID-19 symptoms within er E IN i the last 14 days, have a fever or other symptoms, orcA if you fall into a high-risk category as defined by the CDC. By participating or attending the American Royal Livestock Show, you are acknowledging that an inherent risk of exposure to COVID-19 exists in any public place where people are present. By attending the American Royal, you and any guests voluntarily assume all risks related to exposure to COVID-19 and agree to not hold the American Royal Association, City of Kansas City, Missouri, County of Jackson; or any of their affiliates, directors, officers, employees, agents, contractors, or volunteers liable for any illness or injury. si

Livestock Schedule on page 42. save

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Zeitlow Distributing Company 11025 Oo Hwy., Boonville, MO 65233 • mosales@zeitlow.com • 800-530-5158

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Living the Ritchie Life.

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See Rules and Regulations for more detailed information on these changes/reminders.

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2021 American Royal Livestock Show Tentative Schedule Wednesday, October 6 12:00 p.m. American Aberdeen, Belted Galloway, Black Hereford, Braunvieh, Gelbvieh, Miniature Herefords, Salers, Move-In Thursday, October 7 8:00 a.m. American Aberdeen, Belted Galloway, Black Hereford, Braunvieh, Gelbvieh, Miniature Herefords, Salers, Move-In 1:00 p.m. Black Hereford Sale – Wagstaff Sale Center Friday, October 8 8:00 a.m. Belted Galloway Open Show – East Side Hale Arena presented by Cavender’s 8:00 a.m. Junior Heifer Showmanship–West Side Hale Arena presented by Cavender’s 8:00 a.m. Wether Dams and Wether Does Move-In and Vet Check (All lambs/goats must be on the grounds by 10:00 p.m.) 10:00 a.m. Wether Dam and Wether Doe Weight Card Turn in Begins – Governors (Weight cards due at 11:00 p.m.) 1:00 p.m. Salers Junior/Open Show – East Side Hale Arena presented by Cavender’s 1:00 p.m. American Aberdeen Open Show – West Side Hale Arena presented by Cavender’s 3:00 p.m. Wether Doe Goat Showmanship – Governors 6:00 p.m. Wether Dam Lamb Showmanship – Governors

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Saturday, October 9 10:00 a.m. Wether Doe Goat Show – Governors 8:00 a.m. Miniature Hereford Junior Show/Open Show – West Side Hale Arena presented by Cavender’s 8:00 a.m. Black Hereford Open Show – East Side Hale Arena presented by Cavender’s 2:00 p.m. Wether Dam Lamb Show – Governors

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1:00 p.m. Gelbvieh Junior/Open Show – West Side Hale Arena presented by Cavender’s 1:00 p.m. Braunvieh Junior/Open Show – East Side Hale Arena presented by Cavender’s Tuesday, October 12 10:00 a.m. Market Barrow and Breeding Gilt Move-In and Vet Check – Governors (All swine must be on the grounds by 11:00 p.m.) Wednesday, October 13 8:00 a.m. Market Lamb/Goat Move-In and Vet Check – Upper Ex (All lambs/goats must be on the grounds by 11:00 p.m.) 8:00 a.m. Market Steers, Chianina, Red Angus and Limousin Move-In – Lower Ex 8:00 a.m. Breeding Gilt Check-In followed by Market Barrow Check-In (All cards due by 1:00 p.m.) – Governors 5:00 p.m. Swine Showmanship – Governors 5:00 p.m. Sullivan Supply Lamb and Goat Clinic 6:00 p.m. Sullivan Supply Lamb and Goat Fitting Contest Thursday, October 14 8:00 a.m. All Market Steers, Chianina, Red Angus and Limousin Must Be On the Grounds 8:00 a.m. Market Lamb/Goat Weight Card Turn in Begins (Weight cards due by 11:00 a.m.) – Upper Ex 9:00 a.m. Market Steer Check-In (Weight cards due by 11:00 a.m.) – Lower Ex 9:00 a.m. Breeding Gilt Show (Pedigreed followed by Crossbred) – Governors 9:00 a.m. Weaver Livestock Lamb and Goat Clinic 9:00 a.m. Chianina Junior/Open Show – Hale Arena presented by Cavender’s 11:00 a.m. Weaver Livestock Cattle Clinic - Hale Arena presented by Cavender’s 1:00 p.m. Market Goat Showmanship – Hale Arena presented by Cavender’s 2:00 p.m. Steer/Junior Heifer Showmanship – Hale Arena presented by Cavender’s 4:00 p.m. Market Lamb Showmanship – Hale Arena presented by Cavender’s Friday, October 15 8:00 a.m. Market Barrow Show (Pedigreed followed by Crossbred) – Governors 8:00 a.m. Market Goat Show – Hale Arena presented by Cavender’s 9:00 a.m. Market Lamb Show – Hale Arena presented by Cavender’s 9:00 a.m. Market Steer Show – Hale Arena presented by Cavender’s 7:00 p.m. Royal Elite Drive – Hale Arena presented by Cavender’s


Saturday, October 16 8:00 a.m. Limousin Junior/Open Show – East Side Hale Arena presented by Cavender’s 8:00 a.m. Red Angus Junior/Open Show – West Side Hale Arena presented by Cavender’s 7:00 p.m. Junior Premium Livestock Auction – Hale Arena presented by Cavender’s Sunday, October 17 8:00 a.m. 4-H/ FFA Livestock Judging Contest – Hale Arena presented by Cavender’s 6:00 p.m. 4-H/ FFA Livestock Judging Awards – Hale Arena presented by Cavender’s Monday, October 18 8:00 a.m. Collegiate Livestock Judging Contest – Hale Arena presented by Cavender’s 7:00 p.m. Collegiate Livestock Judging Banquet – Hale Arena presented by Cavender’s Tuesday, October 19 12:00 p.m. Angus, Charolais, Hereford, Maine-Anjou, Shorthorn, & Simmental Move-In Wednesday, October 20 7:00 a.m. Angus, Charolais, Hereford, Maine-Anjou, Shorthorn, & Simmental Move-In Thursday, October 21 9:00 a.m. Shorthorn Junior Show – East Side Hale Arena presented by Cavender’s 9:00 a.m. Maine-Anjou Junior Show – West Side Hale Arena presented by Cavender’s 4:00 p.m. Junior Heifer Showmanship – East Side Hale Arena presented by Cavender’s

Friday, October 22 8:00 a.m. Charolais Royal Breeders Bull Classic – East Side Hale Arena presented by Cavender’s 8:00 a.m. Maine-Anjou Open Show – West Side Hale Arena presented by Cavender’s 9:30 a.m. Shorthorn Open Show – East Side Hale Arena presented by Cavender’s 1:00 p.m. Angus Junior Heifer Show – East Side Hale Arena presented by Cavender’s 1:30 p.m. Royal Collection Charolais Sale – Wagstaff Sale Center 2:00 p.m. Simmental Junior Heifer Show – West Side Hale Arena presented by Cavender’s Saturday, October 23 8:00 a.m. Angus ROV Show – West Side Hale Arena presented by Cavender’s 8:00 a.m. Charolais Junior Heifer Show followed by National Roll of Excellence Charolais Show – East Side Hale Arena presented by Cavender’s 2:00 p.m. Ladies of the Royal Hereford Sale – Wagstaff Sale Center 4:00 p.m. Hereford Junior Heifer Show – West Side Hale Arena presented by Cavender’s Sunday, October 24 8:00 a.m. National Hereford Show – West Side Hale Arena presented by Cavender’s 8:00 a.m. Simmental PTP Female Show followed by PTP Bull Show – East Side Hale Arena presented by Cavender’s 12:00 p.m. Supreme Champion Jr Heifer Show – Hale Arena presented by Cavender’s The American Royal Management reserves the right to cancel events or change scheduling when necessary.

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On the Edge of

Common Sense with Baxter Black Deer Hunting Cow Lick I’ve got a mule deer hangin’ on my wall from northern New Mexico so I could relate to Rafael’s story. He had joined two of his cousins for a deer hunting trip near Cuba, NM where his uncle had a cabin. They arrived late and missed the first day because cousin Dee Dee was going through changes in her life. To be fair, Dee Dee was a good hunter so her ditsy behavior was unexpected. Rafael had agreed to guide, cook and pack. He was up at 5 am getting the cook stove ready, the firewood gathered and making a racket. By 5:30 he could hear Dee Dee getting ready. A waft of something floral floated from her room. A sugary sweet lilac scent filled the cabin and made his coffee taste funny! “What the heck are you doing?” he asked. “Putting on lotion,” she answered. “Women of a certain age need to protect their skin.”

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He knew she was recently divorced and maybe she was trying to be more desirable. That could explain her mood swings. He tried to be understanding.

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They left the cabin at 6:30 am. Rafael knew the better hunting areas, so he led. In his backpack he stuck in a bottle of water, a skinning knife, twine and trail mix for himself. The rest of his backpack carried her essentials; Sugarless Gatorade, cookies, sardines, crackers, smoked oysters, aspirin, Alka-Seltzer, toothpaste, toothbrush, energy bars, peanut butter, hair brush, half a cantaloupe, matches, Steno, clean T-shirt and socks, binoculars, extra ammo, GPS, 2-way radio and TP. All

this in spite of the fact that he had casually reminded her that they planned to be back to the cabin by Beer:30. By 10 am they had picked a blind along a well-traveled trail. In a short time they heard a small herd of cows coming their way. They had been handled and were not spooked by the humans. Bringin’ up drag was a big red-brown Beef Master bull. He sniffed the air and cautiously walked toward our hunters. Dee Dee got itchy. “Just don’t move,” whispered Rafael, “Don’t be aggressive and he won’t hurt you.” They stood like Easter Island statues as Big Red walked up to Rafael and took a mighty whiff! Then he stepped to Dee Dee. “Hold still,” she heard Rafael say. She froze in fear, her eyeballs about to pop out. Big Red stretched out his huge neck, ran out his big ol’ slobbery tongue and licked Dee Dee across the mouth! Epilogue: The bull ran over Rafael trying to escape Dee Dee’s screaming! Rafael went down, smashing the cantaloupe in his backpack trying to escape! And Dee Dee hung her pant leg upside down on a barb wire fence trying to get away! Finally they managed to evade a swarm of bees by dousing Dee Dee with toothpaste and the sugarless Gatorade mix. It came off like stucco.


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COUNTY NEWS

See What’s Happening in Your County

Southwest Missouri Cattlemen’s Association The Southwest Missouri Cattlemen’s Association began their meeting season on September 7 at the University of Missouri Southwest Research Center, Mt. Vernon. Seventy people were in attendance, including 14 members of the Ash Grove FFA Chapter. Following the meal prepared by Sum-R-Sweets, the FFA students presented their rendition of Paul Harvey’s “So God Made a Farmer.” President Scynthia Schnake then introduced Gibson Insurance Group from Tipton. Led By Dean Gibson, they spoke about the Pasture, Rangeland and Forage (PRF) and Livestock Risk Protection (LRP) they offer farmers. They stressed that it was an insurance program and is not going to make you rich. It does provide a

Dean Gibson, Tipton, makes a point during his presentation on Livestock Risk Protection.

means to guarantee a floor under your feeder cattle, fed cattle, hogs and lambs on a per head basis. The PRF program protects you against any two-month period with less than 90% of average rainfall. The business meeting, led by Scynthia, included a lengthy list of “thank yous” from youth who were recipients of scholarships and livestock awards. A thank you in person was given by Chase Daniel, Arcola, who attends College of the Ozarks and intends to graduate debt-free in a couple of years.

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Other thanks came from the Ash Grove FFA, the MCA Beef House and the McCann Family for Linda’s Memorial.

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State Representative Mitchell Boggs who covers Lawrence County, made a few comments about various activities he’s been involved in and thanked the folks who take time to visit Jefferson City. He stressed the importance of visiting more than just the agriculture offices and to be good examples of Southwest Missouri citizens. He closed by mentioning that Lawrence County would have an entry in the Governor’s Parade on September 18 celebrating Missouri’s 200th birthday.


St. Clair County Cattlemen St. Clair County Cattlemen cooked concession stand at the Osceola Rodeo on Labor Day Weekend. Thanks to everyone that came to the rodeo and supported the beef raffle and the concession stand! All proceeds raised will go to support the Cattlemen’s scholarship fund and MoBeef for MoKids fund. St. Clair County Cattlemen are working hard to keep local beef in St. Clair County schools. This program is sustained not only by the local ranchers who are willing to donate, but also by area businesses that make monetary donations. The Cattlemen have been successful in raising funds for MoBeef for MoKids. Phillip and Carol Johnston, Legacy Bank, Community First Bank, Jim Falk Motors, OakStar Bank, Hawthorne Bank, Dull and Heany, and Gregg Smith Ford have donated so far for the 2021-2022 school year. A big thank you to our donors for supporting the St. Clair County Cattlemen as they support the youth in our county! The next meeting is scheduled for October 12, 2021, at 7 p.m. at Osceola School District, and the sponsors will be Prescott Livestock and Edge.

St. Clair County Cattlemen cooking during Labor Day Weekend.

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Nodaway County Cattlemen The Nodaway County Cattlemen have donated 3,500 hamburger patties to high schools in Nodaway County to be sold and served for their individual concession stands this fall. A total of 1,312 pounds of ground beef was donated to the seven county high schools. The Nodaway County Cattlemen feel that the county has given them so much, and this is just one of the ways to give back to the community.

Northeast Nodaway

Jefferson

North Nodaway

Maryville

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South Nodaway

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Nodaway Holt

West Nodaway


Missouri Angus Breeders The #1 State For Angus!

Bulls are our Business!

The Pipkin Family

9770 W. State Hwy 266 • Springfield, MO 65802 j_pipkin@sbcglobal.net • clearwaterangus.com Jim (cell) 417-827-0623 • Joann (cell) 417-827-2756 WD & Bonita Bulls • Replacement Females for Sale

Fall Sale October 18 Nevada Kenny & Janyce Hinkle 14103 E. Summers Rd. • Nevada, MO 64773 Ph/Fax: 417-944-2219 • Cell: 417-448-4127 E-mail: hpca@centurytel.net

Russel and Randy Miller 21146 400th Street Graham, MO 64455 660-254-0137 • 660-415-6339 E-mail: galaxybeef@hotmail.com Female Sale • November 27

WEIKER

Angus Ranch 660-248-3640

Fred Weiker • Julia Weiker Fred: 660-248-3765

1339 Hwy 124, • Fayette, MO 65248 “Where the Extraordinary are Availible”

For All Your Angus Needs!

22227 Saline 127 Hwy • Malta Bend, Mo 65359 Brian Marshall • (660) 641-4522 www.marshallandfennerfarms.com

Since 1942

Fall Sale October 13. 2021

Sydenstricker Genetics Sale November 20 • Mexico, MO

Fall Production Sale October 23 Versailles

21658 Quarry Lane • Barnett, MO 65011 Office: 573-302-7011 • Fax: 573-348-8325 E-mail: meadangus@yahoo.com Website: www.meadfarms.com

Alan Mead, Owner 573-216-0210

734-260-8635

E-mail: Julie@missouriangus.org

missouriangus.org

Russell & Susan Coon

1318 Shelby 169, Bethel, MO 63434 660-284-6518 h • 660-341-2705 c ruscatsol@gmail.com

Larry Coon

1284 Shelby 169, Bethel, MO 63434 660-284-6473 h • 660-342-3889 c

OCTOBER 2021

Julie Conover, Executive Director 634 S.W. 1201 Rd • Holden, MO 64040

Doug & LaRee Frank 608-279-3172 Brent & Keri Hazelrigg 703-587-9959 Visit us online: FHCCbeef.com Fall Sale • October 17 • Fulton, MO

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Polk County Cattlemen’s Association The Polk County Cattlemen’s Association held their meeting on September 9 at Smith’s Restaurant in Bolivar. There were 52 people in attendance. President Bob Moreland gave an update from the board meeting and past events. Members have helped cook and serve food at four different events throughout July and August. We also had four youth members attend the Youth Industry Tour held in Northwest Missouri this year. Josie Toombs shared about her experience. This was her third year attending. Missouri Beef Days 2022 was also introduced. This event will be held May 16-21, 2022, in Bolivar. There will be various events going on all week, including a concert, rodeo and lots of informational talks. More information will be coming soon. Our meeting sponsor was Multimin, Joe Brown. Joe talked about the purpose of Multimin and the benefits of using it. Lastly, we would love to grow our Facebook page, so go check it out! Our next meeting will be held October 14 at 7 p.m. at Smith’s Restaurant. Springfield Livestock Auction will be our sponsor, and we would love to see you there!

Josie Toombs, Madeline Payne, Marenna Pomeroy and Mary Grace Warden at the youth industry tour.

Bob Moreland, President

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Joe Brown, Multimin

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Cooking steaks for Bolivar’s country days

Enjoying the delicious meal


Southeast Missouri Cattlemen’s Association

The SEMO Cattlemen’s Association held their annual summer picnic on August 26, 2021, in Altenburg, Missouri. No formal meeting was held, but Charlie Besher, MCA Secretary, gave a report of the National Cattlemen’s Beef Association (NCBA) Convention he attended August 10-12 in Nashville, TN. He stated many issues that directly affect the cattle industry as well as educational topics were discussed at the convention. The picnic was full of fellowship and good food.

Dallas County After taking a break this summer, the Dallas County Cattlemen’s Association is looking forward to holding membership meetings again this fall. We have an October meeting planned with details still being finalized. We hope to have a working dog demonstration along with a great meal. So members, watch for your notices. Fourteen of our members traveled to Sedalia and enjoyed working in the Beef House on the last day of the Missouri State Fair. After being postponed last year, the annual Buffalo Celtic Festival was held September 10-11. Attendees came from many states to participate in the games and activities. Our grill was busy cooking up many ribeye steaks, hamburgers and hot dogs during the two-day event.

Plans are to hold our annual meeting sometime in November.

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We will also be firing up our grill at a new upcoming fall festival. Har-Fest will be held on October 9. We look forward to promoting beef that day.

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Lafayette County Cattlemen The 2021 Lafayette County Cattlemen’s Bus Trip traveled to Oklahoma and Kansas from Sunday, August 1, through Thursday, August 5. The Arrow Charter bus departed Lexington, and the group enjoyed a picnic lunch at Carthage Central Park. Upon arrival in Oklahoma City, the group headed to Bricktown and enjoyed a canal ride of the Bricktown Water Taxi, learning about the land rush and early OKC. Monday started with a visit to the National Cowboy and Western Heritage Museum. This was a repeat for the group, and you never get to see everything! The annual art competition exhibit was fabulous, as always. Following lunch at Bedlam BBQ, the next stop was Oklahoma National Stockyards. While the guys attended the auction, the gals enjoyed shopping in Stockyards City for the afternoon. Evening meals were quite the challenge on the trip as many restaurants didn’t have staff for full capacity seating or even enough cooks to feed a group! Tuesday’s first stop was the Weatherford, OK, Wind energy exhibit which featured a wind turbine blade at ground level for a closer look. It seems we always have one stop that surprises us, and this trip, it was the Stafford Air and Space Museum. Weatherford is the hometown of Astronaut Lt. General Thomas P. Stafford. What we found was a 63,000 square foot museum that is considered one of the most comprehensive air & space museums in the United States. From the Wright Brothers to the B-2 and space flights (including Russian satellites), our great tour guide reminded us of many of the things we knew and expanded our understanding of the continuing exploration of space travel.

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We next traveled to Woodward, where the girls enjoyed lunch at Walker Mercantile (followed by a little more shopping) as the guys were hosted by Jerry Nine at the Woodward Livestock Auction. The afternoon was spent at Gardiner Angus at Ashland, KS. Mark Gardiner and sons were great hosts as we toured their sale facility and visited as the fall sale bulls were being freeze branded. We headed to Dodge City and enjoyed dinner at historic Dodge House, just down the road from our hotel.

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Wednesday started with breakfast at Boot Hill Museum as part of the Dodge City Roundup Days. The next stop was Winter Livestock who was celebrating their 85th anniversary sale week. The group enjoyed great hospitality from the Winter crew, including a roast beef dinner. The annual King of the Ring auctioneer contest made the sale extra entertaining. The ladies enjoyed the Roundup Art Show downtown, followed by shopping and an Italian lunch. A trolley tour of Dodge took the

LCCA trippers enjoyed a ride on the Brick Canal in Oklahoma City.

Every trip for LCCA is an “out of this world”experience!

Mark Gardiner shared stories with Gene Wagner and the group during a stop at Gardiner’s Angus Ranch.

group to local feedlots, packing plants and historic Fort Dodge. The evening wrapped up at the Dodge City rodeo. Thursday’s return trip included a stop in Herington, KS, where Debbie Lyons-Blythe met the group for a visit about her ranch, their heifer development program, and conversation about beef sustainability and the national committee work Debbie is a part of. One last ice cream stop along the interstate finished off another great LCCA trip.


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The Benefit of Sound Decisions Source: American Simmental Association Lane Giess You care about soundness in your cow herd, right? Of course, you do; it is a trait many in the beef industry today care deeply about. Whether it is in the form of bull returns and guarantees, early culling of replacement heifers and developing bulls, or using an AI sire sight unseen, soundness plays a critical role in your reputation and the success of your enterprise. Soundness by itself is a complex trait controlled by many skeletal and environmental factors. Fortunately, we know soundness traits such as the curvature of claws, the angle of the hoof, or even the angularity of the hock and skeleton can be improved through genetic selection and appropriate culling practices. The heritability of these traits range from 0.10 to 0.40, meaning approximately 10% to 40% of the variation for soundness traits in our cattle populations can be directly associated with genetics.

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Seedstock producers have the responsibility of not only improving the functionality and performance of beef production on a global scale but also improving the profitability of our commercial customers. Given feet and leg soundness issues can present themselves early in an animal’s lifetime, commercial cattlemen can experience major financial losses if whole sire groups of replacement females go lame, or the new bull they bought this spring breaks down while breeding cows. The duty of seedstock producers is to not only remove bad-footed animals from their annual offerings but to also select for genetic improvement in this area.

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and appear to have the strongest relationship of feet and leg indicator traits with longevity. 1. Hoof Angle a description of the angularity that exists between the base of the hoof to the pastern. Can describe steepness, shallowness, and length of toe. 2. Claw Shape a description of the digital confirmation with regard to shape, size, and symmetry. Can describe divergence and openness, or curling/crossing of claws. 3. Rear Leg Side View a description of the angularity that exists in the hock joint in relation to movement. Can describe straightness and rigidness, or overflexion of the hock joint

The best and most effective way to accomplish selecting for genetic improvement is through the use of genetic tools such as Expected Progeny Difference (EPD) predictions and economic selection indexes. However, as many know, these tools are only available if an appropriate amount of data on the trait of interest is supplied to the genetic evaluation.

The American Simmental Association has invested in new and more comprehensive visual rubrics to aid producers in their efforts to classify feet and leg traits in their cow herds. These new rubrics are available in print, as well as on the web, and can be implemented during semi-annual processing to gather data on whole contemporary groups.

As with any new or novel trait development, the production of these genetic predictions is entirely dependent upon a steady stream of data coming in from you, the membership. Much like docility EPD, feet and leg data collection relies on members to submit their own subjective observations on three traits: hoof angle, claw shape, and rear leg side view (hock angle). These three traits have shown to be lowly genetically correlated with each other, have moderate heritability,

A useful way to gather large amounts of feet and leg data is to develop a web-based survey (Google survey works great), and attach the visual rubrics to each question so data can be gathered electronically and with quick access to visual aids. The most effective and fair assessment should be done when cattle do not have their heads caught in a headcatch, as this leads to uneven weight distribution across


all four limbs. Rather, score animals in small groups as they leave the chute, in alleys with an entry gate and separate exit gate to ensure whole contemporary group reporting and accuracy of data collection. Current feet and leg data counts in Herdbook • 53 member accounts • 3,182 distinct animals • 3,215 claw set • 3,214 hoof angle • 2,089 rear leg side view. Guidelines recommended for feet and leg data collection: • Score the three traits (Hoof Angle, Claw Shape, and Rear Leg Side View) on a 1 to 9 scale using the above rubrics. • If there is variation in the conformation of hoof traits between front/rear or left/right, score the worst hoof. • Scores should be collected on all yearling bulls and heifers up to 18 months of age to capture whole contemporary groups. Reminder: animals that are contemporary by themselves will not have their scores included in the evaluation.

• Scores may be evaluated annually on mature cows (taken in conjunction with mature weights and body condition scores) • Score all animals prior to any hoof trimming. • Score animals on a level and hard surface, devoid of mud or grass to ensure an accurate appraisal. • Score all animals on the same day, from the same evaluator. Ultimately, feet and leg appraisal and data collection has a range of benefits, including training membership to become more aware of conformational differences and characteristics in the soundness of their cow herd and annual seedstock offering, building a more robust understanding of feet and leg traits as direct indicators of soundness and longevity, and building a data set for EPD development so all can benefit from more precise genetic selection. Editor’s note: ASA Director Lane Giess spent significant time researching the genetic control of feet and legs in beef cattle during his master’s thesis and time at ASA. Giess has individually scored over 6,000 cattle for numerous feet and leg observations.

For Your Simmental Contact For Your Simmental NeedsNeeds Contact of TheseBreeders… Missouri Breeders… One of TheseOne Missouri For More Information About Simmental Cattle Please Visit: MissouriSimmental.com

Durham Simmental Farms Your Source for Quality Simmental in Central Missouri

38863 185th Road • Nelson, MO 65347

Ralph 660-837-3353

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STEAKS ALIVE John & Jeanne Scorse Semen, embryos and foundation stock available at the ranch P.O. Box 3832 • Joplin, MO 64803 Phone: 417-437-0911 • Fax: 316-856-2338 E-mail: scorsej@steaksalive.com Web Page: http://www.steaksalive.com

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OCTOBER 2021

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Panel Discussed Benefits of IGS Genetic Evaluation at 2021 NCBA Convention Source: Western Ag Reporter - Katie Giess - reprinted with permission from Western Ag Reporter During the 2021 National Cattlemen Beef Association convention (NCBA) hosted in Nashville, Tennessee, August 10-12, beef industry professionals gathered for a panel discussion covering the topic of – “Why IGS?” International Genetic Solutions (IGS) is the largest multi-breed genetic evaluation tool in beef cattle in the world to date, made up of 20 breeds and partner organizations and over 20 million cattle records. You might be asking, “what is the product of this collaboration?” The answer is directly comparable across breeds to expected progeny differences (EPD). The mindset behind this type of genetic evaluation compared to a single breed elevation is the more steam (data) added, the more powerful the engine (IGS) can run. Today’s American cattlemen either believe in a purebred approach or harnessing the power of crossbreeding. Is there such a thing as a right or wrong train to be on? Depending on the goals of one’s operation, they can hop on whichever “train” best suits them. The panel discussion, led by Chip Kemp of IGS, tapped into the knowledge of three renowned professionals in the beef industry: Dr. Bob Weaber, of Kansas State University (KSU) and the Beef Improvement Federation (BIF); Tom Brink, chief executive officer of the Red Angus Association of America (RAAA); and Marty Ropp, founder and executive officer of Allied Genetic Resources (AGR). Each professional holds a key role in the beef chain, bringing a unique perspective to the conversation in addressing some of the factors of this multi-breed genetic evaluation and how the initiatives ultimately ties back to the industry’s commercial cattlemen.

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“What we need to think about when we think about IGS is how much it {the genetic evaluation} benefits the cattle industry as a whole, as well as the participating breeds,” Brink stated.

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The key difference between a multi-breed genetic evaluation and those more traditional singular breed genetic evaluations, is that the multi-breed approach allows massive amounts of hybrid and crossbred data to be analyzed and connected alongside purebred animals. So long as there are shared sire groups between breed populations, a multi-breed genetic evaluation is possible.

Ten years ago, a multi-breed genetic evaluation was perceived as ‘nonsense’ and held no value for the average cattleman. Ropp, who also has previous breed association experience with the American Simmental Association and has carried that knowledge over to the commercial and seedstock sector, recalled the transition into developing the multi-breed evaluation. “Twenty-three years ago, it was still ‘castles and motes,’ we protected our purebred breed, type of mindset,” Ropp said. “Soon, the genetic value wasn’t there, and members were lost. As we began to work our way back through a genetic evaluation, I was fortunate to be there at a time when the first multi-breed calving ease EPD and carcass EPD was developed. It was then, we knew long term this was going to be a multi-breed business.” Dr. Weaber also weighed in on the purpose of the multibreed evaluation. It gives us a better opportunity to evaluate genetic differences between individuals of different breed compositions, and having a genetic evaluation that’s designed from the beginning with that in mind really adds power to not only the EPD calculation, but benefits the commercial industry,” Dr. Weaber said. Genetic Data Benefits Everyone… Panelist moderator, Kemp, discussed with the panelists what makes IGS unique and where genomics comes into the play. (Continued on page 66)


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“The Bolt software uses a genetic evaluation model that leverages the data more completely,” Dr. Weaber explained. “By one, doing a better job modeling the relationships between individual animals and their grandparents, and two, with the software using the actual SNP marker effects in the data that are quantitatively aligned with individual traits.” With the use of genetic technology rapidly growing in the industry, genomic panels that provide SNP effects offer increasing flexibility for both commercial and seedstock producers. However, the benefit of these genomic chips lose value over time without the collection of actual data and phenotypes. Kemp then directed the conversation towards data collection among seedstock cattlemen. “You’re either a professional seedstock producer and you collect all the data, or you’re not a professional seedstock producer because you don’t collect the data,” Ropp stated firmly. The average cattlemen might argue the other side, that they don’t need to collect all of the data because that may give their competitors a leg up. Brink addressed this notion as a miscommunication between the evaluation and the individual breeder.

“There is a misconception to the individual breeder – keep in mind when you collect data on multiple traits, it benefits your individual herd the most,” Brink said. “That data goes right into the evaluation and yes, there is a ripple effect, it does help the whole evaluation too, but if you concentrate as an individual breeder when you submit your data, you concentrate the benefit of that information on your own cattle.” The Power of Collaboration… Dr. Weaber also addressed the need for evaluation in the long-term, and said collaboration is going to be a big piece of this. “The structure of IGS really lends itself to leverage collective data – shared info, genomics, phenotypes, as new participants come in, they immediately get to leverage those genetic relationships, they also have the opportunity to build out genetic programs to help bolster that improvement,” Dr. Weaber explained. Kemp emphasized the value of sharing sweat equity and the brain power of some of the most intelligent scientists in the industry to keep progressing the evaluation forward. “We have a lot of small to medium size breeds within IGS and a few larger breeds, so by collaborating, we can afford the best scientists and really the best science available for genetic evaluation, that in itself is very powerful for the individual breeder,” Brink shared. In tying the evaluation back to an industry viewpoint, Ropp reflected on the direct and indirect effects it has on today’s commercial cattlemen. “The members of the seedstock producers we work with [of AGR], are absolutely, committed to using a genetic evaluation to make a population of cattle that is better each and every generation for their commercial customers, and then also let those customers use some of the tools that are available downstream to make those decisions if they choose to,” Ropp explained.

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Rounding out the panel discussion, no one shied away from the unique challenges associated with the rapid acceptance and growth of the collaborative IGS model.

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“We’re out there on the edge of science,” Brink said with confidence. “We have the best scientific minds, so together, we’re always learning, improving, and pushing forward. It is work and it won’t be without some bumps along the way, but we understand that. That’s the product of being on the cutting edge.”


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Innovation Meets Application Source: ASA - by Jackie Atkins, PhD A lot has changed at the American Simmental Association in the last five years. Five years ago, we moved into our new headquarters. We were gearing up for our 50th anniversary and preparing to write the history book. We were launching the International Genetic Solutions (IGS) Feeder Profit Calculator, and anticipating this new way to encompass management and genetics to estimate the relative value of a set of feeder calves. The genetic evaluation used the previous Cornell software and older models, including a two-step blending process for genomic information, and three times a year a fresh evaluation was released. Now we are settled in the headquarters, the IGS FPC has years of growth and success under its belt, and we are cranking out weekly genetic evaluations using improved methods: single-step genomics and the BOLT software system. The demographics of genotyped cattle looked really different five years ago. The vast majority of genotypes were on top-end bulls creating: 1) genomic knowledge that had some bias with mainly high-performance animals represented; 2) a very limited number of females genotyped, making maternal traits harder to predict

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with genomics; and 3) a void of terminal cattle with genotypes. At the end of 2017, the ASA Board of Trustees passed a program that was the first of its kind. That program was the Cow Herd DNA Roundup (CHR). Enticing members to genotype their entire cow herd for a greatly reduced rate, this program skyrocketed the number of females genotyped in the genetic evaluation. Further, genotyping the entire cow herd reduced the bias caused by only testing the elite genetics. Additionally, members who sent complete records for mature weight with either a body condition score or a hip height were given another $5.00 back per animal. The CHR was and still is wildly successful for genetic evaluation. Looking at the male to female rates of genotyping alone, we now have over 57,000 females genotyped, compared to 49,000 males entering the evaluation for the ASA. The additional mature weights have spearheaded the development of an improved mature weight EPD given the increase in records. This has also paved the way to investigate maternal genomic effects from direct genomic components for traits, such as calving ease and weaning weight, that wouldn’t have been possible without a large set of female genotypes. The CHR also brings great benefit to members by simply reducing the price for genomically enhanced EPD. Having parentage markers on the entire cow herd and parent confirmation of all those animals is a tremendous benefit alone. Plus, adding genomic information to the cow herd EPD is like adding a lifetime of calves to each cow’s evaluation, making the future selection and mating decisions much more precise.

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By the fall of 2018, the board and staff launched another program to target more carcass records and genomic tests on terminal calves. This program eventually named the Carcass Expansion Project, has increased our annual carcass records by fivefold, and added thousands of carcass records on genotyped cattle — which was close to zero previously. Having this data in the evaluation has already increased our ability to predict carcass traits with a DNA test for all of our members. Last summer, the board passed another innovative program called Calf Crop Genomics to offer research price points for members who test their entire calf crop. This program was built to reward members who submit genomics on the entire calf crop to reduce selection bias even further and provide more accurate EPD to members prior to their selection decisions. Again, rebates are offered for phenotypes on the entire calf crop at birth, weaning, and yearling, with additional incentives for carcass records. While this program is just turning one year old, the membership has already bolstered the genomics in the evaluation by over 13,000 samples in a year

70,000 genotypes to the evaluation in the last four years. We now have over 90,000 mature weight records on 60,000 unique cows and 6,000 genotyped terminal calves. We have been so fortunate to partner with Neogen Genomics on these research projects. It would not be possible to offer the research price points without their generous reduction in the DNA research costs. Since Neogen became an IGS partner, they have extended genomic research price points to all the IGS partner breed organizations. The IGS evaluation now has multiple breed organizations launching their own genomic research programs. Already these programs have brought more knowledge to our members on their cattle. We have already seen improvements to the amount and quality of information going into the genetic predictions. The promise of what this data can do to further improve our ability to make future genetic predictions is thrilling. This took significant commitment from our members, our staff, our partner Neogen Genomics, and our board. We don’t take that commitment for granted. We are excited to see what comes in the next five years.

I am amazed by the cumulative results of these three programs. Through these programs, we added over

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Briarwood Farms Backs Angus Beef at Missouri State Fair Angus Contests Source: Brenda Black for Briarwood Angus The Missouri Angus Association (MAA) and Dr. Curtis Long of Butler, Mo., awarded engraved championship insulated cups to top exhibitors of the 2021 Missouri State Fair Angus Steer Contest. Winners at the fair will subsequently also receive monetary awards from Dr. Long and the MAA during the 2022 MAA Annual Banquet in February. On August 16, 2021, Roger Parker, Mexico, Missouri, judged the OnFoot Open Steer Carcass Show & Live Evaluation Contest with three purebred Angus calves in the ring. The following day, Chris Mullinix sorted through four 4-H and five FFA Angus steers. Samuel Jordan of Andrew County was selected 4-H Champion Angus Steer and Faith Williams of Gasconade County was named 4-H Reserve Champion Angus Steer. In the FFA show, Olivia Gerloff of Owensville FFA took the Championship and Alexis Borgstadt earned Reserve. Each champion and reserve champion anticipates cash prizes of $300 and $200, respectively, to be presented in February.

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Samuel Jordan of Andrew County wins Grand Champion Angus Carcass with his 4-H Grand Champion Angus steer. The 1,375 pound steer dressed at 777 pounds, graded Choice with a yield grade of 2.21, and a 14.2” Rib Eye Area and also took the Reserve Champion Over-All MSF Carcass title. Pictured Front Row (L-R): Dr. Curtis W. Long of Briarwood Angus Farms, 2021 Missouri Beef Queen Avery Schiereck, Samuel Jordan, 2021 Missouri State Fair Queen Rosie Lenz, Missouri Cattlemen’s Association President Patty Wood, and Briarwood Angus Farms manager David Warfield. Back row are members of the Missouri State Fair Commission (L-R): Sherry Jones, Director of Missouri Agriculture Chris Chinn, Randy Little, Nikki Cunningham, Ted Sheppard and Kevin Roberts. (photo courtesy Andy Atzenweiler with Missouri Beef Cattleman)


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Samuel Jordan walking his Angus steer in the live carcass evaluation class. Jordan’s calf took the 4-H Grand Champion Angus steer win the following day and later in the week was named Champion Angus Carcass and Reserve Champion Over-All Carcass. (Photo courtesy Briarwood Angus Farms)

The Missouri State Fair announced carcass results from judge Teagan Schnurbusch of the University of Missouri on Saturday, August 21, with Jordan taking the Grand Champion Angus Carcass and winning the title, engraved cup and $500. His 1,375 pound steer dressed at 777 pounds, graded Choice with a yield grade of 2.21, and a 14.2” Rib Eye Area. Jordan was also the Reserve Champion Over-All MSF Carcass. For that achievement, he earned an additional $500 from sponsor Briarwood Angus Farms. Peyson Larrick of Shelby County, won Reserve Champion Angus Carcass in the carcass show. The winner of $300, his steer weighed 1,275 and dressed at 787 pounds, graded Choice and had a yield grade 2.97, with a 13.8” REA. Three participants in the Carcass and 4-H or FFA shows included Samuel Jordan, Savannah, MO; Peyson Larrick, Shelbina, MO; and Alexis Borgstadt, Concordia, MO. Each Angus youth exhibitor will be awarded $200 in February for participating in both contests.

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For more information about the annual State Fair Carcass Contest, visit http://www.mostatefair.com or http://briarwoodangusfarms.com or contact Briarwood Farms at 660-679-3459. And to learn more about the Missouri Junior Angus program, go to http:// missouriangus.org/juniors.html.

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Charles L. “Chuck” Swope Charles L. “Chuck” Swope of Cuba, Missouri was born on Tuesday, November 17, 1931, at Rich Hill, Missouri the son of Jacob H. and Zella (Quaiatto) Swope. He left from this life on Tuesday, August 3, 2021, at Cuba Manor at the age of 89 years.

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Chuck’s father died when he was 5 years old, and his mother died when he was 10 years old. He then made his home with his mother’s brother and his wife, Mike, and Minnie Quaiatto. He graduated from Rich Hill High School and in the fall of 1949, Chuck enrolled at the University of Missouri Columbia. Working his way through college took him 7 years, graduating in 1956 with a B.S. degree in Animal Husbandry. In 1947 at the age of fifteen, Chuck went to work for National Cowboy Hall of Fame Rodeo Producer & Stock Contractor Clyde S. Miller. He continued to work for Clyde Miller until, Miller sold out his rodeo business at the close of the 1951 rodeo season. This was the start of a lifelong interest in the sport of rodeo. Chuck knew many of the great and near great rodeo hands of the late 1940’s and early 1950’s. In the spring of 1952 Chuck went to work for the Z Bar Cattle Co. He continued working there until he graduated from college. While attending college

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Chuck started dating his partner for life, Melba Smith from Carrollton, Missouri. They were married 66 years. In 1957 Chuck went to work for the University of Missouri Extension Service as an Assistant County Agent in Dekalb County at Maysville, Missouri. After about one and ½ years he transferred to Hold County at Oregon, Missouri as a Balanced Farming Agent. Shortly thereafter, he was promoted to County Extension Director for Holt County. In May of 1965 Chuck took over management of the ranches owned by movie and theater executive, the late E.C. Rhoden which included three ranches in Missouri and one in California. Chuck and Melba and their two small sons moved to the R.S.R. Ranch near Tarkio, Missouri. They continued to live there until the end of 1981 after the passing of Mr. Rhoden. Tarkio was the home of the Missouri High School Rodeo. Chuck served on the Board of Director of the Missouri High School Rodeo Association for 12 years. He held every office of the association including (Continued on page78)


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2 years as president. He also served two years on the Board of Directors of the National High School Rodeo Association. Chuck was a founding member of the Missouri Cattleman’s Association for the first 6 years it was in existence. He also served on the executive committee which oversaw the day-to-day operation of the association until a full-time executive secretary was hired. Chuck was president of the Atchison County Missouri Farm Bureau for several years. He also served several years on the Board of Directors of the Crawford

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County Cattleman’s Association. In 1953 Chuck went to work for the Missouri Department of Agriculture, he continued that job until he retired in 1996. In 2000 he and Melba moved to Cuba, Missouri and shortly thereafter he went to work for Jim’s Motors Trailers which he continued until his death. He traveled over a million miles and delivered trailers all over the USA from sea to sea and border to border! Chuck was preceded in death by his parents Jack and Zella Swope: his in-laws Carmel and Bessie Smith, and a son, Robert “Bobby” Swope. Those who are left to treasure his memory and to continue his legacy are his loving wife of sixty-six years Melba J. (Smith) Swope of Cuba; one son Dr. K.C. and wife Dr. Melanie Swope of Bourbon; one foster son Scott and wife Rosa Swope of Monett; two grandchildren Jared and wife Emily Swope of University City, Erin and husband Jake Harlan of St. James; one great-grandson Quentin and soon to be greatgranddaughter Maggie Lou; nieces, nephews, cousins and many friends. If desired, memorials would be appreciated to Justin Cowboy Crisis Fund or the American Cancer Society.


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Ned E. Daggs

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Ned E. Daggs, 66, of rural Ewing, MO passed away Sunday, August 29, 2021 at Blessing Hospital in Quincy, IL.

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Ned was born May 22, 1955, the son of Glenn B. & Betty L. Crist Daggs. He graduated from Highland High School in 1973 and on went on to earn a certificate from Quincy Technical School. He married Beverly A. Stahl on June 3, 1977 at St. Joseph Catholic Church in Canton, MO.

finding a new calf that had gotten up on its own and hot electric fence that would turn cattle. Spring called for his favorite pastime of checking fence, which was his way of saying he was going mushroom hunting. While he wouldn’t share his secret mushroom spots, he enjoyed welcoming deer and turkey hunters to the farm and the friendships he shared with them and their families. He appreciated the solitude of the farm, but was known to make his rounds to the Farmers Coop, Johnnie’s and Nee Nee’s Café to get supplies and socialize.

He spent his entire life farming and raising livestock on the family farm. He enjoyed simple pleasures such as

(Continued on page 82)


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Ned was currently serving as Vice-President of the Lewis County REC Board, a position that he was honored to hold. He was an active member of the Lewis & Marion County Cattlemen’s Association, Board of Directors for the Missouri Cattlemen’s Association and MU Greenley Research Center Advisory Board member. In prior years Ned served on the Lewis County Extension Council, Lewis Co C-1 School Board, Lewis County Soil & Water Conservation District Board, FSA County Committee and 4-H leader. He was a member of ALOT Class VI.

He leaves behind his wife, Beverly, and two daughters, Angela & Ronnie Hamlin of Ewing, MO and Amanda & Ben Hesse of Coatsburg, IL. Grandchildren Macy & Isabella Hamlin and August & Newt Hesse. In-Laws, Meloy (Bud) & Theresa Stahl of LaGrange, MO. Sister in laws, Karen (Bennie) Dodd of Hannibal, MO; Brenda Lay (Kevin Hermann) of Quincy, IL; Debra (Russ) Reiter of Independence, IA. Brother in laws, Kevin (Luann) Stahl of Plainville, IL; Kent (Angela) Stahl of Camp Point, IL; Don Stahl (Diann Kaylor) of LaGrange, MO; Tom (Sara) Stahl of Taylor, MO; and Tim (Gail) Stahl of Maywood, MO. He was preceded in death by his parents; a brother, Roger Daggs; and nephew, Lee Daggs. Graveside services and burial were held Friday, September 3, 2021 at 3:00 p.m. at Mt. Olivet Cemetery near Ewing, MO. There was not a public visitation, but friends and relatives were invited to the committal service. The family suggests memorials be made to the Mt. Olivet Cemetery or to the Lewis and Marion County Cattleman’s Scholarship Fund. Pallbearers were Blake Stahl, Harold “Sonny” Klocke, Jake Klocke, Craig Myers, Emery “Buster” Geisendorfer and Travis Mathes.

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Honorary pallbearers were Ken Disselhorst, Greg Risinger, Scott MacDonald, Mark Risinger and Jon Kelley.

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Show-Me-Select Lowers Enrollment Fees Source: University of Missouri Extension News COLUMBIA, Mo. – U.S. Marine Corps recruiters used to say they were “looking for a few good men.” University of Missouri Extension livestock specialist Eldon Cole says he is “looking for a few good heifers” to help beef producers through the Show-Me-Select Replacement Heifer Program. To help, SMS recently changed its fee structure. The enrollment fee, formerly $5 per head, now stands at $2 per head. “Previously, we felt some producers were not willing to enroll all of their heifers or were unwilling to enroll any heifers if they only intended to sell a small percentage of what they developed,” says Jordan Thomas, MU Extension beef-calf specialist. “By putting more of the fee on the actual heifers that get tagged rather than those that enroll initially, we hope to get more heifers into the program in coming years,” says Thomas. SMS participants follow a recipe for screening, development, breeding and selection of replacement females. Since 1996, more than 900 Missouri farms and 300 veterinarians have participated, and SMS heifers have sold to buyers in 21 states, says Erin Larimore, SMS sale coordinator.

Through MU Extension’s educational efforts, the program focuses on better heifer performance, increased marketing opportunities and creating a reliable source of quality replacement heifers based on management, reproduction and genetics. MU Extension livestock specialists coordinate sales of spring- and fall-calving heifers. “The Show-Me-Select Replacement Heifer Program is very good at helping cow producers add value to a weaned heifer,” says Cole, one of the program’s earliest supporters. In addition to marketing efforts, the SMS program offers an opportunity to learn SMS’s Total Quality Management strategy to improve herds by retaining heifers they produce. SMS is the first statewide program of its kind in the U.S., and it remains the largest and best known. Despite the COVID-19 pandemic, 5,048 heifers were enrolled in the 2020 sale season, up 2% from 2019. Sales brought $3 million to Missouri’s economy, a 21% increase over 2019. Gross sales of heifers since 1996 total almost $59 million, says Larimore. Missouri is in a favorable place to improve beef herds through SMS, says Cole. Although Missouri slipped to third in the nation in beef head count in the 2021 USDA National Agricultural Statistics Service report, southwestern Missouri still reigns as king of the state’s cow country. Polk County leads with 53,000 head, placing it 20th nationwide in cows per county. Other Missouri counties in the nation’s top spots include Lawrence County, ranking 30th with 49,500 head; Texas County, 44th with 46,000 head; Barry County, 48th with 45,500 head; and Newton County, 50th with 45,000 head.

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“You might wonder why our cows numbers have slipped,” Cole said. “I think a lot of landowners who had beef cows five years ago may have converted to steer or heifer backgrounding or stocker programs. As owners get more mature, they like the convenience of not having cows around 365 days out of the year. After the February 2021 weather, more cows have probably been sold, or will be come weaning time in a few months.”

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Learn more about the SMS program at extension. missouri.edu/programs/show-me-select-replacementheifer-program.


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New Hire I’ve been exposed to cattle my entire life. I’ve had countless naps in my family’s feed trucks, chopped ice with my father on Christmas morning and built the most loyal relationship of my life with Melody, my cow horse. Livestock, row crops, farm implements and farmers are synonymous with my childhood. Imagine my surprise when I learned Cooper purchased a book when he became interested in cattle farming. The book targeted novices who were interested in starting a cattle operation. Its objective was to instruct readers how best to work with live animals – yes, animals that have potential to harm them. I was rendered speechless. Despite making fun of him, I never forgot the book’s first sentence, “Having you show up to help work cattle is like having two good men not show.” How true is that?! Nearly all of us have experienced hiring problems. Finding a good fit for a particular job is becoming more challenging, regardless of in which industry one works.

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Everyone is well-aware of today’s current labor issues. Too many job vacancies and insufficient people to fill them. Some businesses have reduced hours of operation, some are paying excessively hoping to attract new employees and others are closing altogether.

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We are not immune from similar employment issues. Cooper and I are a team. I cannot imagine the difficulty of working “with” us. We communicate without speaking and know one another thoroughly from years of working together. We are a hard fit – a fit made more difficult by a stressful job with uncertain hours. After years of searching for the right hire, we are pleased to share that we have a new associate, Mitch Davis. Mitch is a Poplar Bluff native and, as many of you know,

has a hard job ahead of him in trying to contain us. We met Mitch years ago when he ventured to the Capitol at the ripe age of 17. Anyone willing to brave the Capitol halls at 17 isn’t faint of heart and may survive the craziness that is Cooper, Deering and I. Mitch worked for then-Senator Rob Mayer during Mayer’s tenure as Senate Appropriations Chairman and Senate President. He knows the ins and outs of the legislature and the processes we use to advance or slow proposals. Most importantly, Mitch is simply a great human. While we feel for any of you searching for a hired hand for your farm or any other person necessary to assist in your other operations, we are celebrating for us. We are excited about Mitch and his potential to help us better serve you. We are looking forward to you meeting him soon. In the meantime, good luck to all of you fall calvers! Nancy and Cooper


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Missouri Livestock Symposium Keynote to Speak on Cows and Climate Change Source: University of Missouri Extension KIRKSVILLE, Mo. – Dr. Frank Mitloehner, University of California-Davis professor and air quality extension specialist, will be the keynote speaker on Friday evening December 3rd at the 22nd annual Missouri Livestock Symposium, says Garry L. Mathes, chairman. The Missouri Livestock Symposium returns to an inperson event on December 3 and 4, 2021 at the William Matthew Middle School in Kirksville, MO. Zac Erwin, University of Missouri Extension field specialist in livestock and Symposium vice-chair states, “Livestock producers have faced an onslaught of bad press in recent years about how livestock production contributes to greenhouse gases, but there’s more to the story. Dr. Mitloehner is the leading expert on greenhouse gas production from livestock and will share the rest of that story.” Dr. Mitloehner’s research activities focus on air quality, especially quantification of ammonia, dust and odor emissions in dairies, beef feedlots and poultry operations.

Dr. Frank Mitloehner, University of California-Davis.

are 4 to 10 pm. Friday, December 3, and 8 am to 5 pm on Saturday, December 4.

Erwin adds, the Missouri Livestock Symposium focuses on finding leading experts in their respective fields to educate farmers, ranchers, and the general public on issues affecting livestock production and we are excited to bring Dr. Mitloehner to Kirksville in December.

The program is free, with no advance registration. The Symposium offers a free beef dinner at 6 p.m. Friday and free lunch on Saturday. Meals are coordinated by the Missouri Department of Agriculture and sponsored by Missouri commodity groups.

The Missouri Livestock Symposium has an agricultural trade show both days and educational programming on beef, horses, sheep and goats on Saturday. The hours

Details are on the internet at www.missourilivestock.com or ask at Adair County MU Extension Center, 660-6659866, or Mathes at 660-341-6625.

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816-597-3331 or 816-732-6070

Visit our website kingsvillelivestock.com or E-mail us at: kingsville@earthlink.net

Gelbvieh and Balancer® Bulls & Females Specializing in Balancers® for the Modern Rancher Ertel Cattle Company • 660-234-5265 26694 Anchor Way • Greentop, MO 63546 www.ertelcattle.com • gertel@ertelcattle.com

OCTOBER 2021

Cattle Sale Every Tuesday 10:00 a.m.

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SALE CALENDAR Oct. 4 Oct. 8 Oct. 8 Oct. 9 Oct. 9 Oct. 9 Oct. 9 Oct. 13 Oct. 13 Oct. 16 Oct. 16 Oct. 16 Oct. 16 Oct. 16 Oct. 16 Oct. 16 Oct. 16

Express Ranches Bull & Female Sale, Yukon, OK Smith Valley Angus Sale, Salem, MO J&N Black Hereford Sale, Leavenworth, KS Byergo Sale, Savannah, MO East Central Missouri Angus Sale, Cuba, MO Bonebrake Herefords Annual Production Sale, Columbia, MO Big D Ranch Bull & Female Sale, Center Ridge, AR Valley Oaks Sale, Chilhowee, MO Explosive Cattle Co. Online Bull Sale Bradley Cattle Bred Heifer and Bull Sale, Springfield, MO Heart of the Ozarks Angus Sale, West Plains, MO Byergo Private Treaty Sale, Dearborn, MO 3C Cattle Co. Sale, Carrollton, MO Square B Ranch Open House, Warsaw, MO Aschermann Charolais/Akaushi 33rd Edition Bull Sale, Springfield, MO Gerloff Bull Fest Sale, Bland, MO Angell-Thomas Sale, Paris, MO

Callaway Livestock Center, Inc.

On I-70, 4 miles east of Kingdom City, MO on outer road

573-642-7486 Every Monday:

Slaughter Cattle 12:00 p.m. Selling All Classes of Cattle 12:30 p.m.

1st Thursday Nite of Each Month: OCTOBER 2021

6:00 p.m. Bred Cows and Breeding Bull Sale

112

Jack Harrison 573-999-7197 (owner) John P Harrison............. 573-220-1482 Claude Niemeyer.......... 573-470-1017 Roger Temmen............. 573-680-4538 Justin Oberling.............. 217-440-7724 Glenn Stegman............. 573-619-8495

Oct. 16 Oct. 17 Oct. 17 Oct. 18 Oct. 21 Oct. 22 Oct. 22 Oct. 22 Oct. 23 Oct. 23 Oct. 23 Oct. 23 Oct. 24 Oct. 25 Oct. 25 Oct. 30 Oct. 30 Oct. 30

Sutphin Cattle Co. Sale, Heber Springs, AR Frank/Hazelrigg Sale, Fulton, MO Reynolds Hereford Decades of Design Sale, Huntsville, MO Hinkle’s Prime Cut Angus Sale, Nevada, MO Kirkes Black Angus Ranch Sale, Talihina, OK Spur Ranch Sale, Vinita, OK American Royal Charolais Sale, Kansas City, MO T Bar S Sale, Billings, MO Lacy’s Red Angus with MC Livestock Bull and Female Sale, Drexel, MO Mead Farms Production Sale, Versailles, MO Seedstock Plus Fall Bull & Female Sale, JRS, Carthage, MO New Day Genetics Sale, Salem, MO Baker Angus Sale, Butler, MO Southwest Missouri Performance Tested Bull Sale, Springfield, MO J&L Livestock Angus Female Sale, Billings, MT McBee Cattle Co. Sale, Fayette, MO Wall Street Cattle Co. Sale, Lebanon, MO Cattlemen’s Preferred All Breed Bull & Commercial Female Sale, Harrison, AR


WMC Cattle Co. Annual Bull & Commercial Female Sale, Springfield, MO Meyer Cattle Co. Fall Sale, Bowling Green, MO GenePlus Sale at Chimney Rock, Concord, AR Wright Charolais 11th Annual Female Sale, Kearney, MO Seedstock Plus Red Reward Fall Edition’ Bull & Female Sale, Osceola, MO Andras Red Angus Female Sale, Manchester, IL B/F Cattle Co. Bull Sale, Butler, MO Red Tie Event Red Angus Sale, Tina, MO Worthington Angus Bull & Commercial Female Sale, Dadeville, MO Central States Black Hereford Sale, Lebanon, MO Thomas Farms Fullblood Dispersal Sale, Damascus, AR Gibbs Farms Sale, Ranburne, AL Green Springs Bull Test Sale, Nevada, MO Jamison Herefords Dispersal Sale, Quinter, KS Sydenstricker Genetics Sale, Mexico, MO Dalebanks Angus Sale, Eureka, KS Heart of Missouri Limousin Sale, Lebanon, MO MM Ranch Polled Hereford Sale, Nevada, MO Butch’s Angus Sale, Jackson, MO Galaxy Beef Female Sale, Macon, MO College of the Ozarks Sale, Point Lookout, MO Missouri Opportunity Hereford Sale, Sedalia, MO

MBC Classified The MBC Classified column appears monthly. Classified advertising is only 50¢ a word. Send your check with your ad to Missouri Beef Cattleman, 2306 Bluff Creek Drive, #100, Columbia, Mo 65201. Deadline 15th of month before an issue.

“REESE” DISC MOWERS, CADDY V-RAKES, “REESE” TUBE-LINE BALE WRAPPER, AITCHISON DRILLS, SELF-UNLOADING HAY TRAILERS, HEAVY DUTY BALE AND MINERAL FEEDERS, FEED BUNKS, BALE SPIKES, CONTINUOUS FENCING, COMPLETE CORRAL SYSTEMS, INSTALLATION AVAILABLE: Tigerco Distributing Co. 660-645-2212, 800-432-4020 or www.tigercoinc.com. BLACK SIMMENTAL BULLS SINCE 1993: Calving Ease, Attractive, Athletic, Sound Footed and Docile. We Deliver. Mike Williams, Higginsville, 816-797-5450

OCTOBER 2021

Oct. 31 Nov. 5 Nov. 5-6 Nov. 6 Nov. 6 Nov. 6 Nov. 6 Nov. 6 Nov. 6 Nov. 6 Nov. 6 Nov. 13 Nov. 15 Nov. 18 Nov. 20 Nov. 20 Nov. 20 Nov. 21 Nov. 27 Nov. 27 Nov. 27 Dec. 5

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OCTOBER 2021

Advertiser Index

114

American Angus Association................................................71 American Simmental Association.........................................65 Andras Stock Farm................................................................36 Angell-Thomas Sale...............................................................55 B/F Cattle Co Sale.................................................................50 Baker Angus Sale...................................................................75 Buffalo Livestock Market.......................................................22 Callaway Livestock Center Inc............................................ 112 Cattlemen’s Preferred Sale................................................... 68 Central Missouri Sales Co.................................................... 68 Central States Select Black Hereford Sale..........................107 Classified..............................................................................105 Clearwater Farm....................................................................53 College of the Ozarks Sale....................................................36 Coon Angus Ranch...............................................................53 Dalebanks Sale......................................................................17 Durham Simmental Farms....................................................61 Elanco - Cydectin..................................................................13 Ertell Cattle Company........................................................ 111 F&T Livestock Market...........................................................14 FeedTrain...............................................................................43 Fink Beef Genetics Sale........................................................ 88 Frank and Hazelrigg Angus..................................................53 Friday - Cartoon....................................................................70 Galaxy Beef LLC...................................................................53 GenePlus Sale........................................................................37 Gerloff Farms.........................................................................53 Gibbs Farms Sale...................................................................67 Green Country Crop Insurance............................................42 Green Springs Sale................................................................76 Green’s Welding & Sales........................................................33 Heart of the Ozarks Sale.......................................................51 Hinkle’s Prime Cut Angus.....................................................53 Hinkle’s Prime Cut Angus Sale.............................................45 HydraBed..............................................................................66 Irsik & Doll Feedyard.......................................................... 116 J&L Livestock Sale.................................................................82 Jamison Hereford Dispersal Sale...........................................79 Jim’s Motors...........................................................................78 Joplin Regional Stockyards.....................................................2 Kingsville Livestock Auction............................................... 111 Kirkes Black Angus Ranch Sale............................................73 Kranjec Valley Angus Farma................................................53 KT Farms...............................................................................61 Lacy’s Red Angus Annual Production Sale..........................25 Lucas Cattle Co.....................................................................61 Marshall & Fenner Farms.....................................................53 MC Livestock Annual Production Sale.................................25 MCA - Liability Signs......................................................... 110 MCA - Membership Form...................................................109 MCA - Presidents Council...................................................104 MCA Policy Survey......................................................105-106 MCA Profitability Challenge....................................... 101-102 MCA Queen Contest............................................................ 98

McBee Cattle Co.....................................................................7 MCLC .................................................................................. 90 McPherson Concrete Products............................................105 Mead Cattle Co.................................................................... 86 Mead Farms...........................................................................53 Mead Farms Sale...................................................................23 Merck Animal Health...........................................................58 Merry Meadows Simmental..................................................61 MFA ......................................................................................99 Missouri Angus Association..................................................53 Missouri Angus Breeders.......................................................53 Missouri Beef Industry Council............................................21 Missouri Charolais Breeders Association............................. 40 Missouri Limousin Breeders Association..............................77 Missouri Simmental Association...........................................61 Missouri Simmental Breeders...............................................61 MultiMin...............................................................................19 New Day Genetics Sale................................................... 62-63 Ory’s 07 Red Angus ..............................................................12 Oval F Ranch........................................................................61 Red Tie Event........................................................................27 Reynolds Herefords Sale.......................................................78 RLE Simmental.....................................................................61 Sampson Cattle Co................................................................53 Seedstock Plus Sales............................................................. 115 Sellers Feedlot........................................................................72 Shoal Creek Land & Cattle...................................................61 Show Me Select Advertorial............................................ 38-39 Slayton Farms........................................................................61 South Central Regional Stockyards......................................24 Spur Ranch Angus Sale.........................................................57 Square B Ranch/Quality Beef...............................................53 Steaks Alive............................................................................61 Superior Steel Sales...............................................................69 Sutphin Cattle Company Production Sale............................89 Sydenstricker Genetics...........................................................53 Sydenstricker Genetics Sale.....................................................3 T Bar S Sale...........................................................................83 Thomas Farms Limousin Sale.............................................. 80 Touchstone Energy..............................................................103 Trans Ova..............................................................................29 Valley Oaks Angus................................................................53 Valley Oaks Angus/Valley Oaks Meats.................................15 Wall Street Cattle Co Sale.....................................................59 Weiker Angus Ranch.............................................................53 Westway Feeds.........................................................................9 Wheeler Auctions & Real Estate...........................................28 Wheeler Livestock Market.....................................................26 Mike Williams.......................................................................28 WMC - Bull and Commercial Female Sale..........................81 Working Ranch Expo............................................................74 Worthington Sale...................................................................70 Wright Charolais Fall Event Sale..........................................49 Zeitlow - Ritchie Waterers.....................................................41