September 2021 - Missouri Beef Cattleman

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CONTENTS

September 2021

FEATURES 26

Surprise? Freemartin Heifers

70

Redwater in Missouri

This Common Ranch Occurence May Not Always Be What It Seems

Get Ahead of the Growing Disease Before It’s Too Late

26

MEMBER NEWS 6 Association Update 16 Beef Checkoff News 32 County News

Surprise? Freemartin Heifers

COLUMNS 8

70

Redwater in Missouri

MCA President’s Perspective Farm Safety

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CattleWomen’s Corner

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Straight Talk: Mike Deering

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What’s Cooking at the Beef House

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A Month to Remember

Your Funeral

Steak Fry Thanks

On the Edge of Common Sense: Baxter Black

SEPTEMBER 2021

The Producer Meeting

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84

Junior Spotlight

92

Capitol Update

Firearm Safety

Agricultural Homecoming

The Missouri Beef Cattleman is an official publication of the Missouri Cattlemen’s Association.


MISSOURI

BEEF CATTLEMAN

OFFICIAL PUBLICATION OF THE MISSOURI CATTLEMEN’S ASSOCIATION

Volume 50 - Issue 9 (USPS 890-240 • ISSN 0192-3056) Magazine Publishing Office 2306 Bluff Creek Drive, #100, Columbia, MO 65201 Phone: 573-499-9162 • Fax: 573-499-9167 Andy Atzenweiler: Editor/Production/Ad Sales P.O. Box 480977 • Kansas City, Missouri 64148 816-210-7713 • E-mail: mobeef@sbcglobal.net Macey Hurst • Ad Sales • 573-821-6982

Missouri Cattlemen’s Association MCA Website: www.mocattle.com

Mike Deering • Executive Vice President - Ext 230 Mike@mocattle.com Sydney Thummel • Manager of Membership - Ext 231 Sydney@mocattle.com Macey Hurst • Manager of Strategic Solutions – Ext. 235 MBC Editor/Production Artist Macey@mocattle.com Lisa Stockhorst, Administrative Assistant – Ext 234 Lisa@mocattle.com

Missouri’s Cattlemen Foundation

DEPARTMENTS 7

New MCA Members

14

USMEF News

18

Missouri State Fair Sale of Champions Results

21

Missouri Beef House Highlights and Thank You

30

Obituary: Ernest Edward Fluke

42

Angus Highlight

Photo by Emma Hurst, Lady Livestock Company Missouri Beef Cattleman, (USPS 890-240 • ISSN 0192-3056) is published monthly (12 times a year) and is the official publication of the Missouri Cattlemen’s Association, 2306 Bluff Creek Drive, #100, Columbia, Missouri, 65201. PERIODICALS postage paid at Columbia, Missouri and additional mailing offices. Subscription price is included as a part of the minimum membership dues of $70.00 per year in Missouri Cattlemen’s Association. Postmaster: Send address changes to: Missouri Beef Cattleman, P.O. Box 480977, Kansas City, Missouri 64148

http://mocattle.com/missouricattlewomen.aspx

2021 MCA Officers

Patty Wood, President 660-287-7701 • 16075 Wood Road, La Monte, MO 65337 Bruce Mershon, President-Elect 816-525-1954 • 31107 Lake City Buckner Rd., Buckner, MO 64016 David Dick, Vice President 660-826-0031 • 23529 Anderson School Rd., Sedalia, MO 65301 Matt Hardecke, Treasurer 573-846-6614 • 19102 Skymeadows Dr., Wildwood, MO 63069 Charlie Besher, Secretary 573-866-2846 • RR 5, Box 2402, Patton, MO 63662

2021 MCA Regional Vice Presidents

Region 1: Eric Greenley, 61998 Pleasant Valley Rd. Knox City, MO 63446 660-341-8750 Region 2: Chuck Miller, 393 Spring Garden Road Olean, MO 65064 • 573-881-3589 Region 3: Jeff Reed, PO Box 35 Williamsville, MO 63967 • 903-279-8360 Region 4: Deb Thummel, 12601 Hwy. 46 Sheridan, MO 64486 • 660-541-2606 Region 5: John Shipman, 34266 Hwy KK Mora, MO 65345 • 660-221-1013 Region 6: Warren Love, 8381 NE Hwy ZZ Osceola, MO 64776 • 417-830-1950 Region 7: Josh Worthington, P.O. Box 246 Dadeville, MO 65635 • 417-844-2601

SEPTEMBER 2021

ON THE COVER:

www.mocattlemenfoundation.org

Missouri’s CattleWomen

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SEPTEMBER 2021


Abigail Baumgarth, Catawissa, MO Alec Hill, Excelsior Springs, MO Allison Marsh, California, MO Aydin Morlang, Canton, MO Beau Rector, Lexington, MO Brayden Frerking, Concordia, MO Brent Hazelrigg, Frank/Hazelrigg Cattle Company, Columbia, MO Christine Meyer, C-N-N & Sons Farm, Washington, MO Clinton Haglund, Haglund Cattle Co, Graff, MO Cody Bolfing, California, MO Cody Browning, Purple Wave, Leonard, MO Cole Kampman, Blythedale, MO Craig Kilmer, Kilmer Cattle Co., Kirksville, MO Danny Ross, D & G Farms, Eunice, MO Dave Levett, Levett Cattle, Macon, MO David & Sherry Elliott, Ionia, MO David Hinkebein, Daisy, MO David Thomas, Cainsville, MO Dennis Hobbs, Tucker Farms, Springfield, MO Eden Uhing, Ava, MO Ellie Uhing, Ava, MO Emilee Gorrell, Canton, MO

See the MCA Membership Form on page 93

SEPTEMBER 2021

Emma Bell, Bucklin, MO Emma Uhing, Ava, MO Garrett Nauerth, Higbee, MO Heather Johnson, Salem, MO Jack Keene, Columbia, MO Jason Medows, JM Land & Cattle Company, LLC, St. James, MO Jeff Howard, Cline Wood Agency, Bonita Springs, FL Jessica Koenigsfeld, Centertown, MO John Glueck, Scott City, MO John Meek, Ridgeway, MO John Trachsel, Trachsel Fencing, California, MO Josh Murray, Hillsboro, MO Kailyn Frerking, Concordia, MO Kamden Robertson, Eagleville, MO Keena Lowe, Willow Springs, MO Kenneth Pratt, Andy Perl, B’s Meats LLC, Fordland, MO Kenneth Runde, Runde Farms, Parnell, MO Kilee Bradley/Robinson, Downing, MO Kody Schieber, Conception Jct., MO Kolten Fulks, California, MO Kraig Mort, Mort & Son, Gallatin, MO Lauren Bailey, Clinton, MO Lillian James, Belgrade, MO Lily Stephens, Puxico, MO Luke Dalton, Belgrade, MO Megan Lundy, Greenfield, MO Nolan Smith, Willow Springs, MO Randy Gaddis, Double G Cattle, Albany, MO Randy Stephens, Puxico, MO Riglee Welty, Jefferson City, MO Robert Pickering, Pickering Farms, LLC, Meta, MO Rodney & Kali Erdman, Higginsville, MO Roy Presley, Bear Creek Ranch, Pleasant Hope, MO Ryan Thompson, Thompson Cattle Co., Joplin, MO Ryder Yount, Belgrade, MO Sam Bishop, Bunceton, MO Sophia Althoff, Hillsboro, MO Stanley Hostetler, Triple H Feeds LLC, Miller, MO Stephanie Pierce, Rocking P Farm, West Plains, MO Steve & Tami Fredrickson, Carl Junction, MO Tom Volkart, California, MO Washington, MO Zach & Tara Uhing, Maple Staff Farm, Ava, MO Zach Artz, Artz Farm, Aldrich, MO Zane Dodge, Columbia, MO

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Farm Safety Forty-six years ago, a farm accident nearly took my father-in-law, Murray Wood’s, life. His coveralls caught on an auger while feeding silage on a beautiful spring Sunday morning, and in the blink of an eye, life changed for him as well as the Wood Family farming operation. At the age of sixty-three, he spent thirteen weeks in intensive care, in and out of the hospital for years, daily bandaging, and eventually the leg had to be amputated to save his life with other injuries that he dealt with until he passed away at the age of ninety-four.

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In the decades since, the memory hasn’t faded a bit for our family but we find strength in the inspiration of family and friends who support us in time of need as well as connecting with others who have their stories. We know dad’s incident was scary but in no way unique. Agriculture ranks among the most hazardous industries. We are at very high risk for fatal and nonfatal injuries, and farming is one of the few industries in which family members are also at risk.

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The Missouri’s Cattlemen Foundation (MCF) will host the 19th Annual Farm Safety College at the University of Missouri in Columbia, MO on September 23, 2021, and MSU Collegiate Cattlemen’s will host theirs on September 24, 2021 in Springfield, MO. With the agriculture industry being among the most dangerous professions, it is imperative that our youth understand the importance of safety on the farm as well as learn how to practice proper safety procedures where they live, work, and play. Our sincere appreciation to the Missouri’s Cattlemen Foundation for their mission to promote the educational development of rural youth by aiding injured children, providing farm safety training, leadership programs, and scholarships. MCF

work simply couldn’t happen without donors, board members, volunteers, and supporters like you! Farm life can be demanding and stressful. We have all experienced pandemic impacts, extreme weather conditions, financial pressures due to fluctuating commodity prices, labor shortage, and other factors too numerous to mention. Given these ongoing challenges, it’s no surprise that farmers and farm families are experiencing stress and mental health concerns. Connecting with others who are in the same or a similar boat is so valuable. Talking with others can help to put your own experience in perspective and give you a lot of wisdom and understanding while helping others who are hurting as well. My challenge to you and to myself is… Take time off, enjoy your family and get a mental break. We are never going to get all the work done, and it will always be there for you to get back to the next day. Most importantly, safety first and don’t rush! Ask yourself… if you are not around for your family, then what? A healthy farm or ranch is nothing without a healthy you!



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SEPTEMBER 2021



Straight

Talk

with Mike Deering Your Funeral People show up and tell embarrassing stories you hoped would never be repeated. A song plays that perfectly sums up your life in just three minutes. The room is crowded with everyone wanting to pay their respects, even some you really didn’t like all that much. Have you ever imagined what your funeral might be like? When thinking about the moment you ride off into the sunset, you probably imagine yourself in your 80s or even 90s: your body worn out, your skin thick, textured like leather, etched by windburn, and sun from decades of working on the farm. You picture yourself peacefully drifting off. You’re ready for the next journey. What you don’t imagine is dying young, watching from above as your rambunctious 11 year-old son screams, desperately calling out for his dad, his enthusiasm for life obliterated. Your wife, feeling guilty that she is the one still breathing, feels helpless with nothing but uncertainty ahead. You don’t think about this, but you should.

SEPTEMBER 2021

This was my life in 1993 when my dad drew his last breath under a tractor. A horrible, tragic scene that haunts me to this day, I remember the sound of sparrows, the smell of April rain and the undeniable feeling of emptiness. It’s a vivid memory that won’t leave me alone, even with nearly 30 years gone by. Time doesn’t ease your pain. That’s a statement that anyone who has truly felt loss knows is nonsense.

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Time does allow you to develop the courage to turn pain into something bigger, something more powerful. You turn pain into passion and hope your story strikes a chord in the life of just one person. That’s why every September as part of National Farm Safety and Health Week, I share my story with farmers and ranchers. I

Executive Vice President hope maybe, just maybe, someone cuts this editorial out and hangs it in the barn or on the refrigerator to serve as a sobering reminder that our profession is dangerous. The U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics reports that farming and ranching ranks among the most likely occupations in which people can be killed. Twenty-five out of every 100,000 farmers reportedly died of a workplace injury in 2020, the seventh-highest rate of any profession. I’m not going to claim that every single death could have been prevented, but I know many could have been, and so do you. You know there were times you made decisions to save time or money that weren’t exactly brilliant. You know that you know farming. You’re good at your job. This doesn’t make you invincible. Slow down, evaluate the hazards and avoid shortcuts. I care about you, and I want you to keep farming. I also care about your family. I want no one to feel what I felt, to see what I saw or to hear what I heard nearly 30 years ago. I don’t want to hear people gossiping about how you died “before your time” and making coffee shop predictions about what will become of your kids. Do everything you can to make yourself aware of the dangers. I want your funeral to be a day of celebration with embarrassing stories and laughter. Let’s work to prevent your kid from sharing a similar story. Deal?


SEPTEMBER 2021

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U.S. Beef and Pork Exports on Record Pace through June U.S. red meat exports closed the first half of the year on a strong note, according to data released by USDA and compiled by the U.S. Meat Export Federation (USMEF). Although volume and value eased from the enormous totals posted in April and May, export value was still the highest on record for the month of June and first-half shipments established a record pace for both beef and pork exports. “USMEF had expected a continued strong performance in June for both beef and pork exports, despite significant headwinds,” said USMEF President and CEO Dan Halstrom. “2021 has presented many formidable challenges for the U.S. industry, including a very tight labor situation, logistical obstacles that slowed product movement and foodservice restrictions in many key markets. So the fact that first-half exports reached record levels speaks to the loyalty of our international customer base, strong consumer demand for highquality, nutritious U.S. red meat and the U.S. industry’s ability to adapt to a challenging and rapidly changing business climate. We have also seen a welcome rebound in beef and pork variety meat volumes, which had been down last year.”

SEPTEMBER 2021

June beef exports totaled 112,249 metric tons (mt), up 42% from a year ago when exports were still hampered by a COVID-related slowdown in production. Export value was $804.4 million, up 68% from a year ago and the third highest on record after April and May of this year. First-half exports reached 700,087 mt, up 18% from a year ago, valued at $4.64 billion (up 28%). Compared to 2018, the record year for U.S. beef exports, first-half results were up 6% in volume and 15% in value.

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Beef exports were led by an exceptional performance in South Korea, rapid growth in China, strong demand in Japan and Taiwan and a rebound in shipments to Mexico and Central and South America. Pork exports reached 238,935 mt in June, up 15% from a year ago, while export value climbed 35% to $696.8 million. First-half pork exports topped last year’s record pace by 1% at 1.58 million mt, valued at $4.33 billion (up 7%). While China/Hong Kong remains the largest destination for U.S. pork in 2021, first-half export growth was led by Mexico and Central America, along with a sharp increase in shipments to the Philippines and Colombia. Exports also increased to Japan and South Korea. With growing demand in these markets, exports to China/ Hong Kong accounted for just under 30% of total U.S. export volume, after reaching 39% in the first half of 2020. June exports of U.S. lamb were 37% below last year at 1,083 mt, but still managed a slight increase in value to $1.6 million. For the first half of the year, lamb exports increased 25% to 6,816 mt, valued at $9.1 million (up 14%). Growth was fueled mainly by strong demand for both muscle cuts and variety meat in Mexico, as well as larger muscle cut shipments to Bermuda, Trinidad and Tobago and Canada. A detailed summary of first-half export results for U.S. beef, pork and lamb, including market-specific highlights, is available from the USMEF website.


SEPTEMBER 2021

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Your

BEEF CHECKOFF NEWS 35 Years and Counting! As the Beef Checkoff celebrates its 35th anniversary, the National Cattlemen’s Beef Association (NCBA), a contractor to the Beef Checkoff, is shining a light on the successful promotion and research programs that drive the demand for beef. Nothing epitomizes the Beef Checkoff more than the iconic Beef. It’s What’s For Dinner.® brand. From celebrity voices and images of sizzling steaks on the grill, to the familiar “Rodeo” music composed by Aaron Copland, the sights and sounds of the brand are recognized by generations of consumers. As a proud contractor to the Beef Checkoff, NCBA has managed the Beef. It’s What’s For Dinner. consumer marketing program for more than 27 years, inspiring people to purchase and enjoy beef.

SEPTEMBER 2021

“What has made the brand so successful over the years is the ability to adapt based on changing consumer demographics,” said Becca McMillan, Oklahoma producer and co-chair of the Domestic Marketing Checkoff Committee. “It truly has provided producers, like me, a voice and an opportunity to connect with consumers.”

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When Beef. It’s What’s For Dinner. was born in the early ‘90s, the brand frequently appeared in television ads which featured familiar voices of well-known actors. At a time when there was a handful of consolidated networks, television advertising was an effective and logical choice. In today’s ultra-fragmented media landscape there is an endless number of media outlets and advertising opportunities.

Over the years marketing efforts transitioned to digital and social media, reaching consumers where they find information and make purchasing decisions. Today, the vast majority of consumers use smart phones and computers, accessing popular platforms such as YouTube, Facebook and Google, where Checkoff advertising runs year-round. Digital advertising is cost-effective, and ads can be strategically targeted to specific consumers. For example, digital beef ads can be fed to consumers looking for alternative meats, reminding them that beef is the protein of choice. Use of influencers such as chefs, food bloggers, dietitians and producers themselves, also extends the social reach of the positive beef message. These third-party endorsers actively engage with their followers making an emotional connection with consumers, helping combat misinformation about the industry. Beef. It’s What’s For Dinner. advertised on the Hallmark Channel in December 2020 to promote beef for the holidays, appeared on Fox Sports during the Beef. It’s What’s For Dinner. 300 NASCAR Xfinity Series race in February 2021 and is currently showcasing beef as the summer grilling choice on the Food Network. No matter how beef’s story has been shared over the last three decades, one thing remains the same and that is the need for consumer education. Beef. It’s What’s For Dinner. remains a trusted resource for shoppers to learn about beef’s nutritional benefits, find tips for selecting and preparing beef and discover


new recipes. In the last year alone, Beef. It’s What’s For Dinner. garnered more than 1 billion impressions, and the brand is recognized by 70% of the U.S. population.

Beef Checkoff programs have diligently communicated beef’s great taste, value and nutrition to consumers here in the U.S. and around the world, for 35 years.

Jo Ann Smith of Wacahoota, Florida was presented with the Cattlemen’s Beef Board’s first-ever Beef Checkoff Visionary Award during the 2021 Cattle Industry Convention’s Opening General Session in Nashville, Tennessee. This honor recognizes an individual in the beef industry who has demonstrated exemplary support of and commitment to the Checkoff’s goals and vision.

Beef. It’s What’s For Dinner. continues to be the platform for promoting beef’s nutrition, taste and quality as well as for sharing the stories about the producers behind the product. At the end of the day the question on everyone’s mind is “what’s for dinner?” and luckily there is an easy answer: Beef. It’s What’s For Dinner. For more information, visit www. beefitswhatsfordinner.com.

“Jo Ann Smith has been a tireless advocate for the beef industry for decades,” said Hugh Sanburg, 2021 Chair of the Cattlemen’s Beef Board (CBB). “When national trends and fad diets tarnished beef’s image in the late 1970s and early 1980s, demand fell sharply. Jo Ann and other beef industry stakeholders worked diligently to win approval for a national Beef Checkoff program. Without Jo Ann’s efforts, the beef industry might look very different today.” More than 40 years ago, as cattle prices were plummeting, a group of cattlemen and ranchers came to Smith, asking how the beef industry could help itself and address flagging consumer demand. The question, “What could we accomplish with a national checkoff?” came up during those discussions.

SEPTEMBER 2021

“As a group, we tried to put together a program that would pass so we would have a checkoff,” Smith said. “That was our ultimate goal. We needed enough money to pull together, as an industry, and get beef’s message out because new consumers are out there every day – and it’s our responsibility to educate them about why they should choose beef.” Thanks to the strong foundation that Smith and others established during those early days,

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Missouri State Fair Sale of Champions Source: Missouri State Fair (SEDALIA, Mo.)—The Missouri State Fair celebrated youth in agriculture on Saturday, August 21. The annual Sale of Champions highlighted the day, breaking records from previous sales, raising a total of $185,948 for Youth in Agriculture. The Grand Champion Steer was exhibited by Payton Rodgers of Savannah, MO. Payton is the daughter of Blaine and Melissa Rodgers, and she is a member of the Kodiak Kadettes 4-H Club. Her 1,305-pound Crossbred steer sold for $10,000, and was purchased by Edward Jones and 42 Edward Jones Associates located throughout Missouri and Illinois. Additional funds for the Grand Champion Steer were also contributed by Youth in Agriculture and hometown supporters resulting in a final selling price of $22,373. The beef was donated to the University of Missouri’s Livestock Judging Team. The Grand Champion Barrow was exhibited by Connor Keithley of Chillicothe, MO. Connor is the son of Chad and Betsy Keithley, and he is a member of the Chillicothe FFA Chapter. His 225-pound Crossbred hog was purchased for $7,800 by Missouri State Fair Concessionaires and Commercial Exhibitors. This was a record amount raised by the Concessionaires. Additional funds were also contributed by Youth in Agriculture and hometown supporters resulting in a record-breaking final selling price of $44,573. This is the largest amount an exhibitor has ever received for their animal in the history of the Sale of Champions! The pork was donated to Feeding Missouri.

SEPTEMBER 2021

Payge Dahmer of Nevada, MO exhibited the Grand Champion Market Lamb. Payge is the daughter of Cory and Amy Dahmer, and she is a member of the Nevada FFA Chapter. Her Hampshire lamb weighed 128 pounds and was purchased for $4,500 by RIBUS, Inc./ Steve Peirce of St. Louis and the Grant Company LLC/ Eric Grant of St. Joseph; along with additional funds from Youth in Agriculture and hometown supporters, the final selling price was $12,621. The lamb was donated to Feeding Missouri.

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The Grand Champion Meat Goat was exhibited by Rylee Anderson of Chillicothe, MO. Rylee is the daughter of Brad and Lori Anderson, and she is a member of the Liberty 4-H Club. Her Boer goat weighed 79 pounds and was purchased for $4,250 by the Mizzou Sigma Alpha-Alpha Chi Sorority, the Mizzou Independent Aggies, the Mizzou Alpha Gamma Rho Fraternity and the Mizzou College of Agriculture, Food & Natural Resources, Division of Animal Sciences.

Additional funds were also contributed by Youth in Agriculture and hometown supporters resulting in a record-breaking final selling price of $17,369. The goat was donated to the University of Missouri Livestock Judging Team. Carissa Stong, of Sheldon, exhibited the Grand Champion Pen of Rabbits. Carissa is the daughter of Dusty and Melissa Stong, and she is a member of the Lone Star 4-H Club. Her New Zealand pen of rabbits weighed an average of 4.42 pounds and was purchased for $1,500 by the Missouri State Rabbit Producers Association and Missouri State Fair Rabbit Exhibitors; along with additional funds from Youth in Agriculture and hometown supporters, the final selling price was $2,752. The Grand Champion Pen of Chickens was exhibited by Hayden Duncan, of Centertown, MO. Hayden is the son of Kevin and Diana Duncan, and he is a member of the Columbia FFA Chapter. His pen of Cornish Cross broilers weighed an average of 7 pounds and was purchased by the Frank & Hazelrigg Cattle Company, Columbia, for $1,600. Additional funds were contributed from Youth in Agriculture and hometown supporters resulting in a final selling price of $2,615. New to the Sale of Champions this year, was the addition of the Junior Show Grand and Reserve Champion Hams and Bacons. The Grand Champion Ham was exhibited by Josie Stewart of Russellville, MO. She is the daughter of Clay and Kayla Stewart, and she is a member of the Russellville FFA Chapter. Josie’s 24-pound ham was purchased by the Missouri Soybean Merchandising Council - brought to you by Missouri soybean farmers and their check-off, for $2,500. Additional funds from Youth in Agriculture and hometown supporters resulted in a final selling price of $5,520. The Grand Champion Bacon was exhibited by Trent Haas of Curryville, MO. Trent is the son of Darryl and Amanda Haas, and he is a member of the Bowling Green FFA Chapter. Trent’s 7.09- pound bacon was purchased by Ditzfeld Transfer of Sedalia for $500. Additional funds from Youth in Agriculture and hometown supporters resulted in a final selling price of $4,500. The bacon was donated to the Missouri State Fair Foundation. Lucas Leefers, of Edgerton, MO exhibited the Reserve Grand Champion Steer. Lucas is the son of Doyle and Kristen Leefers, and he is a member of the Hoover Heroes 4-H Club. Lucas’ 1,330-pound Crossbred


steer was purchased for $7,500 by the Climate Field View Corporation. Additional funds from Youth in Agriculture and hometown supporters resulted in a final selling price of $17,419. The beef was donated to the Missouri 4-H Foundation. Wyatt Collard of Oronogo, MO showed the Reserve Grand Champion Barrow. Wyatt is the son of Doug and Joy Collard, and he is a member of the Carthage FFA Chapter. Wyatt’s 290-pound Crossbred barrow was purchased for $7,500 by CFM Insurance, Inc., Concordia; Heimer Hampshires/Jesse & Amy Heimer of Taylor; and Passion for Pigs Veterinary Services LLC/ Dr. Stephen Patterson of Shelbina. Additional funds were provided by Youth in Agriculture and hometown supporters resulting in a final selling price of $17,879. The pork was donated to the Missouri State Fair Foundation. Reagan Rodgers of Savannah, MO showed the Reserve Grand Champion Market Lamb. Reagan is the daughter of Blaine and Melissa Rodgers, and she is a member of the Kodiak Kadettes 4-H Club. Her Hampshire lamb weighed 145 pounds and was purchased for $3,500 by Edward Jones and 42 Edward Jones Associates located throughout Missouri and Illinois. Additional funds were also contributed by Youth in Agriculture and hometown supporters resulting in a final selling price of $11,686. The lamb was donated to the University of Missouri Livestock Judging Team. Thomas Limbach, of Eugene, MO exhibited the Reserve Grand Champion Meat Goat. Thomas is the son of Dennis and Twyla Limbach, and he is a member of the Spring Garden 4-H Club. Thomas’ Boer goat weighed 90 pounds and sold for $3,000 to Heimer & Associates, Inc./Rodney Heimer, Quincy, IL; and ADM Animal Nutrition/MoorMan’s ShowTec. Additional funds from Youth in Agriculture and hometown supporters resulted in a final selling price of $8,137.

The Reserve Grand Champion Ham was exhibited by Quynten Cary of California. Quynten is the son of Charley & Deb Cary, and he is a member of the California FFA Chapter. Quynten’s 22.67 pound-ham was purchased by OBP, St. Louis, for $2,000. Additional funds from Youth in Agriculture and hometown supporters resulted in a final selling price of $7,180. The Reserve Grand Champion Bacon was exhibited by Kash Hentges of Clarksburg. Kash is the son of Wes and Cindy Hentges, and he is a member of the Tipton 4-H Club. Kash’s 9.02 pound-bacon was purchased by Ditzfeld Transfer of Sedalia for $800. Additional funds from Youth in Agriculture and hometown supporters resulted in a final selling price of $3,575. The final lot of the day was the Limited Edition Sale of Champions Commemorative Belt Buckle that was purchased by Keithley Farms/Chad & Betsy Kiethley of Chillicothe for $1,600. Chuck Miller, Sale of Champions Superintendent, and Rodney Heimer, Co-Chairman of the Missouri State Fair Foundation Youth in Agriculture Committee offered thanks and appreciation to all buyers and Youth in Agriculture sponsors. “The youth exhibitors were especially excited to participate in the Sale this year and raised an enormous amount of hometown support.” Proceeds from the Sale go to the sale exhibitors and are also used to award Missouri State Fair Youth in Agriculture scholarships. They also thanked LiveAuctions.tv for providing their online bidding service which was sponsored by Wheeler Auctions & Real Estate and Wheeler Angus Farm/Chas Wheeler of Paris. A complete list of all 2021 Youth in Agriculture sponsors will soon be available at www.mostatefair.com and mostatefairfoundation.net.

SEPTEMBER 2021

Kaela Sadler, of Atlanta, exhibited the Reserve Grand Champion Pen of Rabbits. Kaela is the daughter of Travis and Jodi Britton, and she is a member of the Atlanta Home Pioneer 4-H Club. Her Caifornian pen of rabbits weighed an average 5.2 pounds and was purchased for $2,100 by The Grain Belt Express – building Missouri’s future and delivering low cost wind energy to at least 39 Missouri cities. Additional funds from Youth in Agriculture and hometown supporters resulted in a final selling price of $4,123.

Hayden Duncan of Columbia, MO exhibited the Reserve Grand Champion Pen of Chickens. Hayden is the son of Kevin and Diana Duncan, and he is a member of the Columbia FFA Chapter. Hayden’s pen of Cornish Cross chickens weighed an average of 6.6 pounds and was purchased by American Family Mutual Insurance Company, St. Joseph; J.R. Reid, American Family Insurance Agency in Sedalia; and Youth in Agriculture supporters for $1,250. Additional funds were contributed by hometown and Youth in Agriculture supporters resulting in a final selling price of $2,026. The chicken was donated to the University of Missouri Livestock Judging Team.

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What’s Cookin’ at the

Missouri Beef House By Beef House Team

Steak Fry Thanks Ever wonder who is behind the scenes of the 18th Annual MCA Steak Fry in June decorating the tables and preparing the meal? MCA cattlemen and cattlewomen volunteers!!! John and Kathy Harris and Pat and Patty Wood plan the menu with input from the MCA staff, order food according to projected attendance, and prepare checklists for all necessary items from tableware to drinks and a lot in between. Our menu included 10 ounce ribeye, baked potato, salad, honey butter skillet corn, dinner roll, cookies, tea and lemonade.

SEPTEMBER 2021

Suetta Carter, Mike Deering, Kathy Harris, Jack Long, Merrilyn Williams, and Patty Wood decorated all the tables with collected items from Patty’s craft closet. With the numbers anticipated this year, it was imperative that we have three large grills to cook our steaks which were donated by ShowMe Beef/Missouri Prime Beef Packers in Pleasant Hope, Missouri. A BIG THANKS to Lafayette County Cattlemen, Pettis County Cattlemen and Mike Carter for the use of their cookers.

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While most of the food is prepared at the Missouri Beef House, all food and serving items must be transferred to the Agriculture Building on the Missouri State Fairgrounds where our event is held due to large attendance numbers. A HUGE THANKS to Mike Carter and John Harris for bringing their side-by-side ATVs and trailers to transport many loads back and forth between the two locations. A TREMENDOUS THANKS to all our volunteers who helped either prepare, cook, serve, clean-up, etc.: from Benton County: Marvin and Carolyn Dieckman; from Bollinger County: Charlie Besher; from Boone County: Trista McDannald; from Cape Girardeau County: Butch and Eileen Meier; from Cedar County:

Cameron Parrish; from Christian County: Lauren Gilbert; from Clinton County: Isaac Rhode; from Cole County: Ed and Judy Ehrhardt: from Cooper County: Eric Kraus; from Greene County: Lucas Crutcher and Emma Hankins; from Howell County: Blake Crow; from Johnson County: Kenny and Susan Smarr; from Lafayette County: Jeff Bergman, Gary Copenhaver, Marsha Corbin, Ethan Dahler, Marlene Edwards, John and Kathy Harris, Sherie and Darrell Neuner, Don Schlesselman; from Pettis County: Mike and Suetta Carter, Alan Ream, John Shipman, Ted and Merrilyn Williams, Pat and Patty Wood. The success of the dinner served to 500+ people was possible because each of these volunteers work for a cause, not applause; live life to express not impress! Thought for the Month…“Little Boy Blue, go shut the gate. The sheep’s in the meadow, the cow’s on the plate!”


Missouri State Fair Highlights First Customers at the Missouri Beef House 2021

The first customers at the Missouri Beef House this year during the Missouri State Fair were one family of five! Larry and Cathy are Joanna’s parents. Trent was officially the first through the line. Pictured are Larry & Cathy Buckley, Miller County with Trent, Joanna, and Lorelai Kuecker, Lafayette County. The Missouri Beef House opens every day at 11 a.m. during the Missouri State Fair. Photo by Sydney Thummel.

2021 Missouri Beef House Staff

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Missouri Beef House Thank You to our Volunteers

Boys and Girls Club Visit Eugene FFA

Cass/Jackson County

Gentry County

Specializing in Land Equipment and Livestock SEPTEMBER 2021

For Upcoming Sale Info:

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Contact: Mike Williams Higginsville, MO 816-797-5450 mwauctions@ctcis.net

www.wheelerauctions.com

Hickory County


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Missouri Beef House Thank You to our Volunteers

Missouri Junior Cattlemen’s Association

Morgan County

South Central Cattlemen

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Cole County

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California FFA

(Continued on page 86)


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Ernest Edward Flucke Ernest “Ernie” Edward Flucke, 81, of Wellington passed away July 20, 2021 at his home surrounded by family. Visitation will be Saturday, July 24, 2021 at St. Luke Evangelical Free Church, 700 Mo Highway 224, Wellington from 10:00 am until 12:00 pm. A funeral service will also be on Saturday at the church at 12:00 pm. Burial with Military Honors will be in the St. Luke Cemetery. Memorials may be made to St. Luke Evangelical Free Church. Memories and condolences may be left at www.LedfordFamilyFH.com. Arrangements have been entrusted to Walker-NadlerFuller Funeral Home, 1720 South Street, Lexington, Mo 64067, 660-259-2245. Ernie was born January 10, 1940 in Bethany, Mo to Ernest F.W. and Lorene (Rogge) Flucke. On December 27, 1985 he married Maxine (Farley) Flucke. He graduated from Wellington High School in 1957. Ernie was a lifelong member of St. Luke Evangelical Free Church. He was Confirmed in 1953. Ernie earned a Bachelor of Science Degree in Agriculture from the University of Missouri, Columbia. He was a member of Alpha Gamma Sigma Fraternity. He served for three years in the United States Army as a Reserve Commissioned Officer in Denver, Co. During that time he achieved the rank of Captain. He then taught Vocational Agriculture for a year in Wellington and later went back to school to earn an MBA from the University of Missouri, Kansas City. Ernie retired as a Garden Shop Manager with K-Mart after 28 years. He lived and worked on the family Century Farm, raising Simmental Breeding Cattle.

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Ernie was a 40 year member of the Lion’s Club, a board member and past Treasurer of the Kid’s First Foundation, a board member of the Lafayette County Cattlemen’s Association, a Manager for the Samaritan’s Purse Shoebox Project, served as a board member, past Secretary and “Jokester” for the local AARP chapter and was a member of the Borgman-Osthoff American Legion Post 134.

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Survivors include his wife, Maxine, of the home; adopted daughter, Nancy Wyatt and husband John of Plymouth, Wi; and step daughter Cathy (Choate) Young and husband Jack of Oak Grove, Mo; six grandchildren and ten great grandchildren. Ernie was preceded in death by his parents; his first wife, Donna (Ferdinandsen) Flucke; and his sister, Dot (Renno) Nadler. To send flowers or a memorial gift to the family of Ernest Edward Flucke please visit our Sympathy Store.


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COUNTY NEWS

See What’s Happening in Your County

Southeast Missouri Cattlemen The SEMO Cattlemen’s Association served lunch on July 14, 2021, to those attending the 41st Annual Jackson Area Chamber of Commerce Agri-Business Tour. This is one of the longest running agriculture tours in the state. The tour showcases industrial and farm businesses in Southeast Missouri. Approximately 100 attendees spent time at EPS in Perryville, Schoen Farms Dairy in Oak Ridge, Spooler Farms in Apple Creek and Midwest Sterilization in Jackson.

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Your One-Stop for Braunvieh Influence and Black Hybrid Commercial Females

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Call us to see some of the best calf raisers in the business. Grouping and Marketing Customers’ Calves Since 1992!

The SEMO Cattlemen will hold their annual summer picnic on Thursday, August 26, 2021, at 6:00 pm. at the Altenburg Fairgrounds. The program committee is planning some informational meetings for the fall and winter months. If a member has a specific topic they are interested in learning more about, the SEMO Cattlemen’s board would like to hear from you.

Ron McBee

221 State Hwy H Fayette, MO 65248

(573) 228-2517 mcbcattle@aol.com

McBeeCattleCompany.com

Annual Fall Bull & Female Sale, October 30, 2021


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St. Clair County Cattlemen’s Association St. Clair County Cattlemen’s Association met on Tuesday, August 10, at Farmhouse Kitchen with 25 members and guests present. Tom Browning and Brian Mouse with All-American Agency Group spoke to the Cattlemen on Livestock Risk Insurance. All-American Agency Group was started in 2012 by Brian Mouse and currently has three locations: Urich, Holden and Appleton City. Tom started by asking the group what the two biggest risks are facing the cattle industry. He said they were market risk and weather risk. Livestock Protection Insurance helps to lower the risks that you cannot control. Why would you purchase insurance like this? Livestock Protection Insurance helps to protect your cattle business against market decline. You can choose coverage ranging from 70 to 100% of expected ending value. Policy size can be up to 6,000 head, and you must own the livestock. Coverage must be purchased by November 15. Tom and Brian will help people find the right insurance for their needs. Thank you, Tom Browning and Brian Mouse with All-American Agency Group, for speaking to our group IN E cA and sponsoring our meeting! Thank you, Farmhouse AD i M er m Kitchen, for the delicious meal! A si

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St. Clair County Cattlemen are preparing for the start of school with the MoBeef for MoKids Program. Any person or business interested in donating, please contact Weston Shelby or Lawanna Salmon. Monetary donations are being taken to help the Cattlemen purchase cattle when no one has one ready to go at the scheduled time. A big thank you to Community First Bank, Legacy Bank, Hawthorne Bank, Gregg Smith Ford, Dull and Heany Law Office, Oakstar Bank, Jim Falk Motors and Philip and Carol Johnston who have donated so far for the 2021-2022 school year. St. Clair County Cattlemen won a Miraco 3345 30-Gallon 1-Hole Mira Fount Waterer at the Missouri Cattlemen’s Convention in January. The

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Cattlemen have decided to offer it up to any member that is interested. All proceeds will go to support the Scholarship Fund. Anyone interested should contact Weston Shelby. The Cattlemen are selling tickets for the ½ Beef Raffle until Labor Day weekend. Tickets are $5 each. The winner will receive ½ a beef and processing. The drawing will be held Sunday at the Osceola Rodeo, and the beef will go to Buchen Beef in September 2021. All proceeds from the Beef Raffle will go to support the Scholarship Fund. Our next meeting is scheduled for October 12, 2021, at 7 p.m. at Osceola School District in Osceola, Missouri. save

Cuts e.g.

Living the Ritchie Life. The choice of what to cut back on is part of living a busy life. Provide fresh water for your animals, and have more for the other things.

MONEY

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Zeitlow Distributing Company 11025 Oo Hwy., Boonville, MO 65233 • mosales@zeitlow.com • 800-530-5158

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Henry County Henry County Cattlemen grilled beef burgers for the Sale of Champions at the Henry County Fair on July 15. Around 180 burgers were served to support our future cattlemen and cattlewomen.

Pictured left to right: Sammee, Marylin and Anthony Lesmeister, Rick Fosnow, Taylor Bush and Josiah Town. Dale Lawler also helped but is not pictured.

Henry County Cattlemen were honored when Montrose FFA and Montrose Busy Beavers 4-H club members offered to work at the Beef House with them. A BIG thank you goes out to these hardworking young people and their parents for supporting beef.

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Lafayette County Cattlemen The Lafayette County Cattlemen annually sponsor the Rate of Gain Contest for Market Steers at the Lafayette County 4-H and FFA Fair. This year’s winner was Noah Mahnken of Corder. Noah is a member of the Hitt 4-H Club and the son of Luke and Jennifer Mahnken. July 23 the LCCA held the Scholarship Dinner & Auction at the Concordia Community Center. Following an excellent prime rib dinner catered by Randy Hinck and Plowboys of Marshall, a short business meeting was held. Officers retained their positions for the remainder of the year by vote of the membership. Special recognition was given to long-time member W. A. Schlesselman for his 95th birthday and over 75 years of farming and raising cattle in Lafayette County. State Representative Terry Thompson of District 53 presented a resolution on behalf of the Missouri House of Representatives.

W.A. Schlesselman was honored with a resolution from the Missouri House of Representatives. State Rep. Terry Thompson presented the resolution.

Scholarship winners were introduced. This year, LCCA awarded 7 scholarships of $1,250 each. The awardees then helped auctioneer James Bell during the Live Auction portion of the evening. The crowd of over 125 members and friends again supported the youth of Lafayette County well! Numerous auction items including a quilt, pies and cinnamon rolls, a Branson vacation package, and a refurbished manure spreader seat made for lively bidding and much fun for all. LCCA would like to thank all donors for their live and silent auction items to support the youth of Lafayette County.

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Noah Mahnken proudly displays his contest banner from the Lafayette County 4-H and FFA Fair.

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2021 Scholarship recipients, from left to right; front row: Audrey Phillips, Kelsie Rehkop; back row: Trent Begemann, Nathaniel Freund, Caedon Bergman and Michael Dieckmann. Not pictured Cade Rector.

Another successful Scholarship auction for LCCA.


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Vernon County The Vernon County Cattlemen enjoyed their annual day of volunteering at the Missouri State Fair Beef House again this year. As we were a little shorthanded on members, we greatly appreciate the Vernon Countians that filled in for us. It’s always great to see folks from Vernon County eating at the Beef House and supporting our cattle industry!

Bronson Daulton and Terry Logan stayed very busy in the Beef House Express

Kathy Wait is really good at tracking rare, medium, well, etc.

Bob Wilson was in charge of drinks.

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Gail Wilson worked at the sandwich station.

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Steve Mashek and Dale Lipe help with fries and other tasks.

H.M. Logan worked the front line for the first time this year.


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On the Edge of

Common Sense with Baxter Black The Producer Meeting When you take a seat in the waiting room of a veterinary clinic, a feedlot office or an animal health store, you occasionally notice a body sitting there who looks out of place. They are often dressed in a more formal attire than most clientele. They may be doing their times (two times two is four, two times four is eight, etc…), they may be reading the 10-year-old copy of Progressive Recipies Magazine, or they could be annoying you… just killing time. These dedicated people, who seem to take precedence over no one in the animal health food chain, are company reps. Salesmen armed to the teeth with research trials supporting their product, special offers to entice volume buying out of season, and lunch money. They are the mainstays of our continuing education. They seem to exude a certain tension, which is understandable… they have the job security of a smoke jumper. A big part of their regular duties is producer meetings. Some of these meetings go well. Others… well, others prove that masochism builds character.

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John works for an international pharmaceutical company that offers products for use in livestock. He arranged with the manager of a good-sized feedlot to put on a meeting for the cowboys and vet crew employed therein. A local steak house was selected as an appropriate location for the meeting. Supper and drinks were furnished as bait. A good crowd of 18 or 20 showed up for the meeting.

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No separate room was available, but the maitre d’ had set up a single long table that ran the length of the room, wall to wall down the center of the dining area. John set his movie screen against the back wall at the end of the table. The slide projector sat in the middle of the table between the attentive cowboys.

John began his presentation. He started with lung diseases. Pictures of fulminating pluritis glared from the screen, attracting the attention of random diners. Presently, an incidental customer walked between the projector and screen, excusing himself politely as his shadow darted across a rather explicit slide of chronic suppurative pneumonia. As John was soon to discover, he lay in the direct and only path to the restrooms. The wayfarer returned, tripping over the projector cord, which gave everyone a moment’s respite from pulmonary contagion. Just as John segued into injection site abscesses, he was interrupted by the waitress, who stepped into the spotlight and asked, “Who ordered the scotch and water?” Then, in the midst of his discussion on rumen physiology, a group from the other side of the room broke into song. It was “Happy Anniversary to you,” dedicated to a couple celebrating 58 years of wedded bliss...” Happy anniversary…” “…methane…” “…to yo-o-o-o-u-u-u…” “…is released along with…” “Yeah, yeah, applause…” “Scuse me, I gotta go to the john…” “Sure” “Carbon dioxide” “Any questions?” “Yes, who ordered the two whisky sours and the Bud Light?” On the drive home, John commented to his boss, “All in all, it wasn’t too bad a meeting.” “Yeah,” the boss said, “But ya know, they might’ve missed some of the details.”


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Passion and Achievement Displayed by Angus Breeders Source: Angus Communications Angus members receive recognition at the 2021 Beef Improvement Federation Convention. Improving or bettering an operation or industry is never an easy task but the members of the Beef Improvement Federation (BIF) take on this challenge with honor and pride. Beef cattle enthusiasts, breeders, researchers and industry professionals gathered in Des Moines, Iowa, for the 2021 BIF Research Symposium and Convention held on June 22-25, 2021. From the young producer’s symposium to industry-leading research, participants were well educated. The American Angus Association® was also proud to have several members being recognized. Providing leadership and direction for an organization takes passion, energy and time. Fortunately, the Association has members that are willing to go above and beyond to help and serve the industry. The BIF Board consists of both Association staff and Angus members. Troy Marshall, director of commercial industry relations, and Kelli Retallick-Riley, president of Angus Genetics Inc., continue to serve another year. Matt Perrier of Eureka, Kansas, took on the role of president of the BIF board of directors and Joe Epperly of Albion, Nebraska, is now the vice president. Perrier and Epperly are Association members and Angus cattlemen.

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Academically, two of the three scholarships were awarded to Angus members. Past Miss American Angus, Eva Hinrichsen, received the Roy Wallace Scholarship for her commitment and service to the beef cattle industry. Hinrichsen is a junior at Oklahoma State University where she is an animal science undergraduate student who is highly involved in agricultural and university activities. Maci Mueller, a Nebraska native

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and University of California-Davis graduate student, was the award winner for the Baker/Cundiff scholarship. Mueller wrote the winning essay titled “Gene Editing as a Tool for Genetic Improvement of Beef Cattle.” Aside from encouraging the younger generation, BIF presents a Pioneer Award to honor those who have paved the way and made lasting contributions to the improvement of the beef industry. During the symposium, Angus breeder Galen Fink of Randolph, Kansas, was one recipient of this award. Dave Nichols presented the award and shared that Galen has “never been afraid to take risks, dream big, and look for opportunities that no operations have done.” Additionally, Dr. Gene Rouse and Dr. Doyle Wilson were the other recipients of the BIF Pioneer Award. Dr. Rouse and Dr. Wilson played an integral role in the research and implementation of ultrasound scan data on breeding cattle. Their work made profound impacts on the way cattle are evaluated today. The Association congratulates Galen Fink, Dr. Gene Rouse and Dr. Doyle Wilson for their leadership and service to entire beef industry. Nominating a BIF Seedstock Producer of the Year and a Commercial Producer of the Year was also a highlight for the Association when both Angus nominees were named finalists. Jim and Missy Moore of Moore Cattle Company in Charleston, Arkansas, were nominated by the Association for the Commercial Producer of the Year Award. The Moores believe in raising high caliber cattle to increase demand for quality beef and a memorable eating experience. Their philosophy is: Anything worth doing, is worth doing right. Woodhill Farms of Viroqua, Wisconsin, is also focused on quality and beef improvement as they were co-nominated as Seedstock Producer of the Year by the Association. Brian McCulloh manages Woodhill Farms and has been highly involved over the years with the Angus breed and beef cattle industry. Spending three days in Des Moines, Iowa, was filled with industry trends, new research and plenty of networking time. More than that, the Association is proud of the members who continue to step up to the plate and face industry challenges. To join the family and learn more about registered Angus cattle, visit Angus.org or call the Association office in St. Joseph, Missouri at 816.383.5100.


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Bringing Relevance and Value to the Beef Industry Source: Angus Communications Angus CEO shares how breed associations will evolve. Beef industry organizations will need to evolve in order to continue to bring value in the future. That philosophy is particularly true for breed associations, said Mark McCully, chief executive officer of the American Angus Association. McCully spoke this year during the Dr. Harlan Ritchie Symposium for the American Society of Animal Science. “I think it comes down, very simply, to relevance,” he said. “We all understand that you have to maintain relevancy. You have to continue to bring value.” Fostering profitability of commercial cattle producers is what brings value to breed associations like the American Angus Association. Part of that strategy is to guard against complacency — something that can be hard for members of an Association established in 1883. Seedstock breeders

and their breed associations must fight against the tendency to become complacent. Driving for constant improvement is hard when the status quo can be comfortable. “The pace of change today is so incredible,” McCully said. Any organization today has to stay nimble and make decisions in a fast and efficient way. If the last year has taught us anything, he said, it is to adjust as needed. While change is never comfortable, no matter whether you are a breed association, a company or an individual breeder, it is necessary. Focusing on what will drive the beef industry helps, he said. “We need to think more about genetic solutions and the commercial industry,” he said. “After all, that’s what we’re here to do.” One of the ways breeders and their associations can continue to evolve is to adopt disruptive technologies. In the 1950s, artificial insemination was one of those disruptive technologies. “It was a technology that was very controversial at the time,” McCully said. “Today it seems kind of silly to think of that as disruptive.” Being closed-minded and looking at technology as a threat will not benefit the industry. “We have to be very open and quick to embrace and adopt those technologies that may very well change the procedures of what we do,” he said. “We need to make sure that we keep our members relevant to the commercial industry and moving forward.” The need for data will not change, but the ways we collect and think about it may. Associations will then be charged with making the most of the data.

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“I think we have to be very diligent as a breed association to make sure we are building tools that are focused on profitability and biological balance.”

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Biological balance is a term McCully uses to describe avoiding extremes that could lead to unintended consequences. (Continued on page 46)


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In the beef cattle world, the generation interval is longer than other species.

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“When we make a mistake, when we get in the ditch, it takes us an awfully long time to get up out of the ditch.” McCully urged breeders and associations to be thinking about tools that stress optimal production for different environments.

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“It’s about creating value,” McCully said. In the ever-changing marketplace, making those tools widely available to commercial cattlemen is important. Where the industry used to describe cattle by hide color and condition, today it is headed toward programs that document the genetic capabilities of groups of cattle.

One only has to look back with clarity of hindsight to the 1980s when the industry was seeking the highest frame scores. We know now, there were a lot of unintended consequences to chasing maximums, McCully said.

In the future, McCully also sees the Association serving additional needs. As the speed of change continues, Angus breeders are asking for more education, McCully said. “I believe to stay relevant, we’re going to have to be an educational resource.”

In addition to providing the right kind of breeding tools to members, other association-offered programs are important. In the case of the American Angus Association, marketing programs like AngusLinkSM are focused on the commercial cattleman, McCully said. They benefit members by helping their commercial customers achieve more profit. The American Angus Association’s AngusLink program helps document the value of calves with genetic merit and process-verified programs.

For the Angus breed specifically, education is one of the long-range objectives adopted recently. That plan will help guide the Association in the future. “It’s about driving breed improvement. It’s about enhancing the membership experience and success. It’s about focusing on the commercial cattleman and the consumer that ultimately trusts the product we are producing,” McCully said.


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Angus Breeders Engage in Premiere Education at Beef Leaders Institute (BLI) Young Angus breeders gather for a week of producer education and development.

by the Angus Foundation and Certified Angus Beef®. The program’s goal is to provide the complete pasture to plate experience from the selection of genetics, to breeding, registration, packing and retail.

Staying progressive takes work and assuming a consistent posture to learn. On June 14-17, 16 young American Angus Association members from across the country gathered for the 2021 Beef Leaders Institute hosted by American Angus Association and funded

“We believe there is no better learning opportunity then through hands-on learning,” said Caitlyn Brandt, events and industry partnership manager at the American Angus Association. “BLI is a great opportunity for young cattlemen and women to network and really get

Source: Angus Communications

On June 14-17, 16 young American Angus Association members from across the country gathered for the 2021 Beef Leaders Institute hosted by American Angus Association and funded by the Angus Foundation and Certified Angus Beef®. Pictured back row from left are Dustin Frey, Michael Jensen, Chad Horsley, Gabriel Connealy, Joshua Neal, Kim Skinner, Joe Hortsman and James “Rooter” Gray. Front row from left are Shelby Oldenkamp, Dylan Massa, Travis Howard, Alex Bauer, Jordan Hunter, Danny Beckman, Josh Gilbert and Bradley Wolter.

Callaway Livestock Center, Inc.

On I-70, 4 miles east of Kingdom City, MO on outer road

573-642-7486 Every Monday:

Slaughter Cattle 12:00 p.m. Selling All Classes of Cattle 12:30 p.m.

1st Thursday Nite of Each Month: SEPTEMBER 2021

6:00 p.m. Bred Cows and Breeding Bull Sale

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Jack Harrison 573-999-7197 (owner) John P Harrison............. 573-220-1482 Claude Niemeyer.......... 573-470-1017 Roger Temmen............. 573-680-4538 Justin Oberling.............. 217-440-7724 Glenn Stegman............. 573-619-8495

to learn about how the moving parts of the industry intertwine.” Starting Monday, June 14, participants began the program at the American Angus Association in Saint Joseph. While at the Association, the BLI class had the chance to meet with staff and learn about various departments and programs offered at 3201 Frederick Avenue. From visiting with Angus Genetics Inc. (AGI) president, Kelli Retallick-Riley, and learning about the genetic evaluation, to meeting with director of verification services, Ginette Gottswiller, and learning how to add value to your commercial herd, the education spanned to cover each sector of the beef industry. (Continued on page 50)


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“This week was an incredible deep dive and allowed me to catch up on the current state of technology and breeding of Angus cattle,” said Bradley Wolter of Aviston, Illinois. “I am aware of significantly more resources available to me as a breeder and looking forward to leveraging those and pushing them to customers.” Participants had the chance to hear from professionals on the retail side of the industry and dive into how the Certified Angus Beef® (CAB) brand brings extra value to producers. While at the brand headquarters in Wooster, Ohio, the on-staff meat scientist communicated how to fabricate wholesale cuts and the in-house chef prepared an eating experience fit for a king. A huge benefit of BLI is the networking opportunities the experience offers. Attendees from all regions of the United States brought their individual skill sets and knowledge together to learn from each other.

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“Networking was huge. The opportunity to spend a full week with some of the most talented up-and-coming breeders was second to none,” Wolter said. “What

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makes the beef industry so unique is we are creating this protein from a diverse set of producers. “The participants in the group were every bit as important of resources as the Association was.” Providing continued education for the Angus membership is a priority of the Association. BLI is designed to provide members ages 24 to 45 with the resources to seek insight into all segments of the beef industry. Attendees will be stronger, more effective leaders for the Angus breed and beef industry now and in the future. For more information on BLI and applying to be a part of the Class of 2022, visit https:// www.angus.org/Event/BLIEntryForm. Look for the 2022 application to be available in early November. 2021 Beef Leaders Institute Class Danny Beckman, James “Rooter” Gray, Joshua Neal, Alex Bauer, Michael Jensen, Chad Horsely, Josh Gilbert, Travis Howard, Dylan Massa, Dustin Frey, Jordan Hunter, Bradley Wolter, Joe Hortsman, Kim Skinner, Shelby Oldenkamp, Gabriel Connealy.


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Angus Members Achieve One Million Genotypes Source: Angus Communications Angus members’ efforts make Angus Genetics Inc. milestone possible. Angus Genetics Inc. (AGI), a subsidiary of the American Angus Association®, has reached their 1 millionth mark in Angus genotypes. This was a monumental accomplishment for the Angus breed, says Kelli Retallick-Riley, president of AGI. “It has taken just a little over a decade for Angus breeders to reach this impressive milestone,” said Retallick-Riley. “This is a testament to the pioneer mindset Angus breeders have always hung their hats on. The early adoption of genomic technology has led Angus to this point and will lend to future tools designed specifically for users of registered Angus genetics.”

At See Us ar mfest all F F k r a 021 z O r 1-3, 2 Octobegfield, MO Sprin

AGI began including genomics in the genetic evaluation in 2010 with the idea of using this technology to enhance accuracy, evaluate for traits at earlier ages and predict difficult-to-measure traits for Angus breeders. In addition to its large genotype database, the American Angus Association is home to the largest beef cattle breed phenotype database in the world. With that knowledge, the pace of adoption of genomic technology has increased. In the first four years of collecting genomic samples, AGI hit their first milestone of collecting 100,000 genotypes. In 2018, AGI had another breakthrough of accumulating half a million genotypes. While it took eight years to collect the first 500,000 genotypes, it only took three years to collect the next half of a million. Currently, around 3,000 genotypes enter the evaluation each week. As for the future of genomic testing at AGI, the company has hopes it can continue to make significant advancements to further enhance the beef cattle industry economically. With this amount of data in hand, AGI is looking at ways to leverage this database to create novel solutions to real-world problems. RetallickRiley says, Angus producers should be excited about what the future holds. “The value of genomics is here,” said Retallick-Riley. “While we continue to optimize these solutions to ensure accurate genetic tools, I have no doubt that the next ten years with genomics will only continue to drive genetic progress and profitability for our independently owned farming and ranching families.”


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Celebrating Legendary Progress with Passion, Innovation and Achievement Source: Angus Communications The Angus family heads to Fort Worth, Texas, Nov. 6-8 for the 2021 Angus Convention. Passion, innovation and achievement represent the Angus breed. Angus breeders, beef cattle enthusiasts and feeders of the world are all passionate about the work they do day in and day out. In celebration of the past and to continue legendary progress, the American Angus Association invites Angus members, commercial producers and beef industry professionals to the 2021 Angus Convention and Trade Show hosted in Fort Worth, Texas, Nov. 6-8. The 2021 Angus Convention will be three days of making connections, finding solutions and being inspired to foster operational growth and personal leadership. Being innovative is second nature to cattlemen as the industry strives to raise the highest quality product in the most efficient and effective manner. When passion and innovation are coupled, achievement is bound to take place. After a year of virtual events, the power of inperson events will be a highlight of this year’s Angus Convention. Cattleman can network with old and new friends throughout the trade show, educational sessions and the convention tours. Attendees will have the opportunity to meet and mingle with others during several of the receptions featuring Certified Angus Beef® (CAB®) brand meals.

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When attendees aren’t participating in hallway conversations, there will be several educational sessions taking place throughout the three-day event. From cattle handling to the latest in genomics, no topic is left uncovered. Take advantage of learning from industry professionals during Angus University-sponsored breakout sessions and watch hands-on education by attending a session in the cattle demonstration area. Providing tangible information is a goal for the Association; however, listening to keynote sessions will inspire passion in cattlemen to achieve more and innovate their business.

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“Regardless of whether you are a member or a not, there is value for everyone,” says Mark McCully,

American Angus Association CEO. “I invite you to enjoy the company of great friends while listening and learning from the most respected industry professionals.” The Association also invites commercial producers to attend Angus Convention. Participants will gain perspective from commercial industry leaders on the future of the feeder cattle marketplace by attending the Capturing Value session. The first-of-its-kind panel will provide insight from video auction representatives, feedyard operators, seedstock producers and industry professionals alike. “The AngusLink team was excited to offer this opportunity to commercial producers for the first time ever,” says Troy Marshall, director of commercial industry relations for the Association. “We invite producers to attend all educational sessions, but we created the Capturing Value panel to help directly benefit those in the feeder calf business.” The 138th Annual Convention of Delegates for the American Angus Association will also convene this year, where representatives from each state will elect new members and officers to the Board of Directors and look to the future for the Angus breed. Registration for the 2021 Angus Convention and Trade Show is now open. Learn more about the convention sessions, speakers, tours and more on www. angusconvention.com.


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How to Pick a Feedyard Source: Certified Angus Beef A dozen tips for finding the right fit for your cattle, goals. Have cattle to feed? Avoid the cookie-cutter plans, says Warren Rusche, Extension feedlot specialist at South Dakota State University. Not every ranch, pen or feedlot is alike or ideally suited to handle the same class of cattle. David Trowbridge, longtime manager of Gregory Feedlot, Tabor, Iowa, says a manager should be able to look at a customer’s pen and know, “I have a good market for those cattle.” There is a long checklist of ways cattlemen can help themselves when selecting a feedyard. Here are the top 12 tips:

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1. Do your homework. Ahead of marketing season (early summer for spring-born calves), make phone calls to narrow the list and follow up with yards that fit the bill. Don’t wait until just before the sale to make contact with buyers. 2. Stick to a timeline. If selling direct or partnering in a private-treaty transaction, share the timeline to solidify an agreement with a buyer. Talk with the feedyard well in advance about available spots and when the calves will be ready. 3. What’s the marketing strategy? The feedyard should know the best way to market your cattle. That includes grid marketing experience. Ensure the yard can capitalize on your genetics. 4. Know financing options. A cow-calf operator could sell outright, retain ownership or partner with the feedyard, the choice often depending on financing

options. “It can be an attractive option for cash flow or the ability to forego income for a few months,” Rusche says. 5. Make sure the yard can handle your specific needs. Can it manage the age of your calves? Unvaccinated heifers? Preconditioned feeders? 6. Cost is important, but so is cost of gain. “Make sure you’re comparing ultimate bottom line, not just some of the components that go into it,” Rusche says. 7. Be data wise. If data collection is important, discuss that with the manager, so they’re prepared to make it available. 8. Provide key information. Being open about the source of genetics, health protocols and veterinary receipts can add value. There’s opportunity for commercial producers using Angus genetics and offering extra information through programs like AngusLink™, Rusche says. 9. Ask about risk. “You need someone that’s going to give you an honest assessment of what the situation is. I don’t always recommend that a producer finish cattle,” Trowbridge advises. “But you have to look at what your options are, what your risk adversity is and make a decision.”

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10. Value the relationship. If you’re happy with your feedyard, avoid the temptation to go elsewhere. “It’s about the relationship, having that personal touch where the manager calls you when there’s a problem or when there’s success,” Trowbridge says. 11. Get it in writing. “Even if we never have to pull that piece of paper out again, the fact that it’s written down helps people remember exactly what we agreed to and know what the expectations are,” Rusche says. 12. Be up front. A successful feedlot accurately assesses and values risk. “The more questions the rancher can

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answer, the less risk those calves present and the more valuable they become,” Rusche says. Opportunity cattle – those with unknown genetics and health – are attractive only when they’re cheap. “No rancher I know has a goal to sell cheap calves,” he adds. The Human Element Relationships only build over time, so continue conversations every year. Don’t underestimate the human side of feedyard selection. Visit the yard, and take note of its overall appearance. Is there feed outside the bunks? How do personnel act around the cattle? Trowbridge says cattlemen should meet with the management team and learn their business philosophy. “You don’t really feed cattle with Gregory Feedlots, you feed cattle with David Trowbridge,” he says. Also, get references from the feedyard’s nutritionist and veterinarian, plus current and former customers. “The really good, professional yards aren’t going to be afraid of you knowing who their customers are that are happy,” Rusche says.

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Ranchers and feedyards should align their ideals. “Do they have the facilities, management, skills and labor to manage health risks and get cattle to convert as efficiently and cheaply as possible and then deliver a product that is going to have as much value as it can in the marketplace?” Rusche says. After all, that’s good for all involved. “We’re providing a product that our customers have to use,” Trowbridge adds. “Ultimately, the customer has to make money for the feedlot to continue to make money.”

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Backgrounding Can Add Value, Flexibility Source: Certified Angus Beef How backgrounding may boost feeder calf value Getting maximum value when marketing cattle is a constantly evolving process that takes careful planning.

SEPTEMBER 2021

USDA National Agricultural Statistics Service 2017 data reports 70% or more of beef calves are born in the spring. Come fall, this leaves the glut of 550 pound calves at a prices disadvantage compared to their contemporaries that are held and sold after the first of the year.

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Backgrounding calves can open gates to new revenue paths, though not without risk. When more cattle are sent to the grazing fields or grow yards, there’s a shift in the seasonal pattern of the market and more opportunity to take advantage of better prices. Weight Adds Dollars Even for just a couple months, backgrounding can add weight and gross income without using limited grazing resources year-round to stock more cows. Adding weight may boost income, but requires strategy, says Dan Loy, director of the Iowa Beef Center at Iowa State University. He suggests backgrounding the lighter half of steers to reach heavier average sale weights. “If you market the heavier ones direct from weaning, and have done that for years, you’ll have a more uniform group,” he says. “That in itself may help the price on those heavier calves.”

Commodity Trades Welcome

If it seems overwhelming to add a backgrounding enterprise, don’t be afraid to hire expertise, says Chad Cargill, of Cargill Ranch LLC, Medicine Lodge, Kan. He provides services for larger cattle feeders at his custom yard, with help from a nutritionist, veterinarian (Continued on page 62)


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and environmental consultant, plus pharmaceutical representatives.

for 45 days brought at least $50 per head more than unweaned contemporaries.

Every producer has different needs, but the staples are the same. Bunk space with some kind of concrete apron or a grass trap on which feed can be delivered with a mixer wagon, are necessities, as are a chute and working facilities to vaccinate or treat sick calves.

“One issue is easy to handle, but those things together add up to bigger issues,” Cargill says.

“These resources are a substantial investment but necessary for successful backgrounding,” advises Dale Blasi, extension beef specialist at Kansas State University. Time Boosts Health Calf health is often the highest concern for feedyards, so this also gives calves’ immunity time to get through the most stressful event in their lives. “To me, backgrounding should include preconditioning,” Loy says. “That verifies health and lets the vaccines kick in, plus getting calves eating out of a bunk and drinking from new waterers.”

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The dollar-advantage of weaning is well clear. According to the 2020 Iowa Precondition Sales data, Loy says preconditioned calves vaccinated for respiratory and clostridial disease, treated for parasites and weaned

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As calves mature, their immunity improves. That’s important as natural beef labels and other process verified programs become popular. The biggest challenge for those kinds of programs is ensuring calves’ health so they aren’t disqualified due to antibiotics. Yesterday’s most valuable feeder calf may only be average moving forward. That’s because buyers still look for groups with uniform weight and hide color, but verification is gaining importance. The market may soon require certified pre-weaned and vaccinated, age-sourceand-genetics verified, records for performance and carcass history, along with animal welfare claims. When it’s time to head down a new road of marketing, learn from others who have made the trip before you, Blasi suggests. Those are the lessons from peers and mentors, he adds. Participate in a marketing network, or join local and state beef association meetings to learn from each other.


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Not all Good Days are Warm and Sunny Source: Certified Angus Beef When it’s hot and sunny, cattle seek shade. If they can’t find any, it could cost you money. In 2003, scientists estimated heat stress cost the U.S. beef industry $369 million a year. The condition occurs when an animal can’t dissipate heat as fast as it’s incurred. Providing shade when needed is one way to mitigate stress and produce high-quality beef. Stress of any kind affects performance and health, but also well-being and behavior, a special focus for Colorado State University (CSU) animal scientist Lily Edwards-Callaway. Her team’s literature review found shade benefits vary by location, structure type and the weather. Uncovering more questions than answers, the study lays out a basis for updating previous work with results from modern production at feedyards and packing plants. “Cattle management practices have progressed and technology has changed,” Edwards-Callaway says. “I’m sure producers have a lot of innovative, cost-effective ways to shade cattle to improve performance. I think there’s a great need to dig a little deeper.” The key indicators within shade studies vary, but no matter the production system, results favor shaded groups. Weather variation over time makes it complicated. Places with hot and humid summers have a greater need for protection, says Edwards-Callaway, “but we just don’t know how much people are really using shade.” Feedyard economics adds to the complexity. Seasonal and annual weather shifts influence how long a shade structure can endure. Those features become less expensive the longer they can be maintained.

A 1995 heat event in Iowa led to a 4.8% death loss in non-shaded feedyard pens, compared to 0.2% in shaded pens. Those are likely conservative estimates today with recent temperature extremes, Edwards-Callaway says.

“If you’re trying to gain every benefit of high-quality beef that you can, then you probably need to think about adding some shade and protecting cattle for when there is a major weather event,” he says. Animal welfare is connected to every outcome, EdwardsCallaway says. Addressing basic health and production factors ensure cattle perform to their highest potential. She’s already working with packing plants to see what kind of effect shade may have right before slaughter. This ongoing project is looking at distance cattle travel to the plant, along with time waiting to unload and reach the point of harvest. It’s also tracking pen density, weather and their effects on mobility, bruising and carcass characteristics. “Do producers think shade is important?” she asks. “What factors dictate whether cattlemen want to use shade or not?” Finding answers to these and other questions will affect beef’s image, Edward-Callaway says, as well as productivity and profitability for the entire supply chain. Find the paper, “Impacts of shade on cattle well-being in the beef supply chain,” in the February 2021 Journal of Animal Science. Or read it online at: https://cabcattle. com/impacts-of-shade-on-cattle-well-being-in-the-beefsupply-chain/.

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“Variability in the climate really skews the data we looked at,” adds Daniel Clark, meat scientist with the Certified Angus Beef ® (CAB®) brand and collaborator in the research. “A big takeaway is to just be prepared.”

Weather fluctuation affects final carcass quality, too, but Clark says the extent of mild and severe weather event varies. More predictably, extreme heat brings high mortality.

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CattleFax Forecasts Record Beef Demand; Prospects for Tighter Supplies Source: NCBA NASHVILLE, Tenn. (Aug. 11, 2021) – The beef cattle industry is bouncing back from the pandemic, and continued progress is expected in 2022. Beef prices are near record high, and consumer and wholesale beef demand are both at 30-year highs as the U.S. and global economy recover. While drought remains a significant concern with weather threatening pasture conditions in the Northern Plains and West, strong demand, combined with higher cattle prices, signal an optimistic future for the beef industry, according to CattleFax. The popular CattleFax Outlook Seminar, held as part of the 2021 Cattle Industry Convention and NCBA Trade Show in Nashville, shared expert market and weather analysis today. According to CattleFax CEO Randy Blach, the cattle market is still dealing with a burdensome supply of market-ready fed cattle. The influence of that supply will diminish as three years of herd liquidation will reduce feedyard placements. As this occurs, the value of calves, feeder cattle and fed cattle will increase several hundred dollars per head over the next few years. Kevin Good, vice president of industry relations and analysis at CattleFax, reported that the most recent cattle cycle saw cattle inventories peak at 94.8 million head and that those numbers are still in the system due to the COVID-19 induced slowdown in harvest over the past year. “As drought, market volatility and processing capacity challenges unnerved producers over the past 24 months, the industry is liquidating the beef cowherd which is

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expected to decline 400,000 head by Jan. 1 reaching 30.7 million head,” Good said. The feeder cattle and calf supply will decline roughly 1 million head from its peak during this contraction phase. Fed cattle slaughter will remain larger through 2021 as carryover from pandemic disruptions works through a processing segment hindered by labor issues, he added. “While fed cattle slaughter nearly equals 2019 highs at 26.5 million head this year, we expect a 500,000-head decline in 2022,” Good said. “This, combined with plans for new packing plants and expansions possibly adding near 25,000 head per week of slaughter capacity over the next few years, should restore leverage back to the producer.” Good forecasted the average 2022 fed steer price at $135/cwt., up $14/cwt. from 2021, with a range of $120 to $150/cwt. throughout the year. All cattle classes are expected to trade higher, and prices are expected to improve over the next three years. The 800-lb. steer price is expected to average $165/cwt. with a range of $150 to $180/cwt., and the 550-lb. steer price is expected to average $200/cwt., with a range of $170 to $230/cwt. Finally, Good forecasted utility cows at an average of $70/cwt. with a range of $60 to $80/cwt., and bred cows at an average of $1,750/cwt. with a range of $1,600 to $1,900 for load lots of quality, running-age cows. Consumer demand for beef at home and around the globe remained strong in 2021, a trend that will continue in 2022, especially as tight global protein supplies are expected to fuel U.S. export growth. Aftershocks from the pandemic continue to keep domestic demand at elevated levels not seen since 1988. Government stimulus and unemployment benefits are


soybeans has elevated prices in the last 12 months.” Spot prices for soybeans are expected to be $13 to $16 per bushel for the remainder of the next 18 months along with spot corn futures to trade between $4.75 to $6.25 per bushel in the same time frame.

Kevin Good

fueling the economy with demand outpacing available supplies as restaurants and entertainment segments emerge from shutdowns. According to Good, the boxed beef cutout peaked at $336/cwt. in June, while retail beef prices pushed to annual high at $7.11/lb. “Customer traffic remained strong at restaurants and retail – even as those segments pushed on the higher costs, proving consumers are willing to pay more for beef,” he said. Wholesale demand will be softer in 2022, as a bigger decline in beef supplies will offset a smaller increase in beef prices with the cutout expected to increase $5 to $265/cwt. Retailers and restaurants continue to adjust prices higher to cover costs. Good added the retail beef prices are expected to average $6.80/lb. in 2021 and increase to $6.85/lb. in 2022. Global protein demand has increased and U.S. beef exports have posted new record highs for two consecutive months, even with high wholesale prices. The increases were led by large, year-over-year gains into China, and Japan and South Korea remaining strong trade partners for protein. “The tightening of global protein supplies will support stronger U.S. red meat exports in 2022. U.S. beef exports are expected to grow 15 percent in 2021 and another 5 percent in 2022,” Good said.

Murphy noted that drier weather in the Northern Plains and West will pressure hay production and quality in the 2021 season – supporting prices into the next year. “May 1 on-farm hay stocks were down 12 percent from the previous year, at 18 million tons. The USDA estimates hay acres are down 700,000 from last year at 51.5 million acres. So, expect current year hay prices to average near $170/ton, and 2022 average prices should be steady to $10 higher due to tighter supplies and stronger demand,” he said. All session panelists agreed that weather is a major factor impacting the beef industry, and agriculture as a whole in 2021 and going into 2022. A forecasted return of La Niña this fall would lead to intensifying drought for the West and Plains into early 2022, according to Dr. Art Douglas, professor emeritus at Creighton University. Douglas indicated that the precipitation outlook in the fall of 2021 going into the early part of 2022 could see drought push harder in the Pacific Northwest with above-normal precipitation across the inter-mountain West – leaving the Midwest drier, and less tropical storm activity to reduce Southeast rainfall into late fall. Also, the western half of the country will be drier into early spring with a returning La Nina. Blach concluded the session with an overall positive outlook, expecting margins to improve as cattle supply tightens and producers gain leverage back from packers and retailers, beef demand to remain solid with expected export growth, and utilization and packing capacity to improve over the next few years. He also noted that the economy has made gains in 2021 and should stay stronger with low interest rates and government stimulus fueling consumer spending.

“As China rebuilds its pork industry following their battle with African Swine Fever, they are looking for higher quality feed ingredients, such as corn and soybeans” Murphy said “Exceptional demand from China is leading U.S. corn exports to a new record in the current market year, and strong demand for U.S.

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Mike Murphy, CattleFax vice president of research and risk management services, expects summer weather patterns – and their affect on corn and soybean yields – to be the focus of market participants.

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Cattle Industry Commits to Climate Neutrality by 2040 Source: NCBA NASHVILLE, Tenn. (Aug. 12, 2021) – Today, the National Cattlemen’s Beef Association (NCBA) solidified U.S. cattle ranchers’ commitment to environmental, economic and social sustainability with the release of U.S. cattle industry sustainability goals. Beef producers in the United States are already the global leader in sustainable beef production. The setting of these goals will further enhance the sustainability of the U.S. system and set targets that demonstrate to the world that producers are committed to continued improvement. The goals for the U.S. cattle industry include: • Demonstrate climate neutrality of U.S. cattle production by 2040. • Create and enhance opportunities that result in a quantifiable increase in producer profitability and economic sustainability by 2025. • Enhance trust in cattle producers as responsible stewards of their animals and resources by expanding educational opportunities in animal care and handling programs to further improve animal wellbeing. • Continuously improve our industry’s workforce safety and well-being. “Cattlemen and women have demonstrated their commitment to sustainability for generations. They work tirelessly to protect the land, water and air resources in their care. Through countless improvements in genetics, grazing management, manure handling and the adoption of many other technologies, this is just the

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next step on our industry’s path,” said Marty Smith, a Florida cattleman and NCBA past president. “Producers deserve recognition for their use of cutting-edge practices and technologies that minimize environmental impact. By setting goals, we’re publicly committing to continuous improvement and setting targets that allow us to measure and document those efforts.” These goals are the culmination of a grassroots, rancherled process. The Sustainability Goals Task Force was formed in 2021 to evaluate the current state of U.S. beef cattle sustainability, determine which improvements are most critical and help share the story of progress. Members of this working group – cattle farmers and ranchers from across the U.S. – led the process and made all decisions, including setting the sustainability goals. “Sustainability is, and will continue to be, an incredibly important part of what we do, and I’m proud that my fellow leaders across the cattle industry have taken these important steps,” Smith said. “As our country and the world examine risks associated with climate change and other sustainability challenges, our commitment to sustainability positions us to play an even bigger role in mitigating these risks in the future.” To learn more about the cattle industry’s sustainability goals, go to ncba.org/sustainability.


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68th National Red Angus Convention Registration is now open. for the 68th National Red Angus Convention in Boise, Idaho. An exciting lineup of keynote speakers, workshops and awards await commercial and seedstock producers, who are invited to collaborate, innovate and elevate with each other to take the breed to the next level. Featured events include: • Keynote addresses from: Kiah Twisselman Burchett Carey Portell Lance Pekus • Management, Marketing and Leadership Workshops • Foot & Udder Scoring demos • Red Angus Foundation Live Auction and Pick of the Herd • Red Angus Awards Banquet

SEPTEMBER 2021

Registration and housing are open. Registration fees are $285/person through July 16 and will increase to $310/person from July 17 until walk-up registration at convention.

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Grow Now, Graze Later to Reduce Winter Feed Costs Source: Missouri Extension News COLUMBIA, Mo. – Grow now and graze later to get the most out of tall fescue pastures. Winter stockpiling cool-season grasses carries cow-calf operations through the winter, the costliest time to feed cattle, says University of Missouri Extension state forage specialist Craig Roberts. “If we don’t stockpile, we’ll find ourselves feeding hay or other concentrates just to get through the winter,” says Roberts. Fescue’s long growing season and persistence make it Missouri’s No. 1 forage. Its waxy leaves make it the coolseason grass best adapted for stockpiling for use in fall and winter in Missouri. The waxy surface keeps it from getting soggy over winter. Producers should remove cows from fescue pastures before applying nitrogen, the nutrient that most increases yield in grasses. August-applied nitrogen helps grasses grow until after frost, when grazing can resume. Timing nitrogen application before fall rains is vital for growth, Roberts says. In northern Missouri, this is generally the first week of August. For the rest of the state, it is during the second week of August. Application Amounts Vary The amount of nitrogen to apply to Kentucky 31 and novel-endophyte fescues differs, says Roberts. Too much nitrogen on K-31 increases toxins, hurting herd health and profitability.

“We want to do everything we can to reduce those toxins and make money on these animals,” he says. Toxins in fescue spike in spring and fall in Missouri, with the fall peak occurring around early November. Fall Toxins Harder to Control There are fewer ways to manage toxins in fall than spring. These controls must be carried out on multiple levels, and all increase input costs. A single practice can offer partial relief but will not be enough to prevent health problems in animals. “There is no such thing as THE solution for Kentucky 31 fescue,” Roberts says. Nitrogen application is just one, but a critical one. Roberts says the best way to reduce toxins in fescue is to renovate pastures from K-31 to novel-endophyte fescues. For information, visit the Alliance for Grassland Renewal website at www.GrasslandRenewal.org. “Stockpiling is where novel-endophyte fescues show off,” Roberts says. Novel-endophyte stockpiles are highly nutritional, with high protein and energy content because they have no stems or seed heads. Guidelines for Nitrogen Fertilizer Amounts Roberts recommends the following when applying nitrogen: • Toxins vary year to year, so nitrogen rates may vary. • Use 40 pounds of nitrogen per acre or less on toxic fescue varieties such as Kentucky 31. Rates higher than this increase toxins.

SEPTEMBER 2021

• Use 60-100 pounds per acre for novel-endophyte fescues.

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Hwy 42 West • Vienna Missouri 65582 45 Miles South of Jefferson City Selling All classes of Cattle Wednesday • 10:00 a.m. Featuring ‘Star-Vac Program’ Cattle Weekly DVAuction Service for convenient online viewing & bidding For More Information Call… David Patton Office Ross Patton Bill Patton 573-308-6655 573-422-3305 573-308-6657 573-308-6658 Visit our website: www.scrsvienna.com or E-mail us: scrsvienna@gmail.com “Make South Central your Livestock Market”

For more information, visit your county MU Extension center or see the MU Extension Integrated Pest Management video “Fall Forage Stockpiling” at youtube.com/watch?v=oxs8pOFPwg4.


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Missouri Meat, Poultry Processors Receive $16.7 Million in Grants Source: Missouri Extension News COLUMBIA, Mo. – Nearly empty meat aisles are a burden producers, processors and consumers don’t want to face again. To prevent that, the Missouri Department of Agriculture (MDA) awarded $16.7 million to keep 150 meat and poultry processors throughout Missouri going strong. “Our local meat processors were the backbone of our food supply chain during the COVID-19 pandemic,” said Missouri Director of Agriculture Chris Chinn. “Last year, our team doubled the amount of red meat under state inspection, so we know the demand is there.” The Missouri Meat and Poultry Processing Grant helped bring 27 businesses into state-inspection status. It also aided 55 federally inspected facilities and 59 custom-exempt operations, where customers can have their livestock processed for personal consumption. In addition, the Missouri General Assembly appropriated $20 million from the Coronavirus Aid, Relief and Economic Security Act in 2020 to make sure small processing plants can sustain operations as the pandemic continues. “Processors who received federal funding are using this opportunity to expand their facilities, upgrade their equipment and address some of the industry’s chronic workforce challenges,” said Mallory Rahe, University of Missouri Extension agriculture business and policy education director. Rahe helps lead the Missouri Small Business Development Center (SBDC) for Agriculture, Food and Forestry, a partnership of MU Extension’s business development and agriculture/environment programs. She created a rapid-response team to educate processors about the funding opportunity.

SEPTEMBER 2021

County engagement specialist and Missouri SBDC business counselor Jennifer Lutes, who heads the effort to improve Missouri’s meat processing industry within the new center, said the pandemic revealed the importance of local processors.

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“When large processors across the country had to shut down, small processors were inundated with processing requests,” Lutes said. “Most of Missouri’s small processors are booked for the next two years. This past fall, processing appointments were all filled even though many doubled their processing capacity during the previous few months.”

The team compiled a list of Missouri’s small processors in order to notify them about the grant, she said. The list comprised state-inspected plants, USDA-inspected plants and custom-exempt plants. Once the team had the processors all mapped out, they started calling them one by one to offer assistance. “For processors who have never filled out a grant, it can be quite a daunting process,” Lutes said. Lutes and fellow SBDC agricultural business counselors and MU Extension specialists Mallory Rahe, Amie Breshears, Rachel Hopkins, Ryan Milhollin, Eric Meusch and Kyle Whittaker helped processors work through the grant requirements. “Our team members built relationships with many small meat processors to help them navigate the grant process,” said Whittaker. “Most meat processors were experiencing an unprecedented amount of business and lacked the time to complete many of the grant details.” One hurdle meat processors faced when opting to move from custom-exempt to state-inspected with the grant was preparing a Hazard Analysis Critical Control Points (HACCP) plan for approval by the MDA, Whittaker said. “Kyle helped us the entire way,” said Chet Bailey, of Chet and Bill’s Processing in Marshfield. “He first just let us know the grant was available. Secondly, he helped us fill out the application, all the way from becoming state-inspected to helping write our HACCP food safety plan, which is a huge deal due to it being very timeconsuming. Kyle went through all the steps of the grant with us, and he even came out when the inspector was here to see how the flow of the HACCP went.” Under the partnership, MU Extension’s agriculturefocused specialists are also working as Missouri SBDC business counselors within the state’s broader SBDC network and specifically as part of the Missouri SBDC for Agriculture, Food and Forestry. Extension specialists were a natural fit to expand Missouri SBDC services through their knowledge, experience and community relationships, Rahe said. The roles with the SBDC allow the team to better assist livestock, commercial horticulture and crop producers as well as food processors and forest product manufacturers. “As busy as the year has been, without Kyle’s help I don’t think we would have been able to apply for and receive the grant we did,” Bailey added. “I definitely encourage individuals to seek out the center for agricultural-related business assistance.” Learn more about the Missouri SBDC for Agriculture, Food and Forestry at extension.missouri.edu.


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660-287-1341 www.maplewoodacresfarm.com Mo. Fescue Seedstock

Bulls & Females For Sale Charolais • Red Angus • Blacks Bruce & Janna Bradley Marshfield, MO • 417-848-3457 BruceBradley@hotmail.com

Centerview, MO ellisjerryd@hotmail.com

SEPTEMBER 2021

B/B

BRADLEY CATTLE

Jerry Ellis 660-909-6110

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Missouri Beef House Thank You to our Volunteers

Missouri CattleWomen St. Clair County

SEPTEMBER 2021

Memphis FFA

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Moniteau County

Monroe County

Bates County

(Continued on page 89)


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Missouri Beef House Thank You to our Volunteers

Texas County

Warren County

Andrew/Buchanan County

Benton County Look for more Missouri Beef House volunteer photos and scenes in the October issue of Missouri Beef Cattleman.

I-35 Cattlemen

Family owned & operated since 1917

Steve Sellers 620-257-2611

Kevin Dwyer 620-680-0404

SEPTEMBER 2021

Custom Cattle Feeding • 12,000 Head Capacity

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Agricultural Homecoming Homecomings are an incredible Missouri tradition. While many schools including Baylor and Illinois make claims on hosting the first homecoming, every Mizzou enthusiast knows better. The NCAA, Trivial Pursuit, and Jeopardy all bestow the title to the University of Missouri and its 1911 football game. We typically associate homecomings with friends gathering to celebrate with football games, coronations, parades, and more. Though, homecomings can be many things – relatives returning for holidays, military friends returning home from service abroad, or for us, returning to the state fair ham breakfast and beef house.

SEPTEMBER 2021

As we all know, COVID precautions greatly altered state fair activities in 2020. Experiencing the state fair and all its flair is a tradition for numerous Missouri families. Some work throughout the year to ready their show animals for competition. Others save their funds for carnival rides, fair food, and the Hacienda. We anticipate visiting with hundreds of our political friends at the Governor’s Ham Breakfast and dining at the Beef House.

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The 2021 Missouri State Fair provided us our State Fair homecoming. As is the case each year, we began our day at the Governor’s Ham Breakfast. Politicos and friends from across the state poured into the breakfast to visit with one another and show support for the state’s agricultural community. We were pleased to join them. Our next stop always is the Beef House. We can count on being greeted by Patty Wood upon entrance, Mike Deering’s overwhelming enthusiasm, and Jimmy Long

readying the aprons and MCA hats for politicos wishing to hit the grill for photo ops. This is a tradition. It is unfailingly consistent. We love it. Experiencing the ham breakfast and beef house after a two-year break truly was a homecoming – an agricultural homecoming of sorts. The sights, sounds, and people all welcomed us back and allowed us to continue our state fair routine. It was great to see so many MCA members this year at both destinations. We truly appreciate the dedicated volunteers that make the ham breakfast a success and the beef house efficiently serve so many. Your time and devotion are impressive. Thank you for making our state fair homecoming a reality. Looking forward to seeing everyone at the Beef House in 2022! Nancy and Cooper


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SALE CALENDAR Sept. 4 Sept. 18 Sept. 18 Sept. 23 Sept. 24 Sept. 25 Sept. 25 Sept. 25 Sept. 26 Sept. 27 Oct. 2 Oct. 2 Oct. 2 Oct. 2 Oct. 4 Oct. 8 Oct. 8

Four Starr Genetics Production Sale, Eugene, MO Wild Indian Acres & Friends Female Sale, DeSoto, MO Fleckvieh Heritage Sale, Roland, OK Three Cedars Farms Open House, Sedalia, MO Jefferies Red Angus Sale, Checotah, OK KL3 Angus Sale, Poplar Bluff, MO Soaring Eagle Invitational Sale, Springfield, MO NextGen Cattle Co. Flint Hills Classic Production Sale, Paxico, KS WMC - Ladies of the Ozarks Production Sale, Wasola, MO Gardiner Angus Ranch Sale, Ashland, KS Inaugural Fall Colors Sale, Springfield, MO Soaring Eagle Bull & Female Sale, Springfield, MO Journagan/MSU Annual Production Sale, Springfield, MO Jac’s Ranch Production Sale, Bentonville, AR Express Ranches Bull & Female Sale, Yukon, OK Smith Valley Angus Sale, Salem, MO J&N Black Hereford Sale, Leavenworth, KS

Buffalo Livestock Market 1 mile west on Hwy 32 • Buffalo, MO 65622 Barn: 417-345-8122

SEPTEMBER 2021

Sale Every Saturday 12:00 Noon

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• Selling 1200 to 1700 head Farm Fresh Cattle weekly • Special Stock Cow and Bull Sale 3rd Tuesday night of each month at 6:30 p.m. • Pre-Vac Feeder Calf Sales 2nd Saturday of every month in conjunction with Regular Sale (Pfizer Pre-Vac, BLM BPre-Vac, Bayer Program, Mo Quality Assurance. LMA-Vac and MFA Health Track)

Order Buying Service Available

Owners…

Lyle Caselman 417-345-7876 H 417-533-2944 cell

Leon Caselman 417-345-4514 H 417-588-6185 cell

Oct. 9 Oct. 9 Oct. 9 Oct. 9 Oct. 13 Oct. 13 Oct. 16 Oct. 16 Oct. 16 Oct. 16 Oct. 16 Oct. 16 Oct. 16 Oct. 17

Byergo Sale, Savannah, MO East Central Missouri Angus Sale, Cuba, MO Bonebrake Herefords Annual Production Sale, Columbia, MO Big D Ranch Bull & Female Sale, Center Ridge, AR Valley Oaks Sale, Chilhowee, MO Explosive Cattle Co. Online Bull Sale Bradley Cattle Bred Heifer and Bull Sale, Springfield, MO Heart of the Ozarks Angus Sale, West Plains, MO Byergo Private Treaty Sale, Dearborn, MO 3C Cattle Co. Sale, Carrollton, MO Square B Ranch Open House, Warsaw, MO Aschermann Charolais/Akaushi 33rd Edition Bull Sale, Springfield, MO Gerloff Bull Fest Sale, Bland, MO Frank/Hazelrigg Sale, Fulton, MO


MBC Classified The MBC Classified column appears monthly. Classified advertising is only 50¢ a word. Send your check with your ad to Missouri Beef Cattleman, 2306 Bluff Creek Drive, #100, Columbia, Mo 65201. Deadline 15th of month before an issue.

“REESE” DISC MOWERS, CADDY V-RAKES, “REESE” TUBE-LINE BALE WRAPPER, AITCHISON DRILLS, SELF-UNLOADING HAY TRAILERS, HEAVY DUTY BALE AND MINERAL FEEDERS, FEED BUNKS, BALE SPIKES, CONTINUOUS FENCING, COMPLETE CORRAL SYSTEMS, INSTALLATION AVAILABLE: Tigerco Distributing Co. 660-645-2212, 800-432-4020 or www.tigercoinc.com. BLACK SIMMENTAL BULLS SINCE 1993: Calving Ease, Attractive, Athletic, Sound Footed and Docile. We Deliver. Mike Williams, Higginsville, 816-797-5450

SEPTEMBER 2021

Oct. 17 Reynolds Hereford Decades of Design Sale, Huntsville, MO Oct. 18 Hinkle’s Prime Cut Angus Sale, Nevada, MO Oct. 22 Spur Ranch Sale, Vinita, OK Oct. 23 Lacy’s Red Angus with MC Livestock Bull and Female Sale, Drexel, MO Oct. 23 Mead Farms Production Sale, Versailles, MO Oct. 23 Seedstock Plus Fall Bull & Female Sale, JRS, Carthage, MO Oct. 24 Baker Angus Sale, Butler, MO Oct. 25 Southwest Missouri Performance Tested Bull Sale, Springfield, MO Oct. 30 McBee Cattle Co. Sale, Fayette, MO Oct. 30 Wall Street Cattle Co. Sale, Lebanon, MO Oct. 30 Cattlemen’s Preferred All Breed Bull & Commercial Female Sale, Harrison, AR Oct. 31 WMC Cattle Co. Annual Bull Sale, Springfield, MO Nov. 5 Meyer Cattle Co. Fall Sale, Bowling Green, MO Nov. 6 Wright Charolais 11th Annual Female Sale, Kearney, MO Nov. 6 Seedstock Plus Red Reward Fall Edition’ Bull & Female Sale, Osceola, MO Nov. 6 Red Tie Event Red Angus Sale, Tina, MO Nov. 6 Worthington Angus Bull & Commercial Female Sale, Dadeville, MO Nov. 15 Green Springs Bull Test Sale, Nevada, MO Nov. 20 Sydenstricker Genetics Sale, Mexico, MO Nov. 27 Butch’s Angus Sale, Jackson, MO Nov. 27 Galaxy Beef Female Sale, Macon, MO Dec. 5 Missouri Opportunity Hereford Sale, Sedalia, MO

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Advertiser Index

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ADM.................................................................................37 American Angus Association............................................64 Big D Ranch Sale.............................................................85 BioZyme............................................................................ 31 Bradley Cattle ..................................................................79 Bradley Cattle & Hankins Farms Fall Color Sale............ 74 Brickhouse Farms Red Angus..........................................79 Buffalo Livestock Market..................................................96 Byergo Angus Sale............................................................ 57 Callaway Livestock Center Inc.........................................48 Central Missouri Sales Co................................................68 Classified...........................................................................97 Clearwater Farm...............................................................59 Coon Angus Ranch..........................................................59 Double A Land & Cattle...................................................79 Elanco - Cydectin.............................................................23 Ellis Cattle Company Red Angus....................................79 Ertell Cattle Company.....................................................67 Explosive Cattle Company............................................... 77 Express Ranch Sale..........................................................99 F&T Livestock Market...................................................... 14 FCS of Missouri..............................................................100 Fink Beef Genetics Sale....................................................65 Frank and Hazelrigg Angus.............................................59 Frank and Hazelrigg Angus Sale.....................................49 Friday - Cartoon...............................................................62 Galaxy Beef LLC..............................................................59 Gardiner Angus Sale........................................................53 Gerloff Farms....................................................................59 GrassWorks....................................................................... 52 Green Country Crop Insurance.......................................42 Green’s Welding & Sales...................................................28 Hinkle’s Prime Cut Angus................................................59 Hinkle’s Prime Cut Angus Sale........................................45 HydraBed..........................................................................44 J&N Black Hereford Sale..................................................39 Jac’s Ranch Sale................................................................ 47 Jefferies Red Angus Sale................................................... 75 Jim’s Motors......................................................................60 Joplin Regional Stockyards................................................3 Journagan Ranch/MSU Sale............................................ 13 Kingsville Livestock Auction............................................66 KK Farms Red Angus......................................................79 Kranjec Valley Angus Farma...........................................59 Lacy’s Red Angus.............................................................79 Lamine Valley Red Angus................................................79 Maple Oaks Red Angus....................................................79 Maplewood Acres Farm....................................................79 Marshall & Fenner Farms.................................................59 MC Livestock Red Angus.................................................79 MCA - Membership Form................................................93

MCA - Membership Signs................................................94 MCA - Presidents Council................................................ 91 MCA - Show-Me-Select Sale Credit................................95 MCA - Top Hand.............................................................90 MCA Profitability Challenge......................................82-83 McBee Cattle Co..............................................................32 MCF Golf Tournament...............................................87-88 MCF Scholarship..............................................................30 McPherson Concrete Products.........................................97 Mead Cattle Co................................................................50 Mead Farms......................................................................59 Mead Farms Sale..............................................................43 Merck Animal Health.......................................................63 MFA ................................................................................. 41 Missouri Angus Association.............................................59 Missouri Angus Breeders..................................................59 Missouri Beef Cattleman magazine.................................80 Missouri Beef Industry Council....................................... 17 Missouri Red Angus Association......................................79 Missouri Red Angus Breeders..........................................79 MLS Tubs.........................................................................35 NextGen Flint Hills Classic Sale......................................25 Ozark Hills Genetics.........................................................79 Rogers Cattle Co. and Lile Farms Red Angus.................79 S&N Partners - JayLor......................................................58 S&N Partners - TubeLine.................................................58 Sampson Cattle Co...........................................................59 Seedstock Plus Sales..........................................................69 Sellers Feedlot...................................................................89 Shoal Creek Land & Cattle..............................................79 Smith Valley Angus Sale.................................................. 51 Soaring Eagle Farms Sale.................................................55 South Central Regional Stockyards................................. 76 Spur Ranch Angus Sale.................................................... 61 Square B Ranch/Quality Beef..........................................59 Superior Steel Sales...........................................................46 Sydenstricker Genetics......................................................59 Three Cedars Farms Sale.................................................72 Touchstone Energy........................................................... 81 Valley Oaks Angus............................................................59 Valley Oaks Angus/Valley Oaks Meats............................ 15 Wax - Marshall Ryegrass....................................................2 Weiker Angus Ranch........................................................59 Westway Feeds....................................................................9 Wheeler Auctions & Real Estate.......................................22 Wheeler Livestock Market................................................ 24 Mike Williams..................................................................22 Windrush Farm Red Angus.............................................79 WMC - Ladies of the Ozarks Sale....................................33 Zeitlow - Ritchie Waterers................................................34