__MAIN_TEXT__
feature-image

Page 1


CONTENTS

May 2020

FEATURES 30

Getting Heifers Rebred & On Schedule

Tips on Nutrition, Cycling and Selection for Profitable Heifers

64

The Top Five Tips for Proven Pasture Management Success This Summer

MEMBER NEWS 6 Association Update 24 Beef Checkoff News 36 County News

MAY 2020

Getting Heifers Rebred & On Schedule

4

64

Tried & True

30

Tried & True

COLUMNS 8

MCA President’s Perspective Forging Ahead

10

CattleWomen’s Corner

12

Straight Talk: Mike Deering

40

Let’s Persevere

United We Stand

On the Edge of Common Sense: Baxter Black The Cowboy Ball

46

Junior Spotlight

76

Cowboy Poetry

78

Capitol Update

Great Opportunities with MJCA

My New Saddle

Technology Transitions

The Missouri Beef Cattleman is an official publication of the Missouri Cattlemen’s Association.


MISSOURI

BEEF CATTLEMAN

OFFICIAL PUBLICATION OF THE MISSOURI CATTLEMEN’S ASSOCIATION

Volume 49 - Issue 5 (USPS 890-240 • ISSN 0192-3056) Magazine Publishing Office 2306 Bluff Creek Drive, #100, Columbia, MO 65201 Phone: 573-499-9162 • Fax: 573-499-9167 Andy Atzenweiler: Editor/Production/Ad Sales P.O. Box 480977 • Kansas City, Missouri 64148 816-210-7713 • E-mail: mobeef@sbcglobal.net Coby Wilson: Ad Sales 573-499-9162 Ext 235

Missouri Cattlemen’s Association MCA Website: www.mocattle.com

DEPARTMENTS 7

New MCA Members

16

NCBA News

19

Top 100 Profitability Challenge

28

Coby Wilson Moves On

42

Simmental News

43

USMEF News

47 82

MCA All-Breeds Junior Show Preview Advertisers Index

Missouri’s Cattlemen Foundation www.mocattlemenfoundation.org

Missouri’s CattleWomen

http://mocattle.com/missouricattlewomen.aspx

2020 MCA Officers

Marvin Dieckman, President 660-596-4163 • 28998 Hwy JJ, Cole Camp, MO 65325 Patty Wood, President-Elect 660-287-7701 • 16075 Wood Road, La Monte, MO 65337 Bruce Mershon, Vice President 816-525-1954 • 31107 Lake City Buckner Rd., Buckner, MO 64016 Matt Hardecke, Treasurer 573-846-6614 • 19102 Skymeadows Dr., Wildwood, MO 63069 David Dick, Secretary 660-826-0031 • 23529 Anderson School Rd., Sedalia, MO 65301

2020 MCA Regional Vice Presidents

Region 1: Eric Greenley, 61998 Pleasant Valley Rd. Knox City, MO 63446 660-341-8750 Region 2: Chuck Miller, 393 Spring Garden Road Olean, MO 65064 • 573-881-3589 Region 3: Charlie Besher, RR 5, Box 2402 Patton, MO 63662 • 573-866-2846 Region 4: Deb Thummel, 12601 Hwy. 46 Sheridan, MO 64486 • 660-541-2606 Region 5: John Shipman, 34266 Hwy KK Mora, MO 65345 • 660-221-1013 Region 6: Clay Doeden, 14555 S. Hwy A Stockton, MO 65785 • 417-808-0415 Region 7: Traves Merrick, 1956 Hwy 97 Miller, MO 65707 • 417-536-8080

MAY 2020

Missouri Beef Cattleman, (USPS 890-240 • ISSN 0192-3056) is published monthly (12 times a year) and is the official publication of the Missouri Cattlemen’s Association, 2306 Bluff Creek Drive, #100, Columbia, Missouri, 65201. PERIODICALS postage paid at Columbia, Missouri and additional mailing offices. Subscription price is included as a part of the minimum membership dues of $70.00 per year in Missouri Cattlemen’s Association. Postmaster: Send address changes to: Missouri Beef Cattleman, P.O. Box 480977, Kansas City, Missouri 64148

Mike Deering • Executive Vice President - Ext 230 Mike@mocattle.com Sydney Thummel • Manager of Membership - Ext 231 Sydney@mocattle.com Candace Bergesch • MBC Editor/Production Artist Candace@mocattle.com Lisa Stockhorst, Administrative Assistant – Ext 234 Lisa@mocattle.com

5


6

MAY 2020


Sahara Barker-Wellesley, Kansas City, MO David & Terry Booker, Pilot Grove, MO Brit Brengarth, Woodridge, MO Amanda Daniel, Higginsville, MO Cooper Goodman, Nellyville, MO Phil & Sue Gravitt, Jefferson Valley Farms, Bunceton, MO David Hecker, Bunceton, MO William Holland, Everton, MO Amye Johnson, Sparta, MO Carlie Jo Kleeman, Braymer, MO Kade Kleeman, Braymer, MO Karsyn Kleeman, Braymer, MO Jason Luster, Luster Farms, Bunceton, MO Greg Roach, Granite City, IL R. Gayle Stuart, Vandalia, MO See the MCA Membership Form on page 73.

MAY 2020 7


8

MAY 2020


10

MAY 2020


MAY 2020

11


Straight

Talk

with Mike Deering United We Stand We have all heard the phrase, “United we stand, divided we fall.” It’s a phrase with a bloody history as brave leaders were on a relentless pursuit to establish the United States of America. The phrase was first used by Founding Father John Dickinson just ahead of the Revolutionary War. Dickinson said, “Then join hand in hand, brave Americans all! By uniting we stand, by dividing we fall!” The phrase has been used countless times since then and even appears on our state flag. The phrase is also applicable in our industry as we face unprecedented challenges and many producers are forced to make difficult decisions. Following the fire at a Tyson facility in August and now COVID-19, we witnessed extreme market degradation followed by sharp increases in boxed beef prices and unseasonal profitability to the packing segment. The repeat nature of these market reactions absolutely emphasizes how the production sector of the industry is exposed to the highest potential for risk with little-to-no leverage to change that risk position. In a very rare move, we did call for economic relief for cattle producers to be included in the COVID-19 stimulus package. While we are hopeful this will help producers, we are not naive enough to believe this is going to make people whole or that the pending structure of the payments is going to make everyone happy. That’s why we need to continue our focus on long-term solutions over short-term relief. Absent of robust cattle marketing policy, a state working group was formed to examine all options to provide longterm structural changes to the cattle markets. This is a work-in-progress. Our leaders understand the importance of moving quickly, but we do not want to do something full of unintended consequences. The first outcome by this working group was to unite with

Executive Vice President other state cattle organizations to collectively call for the Department of Justice to investigate the extreme market shifts. Any evidence of fraudulent business practices within the meatpacking industry needs to be addressed by the highest level of government. A few associations previously sent letters, but enough with the piecemeal approach. We need to come together to send a powerful message. Along with 22 other state cattle groups, the message was sent on April 17. Livestock Mandatory Price Reporting is up for reauthorization and now is the time to determine what can be modified to bring-forth meaningful change. MCA continues to be a leader in the conversation on requiring more details to be reported on formula trade. We are also diving into ways to increase negotiated cash trade. There are several proposals we are reviewing, including requiring processing facilities to purchase a minimum percentage of their fat cattle through negotiated cash trade. The struggle is price discovery and transparency. We remain laser focused on these objectives and will not be asleep at the wheel. As proposals are presented, we see business-as-usual attacks by those who prefer divisiveness over unity. While we continue to review all ideas and move forward carefully and methodically for Missouri cattle producers, we will not have tolerance for those circling the wagons and shooting inward. The biggest losers in the game of potshots are producers and consumers. It needs to stop. As Mr. Dickinson proclaimed, “By uniting we stand, by dividing we fall!”


MAY 2020

13


MCA (Along with 22 Others) Asks DOJ to Launch Beef Market Investigation COLUMBIA, MISSOURI (April 20, 2020) - The Missouri Cattlemen’s Association, along with 22 other state cattle organizations, sent a letter to U.S. Attorney General William Barr today, April 20, 2020, requesting a formal investigation by the United States Department of Justice to identify and investigate any evidence of fraudulent business practices within the beef meatpacking industry. The letter was prompted by extreme beef market volatility following the fire of a Tyson processing plant in August and the current cornonavirus crisis (COVID-19). “Our members are facing economic and financial destruction during the current crisis, which is compounded by the extreme market shift following the fire in Holcomb, Kansas, eight months ago,” said MCA President Marvin Dieckman. “One segment of the industry is making unprecedented profits while the rest of us are counting pennies. We can not afford to wait another eight months for results of an investigation. We need DOJ to open an investigation immediately.” The 23 state cattle organizations made clear in the letter that these events have emphasized how volatile cattle producers are. “The nature of previous and current concern in both situations is extreme market degradation to the producer segment quickly followed by sharp increases and unseasonal profitability to the packing segment through boxed beef prices,” penned the 23 state cattle organizations. “The repeat nature of these market reactions absolutely emphasizes how the production sector of the industry is exposed to the highest potential for risk with little-to-no leverage to change that risk position.”

MAY 2020

Your One-Stop for Braunvieh Influence and Black Hybrid Commercial Females

14

Call us to see some of the best calf raisers in the business. Grouping and Marketing Customers’ Calves Since 1992!

While USDA is still investigating subsequent to the fire and have added the current crisis to that investigation, the organizations collectively believe DOJ engagement is critical. “We understand and acknowledge there is a pending USDA investigation. However, as our industry looks for clarity of business function moving forward, we believe the DOJ would be the appropriate agency to open an investigation and also support USDA in its investigation allowing this process to be concluded in a timely manner,” the letter stated. “This is of vital importance to the future of one of the largest sectors of U.S. agriculture.” According to Dieckman, both events continue the undue financial burden for all cattle producers within the production side of the beef cattle industry and in turn affect rural America short-term and long-term. In addition to MCA, the letter was signed by Alabama Cattlemen’s Association; Arizona Cattle Growers’ Association; Arkansas Cattlemen’s Association; Georgia Cattlemen’s Association; Hawaii Cattlemen’s Council; Illinois Beef Association; Iowa Cattlemen’s Association; Michigan Cattlemen’s Association; Minnesota State Cattlemen’s Association; Mississippi Cattlemen’s Association; Montana Stockgrowers Association; North Carolina Cattlemen’s Association; North Dakota Stockmen’s Association; Ohio Cattlemen’s Association; Oregon Cattlemen’s Association; South Dakota Cattlemen’s Association; Tennessee Cattlemen’s Association; Utah Cattlemen’s Association; Washington Cattlemen’s Association; West Virginia Cattlemen’s Association; Wisconsin Cattlemen’s Association; and Wyoming Stock Growers Association.

Ron McBee

221 State Hwy H Fayette, MO 65248

(573) 228-2517 mcbcattle@aol.com

McBeeCattleCompany.com


Coronavirus-Related Cattle Industry Losses Estimated at $13.6 Billion Source: NCBA DENVER (April 14, 2020) - A study released today estimates cattle industry losses as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic will reach $13.6 billion. The study was commissioned by NCBA and conducted by a team of industry-leading agricultural economists led by Derrell Peel, Breedlove Professor of Agribusiness and Extension Livestock Marketing Specialist at Oklahoma State University, to assist USDA in determining how best to allocate CARES Act relief funds to cattle producers. The study shows cow-calf producers will see the largest impact, with COVID-19-related losses totaling an estimated $3.7 billion, or $111.91 per head for each mature breeding animal in the United States. Without offsetting relief payments, those losses could increase by $135.24 per mature breeding animal, for an additional impact totaling $4.45 billion in the coming years. Stocker/backgrounder segment losses were estimated at $159.98 per head, for a total economic impact of $2.5 billion in 2020, while feeding sector losses were estimated at $3.0 billion or $205.96 per head. “This study confirms that cattle producers have suffered massive economic damage as a result of the COVID-19 outbreak and those losses will continue to mount for years to come, driving many producers to the brink of collapse and beyond if relief funds aren’t made available soon,” said NCBA CEO Colin Woodall. “This study also clearly illustrates the fact that while the relief funds provided by Congress were a good first step, there

Marketing Cattle Weekly for Cattlemen

“Across Missouri”

remains a massive need for more funding to be allocated as soon as members of Congress reconvene.” Woodall pointed out that relief funds that were meant to provide aid directly to cattle producers were divided among multiple commodities, many of which already have government programs in place to support production. However, cattle producers have always maintained their independence from government programs, and most operate today without the safety net others enjoy. “It’s only because of the extraordinary circumstances we face today that cattle producers need relief. While we appreciate the many members of Congress who supported the cattle industry and ensured cattle producers were eligible for relief funds, we need these same members to do more to make certain every cattle producer who needs relief can access funding. That’s why we’re calling today for additional funds to be made available specifically for cattlemen and women,” said Woodall. STUDY SUMMARY The study conducted by Oklahoma State University estimated total beef cattle industry damages of $13.6 billion as of early April 2020. Damage estimates include: •Revenue losses of $3.7 billion in 2020 to the cow-calf sector, equivalent to $111.91/head for each mature breeding animal in the U.S. If these damages are not offset, additional long-term damages of $4.45 billion or another $135.24 per mature breeding animal will impact the cow-calf sector in coming years. • Revenue losses of $2.5 billion to the U.S. stocker/ backgrounding sector in 2020, equivalent to $159.98/ head. • Revenue losses of $3.0 billion to the U.S. cattle feeding sector in 2020, equivalent to $205.96/head.

MAY 2020

• The current situation is very fluid and uncertain. Additional damages are likely.

16

“Sales each TUESDAY” “Sales each FRIDAY” O:660-882-7413 O:573-324-2295 www.movalleylivestock.com www.emcclivestock.com Justin Angell Mike VanMaanen Jon Angell 573-819-8000 573-881-0402 573-682-4656

The economic damage assessment was conducted by Derrell S. Peel, Oklahoma State University; Dustin Aherin, Rabobank; Randy Blach, CattleFax; Kenneth Burdine, University of Kentucky; Don Close, Rabobank; Amy Hagerman, Oklahoma State University; Josh Maples, Mississippi State University; James Robb, Livestock Marketing Information Center; and Glynn Tonsor, Kansas State University.


MAY 2020

17


NCBA Delivers “Paycheck Protection Program Increase Act” for Cattle Producers and Small Business WASHINGTON (April 21, 2020) - National Cattlemen’s Beef Association Vice President, Government Affairs, Ethan Lane today issued the following statement in response to U.S. Senate passage of additional legislation, the Paycheck Protection Program Increase Act of 2020, to provide relief in the wake of the COVID-19 pandemic: “We applaud the Senate for advancing this critical replenishment of funding to programs like Paycheck Protection Program (PPP), and we are pleased to see the reaffirmation of Congress’s intent that cattle producers be granted access to the Economic Injury Disaster Loan (EIDL) program administered by the Small Business Administration. “We urge the House of Representatives to move swiftly to approve this package and deliver these funds to producers across the country who are continuing to keep grocery store shelves full during this economic disaster.” BACKGROUND: The U.S. Senate on Tuesday evening approved so-called “CARES 2.0” $484 billion emergency relief legislation

by unanimous consent. The measure would provide an additional $321 billion in funding for PPP. Of this amount, $60 billion is set aside for small lenders and community-based financial institutions who serve the needs of unbanked/ underserved small businesses, specifically: • $30 billion for loans made by Insured Depository Institutions and Credit Unions that have assets between $10 billion and $50 billion; and • $30 billion for loans made by Community Financial Institutions, Small Insured Depository Institutions, and Credit Unions with assets less than $10 billion. An additional $50 billion is provided for SBA’s Economic Injury Disaster Loan (EIDL) program – allowing for approximately $300 billion in new loans for small businesses – and $10 billion in funding for SBA’s Emergency Economic Injury Grant program. Authorizing language was included to allow agricultural enterprises as defined by section 18(b) of the Small Business Act (15 U.S.C. 647(b)) with not more than 500 employees to receive EIDL grants and loans.

Livestock Groups Send Letter Advocating for Needs of Rural Healthcare Providers Amid COVID-19 Pandemic Source: NCBA

MAY 2020

DENVER (April 14, 2020) – The National Cattlemen’s Beef Association (NCBA), the American Sheep Industry Association (ASI) and the Public Lands Council (PLC) called on the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) and the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) today to request rural healthcare providers have resources and funding to properly respond to the COVID-19 virus.

18

“Rural healthcare providers have unique needs unlike densely populated areas. We are calling on Secretary Alex Azar and Secretary Sonny Perdue to ensure rural healthcare providers have needed resources, particularly where the number of providers are limited across a vast geographic area, and technology to allow for expanded tele-health services amid the COVID-19 pandemic.” - NCBA CEO Colin Woodall

“This is not business as usual for the sheep and cattle industry. Poor market conditions bring unprecedented levels of stress to farmers and ranchers. COVID-19 has exacerbated this burden through isolation and uncertainty for these industries. We must ensure farmers and ranchers do not navigate this alone by providing ample access to mental health assistance.” - ASI Executive Director Peter Orwick “Much of rural America operates with limited numbers of healthcare providers. If doctors, nurses, or administrators serving rural areas become exposed to COVID-19, it could result in loss of access to care for large regions. It is essential these hospitals have resources to protect their employees and the rural communities at the frontlines of this crisis.” - PLC Executive Director Kaitlynn Glover


MAY 2020

19


MAY 2020

21


22

MAY 2020


MAY 2020

23


Your

BEEF CHECKOFF NEWS Strategies Adapting to Driving Demand

By Samantha Riley, Director of Education and Marketing While the last several weeks have been anything but normal the Checkoff has still been hard at work educating consumers about the protein powerhouse that is beef. Consumers perceptions and behaviors about beef are as strong as they’ve ever been. Restaurants are focusing more on “To Go” menus, free delivery and family style meals. When consumers aren’t ordering food curbside, they’re focusing on ground beef recipes, comfort foods, including meatloaf, pasta and slow cooker recipes, and healthy recipes. Beef. It’s What’s For Dinner. expanded their target demographic to reach more consumers, created new batch cooking, pantry staples and kid-friendly articles to share with consumers and added in heavy rotations of Nicely Done, Beef. ‘Sizzle” videos and Beef 101 videos on social platforms, focusing on preparing beef at home. Since launching these new initiatives, they have received 5 million video views (as of April 7th) and there has been a 51% increase in recipe-related page views on BeefItsWhatsForDinner.com (as of April 7th).

MAY 2020

The Missouri Beef Industry Council is ready, willing and responsive to the situation at hand. Missouri Beef Industry Council staff have been hard at work at adapting and responding to the situation and continuing to stay flexible to changes. Many steps have been taken on the state level, much like the national level, to reach more consumers and producers alike to move the

24

message that beef is important in the diet, sharing at home recipes and educational resources. Now, more than ever, digital marketing has played a huge role in reaching those we cannot see in person. Digital Marketing From mid-March to mid-April, MBIC reached more than 56,000 people and had more than 102,000 impressions across all social platforms. Our digital tactics have changed, focusing more on beef preparation, beef safety and preparing easy, fast and simple meals at home with staples consumers have in their pantries. Providing educational materials has also been a priority for adults and kids alike, featuring activities, coloring pages, and educational games to do together as a family on mobeef.org. MBIC has added a page for consumers to visit to find producers selling beef, provided by Missouri Cattlemen’s Association and Missouri Grown, as consumer interests have changed from solely purchasing from the grocery store. Development of cooking videos started in midMarch, including a Kids in the Kitchen and KidFriendly Meals, and Batch Cooking for the at home chef. MBIC has also been sending out weekly emails including recipes, beef preparation tips and resources. If you would like to sign up for Checkoff updates via email or postal mail contact Samantha Riley at samantha@ mobeef.com. Consumer Affairs Consumer affairs efforts continue to move forward as well. While some events have been postponed, others have adapted to the situation. The Missouri Association of Nutrition and Dietetics (MOAND) made the decision to turn their annual conference into a virtual event via webinar. MBIC sponsored the keynote speaker and a panel. Cara Harbstreet MS RD LD, Street Smart Nutrition, was the keynote speaker, focusing on Rethinking Health: Building Sustainable Plates with Beef.


MBIC also supplied the panelists for the Beef Up Your Communications Toolkit: A Conversation with Industry Experts including: Tiffanie Weekley, a registered nurse, board certified lactation consultant and owner of Morning Glory Farms, Kelly Ast, West Central Community Action Agency’s Health and Wealth project director and Mark Russell, Executive Director of the Missouri Beef Industry Council. There are still plans to move ahead with the Southeast and Southwest MOAND event in St. James this summer focusing on some of the same topics, but in a more hands-on environment.

and events coming this summer, we will continue to stay flexible and adaptable in our strategies to reach consumers to provide them with the tools and resources they need to keep choosing beef again and again. Metal “Beef. It’s What’s For Dinner”. signs are still available to purchase through the MBIC cost-share program. Contact Barb Reynolds at barb@mobeef.com to order. There are currently 50+ Beef. It’s What’s For Dinner. signs across the state. Please follow us on social media @beefcouncil on Facebook, Instagram, Pinterest and Twitter.

Efforts have been made to reach all influencer groups in new ways, including providing resources they can share with members and clients to answer questions about cooking beef at home and beef nutrition. While MBIC may not be able to reach consumers face-to-face during this, it’s still important to find new ways to reach them virtually – either through email, phone conferences or video conferencing. Mo Beef Mo Kids Mo Beef Mo Kids (MoBKF) has been working diligently to provide consumers with educational tools while students are out of the classroom. MoBKF has been focusing on sharing recipes, education and participant spotlights and health and wellness information. The FFA/4H Leadership Academy is also slated to start this summer with high school students serving as representatives for the program and gaining valuable leadership and communication skills. Internal infrastructure is being built to better assist those participating in the program on all levels: schools, processors and producers.

MAY 2020

Looking Forward As the Missouri Beef Industry Council starts planning for the new fiscal year starting in October

25


U.S. Programs Managed on Behalf of Beef Checkoff Continue to Maintain Beef Demand Source: NCBA DENVER, CO (April 14, 2020) – Promotion programs being managed by the National Cattlemen’s Beef Association as a contractor to the Beef Checkoff have shifted and grown in response to the worldwide coronavirus pandemic. These efforts reflect a consumer population that is concerned for their day-to-day health and the availability of delicious, safe and wholesome food products, like beef. “It was only two months ago that Beef Checkoff committees got together in San Antonio at the Cattle Industry Convention to work collectively to develop plans to improve beef demand,” says Buck Wehrbein, a feedlot manager from Nebraska and chairman of the Federation of State Beef Councils. “In a few short weeks our entire world and the way we engage with each other and our communities have changed, and our response through the Beef Checkoff has had to change with it.” Wehrbein notes that many events and conferences the Beef Checkoff had a role in have been canceled and some research projects have paused. In addition, the current issues called for the program to shift messages to meet the needs of consumers immediately. “Our market research and market intelligence staff members are keeping a close eye on what is going on in retail and foodservice channels, as well as how consumers are responding and what they need from us,” Wehrbein says.

MAY 2020

Wehrbein says the supply chain is leveling out and beef is becoming more available in retail meat cases. According to IRI, a market research company, meat has been the leading sales driver for the perimeter of the retail store, up more than 90 percent for the week ending March 22, year-over-year. While those numbers have moderated somewhat, they are still considerably higher than they were for the same period in 2019. Those figures can seem frustrating to producers who feel they have not received a fair share, Wehrbein says, but they do help demonstrate the checkoff is doing its job, which is to strengthen beef demand.

26

With three out of four consumers under stay-at-home orders, they are cooking more meals for more people, more often. NCBA staff, along with staffs of state beef councils across the country, are leveraging their extensive library of content, including advertisements, recipes, cooking videos and educational materials about

beef nutrition to help consumers while they are home during the pandemic. Tips on beef preparation and recipes are being provided to consumers through Beef Checkoff-funded content on the Beef. It’s What’s For Dinner web site, including recipe collections, cooking lessons and beef safety information. Meanwhile, both national and state programs have shifted advertising dollars to deliver this content to consumers and provide it on social media platforms, too. In addition, the checkoff is reminding consumers that Chuck Knows Beef, the digital assistant based on artificial intelligence, is available to help them with their beef questions. Recipes and resources are also being provided to food influencers, supply chain partners and the news media to support their efforts to educate consumers about food preparation and healthy eating. NCBA, in its checkoff role, is also keeping in close contact with supply chain partners to provide support as they adjust to the current consumer and business environments. Wehrbein encourages interested producers to follow Beef. It’s What’s For Dinner. on social media platforms, including Facebook, Instagram and Twitter, to see how Beef Checkoff dollars are helping consumers feel confident in choosing and preparing beef, and is assuring those consumers that the beef industry is committed to providing safe, healthy, wholesome beef to the food supply. Beef in the “Substitute” Seat To reach those consumers, a new campaign was released April 1 to highlight the versatility of beef. NCBA, as a checkoff contractor, partnered with three nationally recognized chefs who found creative ways to substitute beef for more commonly used proteins in one of their favorite dishes. The resulting recipes include: • Peking Chuck: In this nod to Peking Duck, Top Chef finalist Joe Sasto replaces the duck with a Chuck Roast for a unique Asian-inspired beef meal. • Korean Fried Beef (KFB): Who needs fried chicken when you can enjoy fried beef at home? Acclaimed NYC chef Esther Choi shows how to make this classic dish with a beefy Korean twist. • Cowlamari: For this tasty treat, beloved Chicago chef and Food Network regular Lamar Moore replaces the surf with turf and turns Calamari into Cowlamari. This fully integrated campaign includes paid advertising, social media, media relations, influencer engagement


and retail outreach. Through advertising alone, it’s projected the initial campaign flight will secure 31 million impressions. A special webpage that includes the chef videos and recipes provides an overview of the campaign, and the recipes, which use a play on words, complement the Beef Checkoff’s “Nicely Done Beef” campaign. Results show the campaign is already paying dividends. The recipes were shared with major news outlets and resulted in the Associated Press picking up the story. The chefs, who have thousands of followers, are also pushing the recipes out on their own social media platforms. Since the new videos launched, there have been more than 1.2 million video views and nearly 1.5 million social engagements with the content. The team also activated Masters of Beef Advocacy graduates asking them to share their own “beef substitute” recipes. Cooking with the Cowboy making a Steak Pot Pie and Girl Carnivore serving up Beef Parmesan were two results. Extensive engagement with national consumer media reporters was also conducted by NCBA as a Beef Checkoff contractor. As part of the outreach the team distributed four press releases, which were also utilized by state beef councils in extension with local and state media outlets. NCBA has also been pitching media to

secure inclusion of beef in “cooking at home” stories. Finally, Wehrbein points to a summer grilling promotion planned to begin Memorial Day and run through Labor Day that will celebrate beef as the center of grilling activities. The “United We Steak” campaign will feature each state in the country and highlight the favorite steak of that state. The campaign is being developed in close partnership with state beef councils to develop the state features, including individual web pages highlighting that state’s unique components. It’s hoped the timing of the campaign will leverage consumers coming together after the extended “stay at home” orders. “Federation board members, who represent their state beef council on the board, can take pride in the work they’ve done to make these national programs possible. But they can also be proud of the work of their own state organizations,” says Wehrbein. “There are innovative efforts to reach consumers and influencers being conducted on many fronts, including through online platforms.” At the national level those online platforms includes the Beef Quality Assurance website where producers can become certified online, or the Masters of Beef Advocacy that allows industry supporters to take their voices to a broader audience.

MAY 2020 27


Kingsville Livestock Auction Kingsville, Missouri Hwy. 58 • 45 Miles SE of Kansas City, MO

MAY 2020

Special Cow/Bull & Cow/Calf Sale Saturday, May 16 • 11:00 a.m. Cattle Sale Every Tuesday 10:00 a.m.

28

For information call Rick or Jeremy Anstine

816-597-3331 or 816-732-6070

Visit our Website at: www.anstineauctions.com or E-mail us at: kingsville@earthlink.net


MAY 2020

29


30

MAY 2020


MAY 2020

31


32

MAY 2020


MAY 2020

33


34

MAY 2020


MAY 2020

35


COUNTY NEWS

See What’s Happening in Your County

Lafayette County The Lafayette County Cattlemen recognized several members for their contributions to the organization at their annual meeting held March 14. Darrell Neuner of Lexington was honored as Lafayette County Cattleman of the Year for 2019. Don Schlesselman, President introduced Darrell by saying - “He has really stepped up and become a dependable volunteer. He shows up to all events and is ready to help wherever needed in the rain, snow and sunshine.

Also recognized during the meeting were long-time board members Kent Corbin and Don Rasa. Both have served the organization on the county board, as county president, and as a member of the state board. After over 25+ years of service, these members were recognized with gift certificates to enjoy a beef dinner out following their retirement from the board.

This gentleman grew up on a dairy and learned what hard work was at an early age helping his parents milk Holsteins twice a day. Now, he and his wife with the help of their son run a herd of registered Angus cattle. Not only does he graciously volunteer his time with the Lafayette County Cattlemen’s but he can also be found helping the youth as he serves as a scout leader with the Big Muddy District of Boy Scouts. He serves as the vice president of the Lexington FFA Booster Club and is also a member of the Mid-MO Tractor Club. When he’s not busy volunteering and helping the community he enjoys hunting, trapping and fishing and spending time with his two grandkids.”

Darrel Neuner was.honored as Lafayette County Cattleman of the year for 2019. President Don Schlesselman presented the award.

LCCA congratulates Darrell on this honor.

Callaway Livestock Center, Inc.

On I-70, 4 miles east of Kingdom City, MO on outer road

573-642-7486 Every Monday:

Slaughter Cattle 12:00 p.m. Selling All Classes of Cattle 12:30 p.m.

1st Thursday Nite of Each Month: MAY 2020

6:00 p.m. Bred Cows and Breeding Bull Sale

36

John P. Harrison 573-386-5150 Jack Harrison 573-386-2186 David Bell 660-327-5633

Kent Corbin and Don Rasa were recognized as long-time board members of LCCA.


Missouri Angus Breeders The #1 State For Angus!

Bulls are our Business!

The Pipkin Family

9770 W. State Hwy 266 • Springfield, MO 65802 j_pipkin@sbcglobal.net • clearwaterangus.com Jim (cell) 417-827-0623 • Joann (cell) 417-827-2756 WD & Bonita Bulls • Replacement Females for Sale

Russel and Randy Miller 21146 400th Street Graham, MO 64455 660-254-0137 • 660-415-6339 E-mail: galaxybeef@hotmail.com

Kenny & Janyce Hinkle 14103 E. Summers Rd. • Nevada, MO 64773 Ph/Fax: 417-944-2219 • Cell: 417-448-4127 E-mail: hpca@centurytel.net

GERLOFF FARMS Connealy Power Surge

WEIKER

Angus Ranch

AHIR Bulls Semen Available Females

660-248-3640

Fred Weiker • Julia Weiker Fred: 660-248-3765

3154 Hwy A Bland, MO 65014 573-437-3751/2507 Charlie Cell: 573-680-9117 Kim Cell: 573-291-1091 khuebler@fidnet.com www.gerloffcattle.com

Dedicated to the Livestock Industry Since 1906

1339 Hwy 124, • Fayette, MO 65248 “Where the Extraordinary are Availible”

For All Your Angus Needs!

22227 Saline 127 Hwy • Malta Bend, Mo 65359 Brian Marshall • (660) 641-4522 www.marshallandfennerfarms.com

Since 1942

Thank You For a Great Sale!

May 9 Female Production Sale

21658 Quarry Lane • Barnett, MO 65011 Office: 573-302-7011 • Fax: 573-348-8325 E-mail: meadangus@yahoo.com Website: www.meadfarms.com

Alan Mead, Owner 573-216-0210

CIRCLE A RANCH

41 Hwy K Iberia, MO 65486 1-800-CIRCLE-A Leon & Glenda Kleeman • Traves & Waylon Merrick

Farm Address: 1956 Hwy 97 • Miller, MO 65707 Traves Merrick

Cell: 417-536-8080 • Office: 417-452-3883 gleondafarms@hotmail.com www.gleondaangus.com

Dave Gust, Sr. Dave Gust, Jr. Nick Hammett, Commercial Mktg. Mike Lembke Kevin Lennon

For your ANGUS Cattle Needs Contact:

MISSOURI ANGUS ASSOCIATION 734-260-8635

E-mail: Julie@missouriangus.org

missouriangus.org

334 Seth St. - Lincoln, MO 65338 www.RichardsonRanch.net adrrmd@mail.missouri.edu

Registered Angus Bulls & Females Available

Pete 660-281-0353

Ashlyn 660-281-1720

Russell & Susan Coon

1318 Shelby 169, Bethel, MO 63434 660-284-6518 h • 660-341-2705 c ruscatsol@gmail.com

Larry Coon

1284 Shelby 169, Bethel, MO 63434 660-284-6473 h • 660-342-3889 c

MAY 2020

Julie Conover, Gen. Manager 634 S.W. 1201 Rd • Holden, MO 64040

37


Cooper County

Nikodim on behalf of Missouri Farmers Care were in attendance.

The Cooper County Cattlemen had a great turnout and successful annual banquet on February 29. We teamed up with Missouri Farmers Care for the AgriReady sign presentation for Cooper County. This designation is very important for Cooper County, and the Cooper County Cattlemen are proud to help stand for agriculture in the county. A special video message was shared by Gov Mike Parson to start off the evening.

On behalf of Missouri Farmers Care, Don presented the sign to the commissioners. We had these leaders autograph an Agri-Ready sign which was the high

MAY 2020

Our county’s board members worked hard to put on this event and also worked hard at the grill to prepare our ribeye steaks for the evening. This is what our county cattlemen are known for, as it is one of the many cooking events we do throughout the year. We cook on average over 2,000 steaks per year at various events throughout the county. We had a great turnout of over 320 people at the Isle of Capri in Boonville, Missouri. Sen. Caleb Rowden, Rep. Dave Muntzel, Rep. Sara Walsh, our three county commissioners, and Don

38


selling item during the live auction later that evening. We also had the opportunity to learn about the many programs that MCA offers from the MCA staff. Sydney Thummel, Coby Wilson, and Lisa Stockhorst were all present for the evening. MCA President, Marvin Dieckman, and MCA President-Elect Patty Wood also attended to show their support for Cooper County. We are so happy to have the full support of our county and state leaders.

Polk County Unfortunately, the Polk County Cattlemen’s Association had to cancel the April meeting. Jeff Schoen, with Boehringer Ingelheim, had planned to sponsor the meeting at Smiths Restaurant. The May meeting is still undecided. Watch for meeting cards in the mail. The May meeting will be our Scholarship Donor Appreciation meeting, along with scholarship

We held a gun raffle and raised $1,500 which was later donated to Neighbors Helping Neighbors in Cooper County. Our auction helped us raise money to donate to the AFA scholarship program for students working toward a degree in agriculture. Our live auction did very well along with a silent auction. We ended the evening with a live band. A special thanks to all those who donated and helped sponsor this event. This event would not be possible without the support of local businesses. We are already planning and looking forward to next year.

The Polk County Cattlemen’s Association donated over 150 pounds of Hamburger meat to the Community Outreach Program.

presentations. The Polk County Cattlemen’s Association donated over 150 pounds of hamburger meat to the Community Outreach Program. Other than that things have been pretty slow in Polk County this month, and just like everyone else, we are hoping things will get back to normal!

MAY 2020 39


On the Edge of

Common Sense with Baxter Black The Cowboy Ball

MAY 2020

In the midst of Covid-19, one of the deepest psychosies’ is loneliness. “Social distance,” sliding take-out tacos under the door, being served pizza across the counter like a Frisbee, having to carry a measuring tape and whip it out like Marshall Dillon to confirm 6 feet every time some masked stranger comes your way… all to prevent civil discourse and staying friends. IT IS DEPRESSING. Those of you historians familiar with the pioneers who came west know they often found themselves in the lonely isolation that some of us are feeling today. Yet we RISE TO THE OCCASION, BRAVE AND INSPIRED TO MAKE THE BEST OF IT.

40

The rider said he was up country And rarely came this way at all But he thought he’d be a good neighbor By throwin’ a cowboy ball! The pilgrim inspected this stranger Who never got down from his horse. He looked like he needed a dentist, His manner was rugged and coarse.

Blue lonesome is dang hard to handle Especially out where the road ends So any excuse for a party Is welcome, and bound to make friends.

But lonesome can pray on a body And the stranger sounded sincere “We can dance all night if we want to, Play music and toast the Frontier!

Once, a pilgrim seekin’ some solace Staked a claim a long way from town. He’d come from the itch of the city And in six months he’d settled down.

We’ll eat and we’ll drink and be merry, I’ve whiskey enough for us all... So whattya say, are ya willin’ To come to a cowboy ball?”

He built himself a small cabin He sat on the porch one fine day When he saw a rider approaching. He saw him from miles away.

The pilgrim was mullin’ it over, “Ya say they’ll be whiskey and dance? And maybe a kiss in the moonlight?” The stranger said, “Yeah, there’s a chance.”

ORYS 07 RED ANGUS Service age bulls, bred cows, cow/calf pairs, show prospect heifers available.

417-652-3425 417-839-7205 www.oryscircle7.com

“So what should I wear?” asked the pilgrim, “It sounds like a pretty good do.” The stranger said, “Heck, it don’t matter, ‘Cause, Pilgrim, it’s just me and you!”


MAY 2020

41


If Not Now, Then When? Source: Chip Kemp, IGS In 2020, can you leave anything to chance when marketing your calves? Bozeman, MT - The current climate breeds concern, fear, and uncertainty. But it also provides greater time and appreciation for our faith, our families, and our farms. Those are of much greater importance and will ultimately be the positives that move us forward to take advantage of new approaches and innovative ideas that make us and our businesses stronger! As a recent post stated - “Look fear in the face and press on!” We must and we will. We have cows to tend to and calves to sell. And for many of us, we will use the major summer calf sales to garner premiums associated with high-knowledge feeder calves. And that single sale will be responsible for a major chunk of our annual revenue. In today’s marketplace, can you leave anything to chance? This is your family’s paycheck for a year’s worth of work. It is time to pull out all the stops! It is time to explore the IGS Feeder Profit Calculator™ (FPC). The FPC is a powerful tool that highlights quality management and responsible breeding and crossbreeding decisions to feedlot buyers in a manner

For More Information About Simmental Cattle Please Visit: MissouriSimmental.com

Durham Simmental Farms Your Source for Quality Simmental in Central Missouri

38863 185th Road • Nelson, MO 65347

Ralph 660-837-3353

Garry 660-784-2242

they admire - dollars and cents! You share knowledge with buyers they need and desire. Facts. Not hype. Not opinion. Not useless slogans. But facts. Those that indicate long-term health and fitness, feedlot efficiency, and carcass merit. In return, you position yourself to potentially bring home a few more dollars as you provide your customer what he/she needs. Some truth in the midst of lots of empty promises. Allow price differentiation to do what it does - pay more for calves with higher potential. Zero. There is zero cost for you to use the FPC. No charge. Never has been. Never will be. This is a no-cost service that allows serious, focused producers to do what they always do. To make thoughtful decisions and give themselves a leg up on the competition. This is more important now than ever. Lots of folks want to “advise” you. Many want to tell you how things should or shouldn’t be. Some even want to suggest that you sell yourself short by avoiding using the best tools available. One simple question. In 2020, can you leave anything to chance? If not, then visit the IGS homepage to learn more about how you can market with knowledge. Learn more at InternationalGeneticSolutions.com.

For Your Simmental Needs Contact One of These Missouri Breeders… STEAKS ALIVE John & Jeanne Scorse Semen, embryos and foundation stock available at the ranch P.O. Box 3832 • Joplin, MO 64803 Phone: 417-437-0911 • Fax: 316-856-2338 E-mail: scorsej@steaksalive.com Web Page: http://www.steaksalive.com

LUCAS CATTLE CO. Forrest & Charolotte Lucas Owners

Cleo Fields 417-399-7124 Jeff Reed 417-399-1241 Brandon Atkins 417-399-7142

L

Office: 417-998-6878 Fax: 417-998-6408 info@lucascattlecompany.com

Rt. 1, Box 1200 • Cross Timbers, MO 65634 www.lucascattlecompany.com

MAY 2020

Bulls for Sale!

42

Quality Simmentals for 40 years

Oval F Ranch

Don Fischer • Matt Fischer 816-392-8771 • 816-383 0630 ovalfranch.com • Winston MO

merrymoomoos@live.com

For Information About Advertising In This Spot Call Andy 816-210-7713 or Email: mobeef@sbcglobal.net

RLE SIMMENTAL

Roger Eakins • 233 N. Bast, Jackson, MO 63755

573-576-2965

Simmental that excel in Phenotype, Performance, Fertility & Carcass Traits


USMEF Update Despite Global Challenges, U.S. Pork and Beef Exports on Record Pace through February U.S. pork exports posted the third largest month on record in February while U.S. beef exports also recorded double-digit gains from a year ago, according to data released by USDA and compiled by the U.S. Meat Export Federation (USMEF). Through February, exports of both pork and beef are on a record pace and account for a growing share of record-large U.S. production. February pork exports reached 273,056 metric tons (mt), up 46% from a year ago, valued at $726.6 million (up 59%), trailing only the volume and value totals from December 2019 and January 2020. For the first two months of the year, pork exports exceeded last year’s pace by 41% in volume (546,659 mt) and 54% in value ($1.47 billion). Pork export value per head slaughtered was $67.77 in February, up 50% from a year ago and the highest since 2014. The January-February average was $65.02, up 45%. Exports accounted for just under 33% of total February pork production and nearly 30% for muscle

cuts only, the highest on record and up substantially from last year (24% and 21%, respectively). The JanuaryFebruary ratios were 31.3% of total production and 28.6% for muscle cuts, up from 23.8% and 20.6%, respectively, in 2019. U.S. beef exports also achieved outstanding growth in February, increasing 18% from a year ago to 112,021 mt and climbing 17% in value ($681 million). These results pushed January-February volume 10% above last year’s pace at 219,395 mt and 11% higher in value ($1.35 billion). Beef export value per head of fed slaughter was $343.03 in February, up 11% from a year ago and the highest since December 2018. The January-February average was $321.86, up 7%. Exports accounted for 15.3% of total February beef production, up from 13.9% a year ago, and 12.4% for muscle cuts only (up from 11%). Through February, exports accounted for 14.1% of total beef production and 11.5% for muscle cuts, up from 13.5% and 10.7%, respectively, last year. (Continued on page 44)

MAY 2020 43


With COVID-19 dominating all news headlines, including those related to global trade, USMEF President and CEO Dan Halstrom said the February export results confirmed that global demand for highquality protein remains strong and resilient. “By February, COVID-19 had emerged as a major health concern in several key Asian markets and was certainly impacting consumer and business activity, so it is great to see U.S. pork and beef exports achieve such strong growth,” Halstrom said. “Obviously these are uncertain economic times and the road ahead remains very challenging, but these results are really a great testament to our international customer base. In the face of unprecedented obstacles, importers, retailers and restaurateurs are finding creative ways to meet consumer needs, and with record production the U.S. industry is well-positioned as a supplier. While we are in an unusual business climate that requires a lot of flexibility and innovation, there are excellent opportunities for red meat exports to continue to build momentum.” Stronger pork exports to Japan, Mexico complement continued surge to China While China/Hong Kong was the largest driver of pork export growth in February, mainstay markets Japan and Mexico also posted impressive results. February exports to China/Hong Kong were even with the huge January volume and more than tripled from a year ago to 98,847 mt, while export value more than quadrupled to $243.2 million. For the first two months of 2020, exports increased 260% from a year ago to 195,849 mt and soared by 352% in value ($488.5 million). Pork exports to Japan totaled 35,262 mt in February, an increase of 23% year-over-year, while value climbed 28% to $145.8 million. Through February, exports increased 9% in volume (66,840 mt) and 12% in value ($278.4 million). Capitalizing on reduced duty rates, U.S. pork is regaining market share of Japan’s imports of ground seasoned pork and chilled pork. Strong consumer demand for U.S. chilled pork at retail and for sausages

WINDSOR LIVESTOCK AUCTION

produced from ground seasoned pork underpin this growth. In Mexico, February exports climbed 16% to 61,693 mt, while value increased 43% to $107.6 million. January-February exports to Mexico increased 11% in volume (132,153 mt) and 41% in value ($242.3 million) from the same period last year, when most U.S. pork entering Mexico was saddled with a 20% retaliatory duty. Although weekly export data show March volumes to Mexico remained sharply higher year-over-year, the pace slowed from that seen in February, partly reflecting devaluation of the peso. Other January-February highlights for U.S. pork exports include: Exports to Canada continued to build on last year’s strong performance, increasing 18% in volume (37,364 mt) and 14% in value ($128.8 million) from a year ago. While the volume shipped to Oceania eased in February, value continued to increase, pushing the twomonth totals 9% higher in volume to 21,831 mt and 35% above last year’s record value pace at $72.6 million. Strong growth in Honduras, El Salvador, Nicaragua and Costa Rica pushed exports to Central America 4% higher in volume (14,790 mt) and 19% higher in value ($38.6 million) from a year ago. Exports to Vietnam climbed 241% in volume to 3,007 mt and 134% in value ($6.7 million). This included a strong year-over-year increase in variety meat exports, consisting primarily of pork feet. February beef exports climb in most major markets Mainstay Asian markets Japan, South Korea and Taiwan fueled beef export growth in February, but shipments also increased to key destinations in the Western Hemisphere, Africa and the Middle East. February beef exports to leading market Japan increased 24% from a year ago to 27,099 mt and climbed 20% in value to $171.4 million. Through February, exports exceeded last year’s pace by 10% in volume (52,304 mt) and 7% in value ($329.5 million). With a level tariff playing field, U.S. beef is regaining chilled market share

MAY 2020

“FAMILY OWNED AND OPERATED SINCE 1983”

44

Sales Every Wednesday @ Noon Jake Drenon 660-441-7716

Blake Drenon Rodney Drenon 660-351-4887 660-890-4898

Custom Cattle Feeding • 12,000 Head Capacity Family owned & operated since 1917

Steve Sellers 620-257-2611

Kevin Dwyer 620-680-0404


in Japan, boosted by Japan’s strong retail demand. On April 1, the start of the Japanese fiscal year brought another reduction in tariff rates (to 25.8% for beef muscle cuts), and the Japanese yen remains relatively strong. Demand for U.S. beef continued to build momentum in Korea, where February exports totaled 23,532 mt (up 33% from a year ago) valued at $167.7 million (up 32%). This pushed the two-month total 16% ahead of last year’s record pace in volume (41,326 mt) and 14% higher in value ($298.4 million). U.S. beef is also gaining further market share in Korea, with strong retail demand and increased sales through e-commerce platforms. Other January-February highlights for U.S. beef exports include: Exports to Mexico were 5% above last year’s pace at 41,862 mt, valued at $217 million (up 10%). Mexico is the largest volume market for U.S. beef variety meat, and January-February variety meat exports climbed 16% from a year ago in both volume (18,182 mt) and value ($49.3 million). Exports to Taiwan, which is an especially strong destination for chilled beef cuts, were 20% above last

year’s record pace in volume (10,051 mt) and 17% higher in value ($86.2 million). Exports to China/Hong Kong were down 16% to 12,501 mt, with value falling 8% to $111.2 million. But for China specifically, exports were up 12% to 1,408 mt, valued at $10.4 million (up 4%). With access to China now expanded (as of late March), USMEF expects momentum to build for U.S. beef in the world’s largest import market. Strong growth in Peru and Colombia pushed exports to South America 26% above a year ago to 4,367 mt, valued at $20.6 million (up 11%). Guatemala and Panama fueled export growth to Central America, where volume climbed 22% to 2,868 mt, valued at $16.4 million (up 25%). Strong variety meat shipments to South Africa, Gabon, Angola, Cote d’Ivoire, and Mozambique pushed exports to Africa well ahead of last year’s pace. Variety meat exports climbed 40% to 4,186 mt, valued at $3.2 million (up 37%), with livers and kidneys being the main items exported to the region. Total exports to Africa were up 37% in volume (4,226 mt) and 18% in value ($3.7 million).

MAY 2020 45


Jim and Scott Cape…

MAY 2020

57 Years Trusted Service to Missouri Cattlemen “Your Source for Quality Trailers”

46

www.jimsmotors.com 1-800-897-9840


Steak FryPostponed Until July 11

MAY 2020 47


48

MAY 2020


MAY 2020

49


50

MAY 2020


MAY 2020

51


52

MAY 2020


MAY 2020

53


54

MAY 2020


MAY 2020

55


56

MAY 2020


MAY 2020

57


58

MAY 2020


MAY 2020

59


60

MAY 2020


MAY 2020

61


62

MAY 2020


MAY 2020

63


64

MAY 2020


MAY 2020

65


66

MAY 2020


MAY 2020

67


68

MAY 2020


NCBA Ensures Cattle Producers Can Access Additional PPP Relief WASHINGTON (April 23, 2020) — NCBA Vice President, Government Affairs Ethan Lane, today released the following statement in response to final Congressional approval of the Paycheck Protection Program Increase Act. “America’s cattle producers are working hard every day to keep feeding America, even as they face more than $13 billion in financial losses while also tending to the health of their families during this pandemic,” said Lane. “We truly appreciate the swift bipartisan passage of the PPP Increase Act, which we hope will make more aid available to cattle producers across rural America. We’re also thankful Congress explicitly authorized producer eligibility for Economic Injury Disaster Loans and emergency grants administered by the Small MBCSept2014c.qxp_Layout 1 9/24/14 9:59 AM Page 62 Business Administration. Extending this program to agriculture provides another critical source of financing to help preserve family farm and ranch businesses suffering in the wake of the COVID-19 pandemic.

Lane said NCBA members are extremely thankful to members of the House and Senate who spearheaded support for the request. “We’re very thankful to the many elected officials on both sides of the aisle who have worked together with each other and with NCBA to make sure that America’s cattle producers have what they need to keep feeding our nation during these challenging times, and we look forward to working in a bipartisan and cooperative way as we continue to move forward through this crisis.”

Quality Livestock Equipment Since 1961 Panels, Headgates, Calf Tables, Calving Pens, Manual Chutes, Hydraulic Chutes, Tip Chutes, Tubs & Alley Systems

Following NCBA’s letter to USDA earlier today, members in both chambers of Congress sent a letter to President Trump, aligning with NCBA’s request that payment caps be lifted to ensure all cattle producers can access the funds that will be needed to sustain their operations through the COVID-19 crisis. The bipartisan, bicameral effort was signed by more than 150 members of the House and Senate, and urgently requests the lifting of payment caps for the agricultural industries which continue to fight hard to feed Americans despite massive economic hardships.

Buffalo Livestock Market 1 mile west on Hwy 32 • Buffalo, MO 65622 Barn: 417-345-8122

Sale Every Saturday 12:00 Noon • Selling 1200 to 1700 head Farm Fresh Cattle weekly • Special Stock Cow and Bull Sale 3rd Tuesday night of each month at 6:30 p.m. • Pre-Vac Feeder Calf Sales 2nd Saturday of every month in conjunction with Regular Sale (Pfizer Pre-Vac, BLM Pre-Vac, Bayer Program, Mo Quality Assurance. LMA-Vac and MFA Health Track) MAY 2020

Order Buying Service Available

Owners… Lyle Caselman Leon Caselman Howard Miller 417-345-7876 H 417-345-4514 H 417-345-8612 H 417-533-2944 cell 417-588-6185 cell

69


CENTRAL MISSOURI SALES CO. 3503 S. Limit • Sedalia, MO

Your Reliable Market In Mid-Missouri Certified Special VACC Calf Sales the 1st and 3rd Mondays at 2:00 p.m.

Sale Every Monday at 11:00 a.m.

660-826-8286

MAY 2020

Jay Fowler Cary Brodersen E.H. Fowler 660-473-1562 660-473-6373 660-473-1048

70


MAY 2020

71


72

MAY 2020


MAY 2020

73


74

MAY 2020


MAY 2020

75


76

MAY 2020


MAY 2020

77


78

MAY 2020


SALE REPORTS J&N Ranch’s Black Hereford Bull Sale 2.8.20 – Leavenworth, KS 91 Black Hereford Bulls.................................Avg. $4,157 Jamison Total Hereford Bull Sale 2-28-2020 – Quinter, KS 32 Yearling Bulls............................................Avg. $3,992 135 Two-year-old Bulls...................................Avg. $3,135 Post Rock Cattle Co. Annual Bull & Female Sale 2.29.2020 – Barnard, KS 85 Gelbvieh & Balancer Bulls........................Avg. $4,161 63 Gelbvieh & Balancer Females...................Avg. $3,320 Peterson Farms Charolais 27th Annual Bull Sale 3.7.2020 – Mountain Grove, MO 47 Bulls...........................................................Avg. $2,430 Benoit Angus Ranch 31st Annual Production Sale 3.19.2020 – Esbon, KS 154 Bulls.........................................................Avg. $4,586 9 Open Heifers...............................................Avg. $7,694 Falling Timber Farm Bull & Female Sale 3.21.2020 – Marthasville, MO 28 bulls...........................................................Avg. $3,312 35 females.......................................................Avg. $2,383 GeneTrust at Suhn Cattle Company 3.24.2020 – Eureka, KS 103 Yearling Brangus & UltraBlack Bulls......Avg. $4,736 Worthington Angus 3.28.2020 – Dadeville, MO 30 Older Bulls................................................Avg. $6,283 10 Yrlg. Bulls..................................................Avg. $4,425 22 Bred Cows.................................................Avg. $2,140 12 Spring Pairs...............................................Avg. $2,650 Sandhill Farms Spring Production Sale 3.28.2020 – Haviland, KS 103 Bulls.........................................................Avg. $6,180 18 Females......................................................Avg. $3,944

Brockmere Farms 4.6.2020 – New Cambria, MO 66 Registered Bulls.........................................Avg. $3,348 10 Open Heifers.............................................Avg. $1,825 SydGen Influence Sale 4.14.2020 – New Cambria, MO 74 Registered Bulls.........................................Avg. $2,968 6 Bred Heifers................................................Avg. $1,950 6 Commercial Bred Heifers...........................Avg. $1,458 29 Commercial Pairs......................................Avg. $2,433 McBee Cattle Company The Real Deal - Bull and Female Selection Day 4.18.2020 – Fayette, MO 11 PB Braunvieh Bulls...................................Avg. $4,073 19 Hybrid Bulls..............................................Avg. $4,009 5 PB Braunvieh Bred Heifers.........................Avg. $2,425 31 Hybrid Bred Heifers..................................Avg. $1,938 5 Braunvieh Influence Bred Heifers...............Avg. $1,960

Hwy 42 West • Vienna Missouri 65582 45 Miles South of Jefferson City Selling All classes of Cattle Wednesday • 10:00 a.m. Featuring ‘Star-Vac Program’ Cattle Weekly DVAuction Service for convenient online viewing & bidding For More Information Call… David Patton Office Ross Patton Bill Patton 573-308-6655 573-422-3305 573-308-6657 573-308-6658 Visit our website: www.scrsvienna.com or E-mail us: scrsvienna@gmail.com “Make South Central your Livestock Market”

MAY 2020

SW Missouri All-Breed Performance Tested Bull Sale 3.30.2020 – Springfield, MO 27 Registered Bulls.........................................Avg. $3,077

Grand Plan 2020 – Gardiner Angus 4.3.2020 & 4.4.2020 – Ashland, KS 301 Older Bulls..............................................Avg. $7,572 102 Yrlg. Bulls................................................Avg. $6,629 63 Open Heifers.............................................Avg. $7,535 298 Bred Heifers............................................Avg. $3,833 148 Bred Cows...............................................Avg. $3,799 65 Open Cows...............................................Avg. $5,480 85 Fall Pairs....................................................Avg. $5,105 91 Commercial Bred Heifers.........................Avg. $2,653 27 Commercial Bred Heifers.........................Avg. $3,200

79


SALE CALENDAR May 2 May 8 May 9 May 11 May 15

Renaissance Sale, Strafford, MO J Bar J Next Generation Sale, Lebanon, MO Mead Angus Farms Spring Female Sale, Versailles, MO Gardiner Angus “Meating Demand” Bull Sale, Ashland, KS Show-Me-Select Replacement Heifer Sale, Carthage, MO

Specializing in Land, Equipment and Livestock For Upcoming Sale Info:

MAY 2020

Contact: Mike Williams Higginsville, MO cell: 816-797-5450 mwauctions@ctcis.net

80

www.wheelerauctions.com

May 16 May 16 May 16 May 22 May 23 May 30 May 30 May 30 June 5 June 12 June 25

Spur Ranch Back to Grass Sale, Vinita, OK Show-Me-Select Replacement Heifer Sale, Kingsville, MO WMC Cattle Co., Ladies of the Ozarks Sale, Wasola, MO Show-Me-Select Replacement Heifer Sale, Vienna, MO Soaring Eagle First Annual Female Sale, Springfield, MO Show-Me-Select Replacement Heifer Sale, Palmyra, MO Great American Pie Limousin Sale, Lebanon, MO MLBA & HMLBA Spring Sale, Lebanon, MO Show-Me-Select Replacement Heifer Sale, Fruitland, MO Show-Me-Select Replacement Heifer Sale, Farmington, MO JRS Value-Added Sale, Carthage, MO

Due to the COVID-19 issue, these sales are all subject to change. Please check with the sale facility/ manager for up-to-date information. Some do offer on-line bidding.


17th Annual Cattlemen’s Steak Fry Nears Registration Now Open

MBC Classified

The Missouri Cattlemen’s Association is expecting more than 500 people to attend their 17th Annual Cattlemen’s Steak Fry. The event honors past MCA presidents and raises funds for the associations Political Action Committee. This year the event is set for July 11, 2020, in the Agriculture Building located on the Missouri State Fairgrounds in Sedalia, Missouri.

“REESE” DISC MOWERS, CADDY V-RAKES, “REESE” TUBE-LINE BALE WRAPPER, AITCHISON DRILLS, SELF-UNLOADING HAY TRAILERS, HEAVY DUTY BALE AND MINERAL FEEDERS, FEED BUNKS, BALE SPIKES, CONTINUOUS FENCING, COMPLETE CORRAL SYSTEMS, INSTALLATION AVAILABLE: Tigerco Distributing Co. 660-645-2212, 800-432-4020 or www.tigercoinc.com.

“This is a fun event with an important purpose. Participants take time to recognize the efforts of the association’s past presidents and also raise significant funds for the PAC,” MCA Policy and Legislative Affairs Committee Chair Jimmie Long said, adding that last year’s event raised more than $60,000. “We open this event to the public and expect more than 500 people to attend.” The event has grown substantially in the last few years, according to Long who himself is a past MCA president. He attributes the success to the growing awareness that it takes money to ensure candidates who understand and value Missouri agriculture are elected in the state.

The MBC Classified column appears monthly. Classified advertising is only 50¢ a word. Send your check with your ad to Missouri Beef Cattleman, 2306 Bluff Creek Drive, #100, Columbia, Mo 65201. Deadline 10th of month before an issue.

BLACK SIMMENTAL BULLS SINCE 1993: Calving Ease, Attractive, Athletic, Sound Footed and Docile. We Deliver. Mike Williams, Higginsville, 816-797-5450 COVERED MINERAL BUNKS: CCA treated wood bunks work well with salt or other mineral mix. Built is six sizes 6’ - 16’, at Sentinel Industries. Ashland, MO. Phone: 573-657-2164.

“Unfortunately, money matters in politics. It takes money to win elections and we want to make certain that people are elected who will ensure agriculture remains the top economic driver in this state,” said Long. The event previously took place during the week and in a smaller venue. “We moved the event to a larger venue and to a Saturday. It worked very well, so we are continuing down that road.” See pages 61 and 62 for more information and registration/ sponsorship form.

MAY 2020 81


Advertiser Index

MAY 2020

ADM......................................... 57 Bayer - Bite Back....................... 15 BioZyme VitaFerm....................49 Boehringer Ingelheim Alpha.....................................29 BQA.......................................... 75 Buffalo Livestock Market..........69 Bush Hog Ad............................. 70 Callaway Livestock Center Inc.............................36 Central Missouri Sales Co........ 70 Circle A Angus Ranch.............. 37 Classified................................... 81 Clearwater Farm....................... 37 Coon Angus Ranch................... 37 Crystalyx.....................................7 Durham Simmental Farms....... 42 Eastern Missouri Commission Company.............................. 16 F&T Livestock Market..............82 FCS of Missouri........................84 Galaxy Beef LLC...................... 37 GenePlus...................................45 Gerloff Farms............................ 37 Gleonda Farms Angus Traves Merrick...................... 37 Green’s Welding & Sales...........39 Hinkle’s Prime Cut Angus........ 37 HydraBed..................................33 Irsik & Doll Feed Yards.............83 Jim’s Motors..............................46

82

Joplin Regional Stockyards....... 13 Kingsville Livestock Auction....28 Lucas Cattle Co........................ 42 Marshall & Fenner Farms......... 37 MCA Junior Show................ 47-56 MCA Member Benefits............. 71 MCA Membership Form.......... 73 MCA MJCA Point Show ad.....58 MCA Policy Priorities............... 72 MCA Presidents Council.......... 77 MCA Proud Member Signs...... 74 MCA Steak Fry......................... 61 MCA Youth Industry Tour.......60 McBee Cattle Co....................... 14 McPherson Concrete Products................................ 81 Mead Cattle Co.........................65 Mead Farms.............................. 37 Merck Animal Health............... 51 Merry Meadows Simmental..... 42 MFA Health Track....................59 Missouri Angus Association...... 37 Missouri Angus Breeders.......... 37 Missouri Beef Industry Council..................................25 Missouri Simmental Association............................ 42 Missouri Simmental Breeders... 42 Missouri Valley Commission Company................................... 16 MLS Tubs.................................27

Native Grassland Pasture Walk......................................63 Naught-Naught Agency.............38 Ory’s O7 Red Angus.................40 Oval F Ranch........................... 42 P.H. White.................................80 Pinegar Limousin...................... 41 Richardson Ranch.................... 37 RLE Simmental........................ 42 Sellers Feedlot...........................44 Shoal Creek Land & Cattle....... 42 Soaring Eagle Sale....................35 South Central Regional Stockyards............................. 79 Southeast Missouri SMS Sale... 70 Spur Ranch Sale....................... 17 Square B Ranch/Quality Beef.. 37 Steaks Alive............................... 42 Superior Steel Sales................... 43 SW Mo Show-Me-Select Sale...34 Sydenstricker Genetics.............. 37 Valley Oaks Angus.................... 37 Weiker Angus Ranch................ 37 Westway Feed..............................9 Wheeler Auctions & Real Estate............................80 Wheeler Livestock Market........ 24 Mike Williams...........................80 Windsor Livestock Auction.......44 Y-Tex.......................................2, 3 Zeitlow Distributing..................69


Profile for Macey Hurst

May 2020 - Missouri Beef Cattleman  

Advertisement

Recommendations could not be loaded

Recommendations could not be loaded

Recommendations could not be loaded

Recommendations could not be loaded