January 2021 - Missouri Beef Cattleman

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CONTENTS

January 2021

FEATURES 18

Mastering Minerals:

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Hereford Heritage

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Winter Work:

A Producers’ Guide to Choosing the Right Mix of Minerals for Best Economical Results

Mixing Past and Progress, Missouri Hereford Operation Aims to Further the Breed

Tips for Working in Harsh Winter Weather for Cattle and Cattlemen

MEMBER NEWS 6 Association Update 24 Beef Checkoff News 28 County News

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Hereford Heritage

COLUMNS 8

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Mastering Minerals

MCA President’s Perspective Membership is Strength

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CattleWomen’s Corner

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Straight Talk: Mike Deering

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What’s Cookin’ at the Beef House

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Get Involved & Lead

Time Tames Misery

What is Your Favorite Sandwich?

On the Edge of Common Sense: Baxter Black

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A Cowful

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Capitol Update

Hope & New Beginnings

The Missouri Beef Cattleman is an official publication of the Missouri Cattlemen’s Association.


MISSOURI

BEEF CATTLEMAN

OFFICIAL PUBLICATION OF THE MISSOURI CATTLEMEN’S ASSOCIATION

Volume 50 - Issue 1 (USPS 890-240 • ISSN 0192-3056) Magazine Publishing Office 2306 Bluff Creek Drive, #100, Columbia, MO 65201 Phone: 573-499-9162 • Fax: 573-499-9167 Andy Atzenweiler: Editor/Production/Ad Sales P.O. Box 480977 • Kansas City, Missouri 64148 816-210-7713 • E-mail: mobeef@sbcglobal.net Macey Hurst • Ad Sales • 573-821-6982

Missouri Cattlemen’s Association MCA Website: www.mocattle.com

Mike Deering • Executive Vice President - Ext 230 Mike@mocattle.com Sydney Thummel • Manager of Membership - Ext 231 Sydney@mocattle.com Macey Hurst • Manager of Strategic Solutions – Ext. 235 Macey@mocattle.com Candace Bergesch • MBC Editor/Production Artist Candace@mocattle.com Lisa Stockhorst, Administrative Assistant – Ext 234 Lisa@mocattle.com

Missouri’s Cattlemen Foundation www.mocattlemenfoundation.org

Missouri’s CattleWomen

http://mocattle.com/missouricattlewomen.aspx

DEPARTMENTS 7

New MCA Members

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USMEF News

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Missouri Extension News

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Obituaries: Larry Ellison, Harold Six

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Advertisers Index

Marvin Dieckman, President 660-596-4163 • 28998 Hwy JJ, Cole Camp, MO 65325 Patty Wood, President-Elect 660-287-7701 • 16075 Wood Road, La Monte, MO 65337 Bruce Mershon, Vice President 816-525-1954 • 31107 Lake City Buckner Rd., Buckner, MO 64016 Matt Hardecke, Treasurer 573-846-6614 • 19102 Skymeadows Dr., Wildwood, MO 63069 David Dick, Secretary 660-826-0031 • 23529 Anderson School Rd., Sedalia, MO 65301

2020 MCA Regional Vice Presidents

Region 1: Eric Greenley, 61998 Pleasant Valley Rd. Knox City, MO 63446 660-341-8750 Region 2: Chuck Miller, 393 Spring Garden Road Olean, MO 65064 • 573-881-3589 Region 3: Charlie Besher, RR 5, Box 2402 Patton, MO 63662 • 573-866-2846 Region 4: Deb Thummel, 12601 Hwy. 46 Sheridan, MO 64486 • 660-541-2606 Region 5: John Shipman, 34266 Hwy KK Mora, MO 65345 • 660-221-1013 Region 6: Clay Doeden, 14555 S. Hwy A Stockton, MO 65785 • 417-808-0415 Region 7: Traves Merrick, 1956 Hwy 97 Miller, MO 65707 • 417-536-8080

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Missouri Beef Cattleman, (USPS 890-240 • ISSN 0192-3056) is published monthly (12 times a year) and is the official publication of the Missouri Cattlemen’s Association, 2306 Bluff Creek Drive, #100, Columbia, Missouri, 65201. PERIODICALS postage paid at Columbia, Missouri and additional mailing offices. Subscription price is included as a part of the minimum membership dues of $70.00 per year in Missouri Cattlemen’s Association. Postmaster: Send address changes to: Missouri Beef Cattleman, P.O. Box 480977, Kansas City, Missouri 64148

2020 MCA Officers

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James Bangert, Seldom Rest Farm, Cold Water, MO Brad Bray, Bray Farms LLC, Cameron, MO Ralph Durham, Durham Angus Farm, Nelson, MO Terry Thompson, Equity Bank, Higginsville, MO Bill Martin, Martin Farm, Anderson, MO Justin & Sarah Bock, JNS Farms, Stockton, MO Kyle Gildehaus, Gildehaus Farms, Washington, MO Lillian Gildehaus, Washington, MO Celia Gildehaus, Washington, MO Steve Stamate, Ash Grove, MO Beth Bangert, Seldom Rest, Cold Water, MO Ryan Shurvington, Clever, MO Elise Gildehaus, Washington, MO Stephen Cornell, Neosho, MO White Gold Mills, LLC, Wilson, AR Cameron Davis, Davis Farm, Appleton City, MO Lamar Steiger, 808 LLC, Anderson, MO Delmer Barks, Lowndes, MO Lela Bryant, Northwest Collegiate Cattlemen’s Association, Troy, MO Wyatt Wolfe, Deerfield, MO Sam Fix, St. Louis, MO Mason Babb, Piedmont, MO Stacy Davies, Missouri Prime Beef Packers, Frenchglen, OR Brian Frerking, Concordia, MO Justin Stengel, Shickley, NE

Your One-Stop for Braunvieh Influence and Black Hybrid Commercial Females

See the MCA Membership Form on page 61

Ron McBee

221 State Hwy H Fayette, MO 65248

(573) 228-2517 mcbcattle@aol.com

McBeeCattleCompany.com

JANUARY 2021

Call us to see some of the best calf raisers in the business. Grouping and Marketing Customers’ Calves Since 1992!

Garon Morris, Bolivar, MO Shawn Murnahan, Signs By L & J, Mayview, MO Greg Chilton, Deer Lick Ranch, Williamsville, MO Jim & Alisa Kigar, Kigar Cattle, LLC, Greentop, MO Eli Kigar, Greentop, MO Elsie Kigar, Greentop, MO Bruce & Sunshine Shanks, Sassafras Valley Ranch, Belle, MO Erica Loethen, Meta, MO Rick Adams, Renaissance Nutrition, Inc., Columbia, MO Rep. Terry Thompson, Lexington, MO Tim & Dawn Taylor, Bunceton, MO Cartor Taylor, Bunceton, MO Trent Bernskoetter, Jefferson City, MO Julia Bernskoetter, Jefferson City, MO John Bernskoetter, Jefferson City, MO Cade Moon, Indianola, IA Mackenzie Loesch, Russellville, MO Tatjana Sheehy, Maryville, MO Lindsay Hays, Pierce, CO Chandler Wheeler, Hardin, MO Cole Sackett, Maryville, MO Megan Lewis, Kansas City, MO Seth McMullin, Bogard, MO Morgan Looten, Maryville, MO

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Commodity Trades Welcome

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Scott Cape, Owner of Jim’s Motors in Cuba, Missouri. All I have ever done is sell and trade trailers. Give me a call for your next trailer 800-897-9840 www.Jimsmotors.com

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Straight

Talk

with Mike Deering Time Tames Misery In the heat of the moment, some of us are guilty of saying and doing stupid things we later regret. I have been there. More often than not, time helps calm the storm that was hastily created. When it comes to our industry, we often treat it the same way. The fire at the Tyson facility in Holcomb, Kansas, in August of 2019, had us on high alert, but time went by, prices corrected, and the misery was tamed. Roughly six months later, we were floating in the same boat as the pandemic came into our lives. This association took decisive action in quickly calling for investigations and went to work on short-term relief and long-term structural changes in the markets. We were leaders at the national level fighting an uphill battle on behalf of our members. Of that, we should be proud. Prices are not necessarily great, especially fat cattle, but the markets as a whole are certainly better. Replacement females are as high as I have seen them in recent memory. When compared to what we have seen the last year, I feel safe in saying prices are strong.

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With that, the momentum for change has calmed. In a way, that is a good thing because it takes some of the emotion out of it, minimizes knee-jerk reactions to some degree and allows rational thought to prevail. That does not mean all is well in Mayberry. We have the choice between complacency and action. Do we forget or do we remain laser focused on cattle marketing issues?

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Our members and leaders made abundantly clear this association will not back down. The responses to the annual policy questionnaire strongly indicated that

Executive Vice President our work is appreciated but resting on our laurels is unacceptable. We must continue this fight. Our policy committee agreed, and it will be discussed at the annual convention January 8-10. We are one of many state associations uniting to push forward the Cattle Market Transparency Act sponsored in the U.S. Senate by Deb Fischer (R-Neb.) and our very own Congresswoman Vicky Hartzler in the U.S. House of Representatives. MCA members who attend convention will hear from both of these elected leaders at the Cattlemen’s Education Series General Session and Luncheon on January 9. Rep. Hartzler and Sen. Fisher will discuss the path forward when it comes to this legislation that would bring levelheaded, widely supported changes closer to reality. We cannot afford to wait for the next storm to force this industry into action. Efforts to create greater market transparency and robust price discovery should not be tabled. While time may tame misery in some instances, it can also prolong the pain. We need to finish what we started. After a year like 2020, we know well what is on the line. The punches knocked us back, but 2021 could be the year we find our wings and turn the sound of defeat into our battle cry.


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Strong October for Pork and Beef Muscle Cut Exports; Variety Meat Trends Lower Source: USMEF U.S. pork exports posted broad-based gains in October, solidifying 2020’s record pace, according to data released by USDA and compiled by the U.S. Meat Export Federation (USMEF). Beef muscle cut exports were also higher than a year ago in October, though lower variety meat volumes pushed total beef exports slightly below last year. October pork exports were up 8% year-over-year to 242,536 metric tons (mt), with value also increasing 8% to $641.1 million. Exports to Mexico, Japan, China/Hong Kong, Canada and the Philippines were substantially higher than a year ago while shipments to Central and South America were the largest since March. Through the first 10 months of the year, pork exports were 15% ahead of last year’s record pace at 2.46 million mt, with value up 16% to $6.33 billion. With Mexico as the top volume destination, October muscle cut exports posted double digits gains at 201,723 mt (up 11%), with value up 10% to $551.8 million. This pushed January-October totals for pork muscle cuts to 2.07 million mt (up 20%) valued at $5.49 billion (up 18%).

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October beef exports were slightly lower than a year ago at 107,591 mt (down 0.4%), valued at $646 million (down 0.5%), but exports to China set another new record and volumes were above year-ago levels to Japan, Taiwan, Central America and Africa. While still below last year, beef exports to Mexico were the largest since March. For January through October, beef exports trailed last year’s pace by 7% in volume (1.02 million mt) and 8% in value ($6.2 billion). Beef muscle cut exports trended higher than a year ago in October, increasing 5% to 85,445 mt valued at $573.8 million (up 1%). January-October muscle cut exports were 5% below last year in volume (791,694 mt) and 8% lower in value ($5.48 billion).

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Custom Cattle Feeding • 12,000 Head Capacity Family owned & operated since 1917

Steve Sellers 620-257-2611

Kevin Dwyer 620-680-0404

“While the tight labor situation continues to limit the cut and variety meat specifications available for export, red meat demand is strengthening in many critical markets,” said USMEF President and CEO Dan Halstrom. “October exports of bone-in hams, for example, were near the July record and up 50% from a year ago. This has been a volatile year, filled with shifts in consumer preferences and a lot of uncertainty for international buyers. But the U.S. industry has responded positively to these challenges and the demand dynamics for red meat are quite strong as we approach year’s end. When the gains made at retail over the past several months are combined with a stronger foodservice recovery, the prospects for export growth are very promising.” October exports of U.S. lamb were below last year but muscle cut exports trended sharply higher, mainly on strong growth to Mexico. Through October, lamb exports increased 31% from a year ago to 17,355 mt, but value was down 5% to $20.5 million. Lamb muscle cut volume was substantially higher at 8,203 mt (up 355%) with a more modest increase in export value ($12.4 million, up 7%). A detailed summary of U.S. red meat exports through October, including market-specific highlights, is available from the USMEF website.

Japan’s Highest Civilian Order Awarded to Seng Source: USMEF The Government of Japan has announced that Philip M. Seng has been named a recipient of the 2020 Autumn Imperial Decorations. Seng is to receive “The Order of the Rising Sun,” which is awarded to those who have made distinguished achievements in areas such as international relations and promotion of Japanese culture. Japan’s Ministry of Foreign Affairs recommended Seng, former president & CEO of the U.S. Meat Export Federation (USMEF), for his contributions to “strengthening Japan-U.S. economic relations, particularly in the meat field, and promoting mutual understanding between Japan and the United States.”


“I am honored and humbled to receive this prestigious award from the Japanese government,” said Seng. “However, the recognition should primarily go to the many Japanese colleagues who mentored me along the way, and to the numerous Japanese individuals and companies who introduced and championed U.S. meat products in Japan.” While the Order of the Rising Sun, Gold Rays with Neck Ribbon is the third highest order bestowed by the Japanese government, it is considered the highest ordinarily conferred order for civilians. The highest Japanese order, the Order of the Chrysanthemum, is reserved for heads of state or royalty, while the second highest order, the Order of the Paulownia Flowers, is mostly reserved for politicians. “On behalf of USMEF, I offer Phil a wholehearted congratulations on this honor,” said USMEF President and CEO Dan Halstrom. “Phil deserves credit for advancing U.S. red meat interests around the world, and his impact was especially evident in Japan, where he worked tirelessly to strengthen relations between the U.S. and Japan.”

Seng joined USMEF as its Asian director in 1982. He served in that capacity until 1988, when he became USMEF’s vice president of international programs. Seng served as president and chief executive officer from 1990 to 2018. “My strategy was to approach the market respectfully, with the perspectives of the Japanese trade and consumers paramount,” explained Seng. “In this way, we were able to jointly satisfy customer demands and develop everlasting trade relationships that benefitted both the U.S. and Japan.” Seng is the only American to serve as president of the International Meat Secretariat, where he served four terms, and he also served on the President’s Agricultural Policy Advisory Committee. Seng is currently an affiliate professor in the Animal Science Department at Colorado State University. For questions, please contact Joe Schuele or call 303547-0030.

JAYLOR 5 SERIES MIXERS.

IN STOCK AND READY FOR THE FARM

OVERSTOCK Sale Going on NOW JANUARY 2021

www.JAYLOR.com

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What’s Cookin’ at the

Missouri Beef House By Beef House Team

What is Your Favorite Sandwich? What’s your favorite sandwich? Does a hamburger come to mind? Why is it called a hamburger if it’s a beef burger? According to All About the Burger: A History of the America’s Favorite Sandwich by Sef Gonzalez, “During the 15th century, steak tartare was introduced to the Germans, who would eventually shape and refine the delicacy. The dish made its way to New York in the 19th century from the port of Hamburg, Germany, and then became known as the Hamburg steak. The first time the word “hamburger” made an appearance in a menu was in the Walla Walla Union, a newspaper in state of Washington, in an article on January 5, 1889.” Here are some interesting quotes with the word hamburger in it… 1893 “Fraker’s celebrated hamburger steak sandwiches are always on hand to replenish an empty stomach and even fortify Satan himself.” – Evening Gazette (Reno, Nevada) 1896 “A distinguished favorite, only five cents, is a Hamburg steak sandwich, the meat for which is kept

Kingsville Livestock Auction Kingsville, Missouri Hwy. 58 • 45 Miles SE of Kansas City, MO

JANUARY 2021

Special Cow & Bull Sale Saturday, January 23 • 11:00 a.m.

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Cattle Sale Every Tuesday 10:00 a.m. For information call Rick or Jeremy Anstine

816-597-3331 or 816-732-6070

Visit our website kingsvillelivestock.com or E-mail us at: kingsville@earthlink.net

ready in small patties and cooked while you wait on the gasoline range.” –Chicago Tribune (Chicago, Illinois) “America’s favorite sandwich” is a top seller at our MCA Beef House. In 2019, we sold 4,335 cheeseburgers and 1,078 beef burgers during our 11-day Missouri State Fair. Our meat is purchased from PFG/Middendorf Meats, in St. Louis, Missouri, and Holten Meats, Inc., near St Louis, Missouri, is the supplier of our Certified Angus Beef Thick N’ Juicy patties that have an “exceptional rich beef taste, lightly pre-seasoned to enhance the natural beef flavor and the uniform taste throughout, made with high quality ingredients, clean label, few ingredients, contains no MSG, or YVP, soy or other fillers, gluten free, and individually quick frozen for ease of handling, product safety, and product freshness.” Everything about this burger is a winner, from the thick 6 oz. beef pattie cooked and seared perfectly on a flat-top grill, to the juicy, flavorful meat, and satisfaction that you’ve just eaten one of our legendary burgers. Trends come and go, but our love affair with the burger is here to stay. Be it a beef burger or a cheeseburger, one thing’s for sure — the burger is the MCA Beef House and America’s favorite sandwich! Order one of our legendary beef burgers at the Missouri Beef House at the Missouri State Fair, August 12-22, 2021! Thought for the month: “What do you call a cow with no legs? — Ground beef.”


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Your

BEEF CHECKOFF NEWS Getting to Know Your Beef Checkoff Samantha Riley, Director of Marketing and Communications Checking in on the Checkoff at Convention

Make plans to join the Missouri Beef Industry Council on Saturday, January 9 from 2:30 to 5:30 pm at Margaritaville Resort during the 53rd Annual Missouri Cattle Industry Convention and Trade Show. MBIC will be offering three consecutive sessions outlining what your checkoff dollars are doing in Missouri and beyond. Session 1: Beef Grants for Missouri The Missouri Beef Industry Council provides funding for local non-profit organizations to promote and educate about beef in local communities. This year we will be adding a new grant for a “What Your Dollar Does” program. The “What Your Dollar Does” meetings will focus on sharing what the Checkoff is doing here in Missouri while allowing attendees to ask questions about what their dollar goes towards to drive beef demand.

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Session 2: What Your Dollar Does Nationally and Internationally The Beef Checkoff program was established as part of the 1985 Farm Bill. The Checkoff assesses $1 per head on the sale of live domestic and imported cattle, in addition to a comparable assessment on imported beef and beef products. The Checkoff acts as a catalyst for change and is designed to stimulate beef sales and consumption through a combination of initiatives including consumer advertising, research, public relations, and new-product development.

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Session 3: Mo Beef Mo Kids Session More beef, more often. That is the mission of the Mo Beef Mo Kids program. We aim for more beef on the school lunch tray, while educating young people about beef production and nutrition. Team members will be sharing program overview, new initiatives for 2021, and spotlight successes in the state. We will also share more about the Pasture to Plate education series focused on fifth grade. FFA Mo Beef

Academy members will also be present to share their experiences.

Beef. It’s What’s for Holiday Dinner.

Whether you gathered around a beautiful Prime Rib Roast with your closest family and friends, or virtually around the Beef Drool Log, Beef. It’s What’s For Dinner. was there to help make the holidays feel special with festive beef recipes, wine pairings and inspiration for budget-stretching your leftovers. Earned Media Beef. It’s What’s For Dinner. hosted a satellite media tour across television and radio reaching 15,411,666 on the 634 airings. There where 154 multimedia news release pickups from outlets like Yahoo! Finance and Associated Press with a potential audience of 764,461,884. The news releases included recipes for Four-Seasons Beef and Brussels Sprout Chopped Salad and Beef and Spinach Breakfast Sandwich as well as a video featuring Amy Goodson, registered dietitian, who shared tips for a flawless holiday meal with beef. Beef. It’s What’s for Dinner. also ran a Beef Drool Log billboard in Times Square four times on December 4th.

Missouri Beef Industry Council also participated in some earned media efforts across the holidays on two news stations in the state on KY3 News in Springfield and KMIZ News in Columbia. MBIC featured holiday recipes on KY3 on the weekly Beef Bites segments as


well as a month-long contest featuring holiday beef trivia for a gift card for $100 to The Order, a restaurant at Hotel Vandivort. On KMIZ, MBIC featured a Beef Up the Holidays contest which also included holiday beef trivia for a chance to win a holiday beef prize pack worth over $800 from MBIC, Schnucks, Talluahs, Mizzou Meat Market and Top Ten Wines. Foodie Influencers National Cattlemen’s Beef Association, a contractor to the Beef Checkoff, hosted a virtual Roast & Toast event on December 3rd. Eighteen food influencers joined celebrity Chef Jet Tila and Beef. It’s What’s for Dinner. for a special evening that included a Prime Rib Roast recipe demo, beef and wine pairings and an exclusive Q&A session with Chef Tila. Influencers shared the experience on social media and tips and tricks for making a Prime Rib roast with their followers, generating a potential reach of 1,416,870.

Target to drive more beef sales at retail through the holidays with several states joining the initiative including Missouri, to extend the campaign. To showcase the Beef Quality Assurance program, National Cattlemen’s Beef Association, on behalf of the Beef Checkoff, partnered with Chef’s Roll to create videos that brought beef farmers and ranchers together with chefs. The video series, found at www.beefitswhatsfordinner.com/raising-beef/ bqa-and-chefs, takes chefs across the beef lifecycle to get a first-and look at the care that goes into creating high-quality beef and brings farmers and ranchers to restaurants to see popular beef dishes being made. The three videos have had over 300,000 views as of December 15th. To keep up with us follow us on social media, @beefcouncil or sign up for updates at https://www.beefboard.org/thedrive-sign-up-form/.

Missouri Beef Industry Council partnered with the Missouri Wine and Grape Board to host a virtual, Missouri specific Roast & Toast across two evenings in December. The first evening focused on the Missouri beef industry at a glance, beef’s nutritional value, Beef. It’s What’s For Dinner. resources, and Chuck Knows Beef. Session two featured two Beef. It’s What’s For Dinner. recipes, Mini Merry Meatballs and Pistachio Crusted Prime Rib Roast paired with Missouri wine. The attendees heard from Chef Alex, Culinary Manager, National Cattlemen’s Beef Association, who shared tips and tricks for selecting and preparing the perfect holiday roast.

Supply Chain Beef. It’s What’s For Dinner. conducted two e-commerce projects through December with Chicory and

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Attendees were sent a VIP holiday beef and wine package, which included steak rub, a gift card for beef, Missouri wine and Beef. It’s What’s For Dinner. holiday aprons and oven mitts. These foodie influencers shared their experience and unboxing their VIP packages via social media reaching a new audience with their followers.

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COUNTY NEWS

See What’s Happening in Your County

Douglas/Wright County Cattlemen The Douglas/Wright County Cattlemen’s Association met on Tuesday, December 1, 2020, at 6 p.m. in Mountain Grove at Cattlemen’s Steakhouse. The group enjoyed a steak dinner with sides sponsored by the Douglas/Wright County Cattlemen’s Association. President Ernie Ehlers welcomed the group, gave a treasury report, reminded us of the upcoming Missouri Cattlemen’s Convention on January 8-10, and announced new board members for 2021. Ernie asked the blessing before the meal, and the 53 members in attendance enjoyed fellowship during dinner. Following December group at Douglas/Wright County Cattlemen’s Meeting.

J.D. Shannon graciously donated his talents to auction off Landry’s heifer calf.

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Lori and Joe Golden had the winning bid for Landry’s heifer calf.

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ORYS 07 RED ANGUS Service age bulls, bred cows, cow/calf pairs, show prospect heifers available.

417-652-3425 417-839-7205 www.oryscircle7.com

dinner, J.D. Shannon auctioned off essay winner Landry Golden’s heifer calf. Joe and Lori Golden were the winning bidders at $2,800. The proceeds were split between Landry and the Douglas/Wright County Cattlemen’s Association. The Douglas/Wright County group will hold their next meeting on Tuesday, January 12, 2020, at 6 p.m. at Cattlemen’s Steakhouse in Mountain Grove. Douglass Steel will sponsor the meeting, and attending members will have the chance to become BQA certified. Cattlemen in the area are always welcome and encouraged to attend.


Missouri Angus Breeders The #1 State For Angus!

Bulls are our Business!

The Pipkin Family

9770 W. State Hwy 266 • Springfield, MO 65802 j_pipkin@sbcglobal.net • clearwaterangus.com Jim (cell) 417-827-0623 • Joann (cell) 417-827-2756 WD & Bonita Bulls • Replacement Females for Sale

Kenny & Janyce Hinkle 14103 E. Summers Rd. • Nevada, MO 64773 Ph/Fax: 417-944-2219 • Cell: 417-448-4127 E-mail: hpca@centurytel.net

GERLOFF FARMS Connealy Power Surge

Russel and Randy Miller 21146 400th Street Graham, MO 64455 660-254-0137 • 660-415-6339 E-mail: galaxybeef@hotmail.com

WEIKER

Angus Ranch

AHIR Bulls Semen Available Females

660-248-3640

Fred Weiker • Julia Weiker Fred: 660-248-3765

3154 Hwy A Bland, MO 65014 573-437-3751/2507 Charlie Cell: 573-680-9117 Kim Cell: 573-291-1091 khuebler@fidnet.com www.gerloffcattle.com

Dedicated to the Livestock Industry Since 1906

1339 Hwy 124, • Fayette, MO 65248 “Where the Extraordinary are Availible”

For All Your Angus Needs!

22227 Saline 127 Hwy • Malta Bend, Mo 65359 Brian Marshall • (660) 641-4522 www.marshallandfennerfarms.com

Bulls Always for Sale, at the Farm.

To Advertise Here

Since 1942

21658 Quarry Lane • Barnett, MO 65011 Office: 573-302-7011 • Fax: 573-348-8325 E-mail: meadangus@yahoo.com Website: www.meadfarms.com

Alan Mead, Owner 573-216-0210

734-260-8635

E-mail: Julie@missouriangus.org

missouriangus.org

334 Seth St. - Lincoln, MO 65338 www.RichardsonRanch.net adrrmd@mail.missouri.edu

Registered Angus Bulls & Females Available

Pete 660-281-0353

Ashlyn 660-281-1720

Russell & Susan Coon

1318 Shelby 169, Bethel, MO 63434 660-284-6518 h • 660-341-2705 c ruscatsol@gmail.com

Larry Coon

1284 Shelby 169, Bethel, MO 63434 660-284-6473 h • 660-342-3889 c

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Julie Conover, Gen. Manager 634 S.W. 1201 Rd • Holden, MO 64040

Doug & LaRee Frank 608-279-3172 Brent & Keri Hazelrigg 703-587-9959 Visit us online: FHCCbeef.com

Contact Andy Atzenweiler E-mail: mobeef@sbcglobal.net Phone: 816-210-7713

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Barton County Cattlemen The Barton County Cattlemen met November 19, 2020, at 7 p.m. at the Memorial Hall basement in Lamar, Missouri. President Brett Faubion led the meeting, which started with an invocation by Rex Frieden and a delicious brisket dinner sponsored by Joplin Regional Stockyards. Dinner was prepared by Scott Nolting.

Frieden and a delicious brisket dinner sponsored by MFA. Dinner was prepared by Scott Nolting.

After the meal, Skyler Moore from Joplin Regional Stockyards spoke about cattle sales. He stated that carcass weight is up due to cattle being held back from sales. Sales are now above the pre-COVID-19 numbers. Demand has remained up during all of 2020.

Hubbert explained the advantages of using the MFA Health Track preconditioning program. Health Track provides third-party documentation, Vac 45 Processing and Source Verification, for all enrolled calves. With this program, calves are vaccinated in two rounds, one of which is recommended pre-weaning. An ear tag is used for identification to document production, performance, health and the PowerCalf data.

Joplin Regional Stockyards uses several sale methods which benefit both the consigners and buyers. Those selling small numbers of various weights benefit from comingling which increases the price by helping the buyers bid on larger groups. Online sales have increased in popularity. With video marketing there is a “price slide” to allow for shrinkage. Their new pricing method, called JRS RightSlide, prices for pounds over base weight. This removes the uncertainty of the effect of extra pounds at delivery. You can register for online bidding through DVAuction.com. Some sellers are having their cattle sold from their property. Cattle are weighed on site, and video bidding is the method of sale. Cattle never go to the sale barn, but instead go direct from the farm to the buyer’s chosen destination. These are some of the methods modernizing cattle sales and allowing flexibility for both consignee and buyer, resulting in increased prices, reduced costs, and improved convenience for all.

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Brett then talked about the proceeds from the fundraisers at the Lamar Fair and donations made. A scholarship will be given to a high school senior toward college expenses. Seniors should see their school counselor to get information on application submission. Students must live in Barton County and be pursuing a degree related to agriculture.

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The cattlemen will also be purchasing a brick for the Barton County Memorial Park which will recognize veterans from Barton County and workers at the former Barton County Memorial Hospital. The Barton County Cattlemen then met December, 8, 2020, at 7 p.m. at the Memorial Hall basement in Lamar, Missouri. President Brett Faubion led the meeting which started with an invocation by Rex

After the meal, Ward Thomas, manager of MFA at Lamar, introduced our speaker, Chuck Hubbert, a key account manager.

Nutrition is key to a strong immunity. Calves begin on a complete diet after weaning through day 14. Days 15-45 post weaning calves are fed an MFA-approved diet, which has a target of 2.5 to 3 pounds ADG. 45 days post-weaning. Health Track cattle are ready to go to market. Feeding Cattle Charge does better for cattle on forage than corn. Digestion is improved, providing good feed efficiency. MFA also offers CTI tubes, 12% protein is 25 to 30 cents a day per head. QLF is also available. Phosphorous needs to be offered along with QLF to prevent overeating the QLF. Danny Little from Red Neck Blinds presented information on an upcoming charity event. On December 22, Show Me Wagyu Charities and Judy Crockett of Tractors will put on both noon and evening Holiday Drive-Thru Charity Meals at the Moore Pavilion. Gourmet Wagyu burgers and brats, along with fries and drinks, will be served at the Moore Pavilion in carryout boxes. There will be donation barrels at the end of the drive-thru line for Good Samaritan, Senior Citizens Meals on Wheels, and Lamar Ministerial Alliance. Show Me Wagyu Charities has agreed to match donations to each organization up to $5,000. The goal is to raise $30,000 for these charities which help people in need. Meals will be free to anyone who cannot afford to donate but need a tasty meal. Companies can write a donation check to the charity or charities of their choice. The suggested minimum donation for those that can donate is $10. A motion was made and passed for the cattlemen to be involved in volunteering to help with the cooking and distributing the food for this charity. The next meeting will be in January in Lamar. Watch the Facebook page for Barton County Cattlemen for updates. To become a member of the Barton County Cattlemen’s, go to: mocattle.org.


South Central Cattlemen The South Central cattlemen’s encompasses Howell, Oregon, Ozark, Shannon and any other surrounding county cattlemen and women that want to join us for our monthly meetings. This year has been challenging to all of us and, as the president of the SCCA, tough times call for a change of habits, especially when it comes to unknown viruses and our personal well being. Like everyone else we have cancelled meetings, held zoom meetings, emailed and posted on social media to help keep our members up to date on the happenings on the state and national level. I am happy to say we were able to hold a meeting on December 3 at the Howell County Extension office. Our attendance was about half of normal but the question might be, “What is normal these days?”

difficulties with the WiFi and (me) posed problems. Plan B kicked in, and I recorded our guest speaker and MCA member, Dr. Mikael Orchard, DVM of Barn Hollow Vet Clinic in Mountain View. We are very lucky to have a local veterinarian and native of the area willing to share his knowledge of herd health. You can watch his speech about “Viruses in the Cow Herd” on our SouthCentral Cattlemens Assoc. Cacebook page. This video has had 1.7K views in just two days. Hope to see you all safely soon, Janet Crow - SCCA, President

To accommodate those that wanted to be in attendance, I attempted to post live on Facebook, but technical

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The guest speaker and MCA member, Dr. Mikael Orchard, DVM of Barn Hollow Vet Clinic in Mtn. View, Missouri.

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Southwest Missouri Cattlemen’s Association The Southwest Missouri Cattlemen’s Association met for their annual meeting and foundation auction on December 5 at the University of Missouri’s Southwest Research Center, Mt. Vernon, where 85 people.were in attendance. Those helping sponsor the strip steak meal grilled by the association’s grillers were: Old Missouri Bank, Mid-Missouri Bank, Freedom Bank, Kristi and Russell Marion.

Jackie Moore, Joplin Regional Stockyards works for another bid while Traves Merrick, Region 7 MCA vice-president announces sale items.

The evening started off with Scynthia Schnake, incoming president, introducing one of the four, $1,000 scholarships awardees, Donielle Brottlund, an MU freshman who thanked the association for her scholarship. Other recipients were Chase Daniel, Kensie Darst and Donell Kleiboeker. Scynthia also introduced newly-elected state representative Mitchell Boggs, La Russell. President Jeff Kaal, conducted the business meeting. He announced that the board had contributed $500 to the Ralph Schallert Memorial as well as $1,000 to the Everett Forkner Endowment to support the University of Missouri livestock judging team. Eldon Cole welcomed the association to the new Research Center Conference Room on behalf of the interim superintendent, Reagan Bluel. He announced that a heifer development program using the GrowSafe feed system would be available for cattlemen to use to evaluate their heifers’ feed efficiency beginning after January 1.

Jeff Kaal, retiring president appears happy his two-year term is over.

Sydney Thummel, MCA manager of membership, was called on to make a few remarks, and she thanked the members for their support of youth activities in 2020. She announced the upcoming MCA state convention as well as the NCBA convention in August in Nashville.

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Russell Marion reported for the nominating committee. Those chosen were: President - Scynthia Schnake; Vice-President - Nathan Isakson; Secretary-Treasurer - Stephanie Fizette;Board Members - Kyle Caldwell Debbie Seufert - Joe Brattin.

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Jackie even served as a traffic control officer as two youngsters enjoyed the pedal tractors.

The highlight of the evening was the foundation’s auction of many items from feed, mineral, veterinary services, gates, toy tractors, dewormers, various farm supplies, cakes, pies, and leftover strip steaks. Altogether, around $15,700 was donated for the foundation. That wasn’t a record, but will help the revenue stream that was lost due to COVID cancellations of steak grilling dates.

Editorial Note: Please send County News items via email to:

mobeef@sbcglobal.net Andy Atzenweiler • Deadline for the February 2021 issue is January 15.


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On the Edge of

Common Sense with Baxter Black A Cowful Grandpa Tommy’s dad used to say “A cowful is a substantial quantity.” According to my research, the rumen on a mature cow can hold up to 300 pounds. And by anybody’s standards that is quite a bit. Say you had a cowful of pocket change. You’d almost need a cow to keep it in. Say you had a cowful of wet laundry. It would take a forklift to get it in the dryer. Say you had a cowful of manure. Well, I guess a lot of us do. If cowful became an accepted unit of measure it could replace the antiquated English standards like the dram and the rod. And those bland, simple minded metric names that somehow sound communistic; kiloliter, hectometer, decigram. Can you picture in your mind a decigram? Is it the weight of a decimated graham cracker? Or ten grandma’s standin’ on the scale? Under the cowful system 15 scoopfuls would equal a cowful. Two bootfuls would make a scoopful, two hatfuls would make a bootful. Half a hatful would equal a capful. 6 canfuls, as in beer cans, makes a capful. One canful equals 40 thimblefuls, 20 teardrops in a thimbleful. The dosage for penicillin would read: 4 teardrops per 5 scoopfuls of body weight IM.

For Blackleg four-way vaccination: 1 thimbleful SQ. Repeat in 60 days. Bizarre, you say. If cowful was a measure of weight or volume, possibly the distance between postholes would become the standard unit of measure for length, i.e. 660 post holes per section line - 4 thumbs to a hand, 3 hands to a foot, 4 feet to a coyote length and 2 coyote lengths to a posthole. Decibels of loudness would be described in more understandable terms. From chicken peck to pig squeal for everyday sounds. Loud noises would be categorized as small wreck, big wreck and heck’uva wreck. “So, did you hear about Orbin gettin ‘bucked off? Musta sailed 5 coyote lengths, hit the side of the grain bin with a moose bugle and two cowfuls of pellets fell on him. Smashed him flatter’n a rabbit ear.

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“They got him to the Doc in half a coon’s age, transfused him with a six pack of type 0 negative and removed a posthole of intestine. He’s doin’ okay but he’s lost about six hat fulls.

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“He’s been a sheep’s gestation recovering. Doc says it’s shock, but I figger it just scared a pea waddin’ and a half out of him. Well, I gotta go. I’ve got an appointment in 4 1/2 shakes of a lambs tail.”


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MBCSept2014c.qxp_Layout 1 9/24/14 9:59 AM Page 62

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Missouri Trending Wetter and Warmer Source: University of Missouri Extension COLUMBIA, Mo. – Missouri’s seasons are getting warmer and wetter, especially winter and spring. For farmers, this means a longer growing season, wetter fields and potential for more plant diseases and insects. Four of the five warmest winters in Missouri on record have occurred since the early 1990s, says University of Missouri Extension climatologist Pat Guinan. The five warmest springs on record have taken place since 1977. Guinan says Missouri has witnessed a trend of “unprecedented” annual warming over the past couple decades. “There have been only five years since 1998 that were cooler than average,” he says. “We’ve also seen a trend of higher nighttime temperatures in all four seasons.” Missouri’s five warmest years, in descending order, are 2012, 1921, 2016, 1938 and 1931/1998 (tie). Missouri has broken seven all-time monthly high temperature records during the past 22 years. Of these, most occurred during the cold season. In 19 of the past For More Information About Simmental Cattle Please Visit: MissouriSimmental.com

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22 years, the annual minimum temperature in Missouri has been above average, according to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. However, summer days with extreme heat are less common, Guinan says. There are fewer 90-degree days, but summer nights are warmer and more uncomfortable, with more days when temperatures do not fall below 70 degrees. These trends are due in part to water vapor content, which has been increasing in Missouri over the past several decades, he says. One way to express atmospheric moisture is through dew point, the temperature at which the air becomes saturated. Higher dew points elevate minimum air temperatures and suppress maximum temperatures, a phenomenon that has become most pronounced during the growing season. These higher nighttime temperatures create a humid environment ripe for plant diseases. Another change with significant consequences for agriculture: Compared to the long-term average, over the past 20 years the median date of the last spring frost is about six days earlier and the first fall frost is generally

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five days later. That extends the growing season by 11 days. Missouri is also experiencing an unprecedented wet period, Guinan says. Twenty-four of the last 39 years have had above-normal precipitation. Missouri saw its seventh-wettest year on record in 2019. While long-term (1895-2010) average annual precipitation in the state is 40.86 inches, since 1973 annual precipitation has exceeded 50 inches nine times, with fewer dry periods compared to the first seven decades of the 20th century. Not only is there more rain, heavy rain is happening more often, leading to more flooding and wetter cropland. Missouri has seen a 35% increase in 3-inch daily rain events over the past couple decades compared to the long-term average. Missouri has also broken four all-time monthly records since 2015.

1936. The following month saw 21 consecutive days with temperatures of 100 degrees or higher. Since 2013, Lamar has recorded no triple-digit temperatures. Conversely, the last time an all-time monthly average low temperature record was broken in Missouri was December 1983, when a weather observer near Hamilton recorded 13 days with subzero temperatures. The coldest day was Dec. 22, when it was minus 23. A high temperature of minus 12 was reported on Christmas Day. Through the years, Missouri farmers have learned to adapt and be resilient when weather changes quickly, Guinan says.

But weather can change quickly, as shown by the drought of 2012, Guinan says. Missouri has had multiyear droughts and extreme summer heat, particularly in the 1930s and 1950s. In 1936 there were more than 60 days of triple-digit temperatures in Lamar, peaking at a brutal 118 degrees on July 19,

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MU Research Looks at Technology to Kill Weeds Source: University of Missouri Extension

rather than in a single pass.

COLUMBIA, Mo. – If it’s a weed, spray it. That’s the mindset that most in the agriculture industry held for years.

It is most effective on waterhemp, ragweeds, horseweeds and cocklebur. It is less effective on foxtail and barnyardgrass.

That thinking no longer works as more weeds become resistant to herbicides, says Kevin Bradley, University of Missouri Extension weed scientist.

“It’s not a silver bullet, but it is very effective on several of our most troublesome weed species,” Bradley says.

Bradley uses waterhemp as an example. Waterhemp is one of 14 herbicide-resistant weed species in Missouri. It is a prolific producer of seeds, and Bradley considers it Missouri’s most worrisome weed. “It’s clear that we need a new approach,” he says. MU Extension researchers are looking at how to remove weeds without herbicides. One nonchemical method is electrocution. The Weed Zapper, made in Sedalia, Mo., is used mostly in organic operations, but it may also work in conventional pasture and row crops. Mizzou has used the Weed Zapper on test plots and saw 98.6% effectiveness in waterhemp destruction. The Weed Zapper’s copper boom attaches to the front of a tractor and hits weeds with 15,000 volts of electricity from a 110,000-watt generator on the back of the tractor. Bradley notes that the Weed Zapper can be dangerous because of its voltage. It also can have negative effect on soybean yield if a lot of the foliage is contacted by the boom in later growth stages. Its effects are immediate and deadly, especially on larger weeds. It works best when used at seven-day intervals

Callaway Livestock Center, Inc.

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1st Thursday Nite of Each Month: 6:00 p.m. Bred Cows and Breeding Bull Sale

John P. Harrison 573-386-5150 Jack Harrison 573-386-2186 David Bell 660-327-5633

Another option is the Seed Terminator. This seed control tool attaches to the back of a combine. Its dual hammer mills crush the chaff through stationary and rotating bars to make it nonviable. Bradley says there is a need for more research to understand how new technologies can best reduce weeds in U.S. soybean. Seed destruction is popular in Australia but not widely used in the U.S. Weeds such as waterhemp, Missouri’s No. 1 weed, can exit the combine in areas such as the header and grain tank. In fact, Bradley says about two-thirds of the seed goes out the back of the combine. Multistate studies are underway to look at how to reduce the number of seeds making it to the soil. It might take several seasons of use to see substantial reductions, Bradley says. Most seed that goes through the combine, even pinhead sized waterhemp and palmer amaranth seeds, becomes nonviable. Increased engine load on the combine raises fuel consumption an average of 4.1 gallons per hour. Funding for this research project comes from the Seed Terminator, Mizzou Weed Science, United Soybean Board, Missouri Soybeans and Case IH Agriculture. Graduate students Travis Winans and Haylee Schreier work with Bradley on the research. Watch a Mizzou Weed Science demonstration of the Weed Terminator at ipm.missouri.edu/IPCM/2020/7/ fieldDayVideo5-MB. Learn more about MU Weed Science research at weedscience.missouri.edu, on Facebook at weedscience. missouri or @ShowMeWeeds on Twitter.


Southwest Missouri Spring Forage Conference Source: USDA - Adams, Pat - NRCS, Ozark, MO

Emotion, and Misinformation.

The 37th annual Southwest Missouri Spring Forage Conference will be held Tuesday, February 23 and Wednesday February 24, 2021. The conference will be virtual in 2021 with pre-registration required by February 16, 2021.

Along with the keynote topic on the first day, 13 other 45-minute sessions will be held throughout the two-day event. Topics include: beef cattle markets, Missouri climate trends, year-round pasture management, matching cow size to forage resource, small ruminant pasture management, clover and nitrogen fertilizer management, strip grazing milo, bale grazing, managing the grazing system in the winter months, annual forages for livestock production, warm season grasses testing and performance, and forage pest issues.

The sessions will run from 8:00 am to 2:15 pm each day. Conference log-in begins at 7:30 a.m. Registered participants can enter or exit the conference as they want. After the conference, recorded sessions will be available to participants until March 24th, 2021. Participants can watch from home or ‘watch parties’ are being set up to allow multiple participants in one location. Locations will be listed on the conference’s website. This year’s keynote speaker will be Dr. Peter Ballerstedt, Forage Ambassador for Barenburg USA. Dr. Ballerstedt has bachelors and master’s degrees from the University of Georgia and a doctorate from the University of Kentucky. He was the forage extension specialist at Oregon State University from 1986 to 1992. The title of his keynote address on the first day is: Red Meat and Our Health: Separating Scientific Fact from Politics,

Agricultural businesses and organizations will have commercial displays and logo representation before and between sessions. For more information on becoming a sponsor or exhibitor during this virtual event, visit the website or contact Nathan Witt at 417-451-1007 ext.3. The cost is $45 per person. Mail in registrations must be received by February 16th to assure access to the conference. Participants can find more information about the conference and register online at www. springforageconference.com. Contact the Laclede County SWCD office at 417-532-6305, ext.101 for additional questions.

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Larry Dean Ellison Larry Dean Ellison was born December 29, 1945 to Ray and Ethel (Anderson) Ellison, in Springfield, Missouri. Larry graduated from Pleasant Hope High School, got his bachelor’s degree from Missouri State and his master’s degree in accounting from the University of Missouri. He was joined in marriage on March 30, 1968 to Merrilyn Woodmansee. Larry is survived by Merrilyn, his children, Kimberli (Russell) Andrews and Kevin (DeeDe) Ellison and grandchildren, Nicholas Andrews, Caelyn Ellison, Benjamin Andrews, Ashlyn Ellison, and Emmet Ellison, all of Springfield. Also surviving, is his sister Donna (Carl) Buckner of Fair Grove and brother Al (Patricia) Ellison of Springfield, along with many nieces, nephews, and cousins. Larry had two “daughters” that meant the world to him as well, Stephanie Jean Matlock and Connie Robayo Shaffer. Larry spent his career as a CPA in a variety of industries. Most notably, as a partner at BKD and KPM CPA firms, C.F.O at Empire Gas, and partner at EllisonLiggett Litigation Consultants. He spent the last 3 years helping to establish the Missouri medical marijuana industry. He was heavily involved in the passage of the legislation and was so proud to be a part owner of one of Missouri’s first medical dispensaries. The most important things in Larry’s life were family, farm and the (Ozark Empire) fair.

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Larry volunteered in many organizations over the years, including The Victim Center, CASA, Lost & Found, Easter Seals and Springfield Jaycees. However, he was most proud of his work with the Ozark Empire Fair and the Ozark Empire Fair Foundation. Larry’s love of the Fair came at a young age, when he spent his days at the Fairgrounds with his grandpa, who ran the racetrack. He began showing dairy cattle in high school and

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Hwy 42 West • Vienna Missouri 65582 45 Miles South of Jefferson City Selling All classes of Cattle Wednesday • 10:00 a.m. Featuring ‘Star-Vac Program’ Cattle Weekly DVAuction Service for convenient online viewing & bidding For More Information Call… David Patton Office Ross Patton Bill Patton 573-308-6655 573-422-3305 573-308-6657 573-308-6658 Visit our website: www.scrsvienna.com or E-mail us: scrsvienna@gmail.com “Make South Central your Livestock Market”

showing became a life-long passion. He and Merrilyn created Harmony Hills in 1978 and shared their love of farm and cattle with their kids, grandkids, and youth across the country. Larry served for over 20 years as a board member of the Ozark Empire Fair and was one of the founding members of the Ozark Empire Fair Foundation, which has raised nearly $2 million dollars for youth in agriculture. If you know Larry at all, you know family was the most important thing in the world to him. He loved his family fiercely and took great joy in their accomplishments and just simply spending time together as a family. His family is grateful for every moment spent with him. He would move heaven and earth for his family and friends, and we feel the same for him.

Harold Lee Six Harold Lee Six, 86, died September 25, 2020 at his home in rural Adrian. Funeral services were held Tuesday, September 29, 2020 at the Adrian United Methodist Church. Burial in Crescent Hill Cemetery, Adrian. In lieu of flowers, the family encourages donations to the Adrian Optimist Club and Crescent Hill Masonic Lodge #368. Harold was born on July 22, 1934, the second son of C.A. and Naomi King Six. He graduated from Adrian High School in 1952, earned Eagle Scout distinction with Troop #238, and later served in the U.S. Army being stationed in Germany. Harold retired after 20 years of service as the Rural Water District #5 Superintendent in 1999. Harold was an Adrian Bank Board of Director until 2014 and was currently serving as an Advisory Director. Harold married Thelma Massey of Lebanon on May 29, 1955. Together, they raised three children on the family farm northwest of Adrian: Cheryl Lawrence of Adrian, Darla Six of Harrisonville, and Cary (Lara) Six of Adrian. Giving back to the Adrian community and Bates County was important to Harold. He volunteered countless hours of time to many civic organizations. He was a 60-year member of the Crescent Hill Masonic Lodge #368. Harold was a charter member of the Adrian Optimist Club where he served as president the year the first community building was built, grilled burgers under the tree at the City Park for numerous 4th of July celebrations, and was kitchen boss on Monday nights for Bingo at the old and new building many years. He was proud to be a tri-chairman of the Adrian Bi-Centennial Book project. Taking money and


chatting with vendors and visitors for Optimist gun shows was something he looked forward to twice a year. Harold loved being a cattleman and was a member of the Bates County Cattlemen’s group. As a young man, he worked for the Cavanah-Purdy Polled Hereford Ranch in Luther, Oklahoma and traveled with a show string on the professional circuit. His claim to fame was having showed cattle in every state fair west of the Mississippi (and many to the east). He passed his love and knowledge for showing on to his children and other community kids as a 4-H beef leader. His daily routine included going to the pasture to keep tabs on his cow & calf herd. Harold wanted the youth of the Adrian community to thrive. To keep the best better as the Optimist theme states, he helped organize the Adrian Booster Club and served early on as president. He was an avid supporter of his children, grandchildren, and other community kids at various Blackhawk events. He helped form the Bates County Fair and served on its board for many years and was honored as his family received the “Friends of the Fair” recognition in 2018. Harold’s favorite pastimes included nurturing and tending to huge vegetable gardens, hunting with his buddies, taking Foxtrotters out on trail rides, adding to

his collections of guns and pocketknives, and being a part of numerous shed “board meetings” with Milsap neighbors. He looked forward each day to going to town and chatting with the coffee club. He’d make various stops at local businesses to get caught up on news and happenings. Harold and Thelma were season ticket holders to Mizzou football for over 50 years. Early on they spent many Saturday afternoons in Columbia tailgating with friends and later with his children and grandchildren. His enthusiasm for life and presence will leave a big void in many lives. Harold was preceded in death by his parents, brother, G. J. Six, and son-in-law, Monte Lawrence. He is survived by his wife of 65 years, Thelma, of the home; his three children; daughter-in-law, and five grandchildren, whom he deeply loved: Rebecca Lawrence of Lakewood, CO, J.R. (Erica) Lawrence of Boonville, MO, Makyna (Drew) Scott of Raymore, MO, and Bayler and Kyler Six of Adrian; sister-in-law, Reine Six of Holiday, FL; one cousin, Sue Ann (Ed) Steele of Butler, MO. Harold was also blessed with numerous other relatives and friends. Harold’s commitment to his family and community will be greatly missed.

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SALE REPORTS Lacy’s Red Angus and MC Livestock Bull & Female Sale 10.24.20 • Drexel, Missouri 18-Month-Old Bulls......................................Avg. $8,000 14-Month-Old Bulls......................................Avg. $4,535 Heifer Show Prospects...................................Avg. $5,375 Bred Heifers...................................................Avg. $3,689 Open Heifers..................................................Avg. $3,202 Heifer Pairs....................................................Avg. $5,400 Semen, LACY Collusion 115F.........................Avg. $203 Commercial Bred Heifers..............................Avg. $1,859 Commercial Open Heifers.............................Avg. $1,388 Sydenstricker Angus Genetics Sale 11.21.2020 • Mexico, MO 84 Yrlg.Bulls..............................................Avg. $6,223.00 75 Bull Calves...........................................Avg. $4,442.00 159 Total Registered Bulls.........................Avg. $5,383.00 135 Open Heifers......................................Avg. $4,010.00 41 Bred Heifers.........................................Avg. $4,851.00 24 Bred Cows............................................Avg. $2,806.00 64 Fall Pairs...............................................Avg. $4,419.00 264 Total Registered Females...................Avg. $4,130.00 10 Embryos (no.).......................................Avg. $1,280.00 423 Reported Sale Total...........................Avg. $4,601.00

Dalebanks Ranch Bull Sale 11.21.2020 • Eureka, KS 59 Older Bulls...........................................Avg. $6,033.00 70 Yrlg.Bulls..............................................Avg. $4,935.00 129 Total Registered Bulls.........................Avg. $5,437.00 Gardiner-Influenced Commercial Angus Female Sale 11.23.2020 • Ashland, KS 128 Commercial Open Heifers.................Avg. $1,305.00 294 Commercial Bred Heifers..................Avg. $2,058.00 100 Commercial Bred Cows.....................Avg. $2,270.00 100 Commercial Pairs...............................Avg. $2,005.00 622 Reported Sale Total............................$1,199,850.00 Finley Bros. Cattle/5K Cattle Co. Angus Dispersion 12.11.2020 • Joplin, MO 40 Reported Sale Total.....$159,780.00....Avg. $3,994.00

Specializing in Land Equipment and Livestock For Upcoming Sale Info: Contact: Mike Williams Higginsville, MO 816-797-5450 mwauctions@ctcis.net

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SALE CALENDAR Jan. 29 Jan. 30 Jan. 30 Feb. 5 Feb. 6 Feb. 13 Feb. 13 Feb. 13-21 Feb. 19 Feb. 20 Feb. 20 Feb. 24 Feb. 26 Feb. 27 Feb. 27 March 5

Drake Simmental Sale, Centerville, IA Nichols Farms Sale, Bridgewater, IA Jauer Dependable Genetics Sale, Hinton, IA Cow Camp Ranch Spring Bull Sale, Lost Springs, KS Loonan Stock Farm Sale, Corning, IA J&N Black Hereford Sale, Leavenworth, KS Crooked Creek Angus Sale, Clarinda, IA Iowa Beef Expo, Des Moines, IA Galaxy Beef Production Sale, Macon, MO Byergo Angus Sale, Savannah, MO Tweedy Cattle Co., Angus Sale, Pocahontas, AR Robert Elliot & Sons Angus Production Sale, Adams, TN Jamison Hereford Bull Sale, Quinter, KS Seedstock Plus North Missouri Bull Sale, Kingsville, MO 64th Missouri Angus Breeders Futurity Sale, Columbia, MO Express Ranches Spring Bull Sale, Yukon, OK

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Sale Every Monday at 11:00 a.m.

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Jay Fowler Cary Brodersen E.H. Fowler 660-473-1562 660-473-6373 660-473-1048

March 6 March 6 March 6 March 12 March 13 March 13 March 13 March 13 March 13 March 15 March 17 March 19 March 19 March 20 March 20 March 20 March 20 March 20

Mead Farms Spring Sale, Versailles, MO Peterson Farms Bull Sale, Mountain Grove, MO Seedstock Plus Arkansas Bull & Female Sale, Hope, AR Schlager Angus Production Sale, Palmyra, MO Sampson Annual Bull Sale, Kirksville, MO Wright Charolais Bull Sale, Kearney, MO Express Honor Roll Sale, Yukon, OK Heart of the Ozarks Angus Sale, West Plains, MO Seedstock Plus Red Reward Bull & Female Sale, Osceola, MO Hinkle’s Prime Cut Angus Sale, Nevada, MO Valley Oaks Spring Sale, Lone Jack, MO Marshall & Fenner Farms Sale, Marshall, MO THM Land & Cattle Sale, Vienna, MO Pinegar Annual Herdbuilder XXVII Sale, Springfield, MO Falling Timber Farm Sale, Marthasville, MO Aschermann Charolais Bull Sale, Carthage, MO Brinkley Angus Ranch Sale, Green City, MO Mississippi Valley Angus Sale, Palmyra, MO

Cowboys at the Capitol on Wednesdays See Schedule on Page 26


MBC Classified The MBC Classified column appears monthly. Classified advertising is only 50¢ a word. Send your check with your ad to Missouri Beef Cattleman, 2306 Bluff Creek Drive, #100, Columbia, Mo 65201. Deadline 10th of month before an issue.

“REESE” DISC MOWERS, CADDY V-RAKES, “REESE” TUBE-LINE BALE WRAPPER, AITCHISON DRILLS, SELF-UNLOADING HAY TRAILERS, HEAVY DUTY BALE AND MINERAL FEEDERS, FEED BUNKS, BALE SPIKES, CONTINUOUS FENCING, COMPLETE CORRAL SYSTEMS, INSTALLATION AVAILABLE: Tigerco Distributing Co. 660-645-2212, 800-432-4020 or www.tigercoinc.com. BLACK SIMMENTAL BULLS SINCE 1993: Calving Ease, Attractive, Athletic, Sound Footed and Docile. We Deliver. Mike Williams, Higginsville, 816-797-5450

JANUARY 2021

March 27 Worthington Angus Sale, Dadeville, MO March 27 Seedstock Plus South Missouri Bull Sale, Carthage, MO April 1 Hunter Angus Sale, Fair Grove, MO April 2 Meyer Cattle Co. Sale Curryville, MO April 3 Four State Angus Association Sale Springfield, MO April 3 Show-Me Classic Bull & Female Sale, Windsor, MO April 3 B/F Cattle Co. Spring Maternal Integrity Gelbvieh & Balancer Bull Sale, Butler, MO April 5 Brockmere Farms Inc. Sale, New Cambria, MO April 9 Howard County Angus Association Sale, Fayette, MO April 10 Central Missouri Polled Hereford Sale, Cuba, MO April 10 Renaissance Sale, Strafford, MO April 13 Sydenstricker Genetic Influence Sale New Cambria, MO April 17 East CentralMissouri Angus Association Sale, Cuba, MO April 17 New Day Genetics Sale, Salem, MO April 21 Ade Polled Hereford Bull & Female Sale, Amsterdam, MO April 23 NextGen Cattle Co. Spirng Event Sale, Paxico, KS May 8 Mead Angus Farms Spring Female Sale, Versailles, MO May 22 Soaring Eagle Production Sale, Springfield, MO May 22 Great American Pie Annual Limousin Sale, Lebanon, MO

65


Advertiser Index

JANUARY 2021

American Angus Association........................................ 43 Buffalo Livestock Market..............................................49 Callaway Livestock Center Inc.....................................54 Central Missouri Sales Co............................................64 Classified.......................................................................65 Clearwater Farm...........................................................29 Coon Angus Ranch......................................................29 Cow Camp Ranch ....................................................... 41 Drake Simmental.......................................................... 53 Durham Simmental Farms........................................... 52 F&T Livestock Market..................................................66 Farm Credit of Missouri...............................................68 Frank and Hazelrigg Angus.........................................29 Galaxy Beef LLC..........................................................29 GDI............................................................................... 35 Gerloff Farms................................................................29 Green’s Welding & Sales...............................................50 Hinkle’s Prime Cut Angus............................................29 HydraBed......................................................................36 Iowa Beef Expo............................................................. 37 J&N Ranch Black Hereford Sale....................................9 Jamison Herefords Sale................................................. 39 Jauer Dependable Genetics...........................................49 Jim’s Motors.................................................................. 11 Joplin Regional Stockyards.............................................3 Kingsville Livestock Auction........................................ 16 Legend Lespedeza......................................................... 53 Loonan Stock Farm...................................................... 33 Lucas Cattle Co............................................................ 52 Marshall & Fenner Farms.............................................29 MCA Cowboys at the Capitol....................................... 26 MCA Membership Form.............................................. 61 MCA Presidents Council.............................................. 59 MCA Proud Member Signs.......................................... 62 MCA Top 100 Profitablity Challenge.....................50-51 McBee Cattle Co. Sale....................................................7

66

McPherson Concrete Products.....................................65 Mead Cattle Co............................................................ 57 Mead Farms..................................................................29 Merck Animal Health................................................... 27 Merry Meadows Simmental......................................... 52 Meyer Manufacturing.................................................. 19 Missouri Angus Association..........................................29 Missouri Angus Breeders..............................................29 Missouri Beef Industry Council.................................... 25 Missouri Simmental Association.................................. 52 Missouri Simmental Breeders....................................... 52 MLS Tubs..................................................................... 22 Nichols Farms............................................................... 67 Ory’s 07 Red Angus...................................................... 28 Oval F Ranch............................................................... 52 Ozark Farm & Neighbor............................................... 42 Pinegar Limousin.......................................................... 13 Richardson Ranch........................................................29 RLE Simmental............................................................ 52 S&N Partners - JayLor.................................................. 15 Sellers Feedlot............................................................... 14 Shoal Creek Land & Cattle.......................................... 52 Slayton Farms............................................................... 52 South Central Regional Stockyards.............................56 Square B Ranch/Quality Beef......................................29 Steaks Alive................................................................... 52 Superior Steel Sales.......................................................46 Sydenstricker Genetics..................................................29 Valley Oaks Angus........................................................29 Vitalix........................................................................... 17 Weiker Angus Ranch....................................................29 Wheeler Auctions & Real Estate................................... 63 Wheeler Livestock Market............................................40 Mike Williams.............................................................. 63 Y-Tex...............................................................................2 Zeitlow Distributing...................................................... 31




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