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ADVANCING

FOOD SAFETY THROUGH BEHAVIOR CHANGE January 25-27, 2017 Washington DC cfsec2017.fightbac.org

y t e e f c a n S e d er o f o n F o r C k e n o m io o u B t s a m n c a r g Co du o r E P


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Tools to Stay Connected Website Free downloads, images and information! fightbac.org

Weekly Emails New Resource announcements, outreach tips, and upcoming events. Text: PFSE to 22828 to join our e-list.

Social Media Share and re-tweet our postings and your food safety outreach is covered! Twitter: @Fight_BAC Facebook: @FightBAC

Webinars Our webinars feature experts on new and exciting topics and offer free continuing education credits.

Knowledge Exchange Calls Experts answer your questions during these live conference calls.

BAC Fighter Blog Find out what your colleagues are up to and share your own consumer education story!

And so much more…

fightbac.org Every year you — health and food safety educators we call BAC Fighters — reach millions of consumers with important safe food handling information. The non-profit Partnership for Food Safety Education equips BAC Fighters with the tools they need to stay strong on the front lines of food safety. Contact us at info@fightbac.org

Visit fightbac.org today to discover resources that support your work!


Acknowledgements PFSE Board of Directors Shelley Feist, Executive Director Partnership for Food Safety Education Hilary Thesmar, Chair Food Marketing Institute Kathy Means, Vice Chair Produce Marketing Association Brian Bedard GMA Science and Education Foundation Patricia Buck Ctr for Foodborne Illness Research and Prevention Joe Corby Association of Food & Drug Officials Donna Garren American Frozen Food Institute Thomas Gremillion Consumer Federation of America Judy Harrison University of Georgia Extension Stan Hazan NSF International Steve Larsen National Pork Board Howard Magwire Consultant David Tharp Intl Association for Food Protection

Marketing and Communications Committee Mary Choate Partnership for Food Safety Education Mindy Costello NSF International Ashley Eisenbeiser Food Marketing Institute Thomas Frey NSF International Elizabeth Greene CDC Cory Hedman Meijer Shauna Henley University of Maryland Extension Criztal Hernandez Produce Marketing Assn. Carolyn Jackson Amr. Assn of Family & Consumer Sciences

Conference Program Committee Frank Yiannas, Co-Chair Wal-Mart Kathy Means, Co-Chair Produce Marketing Association Brian Bedard GMA Science and Education Foundation Patricia Buck Ctr for Foodborne Illness Research and Prevention Sheryl Cates RTI Ben Chapman North Carolina State University Mildred Cody Georgia State University, retired Joe Corby Association of Food & Drug Officials Shelley Feist Partnership for Food Safety Education Angela Fraser Clemson University Donna Garren American Frozen Food Institute Sandria Godwin Tennessee State University Marianne Gravely USDA Food Safety and Inspection Service, FSES Stan Hazan NSF International Jennifer Li NACCHO Sara Mortimore Land O’Lakes

Table of Contents Welcome. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Continuing Education Credits . . . . 13 Washington Marriott . . . . . . . . . . 14 Wardman Park Maps Agenda & Schedule . . . . . . . . . . . 16 Keynote Speakers . . . . . . . . . . . . 28 Plenary Speakers. . . . . . . . . . . . . 30 Speaker Index. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34 Student Scholarship Winners . . . . 38 Poster Presentations . . . . . . . . . . 41 Sponsor Listings . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46

Christine Prue Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Mike Robach Cargill

Media Sponsor

Michael Roberson Publix Super Markets Inc. Ayma Rouhani ORISE Fellow, US Food and Drug Administration Jan Singleton USDA Natl. Institute for Food and Agriculture Ann Taubenheim US Food and Drug Administration Hilary Thesmar Food Marketing Institute

Kelly McGlumphy GOJO Industries

Student Scholarship Review Committee

Kathy Means Produce Marketing Association

Sharmi Das US Food and Drug Administration

Ayma Rouhani FDA CFSAN

Marianne Gravely USDA Food Safety and Inspection Service,

Anna Schmitt-Reichert NSF International

Judy Harrison University of Georgia Extension

Howard Seltzer FDA CFSAN

Kali Kniel-Tolbert University of Delaware

Clare Sinacori Natl Environmental Health Association

Gina Kramer Savour Food Safety

Tom Super Natl Chicken Council

Mary Saucier Choate Partnership for Food Safety Education

William Weichelt Natl Restaurant Assn.

Betty Feng University of California, Davis

Jodi Williams USDA Natl. Institute of Food and Agriculture

Shauna Henley University of Maryland Extension

Stefanie Winston Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics

Kristen Spotz Grocery Manufacturers Association

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Welcome from the Partnership for Food Safety Education The Partnership for Food Safety Education has a focus on preventing illness and death from foodborne infection in the United States. We work with a network of more than 14,000 BAC Fighters, with our partner organizations, and with our Federal agency liaisons to ensure consumers have the information they need to reduce their risk of foodborne illness. What began in 1998 with the national Fight BAC!® campaign continues today through the network of committed individuals and organizations – BAC Fighters – who develop and deliver evidence-based behavioral health messaging to people across the country. You help save lives, and the Partnership for Food Safety Education is committed to supporting you with this Consumer Food Safety Education Conference – connecting you with experts and colleagues, new research and outreach tools. More than 25 PFSE contributing partner organizations and liaisons from the FDA, the CDC and USDA keep alive the spark of public-private collaboration behind consumer food safety education. The resources and learning opportunities for consumers and BAC Fighters don’t end with this conference. Be sure to visit www.fightbac.org for free food safety resources and sign up to receive notices of our free webinar series for educators! Thank you for all you do and congratulations on your accomplishments in connecting with consumers on the basics of Clean, Separate, Cook, and Chill. Together we can reach greater levels of effectiveness in reducing the incidence of food poisoning. Welcome to the conference!

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Shelley Feist

Hilary Thesmar

Executive Director Partnership for Food Safety

Vice President of Food Safety Programs Food Marketing Institute

2017 Consumer Food Safety Education Conference


Advancing Food Safety Through Behavior Change Jan. 25–27, 2017

Washington Marriott Wardman Park 2660 Woodley Road NW, Washington, DC 20008

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Welcome from the Conference Co-Chairs Welcome to Washington, D.C, and the 2017 Consumer Food Safety Education Conference! We are delighted you have dedicated the time and resources to be here at this important conference. This meeting brings together people from public and private sectors that are committed to supporting the good health of consumers. Over the next few days you will: • Focus on behavior change which is at the heart of improved food safety practices at home and at work.

• H  ave the opportunity to network and engage in collaborative dialog with health and food safety educators from federal agencies, non-profit organizations, higher education, and the food industry.

• G  ain strategies to effectively change the food safety knowledge, attitudes and behaviors of millions of consumers.

• E  xperience a solution-based program designed to equip you with the tools and resources to address your biggest food safety challenges of today and tomorrow.

Be sure not to miss any of our plenary sessions – our plenary and keynote presenters are some of the leading thinkers and researchers on behavior change. We’ll also feature a panel of the nation’s Federal leaders in food safety. There will be time to mix and mingle Thursday evening from 4:30-6:00pm with our poster presenters at a fantastic reception. After the reception you have the opportunity to meet new people through neighborhood dine-around groups. These are terrific networking aspects of the conference not to be missed! Congratulations on being here to take steps towards furthering your career and furthering consumer food safety education practice. We look forward to talking with you over the next two days and to learning alongside you. Enjoy the conference!

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Kathy Means

Frank Yiannas

Vice President of Industry Relations Produce Marketing Association

Vice President, Food Safety Walmart Stores, Inc.

2017 Consumer Food Safety Education Conference


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2017 Consumer Food Safety Education Conference


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2016 Contributing Partners Public and Contributing Partners are the organizations that form the leadership base of the Partnership for Food Safety Education. In other words, they are the “partners” in the “Partnership” and they contribute to the Partnership’s mission to improve public health and reduce foodborne illness.

Partnership for Food Safety Education

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CURRENT CONTRIBUTING PARTNERS

FEDERAL LIAISONS

Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics American Beverage Association American Frozen Food Institute Association of Food and Drug Officials Cargill, Inc. Consumer Federation of America Food Marketing Institute GoJo Industries, Inc. Grocery Manufacturers Association Institute of Food Technologists International Association for Food Protection International Dairy-Deli-Bakery Association International Food Information Council Foundation National Chicken Council National Grocers Association National Pork Board National Turkey Federation North American Millers’ Association Meijer NSF International Produce Marketing Association Publix Super Markets Charities ServSafe The Kroger Co. United Fresh Produce Association US Foods

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention U.S. Food and Drug Administration, CFSAN U.S. Department of Agriculture, FSIS FSES U.S. Department of Agriculture, NIFA Your support is critical to the Partnership’s work to deliver trusted, science-based behavioral health messaging and a network of resources that support consumers and health educators. Thank you!

Being a PFSE contributing partner means your organization has significant visibility within a highly respected and representative public-private partnership with a reputation as a credible program resource for industry, health educators, the media and consumers. Please join us in 2017! Contact Shelley Feist, Executive Director at sfeist@fightbac.org.

2017 Consumer Food Safety Education Conference


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2017-01-03-lConferenceProgramBookAd copy.pdf

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1/3/17

10:17 AM

Thank you to the Partnership for Food Safety Education for organizing the sixth in the series of Consumer Food Safety Education Conferences, and congratulations on the Partnership’s 20th anniversary. In May 1997, the Report to the President: Food Safety from Farm to Table recommended that a public-private partnership be established to work with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, U.S. Department of Agriculture, and FDA to develop and launch a food safety public awareness and education campaign. Since then the Partnership has been a national leader in improving consumer food safety practices. To begin, the Partnership and its federal liaisons condensed a profusion of safe food handling information into four simple, easy-to-understand key messages, Clean, Separate, Cook, and Chill, which has became the basis for food safety education throughout the United States and much of the world.

Today the Partnership, with its network of 13,000 BAC Fighters and its library of tested and effective educational materials on every aspect of consumer food safety, connects with an estimated 7.5 million consumers annually. FDA joins with the other cosponsors of the conference in saying "well done" to the Partnership and to the attendees who bring their food safety education competence and dedication to this event in order to explore how we can further improve consumer food handling behaviors.

www.fda.gov

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2017 Consumer Food Safety Education Conference


Continuing Education Credit The 2017 Consumer Food Safety Education Conference offers food safety educators the opportunity to enhance their knowledge and exchange information on food safety education. The planning committee has obtained continuing education certification for a variety of professions so conference participants may receive credit. While the conference is not charging fees to participants for processing CE units/contact hours, some organizations may charge for registering CE units/contact hours; such fees are the responsibility of the participant. Continuing Education Attendance Verification forms are in all attendee bags. Please complete and return it to the Registration Desk before you leave the conference. If you leave early, you will not be eligible for CEUs. The following organizations have approved the 2017 Consumer Food Safety Conference for CEUs: Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics Commission on Dietetic Registration The conference is approved for 15 hours and 1.5 poster hours. American Association of Family and Consumer Sciences The conference has PDU Approval #1322 for 3.5 preconference hours and 11.25 regular conference hours. American Culinary Federation This program is approved for 3.5 CEH for preconference sessions and 13.25 for the full conference toward the initial or recertification application for ACF certification. Note: These programs are not endorsed, accredited, or affiliated with ACF or the ACF Certification Program Association of Nutrition & Foodservice Professionals/Certifying Board for Dietary Managers The conference is approved for 13.25 hours and the preconference sessions are approved for 3.5 hours.

ADVANCING FOOD SAFETY

Institute of Food Technologist’s Certified Food Scientist This program qualifies for Certified Food Scientist (CFS) recertification contact hours (CH). CFS Certificants may claim a maximum of 15.5 CH for their participation in this program. For more information, please visit ift.org/certification or email ifscc@ift.org. National Board of Public Health Examiners The conference is approved for 14 hours and the preconference sessions are approved for 4 hours each. National Commission for Health Education Credentialing The provider number is 101800, and the program number is 27356. The conference is approved for 3.5 preconference hours and 13.5 conference hours. National Environmental Health Association The conference has been approved for 3.5 hours for the pre-conference sessions and 13.25 for the conference.

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Washington Marriott Wardman Park Maps

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2017 Consumer Food Safety Education Conference


Washington Marriott Wardman Park 2660 Woodley Road NW, Washington, DC 20008

n  Event Registration Registration B Mezzanine Level n  Plenary Sessions Thurgood Marshall Ballroom Mezzanine Level n  Breakout Sessions Lincoln 2, 3, 4, 5 Exhibition Level

n P  oster Session and Reception Lincoln Foyer Exhibition Level n  Lunches Thurgood Marshall Ballroom Mezzanine Level

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2017 Consumer Food Safety Education Conference

KEY Special Breakout Session Plenary Session 16

Plenary Sessions will be live broadcast at:

http://foodsafety.live. conferencecontent.net Â

2017 Consumer Food Safety Education Conference


Schedule of Events WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 25 11:00am–6:30pm

Thurgood Marshall Foyer

Registration Open

Case Study Workshop: An anatomy of an outbreak: handling and consuming raw dough and dough ingredients

1:00pm–4:30pm Preconference Sessions

(pre-registration required)

Effective Story Telling with Lori Jacobwith How to Find & Share Stories That Knock Peoples’ Socks Off!

Room: Wilson A Speaker: Lori Jacobwith

In this interactive session master storyteller and fundraising culture change expert, Lori L. Jacobwith, will teach you how to find the nuggets of powerful stories from your food safety education work. You’ll learn the questions to ask, who to talk to and where to ask questions to gather nuggets of information you can turn into an inspiring story. Plan to walk away with a first draft of a powerful, engaging story.

Evaluation of Consumer Interventions— How to Get Started!

Room: Wilson B Workshop Leader: Ayma Rouhani, ORISE Fellow, Education and Outreach Branch, Division of Education, Outreach, and Information, OAO, CFSAN, USDA Speakers: J onathan Blitstein, Public Health Psychologist, Food, Nutrition, and Obesity Policy and Research, RTI International Sheryl Cates, Sr. Research Analyst, RTI International

New to program evaluation? This interactive workshop will help you get started!. The workshop will cover the key components of program evaluation and introduce you to a new evaluation resource created just for you by the Partnership for Food Safety Education and the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. The session will also include Q&A time with evaluation experts who can help you with your specific challenges to getting started. Walk away with new tools that will help you start evaluating your consumer food safety education activities this year!

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Room: Wilson C Speakers: B  enjamin Chapman, Associate Professor, Food Safety Specialist, Department of Youth, Family, and Community Sciences, North Carolina State University, Karen Neil, Epidemic Intelligence Service Officer, Enteric Diseases Epidemiology Branch, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Don Schaffner, Extension Specialist in Food Science and Distinguished Professor at Rutgers University

Cookie dough, pizza dough, play dough and flour have all been linked in recent years to foodborne illness outbreaks. Behaviors associated with preparation and handling these foods (and ingredients) have been identified as contributing factors – as well as the consumption of the uncooked/ undercooked not-ready-to-eat treats. In this workshop, participants will be led through case studies of these events and engaged in a discussion of risk analysis (assessment, management and communication). Presenters will highlight the science and behavioral challenges, lessons learned and new strategies to protect public health.

Case Study Workshop: Understanding consumer perception and behavior towards preparing frozen foods

Room: Madison A Speaker: Donna Garren, Senior Vice President, Regulatory and Technical Affairs, American Frozen Food Institute Sanjay Gummalla, VP Regulatory and Technical Affairs, American Frozen Food Institute

Frozen foods provide access to nutritious, safe and affordable food for millions Americans. Some are not-readyto-eat foods, which means they require consumers to follow package cooking instructions. Recently, frozen breaded poultry products, frozen entrees and frozen vegetables have all been linked recently to foodborne illness outbreaks. In this workshop, participants will be led through case studies of recent recalls and consumer insight research to understand consumer perception and behavior regarding the safe handling and cooking instructions on frozen foods.

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2017 Consumer Food Safety Education Conference THURSDAY, JANUARY 26 7:45am–8:30am

Thurgood Marshall Foyer

9:30am–10:45am Plenary Session

What are key elements of effective behavioral change strategies?

Continental Breakfast

8:30am Conference Welcome

Partnership for Food Safety Education

Room: Thurgood Marshall Ballroom Speakers: F  rank Yiannas, Conference Co-Chair Vice President, Food Safety, Walmart Stores Inc. Shelley Feist, Executive Director Partnership for Food Safety Education Kathy Means, Conference Co-Chair Vice President, Industry Relations, Produce Marketing Association

8:30am–9:30am Opening Keynote

The Behavior Change Wheel

Room: Thurgood Marshall Ballroom Introduction: K  athy Means, Vice President, Industry Relations, Produce Marketing Association Speaker: L ou Atkins, Senior Teaching Fellow, University College London Centre for Behaviour Change

Hear from author and professor Lou Atkins on designing and evaluating behavior change interventions and policies. She will describe the process broken down into eight steps. It is based on the Behavior Change Wheel, a synthesis of 19 behavior change frameworks that draw on a wide range of disciplines and approaches.

Plenary Sessions will be live broadcast at

http://foodsafety.live.conferencecontent.net Tweet during the conference with #foodsafety2017 18

Room: Thurgood Marshall Ballroom Introduction: S  arah Malenich, Senior Manager, Safe Quality Food Institute Speakers: B  enjamin Chapman, Associate Professor, Food Safety Specialist, Department of Youth, Family, and Community Sciences, North Carolina State University, Michael Roberson, Director of Corporate Quality Assurance, Publix Super Markets, Inc.

Strategies for behavioral change come in many sizes. Some are small and simple, while others involve collaboration and negotiation. In this session, through real world examples you will learn about impacts on behavior change resulting in sustained improved safe food handling. From the field to the fork and from the boat to the throat, this session will cover strategies you can take away to improve food safety in your community.

10:45am–11:00am Thurgood Marshall Ballroom Foyer

Networking Break 11:00am–12:15pm Concurrent Track Sessions

Motivation and Risk Perception as Keys to Behavior Change  Motivating Consumers to Adopt Safe Handling and Preparation Practices for Raw Poultry

Room: Lincoln 2

Speaker: S  andria Godwin, Professor and Director, Didactic Program in Nutrition and Dietetics, Department of Family & Consumer Sciences, Tennessee State University Sheryl Cates, Senior Research Analyst RTI International

The purpose of this presentation is to describe the process used to take research findings from a variety of sources to identify key messages for improved handling and preparation of raw poultry and translate these messages into targeted educational materials to motivate behavior change.

2017 Consumer Food Safety Education Conference


Providing safe and affordable food, so people can live better

$481 BILLION

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Serving millions of customers worldwide every day, we have an important responsibility and unique opportunity to advance food safety and improve public health. Providing safe and affordable food to our customers is one of the reasons we continue to be successful in an increasingly challenging environment.

260 MILLION

As a leader in the retail food business, maintaining a progressive and effective food safety management system is a vital part of that continued success.

A WEEK WORLDWIDE

CUSTOMERS


2017 Consumer Food Safety THURSDAY, JANUARY 26 continued  Consumption of Undercooked Products: Communicating Actual vs. Perceived Risk

Room: Lincoln 2

Speaker: K  aren H. Hunter, Sr. Policy Analyst – Lead, USDA Food Safety and Inspection Service, Office of Public Affairs and Consumer Education

Using a premise of recent illness outbreak information, FSIS will shared how the Agency is approaching communication of actual versus perceived risk of raw and undercooked product consumption, including identification of appropriate audience, potential barriers to message adoption, and processes to effectively mitigate issue obtrusiveness.

 Barriers and Motives to Consumers’ Adherence to Washing Produce from Farmers’ Markets

Room: Lincoln 2

Speaker: S  hauna Henley, PhD, Family & Consumer Sciences Education, AGNR, University of Maryland Extension, Baltimore County

It is recommended that consumers make half their plate fruits and vegetables; and farmers markets continue to be a great local source to meet individual dietary needs. However, more outbreaks are connected to produce than protein. Researchers explored where the knowledge and behavioral gaps exists between vendors and consumers. The talk will break down how theory was used to understand consumers’ barriers and motives to safe produce handling at farmers’ market. The end goal is to create educational messaging at the point of purchase that may encourage safe produce handling for consumers at the farmers’ market and at home.

Influencing Behavior Though Physical Design  A Role for Human Factor Engineering in Designing a Safer Workplace: A Review

Room: Lincoln 3

Speaker: J effrey Clark, Research Assistant, Food Science, University of Arkansas

Human Factors Engineering provides the framework for designing food safety environments that can enhance food safety practices through various avenues.

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 Lighting Conditions Affect Perception of Doneness and Willingness-to-eat Turkey Patties

Room: Lincoln 3

Speaker: E  dgar Chambers IV Distinguished Professor, Sensory Analysis Center, Kansas State University

Changes in federal regulations have impacted the availability of lighting sources in consumer homes, yet consumers report using visual appearance of food to determine doneness. The effect of lighting sources on consumer perceptions of doneness and willingness to eat turkey patties cooked to different temperatures will be discussed.

Measuring Behavior Change  Evaluation of the implementation of a food safety intervention for food pantries

Room: Lincoln 4

Speaker: A  shley Chaifetz, Research Associate, Department of Youth, Family, and Community Sciences, North Carolina State University

To lessen the foodborne illness risk in food pantries, evidence based guidelines were created and implemented in food pantries using outreach and extension principles. A difference-i- -difference model was used to examine how the provision of online information improved food safety behaviors in 60 food pantries in 12 North Carolina counties.

 Empowering Change through the Safe & Healthy Food Pantries Project

Room: Lincoln 4

Speakers: B  arbara Ingham, Professor & Food Safety Specialist, Food Science, University of Wisconsin-Madison Amber Canto, SNAP-Ed State Program Director, University of Wisconsin Extension

Low-income households rely on food pantries for food. Using the social ecological framework, the Safe & Healthy Food Pantries project engaged Extension educators, hunger prevention programs, and food banks, and food pantries and their clients in improving access to safe, healthy food for those in need.

2017 Consumer Food Safety Education Conference


Education Conference Schedule continued

 Motivating High School Students to Follow Safe Food Handling: An Effective Food Safety Curriculum

1:30pm–2:45pm Concurrent Track Sessions

Room: Lincoln 4

Speaker: B  etty Yaohua Feng, Postdoc, Department of Food Science and Technology, University of California, Davis

Room: Lincoln 2

Speaker: C  hristopher Bernstein, Director of Food Safety Education, USDA

This presentation focuses on factors that motivate high school students to change their food handling practices. Findings demonstrate that high school students need effective food safety education. The new food safety curriculum and its effect on reported behavior will be described.

Targeting At-Risk Populations  Food Safety 101 for Older Adults

“Food Safety 101 for Older Adults” was designed by the USDA Food Safety and Inspection Service with the National Council on Aging to educate older adults and caregivers about the basics of food safety and to encourage them to follow the steps needed to prevent foodborne illness in their home.

Communications Tools to Share Your Mission Powerfully

 Assessing personal attitudes and behaviors associated with listeriosis prevention during pregnancy

Room: Lincoln 2

Speakers: W  enqing Xu, Assistant Professor, Nutrition and Food Sciences Melissa Cater, Assistant Professor, Agricultural and Extension Education & Evaluation, LSU AgCenter

11:00am–12:15pm

Special Breakout Session

Room: Lincoln 5 Speaker: L ori L. Jacobwith

Master storyteller and fundraising culture expert, Lori L. Jacobwith, will teach participants how to find the nuggets of powerful stories in their food safety education work. Plan to walk away with a first draft of a powerful, engaging story.

12:15pm–1:15pm

Lunch Keynote

Food Safety = Behavior 2.0

Room: Thurgood Marshall Ballroom Introduction: S  helley Feist, Executive Director, Partnership for Food Safety Education Speaker: F  rank Yiannas, Vice President for Food Safety, Walmart Stores, Inc.

The importance of organizational culture, behavioral science, and human behavior are well documented in the occupational safety and health fields. However, significant contributions to the scientific literature on these topics are noticeably absent in the field of food safety. In Food Safety = Behavior, Frank Yiannas explains proven behavioral science principles and offers perspectives on how to leverage them based on a career of experience in the field about how food safety behaviors can be changed.

It has been reported that pregnant women are about 10 times more likely than the general population to get Listeriosis. To reduce the risk of Listeriosis, pregnant women, as a high risk population, have to avoid certain high risk foods and follow food safety practice. The purpose of this study is to assess the awareness and food safety practices related with Listeriosis and ready-to-eat products consumption, among pregnant women in southeastern Louisiana Parishes in and around an urbanized area. Results showed the gap between self-reported awareness, food consumption behaviors, and food safety practices.

1:15pm–1:30pm Thurgood Marshall Ballroom Foyer

Break and Frank Yiannas book signing

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2017 Consumer Food Safety THURSDAY, JANUARY 26 continued 1:30pm–2:45pm Concurrent Track Sessions

 Handling of Leafy Greens in Foodservices Serving Older Americans: Before and After Intervention

Room: Lincoln 2

Speakers: S  usan Arendt, Professor, AESHM, Iowa State University Kevin Sauer, Associate Professor, FNDH, Kansas State University

This project assessed effects of an easily implemented intervention (minimal text posters with key safety messages) on handling practices of leafy greens served in foodservice operations that target older Americans. Results indicated overall acceptable microbial levels of foods and contact surfaces with poster intervention improving overall practices in some operations.

Motivation and Risk Perception as Keys to Behavior Change  Creating Effective Mexican-American Narratives of Foodborne Illness to Increase Perceptions of Risk

Room: Lincoln 3

Speakers: M  ichael A. Shapiro, Professor, Department of Communication Robert G. Gravani, Professor Emeritus, Food Science, Cornell University

First person narratives based on the experiences of MexicanAmerican victims of foodborne illness and their affected family members will be presented as a potentially effective messaging strategy to increase the perception of risk of foodborne illness and to reduce foodborne illness among Mexican-Americans who cook regularly for their families.

 Storytelling to Motivate Change in Food Safety

Room: Lincoln 3

Speaker: P  atricia Buck, Executive Director, Center for Foodborne Illness Research and Prevention

 Healthy Hand Hygiene Behaviors at Fairs: Linking 4-H Peer Education Projects with Guest Education Targeting At-Risk Populations

Room: Lincoln 3

Speaker: B  . Susie Craig, Professor, Food Safety and Health Area Specialist, Washington State University Extension

Explore 4-H peer education with Junior Fair Board outreach linking their herdsmanship (animal exhibits) projects with the adoption of hand hygiene practices of fair guests visiting animal barns during fairs and festivals. Presentation includes process overview, youth developed education tools, and evaluation.

Behavior Change in the Digital Age  Dinner Party Food Safety Video: Educational Tools for Public Health Professionals

Room: Lincoln 4

Speaker: M  indy Costello, Consumer Information NSF International

This award-winning food safety video series provides an educational resource for public health professionals and health educators to use in their work in teaching and protecting public health. There are three segments focusing on cleaning, cooking and household food safety tips with “man on the street” type interviews.

 From Rotary Phones to Virtual Chat: 30 years of One-on-One Food Safety Education

Room: Lincoln 4

Speaker: M  arianne H. Gravely, Technical Information Specialist, U.S. Department of Agriculture, FSIS

USDA’s Meat and Poultry Hotline has been providing food safety advice to consumers for over 30 years. It has grown from a phone-based system to a service answering questions via phone, email, internet, and live chat on a number of food safety issues associated with meat, poultry and egg products.

National food safety advocate will explore the use of storytelling as a method for changing food safety behaviors and policies.

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2017 Consumer Food Safety Education Conference


Education Conference Schedule continued

 The power of interactive media to change consumer behavior

4:30pm–6:00pm Lincoln Foyer

Room: Lincoln 4

Speakers: B  arbara Chamberlin, Professor, Game Developer, NMSU Learning Games Lab Jeanne Gleason, Department Head, Professor, New Mexico State University Media Productions

Visit 20 poster presentations while mixing and mingling with conference attendees. Don’t forget to complete your Poster Passport to get a free drink ticket!

NMSU Media Productions and Learning Games Lab have developed a wide variety of games, interactive programs, apps, videos and animations on food safety education. Here, Barbara Chamberlin and Jeanne Gleason will give an overview of how they choose what kind of interactive media depending on audience and content, and recommendations for designing (and measuring the impact of) new tools.

BAC Fighter Lightning Talks

Room: Lincoln 5

Fast-paced show and tell where presenters take three minutes to provide information, ideas, experiences and passions about a food safety education topic.

Reception and Poster Presentations

7:00pm 

Informal Group Dinner Dine-arounds Advance signup requested, by Registration. Have dinner in a nearby restaurant with fellow conference attendees! Cost is on your own.

FRIDAY, JANUARY 27 7:45am–8:30am

Continental Breakfast 8:30am–9:30am Plenary Session

What is the Role of Federal Agencies in Consumer Behavior Change?

Networking and Dessert

3:15pm–4:30pm Plenary Session

2:45pm–3:15pm Thurgood Marshall Ballroom Foyer

What Affects Risk Perception & Motivation?

Room: Thurgood Marshall Ballroom Introduction: F  rancie Buck, Global Food Safety Manager, Sealed Air Speakers: M  onique Turner, Associate Professor, Department of Prevention and Community Health George Washington University Rylee Gustafson Christine Prue, Associate Director for Behavioral Science at the National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

We know that many things affect behavior—and risk perceptions and motivations are in that mix. But what affects risk perceptions and motivations? This plenary will answer that question in ways that offer vivid examples across a wide array of health topics which can be applied to promoting food safety behaviors.

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Thurgood Marshall Foyer

Room: Thurgood Marshall Ballroom Introduction: N  icolas Granucci, Ecolab Moderator: S  helley Feist, Executive Director, Partnership for Food Safety Education Speakers: S  tephen Ostroff, Deputy Commissioner for Foods and Veterinary Medicine, FDA David Goldman, Assistant Administrator, Food Safety Inspection Services, USDA Robert Tauxe, Director, Division of Foodborne, Waterborne and Environmental Diseases, National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases, CDC

Food safety concerns are a major threat to confidence in the food supply. Protecting the public health by ensuring the safety and security of our nation’s food supply is the responsibility of USDA’s Food Safety and Inspection Service, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The federal focus is on both enforcement and prevention. Food safety outreach and education is the key to promoting knowledge AND adoption of safe practices. However, preventing foodborne illness also means that people must change their behaviors to minimize the risk of food contamination. Federal agencies are taking food safety education into communities across America, where it can make a difference!

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2017 Consumer Food Safety FRIDAY, JANUARY 27 9:30am–9:45am Thurgood Marshall Ballroom Foyer

 Consumer Confusion: The Keys to Motivate Positive Food Safety Behavior Change

Networking Break

Room: Lincoln 2

Speakers: R  obert Gravani, Professor and Director of the National Good Agricultural Practices Program, Cornell University Matthew Raymond, Sr. Director of Communications, IFIC Foundation Michele Samarya-Timm, Somerset County Department of Health

continued

9:45am–11:00am Concurrent Track Sessions

Motivation and Risk Perception as Keys to Behavior Change  Beyond Knowledge: Strategies to Encourage Actual Behavior Change

Room: Lincoln 2

Speakers: K  evin Roberts, Associate Professor & Director, The Center of Excellence for Food Safety Research in Child Nutrition Programs, Department of Hospitality Management Kevin Sauer, Associate Professor, The Center of Excellence for Food Safety Research in Child Nutrition Programs, Department of Food, Nutrition, Dietetics, and Health, Kansas State University

While many food safety training and education programs exist, research has consistently indicated that consumers and employees fail to utilize this knowledge while preparing food. This session will discuss innovative approaches and other considerations to change an individual’s food safety behavior.

 Assessment of Consumer Responses to Risk Messages

Room: Lincoln 2

Speakers: E  llen Thomas, Food Safety Scientist, RTI International Benjamin Chapman, Associate Professor, Department of Youth, Family, and Community Sciences, North Carolina State University

The purpose of this study was to investigate how consumers respond to different risk messages related to undercooked ground beef and to discuss risk communication challenges in restaurants, with suggestions for future consumer studies.

24

Food safety educators often need to counteract misinformation in the media and online. To address current challenges, this session will delve into knowledge of today’s food safety environment, review consumer knowledge and trends and provide tips for effective online communication approaches, to assist in providing credible, scientifically sound consumer advice.

Targeting at-risk Populations  Food Preservation Training Model with Limited Staff and Resources

Room: Lincoln 3

Speaker: S  andra Brown Food Safety Faculty, Washington State University Extension Margaret Viebrock, Director Washington State University Extension

Limited food safety staff and resources in Extension offices made it necessary to develop a unified state-wide training and delivery model for home food preservation. Fifty faculty, staff and volunteers were trained, a mentoring system was used and follow-up evaluation showed numbers reached, knowledge gained and food safety behaviors changed.

 A Case Study Identifies the Barriers for Health Professionals to Deliver a Food Safety Curriculum

Room: Lincoln 3

Speaker: B  etty Yaohua Feng, Postdoc, Department of Food Science and Technology, University of California, Davis

To protect high-risk patients from foodborne illness, management must concur that additional training in food safety is needed. This presentation revealed the key barriers for health professionals to deliver food safety information in-class. Components of this Positive Deviance curriculum can be incorporated into existing nutrition and food selection education programs.

2017 Consumer Food Safety Education Conference


Education Conference Schedule continued

 Building Successful Food Safety Programming in Native American Communities

Room: Lincoln 3

Speaker: L inda McLean, Director, WSU Colville Reservation Extension, Washington State University Kayla Wells, Family and Consumer Sciences Extension Educator WSU Colville Reservation Extension, Washington State University

Need ideas for enhancing or building your food safety programming with Native American audiences? Join us to learn about successful programming on the Colville Reservation in Washington state. Also, learn successful practices to gain trust & build relationships to establish or build culturally-relevant food safety programs.

Behavior Change in the Digital Age  Do Television Celebrity Chefs Food Handling Practices Impact Consumer Attitudes And Behavior?

Room: Lincoln 4

Speaker: C  hristine Bruhn, Retired Director, Center for Consumer Research, Food Science and Technology, University of California, Davis

Food safety professionals may well cringe when they see celebrity chefs mishandling food on television programs, but what do consumers think? This presentation will document current food handling practices by four popular chefs and describe how chefs in training and consumers view these practices.

 The FoodKeeper: Using Digital Applications to Engage with Consumers

Room: Lincoln 4

Speaker: C  hristopher Bernstein, Director, Food Safety Education OPACE, USDA FSIS

The FoodKeeper application is one of the many vehicles FSIS uses to promote safe food handling practices. Learn about the app itself, how it was developed, what it offers, the consumer response since release, back-end functionality, opportunities to use the data powering the application for other purposes, and upcoming enhancements.

ADVANCING FOOD SAFETY

BAC Fighter Lightning Talks

Room: Lincoln 5

Fast-paced show and tell where presenters take three minutes to provide information, ideas, experiences and passions about a food safety education topic.

11:00am–11:15am Thurgood Marshall Ballroom Foyer

Break 11:15am–12:30pm Concurrent Track Sessions

Targeting At Risk Populations  Child Care Food Safety: A Population At-Risk?

Room: Lincoln 2

Speaker: J oel Reynolds, Doctoral Candidate, Hospitality Management, Iowa State University

This study evaluated child care food safety inspection reports to identify gaps in current food handling practices in child care establishments. The most and least prevalent food safety violation categories were identified. Recommendations for future research in child care food safety is discussed.

 Risk Perception and Hand Washing Practices in an Early Childhood Center

Room: Lincoln 2

Speaker: J effrey Clark, Research Assistant, Food Science University of Arkansas

This study looked at hand washing practices of caregivers, paraprofessional aides, and parents in an early childhood center and explored the impact of risk perceptions on their behaviors.

 Providing Safe Food in the Childcare Setting

Room: Lincoln 2

Speakers: S  haron McDonald, Senior Extension Educator/Food Safety Specialist Jill Cox, Better Kid Care Program Development Specialist, Nutrition, Health and Wellness, College of Agricultural Science, The Pennsylvania State University

This session will review the Penn State Better Kid Care online learning module, “Food Safety in Childcare: From Prep to Cleanup,” and how it can be used as an effective training tool to provide food safety education to anyone involved in preparing, handling or serving food to young children.

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2017 Consumer Food Safety FRIDAY, JANUARY 27

Predicting Food Safety Failures Before They Happen

continued 11:15am–12:30pm Concurrent Track Sessions

Room: Lincoln 3

Measuring Behavior Change  The use of logic models to connect theory the measurement in safe food handling interventions

Speakers: T om Ford, Vice President, Food Safety, Ecolab, Inc. Benjamin Chapman, Associate Professor, Food Safety Specialist, Department of Youth, Family, and Community Sciences, North Carolina State University,

Room: Lincoln 3

Speaker: J onathan Blitstein, Public Health Psychologist, Food, Nutrition, and Obesity Policy and Research, RTI International

Logic can be used to map the complex causal mechanisms that drive behavior change in consumer food safety education programs. This presentation will provide an understanding of the way logic models can be used to operationalize behavioral theory into measureable to assess the effectiveness of food safety education interventions.

 Trends in Food Safety – Results from the 2016 Food Safety Education Survey

Room: Lincoln 3

Speaker: A  my Lando, Consumer Science Specialist, CFSAN, FDA

How safely are consumers preparing food at home? The 2016 Food Safety Survey (FSS) is the seventh wave of a repeated cross-sectional survey measuring U.S. adult consumers’ attitudes, behaviors, and knowledge about food safety. We will explore food safety trends with data from the survey.

The session will share early results of a new research study conducted by North Carolina State University and Ecolab that analyzes the food safety assessments conducted in retail stores in the United States.

Behavior Change in the Digital Age  Tales from Twitter— Success Stories from Communicating NoroCORE Efforts Online

Room: Lincoln 4

Speaker: R  ebecca Goulter, Associate Director, Food, Bioprocessing and Nutrition Sciences, North Carolina State University

NoroCORE\’s efforts in the online communication realm are outlined in this session. Specific success stories from our strategic communication plan are described.

HOLD THE DATE!

 The Future of Food Safety:

THE NEXT

 ONSUMER FOOD SAFETY C EDUCATION CONFERENCE MARCH 6–8, 2019

ORLANDO, FLORIDA SWAN & DOLPHIN RESORT 26

For more information contact us at: info@fightbac.org

2017 Consumer Food Safety Education Conference


Education Conference Schedule continued

 Evaluating Different Methods for the Use of Social Media Engagement as a Food Safety Education Tool

12:30pm–1:15pm Thurgood Marshall Ballroom

Room: Lincoln 4

1:15pm–2:30pm Closing Keynote

Speaker: M  ary Yavelak, Undergraduate Research Assistant, Food, Bioprocessing, and Nutrition Sciences, North Carolina State University

The Power of Habit

A more effective way of using social media platforms for educating the general public about food safety was investigated. Two approaches were examined and the results will be discussed as well as how this information can be used in future educational efforts.

Food Industry Engagement in Consumer Food Safety Education  The Importance of Winning Hearts and Minds When Building and Strengthening Food Safety Culture.

Room: Lincoln 5

Speaker: H  ugo Gutierrez, VP Quality, Safety & Regulatory Affairs The Hershey Company

The presentation will introduce the concepts of motivation and risk perception through the lens of effectively assessing the audience motivation and tailoring messaging and education to drive desired behavior change.

Networking Lunch

Room: Thurgood Marshall Ballroom

Introduction: F  rank Yiannas, Vice President for Food Safety, Walmart Stores Inc. Speaker: C  harles Duhigg, Pulitzer Prize-winning reporter for the New York Times and author of The Power of Habit

In this keynote lecture, Charles Duhigg begins by exploring the science of habit formation, illustrating why we do what we do and how we can change it. Duhigg explains why the most powerful habits have emotional cores, and how tweaking even one habit can have staggering effects. Duhigg draws from a number of current case studies – including the success of Febreze, how Starbucks trains employees in willpower habits, how organizational habits contributed to a tragic subway fire, and others – customizing them to his specific audience.

2:30pm–3:00pm Thurgood Marshall Ballroom Foyer

Charles Duhigg Book Signing

 The Story of Your Dinner - Anecdotes from a Public-Private Sector Food Safety Outreach Initiative in the SE United States.

Room: Lincoln 5

Speakers: M  ichael Roberson, QA Director, Publix Super Markets Inc. Shelley Feist, Executive Director, Partnership for Food Safety Education

Food and beverage companies put considerable resources into development of science-based solutions along their supply chains. Some take food safety further. Recently several large food companies collaborated with the nonprofit Partnership for Food Safety Education on a project— The Story of Your Dinner - that put consumer handling in the context of the chain of prevention in food safety. This session will feature a company that participated in the effort, and will highlight results of the project to-date.

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27


Keynote Speakers  ou Atkins PhD is a researcher, trainer and consultant in behaviour change L intervention design and evaluation. As Senior Teaching Fellow of the UCL Centre for Behaviour Change she leads the Australasian Hub. Lou is involved in a number of projects to improve health and wellbeing through the application of behaviour change theory to intervention design to change health professional behaviour, prevent and manage illness and promote environmental sustainability.

Lou Atkins

Together with Professors Susan Michie and Robert West, Lou co-authored the book, ‘The Behaviour Change Wheel – A Guide to Designing Interventions’. She a registered Chartered Psychologist and Associate Fellow of the British Psychological Society. Lou is a regular speaker at national and international scientific meetings and in UK Government departments including Department for Work and Pensions and The Treasury.

Senior Teaching Fellow, University College London Centre for Behaviour Change

The Behavior Change Wheel Thursday, 8:30am–9:30am, Thurgood Marshall Ballroom

Charles Duhigg was awarded the 2013 Pulitzer Prize in Explanatory Reporting as a member of The New York Times staff for the series “The iEconomy,” which examined Apple’s manufacturing practices overseas and what those practices can tell us about the American economy. Duhigg is also the winner of the National Academies of Sciences, National Journalism, and George Polk awards, and a frequent contributor to television and radio, including PBS NewsHour, Frontline, Dr. Oz, This American Life and various programs on CNBC and NPR. He is a graduate of the Harvard Business School and Yale College.

Charles Duhigg Pulitzer Prize-winning reporter for the New York Times and author of The Power of Habit

The Power of Habit

Friday, 1:15pm–2:30pm Thurgood Marshall Ballroom

28

Charles Duhigg’s The Power of Habit: Why We Do What We Do in Life and Business has spent over a year on the New York Times bestseller list. The book contains specific strategies that can transform lives and workplaces. It details scientific studies on boosting willpower, replacing bad habits, and revolutionizing companies’ productivity. Duhigg’s latest book, Smarter, Faster, Better (March 2016), applies the same relentless curiosity, deep reporting, and rich storytelling of The Power of Habit to explore the science of productivity. Duhigg illustrates his concept with compelling case studies from the U.S. Marine Corps, the FBI, and the Disney Animation team behind Frozen, among many others. Duhigg’s inventive and practical books and his accomplishments as an investigative reporter for The New York Times have made him an in-demand speaker for organizations such as the UCLA School of Management, M.I.T., The Johnson Foundation and the Pasadena Art and Science Festival. Full of compelling narratives, Duhigg’s lectures draw on insights from the likes of Howard Schultz (Starbucks CEO), Tony Dungy (Super Bowl-winning football coach), and Bob Bowman (coach of Olympic legend Michael Phelps).

2017 Consumer Food Safety Education Conference


Info and Bios As Vice President of Food Safety, Frank Yiannas oversees all food safety, as well as other public health functions, for the world’s largest food retailer, WalMart, serving over 200 million customers around the world on a weekly basis. Frank’s scope of responsibilities includes food safety oversight of Wal-Mart’s stores, Neighborhood Markets, and Sam’s Clubs. Training and education of Associates, food safety oversight of thousands of food suppliers, and a number of critical regulatory compliance issues also come under his purview.

Frank Yiannas Vice President – Food Safety, Wal-Mart Stores Inc.

Food Safety = Behavior 2.0 Thursday, 12:15pm–1:15pm, Thurgood Marshall Ballroom

Prior to joining Wal-Mart in 2008, Frank was the Director of Safety & Health for the Walt Disney World Company, where he worked for 19 years. In 2001, under his tenure, Walt Disney World received the prestigious Black Pearl Award for corporate excellence in food safety by the International Association for Food Protection. In 2008, Frank was given the Collaboration Award by the FDA and is the 2007 recipient of the NSF International Lifetime Achievement Award for Leadership in Food Safety. and the 2015 Industry Professional Food Safety Hero Award by STOP Foodborne Illness. Frank is also a Past President of the IAFP and a Past Vice-Chair of the GFSI. He is also an adjunct Professor in the Food Safety Program at Michigan State University. He is the author of Food Safety Culture, Creating a Behaviorbased Food Safety Management System, and Food Safety = Behavior, 30 Proven Techniques to Enhance Employee Compliance. He received his BS in Microbiology from the University of Central Florida and his Master of Public Health (MPH) from the University of South Florida.

Plenary Sessions will be live broadcast at

http://foodsafety.live.conferencecontent.net Tweet during the conference with #foodsafety2017

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Plenary Speakers Alfred V. Almanza Administrator, Food & Safety and Inspection Service USDA

What is the Role of Federal Agencies in Consumer Behavior Change? Friday, 8:30am–9:30am Thurgood Marshall Ballroom

Alfred V. Almanza is the Administrator of the Food Safety and Inspection Service. Mr. Almanza has been in this role for almost ten years. He previously served as Deputy Under Secretary for Food Safety at the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) from September 2014 to December 2016 after having served as Administrator of USDA’s Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) since June 2007. In 1978, Mr. Almanza began his FSIS career as a food inspector in a small slaughter plant in Texas. During his 39year career with FSIS, Mr. Almanza moved up quickly from that entry level position – serving as Labor Management specialist, District Manager of the Agency’s Dallas District Office, and ultimately Administrator of FSIS. His experiences in the field and headquarters have made him extraordinarily qualified to lead the agency. Mr. Almanza has spearheaded the Agency’s efforts to modernize inspection by using a scientific approach. Under his leadership, FSIS introduced the New Poultry Inspection System, established new performance standards for Salmonella in chicken parts and carcasses, and launched the Public Health Information System (PHIS) to improve data collection.

Benjamin Chapman Associate Professor and Food Safety Extension Specialist, North Carolina State University

What are Key Elements of Effective Behavioral Change Strategies? Thursday, 9:30am–10:45am Thurgood Marshall Ballroom

Dr. Ben Chapman is an associate professor and food safety extension specialist at North Carolina State University. As a teenager, a Saturday afternoon viewing of the classic cable movie, Outbreak, sparked his interest in pathogens and public health. With the goal of less foodborne illness, his group designs, implements, and evaluates food safety strategies, messages, and media from farm-to-fork. Through reality-based research, Chapman investigates behaviors and creates interventions aimed at amateur and professional food handlers, managers, and organizational decision-makers; the gate keepers of safe food. Ben co-hosts a biweekly podcast called Food Safety Talk and tries to further engage folks online through Instagram, Twitter, Facebook, YouTube and, maybe not surprisingly, Pinterest. Follow on Twitter @benjaminchapman.

Rylee Gustafson Henderson, Nevada resident who became ill from E. coli in spinach in 2006

What Affects Risk Perception & Motivation? Thursday, 3:15pm–4:30pm Thurgood Marshall Ballroom

Rylee’s mother, Kathleen Chrismer, had taken her to Monterey, California, for her ninth birthday. While they had planned to visit attractions like the aquarium, they ended up spending a month in the hospital. Rylee awoke the day after arriving with severe stomach pain and diarrhea. Admitted to a pediatric intensive care unit, she experienced dehydration, hallucinations, low blood pressure, and kidney failure. Her infection was later traced to a spinach salad she had eaten on the way to Monterey. Rylee has irreversible kidney problems and has recently been diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes.

30

2017 Consumer Food Safety Education Conference


Info and Bios Stephen Ostroff Deputy Commissioner for Foods and Veterinary Medicine FDA

What is the Role of Federal Agencies in Consumer Behavior Change? Friday, 8:30am–9:30am Thurgood Marshall Ballroom

Stephen Ostroff, M.D., is the Food and Drug Administration’s Deputy Commissioner for Foods and Veterinary Medicine. Dr. Ostroff oversees the food and animal health activities of FDA, including FDA’s responsibilities in the areas of food safety and nutrition, food labeling, food and color additives, dietary supplements, animal drugs and animal feed, and research to support the food and veterinary medicine mission of FDA. As Deputy Commissioner, he provides leadership and direction to FDA’s Center for Food Safety and Applied Nutrition (CFSAN), Center for Veterinary Medicine (CVM) and the foods-related programs of FDA’s inspection and compliance arm, the Office of Regulatory Affairs (ORA). His responsibilities include leading the implementation of the FDA Food Safety Modernization Act of 2011. Dr. Ostroff joined FDA in 2013 as Chief Medical Officer in the Center for Food Safety and Applied Nutrition and Senior Public Health Advisor to FDA’s Office of Foods and Veterinary Medicine. Dr. Ostroff graduated from the University Of Pennsylvania School Of Medicine and completed residencies in internal medicine at the University of Colorado Health Sciences Center and preventive medicine at CDC.

Christine E. Prue Associate Director for Behavioral Science at the National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases CDC

What Affects Risk Perception & Motivation? Thursday, 3:15pm–4:30pm Thurgood Marshall Ballroom

Dr. Christine Prue is the Associate Director for Behavioral Science at the National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). She works to apply and advance the science of health behavior and health communication to prevent and control infectious diseases. Since 2008 she has led communication response efforts to numerous foodborne outbreaks, conducted research to develop messages promoting consumer food safety behaviors, guided communication of new scientific findings, led efforts to engage public health, industry, and consumer advocacy partners on a number of issues. She has worked as part of numerous outbreak response efforts starting with the 2008-9 Salmonella typhimurium response (peanut paste), the 2014-15 Ebola response, and now CDC’s response to the Zika virus. Dr. Prue is the co-author of CDC’s Clear Communication Index, a research-based tool to plan and assess communication products. Chris received a bachelor’s of science degree from the University of Maine, Orono, a master’s of science in public health in community health education from the University of Massachusetts, Amherst and a PhD in health education from the University of Maryland, College Park in 1998.

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Plenary Speakers Michael Roberson Director of Corporate Quality Assurance, Publix Super Markets, Inc.

What are Key Elements of Effective Behavioral Change Strategies? Thursday, 9:30am–10:45am Thurgood Marshall Ballroom

Michael Roberson is the Director of Corporate Quality Assurance with Publix Super Markets, Inc. of Lakeland, Florida. Mr. Roberson leads a team of professionals responsible for food safety, brand integrity, and regulatory compliance programs related to products and labeling throughout Publix supply chain, manufacturing, distribution, and retail food stores. With a technical background and a thorough understanding of the microbial hazards associated with food and factors most frequently implicated in foodborne disease, Mr. Roberson is actively engaged with industry, regulatory, academic, and community leaders in the development of food safety preventive controls and the development of strategic food protection and quality assurance systems. He holds a B.S. degree in Microbiology from Mississippi State University, and received a M.S. degree in Food Safety from the College of Veterinary Medicine at Michigan State University. He is an active member of the Association of Food and Drug Officials, and the International Association for Food Protection, and the Institute of Food Technologists where earned his Certified Food Scientist credentials with the inaugural class of food scientists.

Robert V. Tauxe Director, Division of Foodborne, Waterborne and Environmental Diseases, National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

What is the Role of Federal Agencies in Consumer Behavior Change? Friday, 8:30am–9:30am Thurgood Marshall Ballroom

Dr. Robert Tauxe is Director of the CDC Division that is charged with prevention and control of foodborne, waterborne and fungal infections. The Division monitors the frequency of these infections in the United States, investigates outbreaks, and develops strategies to reduce the disease, disability and deaths that they cause. Dr. Tauxe graduated from Yale University in 1975, and received his medical degree from Vanderbilt Medical School in Nashville, Tennessee. He holds a Masters in Public Health degree from Yale, and completed an internal medicine residency at the University of Washington. He then then trained at CDC in the Epidemic Intelligence Service for two years, and joined CDC staff in 1985. His interests include bacterial enteric diseases, epidemiology and pathogenesis of infectious diseases, epidemiologic and clinical consequences of bacterial genetic exchange, antimicrobial use and resistance to antimicrobial agents, and teaching epidemiologic methods. His faculty appointments include the School of Public Health and the Department of Biology at Emory University, Atlanta.

th prevention and control Dr. Tauxe has written/co-authored 290 journal articles, letters and book chapters. ors the frequency of these trategies to reduce the

medical degree from ers 32 in Public Health degree

2017 Consumer Food Safety Education Conference


Info and Bios

continued

Monique Turner Associate Professor and Asst Dean, Milken Institute School of Public Health, George Washington University

What Affects Risk Perception & Motivation? Thursday, 3:15pm–4:30pm Thurgood Marshall Ballroom

Dr. Monique Mitchell Turner is Associate Professor and Assistant Dean at the Milken Institute School of Public Health at the George Washington University. She received her Ph.D. in communication from Michigan State University. Turner has held faculty positions in Departments of Communication at the University of Oklahoma, University of Texas, and the University of Maryland. Turner’s expertise is in campaign message design and evaluation, risk communication, risk perception, and cognitive processing of health risks—including informed decision making and critical thinking. Dr. Turner is the author of the Anger Activism model—a behavioral theory explaining the conditions when emotions (anger) can be constructive versus deleterious. She is most well known for her work in risk perception and risk communication. As the former director of the Center for Risk Communication Research at the University of Maryland, Turner’s research has been funded by organizations such as the Food and Drug Administration, the Joint Institute for Food Safety and Applied Nutrition (JIFSAN), the Centers for Disease Control, Health and Human Services, and the Department of Homeland Security. Turner has written and published over 50 research papers, journal articles, book chapters and books on persuasion, health communication and risk perception. She was formerly the associate editor of Communication Research Reports, is the past chairperson of both the Communication and Social Cognition Division of the National Communication Association and the Health Communication Division of the International Communication Association. She is the former Senior Editor of Health Communication.

NSF INTERNATIONAL: PROTECTING AND IMPROVING HUMAN HEALTH NSF is a 15-year supporter of PFSE and sponsor of the 2017 Consumer Food Safety Education Conference. Look to NSF for technical expertise in food safety and quality, from farm to fork at nsf.org. Use our free consumer education resources at nsf.consumer.org or contact 1 (800) 673-8010 or info@nsf.org. Kids learn how to wash their hands at Scrub Club for Kids at scrubclub.org.

CORP - PFSE Sponsorship Ad_Jan2017.indd 1

ADVANCING FOOD SAFETY

12/21/2016 11:27:19 AM

THROUGH BEHAVIOR CHANGE

33


Speaker Index

A Almanza, Alfred Page 23 Plenary Session What is the Role of Federal Agencies in Consumer Behavior Change? Arendt, Susan Page 21 Breakout Handling of Leafy Greens in Foodservices Serving Older Americans: Before and After Intervention Atkins, Dr. Lou Opening Keynote The Behaviour Change Wheel

Page 18, 28

B Beaulieu, Justine Page 44 Poster Determining Factors that Encourage Grower Adoption and Implementation of Good Agricultural Practices Belisle Hamilton, Ann Poster Safety Awareness in the Food Environment

Page 41

Bernstein, Christopher Breakout FoodSafety 101 for Older Adults

Page 21

Bernstein, Christopher Page 25 Breakout The FoodKeeper: Using Digital Applications to Engage with Consumers Blakeslee, Karen Poster Using online videos, infographics and other resources in home food preservation education

Page 43

Blitstein, Jonathan Preconference Workshop Consumer Interventions— How to Get Started!

Page 17

Blitstein, Jonathan Page 26 Breakout The use of logic models to connect theory the measurement in safe food handling interventions Bradshaw, Elizabeth S. Page 42 Poster The Go Noroviral Experiment: A teaching tool for modeling person-to-person disease transmission

34

Brown, Sandra Breakout Food Preservation Training Model with Limited Staff and Resources

Page 24

Bruhn, Christine Breakout Do Television Celebrity Chefs Food Handling Practices Impact Consumer Attitudes And Behavior?

Page 25

Buck, Patricia Breakout Storytelling to Motivate Change in Food Safety

Page 22

C Canto, Amber Breakout Empowering Change through the Safe & Healthy Food Pantries Project

Page 20

Cater, Melissa Breakout Assessing personal attitudes and behaviors associated with listeriosis prevention during pregnancy

Page 21

Cates, Sheryl Preconference Workshop Consumer Interventions— How to Get Started!

Page 17

Cates, Sheryl Breakout Motivating Consumers to Adopt Safe Handling and Preparation Practices for Raw Poultry

Page 18

Chaifetz, Ashley Breakout Evaluation of the Implementation of a Food Safety Intervention for Food Pantries

Chapman, Benjamin Page 17 Preconference Workshop Case Study Workshop: An anatomy of an outbreak: handling and consuming raw dough and dough ingredients Chapman, Benjamin Plenary Session What are key elements of effective behavioral change strategies?

Page 18

Chapman, Benjamin Breakout Assessment of Consumer Responses to Risk Messages

Page 24

Chapman, Benjamin Breakout The Future of Food Safety: Predicting Food Safety Failures Before They Happen

Page 27

Chilcote, Amy Poster Merging Research and STEM Education to Create Vertically Integrated Food Safety Curricula

Page 41

Clark, Jeffrey Breakout A Role for Human Factor Engineering in Designing a Safer Workplace

Page 20

Clark, Jeffrey Page 26 Breakout Risk Perception and Hand Washing Practices in an Early Childhood Center Page 22

Page 20

Costello, Mindy Breakout Dinner Party Food Safety Video: Educational Tools for Public Health Professionals

Page 26

Chamberlin, Barbara Breakout The Power of Interactive Media to Change Consumer Behavior

Page 22

Cox, Jill Breakout Providing Safe Food in the Childcare Setting

Page 22

Chambers IV, Edgar Breakout Lighting Conditions Affect Perception of Doneness and Willingness-to-eat Turkey Patties

Page 20

Craig, B. Susie Breakout Healthy Hand Hygiene Behaviors at Fairs: Linking 4-H Peer Education Projects with Guest Education Targeting At-Risk Populations

2017 Consumer Food Safety Education Conference


United States Department of Agriculture

The FoodKeeper App helps you understand food and beverage storage and maximize the freshness and quality of 400+ food items.

Calendar integration allows users to set up reminders when products are nearing their recommended storage date.

Includes cooking advice to help users prepare products in ways that eliminate foodborne bacteria.

Users can submit a question to USDA using the ‘Ask Karen’ feature of the application.

App now available in Spanish and Portuguese.

www.fsis.usda.gov/apps USDA is an equal opportunity provider, employer, and lender.

D Duhigg, Charles Closing Keynote The Power of Habit

Page 27, 28

F Feist, Shelley Page 27 Breakout The Story of Your Dinner - Anecdotes From A Public-Private Sector Food Safety Outreach Initiative in the SE United States Ford, Tom Breakout The Future of Food Safety: Predicting Food Safety Failures Before They Happen

Page 27

G Garren, Donna Page 17 Preconference Workshop Case Study Workshop: Understanding consumer perception and behavior towards preparing frozen foods Ghering, Adam Page 41 Poster USDA Food Safety Discovery Zone and Food Safety Ambassador Program

Gleason, Jeanne Breakout The Power of Interactive Media to Change Consumer Behavior

Page 22

Page 24

Page 26

Gravani, Robert Breakout Consumer Confusion: The Keys to Motivate Positive Food Safety Behavior Change

Godwin, Sandria Breakout Motivating Consumers to Adopt Safe Handling and Preparation Practices for Raw Poultry

Page 41

Page 26

Guin, Autumn Poster Merging Research and STEM Education to Create Vertically Integrated Food Safety Curricula

Godwin, Sandria Poster Recipe Modification Improves Food Safety Practices during Cooking of Poultry

Goulter, Rebecca Page 27 Breakout Tales from Twitter - Success Stories from Communicating NoroCORE Efforts Online Gravely, Marianne H Breakout From Rotary Phones to Virtual Chat: 30 years of One-on-One Food Safety Education

Page 22

Gravani, Robert G. Breakout Creating Effective Mexican-American Narratives of Foodborne Illness to Increase Perceptions of Risk

Page 22

ADVANCING FOOD SAFETY

Gumalla, Sanjay Page 17 Preconference Workshop Case Study Workshop: Understanding consumer perception and behavior towards preparing frozen foods Gustafson, Rylee Page 23 Plenary Session What Affects Risk Perception & Motivation? Gutierrez, Hugo Breakout The Importance of Winning Hearts and Minds When Building and Strengthening Food Safety Culture. H Henley, PhD, Shauna Breakout Barriers and Motives to Consumers’ Adherence to Washing Produce from Farmers’ Markets

THROUGH BEHAVIOR CHANGE

Page 27

Page 20

35


Speaker Index

Hunter, Sr., Karen H. Breakout Consumption of Undercooked Products: Communicating Actual vs. Perceived Risk I Ingham, Barbara Breakout Empowering Change through the Safe & Healthy Food Pantries Project

Page 18

Page 20

j Jacobwith, Lori Page 17 Preconference Workshop Effective Story Telling with Lori Jacobwith Jacobwith, Lori L. Breakout Finding & Sharing Stories

N Neil, Karen Page 17 Preconference Workshop Case Study Workshop: An anatomy of an outbreak: handling and consuming raw dough and dough ingredients Nwadike, Londa Poster Using online videos, infographics and other resources in home food preser vation education

Page 43

O Ostroff, Stephen Page 23, 31 Plenary Session What is the Role of Federal Agencies in Consumer Behavior Change?

Page 26

P Paul, Lynn Page 44 Poster Creating the Successful “Celebrating Safe Food at Pow Wows” Training Video Based on Useable Learning Concepts and Adult Learning Principles

Lando, Amy Poster Emerging Issues in Food Safety— Results from the 2016 Food Safety Survey

Page 44

Prue, Christine Page 23 Plenary Session What Affects Risk Perception & Motivation?

Liu, Sherry Poster Emerging Issues in Food Safety— Results from the 2016 Food Safety Survey

Page 44

R Raymond, Matthew Breakout Consumer Confusion: The Keys to Motivate Positive Food Safety Behavior Change

L Lando, Amy Breakout Trends in Food Safety – Results from the 2016 Food Safety Education Survey

M McDonald, Sharon Breakout Providing Safe Food in the Childcare Setting

36

Page 21

continued

Page 26

McLean, Linda Breakout Building Successful Food Safety Programming in Native American Communities

Page 25

Means, Kathy Opening Keynote The Behaviour Change Wheel

Page 18

Reynolds, Joel Breakout Child Care Food Safety: A Population at-Risk?

Page 24

Page 25

Richards, Jennifer Page 42 Poster Modifying an effective food safety education curriculum for 4-H students to maximize sustainability Roberts, PhD, Kevin Breakout Beyond Knowledge: Strategies to Encourage Actual Behavior Change

Page 24

Roberts, PhD, Kevin Poster Education Success - Serving up Science: The Path to Safe Food in Schools

Page 42

Roberson, Michael Plenary Session What are key elements of effective behavioral change strategies?

Page 18

Roberson, Michael Breakout The Story of Your Dinner - Anecdotes From A Public-Private Sector Food Safety Outreach Initiative in the SE United States

Page 27

Rosenkrans, Wouter Poster The Invisible Made Visible

Page 43

Rouhani, Ayma Page 17 Preconference Workshop Evaluation of Consumer Interventions – How to Get Started! S Samarya-Timm, Michele Breakout Consumer Confusion: The Keys to Motivate Positive Food Safety Behavior Change

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Sauer, PhD, RDN, LD, Kevin Poster Education Success - Serving up Science: The Path to Safe Food in Schools

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Sauer, PhD, RDN, LD, Kevin Breakout Beyond Knowledge: Strategies to Encourage Actual Behavior Change

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Schaffner, Donald Preconference Workshop Case Study Workshop: An anatomy of an outbreak: handling and consuming raw dough and dough ingredients

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Schmitt-Reichert, Anna Poster Common Household Germs: Perception vs. Reality

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Schober, Amy Poster Produce Safety University

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2017 Consumer Food Safety Education Conference


TRY THE CLASSIC NEW

#CLASSICREIMAGINED *PLEASE NOTE PRINTER RESPONSIBLE FOR TRAP.

Supplier is responsible for checking working drawings for accuracy in measurements, plate tolerance requirements, registration and construction detailing before plates are made. Any changes made to suit production requirements should be approved by both the client and TPN. All copy should be proofread by client. Any legal requirements should be checked by client’s legal department. This proof illustrates approximate color only. For accurate color matching, refer to the color system indicated, drawdowns and/or matchprints as directed.

12493_mch_ad_clc_conf_7x5.ai CONFERENCE Shapiro, Michael A. Page 22 W National Y APPROVALS BROCHURE AD Cookie Layer Crunch 1/11/2017 Job Name Element Ship Materials DatePage 41 Breakout Walsh, Christopher APPROVED Yavelak, Mary NOT APPROVED CONCEPT INKS: AE Creating Effective Mexican-American Trim na Poster Breakout Haley Ovington Hershey Live 7.5” x 5” AC M Y K Narratives of Foodborne Illness to Bleed na C Developing ahcsmev produce safety course Evaluating Different Methods for the AD C Accardo / M Mesic CD Increase Perceptions of RiskPRE-MECH for students to assess risk and write Use of Social Media Engagement as a PM Dinah Montgomery Adobe Illustrator CC STUDIO Proof Scale 100% food safety plans Food Safety Education Tool PROOFREADER GUIDE MARKS: Allison Emery TBD Build Scale 100% NOTES: _ T LIVE - Do Not Print NOTES: TRIM Wells, Kayla Erich S @ 2015 Yaohua Feng, Betty Vince Scolaro Page 25 - Do Not Print Tauxe, Robert Page 23 1 Breakout MECHANICAL BLEED - Do Not Print VERSION Breakout Plenary Session Building Successful Food Safety Motivating High School Students LICENSING PRINTER SPECIFICATIONS 1-2 Days Post Approval STOCK PHOTO/ILLUSTRATION Programming What is the Role of Federal Agencies NO ROYALTY RIGHTS PURCHASED in Native American to Follow Safe Food Handling: An CHARGE FREE MANAGED PRICE DESCRIPTION IMAGE Printshop | Schawk | Customer Printer | Other in Consumer Behavior Change? Communities Effective Food Safety Curriculum #0000000000 $0.00 Description PCM#: 00000 #0000000000 $0.00 Thomas, Ellen Page 24Description Wenke, Mark # Page 42 Yaohua Feng, Betty Item/FERT 00000-00000 : #0000000000 $0.00 Description Breakout Breakout Comp/VERP#: 000-00000-000 #0000000000 $0.00 Description Poster Assessment of Consumer Responses 00000000 v.AStudy Identifies the Barriers BASIC COMPLEX A novel approach to affecting NEEDED Dieline#: A Case ImageWorks 2-4 Days Post Approval Client/Package Art knowledge, to Risk Messages 00000 Other: adolescents’ food safety for Health Professional to Deliver a attitudes, and behaviors Food Safety Curriculum Turner, Monique Page 23 Plenary Session Wiedmann, Martin Page 43 Yaohua Feng, Betty What Affects Risk Perception & Motivation? Poster Poster AS IS

Client

Account Coordinator

Client Code

Account Executive

Software/Version

Art Director

Substrate

Creative Director

Studio Production Artist

Proofreader

W/CHG

REVISE & RESUBMIT

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V Verrill, Linda Poster Emerging Issues in Food Safety— Results from the 2016 Food Safety Survey Viebrock, Margaret Breakout Food Preservation Training Model with Limited Staff and Resources

Page 44

Page 24

Building a Multidisciplinary Food Safety Training Pipeline from K-12 to Graduate School X Xu, Wenqing Breakout Assessing personal attitudes and behaviors associated with listeriosis prevention during pregnancy

ADVANCING FOOD SAFETY

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Focusing On The Benefits Of Food Safety Innovations: A Case Study of Food Irradiation Communication

Page 21

Yiannas, Frank Lunch Keynote Food Safety = Behavior 2.0

THROUGH BEHAVIOR CHANGE

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Student Scholarship Winners These students have been selected through a competitive essay process to receive support to attend the conference. The Partnership for Food Safety Education is pleased to be able to offer support for these students to attend the conference and hope to inspire future food safety leaders! Scholarships made possible through a grant from the US Department of Agriculture, National Institute of Food and Agriculture; award 2017-68003-25971. The list below indicates the awardees’ names and institutions.

BASEM BOUTROS

EMILY HOLMAN

NICK SEVART

Kansas State University

The Ohio State Universtiy

Kansas State University

SHIYU CAI

DYLAN MARTINEZ

AUSTIN WONG

Cornell University

University of Arkansas

Louisiana State University

LAURA DICKENS

GEMILLE PURNELL

ZIRUI XIONG

West Chester University of Pennsylvania

University of Missouri-Columbia

Cornell University

ANA ROMERO-VEGA

LILY YANG

MARY GRIGAR

Clemson Univeristy

Virginia Tech

Texas A&M University

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SCIENCE + SERVICE A PARTNERSHIP FOR FOOD SAFETY

The right technology and information are only part of the food safety equation. Advice, training and implementation of a comprehensive program are the other. With world-class technology, application expertise and in-depth knowledge of your business, we work with you onsite to ensure you get the best performance — and get it consistently everywhere you operate. Partnering together, we can help you achieve your food safety goals.

Ecolab is proud to sponsor the 2017 Consumer Food Safety Education Conference.

2017 Consumer Food Safety Ad.indd 1

TM

12/22/16 4:58 PM


A strong Foundation focused on helping the industry meet the challenges of the future. Key Projects Include: Research funding to reduce and ultimately eliminate Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli in fresh beef, Listeria monocytogenes in ready-to-eat meat and poultry products and Salmonella in meat and poultry products Education programming for meat and poultry industry professionals Consumer food safety education to ensure that food is safe when served

1150 Connecticut Ave NW, Suite 1200 | Washington, DC 20036 | 202.587.4200 www.meatpoultryfoundation.org

Cargill Salutes the BAC Fighters and The Story of Your Dinner

Cargill is proud to be a sponsor of The Story of Your Dinner with Coca Cola, Frozen Food Foundation, Nestle and Publix.


2017 CFSE Conference Poster Presentations Thursday, January 26

4:30pm–6:00pm

Complete your Poster Passport! Each attendee received a Poster Passport for the poster reception. Please get your passport “stamped” by five different poster presenters to earn another drink ticket. Please visit a conference staff member by the bar to exchange your passport for an additional drink ticket (1 per person).

1 USDA Food Safety Discovery Zone and Food Safety Ambassador Program Author: Adam Ghering Public Affairs Specialist, Food Safety Education Staff, USDA-Food Safety and Inspection Services The USDA Food Safety Discovery Zone and Food Safety Ambassador Program are unique programs that directly connect food safety messages and resources with consumers in their local communities.

2 Produce Safety University Author: Amy Schober Program Analyst, Office of Food Safety, FNS, USDA This poster will share the secrets behind the success of the award-winning immersion course, Produce Safety University.

3 Safety Awareness in the Food Environment Author: Ann Belisle Hamilton Field Specialist, Food Safety, Carroll County, UNH Cooperative Extension Safety Awareness in the Food Environment (SAFE) is a training opportunity for food service workers in a variety of settings. Using discussion, demonstrations/activities, and DVDs, the two-hour training covers the top challenges in food service. Since 1993, UNH Cooperative Extension has reached over 20,000 food workers with SAFE.

ADVANCING FOOD SAFETY

4 Merging Research and STEM Education to Create Vertically Integrated Food Safety Curricula Authors: Autumn Guin Program Design & Evaluation Extension Associate, Department of Youth, Family and Community Sciences Amy Chilcote Curriculum Specialist, NC 4-H & Family and Consumer Sciences, NC State University

Kenan Fellows, NC 4-H, and researchers in the Prestage Poultry Department at NC State University and at UNC-Chapel Hill partnered to create research-based k- 12 food safety curricula. Part of AFRI funded Integrated Food Safety grant (#2012-6800- -19621), the curricula produced statistically significant gains in food safety practices and career aspirations.

5 Developing a produce safety course for students to assess risk and write food safety plans Author: Christopher Walsh Professor, Plant Science and Landscape Architecture, University of Maryland

Undergraduate enrollment in agricultural production programs is growing, primarily by attracting students from non-farm backgrounds, but there is little produce safety training to these students. Using funds from a USDANIFA SCRI grant, we developed an effective one credit module to provide food safety training in fruits and vegetables for undergraduate students.

THROUGH BEHAVIOR CHANGE

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Poster Presentations

continued

6 The Go Noroviral Experiment: A teaching tool for modeling person-to-person disease transmission Author: Elizabeth S. Bradshaw Extension Associate for NoroCORE, Food, Bioprocessing, and Nutrition Sciences, North Carolina State University This interactive teaching exercise takes the form of a mock norovirus outbreak, where people infect other people using individually numbered buttons. Since each button is numbered, the entire outbreak can be mapped and analyzed.

7 Modifying an effective food safety education curriculum for 4-H students to maximize sustainability Author: Jennifer Richards Assistant Professor & Curriculum Developer, Agricultural Leadership, Education and Communications, University of Tennessee Hands On has effectively manipulated their food safety education classroom curriculum into applicable use for extension and outreach programs using diverse skill sets of Hands On development team. This session will provide attendees with assess the Hands On curriculum as well as future opportunities to use Hands On 4-H.

8 A novel approach to affecting adolescents’ food safety knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors Author: Mark Wenke Graduate Assistant, Food Science and Technology University of Tennessee Hands On is a scientifically validated interdisciplinary food safety education curriculum that provides middle school teachers with an effective method of meeting state mandated standards while improving students’ food safety knowledge and behaviors. This session will provide information about Hands On and its effectiveness. Attendees will be given curriculum access.

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9 Education Success—Serving up Science: The Path to Safe Food in Schools Authors: Kevin Sauer, PhD, RDN, LD Associate Professor, Food, Nutrition, Dietetics, and Health Kevin Roberts, PhD Associate Professor, Hospitality Management, Center of Excellence for Food Safety Research in Child Nutrition Programs, Kansas State University Serving Up Science is an innovative education initiative that enhances the culture of food safety and behavior change in school districts, and provides many applications for all foodservice environments. Program graduates are able to support food safety efforts in schools through education and technical assistance.

10 Using online videos, infographics and other resources in home food preservation education Authors: Karen Blakeslee Extension Associate - Rapid Response Center, Animal Sciences and Industry, Kansas State University Londa Nwadike State Extension Food Safety Specialist, Extension Family and Consumer Science, Kansas State University University of Missouri Kansas State University developed a number of short online videos providing science based information on various aspects of home food preservation, which will be shown on a looped feed on a tablet incorporated into this poster. We will also show a number of infographics recently developed on safe home food preservation.

2017 Consumer Food Safety Education Conference


Thursday, January 26

4:30pm–6:00pm

11 Common Household Germs: Perception vs. Reality Author: Anna Schmitt-Reichert Global Director of Communications, NSF International NSF International microbiologists conducted two studies (2011, 2013) identifying germ hot spots in the home based on environmental sampling of 14 common kitchen items in 22 homes. Details of the procedures used will reveal surprising areas where germs were found. Food safety and proper cleaning techniques will be shared.

12 The Invisible Made Visible Author: Wouter Rosenkrans Team Leader, Food Safety, The Netherlands Nutrition Centre The Netherlands Nutrition Centre poster shows the design and results of our campaign called “Ziekmakers zie je niet” (foodborne pathogens are not visible). When exposed to the outdoor campaign consumers estimated to have a higher risk to catch a food borne illness due to food handling and preparation at home.

13 Building a Multidisciplinary Food Safety Training Pipeline from K-12 to Graduate School Author: Martin Wiedmann Professor, Food Science Cornell University This presentation reports on the development and implementation of a Multidisciplinary Food Safety Training Pipeline from K-12 to Graduate School.

14 Recipe Modification Improves Food Safety Practices during Cooking of Poultry Author: Sandria Godwin Professor, Family and Consumer Sciences, Tennessee State University Several approaches have been taken to educate consumers on appropriate food safety behaviors, but there still is a deficit in actual practice of these behaviors. The effectiveness of the inclusion of food safety instructions as directions in a standard recipe format was evaluated.

15 Determining Factors that Encourage Grower Adoption and Implementation of Good Agricultural Practices Author: Justine Beaulieu Faculty Research Assistant/ Good Agricultural Practices (GAP) Educator, Plant Science and Landscape Architecture, University of Maryland Farmers are required to comply with federal food safety regulations and buyer requirements, but Good Agricultural Practices (GAPs) certification remains low. This presentation describes factors influencing growers’ opinions on food safety and barriers to certification. The information is being used to adapt future trainings to encourage greater implementation of GAPs.

16 Focusing on The Benefits of Food Safety Innovations: A Case Study Of Food Irradiation Communication Author: Betty Yaohua Feng Postdoc, Department of Food Science and Technology, University of California, Davis This presentation will provide guidance for food safety educators on factors that have the greatest impact when communicating to consumers about food safety innovations. Recent consumer research on food irradiation will be presented, and the effectiveness of three messages will be discussed.

ADVANCING FOOD SAFETY

THROUGH BEHAVIOR CHANGE

43


Poster Presentations continued

17 Emerging Issues in Food Safety— Results from the 2016 Food Safety Survey Author: Amy Lando Consumer Science Specialist, CFSAN, FDA Linda Verrill Consumer Science Specialist CFSAN, FDA Sherry Liu Social Scientist CFSAN, FDA

18 Creating the Successful “Celebrating Safe Food at Pow Wows” Training Video Based on Useable Learning Concepts and Adult Learning Principles Author: Lynn Paul Professor, Extension Food and Nutrition Specialist, Health and Human Development, Montana State University

There is a plethora of advice about cooking and food safety, but are consumers getting the “right” messages about issues like washing chicken before cooking, using devices in the kitchen and mechanically tenderized beef? We will explore these topics with data from the 2016 Food Safety Survey (FSS).

The successful “Celebrating Safe Food at Pow Wows” training video utilized “useable learning” concepts. Led by Extension, a team representing tribes, sanitarians, and vendors operationalized key principles including: adult involvement in development; holistic knowledge and experiences of this unique venue; inclusiveness of reservation representatives to provide culturally-relevant knowledge and recommendations.

Like what you’ve seen at the conference? JOIN US FOR MORE THIS YEAR!

@fight_BAC 44

@fightBAC

Become a PFSE Partner Become a BAC Fighter! Share Resources from FightBAC.org Make a Tax Deductable Donation!

fightbac.org

2017 Consumer Food Safety Education Conference


The Produce Marketing Association thanks and supports consumer food safety educators for your hard work to keep American consumers healthy! For produce-specific consumer safety tips, check out the Produce Pro campaign at the PFSE’s web site: www.fightbac.org.


Thank You Sponsors

together we can do great things

With the support of:

Platinum Sponsors

Gold Sponsors

Silver Sponsors 3M • American Frozen Food Institute • International Association for Food Protection • Land O Lakes

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2017 Consumer Food Safety Education Conference


ADVANCING FOOD SAFETY

THROUGH BEHAVIOR CHANGE

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Advancing Food Safety Through Behavior Change. The Consumer Food Safety Education Conference 2017 brings together people from public sectors who are committed to supporting the good health of consumers.

The conference is hosted by the non-profit Partnership for Food Safety Education. For more information about the Partnership and for free consumer education downloads, please visit: www.fightbac.org

cfsec2017.fightbac.org @Fight_BAC #foodsafety2017

Consumer Food Safety Education Conference 2017 program book  

the Official Program Book and Conference Schedule guide for the 2017 Consumer Food Safety Conference— Advancing Food Safety Through Behavior...

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