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April 2019 VOL. 34 NO. 4

Penn’s Northeast to present real estate summit

become fertile ground for commercial real estate developers. The six-county region is he upcoming second annual Northhome to nearly 900,000 residents, and within eastern Pennsylvania Real Estate a one-day drive resides almost one-third of Summit, presented by Penn’s Norththe American population and one-half of the east, will explore an economic development Canadian populace. system that’s a far cry from the old business The NEPA populations has also been growplan of just build a park ing since 2000, and approximately 386,000 and they will come. jobs now exist in the six-county region, with John Augustine, Penn’s two-thirds of these located in Lackawanna and Northeast president and Luzerne counties. This market now sports an CEO, explained that the average unemployment rate of 5.6 percent, event is a formal sequel which is typically higher than within Pennto the 2018 inaugural sylvania and the national rate, but also has summit attended by nearly achieved a large decrease since the dark days 200 business people. The of the Great Recession. Networking opportunities AUGUSTINE 2019 version will focus on On the real estate front, more than 6 According to Augustine, one of the big commercial, industrial and million square feet of buildings are under convalues in attending a business forum, in office markets, and explore growth and invest- addition to the educational possibilities, is struction within NEPA. Since 2000, more than ment opportunities within the sectors of medi- the participation in networking among those 41 million square feet of industrial space has cal services, downtown development, housing, present. This is vital if business people are to been leased, with 2017 featuring 5.4 million retail and office space, plus e-commerce and square feet of new industrial leases. connect and learn how to overcome predictdistribution. Unlike many single-occupation markets, able challenges that always face developers. “The forum will offer a true picture of the NEPA offers work diversity. Health care, He also commented that creation of a local regional and national real estate markets capable and pertinent workforce has now beemploying more than 65,000 workers, is the plus investment opportunities and the inherent come one of the keys to economic expansion. busiest sector followed by retail with 48,000 processes, and one of our prime goals will be The almost universal big push for four-year employees and manufacturing with 42,000. to answer development inquiries that repeatEducation also is booming. Overall, more degrees must be supplemented by two-year edly come up,” said Augustine. “In effect, this technical educations, as tech and trade careers than 40,000 students are enrolled at the will allow us to see into our own backyard, region’s 19 colleges and universities. prove to both rewarding and satisfying. plus into the neighbor’s backyard.” The warehousing and storage industry has “Remember, you can’t outsource a tech Augustine explained that within the northquickly become a great success story. This repair job to China,” said Augustine. east urban industrial corridor, recognition is According to data compiled by Penn’s occurring that NEPA is the next profitable fron- Northeast, the overall NEPA market has Please see Real Estate , Page 13 Dave Gardner

T

tier for company expansion. Operating costs are steeply rising for commerce within urban setting, making NEPA a favorable target for operations as automation and superior electronic connectivity allow companies to operate in locations once thought of as unfavorable. “Many talented kids coming out of school in NEPA still leave the region, and we must do a better job of showing them the opportunities that are here,” said Augustine. “When you add in the reality that NEPA manufacturing still has a relatively older workforce, many workplace opportunities are opening up, but we’ve got to retain our graduating talent.”

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peNNSYlVANiA

Vol. 34, No. 4 • April 2019 149 peNN AVe., ScrANtoN, pA 18503 www.biz570.com The Northeast Pennsylvania Business Journal is a member of Times-Shamrock Publishing Division

CNG MANAGING EDITOR elizabeth baumeister — ext. 3492 CNG SALES MANAGER Alice manley — ext. 9285 CONTRIBUTING REPORTERS Dave Gardner Joe Sylvester phil Yacuboski

ON THE COVER

penn’s Northeast to present real estate summit

FiND US oNliNe: www.Biz570.com facebook.com/570 • twitter.com/biz570

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FEATURES

NPbJ is protected under the federal copyright act. reproductions of any part by any means or facsimiles without the express written permission of the publisher are not permitted. reprints of NPbJ articles are available. Northeast Pennsylvania Business Journal cannot be responsible for the return of unsolicited materials — manuscripts or photographs — with or without the inclusion of a stamped, self-addressed return envelope. information in this publication is gathered from sources considered to be reliable, but the accuracy and completeness of the information cannot be guaranteed. No information expressed herein constitutes a solicitation for the purchase or sale of any securities. Northeast Pennsylvania Business Journal (iSSN 1078-5698) is published monthly except twice in the month of may by The Scranton Times from offices located at 149 Penn Ave., Scranton, PA. Periodicals postage paid at Scranton, PA. The Journal serves business owners, managers and professionals in a 10-county region. Subscriptions are available for $28 per year, $49 two years or $64 for three years. PoStmaSter: Send address changes to Northeast Pennsylvania Business Journal, 149 Penn Avenue, Scranton, PA 18503.

Outdoor recreation technologies .... 4 Leadership skills development ....... 5 Unemployment and hiring woes ...... 7 Entrepreneurship in Pa. ............... 7 Plasma donation center opens ....... 8 Women entrepreneurs spotlight.... 11 Manufacturing spotlight............. 12 Capitalizing on Instagram ........... 14 Health care update ............... 15-22

EXECUTIVE SUITE Brand ..................................... 2 Economic development .............. 10

BUSINESS BULLETINS

Personnel File..................... 23-27 Deeds ............................... 28-29 Mortgages ......................... 29-31

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BRAND

brand damage: the right way and the wrong way to correct a mistake by Dave Taylor

A few years ago, i had water treatment equipment installed at my home including a water softener and acid neutralizer. The company i used was a wellestablished regional brand and completed the job at a competitive price. The technician set up the equipment and told me they would contact me in a month to come back and check that all the settings were correct. Strike one. a month went by and i didn’t hear anything. Finally after about two months, i called back and asked when the follow-up would be. i also noted that i hadn’t seen much difference in the water quality but wasn’t sure what to expect. “oh, i thought we called you, but we’ll come out right away,” the customer service representative said. we set an appointment. Strike two. The technician arrived, checked the equipment and admitted something was wrong. Apparently, the original technician had forgotten to turn on the equipment. it hadn’t actually been running at all. really? So since you never followed up as promised, and your tech never turned on the equipment, it would have stayed that way for who knows how long if i hadn’t called in. i let the new tech know i wasn’t very happy about that and that i felt let down. Strike three. the tech’s response seemed innocuous at first. “i’m sorry you feel that way,” he said. “i could have made the same mistake myself.” He turned on the equipment and left soon after. As i drove to work, i found myself directly behind the company’s service vehicle with their phone number emblazoned across the back. i called it and asked for the service manager. i explained that, with his com-

S U B S C R I P T I O N

Business Journal NortHeASt

ment, i thought the tech had essentially blamed me for being upset, and that i felt he should have been more apologetic for his company’s errors. To his credit, and that of the company, the service manager stepped up. First, he owned the problem. “This never should have happened,” he told me. “our system clearly broke down.” He went further, saying, “i apologize for what your tech said to you. You have every right to be dissatisfied.” And then he made an unexpected request. “would you mind if i used this as a situation in our training sessions?” he asked. “i’d like to use this as an example of what not to do.” That last question had a tremendous effect on me. He had taken responsibility, apologized and saw the value of using it to prevent future problems. As a firm believer that customers should complain if they want to see a company change its ways, i saw this as a stellar example of how a brand should act. His tech didn’t get it, but he did, and he was going to actively seek to fix the problem. This is a question all brand managers should ask themselves. How do you handle complaints in a way that both respects the customer and actually improves the brand? a stellar example is L.L. bean’s return policy. Though recently modified due to dishonest abuse, they will still take any product back for up to a year with proof of purchase. This still generous return policy is part of what makes their brand loyalty so strong among their core customers. All brands will have problems with their service or product at some point. But what they do next can have a huge effect on whether their brand gets stronger or weaker as a result.

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FEATURE

New technologies emerge in outdoor recreation market program within Northeast Pennsylvania now includes the annual STREAM Conservation Camp at Keystone College. Within this effort, STREAM stands for science, technology, recreation, engineering, arts and math, where a one-week summer camp strives to deliver education about these subjects as they pertain to environmental management. In addition, Trout Unlimited is offering a “5 Rivers Program” statewide on college campuses. This effort organizes college campus clubs to teach students subjects that include fly casting and waterway conservation. “We take the job of preparing students for environmental and conservation careers very seriously,” said Charlesworth.

by Dave Gardner

A mix of old-fashioned activities and new technologies is fueling changes within the bustling business of outdoor recreation. Domestically, a healthy retail market for recreational goods is enjoyed by various players in the supply chain, according to Nick Rigitano, research and information RIGITANO manager with the National Sporting Goods Association (NSGA). He cited data indicating that the domestic market for fishing equipment expanded from a 2013 sales total of $1.5 billion to $1.6 billion in 2017. Other associated product sectors enjoyed similar growth. Sales for camping equipment as a whole grew from $1.6 billion in 2013 to $1.9 billion in 2017. For the broad category of hiking shoes and boots, the 2013 sales total of $1.3 billion expanded to $1.5 billion during 2017. “The rise in fishing equipment sales was driven by rod-reel combinations, separate fishing reels and tackle boxes,” said Rigitano. “The increase in camping equipment was driven by increases in all camping product categories tracked by the NSGA, and was led by increases in ice chests, tents for three or more persons, backpacks and daypacks.” One of the organizations driving market forces for outdoor equipment is Trout Unlimited, which is now celebrating 60 years of existence since its inception in Michigan. Charles Charlesworth, immediate past president of state council for Trout Unlimited PA, commented that the nation as a whole is now encountering a first-time generation of youth who largely have not been taught to fish by time and career-stressed parents. This societal evolution within the fishing arena has directly impacted the total number of fishing licenses purchased within Pennsylvania. According to Charlesworth, during a four-year period, annual license sales dropped statewide from 1.4 million to 900,000. To counteract these market changes, Trout Unlimited is expanding its outreach toward groups that were largely ignored in the past. This includes females, who during 2014 purchased

Charles Charlesworth of Trout Unlimited. 13.9 percent of Pennsylvania’s general licenses and a full 13 percent of fly-fishing trout permits. “The joys of fishing start with education about the sport itself,” said Charlesworth. “As sales of equipment shift from the mom and pop stores to the big-box retailers, efforts have to be made to continue the education to the smaller stores once provided. “This is one of the segments of our outreach to new groups, including those of ethnic diversity.” Technological incursion As the face of the sport of fishing changes, so does the inherent technology being applied. Charlesworth endorses computer-enhanced equipment such as electronic fly rods that can measure the physical activity of a cast and then display metrics such as velocity, motion, strength and what segments of the cast require improvement.

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Compact electronic fish finders utilizing sonar are now commonplace. One of the ways these units impact ice fishing involves the ability to drill many holes in the ice, snake the sonar unit’s transducer down and almost immediately detect the presence of prey. Clothing is also evolving for comfort. Waders are now available that are so warm within cold water, the fisherman will perspire. When matched with thermostatically controlled socks, a day of waterway comfort is almost assured. Charlesworth declared himself a traditionalist with most sporting activities, and jokes that he still uses a wooden tennis racket. With fishing, however, he is a realist, and has endorsed the use of technology that can enhance the angling experience. “I still have my bamboo rods, but they are now centerpieces of my fireplace mantel,” he said. He added that Trout Unlimited’s educational

Golfing connectivity Advancing digital technology has also invaded the popular sport of golf. Tony Barletta, director of golf at the 27-hole Blue Ridge Trail Golf Club, BARLETTA explained his facility now offers state-of-the-art GPS units on all of its carts via a tablet that hangs from the roof. The cart can therefore be parked and the GPS can measure metrics such as the distance from the ball to the pin. Food and beverages can also be ordered from the GPS, and management can track the location of every cart out on the course. “This is a pretty awesome system and separates us from the competition,” said Barletta. “In addition to management seeing the position of every cart, we can immediately send messages to the golfers.” Technology is also serving as an educator with Blue Ridge’s use of the Trackman simulator. This technology uses Doppler radar to detect the speed, trajectory and distance of both an indoor practice shot or out on the driving range, while indoor golfers can “play” a simulated game complete with lifelike images on 50-60 famous courses around the world, including the British Open. “We have one of the first indoor tracker systems in the United States,” said Barletta. “Offering technologies such as these definitely give a golf club a competitive edge over the competition,” said Barletta.


FEATURE

Developing skills that lead the way by Joe Sylvester

Innovation, creative thinking and vision are valuable traits in successful leaders, according to Lori Nocito, executive director of Leadership Wilkes-Barre. “Good NOCITO communication skills and decision-making capabilities also play a vital role in the success and failure of a leader,” Nocito added. Nocito and others who have helped develop leaders for years in Northeast Pennsylvania recently talked about what makes a good leader and what employers should look for in candidates “I think a good for leadership leader needs positions. to see the big Leaders, picture and needs they said, must to constantly keep learning. They must have think about the organization as a discipline. “Even if whole.” someone seems Nicole Morristell, to naturally director of Leadership exhibit typical Lackawanna leadership qualities, people don’t become great leaders overnight,” Nocito said. “They must be developed through ongoing learning and training opportunities. “Leadership is a process, a skill that must be developed. If a company doesn’t invest in leadership training for its highpotential employees, those individuals are likely to leave and find that opportunity elsewhere.” Nicole Morristell, director of Leadership Lackawanna, believes some people are born with leadership skills. MORRISTELL It’s not a strictly learned

behavior. But, like Nocito, she said that even those who have leadership traits require training. “I still think you need to train and you need to hone in on those traits,” Morristell said. She said leaders need to continually learn and train through workshops, classes, books or online articles. “I think everybody should have that thought in their mind that they should be a lifelong learner,” Morristell said. “Probably the “A potential or biggest thread current employee that underlines who expresses all leadership a desire to learn is discipline. and take on new You gotta have challenges as well as work good discipline. with a team has You cannot ask the potential to someone to do become a great something if leader,” said you’re not willing Nocito. The big picture Morristell cited honesty,

to do it yourself.”

Lt. Col. Bill White, professor, The University of Scranton Military Science Department

inspiration, commitment, passion, decisionmaking skills, creativity and communication as traits leaders possess. “I think a good leader needs to see the big picture and needs to constantly think about the organization as a whole,” she said. A leader must communicate the organization’s message to employees, members, key stakeholders, all the people who make up an organization and do a good job of relaying their vision down to the people below them. “If you have enthusiasm, commitment, passion, it’s contagious,” Morristell said. Lt. Col. Bill White, a professor in The University of Scranton Military Science Department who also oversees ROTC programs at 12 universities and colleges from Wilkes-Barre to East Stroudsburg, said the Army requires of its leaders a certain amount of intellect along with a certain amount of character. “You have to have a certain amount of presence,” he said. He added potential leaders should be able to demonstrate how they would react in certain situations. Part of being a leader, White said, is getting others to do what you want them

to do. “You could be a poor leader and do that,” he said. “Our goal is to make leaders who make others want to follow them.” He said there is a negative style of leadership which uses fear-based motivation to get others to follow or perform. But he said that is not effective. “One of the difficulties you find in the civilian world is a lot of your evaluations are based on performance,” White said. “In the military, we evaluate based on attributes. It narrows it down to how well do they get results. They may just be good at getting to the bottom line.” He said he talks WHITE to candidates about different scenarios, such as what they would do if they discovered a friend was cheating in class or stealing or lying. Some people might know the right answer, but he said there are certain tells that reveal whether they actually believe the answer. Please see Skills, Page 6

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FEATURE FROM PAGE 5

An art and a science White agreed that most people are not natural-born leaders. “Some may have a more approachable personality, are more charismatic and can inspire others,” he said. But he said that is not always necessary in good leaders. He said the more senior leaders are surprisingly more introverted. “Leadership is an art and a science,” White said. He said leader should be able to understand what the guy on the line is doing. As for the military, it develops a work ethic that is not based on an eight-hour day, but rather on working longer days. “You’re forced to be a good time manager or you fail as a leader,” White said. A high stress environment will start molding a person into dealing with stress. “Probably the biggest thread that

“Certain people are better at being leaders, but I wouldn’t say it’s beyond hope (for others). Some are not self-actualized to the idea. Some people come naturally to it, some educate themselves to it.”

Mark Durdach, Student Government Association president, Keystone College

underlines all leadership is discipline,” White said. “You gotta have good discipline. You cannot ask someone to do something if you’re not willing to do it yourself.” Leaders also should be fair, consistent and hold themselves to a high standard. If you don’t feel like doing something you should do, you do it anyway. Do the same thing you expect of others. The leader as guide Mark Durdach, 21, of Honesdale, a junior information technology major at Keystone College in La Plume,

knows something about leadership. He is Student Government Association president at Keystone. He believes a leader is not someone who just takes charge and tells others what to do. It is someone who guides others to help them all achieve certain goals, much like a basketball coach would make sure everyone is doing what they are supposed to help the team win games. “I was always involved in team leadership,” Durdach said. “I was in Boy Scouts for 13 years. I became an Eagle Scout in 2016.” He said he always had a desire to be involved, to help others. One way to do that at Keystone was to get involved in student DURDACH government. “I had been a freshman representative, then vice president,” Durdach recalled. He wanted to take it to the next level.

He was elected president. He also did an internship in the student activities office. While it came more naturally for him than others, Durdach, who wants to work in software development for a large corporation someday, said it’s possible to train those who have not held leadership positions. “Certain people are better at being leaders, but I wouldn’t say it’s beyond hope (for others). Some are not selfactualized to the idea. Some people come naturally to it, some educate themselves to it.” He believes employers can recognize someone with good leadership qualities. “I think it really comes down to motivation and attitude,” Durdach said. He said someone interviewing for a position may not necessarily be the most qualified for the job, but they may be more animated, passionate and willing to grow. “There are some great people out there,” he said. “Without the motivation, they can’t do much.”

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FEATURES

Hiring woes in a time of low unemployment a three-month training course. Upon completion of the course, more education is provided to help the With the uptick in the economy and lower student and new employee advance in their career. unemployment, many companies are finding it difThe Bureau of Labor Statistics estimates entryficult to find the employees they need to fill out their level jobs can pay as high as $43,000 per year, with workforce. room for advancement. At General Dynamics Plant in Eynon, Frank Fata, A competitive economy is making it tough for director of plant operations, said the company is some employers to find workers. having difficulty finding experienced CNC (computer “We have nearly 2,000 jobs available in Lackawanumeric controlled) machinists. nna County right now,” said Bob Durkin, president “The lack of a CNC machinist is a common prob- and CEO of the Scranton Chamber of Commerce. lem,” said Fata, “as we are experiencing exponential “Just in the last 30 days, we’ve received 600 to 700 growth in our manufacturing base. We don’t seem to jobs were posted. And that’s just CareerLink.” attract newbies to the industry. What was years ago, The latest unemployment number for Lackawaa bit and smelly and not so easy, is today very much nna County is at 4.8 percent. different.” “Not everyone posts their jobs either,” said Durkin. “Everywhere you go, companies are posting Fata said the machinery has evolved ‘ten-fold’ jobs on places like billboards and other signage to over the past few decades. get workers.” “They (the machine operators) have to be techHe said he’s personally met with at least 15 difsavvy and work in a clean environment,” he said. ferent companies in the past two months regarding While he declined to provide specifics on how the employment situation. many people they were looking for, he said General “Every single one of them is looking for people,” Dynamics has partnered with Johnson College for by Phil Yacuboski

he said. “The challenge isn’t our economy. The biggest challenge is how do we sustain out existing workforce. There’s definitely a skills gap.” The lack of skilled workers is a problem not only in Pennsylvania, but is part of a national picture that some argue is not pretty. A 2015 report by the Manufacturing Institute (part of the National Association of Manufacturers) said as many as two million manufacturing jobs ‘could go unfilled’ by 2025. “It goes from skills to soft skills,” said Durkin. “People have to have some sort of STEM education or an advanced degree. If we aren’t delivering from a secondary and post-secondary perspective and people aren’t ready, that’s the challenge. It’s a workforce issue.” Only 13 percent of the U.S. is employed in STEM jobs, according to a 2018 study from Pew Research. Those in the survey were asked why they did not choose a STEM career and most said ‘time and cost’ were barriers. “We’ve been working with our industrial and manufacturing sectors in several areas to identify places of need and all of our employers have ad-

dressed concerns over the need of a workforce,” said Amy Luyster, vice-president of the Scranton Chamber of Commerce. “It’s across the board.” She said many companies are even revamping their facilities to attract workers by adding gyms, gaming facilities and marketplaces for employees to grab a quick snack. Luyster said the Chamber has also recruited educators to place them in the workforce to transfer that knowledge back to a high school classroom. “They are taking what they learn in the field and using it to put together a curriculum,” she said. “It brings the business into the classroom and it’s a way to draw awareness and to build a pipeline from the school to the workforce.”

Entrepreneurship in Pennsylvania is a challenge, not impossible Hall-Zielinski, director of the Small Business Development Center, located at The University of It’s no stretch to say Joy Zazerra enjoys run- Scranton, which serves eight counties in Northning her own business as well as teaching yoga. east Pennsylvania. “I know there are obstacles, The former teacher and college athletics but I see so many things that are helping to administrator is now the owner of ‘Yoga with make things easier.” Joy.’ Her studio is in Mayfield on the Scranton/ She explained many people get tangled in Carbondale Highway. licensing and regulations. She added, however, “What I struggled with was finding the right that Pennsylvania recently made things easier location,” she said, “in affordability in both price by creating the One Stop Shop. and square footage and in visibility. I didn’t want “It’s a website so that it’s simpler for to get in over my head.” people,” she said. A new study from the Ewing Marion Hall-Zielinski said there are constant Kaufman Foundation found that entrepreneurs conversations between the counties they serve, are struggling with far more in Pennsylvania. the state and the city of Scranton about how to The business advocacy group based in Missouri make the process easier. recently found Pennsylvania is one of the worst “What really didn’t surprise me is the necesstates to start a business; it ranked as one of sity entrepreneurs,” she said. “That’s because the worst for new entrepreneurs. Many argue we have such a low unemployment rate. We it’s Pennsylvania’s tax structure and lack of also see entrepreneurships rise when uneminfrastructure that bring down the numbers. ployment is higher. They are driven to start a “I’m on the side of more positive,” said Lisa business to make life better.” by Phil Yacuboski

“I’m always intrigued to see how they (Kaufman) survey the landscape as a place to do business in Pennsylvania,” said Steve Stumbris, director of the Small Business Development Center at Bucknell University, which serves six counties in central Pennsylvania. He said ‘results may vary.’ “We’ve had great success here,” he said. “I do see differences in what’s happening here locally compared to what is happening throughout the Commonwealth.” He said those who are typically struggling with starting a business are often those the SBDC is not hearing from during the process. “They will face the greatest challenge,” he said. “They simply don’t know about the resources out there to help them on a local, state and national level. It’s always my piece of advice to do research to educate themselves.” Stumbris said in the past year, 31 new businesses have started in the Bucknell SBDC client area; he said they’ve helped more than 150

existing businesses with various regulation and loan programs. Zazzera’s entrepreneurial spark came from the family’s business – Zazerra’s Grocery Store in Forest City. The business recently closed after it opened in 1976. She planned a year in advance of opening her studio in October after learning the ropes from a national yoga instructor in 2018. She’s at her studio five days a week and teaches as many as 15 classes a week. “I have more good things to say about it than negative,” said Zazzera. “I felt very motivated from the get go and I felt super prepared.” “There are a lot of people in local chambers of commerce and other organizations that will bend over backwards to help people get started,” said Hall-Zielinski. “If we all stick together and help each other, it really helps everyone.” “We are here to help people start businesses,” said Stumbris, “and we’re also here to help them stay in business.”

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FEATURE

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The collection facility has centrifuge machines to remove solids from the plasma and return it to the donors. plasma is booming at the same time the uses of the organic fluid remain a mystery to most people. Plasma is the fluid within The straw-colored liquid known as the blood that liquifies the mixture while plasma that circulates within the veins of carrying microscopic solids such as blood each human can be a lifesaver, provided an cells, proteins, fats, immune system efficient and profitable system exists for components and clotting ingredients. its donation, testing and processing. Unfortunately, to a large degree, a An expanded option for this process negative stigma still exists around the now exists in NEPA by virtue of the plasma donation process. Many people opening of CSL Plasma’s new center still believe donation is only pursued by on South Main Avenue in Taylor. The people in need of a quick buck, although company, which operates more than 200 Joseph Korea, CSL center manager centers across the United States, uses a in Taylor, emphatically declared that business plan where plasma donors, after individuals from all walks of life and strict screening, receive cash for their financial situations donate. efforts in the form of a retail debit card. Please see Plasma, Page 10 According to CSL, global demand for by Dave Gardner


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ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT

FROM PAGE 8

From an altruistic standpoint, plasma donation is a true lifesaver. The fluid is the essential ingredient for products crucial to treating patients suffering from life-threatening conditions and disorders that include hemophilia, immune deficiencies, respiratory disease, transplant side effects and burns. “This is for good cause because it truly saves lives,” said Korea. “Initially in Taylor we will average 100 to 200 donors per day, with that total expanding to as many as 1,800 per week once we’re established in the community.”

Events that dictate economic security

The cost of undergraduate or graduate programs has skyrocketed, however, and There are many events that dictate needs a solution. economic security or insecurity in this New obstacles to international trade region. Some are self-induced and some have threatened the traditional means to come from national or international trends. advance global support for trading and the They all relate to patterns of systematic recent spate of tariff negotiations has meant publicity, spelled out by economist writers, difficult economic times – an issue which authors, historians and other workers of affects all of the United States, as well as tales that sharpen the minds of readers other countries. The role of the private, or other protagonists who wish to offer public and nonprofit commentaries about these conditions. sectors needs study, For example, one topic is the question analysis and generated of economic insecurity, which is growing actions that spell out across the nation, this region and the the differences and world. It has been defined by authors such the common impacts as Steven Brill, Tom Friedman and others. of these sectors of the Some have argued this solution can only economy, regionally, come about by holding the community or statewide and nationally. GROSSMAN geographic area together. The overall impacts of Household debt is another growing social media and other condition which needs corrective action, ways to transfer information have changed and this has clearly entered the dimension society in ways that authors such as Walter of regional life in the Pocono-Northeast. Isaccson have written about and examined Debt has led to many families being unable thoroughly, and these ideas and thoughts to save, many local governments entering need to be studied and implemented across the life of budgetary obstacles and the blurred geographic boundaries. growing condition of pension plans being Attacking the First Amendment a perennial issue affecting governmental threatens a traditional source of news budgets. One in five families are without gathering and should spur ways to make access to sufficient food for an active, sure that this First of the Bill of Rights healthy life. Infrastructure is clearly falling remains a strong standard for protecting apart in many places, and is an issue in this the role that the Founding Fathers region. It generates what may be called a strengthened when this was initially broken region, state and nation, and needs examined through the Constitution. quick and large-scale federal responses – The writers of a book titled which to this point has not occurred. “Generations,” years ago, defined how Game playing has affected the true we are interconnected across time lines safety nets, which at one time included that have given the nation, and therefore social security, medicare and other tools its regions, creative generations that such as Medicaid. These and other safety truly move from one area to another, in a nets are threatened by political stands straight and predictable pathway, lending which are obviously being attacked and history and futurism together – something not accepted strategies which have proven that, at a regional scale, is as true as effective in the past. There is a need to find anywhere in the world. Think of what solutions to maintaining these important time it takes our Congressional leaders to ways to meet the needs of a large share of raise funds, some saying five hours a day, American demographics. and this is an unholy process that needs It is a regional issue that should be correction as well as the Citizens United further enhanced by an approach that Supreme Court case that changed how leads toward an action-focused task force. funds are accumulated for elected races. Colleges and universities deserve credit It is a drag on the overall economy of a for training new leaders and workers. nation in distress. by Howard J. Grossman, AICP

Competitive business Plasma donation as a segment of the medical community is a competitive business, and as part of the process Taylor Center donors receive a cash payment of $50 for each of their first five donations. Following the initial five, payments are in the vicinity of $25 per donation. The reality of plasma donation operates within a set of strict criteria and processes. Potential donors must present multiple and verified identification, submit to a questionnaire of health inquiries and be examined by a nurse. The 45-minute donation process itself involves connection to a machine that withdraws blood, immediately separates the plasma using a centrifuge, and returns the microscopic solid components to the donor. The plasma is screened for disease and opiates, and Korea explained that all pertinent health irregularities are detected. “We have a donor alert system that identifies for us any potential donor who has previously failed a health screening,” said Korea. He added that repeat donations are a key segment of the CSL business plan. The 30 initial employees at the Taylor site, which will swell to 75 to 90 people, strive for donor satisfaction and use marketing tools such as consumer merchandise perks to encourage donation.

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There was a bill that would have been a Constitutional Amendment that would have changed this system, but it never passed. Another economic change has been the growth of online shopping, which has impacted retail jobs strongly and shows no sign of diminishing. While training is badly needed, some statistics show that the nation is falling behind many smaller countries in the amount of funds available for this purpose. This is something this region needs. We have excellent training entities, but the needs are higher here than in many other geographic places. Perhaps the most dramatic erosion has been accountability and responsibility being misplaced as a tool for finding answers to some of these problems economically. As this nation and this region age demographically, the needs are stronger and the solutions become more difficult to be obtained. On the other hand, security can be examined in the following context as economic development continues as a major priority. Here are some ideas: ■ Create a regional organization that shadows these trends and takes action accordingly to discover new ways to meet these obstacles and ensure new generations that ability to overcome some of these trends. ■ Prepare a regional documentary on economic trends and evaluate what steps are best suited for meeting our needs in the next year or two. ■ Have all the regional colleges and universities in the region collectively prioritize ways they can help meet the economic needs of the future. ■ Develop a regional plan that can adjust current practices to best practices for economic security for the growth and development of the region. ■ Make sure the middle class is not lost in the turmoil of turbulence that engenders the future of this region and that the safety nest discussed previously remain mainstay of economic stability inside the Pocono-Northeast. In these ways, economic security may overcome economic insecurity.


CELEBRATING WOMEN ENTREPRENEURS

Focused on nature

by Cassandra Wisdo and Sean Myers

Lisa Spangenberg’s photography business, A Country Mile, is local and nature-focused. While she does not have a storefront or website, the photographer sells her work at marketplaces throughout the year. She decided to open her business last January at the age of 51 after working as a registered nurse for 19 years, as well as a part-time secretary and treasurer for Ararat Township. Some of Spangenberg’s other hobbies include hiking, birding and gardening, which are also showcased in her pictures. Spangenberg’s grown daughter, Chelsey, who lives close by, works with her two days a week as a fellow photographer. She is her best friend and big supporter, and has been with her every step of the way, taking classes, hiking and taking pictures. A dream come true Although it was always a dream of hers to have her own business, the idea to start A Country Mile began when Spangenberg’s friends encouraged her to set up a table at local fairs and fundraisers. She started by contacting Lisa HallZielinski at the Small Business Development Center for advice. Hall-Zielinski suggested attending business courses at The University of Scranton. After completing the courses with her daughter, Spangenberg found she had all the basics for getting started, as well as a support system available anytime she had questions or needed advice. No place like home Spangenberg’s work features elements she enjoys, and the business focuses on selling that work. Her inspiration comes from many sources, but in the end, she wants her photography to be something one might hang on a wall at home. She offers various sizes of matted, ready-to-frame prints, as well as preframed, ready-to-hang pieces. That feeling of “home” is a common theme the photographer’s customers enjoy about her work, and it keeps them coming back for more. Spangenberg also contributes to NEP Telephone’s calendar each year. All the images

Yourr collected for the calendar are from local photographers. Do what you enjoy Spangenberg’s recommendation to other entrepreneurs is “to do something you like.” “If you don’t enjoy it, you won’t be successful,” she said. “Think big but start small and work within your means, and then expand your business as your income grows. “A business is always a work in progress. Evaluate what is working for you and what is not, and be flexible enough to make those changes.”

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On the horizon Looking to the future, Spangenberg hopes to bring the business online. While she believes doing so will expand her customer base, she also values the human element of selling her photography face-to-face, and believes it’s necessary for people to see her work in person to fully appreciate it.” For more information about Lisa Spangenberg and her photography, visit the A Country Mile Photography page on Facebook or contact the businesswoman at acountrymile@nep.net. Cassandra Wisdo and Sean Myers are interns with The University of Scranton Women’s Entrepreneurship Center under the supervision of Donna Simpson, Consultant Manager.

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REAL ESTATE FROM PAGE 1

NEPA sector is expanding at almost five percent per year, and has created approximately 6,600 new jobs during the past decade. “During the last two years, due to market conditions and a lot of hard work, we have doubled the minimum wage in the NEPAbased distribution and warehousing industries,” said Augustine.

FOZ success Another forum panelist, Kevin Rogers, serves as community development lending and investing manager with PNC Community Development Banking, and has seen first-hand how the FOZ process can work. He cited ROGERS the example of a stately 100-plus-year-old brick structure located within Bethlehem’s south side that hand been once used as an ice plant and for cold storage. Lehigh University then utilized the building for a dry storage and maintenance facility. PNC became involved with a developer pursuing FOZ and the structure is now destined to house 30 apartments, plus retail and dining areas. “The FOZ process creates a natural extension of our work,” said Rogers. “Here at PNC we have the pros to guide the lending and investment services, and we know each community’s needs.” According to Rogers, availability of a program such as FOZ is not an automatic slam-

dunk. Developers which are crucial to a project are historically attracted to larger housing and development opportunities, such as those involving $25 million and above, making it difficult to recruit those who would be willing to pursue more modest projects within officially distressed locales. “Yet, we had the FOZ program deployed during 2018, and we’ve had four transactions so far,” said Rogers. “It’s also important to remember for a bank to receive that CRA credit, the project must be located within a low to moderate income area and upon completion benefit the community.” Rogers cited another program, known as a Community Development Entity, as a good deal worthy of investigation by developers. This allows creation of a domestic corporation or partnership that serves as an intermediary vehicle for the provision of loans, investments, or financial counseling within low-income communities.

Capital gains opportunities Bob Durkin, president of the Greater Scranton Chamber of Commerce, is scheduled to be a panelist at the 2019 forum. He zeroes in on a prime opportunity for commercial real estate investment DURKIN using Federal Opportunity Zones (FOZ). The FOZ program allows distressed tracts of land to be identified in a region, approved by Harrisburg, and then marked for special Market twists private investment. A vastly declining tax Ongoing changes to market conditions burden on capital gains is then available if must be recognized within any commercial the property is held as an investment for the real estate plan, according to designated long haul. A variety of regions have been identified within NEPA as FOZ eligible. These include the boroughs of Blakely and Jessup plus tracts of land that wrap around Scranton’s downtown, creating an incentive for banks to be involved in investment and dollars to the distressed areas while potentially earning Community Reinvestment Act (CRA) credits from Uncle Sam. “The FOZ process is now a prime tool to promote funding projects,” said Durkin. “We have various experts in place to assist with the process for investment, but we still need potential entrepreneurs to move forward.” Durkin also is enthusiastic about “marrying” other investment possibilities with the FOZ opportunities. These include use of the Local Economic Revitalization Tax Assistance Act (LERTA), which promotes economic development by providing property tax improvement abatements for up to 10 years for improvements to industrial, commercial and business property. “When LERTA is used, the land owner will still continue to pay their base taxes, so the county, city and school district lose nothing up front,” said Durkin. Panelists engage in discussion at last year’s event.

panelist Jeff Algatt, senior vice president with Collier’s International Global Real Estate Services. He cited the bustling health care arena as an example, where urgent ALGATT care centers are now popping up is a wide variety of locations, including potentially within Walmart parking lots, and some analysts believe the nation is head for the existence of perhaps only five giant health care systems after consolidations. As markets rapidly evolve, Algatt is urging financing professionals and developers to utilize a demand-side approach. Within this philosophy, instead of focusing on the supply of real estate listings, efforts are concentrated on identifying specific derivers for development, creating them and then attracting occupants to these factors. “When a business wants to come to a region, automatic opportunities for commercial real estate development are created,” said Algatt. “This process is the opposite of a supply-side approach, where the buildings are first made available and then occupants located.” Algatt is enthusiastic about the economy as it pertains to commercial real estate. His firm is forecasting continuing profitability for business in the years immediately ahead, and at worst only a slow-down of economic expansion will appear during 2020 as interest rates and market fundamentals continue to look favorable. Additional market changes identified by Algatt as drivers within the real estate arena include the expanding use of automation and artificial intelligence, particularly within the distribution industry. These advances will cause great process and workforce disruption, while ending some jobs but also creating new opportunities for skilled workers. “Identifying these market changes and then pursuing the opportunities being created are all part of a demand-side approach to development,” said Algatt. “These include the reality that health care management is now about cost cutting, market share, patient comfort and patient attraction, which in many ways are a big change from the way health care has traditionally been delivered.”

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FEATURE

Small businesses find Instagram an invaluable tool and comments. “We make it special,” she said. “Even the On the Trackside Station Grill & Bar’s photography.” Instagram account, one will find pictures of an Walker said the Instagram page was open-faced shredded beef sandwich, wings, developed five years ago and has spent money burgers and a recent drink special – an Absothrough Facebook, which gets linked to Instalute Citron with Limoncello, Pernod, lemonade, gram. She said they buy one ad per month. basil and lemon. “It’s definitely increased business because The number of potential viewers? more people are aware,” she said. “The location More than 16,000. services on Instagram are fascinating because The East Stroudsburg eatery has used someone can search East Stroudsburg and organic growth to gain thousands of followers. Trackside will pop up. We’ve gotten new follow“It was a slow and steady incline,” said Caro- ers and new customers based on our posts. It’s lyn Walker, who manages the restaurant’s page. very rewarding to hear.” “Our goal is to be as personable as possible.” One look at the Lake Naomi Club’s InstaInstagram is hoping to gain more tracgram page and you’ll see breathtaking images tion with local businesses as it begins to test of the Poconos and its surroundings – everyin-app profile pages for them. While there is thing from flowers to wildlife. no specific date for the rollout, users may see “I spend a lot of time just walking around them soon. our area taking pictures,” said Mark Luethi, “It models the Google Knowledge panel, social media coordinator and photographer for which I think is very popular with users and I the page. think it’s going to bring that kind of information The 3,000 posts are gaining traction with to Instagram,” said Denise Sevick-Bortree, a people who want to come and visit, he said. professor in the Bellisario College of CommuniHe said many of the photos are shot with a cations at Penn State University. professional, digital camera and then ‘touched She said it will be helpful for small busiup’ using software. nesses to have this type of information available “We’re getting a lot of likes,” he said. “It’s a The Trackside Grill & Bar in East Stroudsburg has more than 16,000 followers on Instagram, as shown in this screenshot, created on March 21. in the Instagram app, so people can search for good thing.” the cost of a meal or hours of operation. “It will be a big advantage for small businesses,” she said. Sevick-Bortree said Instagram’s appeal for many is that it is loaded with pictures, which heighten its usability. “To have that information in tandem with photos is great,” she said. In January, Instagram’s owner Facebook reported 2018 fourth quarter earnings of $16.6 billion for the final quarter of 2018 – a 30 percent jump over the previous year. Their profits show businesses are using the social media platform as a source of advertising. “Particularly with the younger demographic, it’s a fantastic way to reach people and to be in a place where they are already are – in social media,” she said. “My 13-year-old daughter spends her time (on the app) because it’s a place where all of her friends are.” A winter landscape is featured in this A screenshot shows a photo posted to The Lake Naomi Club’s Instagram page feaWalker said to grow the numbers, they post on the Lake Naomi Club’s Instagram by Trackside Station Grill & Bar, tures breathtaking images of the Poconos and surrounding areas. promoting its open faced beef sandwich. Instagram page. often interact with clients through messages by Phil Yacuboski

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HEALTH CARE BRIEFS The Wright Center for Community Health and the Maternal and Family Health Services receive grant from AllOne Foundation to support regional initiative The Wright Center for Community Health and Maternal and Family Health Services were recently awarded a $500,000 grant from AllOne Foundation to support the organizations’ work within the community-based Healthy MOMS (Maternal Opiate Medical Support) PregnancyRecovery initiative. The Healthy MOMS program launched in late 2018 with a goal of organizing regional players in the health care, legal and social services sectors to care for pre- and post-natal women with Opioid Use Disorder (OUD) and, ultimately, reduce their babies’ risk of neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS). Benefitting from these grant funds, moms-tobe within multiple counties served by AllOne Foundation (Lackawanna, Luzerne, Susquehanna, Wayne and Wyoming) are eligible for services/ care during their pregnancy, through delivery and continued throughout their postpartum “fourth trimester.” Support can include assistance with housing, childcare, transportation, medicationassisted treatment (MAT), substance abuse counseling, case management, mental health counseling, recovery supports through a certified recovery specialist and medical care for mom and baby. The Healthy MOMS program is modeled after Ohio’s successful MOMS (Maternal Opiate Medical Support) Project, a community-based model that addresses the needs of pregnant women struggling with OUD and their newborns. Care is coordinated through a team of community partners specifically aligned to guide a woman with OUD on her path of recovery. Although The Wright Center for Community Health and Maternal and Family Health Services are the co-recipients of this grant from AllOne Foundation, the Healthy MOMS collaborative is made possible through the engagement of many community-based organizations, including Lackawanna/Susquehanna Office of Drug and Alcohol Programs, Lackawanna County Office of Youth and Family Services, Susquehanna County Children and Youth Services, Moses Taylor Hospital, Outreach Center for Community Resources, Geisinger and Scranton Primary Health Care Center. The Healthy MOMS program continues to grow, and interested community partners within any of the counties served may reach out to Maria Kolcharno, The Wright Center for Community Health’s director of addiction services, at 570955-7821 to get involved or make a referral into the program. People may also self-refer by contacting Kolcharno at 570-955-7821. More details about the program, including downloadable literature and information for potential community partners, is available at healthymoms.org. Bleeding control kits donated to Northeast

Submitted photo

The Wright Center for Community Health and the Maternal and Family Health Services were recently awarded a $500,000 grant from AllOne Foundation to support the organizations’ work within the community-based Healthy MOMS (Maternal Opiate Medical Support) Pregnancy-Recovery initiative. From left: Maria Kolcharno, director of addiction services, The Wright Center for Community Health; Cindy Kennedy, director COC and DSS Operations, Maternal and Family Health Services; Yurii Lynn Harden, licensed clinical social worker, Maternal and Family Health Services; Bette Saxton, president and CEO, Maternal and Family Health Services; Dr. Linda Thomas-Hemak, chief executive officer, The Wright Center for Community Health; John Menapace, board member, AllOne Foundation and Charities; John W. Cosgrove, executive director, AllOne Foundation and Charities; Mary Carroll Donahoe, program officer, AllOne Foundation and Charities; Dr. Maria Montoro-Edwards, vice president of strategic initiatives, The Wright Center for Community Health; and Scott Constantini, director of behavioral health, The Wright Center for Community Health. Pennsylvania schools, governments and community groups Since January 2017, Geisinger trauma services has trained more than 10,000 people through the national Stop the Bleed program. Now, Geisinger is providing more than 2,300 bleeding control kits – including 1073 kits to locations in Lackawanna, Luzerne, Pike, Monroe, Susquehanna, Wayne and Wyoming counties – to further arm first responders and residents in the battle against blood loss. Regional schools, churches and public locations will receive wall-mounted bleeding control stations, containing eight bleeding control kits each. Individual kits are being provided to emergency responders, Boy Scout and Girl Scout troops and community groups. The bleeding control kits contain plastic gloves, gauze, tourniquets and easy-to-follow instructions. They are designed to be used by anyone to help control bleeding during a traumatic incident. According to the National Trauma Institute, 35 percent of fatalities occur due to blood loss before victims arrive at a hospital. The kits supplement the nationwide Stop the Bleed training program. Launched as a

collaboration between the Department of Homeland Security, the White House and other agencies, Stop the Bleed trains ordinary citizens – and potential bystanders – how to help during a severe-bleeding incident before medical and emergency professionals arrive on scene. To learn more about Stop the Bleed, send an email to stopthebleed@geisinger.edu. Commonwealth Health, Jefferson collaborate on stroke telemedicine Commonwealth Health joined the Jefferson Neuroscience Network, a collaboration that uses telemedicine technology to provide local patients with access to Jefferson Health’s comprehensive stroke program and an immediate link to the top neuroscience specialists in the country. The Jefferson Neuroscience Network connects community hospitals with Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, Philadelphia, providing around-the-clock access to neuroscience specialists and further advancing Commonwealth Health’s stroke care in the region. Patients who are admitted to the emergency departments at Commonwealth Health’s five acute care hospitals within 24 hours of exhibiting symptoms of stroke will be linked

through telemedicine services to a neuroscience physician from Thomas Jefferson University Hospital. This arrangement offers Commonwealth Health access to Jefferson Health’s stroke program including education programs for clinicians and the community, clinical trials and advanced protocols for the treatment and management of stroke. A patient who is admitted to a Commonwealth Health emergency department showing signs of stroke is immediately linked through Jefferson Expert Teleconsulting, or JET, a high-tech, mobile robotic teleconsulting system that is covered by the top neuroscience physicians in Philadelphia. Newly installed software and robotic equipment at Commonwealth Health hospitals enable the Jefferson Health neuro-specialist to examine patients remotely while speaking directly with the clinical team at Commonwealth, the patient and their family members. Here’s how the program works: ■ The emergency room physician at Commonwealth Health places a phone call to Jefferson Health and requests a JET consult. Please see Health, Page 18

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ADVERTORIAL

An Integrated Approach to Recovery: Center of Excellence Initiative Sets Roots in NEPA

A man confronting his opioid addiction arrived for an appointment at The Wright Center for Community Health’s Old River Road location in South Wilkes-Barre, flopped into a chair and confessed. “Before I tell you anything else,” he told the case manager, “I need to tell you that I shot up this morning.” Embarrassed and expecting the worst, the patient, who had begun treatment at the clinic about two months earlier, seemingly waited to be scolded about the incident, his first slip-up. Instead, he got a sympathetic ear – and speedy help. Case manager Edward Walsh calmly questioned the patient and learned the morning’s episode had been triggered by physical pain resulting from a history of neck and back surgeries. Walsh consulted with a physician and others at the clinic, which is co-located with Harrold’s Pharmacy, to arrange for the man to receive physical therapy as well as an anti-inflammatory medicine to reduce swelling – the source of his discomfort. “If that’s what is causing you to relapse,” Walsh later explained, “let’s get it out of the equation.” The Wright Center for Community Health repeatedly uses this strategy – knocking down barriers to effective treatment – as it strives to address the root of an individual’s addiction and engage them into whole-person treatment. The mission couldn’t be more urgent. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, of the 130 lives lost to addiction each day in the United States, 10 are Pennsylvanians. Gov. Tom Wolf’s administration responded nearly three years ago, unrolling its Opioid Use Disorder Center of Excellence, or COE, initiative. The Wright Center for Community Health is one of dozens of COEs, each hand-picked by the state government, aiming to integrate

behavioral health and primary care, inclusive of Medication-Assisted Treatment (MAT), to help guide a coordinated response to our stillunfolding public health catastrophe. In short, here’s the approach: Assist each patient in overcoming his or her unique hurdles (physical, emotional, financial and other) on the way to recovery. Get results by working collaboratively and tap into resources in and outside of the region’s healthcare network. And never scrimp on compassion. Since the initial COE designation, The Wright Center for Community Health’s team – working at practices in Jermyn, Clarks Summit, Scranton and Wilkes-Barre – has seen 450+ patients for opioid abuse or other addictions. More than 200 are active in treatment. An alternative to traditional in-patient “rehab,” The Wright Center for Community Health’s outpatient COE program allows a person to stay in his or her community while learning to reroute the energy of addiction. Patients are typically treated using a combination of counseling, support from family and friends, and possibly MAT medications such as Suboxone and Vivitrol. Those drugs block receptors in the brain so patients don’t get the euphoric feeling commonly associated with heroin and other opioids, gradually reducing their cravings. (An alternative, Subutex, is used for women who are pregnant or breastfeeding.) As with its typical safety-net health service offerings, The Wright Center for Community Health does not allow a person’s insurance status to prevent access to addiction treatment. “We will never turn anyone away,” Walsh said. The team helps patients determine eligibility for health benefits coverage options, including the organization’s sliding fee discount scale, based on family (or household) income and size. If an individual has financial barriers to treatment,

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alternative funding options are in place to enable care. The Center of Excellence team takes a similarly dogged approach to connecting its patients with the resources they require to stay on the recovery track and improve their life circumstances. Need a bus pass to get to the doctor’s office? No problem. Job search at a dead-end? Walsh — and all of the organization’s COE team members — knows local employers who might be willing to say yes. Patients get checked for the Hepatitis C virus and other infectious diseases for which they might be at particular risk. Likewise, the Center of Excellence team – consisting today of six certified recovery specialists, five case managers, multiple social workers and medical providers – stands ready to help patients sort through an often-complex web of associated mental health and family issues. “We’re not just addressing the addiction,” Walsh said. “We’re addressing the whole person.” The majority of the organization’s COE patients – some 60 to 65 percent, according to Walsh – have never used heroin. Instead, they can trace their addiction troubles to legally prescribed pain-killing

medications. For example, car-crash victims and other injured individuals might begin taking the drugs for relief, then, after a month or more, find they crave the substances and can’t stop taking them. Some satisfy their urges by “doctor shopping” for multiple prescriptions; others turn to the street for illegal pill sales or steal opioids from medicine cabinets and other storage places. The trend might explain, in part, why Walsh detected a recent uptick in the number of women, approximately ages 30 to 45, contacting The Wright Center for Community Health for addiction treatment. Or, the rising number of women in the program might be attributed to the grassroots outreach efforts of the region’s Healthy MOMS initiative, in which The Wright Center for Community Health is a key partner. The Healthy MOMS program capitalizes on the strengths of regional resources and partner organizations to provide a full spectrum of services for mothers facing opioid addiction while pregnant. Services include pre-and post-natal healthcare, birthing classes, peer/recovery support groups, assistance in finding stable housing and even ensuring appropriate checkups for baby for the first two years after birth.

Dr. Joseph Anistranski, left, and case manager Edward Walsh are members of the Center of Excellence team at The Wright Center for Community Health.


ADVERTORIAL

A byproduct of the new normal of comprehensive addiction treatment for expectant mothers, the Healthy MOMS program is constantly evolving; nearly 30 women have engaged in the program since it started just a few months ago. It is just one more way the community has come together to tackle the opioid crisis from new angles. Also among the patients Walsh routinely sees: an 80-year-old woman who started taking painkillers decades ago due to a spinal problem and now yearns to be opioid-free by age 85. “She brings me banana bread every time she comes in,” Walsh said. “I think it’s sweet; she’s like my grandmother.” More typically, the person seeking treatment through the Center of Excellence is a man in his 20s or 30s. He might struggle with financial or family woes, or both. He might be depressed. He most assuredly has an unresolved pain – be it physical, emotional or “spiritual,” the latter of which Walsh describes as an internal conflict. “A lot (of people with addictions) have done things they find morally reprehensible,” he said. “To get them over it, that’s a task but it can be done.” The Wright Center for Community Health’s team has capacity to welcome new patients into its COE treatment program and opportunities for individuals seeking employment within the behavioral health and addiction/recovery space are growing. “We’re always expanding (our COE team),” Walsh said. One recent addition to the team: Dr. Joseph Anistranski, whose certification in Medication-Assisted Treatment enabled patients to start accessing addiction/recovery services at the South Wilkes-Barre practice in November 2018. Three months later, the clinic has 10 active patients – with the capacity to accept dozens more.

“If we had two providers who saw only (Center of Excellence) patients, I could keep them busy every single day; the need is that big out there,” Walsh said. About a half-dozen other Centers of Excellence operate in Northeastern Pennsylvania, providing potentially life-saving treatment. Some regional COEs include Geisinger South WilkesBarre, Miners Medical in Ashley, and CleanSlate, which has offices in both Scranton and Wilkes-Barre. The Wright Center for Community Health promotes awareness in the community about those centers. It also swaps best practices with other addiction treatment providers. In fact, in July 2018, The Wright Center for Community Health was selected as one of eight organizations statewide to expand access to MAT treatment through the Pennsylvania Coordinated Medication-Assisted Treatment (PacMAT) program, as well as share care models and promote cross-organizational learning. Along with Geisinger, another designated PacMAT right here in Northeastern Pennsylvania, The Wright Center for Community Health serves as a hub for a proposed network of 10 primary care practices in Lackawanna, Luzerne, Susquehanna, Wayne and Wyoming counties. The network’s shared treatment model reflects and amplifies many of the tactics Walsh already uses each week in South Wilkes-Barre, treating each patient with what he described as “human decency and kindness.” “It’s a tone,” he said. “We’re not the police; we’re not this hammer over their head. I’m merely asking the patient, ‘Are you OK? Tell me what I can do to help you.’” For information about The Wright Center for Community Health’s Opioid Use Disorder Center of Excellence, call 570-230-0019 or visit thewrightcenter. org/coe.

NORTHEAST PENNSYLVANIA BUSINESS JOURNAL APRIL 2019 17 TS_CNG/ADVERTISING/AD_PAGES [ADB17] | 03/27/19

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Wayne Memorial: New Tower, New Health Initiative in 2019

(Honesdale, March 14, 2019)…. This year will prove exciting for Wayne Memorial Hospital in Honesdale. Its biggest expansion in history, an 85,000 square foot tower of 50 private patient rooms, is slated to open later this spring. And last month, the hospital officially became one of only five rural hospitals in the state of Pennsylvania to participate in an innovative health initiative called the Rural Health Model (RHM). Under this plan, participants are encouraged to focus almost as much on preventive medicine as healing in the hopes of reducing “avoidable hospital utilization.” Unnecessary ER visits and readmission rates mean high costs for hospitals and their payers. Four commercial payers, plus Medicare have agreed to pay the hospitals a fixed amount annually instead of paying only as the service is rendered.

“Traditionally hospitals are paid on a fee-for-service basis,” said WMH CEO David Hoff, “this new model is turning the glass upside down. We will be getting a steady, predictable income which will enhance financial stability. The intent is to help hospitals transform over a six-year period of time to invest in preventive care with the ‘extra money’ or savings that should be generated.” Hoff suggested a portion of the stable income might, for example, fund health initiatives such as vaccinations or collaborative work to address issues like lack of transportation or create programs for patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. The four participating private insurers or payers—Geisinger, Highmark, UPMC and Gateway— are calculating their payments

Submitted photo

The Pennsylvania Department of Health announces the Rural Health Model, left to right at the State Capitol in Harrisburg March 5th: Senator Lisa Baker; Sara Adornato, CEO, Barnes-Kasson County Hospital; Representative Tina Pickett; Loren Stone, CEO, Endless Mountains Health Systems; Tammy Anderer, CAO, Geisinger Jersey Shore; Andy Carter, President and CEO, The Hospital and Healthsystem Association of Pennsylvania; Rachel Levine, MD, Secretary, Pennsylvania Department of Health; David Hoff, CEO, Wayne Memorial Hospital.

on historical data for each hospital, but Hoff said payments can be adjusted as needed. The other hospitals in the RHM are Endless Mountains and Barnes Kasson in Susquehanna County, Jersey Shore in Lycoming County, and UPMC Kane in McKean County. Wayne Memorial’s new patient tower represents a step in the direction of promoting good health. Private rooms lessen the potential for infection. “In addition, private rooms offer reduced noise levels and enhanced opportunities for communication between the patient and his/her clinical team,” Hoff said, “all of which can also aid sleep – and recovery.” A grand opening is planned for the new tower later this year.

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Geisinger Community Medical Center Trauma Services recently donated bleeding control kits to North Pocono School District and many other regional schools, churches and public locations as part of the nationwide Stop the Bleed program. From left: Geisinger Community Medical Center Trauma Medical Director John Mitchell; North Pocono Superintendent Bryan McGraw; North Pocono science teacher Lindsay Croom; North Pocono Assistant Superintendent Dan Powell; North Pocono Certified School Nurse Lynn Heard, DNP; Geisinger Community Medical Center Trauma Outreach Coordinator Kathryn Bommer and North Pocono High School Principal Ron Collins. FROM PAGE 15 ■ Within minutes, the Jefferson Health neurospecialist on call uses a computer or iPhone to connect remotely via the robot to see and speak with the attending physician, patient and family members. ■ The Jefferson Health physician obtains the patient’s medical history, examines the patient, reviews CT scans and lab results and provides recommendations for immediate treatment. ■ A decision is made to either admit the patient to the Commonwealth Health facility for continued care or to transfer him or her to a hospital such as Jefferson Hospital for Neuroscience for more advanced care. Commonwealth Health includes five acute care hospitals: Berwick Hospital, Columbia County; Moses Taylor Hospital and Regional Hospital of Scranton, Lackawanna County; Tyler Memorial Hospital, Wyoming County, and Wilkes-Barre General Hospital, Luzerne County. The Jefferson Neuroscience Network introduced its stroke telemedicine program in 2010 in response to the growing shortage of neurologists facing rural and smaller market hospitals. It serves 37 community hospitals and has performed more than 10,000 remote acute stroke consultations.

Allied Services Transitional Rehab Units named region’s highest performing Nursing Homes Allied Services Transitional Rehab Unit in Scranton recently received the title of “High

Performing” in the 2018-2019 ratings done by U.S. News and World Report. U.S. News evaluated more than 15,000 homes nationwide. The ratings draw on data from Nursing Home Compare, a program run by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS), the federal agency that sets and enforces standards for nursing homes. Allied Services Transitional Rehab Unit and Heinz Transitional Rehab Unit are the only two facilities within 100 miles of the Scranton/Wilkes-Barre metropolitan area to receive the survey’s top rating of “High Performing” in both the Overall and Short-Stay Rehabilitation ratings. This double accolade earned these non-profit health facilities the “Best Nursing Home” designation. The Wright Center for Community Health first in the country to earn NCQA School-Based Medical Home Recognition The Wright Center for Community Health’s School-Based Practice in West Scranton Intermediate recently became the first in the country to receive National Committee for Quality Assurance (NCQA) School-Based Medical Home Recognition. Based on the Patient-Centered Medical Home (PCMH) care model, practices that follow medical evidence to deliver high-quality, coordinated care and are committed to continuous improvement over time are eligible for NCQA distinction. Please see Health, Page 20


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unexpected to our guests and signaling the many changes that are coming to our restaurants,” said [Joseph DeSanto, owner of five Subway Restaurants.

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About Subway® Restaurants

Subway offers a fresh alternative to traditional Wilkes-Barre/Scranton fast food, serving 7 million April 3rd, 2019 made-to-order sandwiches Something new is coming to your Wilkes-Barre/ a day. Guests choose from Subway and Franchise Scranton Subway® 4.9 billion combinations Owners began testing the restaurants. Subway refresh restaurant concept of quality proteins, fresh invested more than $80 vegetables, and bread in December 2017 in Los million in the national baked daily. The world’s Angeles and San Diego. rollout a restaurant refresh Following an overwhelming largest restaurant chain to deliver an even more serves nutritious and amount of positive personalized Subway delicious subs, soups, feedback, the brand experience. announced in August 2018 and salads at about 44,000 restaurants in Guests visiting Wilkesits $80 million investment more than 100 countries. Barre/Scranton Subway® to rollout the concept to • Bold menu boards that The Subway experience restaurants will enjoy new U.S. restaurants, which are simple and easy to is also delivered online at sauces and spices, new are all independently read and an enhanced beverages, as well as owned and operated, at no www.Subway.com and personalization through the Subway® App, notice new uniforms for additional cost to eligible experience along the available in select markets Sandwich Artists™, among Franchise Owners. The sandwich line. at the Apple App Store and other new restaurant restaurant refresh follows a Google Play. features, including: • New Sandwich Artist long list of enhancements uniforms inspired by Founded by then 17-yearthe brand has made to • Signature Flavor the new menu offerings old Fred DeLuca and Stations, featuring new deliver a modern and and designed to engage family friend Dr. Peter Buck sauces and spices such even better Subway guests. more than 52 years ago, as a signature Sub Spice experience, including Subway is still a familyblend, Mustard Seed the restaurant redesign, “We are very excited to owned business, working Spread, Subway® Herb new menu innovations, provide our guests with a with more than 21,000 Garlic Oil, Provencal and the launch of the new Subway experience. dedicated franchisees in Herbs, and fresh cracked From the new refreshing new Subway app and communities around the Sea Salt and Bi-Color the Subway MyWay® beverages to the exciting world. Pepper sauces and freshly cracked Rewards program, as well as its third-party delivery spices in the Signature Subway® is a registered • Beverage Stations, program, among many Flavor Station – we are trademark of Subway offering refreshing other initiatives. IP Inc. delivering something Agua Fresca including

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Getting Cervical Cancer Under Control

Like any oncologist, Dr. Meghan Haggerty’s days are spent treating patients who’ve been diagnosed with cancer. Raising awareness and promoting efforts to prevent cancer are also very important to her. As April is National Cancer Control Month, she has taken some time to share insights and important information about one of her passions, cancer of the cervix, which she describes as, “for the most part, preventable.” “In its earliest stages, cervical cancer is highly curable,” states Haggerty. In the majority of cases, the disease is caused by the Human Papillomavirus (HPV.) According to the Centers for Disease Control (CDC), nine in ten people will get an HPV infection during their lives. Interestingly, most people with HPV never develop symptoms or associated health problems, and most HPV infections go away by themselves within two years. Sometimes, however, these infections will last longer. “HPV persistence ultimately induces changes in the cells of the cervix, called dysplasia. These dysplastic cells are precancerous, and will ultimately cause an invasive cancer to grow. Pap smears can find the dysplastic cells before a cancer has developed. This early identification of precancerous cells allows for them to be

removed with minimally invasive procedures. This in turn allows women to maintain fertility, normal sexual health, and a good long life expectancy. All women should be able to look forward to these things.” Once a true, invasive cervical cancer has developed, particularly an advanced stage cancer, treatment and potential side effects become much more complicated. A combination of chemotherapy and radiation therapy is the standard treatment in patients with advanced cervical cancer. Dr. Haggerty performs the final five radiation treatments in an operating room, as the treatment is invasive and requires anesthesia. This type of procedure is called brachytherapy, and is standard in the management of advanced cervical cancer. “The procedure delivers very high doses of radiation internally, directly to the tumor, and allows for significant sparing of the surrounding healthy tissues, such as the bowel and bladder,” says Haggerty. “This is an advanced service that I feel grateful to be able to perform here at NROC. It is really nice for patients to be able to stay close to family during a very challenging time.” While the entire team at Northeast Radiation Oncology Centers feels

Meghan S. Haggerty, M.D., is pictured with brachytherapy equipment.

privileged to provide hopeful, lifesaving care, they respect that survivorship of any cancer treatment can come at some cost. “As a young woman, and especially as a mother, I feel that some of the survivorship issues that cervical cancer patients have to deal with are especially hard. The acute side effects like fatigue, nausea, diarrhea, urinary frequency and skin irritation go away. However, once your fertility is taken from you, you never get it back. And the saddest thing of all is that if the disease is advanced enough, some women cannot be cured.”

pre-teens and teenagers talk about the issue at hand, educate themselves and their children about HPV, and that women regularly communicate with their physicians about their gynecological health.

Detailed information can be found online at www.cdc.gov/hpv. The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists generally suggests that women ages 21 to 29 have a Pap test every three years, and women ages 30 to 65 have a Pap test and HPV test concurrently every five years. It is further recommended Dr. Haggerty feels very that anyone interested in encouraged about the these topics should also future of cervical cancer. reach out to her or his “The good news is that own physicians. For more we will be seeing far less information on treatment cervical cancer in future and support services at years with the advent of NROC, please call HPV vaccination.” She advises that women, men 570-504-7200, or visit and parents of www.nrocdoctors.com.

NORTHEAST PENNSYLVANIA BUSINESS JOURNAL APRIL 2019 19 TS_CNG/ADVERTISING/AD_PAGES [ADB19] | 03/27/19

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FROM PAGE 18 Qualified programs provide a range of services for students and families in the surrounding community, from attending to episodic needs of students during the day and coordinating with outside primary care providers to acting as patients’ primary care medical home. To learn more about The Wright Center for Community Health’s School-Based Practice, visit bit.ly/2TzloAa. To learn more about NCQA School-Based Medical Home Recognition, visit bit.ly/2EWjcKH.

The Diocese of Scranton announces letter of intent with Allied Services for sale of health care facilities The Diocese of Scranton announced on Friday, March 8 that it received a non-binding letter of intent (LOI) for the sale of its long-term health care facilities in Wilkes-Barre. The Diocese entered into a due diligence agreement with Allied Services Integrated Health System, a locally-based, regional not-for-profit health system with a 60-year tradition of providing quality health care and human services with compassion and empathy. Assets included in the sale are: ■ Little Flower Manor, a 133-bed skilled nursing facility with 71 private rooms ■ St. Therese Residence, 60 units with access to the finest personal care services and amenities, as well as 15 units for patients requiring specialized memory impairment services ■ St. Luke’s Villa, a 50-bed skilled nursing unit, a 48-unit personal care facility and 31 independent living apartments Across the two campuses, services include 24-hour nursing care and rehabilitation for those

recovering from an illness, injury or surgery, personal care assistance and independent living spaces. The Diocesan-owned and operated facilities are non-profit, faith-based and missiondriven, and are the providers of choice in their service areas. Approximately 400 employees and volunteers care for the facilities’ 322 residents. For several years, Diocesan leadership has been evaluating its long-term care facilities. Given continued shifts in the health care industry, the Diocese of Scranton faced a number of challenges including decreased reimbursement rates and heightened regulations. The Diocese has been highly selective and considered a number of buyers. Allied Services has committed to utilizing its best efforts to retain current staff, whose dedication has helped maintain strong quality ratings and occupancy rates in recent years. Allied Services has also committed to preserving religious articles and artifacts. The sale of these facilities will allow the Diocese of Scranton to continue its commitment to serving the people of this region through core services such as food pantries, community outreach and emergency shelter programs. While the Diocese originally chose to explore selling these two facilities because of the evolving health care landscape, it has determined that proceeds from this sale may assist with funding the recently announced Independent Survivors Compensation Program. The due diligence process requires 90 days during which Allied Services will review the assets from a financial, operational and compliance standpoint. If Allied Services chooses to move forward with the sale, both parties will enter into an approval process before the sale is final.

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The Region’s Award-Winning Source of Business News and Information 570-348-9190 • 877-584-3561 149 Penn Avenue, Scranton, PA 18503 75 North Washington Street, Wilkes-Barre, PA 18711 mrade@timesshamrock.com 20 NORTHEAST PENNSYLVANIA BUSINESS JOURNAL TS_CNG/NPBJ/PAGES [B20] | 03/27/19

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Submitted photo

From left, Paul Dougherty, principal, West Scranton Intermediate School; and from The Wright Center for Community Health, Kellen Kraky, manager of student health services; Allyson Favuzza, doctor of nursing practice; Paige Miseo, certified medical assistant; and Debbra Irving, certified medical assistant. Kraky displays a certificate of recognition from the National Committee for Quality Assurance.


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Highmark and Geisinger complete joint venture for new health care organization will continue our work to deliver highquality care to patients whenever and wherever they need it.” Rice-Johnson and Dr. Ryu also noted that the new organization will work with independent physicians and community-based hospitals in the area to maintain access to care for regional consumers. New Clinical Facilities

Geisinger and Highmark Health announced the completion and details of a previously-announced clinical joint venture. The organizations signed a letter of intent to explore the joint venture in May 2017, and in the time since have been working together to plan and design new facilities and services that will improve access to needed primary care, specialty care and appropriate acute inpatient care in northcentral Pennsylvania. The agreement creates a new, notfor-profit health care organization that includes existing Geisinger locations and developing new facilities to expand access to care for those who need it most in a four-county region covering Clinton, Lycoming, Sullivan and Tioga counties. The new health care organization will include existing Geisinger Clinics and Careworks Urgent Care facilities in the Lock Haven and Williamsport areas to serve as key access points to care in the new health care organization. “We always strive to work with forward-thinking provider partners

who have a shared vision to improve health care and create positive experiences for members and patients,” said Deborah RiceJohnson, president, Highmark Health Plan. “Geisinger and Highmark have worked together for many, many months to design a collaboration that will bring innovative, valuebased care models to consumers in northcentral Pennsylvania.” The joint venture will serve both Highmark and Geisinger Health Plan members - including those in Medicare Advantage Plans - as well as patients with other insurance plans, Rice-Johnson added. “This is an important step forward for health care in the communities of northcentral Pennsylvania” said Jaewon Ryu, MD, interim president and CEO of Geisinger. “Geisinger and Highmark are committing more than $100 million to improve existing clinical facilities, develop new ones, expand services and improve access to care across the region, underscoring our shared commitment to the region and the patients we serve. Through this collaboration, we

In Lock Haven, a new two-story facility will be constructed, offering a walk-in urgent care center, adult and pediatric primary care offices and imaging and lab services. The new facility will also house physical and occupational therapy, as well as a specialty clinic with dermatology, cardiology, gastroenterology, surgery and women’s health services. In the Williamsport area, a new threestory, 119,500 square foot hospital and healthplex will be constructed in Muncy Township to meet emergency, routine and acute care needs. The new facility will include a full-service emergency department, as well as imaging and lab services. Medical oncology services, chemotherapy preparation and general surgery services will also be available. For more routine care, the healthplex will include a multi-specialty clinic with adult and pediatric primary care, orthopedics, cardiology, ophthalmology, pulmonary services and women’s health services. For hospital care, the Muncy Township facility will also house a state-of-the-art operating suite and 20 inpatient beds. “One of the most exciting features of the new relationship between Highmark and Geisinger is the way

we will care for our patients and members,” said Dr. Ryu. “We are transforming how care is delivered in this new HealthPlex in Muncy Township. Using telemedicine technology, patients will have access to specialists in Danville and across the Geisinger system without having to travel. This not only improves quality, access and convenience, but has the added benefit of reducing health care costs.” Improving Effectiveness and Reducing Costs The care delivery and payment models of the new health care organization are also designed to improve efficiency and effectiveness and reduce health care costs. “We have been caring for the people of northcentral Pennsylvania for more than 100 years, and as health care evolves we are looking to the future and anticipating what is needed to create health communities,” continued Dr. Ryu. “Alongside Highmark, we are actively taking steps to ensure that patients in these communities, many who are underserved, will have access to modern, state-of-the-art facilities and receive high-quality, affordable local care.” “By working together, sharing current resources and investing in new resources, I am confident that this new organization will achieve the goals of improved care efficiency and effectiveness and reduced costs,” said Rice-Johnson. “Through evidence-based care, population health management and value-based physician payment programs, this new health care organization will bring greater value and lower costs to northcentral Pennsylvania.”

NORTHEAST PENNSYLVANIA BUSINESS JOURNAL APRIL 2019 21 TS_CNG/ADVERTISING/AD_PAGES [ADB21] | 03/27/19

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You’re not alone

and neither are we.

Our community’s recovery plan can only be effective through unprecedented collaboration. Grassroots efforts and deep connections with our local social service agencies, health organizations, first responders and legal systems are enabling our Wright Center for Community Health team to reach individuals and families during some of their most challenging times.

If we can help you, or someone you know, get in touch today.

Call us at 570.230.0019

For more information on our program, as well as a list of additional Center of Excellence locations in Northeastern Pennsylvania, visit TheWrightCenter.org/COE 22 NORTHEAST PENNSYLVANIA BUSINESS JOURNAL TS_CNG/ADVERTISING/AD_PAGES [ADB22] | 03/27/19

APRIL 2019

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PERSONNEL FILE AAA NORTH PENN

Andrew Snyder was promoted to the position of Scranton office manager. Snyder started in the emergency road service department in April 2009. Later in October 2014, he was promoted to administrative assistant in the Scranton administrative office. In 2015, he took on SNYDER an additional responsibility to be trained and certified as a mature operator instructor for the Carbondale, Honesdale, Scranton, Stroudsburg, Montrose and Tunkhannock territories. In June 2017, he became the director of continuing education. Melissa N. Garcia, CPA, MBA, who served as conGARCIA troller since joining in 2013, was recently promoted as a member of the executive team. She was formerly employed as an audit supervisor by a local public accounting firm. Garcia is a member of both the American Institute of Certified Public Accountants and the Pennsylvania Institute of Certified Public Accountants. WASKEVICH Nina Waskevich, MBA, was promoted to the position of vice president brand and membership. Waskevich joined in 2013 as director of marketing/public relations. She formerly held various positions at a local credit union for 12 years, working her way up to vice president of sales. She has more than 15 years’ experience in marketing, sales and overall business operations.

A. PICKETT CONSTRUCTION INC.

James Solano was promoted to president and CEO of the company. He joined the firm 20 years ago and advanced to his present position through vast knowledge and experience in business operations, construction and safety, the company said. Solano is a former chairman of Associated Builders and Contractors Eastern Pennsylvania chapter and remains active SOLANO in the organization. He is a LEED Green Associate, a member of the Society of Professional Estimators, a member of the Construction Financial Management Association, Green Advantage Commercial certification, and holds numerous safety certifications. Levi Bonnice was BONNICE promoted to vice president.

He has been with the company since 2012 and was initially hired as chief estimator and project manager. His experience and reputation in the regional construction market continue to add value to the company, according to the firm, which said he has played a key role in the growth of the company. His expertise includes a wide variety of project experience, such as industrial, health care, retail, manufacturing, renovations, educational and food service sectors.

ADMAR CONSTRUCTION EQUIPMENT & SUPPLIES

Chris Towns has been hired as rental coordinator in the Wilkes-Barre office. In his new role, Towns will be responsible for customer service across multiple communication channels. In addition, he will write contracts, make reservations and assign equipment. Towns joins the team from HSA Engineering Consultants, where he spent TOWNS 13 years as a computer-aided draftsman and designer.

BETTER HOMES AND GARDENS REAL ESTATE WILKINS & ASSOCIATES

Kathleen A. Caponigro, a Realtor, joined the firm and is licensed with the Stroudsburg office at the BHG Business Campus. Caponigro has been a member of the Pocono Mountains Association of Realtors and a licensed real estate salesperson since 1994. CAPONIGRO She formerly worked for Century 21 Unlimited, where she was recognized as a Bronze Award winner in 2009. She has trained, mentored and developed several top-producing Realtors and personnel throughout her career.

CHAMBER OF THE NORTHERN POCONOS AND THE GREATER HONESDALE PARTNERSHIP

Keith Williams has been selected as the new president of both organizations. Williams has extensive WILLIAMS experience and background in business and tourism. As the president, Williams will oversee the staff of both organizations and be visible and available to Honesdale and the greater northern Pocono region.

CLASSIC PROPERTIES

Melissa Donlick joined the realty firm’s Kingston office. She was raised in Tunkhannock and earned an associate degree in applied science from Luzerne County Community College.

DONLICK

Donlick recently completed her real estate education from the Pennsylvania Real Estate Academy in Luzerne County.

COMMONWEALTH HEALTH

Seven employees became certified training instructors by completing an Advanced Stroke Life Support course at a seminar in Miami. They will serve as trained instructors for Commonwealth Health Emergency Medical Services, the only training center in Northeast Pennsylvania. The curriculum will be offered in the inpatient setting and pre-hospital setting. It will create a standardized internal stroke course throughout the health system and establish pre-hospital stroke advocates through network personnel while expanding educational offerings to regional agencies. Those attending included five CHEMS employees and two registered nurses on staff at Wilkes-Barre General Hospital: Robert Rutkowski, Greg Moran, Carmen Passaniti, Margaret Harris and Chassidy Babcock, and Bernadette Royce and Lisa Misson. The health system also announced its 2018 Employee of the Year award winners. Each hospital names an Employee of the Year, Clinical Manager of the Year and Manager of the Year. The Employee of the Year and a guest are honored at an awards celebration in Franklin, Tennessee. The trip includes a stay in Nashville and tours of that city’s sights. Employees of the Year are: Molly Maciejewski, Berwick, is a financial counselor at Berwick Hospital Center. She has been employed by the hospital for five years. Judith Vispi, Jessup, is a certified nursing assistant at Moses Taylor Hospital and has been with the hospital since 2007. Jill Monko, West Wyoming, is a staffing coordinator in the nursing administration department, Regional Hospital

MACIEJEWSKI

VISPI

MONKO

THOMAS

JONES

ZALOGA

of Scranton. She joined the hospital staff in 2007. Courtney Thomas, Noxen, has been employed by Tyler Memorial Hospital for two years. She is a phlebotomist in the hospital laboratory. Annette Jones, Dallas, is a registered nurse at WilkesBarre General Hospital who has been with the hospital for almost 28 years. She is a coordinator in the rehabilitation department. The Clinical Managers of the Year are: Sally Zaloga, Tresckow, is director of imaging at Berwick Hospital Center and has been employed by the hospital since 2014. Christina Walsh, Kingston, is a psychiatric nurse manager in the adult mental health unit at First Hospital. She joined the staff in 2007. David Soltis, Jessup, is manager of Advanced Imaging Specialists, Dunmore, a Moses Taylor Hospital site. He joined the hospital staff in 2003. Deborah DeSando, Old Forge, is director of the clinical laboratory, respiratory and patient transport departments at Regional Hospital. She joined the staff in 2016. Peg Rogers, Montrose, is director of surgical services. She has been with Tyler Memorial Hospital for 27 years. Kathy Oross, White Haven, is director of the Same Day Surgery Center at Wilkes-Barre General Hospital, where she has worked since 2003. Non-Clinical Managers of the Year are: Linda Makowski, Wapwallopen, is director of health information management at Berwick Hospital Center. She also directs the HIM department at WilkesBarre General Hospital. Mary Kasper, Scranton, is a registered nurse and serves as director of quality and risk management at Moses Taylor. She has worked at the hospital since 2007. Christine Wilczewski, Dalton, is the risk manager at Regional Hospital of Scranton. She has been an employee for 13 years.

WALSH

SOLTIS

DESANDO

ROGERS

OROSS

MAKOWSKI

Please see Personnel, Page 24

NORTHEAST PENNSYLVANIA BUSINESS JOURNAL APRIL 2019 23 TS_CNG/NPBJ/PAGES [B23] | 03/27/19

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PERSONNEL FILE

FROM PAGE 23 Lois Schillinger-Gregory, Tunkhannock, is OccuCare manager at Tyler Memorial Hospital. She joined the staff in 2006. Anne Marie Zimmerman, Hunlock Creek, is director of quality risk management at Wilkes-Barre General Hospital. She has been employed for almost 30 years.

DIME BANK

Paula A. Ralston Nenish, MBA, CIA, CRMA, CCBCO, CRCM, vice president, compliance officer and community reinvestment act officer, was recently awarded the Certified Regulatory Compliance Manager professional designation from the American Bankers Association. Ralston Nenish, who joined the bank in 2013, is responsible for the direction and oversight of the bank’s compliance management system including developing the compliance plan, which covers compliance administration, monitoring, training, board reporting and complaint resolution. She formerly served as director of internal audit for a local financial institution.

KASPER

WILCZEWSKI

SCHILLINGERGREGORY

EVERCOR FACILITY MANAGEMENT

Lawrence P. Berti has joined the self-performing facilities maintenance firm specializing in the maintenance and support of commercial and industrial facilities. Berti will be responsible for expanding the company’s customer base and increasing brand engagement with core customers by broadening the depth of services provided to each client. With 36 years of experience in the sales industry, he formerly worked for Coates Toners in Dallas, starting as a sales executive and eventually becoming CMO in 2008. During his time there, he developed, organized and managed key strategic relationships to drive multimillion-dollar sales initiatives.

ZIMMERMAN

RALSTON NENISH

GEISINGER

Sandra Culbertson, M.D., a board-certified urogynecologist, has been named chairwoman of the health system’s Institute of Women and Children. In this new role, Culbertson will not only oversee women’s services across the system but also children’s services, including general pediatrics and pediatric subspecialties. Culbertson also will CULBERTSON be caring for patients in Danville and Wilkes-Barre, focusing on the treatment of recurrent urinary incontinence and prolapse. She previously spent more than 20 years at the University of Chicago, where she was the vice chairwoman of the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology. M. Justin Coffey, M.D., a board-certified psychiatrist and behavioral neurologist, has been named chairman of the Department of Psychiatry, Addiction Medicine and Behavioral Health. Coffey will lead a team whose expertise spans all aspects of psychiatric care, addiction medicine, neuropsychology and behavioral COFFEY health across the health system. He will also oversee education and training programs in psychiatry, adult psychology, neuropsychology and pediatric psychology. He most recently served as vice president and chief information officer at the Menninger Clinic in Houston, where he was also the medical director of the Menninger Center for Brain Stimulation.

GEISINGER COMMONWEALTH SCHOOL OF MEDICINE

FIDELITY BANK

The bank recently honored financial professionals celebrating career mile-

stones at the annual gala at the Scranton Cultural Center at the Masonic Temple. The following bankers earned service awards: Katelyn Abraham, Cynthia Cacioppo, James Igoe, Michael Karpovich, Carol Petliski, David Saxton and Sarah Sorrells were acknowledged for five years of service. Michael Coury, Cynthia Dopko, Carey Garvey, Delbert James, Lisa Minor, Tim O’Brien, Joanne Pezzuti, Marian Puzycki, Jill Valentini and Amanda Vinciguerra were honored for 10 years of service. Joann Marsili, Jason McCabe, Michelle McMaster, and Wayne Parker celebrated 15 years of service. Frank Cimino, Yvonne Del Rosso, Mary Ann Marranca and Melissa Sadaka were recognized for 20 years of service. Susan Lucas, Maureen Polster and Chris Sledzinski were acknowledged for 25 years of service. Jack Ferrett celebrated 35 years of service, and Patricia Bohan was honored for 50 years of service.

BERTI

Gregory A. Shanower, Ph.D., of Clarks Summit, assistant professor of molecular

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biology, will assume the role of program director of the school’s master of biomedical sciences program as of July 1. He will also continue to teach the school’s MD and MBS students. In addition to overseeing the curriculum coordination and curricular administration, he will work to expand the program into the online learning environment. He will also coordinate core curriculum between the MBS program and the upcoming portfolio of precision health graduate programs. Finally, he will develop multiple pathways for success for the MBS students.

SHANOWER

HOURIGAN, KLUGER & QUINN PC

ALPERT

GREATER SCRANTON CHAMBER OF COMMERCE

The region’s premier member-based business organization announces the following people have been named to its board of directors for three-year terms. Megan Alpert, a senior financial adviser with Preate, Behr, Alpert and Yanoski Group of Merrill Lynch Ryan Flynn, senior vice president and market manager for Entercom WilkesBarre/Scranton Jessica Kalinoski, director of operations for Admiral Management Services Eric Pusey, R.Ph., owner of Medicap Pharmacy in Olyphant Alana Roberts, regional affairs director for the Northeast Region for PPL Corp.

FLYNN

KALINOSKI

HONESDALE (NATIONAL BANK

Three employees with 15 years of service and nine employees with 10 years of service were recognized at the bank’s annual employee recognition dinner at Lukan’s Farm Resort. The 15-year honorees received a special gift in recognition of their 15 years of service. The honorees were Kim Canfield, head teller, Montdale office; Debbie Miller, BSA assistant, corporate center; and Ron Sebastianelli, vice president, chief lending officer, corporate center. The 10-year honorees

received a golden lapel pin with a diamond, signifying their decade of service to the bank. Those recognized were Kaitlyn Carroll, head teller/CSR, Eynon office; Ray Ceccotti, senior vice president, branch administrator, corporate center; John Conte, loan officer, Main Street Honesdale office; Christopher Cook, vice president, commercial loan officer, corporate center; Jeanne Frank, trust clerk, corporate center; Theresa Halliday, assistant branch manager, Main Street Honesdale office; Maggie Klim, receptionist, corporate center; Neil Neumann, PC support specialist, corporate center; and Melissa Rushworth, assistant vice president, branch manager, Forest City office. Attorney Kevin M. Walsh Jr. joined the law firm’s commercial team in the Kingston office. Walsh will be specializing in real estate transactions, banking and creditors’ rights, zoning and tax assessment appeals matters. Walsh worked as an associate attorney with Donald G. Karpowich, WALSH Attorney-at-Law PC for the past nine years, where he litigated numerous cases in various jurisdictions. He is a member of the Supreme Court of Pennsylvania, the United States District Court for the Middle District of Pennsylvania and the United States Court of Appeals for the Third Circuit. Attorney Christopher C. Quinn joined the personal injury team in the Kingston office. Quinn will be specializing in product liability, medical malpractice and auto negligence. He served as law clerk to the Honorable Terrence R. Nealon, where he conducted legal research, edited and evaluated the legal analyses in drafts of written opinions, prepared bench memoranda, and attended oral QUINN arguments, conferences and trials. He is a member of the Pennsylvania Bar Association. Quinn is a current board member and cofounding member of the Cody Jude Barrasse Memorial Foundation.

JOHNSON COLLEGE

PUSEY

ROBERTS

The college announced the promotion of Liz Renda as chief financial officer. Renda began her career in higher education at Johnson College in 2011. She brings to the college more than 15 years of accounting experience and involvement as a community leader. She volunteers annually with the Jude Zayac Foundation RENDA and is active in programs at St. Clare/St. Paul School in Scranton. Please see Personnel, Page 25


PERSONNEL FILE FROM PAGE 24

KEYSTONE CONTRACTORS ASSOCIATION

John Panzitta of Panzitta Enterprises Inc., based in Wilkes-Barre, was named vice president of the association. David Miorelli, Joseph Miorelli & Co., based in Hazleton, is serving on the board of directors. The association represents the leading commercial construction companies in Pennsylvania and provides valuable member services such as education and training, career development, safety, labor relations, government relations and community service.

KING’S COLLEGE

Drums resident Dr. Christopher Aults, assistant professor of psychology, was recently awarded the 2018 Association for Women in Psychology Distinguished Publication Award for a paper he co-authored. The paper, “Psychological Androgyny and Children’s Mental Health: A New Look with New Measures,” was discussed at this year’s AWP Symposium in Newport, Rhode Island. The paper resulted from a study of over 500 children, AULTS aged 10 to 13, and found that children who possess the selfperception of psychological androgyny, perceiving the self to possess characteristics of both genders, had better indicators of mental health.

LANDMARK COMMUNITY BANK

Chris Hackett has been named to the bank’s board of directors. An entrepreneur for more than 25 years, Hackett currently leads five businesses: Business Process Outsourcing, Polymer Manufacturing, Insurance Brokerage, Temporary Staffing and Executive Search and Recruiting. He earned his certified HACKETT public accountant designation in 1986 and his certified management accountant designation in 1987. In 2015, Hackett was appointed by Gov. Tom Wolf to the Workforce Investment Board.

MISERICORDIA UNIVERSITY

Matthew Nickel, Ph.D., assistant professor of English, has been named to a three-year term on the board of directors of the Hemingway Foundation and Society. The international organization is the largest single-author society in the world. Nickel has dedicated much of his scholarly research and teaching to the study of Hemingway. His expertise was recognized when he was selected to co-direct the Hemingway Society’s 2018 biennial conference, along with H.R. Stoneback, Ph.D., the NICKEL world’s leading scholar on

Hemingway. The 2018 conference was held in Paris and was the largest gathering of Hemingway scholars in history.

NAVIENT

Lori Ellis, a 15-year company employee, was honored with the company’s Solutions Navigator Award. The process engineer was recognized for spearheading innovative tools to support the company’s continuing journey of customer communications improvement. The quarterly award recognizes an employee who demonstrates one or more of the company’s core values: customer-centricity, proactivity, leadership, stability, integrity and innovation. Ellis played a key role in piloting a new application for customer service specialists to provide customers with more complex student loan questions, and clear and customized information about their specific accounts.

NBT BANK

Matt Colgan has been promoted to regional commercial banking manager. Colgan has more than a decade of banking experience. He joined the bank in 2008 as a part of the commercial banking development program. Since then, he has assumed positions of increasing responsibility, including commercial banking relationship manager. Colgan, a resident of Simpson, is a board member for the Scranton Enterprise Center and King’s College McGowan School of Business and is a graduate COLGAN of Leadership Wilkes-Barre. Thomas Sohns has been promoted to vice president. Sohns has nearly 10 years of experience in the financial services industry and serves as a commercial banking relationship manager. Before joining the bank, he worked as a business banking officer and commercial lender for FNB Corp. SOHNS Sohns, a resident of Dunmore, serves on the board for Dress for Success Lackawanna.

NEPA YOUTH SHELTER

The organization announced the election of Dorothy Grill, April Guse, Richard Pica and John Rosengrant to its board of directors. Their terms began Feb. 10.

NORTH BRANCH LAND TRUST

Mollie Maseychik of Clarks Summit was appointed to the board of directors. Maseychik is president/principal of R.S. Maseychik Agency Inc. in Scranton. Maseychik has been involved with the ALS Association’s 5K Walk/Run, the Scranton High School Music Program and with local theater productions.

NORTHEAST REGIONAL CANCER INSTITUTE Holly Roever Carron

MASEYCHIK

was named chair for the cancer institute’s 16th Annual CASUAL (Colon cancer Awareness Saves Unlimited Adult Lives) Day. Carron is president at HW Roever Inc., an independent, family-operated franchisee of Dunkin’ Donuts. She is a member of several local community-minded boards. such as Leadership Lackawanna. Carron is currently a member of the Dunkin’ Brands Wilkes-Barre/Scranton Ad Committee assisting in making marketing dcisions for 78 stores. CASUAL Day, held on March 28, is a dress-down day to raise awareness for colorectal cancer in Northeast Pennsylvania.

PENN STATE SCRANTON

An article researched and written by Dr. Michael Evans, M.S.Ed., RN, ACNS, CMSRN, CNE, instructor in nursing Kelly Worozbyt, MSN, R.N., campus alumna Kiernan Riley (at the time a senior honors BSN student, now a BSN-Ph.D. student in the College of Nursing at University Park, and Scranton honors nursing student Kalei Kowalchik has been accepted for publication in MedSurg Matters, the official newsletter of the Academy of Medical-Surgical Nurses. Caring for a Patient with Pneumonia with Schizophrenia in a MedicalSurgical Setting highlights the important aspect of caring for a patient with mental illness and an acute illness in a medical/surgical setting. In addition, this manuscript is significant because Worozbyt and Evans collaborated because of their two specialty areas: medical/surgical nursing for Evans and mental health nursing for Worozbyt.

PENNSYLVANIA DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION

EVANS

WOROZBYT

RILEY

Richard Roman, PE, has been appointed the acting KOWALCHIK district executive for the northeastern region of the department. In this acting role, Roman is responsible for overseeing all functions in District 4, which serves Lackawanna, Luzerne, Pike, Susquehanna, Wayne and Wyoming counties. Roman began his career in 1997 as a transportation construction inspector. Over the years, he progressed through various roadway programs and civil engineering positions. Since 2014, Roman has served as the highway administration bureau director for the Bureau of Maintenance and Operations.

RJ BURNE CADILLAC

David Wert of WilkesBarre joined the Cadillac dealership on Wyoming Avenue in Scranton. He is a 20-year veteran of the automotive industry.

SCRANTON AREA COMMUNITY FOUNDATION

WERT Kevin Salaway, Harveys Lake, has joined the foundation as senior director of development. He has more than 15 years in development and university advancement, having served as vice president for advancement at the University System of Georgia, Brunswick Campus, and director of development and university relations at Penn State University, Hazleton Campus. He served as past president of the American Advertising Federation Northeastern Pa. chapter, former board member of SALAWAY the Hazleton Chamber of Commerce and Industry and the YMCA of Greater Hazleton. He was also a founding member and subcommittee chair for the Luzerne County Diversity Commission.

SCRANTON LACKAWANNA INDUSTRIAL BUILDING CO.

The not-for-profit industrial development affiliate of the Greater Scranton Chamber of Commerce has named its board of directors for 2018-19. They include Marianne Gilmartin, president; Bob Durkin, executive vice president; James J. Peters and Penny Common, vice presidents; Virginia Goodrich, secretary; Susan Duckworth, treasurer; Andrew Hailstone, Jennifer Davis, Alex Stark, Vincent A. Bonaddio, Charles C. Jefferson, Alana Roberts, Kenneth G. Okrepkie, Richard R. Beasley, Donald Brominski, Joseph Ferretti, Christopher L. DiMattio, Thomas Baileys, Philip P. Condron, Frank J. Fata, Paul D. Horger, Patricia P. Acker, Raymond S. Angeli, Lawrence C. Malski and Robert Markowski.

ST. JOSEPH’S CENTER

Three Direct Support Professionals of the Year were honored for their dedication to the Mission of St. Joe’s at the recent center board meeting at the IHM Center. Each honoree received a framed artwork created by St. Joe’s residents. Michele Mandarano of Scranton has worked as a coach for Community Support Services for more than three years. She was nominated for and given the award because she demonstrates respect and great insight to those she serves, administrators said. She takes time to learn about the people she supports before she MANDARANO suggests a plan. Please see Personnel, Page 26

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PERSONNEL FILE

FROM PAGE 25 She pays close attention to their rights and gives them the confidence to be able to enjoy their lives. She is completely focused on each person she is supporting. Sean Greguske of Blakely is a community support professional working for five years in the Community Living Arrangement homes. He was chosen for his demonstration of the center’s core values in his interactions with the men he serves and with his co-workers, administrators said. He also seeks opportunities outside the home that enrich the lives of the men he serves and enrich the community. Sean and two men in the home are active participants at Divine Mercy Parish Masses and events. Terry Weber of Olyphant is a direct GREGUSKE support professional of 12 years at the Main Center (Intermediate Care Facility). The men in her care are nonverbal and almost completely dependent on her to meet their every need, physically and emotionally. She also had the pleasure of including one of her clients in several of her family events after she found mutual interests. She was chosen for the award because she has opened up the world to one young man and actively looks for new occasions to help them feel safe, connected and successful, administrators said. Also included in the recognition was Hannah Ruddy of Lake Ariel, WEBER an adult day services assistant at the center’s Luzerne County site. She has been working in this position for 2½ years and offers direct support including personal care, developmental programming and sincere encouragement to each of the 20 people who receive services, administrators said. Ruddy’s interest in the people she serves recently led her to accept a position at the center’s Hughestown Intermediate Care, home where five-day services participants live.

SUSTAINABLE ENERGY EDUCATION AND DEVELOPMENT SUPPORT

Sandy Long was named the organization’s new executive director. The nonprofit environmental education organization based in Honesdale serves the northeastern region of the state, promoting sustainable energy and sustainable living. Long is an award-winning writer, photographer and artist who focuses pen and lens on environmental, cultural and community issues. She is co-founder of Heron’s Eye Communications and, following a career in higher education administration, freelanced for publications in the Upper Delaware River region and worked as a staff photojournalist and columnist for The River Reporter.

UNITED GILSONITE LABORATORIES

The global leader in specialty paint and construction coatings announced the appointment of Joseph M. McGraw to senior vice president of North American sales and Michele Margotta Neary to vice president of marketing. McGraw has more than 30 years of leadership experience at the company. He has a proven record of building, driving and leading sales strategies with the ability to run an effective, efficient sales process, the company said. In his previous position as vice president of marketing, McGraw proved that he can take the company’s established history and push the company to the next level. Neary joined in 2012 as director of public relations and progressed to media buyer and most recently McGRAW senior director of corporate communication and brand marketing. Neary will step into the vice president of marketing role with a mission to continue the company’s success in the home improvement/coatings industry and will be responsible for monitoring and implementing brand strategies to achieve annual objectives and create NEARY pathways for long-term growth.

institutional memorandum toward proposing a prison education initiative entailing an associate’s and eventual bachelor’s degree, through the University of Scranton.” Hengameh Hosseini, Ph.D., assistant professor of health administration and human resources, received a grant to study “Misinformation in YouTube videos about sarcopenia and frailty in older Americans: Content and network analysis.” Andrew LaZella, Ph.D., associate professor of philosophy, received a grant to study “StatusNominalism and the Problem of Universals.” Mohammad Maktoomi, Ph.D., assistant professor of physics/electrical engineering, received a grant to study “Dual-Band RF Energy Harvesting Circuit for IOTs.” Sufyan Mohammed, Ph.D., associate professor of communication, received a grant to study “The Evolution of Social Media Use by Corporate India over the Past Decade: How the Top 500 Companies in India Utilize Digital and Social Media for Customer Relationship Management and Media Relations.” Masood Otarod, Sc.D., professor of mathematics, received a grant to study “Factorization model: Dimensionally reduced dispersion model for the performance assessment of packed catalytic reactors.” Ann Pang-White, Ph.D., professor of philosophy, received a grant to study “Knowledge, Virtue and Akrasia in Early Confucian Ethics.” Janice Voltzow, Ph.D., professor of biology, received a grant to study the “Structure and Function of Abalone, Delicious and Beautiful Snails.”

Deborah Goguen-Ellis joined as regional vice president of sales. She will lead the company’s sales and marketing team with 18 years of industry experience. Goguen-Ellis formerly served as regional sales manager, vice president at MBH Settlement Services headquartered in Chantilly, Virginia. With her extensive experience in team building and leadership, she launched a wholesale office for Wachovia in 2005 where her sales and operational team quickly became the top producer in the United States. She also earned the highest market share growth of 65 percent in Community Lending Sales in 2014, and in 2015 she had the highest Return of Equity average of 10 percent with 75 accounts.

Ronald DePasquale was promoted to facilities officer. He joined the bank in 1998 and has held several titles during his tenure. He is an Army veteran and was stationed in Korea for 18 months. Gerald Arnese was promoted to assistant vice president. He joined the bank in December 2013 as the resource recovery officer and currently serves as the installment lending officer in the Centralized Lending Department. He has more than 23 years of banking experience. Wendy Olsen was promoted to assistant manager of the Milford Community Office. She joined the bank in October 2015 and, before this promotion, served as branch specialist for the Milford Community Office. She has more than 10 years of banking experience. Frank Sislo was promoted to vice president. He joined the bank in February 2012 and currently serves as the consumer

UNITED ONE

UNIVERSITY OF SCRANTON

The university awarded faculty development intersession grants for 2019-11 faculty members from eight departments. Maureen Carroll, Ph.D., professor of mathematics, received a grant to study “Geometry in Motion.” Will Cohen, Ph.D., associate professor of theology and religious studies, received a grant to study “Aarhus 1964 and the Dialogue between Orthodox and Oriental Orthodox Christians.” Eleni Gousgounis, Ph.D., associate professor of economics and finance, received a grant to study “Why do new futures contracts succeed or fail? The case of the FTSE Emerging Index Futures contract.” Christopher Haw, Ph.D., assistant professor of theology and religious studies, received a grant to work on “The development of an

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WAYNE BANK

DePASQUALE

ARNESE

lending manager. He has more than 13 years of consumer lending experience.

WAYNE MEMORIAL COMMUNITY HEALTH CENTER

Wynter Newman received the Employee SISLO of the Year Award at the annual holiday and awards dinner held Feb. 2 at Silver Birches in Tafton. Newman has been employed by the health center for eight years. She oversees the medical practices of Honesdale Family Health Center, Honesdale VA Outpatient Clinic, Northern Wayne Family Health Center, Honesdale Pulmonary and NEWMAN Sleep Medicine and most recently, the McAndrew and Carbondale Family Health Centers. Newman resides in Lakewood.

WAYNE MEMORIAL HOSPITAL

Chief Financial Officer Mike Clifford retired Dec. 31, more than 40 years after he started at the hospital. Clifford, who was raised in Avoca in Luzerne County but has lived in Honesdale for many years, played a big role in the hospital’s sustainability. Nadine Greco, M.S., Dunmore, manager of cardiac rehabilitation for the hospital’s cardiac rehabilitation Clifford department, became a fellow of the American Association of Cardiovascular and Pulmonary Rehabilitation during the group’s annual conference in Louisville, Kentucky, in September. Greco, who has been with the hospital for more than two decades, has been very involved with the association at both the state and national levels. She was president of the Tri-State GRECO American Association of Cardiovascular and Pulmonary Rehabilitation from 2014-15. Greco, along with several registered nurses, founded the department and program in 1993.

WELLS FARGO ADVISORS

Tony Biscotto, a resident of West Pittston, has joined the Allentown branch as a financial advisor, vice president — investments. He formerly served as a vice president at M&T Securities for 20 years.

OLSEN

BISCOTTO

Please see Personnel, Page 27


PERSONNEL FILE FROM PAGE 26 At M&T Securities, he managed more than $60 million in client assets. The Allentown office now has 35 financial advisers serving investors in the Allentown area. Biscotto’s office is located at 1 S. Main St., Pittston.

WILKES UNIVERSITY

The university recognized 16 faculty and staff members with nine awards for excellence in teaching and advising at the 2018 Teacher Recognition and Effectiveness Committee Awards Ceremony. The recipients of this year’s awards are: Edward Foote, former professor of pharmacy practice and department chair, received the Carpenter Award for Teaching. The award, considered the university’s highest honor for teaching, recognizes an outstanding member of the faculty and includes a $1,000 award and framed certificate. The award recipient is nominated by his or her full-time colleagues and must have been a full-time employee for at least three years. Kristina Powers, experiential coordinator in pharmacy practice, received the Academic Support Award. This award is given to a member of the staff who facilitates classroom or experiential initiatives and learning among students. Academic support is defined as an individual who is not on faculty at the university, but participates in educational offerings including classroom activities, laboratory activities or coordination of experiential learning opportunities. Powers joined as an adjunct clinical instructor and experiential coordinator in the department of pharmacy practice in 2015 and has a clinical practice site at the Geisinger Call Center in Wilkes-Barre. Morgan Clevenger, former assistant professor of entrepreneurship; Jennifer Malinowski, assistant dean of academic affairs and assessment in pharmacy practice; and Marie Roke Thomas, associate professor of pharmaceutical sciences, received the Interdisciplinary Teaching Award. The award is given annually to recognize one crossdisciplinary team of teachers that demonstrates outstanding initiatives in the classroom to further the ideals of interdisciplinary learning. They developed an interdisciplinary approach to challenge students to incorporate new pharmacy accreditation standards of innovation and entrepreneurship into their approach to finding solutions to reduce medication errors. Students were encouraged to identify solutions from a range of disciplines outside of pharmacy that could lead to a better understanding of medication errors and to gain a broader perspective to the solution. The concept of a “Shark Tank” business perspective was introduced to inspire an integration of different ideas. Nicole Pezzino, assistant professor of pharmacy practice, received the Outstanding New Faculty Award. The award recognizes one full-time, nonvisiting faculty member in his or her second or third year of full-time teaching at the university who demonstrates excellence in teaching, advising and service. The award recipient is nominated by his or her department chair.

Daniel Longyhore, associate professor of pharmacy practice, received the Alumni Mentoring Award. The alumni-nominated award recognizes a teacher who continues to mentor students post-graduation. Andrew Miller, associate professor of political science, received the Innovative and Non-Traditional Teaching Award. The student-nominated award recognizes a teacher who successfully incorporates innovative or nontraditional strategies into at least one class. Teaching innovation includes effective small group, collaborative methods; advanced use of technology in the classroom; consistent studentcentered, interactive classroom experience; engagement in outside-the-classroom learning experiences that enrich student mastery of concepts and theories; and engaging students in joint faculty-student research projects. Zbigniew Witczak, professor and chair of pharmaceutical sciences, received the Scholarship Award. This is awarded to a faculty member who demonstrates commendable success in the area of research and scholarly activity that influences the university and its students. Witczak’s research is in the area of thio sugars and carbohydrate synthons, including Levoglucosenone and L-Arabinose as templates for carbohydrate-based therapeutics. Dorinda McHenry, adjunct professor in education, was awarded the Adjunct Faculty Award. The award goes to an adjunct faculty instructor who demonstrates excellence in teaching through innovative practices and forming relationships with students. McHenry taught differentiated reading, assessment in education, adolescent literature, content area literacy and accommodation and adaptation in literacy to undergraduates in the School of Education. Blake Mackesy, assistant professor in graduate education, was awarded the Multiculturalism Award. The award goes to a faculty member who demonstrates leadership in the advancement of multiculturalism ideals in the classroom. The Outstanding Advisor Award is a studentnominated award that recognizes one academic adviser from each college who demonstrates excellence in academic advising based on load, advising philosophy and testimony by advisees. This year’s recipients are: Megan Jones, Act 101-program coordinator, Outstanding Advisor Award for University College. Helen Davis, associate professor of English, Outstanding Advisor Award for the College of Arts, Humanities & Social Sciences. Ka Lok Hong, assistant professor of pharmaceutical sciences, Outstanding Advisor Award for the Nesbitt School of Pharmacy. Prahlad Murthy, associate dean and professor of environmental engineering and earth science and geology, Outstanding Advisor Award for the College of Science and Engineering. Paul Reinert, assistant professor of graduate teacher education, received the Outstanding Advisor Award for the School of Education.

SUBMIT PERONNEL FILE items to business@timesshamrock.com or (The Times-Tribune, 149 Penn Ave., Scranton, PA 18503.

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FOR THE RECORD DEEDS

COLUMBIA COUNTY

John Sikalias. Property Location: Bloomsburg. Seller: Seitzinger Group. Amount: $350,000. Todd W. Kreisher. Property Location: Bloomsburg. Seller: Seitzinger Group. Amunt: $512,000. Redner Real Estate LLC. Property Location; Benton Twp. Seller: Mill Race Golf Club & Camping Resort Inc. NKA 523 Enterprises Inc. Amount: $650,000. Gardner Realty Investments LLC. Property Location: Berwick. Seller: Robert P. Powell. Amount: $475,000. Abram Smoker. Property Location: Greenwood Twp. Seller: James E. Fausey. Amount: $360,000. Gerald L. Avery. Property Location: Fishingcreek Twp. Seller: William A. & Shirley M. Avery Family Trust. Amount: $400,000. Alan C. Kemmerer. Property Location: South Centre Twp. Seller: Robert A. Seesholtz. Amount: $400,000.

LACKAWANNA COUNTY

Judge Family Estates LLC. Property Location: Clifton Twp. Seller: Leonard E. Watkins. Amount: $335,000. John A. Kwasna. Property Location: Covington Twp. Seller: Garbarczyk Zygmunt. Amount: $350,000. Kathleen Elaine Fage. Property Location: Dunmore Boro. Seller: Helping Hands Property Care LLC. Amount: $390,000. D V R Adams. Property Location: Fell Twp. Seller: Carol M. Datto Est. of Decd. Amount: $700,000. Cheryl Roback Flynn. Property Location: Greenfield Twp. Seller: Charles Rogers Sr. Amount: $259,000. Christopher Ryan Stafford. Property Location: Jefferson Twp. Seller: Outlook Design & Construction Inc. Amount: $376,000. Robert Weidow. Property Location: Mayfield Boro. Seller: Thaddeus J. Manchak. Amount: $350,000. Weichert Workforce Mobility Inc. Property Location: Newton Twp. Seller: Kenneth D. Price. Amount: $349,500. Lisa Armetta. Property Location: Newton Twp. Seller: Weichert Workforce Mobility Inc. Amount: $349,500. William Blazejewicz. Property Location: Ransom Twp. Seller: Bradley D. Glynn. Amount: $285,000. Emmett Oberrdender. Property Location: Roaring Brook Twp. Seller: Ann Donna Moody. Amount: $425,000. Viridi Pascua LLC. Property Location: Scranton City. Seller: Leonid Manannikov. Amount: $250,000. Charles J. McAvoy. Property Location: So. Abington Twp. Seller: Herbert S. Hollenberg. Amount: $275,000. Keystone Company. Property Location: Throop Boro. Seller: Underwood Realty Co. Inc. Amount: $329,900. Robert Brehm. Property Location: Vandling Boro. Seller: Robert Vandling. Amount: $250,000. Richard Gerrity Jr. Property Location: Unknown. Seller: Brian Maxwell. Amount: $252,000. William T. Botke. Property Location: Unknown. Seller: John A. Kutz. Amount: $647,000. Louis Demarco Jr. Property Location: Unknown. Seller: Maryann Veno Extrx. Amount: $275,000. Francis E. Brieden. Property Location: Unknown. Seller: MSA Inc. Amount: $275,000.

LUZERNE COUNTY

Lisa K. Strawser. Property Location: Nuangola. Seller: Susan E. McLaine. Amount: $251,000. Chad L. Kelley. Property Location: Dallas Twp. Seller: David L. Dillon Jr. Amount: $555,000. Stark Street Holdings LLC. Property Location: Plains Twp. Seller: Legacy Weavers LLC. Amount: $635,000. Christopher Altieri. Property Location: Butler Twp. Seller: Thomas M. Dbortoii. Amount: $407,000. Terry Holmes Ogle Jr. Property Location: Dallas Twp. Seller: Lewis W. Wetzel. Amount: $320,000. Christopher Thomas Rivera. Property Location: Rice Twp. Seller: Thomas J. Rushton. Amount: $286,000. Ambica Properties LLC. Property Location: Plains

Twp. Seller: Andrew P. Jezycki. Amount: $$345,000. Valley Crest Real Estate LP. Property Location: Plains Twp. Seller: Francis J. Murray. Amount: $424,748. Citi MG LLC. Property Location: Wilkes-Barre. Seller: Empire Street Realty LLC. Amount: $770,000. Aimee Nicole Fritzges. Property Location: Dallas Twp. Seller: Eastern Communities Limited Partnership. Amount: $323,338. Jarrett J. Ferentino. Property Location: Jenkins Twp. Seller: John J. Terrana. Amount: $650,000. Brenda Pugh. Property Location: Dallas Twp. Seller: Joseph B. Sabo. Amount: $350,000. Daniel J. Brooks. Property Location: Fairmount Twp. Seller: James Bonner. Amount: $415,000. Torey B. Sattof. Property Location: Kingston Twp. Seller: Charles Cherkas. Amount: $$275,000. J&K Humboldt Station LP. Property Location: Hazle Twp. Seller: Greater Hazleton Community Area New Development Organization Inc. Amount: $758,525. Michael M. Luksic. Property Location: Kingston Twp. Seller: Wendy E. Lipka. Amount: $395,000. Michael J. Kester. Property Location: Kingston Twp. Lender: Michael M. Luksic. Amount: $300,000. Messa Verde LLC. Property Location: Wyoming. Seller: Frederick H. Rutzke Farms Inc. Amount: $$500,000. Greg R. Kulp. Property Location: Nescopeck Twp. Seller: Robert W. Eroh Jr. Amount: $295,000. Kaitlyn Marie Falzone. Property Location: Dallas Twp. Seller: Sean Walski. Amount: $325,000. Juan M. Inc. Property Location: Wilkes-Barre. Seller: Keystone Automotive Operations Inc. Amount: $370,000. Manuel V. Isherwood. Property Location: Wright Twp. Seller: MTGLO Investors LP. Amount: $287,000.

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APRIL 2019

Thomas W. Glynn II. Property Location: Dallas. Seller: Jerome E. Majusiak. Amount: $300,000. Kelly Saba. Property Location: Dallas. Seller: Marilyn M. Grant. Amount: $265,000. V Prop LLC. Property Location: Wilkes-Barre. Seller: Clearbrook Inc. Amount: $650,000. SRG HI LLC. Property Location: Hazle Twp. Seller: Great Hazleton Community Area New Development Organization Inc. Amount: $600,000. Adam Boyce. Property Location: Kingston Twp. Seller: NEPA Property Investors LLC. Amount: $275,000. LCHP Realty LLC. Property Location: West Hazleton. Seller: Christopher J. Allessio. Amount: $250,000. VirajS.PereraKoswattage.PropertyLocation:ButlerTwp. Seller:SandSpringsDevelopmentCorporation.Amount:$381,000. Andrew James Maio. Property Location: Nescopeck Twp. Seller: Charles M. Stori Jr. Amount: $305,000. Mark A. Finnegan. Property Location: Plains Twp. Seller: Edward H. Thomas. Amount: $250,000. Ross Andrew Spencer. Property Location: Dallas Twp. Seller: Albert R. Klein Jr. Amount: $529,998. Nicholas Realty LLC. Property Location: WilkesBarre. Seller: RCMP Enterprises LLC. Amount: $272,000. Edward J. Williams III. Property Location: Lehman Twp. Seller: Village at Greenbriar Inc. Amount: $380,000. Samma Realty LLC. Property Location: Kingston. Seller: Akromas Realty LLC. Amount: $525,000. Rock’s Realty LLC. Property Location: Butler Twp. Seller: Shastri Krupa LLC. Amount: $1,300,000. Robert Matthew Belza. Property Location: Exeter. Seller: Melanie Dovidas. Amount: $280,000. Michael Eisenhower. Property Location: Dallas Twp. Seller: John Falcome. Amount: $413,500.

Paul Connolly. Property Location: Fairview Twp. Seller: Bolek Construction LLC. Amount: $344,900. Aaron L. Yaple. Property Location: Huntington Twp. Seller: Stone Financing LLC. Amount: $310,000. Randolph I. Granger. Property Location: Yatesville. Seller: R&A LLC. Amount: $285,000. Erin T. Vieney. Property Location: Rice Twp. Seller: Vanessa Ann Ferrance. Amount: $382,000. Cartus Financial Corporation. Property Location: Wright Twp. Seller: Luis D. Carrillo. Amount: $260,000. Paul M. Comishock. Property Location: Wright Twp. Seller: Cartus Financial Corporation. Amount: $260,000. Gregory Shannon. Property Location: Kingston Twp. Seller: Ronald T. Selenski. Jr. Amount: $500,000. Christopher J. Fisher. Property Location: Black Creek Twp. Seller: Suzanne M. Frackle. Amount: $279,000. KAVE LLC. Property Location: Forty Fort. Seller: MMOC Realty LLC. Amount: $437,500. Patti Bobrowski. Property Location: Ross Twp. Seller: Judith D. Masters. Amount: $354,000. Dan S. Butoi. Property Location: Rice Twp. Seller: Albert B. Sun. Amount: $380,000. Kelly Carroll. Property Location: Duryea. Seller: Joseph Casella. Amount: $312,000. Shasri Krupa LLC. Property Location: Pittston Twp. Seller: Shiva Associates. Amount: $1,500,000. Trinidad J. Martinez. Property Location: Kingston Twp. Seller: Mary Ellen H. O’Brien. Amount: $329,000. Jason Kozicki. Property Location: Dallas Twp. Seller: William Abrams. Amount: $285,000. Please see Record, Page 29


FROM PAGE 28 Matthew D. Bradley. Property Location: Kingston Twp. Seller: Daniel J. Chipego. Amount: $465,000. Joshua M. Brucher. Property Location: Ross Twp. Seller: Michael H. Brucher. Amount: $325,000.

MONROE COUNTY

Jeffrey Liu. Property Location: Jackson Twp. Seller: Vincent Traina. Amount: $315,000. Robert Reilly. Property Location: Tobyhanna Twp. Seller: David Samad. Amount: $380,000. Christian Uhler. Property Location: Ross Twp. Seller: Andrew May. Amount: $365,000. Cresco Post Office Holdings LLC. Property Location: Barrett Twp. Seller: Eileen McCluskey. Amount: $465,000. Aastha Homes LLC. Property Location: Coolbaugh Twp. Seller: Dynasty Custom Homes Inc. Amount: $865,000. Tobyhanna Twp. Economic Development Authority. Property Location: Tobyhanna Twp. Seller: B&R General Realty LLC. Amount: $500,000. John Favara. Property Location: Coolbaugh Twp. Seller: Paul Gaglioti. Amount: $475,000. Michael Tracy. Property Location: Tobyhanna Twp. Seller: Hannig Development LLC. Amount: $334,000. Lakeside Manor Inn LLC. Property Location: Middle Smithfield Twp. Seller: Venture Options LLC. Amount: $340,000. Kaushal Realty LLC. Property Location: Smithfield Twp. Seller: Smoker R Us of Pa Corp. Amount: $1,400,000. 3305 Bartonsville LLC. Property Location: Pocono Twp. Seller: Pocono Land & Homes Inc. Amount: $325,000. Brad Rappaport. Property Location: Tobyhanna Twp. Seller: Ritter Family House LLC. Amount: $390,000. Thomas Nedo. Property Location: Ross Twp. Seller: Ruth Borger. Amount: $458,750. Ariel Horn. Property Location: Tobyhanna Twp. Seller: Jerry Marcopoulos. Amount: $507,500. Christopher Rogers. Property Location: Tobyhanna Twp. Seller: John Cosica. Amount: $380,000. Kenneth Clement. Property Location: Pocono Twp. Seller: DE&S Properties Inc. Amount: $300,000. Mamitas Ices Ltd. Property Location: Jackson Twp. Seller: Frances Dillon. Amount: $335,000. Maria Hackney. Property Location: Paradise Twp. Seller: Michele Barzydlo. Amount: $330,000. John McMann. Property Location: Tobyhanna Twp. Seller: Hannig Development LLC. Amount: $299,500. Heinzee LLC. Property Location: Pocono Twp. Seller: Sunset Hill Range LP. Amount: $2,750,000. Lev Lewin. Property Location: Smithfield Twp. Seller: Douglas Petit. Amount: $468,000 Daniel Conception. Property Location: Pocono Twp. Seller: Edward Sarubbi. Amount: $371,000. Zuchey Fabian. Property Location: Middle Smithfield. Seller: LTS Homes LLC. Amount: $303,290. Richard Parente. Property Location: Price & Stroud Twps. Seller: Frank Rogowicz. Amount: $615,000. Solomn Sade. Property Location: Tobyhanna Twp. Seller: Joseph Bachmeier. Amount: $340,000. William Bielefeld. Property Location: Tobyhanna Twp. Seller: John Demeo. Amount: $400,000. Eron Rouse. Property Location: Stroudsburg. Seller: James Wilkins. Amount: $440,000. 123 Spring Hill Farm LLC. Property Location: Middle Smithfield Twp. Seller: Dime Bank. Amount: $390,000. Stroudsburg DG LLC. Property Location: Hamilton Twp. Seller: MBC Development LLC. Amount: $1,545,000. Daniel Flipkowski. Property Location: Property Location: Hamilton Twp. Seller: Ranch Holdings LLC. Amount: $433,000. Peter Lepore. Property Location: Middle Smithfield Twp. Seller: Juan Barragan. Amount: $335,000. Sung Hong. Property Location: Pocono Twp. Seller:

Varsha Vaishnav. Amount: $306,500. Ginette William. Property Location: Pocono Twp. Seller: DE&S Properties Inc. Amount: $308,500. ODM Holdings LLC. Property Location; East Stroudsburg. Seller: 434 King Street LLC. Amount: $750,000. Rite Aid of Pennsylvania Inc. Property Location: Chestnuthill Twp. Seller: JJ Fixl Properties LLC. Amount: $3,425,000. Christopher McNicholas. Property Location: Hamilton Twp. Seller: Wanda Ferguson. Amount: $329,000. 940 Holdings LLC. Property Location: East Stroudsburg. Seller: MLF3 East Stroudsburg LLC. Amount: $450,000. Eamonn Fox. Property Location: Tunkhannock Twp. Seller: Losaura Living Trust. Amount: $435,000. Carol Robinson-Stern. Property Location: Coolbaugh Twp. Seller: Classic Quality Homes. Amount: $300,000. Colin Gardner. Property Location: Barrett Twp. Seller: Country Properties LLC. Amount: $299,000. Jason Runell. Property Location: Middle Smithfield Twp. Seller: RGB Homes LLC. Amount: $353,000. AVK Properties LLC. Property Location: Pocono Twp. Seller: Hamilton Twp. Properties LLC. Amount: $375,000. AVK Properties LLC. Property Location: Paradise Twp. Seller: Hamilton Twp. Properties LLC. Amount: $275,000.

Joseph Micek. Property Location: Palmyra Twp. Seller: Anthony M. Marseglia. Amount: $265,000. Polise Group LLC. Property Location: Palmyra Twp. Seller: Tanglwood Lakes Country Club Inc. Amount: $785,000. Stanley J. Stuczynski. Property Location: Blooming Grove Twp. Seller: Kurt Harold Fohl. Amount: $322,500. Richard A. Flora. Property Location: Blooming Grove Twp. Seller: Michael J. Plunkett. Amount: $322,500. Vera Kagan. Property Location: Blooming Grove Twp. Seller: Linda Dolan. Amount: $320,000. Alcides Lucas Diaz. Property Location: Dingman Twp. Seller: Anthony E. Delmo. Amount: $324,000. Robert Bowen. Property Location: Dingman Twp. Seller: Thomas Patrick Alexander. Amount: $310,000. Charles J. Joaquin. Property Location: Dingman Twp. Seller: Milford West Development LLC. Amount: $275,000. Russell Burns III. Property Location: Dingman Twp. Seller: Cheryl F. Viner. Amount: $330,000.

$6,331,207. MVRN Twelve LLC. Property Location: Bloomsburg. Lender: First Keystone Bank. Amount: $6,331,207. John C. Klingerman. Property Location: Montour Twp. Lender: NBT Bank. Amount: $1,440,000. Alan C. Kemmerer. Property Location: South Centre Twp. Lender: Robert A. Seesholtz Jr. Amount: $400,000. Blaschak Coal Corp. Property Location: Centralia Boro. Lender: Marquette Business Credit LLC. Amount: $18,000,000. Blaschak Coal Corp. Property Location: Centralia Boro. Lender: Marquette Business Credit LLC. Amount: $18,000,000. Blaschak Coal Corp. Property Location: Centralia Boro. Lender: Marquette Business Credit LLC. Amount: $18,000,000.

LACKAWANNA COUNTY

Idle Hours Realty Inc. Property Location: Dickson City. Lender: NBT Bank. Amount: $3,466,815. Elizabeth A. Hopkins. Property Location: Dunmore SCHUYLKILL COUNTY Boro. Lender: Quicken Loans Inc. Amount: $257,936. Ira Walters. Property Location: No. Manheim Twp. Thomas Edward Drewes. Property Location: Seller: Aaron Clauser. Amount: $342,000. Dunmore Boro. Lender: Parkside Lending Inc. Amount: Carl G. Sensenig. Property Location: Union Twp. $370,500. Seller: Wayne Horn. Amount: $500,000. John B. Dempsey Jr. Property Location: Dunmore Eric Halye. Property Location: East Brunswick Twp. PIKE COUNTY Boro. Lender: FNCB Bank. Amount: $895,535. Charles A. Mitchell. Property Location: Greene Twp. Seller: Elizabeth O’Donnell. Amount: $395,000. Charles Rogers Sr. Property Location: Greenfield Patrick Jones. Property Location: No. Manheim Twp. Twp. Lender: Stearns Lending LLC. Amount: $254,308. Seller: Andrew Andrejcisk. Amount: $375,000. Seller: Renee Herman. Amount: $255,000. John A. Lang. Property Location: Palmyra Twp. Chris Ryan Stafford. Property Location: Greenfield Seller: John P. Pieroni. Amount: $270,000. Twp. Lender: Mortgage Research Center LLC. Amount: WAYNE COUNTY Joseph R. Marturano Jr. Property Location: Delaware Pile of Dirt LLC. Property Location: Berlin Twp. Seller: $376,000. Twp. Seller: Dennis B. Gallagher Jr. Amount: $250,000. Robert Weidow. Property Location: Moosic Boro. Maple Ridge Properties. Amount: $300,000. Dick Lee. Property Location: Delaware Twp. Seller: Michele Blockberger. Property Location: Berlin Twp. Lender: PS Bank. Amount: $250,000. Frank J. Arrison. Amount: $280,000. Lee Batzel. Property Location: Moosic Boro. Lender: Seller: Fannie Mae AKA by AF. Amount: $252,000. Jon R. Shiechter. Property Location: Blooming Grove Stephen K. Calles III. Property Location: Lehigh Twp. Honesdale National Bank. Amount: $450,000. Twp. Seller: Milton Ciplet. Amount: $260,000. Tammy Gaughan. Property Location: Moosic Boro. Seller: Gerald P. Marks. Amount: $404,000. Brian Minkoff. Property Location: Blooming Grove Rosemarie Cazzorla. Property Location: Mt. Pleasant Lender: Citizens Savings Bank. Amount: $287.920. Twp. Seller: Diana Krinker. Amount: $560,000. Lisa Armetta. Property Location: Newton Twp. Twp. Seller: Matthew C. Mole, Tr. Amount: $425,000. Matthew Brian Jones. Property Location: Blooming Lender: PS Bank. Amount: $279,600. Tricia S. Blair. Property Location: Paupack Twp. Grove Twp. Seller: Zachary Evans. Amount: $305,000. Robert G. Dougher Jr. Property Location: Old Forge Seller: David B. Pearse. Amount: $324,500. Juliann Herrman Beckmann. Property Location: Boro. Lender: United Wholesale Mortgage. Amount: Yancy Wayne Davis. Property Location: Salem Twp. Blooming Grove Twp. Seller: Gary Wand. Amount: $380,000. Seller: Cesar A. Vargas. Amount: 283,250. $367,000. Mark Matylewica. Property Location: Old Forge Boyd State Ariel. Property Location: Sterling Twp. Richard P. Mai. Property Location: Shohola Twp. Boro. Lender: US MortgageLine. Amount: $276,400. Seller: Hudson Advisors Wayne. Amount: $1,600,000. Seller: John D. Shewchuk. Amount: $475,000. Dennis L. Furman. Property Location: Olyphant WYOMING COUNTY Roy Meriluoto. Property Location: Shohola Twp. Boro. Lender: Provident Bank. Amount: $250,000. Edward W. Polonis. Property Location: Exeter Twp. Seller: Maria D. Guarnaschelli. Amount: $330,000. William Blazejewica. Property Location: Ransom Seller: Charles Kozicki. Amount: $267,938. Frank Broussard. Property Location: Lackawaxen Twp. Lender: Quicken Loans Inc. Amount: $255,500. Select Sires Inc. Property Location: Eaton Twp. Twp. Seller: Thomas S. Hartman. Amount: $569,000. Emmett Oberrender. Property Location: Roaring Seller: Benjamin J. Dziuba POA. Amount: $883,450. EJJ Trust. Property Location: Lackawaxen Twp. Seller: Brook Twp. Lender: FirstTrustBank. Amount: $290,000. Antonio Manganaro. Property Location: TunkhanTheresa H. Shanoff. Amount: $264,000. Tyler Martin Waters. Property Location: Scott nock Twp. Seller: Joseph Peter Papi. Amount: $250,000. James Klieber. Property Location: Lackawaxen Twp. Twp. Lender: Mortgage Research Center LLC. Amount: Victor J. Kochmer. Property Location: Clinton Twp. Seller: Larry R. Dickstein. Amount: $275,000. $263,168. Seller: Dean Sai One Enterprises LLC. Amount: $800,000. David Wayne Gangeri. Property Location: LackawaxPaul S. Cooper Co. Ptnr. Property Location: Scranton Justin M. Higgins. Property Location: Factoryville Boro. en Twp. Seller: Stephen M. Russo. Amount: $392,000. City. Lender: Peoples Security Bank & Trust Co. Amount: Seller: Charlotte M. Davis Trustee. Amount: $255,750. Michael Berinato. Property Location: Lackawaxen $300,000. Twp. Seller: G.A. Homes Inc. Amount: $320,000. ATR Properties LLC. Property Location: ScranMORTGAGES Steven R. Danielsen. Property Location: Lackawaxen ton City. Lender: First National Bank of PA. Amount: COLUMBIA COUNTY Twp. Seller: Gary J. Rush. Amount: $350,000. $400,000. Timothy A. Hostetter. Property Location: No. Centre Scott Emlen Smith. Property Location: Milford Twp. Gerald A. Raymond. Property Location: Scranton City. Twp. Lender: First Columbia Bank & Trust Co. Amount: Seller: Bruce J. Diamond. Amount: $595,000. Lender: Peoples Security Bank & Trust Co. Amount: $633,000. $657,450. John Sellen. Property Location: Greene Twp. Seller: Margaret M. Scott. Property Location: Scranton City. Todd W. Kreisher. Property Location: Mifflin Twp. Patrick Reardon. Amount: $285,000. Lender: Loandepot com LLC. Amount: $312,320. Lender: Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems Inc. Michael G.D. Meyers. Property Location: Greene Idle Hours Realty Inc. Property Location: Scranton Amount: $453,100. Twp. Seller: Michael F. Kleimont. Amount: $340,000. City. Lender: NBT Bank. Amount: $3,466,815. Hadden LLX. & Piri Inc. Property Location: Mifflin Kevin Sardo. Property Location: Lackawaxen Twp. Local 81 IBEW Building Inc. Property Location: Twp. Lender: Access Point Financial LLC. Amount: Seller: Robert J. Schneider. Amount: $275,000. Scranton City. Lender: Fidelity Dep & Disc Bk. Amount: $2,700,000. Vincent P. Fiumidinisi. Property Location: Lacka$260,000. MVRN Nine LLC. Property Location: Bloomsburg. waxen Twp. Seller: David J. Medford. Amount: $281,000. Charles J. McAvoy. Property Location: So. Abington Lender: First Keystone Community Bank. Amount: Frank Barbaro. Property Location: Lackawaxen Twp. Twp. Lender: Residential Mortgage Services Inc. Amount: $6,331,207. Fannie Mae AKA Federal National Mortgage Association. $280,912. MVRN Ten LCC. Property Location: Bloomsburg. Amount: $279,900. Gollhardt Properties LLC. Property Location: So. Mikhail Cherny. Property Location: Lackawaxen Twp. Lender: First Keystone Community Bank. Amount: Abington Twp. Lender: NBT Bank. Amount: $554,125. $6,331,207. Seller: Anthony Como. Amount: $400,000. MVRN Eleven LLC. Property Location: Bloomsburg. Slava Ashurov. Property Location: Lackawaxen Twp. Please see Record, Page 30 Lender: First Keystone Community Bank. Amount: Seller: G.A. Homes Inc. Amount: $323,000.

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FROM PAGE 29 Julie Wise Hall. Property Location: Springbrook Twp. Lender: Honesdale National Bank. Amount: 288,000. Taylor 1 LLC. Property Location: Taylor Boro. Lender: FNCB Bank. Amount: $1,100,000. William T. Botke. Property Location: Unknown. Lender: Navy Federal Credit Union. Amount: $582,300. Lori L. Bonacci. Property Location: Unknown. Lender: PA State Employees Credit Union. Amount: $345,000. Andrew J. Peranick. Property Location: Unknown. Lender: Citizens Savings Bank. Amount: $310,000. NJ Blue Sky Holdings LLC. Property Location: Unknown. Lender: Berkadia Commercial Mortgage LLC. Amount: $10,920,000. Michael J. McHale. Property Location: Unknown. Lender: Peoples Security Bank & Trust Co. Amount: $331,200.

LUZERNE COUNTY

Shawn Donnelly. Property Location: Sugarloaf Twp. Lender: First Keystone Community Bank. Amount: $299,100. Sean A. Moran. Property Location: Harveys Lake. Lender: Fidelity Deposit & Discount Bank. Amount: $284,000. Kenneth L. Hoffer. Property Location: Butler Twp. Lender: Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems Inc. Amount: $274,043. Interstellar Properties LLC. Property Location: Butler Twp. Lender: Lakeland Bank. Amount: $3,225,000. Brian J. DeLuca. Property Location: Butler Twp. Lender: Landmark Community Bank. Amount: $588,800. Christopher Altieri. Property Location: Butler Twp. Lender: Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems Inc. Amount: $366,200. NP Wilkes-Barre Building III LLC. Property Location: Hanover Twp. Lender: Northwestern Mutual Life Insurance Company. Amount: $14,293,000. Terry Holmes Ogle Jr. Property Location: Dallas Twp. Lender: Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems Inc. Amount: $304,000. Edward R. Button Jr. Property Location: Dorrance Twp. Lender: Peoples Security Bank & Trust Company. Amount: $635,000. Luchi Real Estate LLC. Property Location: Wright Twp. Lender: Branch Banking & Trust Company. $800,000. Akshar Yogi Real Estate LLC. Property Location: Pittston Twp. Lender: Wayne Bank. Amount: $350,000. Christopher J. Falvello. Property Location: Butler Twp. Lender: Marie C. Falvello. Amount: $250,000. Ambica Properties LLC. Property Location: Plains Twp. Lender: Essa Bank & Trust. Amount: $276,000. John McCarrie. Property Location: Hazle Twp. Lender: First Columbia Bank & Trust Company. Amount: $250,000 Luchi Real Estate LLC. Property Location: Butler Twp. Lender: Branch Banking & Trust Company. Amount: $800,000. Mapps LLC. Property Location: New Columbus. Lender: Green Rock II. Amount: $273,000. Regina Mealia. Property Location: Sugarloaf Twp. Lender: Elizabeth A. Grimm Revocable Trust. Amount: $370,000. William Vigorito. Property Location: Lehman Twp. Lender: Mortgage Electronic Registration System Inc. Amount: $398,000. Denzel Construction Company LLC. Property Location: Wilkes-Barre. Lender: Honesdale National Bank. Amount: $400,000. Citi Mg LLC. Property Location: Wilkes-Barre. Lender Empire Street Realty LLC. Amount: $578,000 Richard P. Eckman. Property Location: Jackson Twp. Lender: Brown Brothers Harriman & Company. Amount: $1,100,000. Aimee Nicole Fritzges. Property Location: Dal-

las Twp. Lender: Honesdale National Bank. Amount: $300,000. Jarrett J. Ferentino. Property Location: Jenkins Twp. Lender: Landmark Community Bank. Amount: $494,000. Hugo O. Anrade. Property Location: Laflin. Lender: Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems Inc. Amount: $355,300. Brenda Pugh. Property Location: Dallas Twp. Lender: Fidelity Deposit & Discount Bank. Amount: $280,000. Toni J. Rogan. Property Location: Rice Twp. Lender: Citizens Bank of Pennsylvania. Amount: $648,000. Daniel J. Brooks. Property Location: Fairmount Twp. Lender: Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems Inc. Amount: $332,000. Bonnie L. Asman. Property Location: Dallas Twp. Lender: Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems Inc. Amount: $273,500. Michael M. Luksic. Property Location: Kingston Twp. Lender: Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems Inc. Amount: $375,250. Dennis X. Hooper. Property Location: Laurel Run. Lender: Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems Inc. Amount: $410,000. Mesa Verde LLC. Property Location: Wyoming. Lender: Frederick H. Rutzke Farms Inc. Amount: $450,000. Jason Lukachinsky. Property Location: Fairview Twp. Lender: Essa Bank & Trust. Amount: $255,000. Richard E. Angelo. Property Location: Hazleton. Lender: Wayne Bank. Amount: $431,000. Huntsville Limited Partnership. Property Location: Wilkes-Barre Twp. Lender: Luzerne Bank. Amount: $800,000. Juan M. Inc. Property Location: Wilkes-Barre. Lender: Community First Fund. Amount: $296,000. Paul Young. Property Location: W. Hazelton. Lender: Huber Investments. Amount: $287,000. Executive Land Development LLC. Property Location: Pittston Twp. Lender: Honesdale National Bank. $365,500. Jeffrey Edwin Kuniegel. Property Location: Dennison Twp. Lender: Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems Inc. Amount: $331,593. Pramthesh K. Desai. Property Location: Kingston Twp. Lender: PNC Bank. Amount: $450,000. Joseph A. Ruitolo. Property Location: Lake Twp. Lender: Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems Inc. Amount: $394,500. BSL Real Estate LLC. Property Location: Dallas Twp. Lender: Penn Security Bank & Trust Company. Amount: $302,637. Jerome E. Majusiak. Property Location: Dallas Twp. Lender: Thomas W. Glynn. Amount: $300,000., Marilyn M. Grant. Property Location: Dallas Twp. Lender: Kelly Saba. Amount: $265,000. Shelley W. Davis. Property Location: Plymouth. Lender: Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems Inc. Amount: $253,500. John Kieffer. Property Location: Lake Twp. Lender: PS Bank. Amount: $300,000. V PROP LLC. Property Location: Wilkes-Barre. Lender: First Keystone Community Bank. Amount: $550,000. Matthew Carey. Property Location: Huntington Twp. Lender: Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems Inc. Amount: $252,492. Adam Boyce. Property Location: Kingston Twp. Lender: Citizens Bank. Amount: $270,019 Viraj S. Perera Koswattage. Property Location: Butler Twp. Lender: Mortgage Electron Registration Systems Inc. Amount: $361,950. R&A LLC. Property Location: Wilkes-Barre. Lender: Landmark Community Bank. Amount: $805,000. David A. Zeiter Jr. Property Location: Salem Twp. Lender: First Keystone Community Bank. Amount: $300,000. Marcus Magyar. Property Location: Dallas Twp.

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09:08 | BAUMEISTER

APRIL 2019

Lender: Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems Inc. Amount: $308,000. Home Hunters Realty LLC. Property Location: Fairmont Twp. Lender: REHAB Financial Group LP. Amount: $101,880.74. Andrew James Maio. Property Location: Nescopeck Twp. Seller: Charles M. Stori Jr. Amount: $305,000. John P. Scalleat. Property Location: White Haven. Lender: Wayne Bank. $495,000. Maria Guadalupa Maio. Property Location: Nescopeck Twp. Lender: Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems Inc. Amount: $250,000. Derick J. Sabbatini. Property Location: Laflin. Lender: Honesdale National Bank. Amount: $300,000. Ross Andrw Spencer. Property Location: Dallas Twp. Lender: Albert R. Klein Jr. Amount: $530,000. Milton de Jesus Roasrio. Property Location: Jenkins Twp. Lender: Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems Inc. Amount: $295,000. Samma Realty LLC. Property Location: Kingston. Lender: Community Bank. Amount: $405,000. Samed D. Eid. Property Location: Forty Fort. Lender: Community Bank. Amount: $405,000. Samed D. Eid. Property Location: Kingston. Lender Community Bank. Amount: $405,000. Rock’s Realty LLC. Property Location: Butler Twp. Lender: First Keystone Community Bank. Amount: $1,375,000. Richard E. Angelo Family Limited Partnership. Property Location: Wayne Bank. Amount: $290,000. Citi Tower LLC. Property Location: Wilkes-Barre. Lender: NCC Properties Group LLC. Amount: $650,000. Megan Eisenhower. Property Location: Dallas Twp. Lender: Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems Inc. Amount: $392,825. Paul Connolly. Property Location: Fairview Twp. Lender: Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems Inc. Amount: $293,165. James Scrobola Aircraft Services Inc. Property Location: Forty Fort. Lender: FNCB Bank. Amount: $292,693.33. Randolph I. Granger. Property Location: Yatesville. Lender: Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems. Amount: $279,837. Erin T. Vieney. Property Location: Rice Twp. Lender: Pennsylvania State Employees Credit Union. Amount: $362,900. James K. Bonham Jr. Property Location: Huntington Twp. Lender: First Keystone Community Bank. Amount: $575,000. Gregory Shannon. Property Location: Kingston Twp. Lender: Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems. Amount: $400,000. KAVE LLC. Property Location: Forty Fort. Lender: Fidelity Deposit & Discount Bank. Amount: $330,000. Wilkes-Barre Northern Properties LLC. Property Location: Wilkes-Barre Twp. Lender: Peoples Security Bank & Trust Company. Amount: $1,892,036. Stephanie Decker. Property Location: Salem Twp. Lender: Lexington National Insurance Corporation. Amount: $2,000,000. Laurel Mall Tenant LLC. Property Location: Hazle Twp. Lender: Levon Keystone LLC. Amount: $4,500,000. Thomas Cavanaugh. Property Location: Rice Twp. Lender: Mortgage Elecctronic Registration Systems. Amount: $310,000. Steven Sutliff. Property Location: Hunlock Twp. Lender: First Keystone Community Bank. Amount: $590,000. Edward Lee Patrick. Property Location: Dorrance Twp. Lender: Luzerne Bank. Amount: $623,200. Christopher J. Menedez. Property Location: Jenkins Twp. Lender: Citizens Savings Bank. Amount: $286,338. Kelly Carroll. Property Location: Duryea. Lender: UFCW Federal Credit Union. Amount: $302,600. Trinidad J. Martinez. Property Location: Kingston

Twp. Lender: Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems Inc. Amount: $329,000. Jason Kozick. Property Location: Dallas Twp. Lender: Honesdale National Bank. Amount: $265,000. Fellowship Evangelical Free Church of Back Mountain. Property Location: Dallas Twp. Lender: Christian Investors Financial. Amount: $2,300,000. Gary Brand. Property Location: Kingston. Lender: Caliber Home Loans Inc. Amount: $299,669. Joshua M Brucher. Property Location: Ross Twp. Lender: Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems Inc. Amount: $260,000. Craig W. Baker. Property Location: Butler Twp. Lender: Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems Inc. Amount: $369,100 Robert T. Zbysheski. Property Location: Duryea. Lender: ESSA Bank & Trust. Amount: $255,900. JRS Property Management LLC. Property Location: Nescopeck. Lender: First Columbia Bank & Trust Company. Amount: $500,000. Jayce Inc. Property Location: Kingston. Lender: Luzerne Bank. Amount: $386,400. Shazaam Realty LLC. Property Location: Kingston. Lender: Peoples Security Bank & Trust Company. Amount: $500,000.

MONROE COUNTY

Philip Fisher. Property Location: Tobyhanna Twp. Lender: Byline Bank. Amount: $970,000. Stroud Real Estate Inc. Property Location: Stroud Twp. Lender: ESSA Bank & Trust. Amount: $2,405,510. Cresco Realty LLC. Property Location: Barrett Twp. Lender: Citibank NA Amount: $12,800,000. Zhengs Lucky Inc. Property Location: Stroudsburg. Lender: First Keystone Community Bank. Amount: $940,000. Robert Reilly. Property Location: Tobyhanna Twp. Lender: American Neighborhood Mortgage Acceptance Co. LLC. Amount: $304,000. Christian Uhler. Property Location: Ross Twp. Lender: Santander Bank NA. Amount: $338,675. Kayleigh Kelly. Property Location: Jackson Twp. Lender: ESSA Bank & Trust. Amount: 316,350. Aastha Homes LLC. Property Location: Coolbaugh Twp. Lender: Dynasty Custom Homes Inc. Amount: $665,000. Michael Tracy. Property Location: Tobyhanna Twp. Lender: New American Funding. Amount: $334,900. John Casey. Property Location: Jackson Twp. Lender: M&T Bank and Commissioner of Housing & Urban Development. Amount: $493,500. Kaushal Realty LLC. Property Location: Smithfield Twp. Lender: NBT Bank NA. Amount: $1,477,500. John Comstock. Property Location: Tobyhanna Twp. Lender: Quicken Loans Inc. Amount: $300,000. 3305 Bartonsville LLC. Property Location: Pocono Twp. Lender: First Keystone Community Bank. Amount: $267,750. Rodney Raughley. Property Location: Polk Twp. Lender: Keybank NA. Amount: $310,000. Mark Hug. Property Location: Middle Smithfield Twp. Lender: TIAA FSB. Amount: $375,000. Thomas Sodano. Property Location: Tobyhanna Twp. Lender: Peoples Security Bank & Trust Co. Amount: $300,000. Thomas Nedo. Property Location: Ross Twp. Lender: Wayne Bank. Amount: $366,400. Ariel Hom. Property Location: Tobyhanna Twp. Lender: Bank of America NA. Amount: $304,000. HSK Properties LLC. Property Location: Chestnuthill Twp. Lender: First Northern Bank & Trust Co. Amount: $3,153,765. Scott Slater. Property Location: Chestnuthill & Ross Twps. Lender: First Northern Bank & Trust Co. Amount: Please see Record, Page 31


FROM PAGE 30 $3,153,765. VRC LLC. Property Location: Barrett Twp. Lender: Anchor Loans LP. Amount: $292,480. Tobyhanna DG LLC. Property Location: Coolbaugh Twp. Lender: CommerceOne Bank. Amount: 1,261,750. Lev Lewin. Property Location: Smithfield Twp. Lender: Trident Mortgage Co. LP. Amount: $372,000. James Dellaria. Property Location: East Stroudsburg. Lender: ESSA Bank & Trust. Amount: $352,500. Jeremiah Nethercutt. Property Location: Jackson Twp. Lender: Cetra Credit Union. Amount: $352,000. Daniel Conception. Property Location: Pocono Twp. Lender: Quicken Loans. Amount: $352,100. Richard Parente. Property Location: Price & Stroud Twps. Lender: Cardinal Financial Co. LP. Amount: $484,000. Guy Long. Property Location: Eldred Twp. Lender: NBT Bank NA. Amount: $345,000. Spirit of Swiftwater Inc. Property Location Pocono Twp. Lender: First National Bank of Pennsylvania. Amount: $695,000. Jordan Trunk. Property Location: Stroud Twp. Lender: ESSA Bank & Trust. Amount: $378,000. Eron Rouse. Property Location: Stroudsburg. Lender: Mortgage Network Inc. Amount: $418,000. Pocono Produce Co. Inc. Property Location: Stroud Twp. Lender: Cit Northbridge Credit LLC. Amount: $24,000,000. Rich Williams. Property Location: Tobyhanna Twp. Lender: Finance of America Mortgage LLC. Amount: $320,000. Evangel Hispanic Church Inc. Property Location: Pocono Twp. Lender: Heritage Investment Services Fund Inc. Amount: $1,400,000. Jean-Paul Romes. Property Location: Hamilton Twp. Lender: FNCB Bank. Amount: $1,950,000. Stroudsburg DG LLC. Property Location: Investors Bank. Amount: $1,081,000. Daniel Filipkowski. Property Location: Hamilton Twp. Lender: Pennsylvania State Employees Credit Union. Amount: $308,000. Ginette William. Property Location: Pocono Twp. Lender: American Financial Network Inc. Amount: $299,653. James Smith. Property Location: Middle Smithfied Twp. Lender: Quicken Loans Inc. Amount: $425,000. Jimmy Schlier Sr. Property Location: Pocono Twp. Lender: First National Bank of Pennsylvania. Amount: $426,000. Christopher McNicholas. Property Location:

Hamilton Twp. Lender: Summit Mortgage Corp. Amount: $336,073. 940 Holdings LLC. Property Location: East Stroudsburg. Lender: Dime Bank. Amount: $375,000. Eamonn Fox. Property Location: Tunkhannock Twp. Lender: Wells Fargo Bank NA. Amount: $391,500. Donald Heller. Property Location: Pocono Twp. Lender: First Northern Bank & Trust Co. Amount: $355,000. High Peak LLC. Property Location: Stroud Twp. Lender: First Keystone Community Bank. Amount: $1,138,682. Franciana Williams. Property Location: Stroud Twp. Lender: Caliber Home Loans Inc. Amount: $302,816. Jason Runell. Property Location: Middle Smithfield Twp. Lender: ESSA Bank & Trust. Amount: $335,350. Santiago Majam. Property Location: Tunkhannock Twp. Lender: Quicken Loans Inc. Amount: $311,527. Emir Hot. Property Location: Pocono Twp. Lender: Unity Bank. Amount: $950,000.

PIKE COUNTY

Frank Broussard. Property Location: Lackawaxen Twp. Lender: MERS. Amount: $4,353,100. John Bibbo Tr. Property Location: Delaware Twp. Lender: Mortgage Electronic Registration System Inc. Amount: $332,250. John Bibbo. Property Location: Delaware Twp. Lender: Secretary of Housing & Urban Development. Amount: $332,250. Dmitry Cherny. Property Location: Lackawaxen Twp. Lender: MERS. Amount: $300,000. Jayasekhar Talluri. Property Location: Lackawaxen Twp. Lender: Citizens Savings Bank. Amount: $250,000. James S. Bedford III. Property Location: Greene Twp. Lender: Fidelity Deposit & Discount Bank. Amount: $320,000. Jones Enterprises. Property Location: Lackawaxen Twp. Lender: Dime Bank. Amount: $300,000. Amanda Marilyn Berinato. Property Location: Lackawaxen Twp. Lender: Honesdale National Bank. Amount: $256,000. Gary Allen. Property Location: Dingman Twp. Lender: Citizens Bank of Pennsylvania. Amount: $440,000. Brian Minkoff. Property Location: Blooming Grove Twp. Lender: Wells Fargo Bank NA. Amount: $275,000. Matthew Brian Jones. Property Location: Blooming Grove Twp. Lender: MERS. Amount: $313,323. Mitchell Possinger. Property Location: Palmyra Twp. Lender: Neffs National Bank. Amount: $350,000. Juliann Beckmann Herrmann. Property Location: Blooming Grove Twp. Lender: MERS. Amount: $312,375.

Ryan Boyle. Property Location: Delaware Twp. Lender: Charles Sebring. Amount: $280,000. Alcides Lucas Diaz. Property Location: Dingman Twp. Lender: MERS. Amount: $296,703. Thomas J. Frost. Property Location: Blooming Grove Twp. Lender: Citizens Bank of Pennsylvania. Amount: $250,000. Renee Emery. Property Location: Dingman Twp. Lender: Michele I. Fleming. Amount: $500,000. Richard A. Flora. Property Location: Blooming Grove Twp. Lender: JPMorgan Chase Bank NA. Amount: $290,250. Margaret P. Locicero. Property Location: Palmyra Twp. Lender: PNC Bank NA. Amount: $270,000. Mikhail Cherny. Property Location: Lackawaxen Twp. Lender: MERS. Amount: $320,000. Calvin Tallman. Property Location: Westfall Twp. Lender: MERS. Amount: $254,118. Charles J. Joaquin. Property Location: Dingman Twp. Lender: Navy Federal Credit Union. Amount: $279,812. Scott Emlen Smith. Property Location: Milford Twp. Lender: Eileen Smith Horton. Amount: $476,000. Michael G. D. Meyers. Property Location: Green Twp. Lender: MERS. Amount: $272,000. Russell Burns III. Property Location: Dingman Twp. Lender: MERS. Amount: $340,890.

Lender: FNCB Bank. Amount: $310,000. Grace N. Nebzydoski. Property Location: Texas Twp. Lender: Andrew P. Nebzydoski. Amount: $230,000. Peregrine Property Group LLC. Property Location: Salem Twp. Lender: Dime Bank. Amount: $287,000. Randall G. Moore. Property Location: Cherry Ridge Twp. Lender: Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems. Amount: $284,000. Ernest Muller III. Property Location: Berlin Twp. Lender: Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems. Amount: $284,747. Michael J. Ochlan. Property Location: Salem Twp. Lender: Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems. Amount: $251,636. Besko Realty Holdings. Property Location: Salem Twp. Lender: First National Bank of PA. Amount: $350,000. Strong Enterprises Inc. Property Location: Hawley Boro. Lender: Dime Bank. Amount: $494,065. John C. Bilsky. Property Location: Mt. Pleasant Twp. Lender: Northwest Bank. Amount: $268,000.

WYOMING COUNTY

Edward W. Polonis. Property Location: Exeter Twp. Lender: Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems Inc. Amount: $263,084. SCHUYLKILL COUNTY BSL Real Estate LLC. Property Location: Factoryville Tiffany Bieber. Property Location: W. Penn Twp. Boro. Lender: Peoples Security Bank & Trust Company. Lender: Mauch Chunk Trust Co. Amount: $318,250. Amount: $302,637. Bonnie Markley. Property Location: W. Brunswick Sarah J. Williams. Property Location: Falls Twp. Twp. Lender: Homeside Financial LLC. Amount: $315,000. Lender: Fidelity Deposit & Discount Bank. Amount: Ira Walters. Property Location: No. Manheim Twp. Lender: Home Sale Mortgage LLC. Amount: $324,900, $264,000. 45 Cherryhill Court L.P. Property Location: Pottsville. Oxbow Creek Energy LLC. Property Location: Lender: FortyFive Cherryhill Court LP. Amount: $340,000. Nicholson Twp. Lender: Ares Capital Corporation Agent. James Spotts. Property Location: Schuylkill Haven. Amount: $70,000,000. Lender: Riverview Bank. Amount: $284,850. David Krewson. Property Location: New Ringgold. Lender: Riverview Bank. Amount: $300,000. Amos Stottzfos. Property Location: Gratz. Lender: Gratz Bank. Amount: $450,000. William Smeltzer. Property Location: So. Manheim Twp. Lender: Jonestown Bank. Amount: $1,000,000. Joseph Chipriano. Property Location: Wayne Twp. Lender: M&T Bank. Amount: $369,000. Eric Halye. Property Location: East Brunswick Twp. Lender: Home Sales Management. LLC. Amount: $395,000.

Relocation Opportunities Wanted

WAYNE COUNTY

Joseph Gillott. Property Location: Clinton Twp.

Bring us any and all potential locations. We will determine if we can develop or relocate to your site. Pennsylvania Counties of Interest Include: • Bradford, Bucks, Carbon, Columbia, Lackawanna, Lehigh, Luzerne, Lycoming, Monroe, Northampton, Pike, Schuylkill, Sullivan, Susquehanna, Tioga, Wayne, Wyoming

Types of Locations Wanted: • End Cap, In-Line, Drive-Thru, Free Standing PLEASE CONTACT Abbie Muto muto_a@sdepa.com Cheryl Green green_c@sdepa.com (610) 366-8120 • www.sdepa.com

Member of International Council of Shopping Centers

NORTHEAST PENNSYLVANIA BUSINESS JOURNAL APRIL 2019 31 TS_CNG/NPBJ/PAGES [B31] | 03/27/19

13:37 | BAUMEISTER


32 NORTHEAST PENNSYLVANIA BUSINESS JOURNAL TS_CNG/ADVERTISING/AD_PAGES [ADB32] | 03/27/19

APRIL 2019

17:11 | BAIRDATHLE

Profile for CNG Newspaper Group

Northeast Pennsylvania Business Journal--April 2019  

Northeast Pennsylvania Business Journal--April 2019  

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