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Business Journal NORTHEAST

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PENNSYLVANIA

THE REGION’S AWARD-WINNING SOURCE OF BUSINESS NEWS AND INFORMATION

December 2019 VOL. 34 NO. 12

TOP 20 UNDER 40

BUSINESS PROFESSIONALS IN NORTHEAST PENNSYLVANIA

MAJOR LIVE REAL ESTATE AUCTIONS TUNKHANNOCK AREA SCHOOL (MILL CITY SCHOOL) Saturday January 11, 1:00 pm School located 1113 Buttermilk Road, Falls, Pa, Wyoming County School consists of Large brick 1 story building built in 1976 located on approx. 8+ acres with approx. 39,280 square feet of space. Deed Book 317-285, Parcel # 07-034.0-174-00 EXO. Drilled well, Oil fired hot water heat, septic, air conditioning. Several movable walls. Bathrooms in most rooms INSPECTIONS: Saturday, December 14, 12:00-1:30 Saturday, December 28, 12:00-1:30 Saturday, January 4, 12:00-1:30 Friday, January 10, 12:00-1:30 TUNKHANNOCK AREA SCHOOL (EVAN’S FALLS) Saturday January 11, 1:00 pm School located 2055 29S, Tunkhannock, Pa.18657, Wyoming County School consists of Large 1 story building built in 1978, located on approx 24.029 acres. 45,025 Square foot building. Drilled Well, Oil fired hot water heat. Air conditioning, Deed book 339, Page 460. Parcel # 14-027.0-052-00 EXOO. On site septic, bathrooms in most rooms. ** Complete kitchen will be offered to successful bidder at completion of bidding for a set price. This will be added to the sale price of the real estate. INSPECTIONS: Saturday, December 14, 2:30-4:00 Saturday, December 28, 2:30-4:00 Saturday, January 4, 2:30-4:00 Friday, January 10, 2:30-4:00

See pages 15-26.

TERMS: $10,000.00 down at the conclusion of the bidding, balance due upon delivery of the deed within 60 days of approval from school board. 10% Buyers premium will be added to the sale price. Broker’s Participation welcome. Broker must contact Auction Company at least 72 hours prior to the auction to register your client. Any other terms and conditions will be announced auction day. If auction is delayed due to inclement weather watch the TASD web site and Shamrock Auction web site.

SHAMROCK AUCTION SERVICES, LLC

Auctioneer: Jerry Burke & Family AU-116 Phone: 570-869-1982 email: shamroc1@epix.net 570-362-0057

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PeNNSYlVANiA

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Vol. 34, No. 12 • December 2019 149 PeNN AVe., ScrANtoN, PA 18503 www.biz570.com

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The Northeast Pennsylvania Business Journal is a member of Times-Shamrock Publishing Division

CNG MANAGING EDITOR elizabeth baumeister — ext. 3492 CNG SALES MANAGER Alice manley — ext. 9285 CONTRIBUTING REPORTERS Jennifer butler Dave Gardner Joe Sylvester Phil Yacuboski FiND US oNliNe: www.Biz570.com facebook.com/570 • twitter.com/biz570

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NPbJ is protected under the federal copyright act. reproductions of any part by any means or facsimiles without the express written permission of the publisher are not permitted. reprints of NPbJ articles are available. Northeast Pennsylvania Business Journal cannot be responsible for the return of unsolicited materials — manuscripts or photographs — with or without the inclusion of a stamped, self-addressed return envelope. information in this publication is gathered from sources considered to be reliable, but the accuracy and completeness of the information cannot be guaranteed. No information expressed herein constitutes a solicitation for the purchase or sale of any securities. Northeast Pennsylvania Business Journal (iSSN 1078-5698) is published monthly except twice in the month of may by The Scranton Times from offices located at 149 Penn Ave., Scranton, PA. Periodicals postage paid at Scranton, PA. The Journal serves business owners, managers and professionals in a 10-county region. Subscriptions are available for $28 per year, $49 two years or $64 for three years. PoStmaSter: Send address changes to Northeast Pennsylvania Business Journal, 149 Penn Avenue, Scranton, PA 18503.

BRAND

ON THE COVER

Kathleen Barry ........................ Joshua Braddell....................... Dr. Kaitlyn Connors ................... James Cooney ......................... Adam Davis ............................ Cyrus Entezam......................... Eric Fino................................ Brianna Florovito ..................... Glynis Johns ........................... Stephen Kopko ........................ Michael Magistro..................... John McGloin.......................... Lawrence Nicolais Jr. ................ Dan Pittman ........................... Todd Pousley .......................... Andrew Shumlas ...................... Andrew Snyder ........................ Kat Sokirka ............................ Matthew Vough ....................... Joya Whittington......................

25 24 17 19 15 24 20 18 22 20 18 21 23 21 23 17 16 25 16 22

FEATURES

Hazleton focus ....................... 4-7 Business trends of 2019 ............... 8 Holiday shopping update ........ 10-11 Giving report........................... 12 State health care talk................ 12 Agriculture center .................... 27 Celebrate Women Entrepreneurs... 28

EXECUTIVE SUITE

Brand ..................................... 2 STEM education....................... 27 Scranton Tomorrow................... 28 Economic Development.............. 29 Banking & finance ................ 29-30

BUSINESS BULLETINS

Briefs ................................... 30 Personnel file ..................... 31-35 For the Record .................... 35-39

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DECEMBER 2019

The CVS Health brand talks the talk and walks the walk

it is handing them to the consumer in ways that had the potential to be unsafe or increase the risk Five years ago, cVS changed the drug store of addiction. it moved to limit the number of pills landscape. The company announced it would it would fill in a prescription and the length of time no longer sell tobacco products in its pharmacy for the supply. stores, and that it was changing the corporate cVS could very easily have made the exact name to cVS Health as part of a “broader healthopposite argument to protect its profits by claimcare commitment.” ing its customers have legal prescriptions from in essence, cVS created a new category of medical professionals. But it chose a path directed business and challenged its competitors to follow. by the concept of its brand rather than pure profits Today, the it defines its purpose as a company, – or even customer satisfaction – since this made “helping people on their path to better health.” acquiring opioids more difficult. call it a “purpose,” or even a mission statement, when the recent vaping crisis arrived, cVS did but that’s as succinct a brand promise as you are nothing, because it didn’t need to. it didn’t sell vaplikely to find in any industry. And cVS Health has ing products in the first place, again seeing those been backing it up ever since. products as opposed to its promise of a path to in the short term after the announcement, cVS better health. lost an estimated $2 billion in sales, overall revenue cVS Health has not escaped criticism and has was down across their nearly 9,800 pharmacy been named in opioid lawsuits along with other stores and industry pundits were clucking about large retail chains such as walgreens, walmart and the wisdom of their choice. but cVS didn’t waver. rite aid. but its brand focus remains the same. in in subsequent years, the company’s sales im2017 and 2018, Points of Light, the world’s largest proved and reestablished strong growth. organization dedicated to volunteer service, named And that was just the beginning of cVS Health cVS Health one of the top 50 community-minded reinventing the category and establishing itself as companies in the country. the leading brand. it introduced more than 1,000 it’s easy for any company or organization minute clinics for basic health services such as to make grand claims about being communityblood pressure checks and flu shots. it added minded or dedicated to health. most other large omnicare, a long-term prescription management pharmacy chains do. But only cVS stopped selling program and infusions services under the name highly profitable tobacco products and never began coram. selling vaping products. it was the first to limit in the midst of the national opioid overdose opioid prescriptions. crisis, cVS was the first large pharmacy to cVS is a clear example of a company following respond. while cVS doesn’t make opioids, market its purpose, delivering on a brand that is different them or prescribe them, the company recognized and reaping success as a result. by Dave Taylor

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Hazle Compounding achieves elite status Hazle Compounding announced its compounding pharmacy received accreditation from the Pharmacy Compounding Accreditation Board (PCAB), a service of Accreditation Commission for Health Care (ACHC). This accreditation demonstrates commitment to the highest industry standards for quality and safety. PCAB assesses pharmacies that compound medications by combining, mixing or altering drug ingredients to create a medication as prescribed for an individual patient. The accreditation process includes an extensive onsite survey conducted by an independent expert and annual verification to ensure compliance with the pharmacy compounding process defined by the U.S. Pharmacopeial Convention (USP) guidelines. “Compounded medications can be a lifesaver for patients who are unable to take commercially available drugs because of allergies or difficulty swallowing,” said Bill Spear, R.Ph, CCN. “For patients with unique therapeutic needs, compounded medications are a highly customized, cost-effective option to provide clinically necessary therapies.” The practice of compounding medications has received recent attention for both affordability and quality. Hazle Compounding employs highly trained pharmacists who prepare safe, effective, custom compounded medications by mixing individual ingredients in the precise strength and dosage prescribed for an individual patient. Prepared in a state-of-the-art lab to prevent cross

Hazleton art center progress continues

contamination, compounded medications available from Hazle Compounding include Bio—Identical Hormones for Women and Men, Allergen-Free preparations, Formulations for patients who have trouble swallowing or taste sensitivities, and Combinations of multiple medications made into a single dose form. Achieved by a select number of compounding pharmacies nationally, accreditation from PCAB validates Hazle Compounding’s commitment to safe practices, and offers an affordable solution for patients. “PCAB Accreditation allows pharmacies to distinguish themselves as a high-quality pharmacy, committed to the highest compounding standards,” said Jon Pritchett, Pharm. D., R.Ph., associate director of pharmacy for PCAB. “Hazle Compounding has successfully demonstrated its ability to develop high quality, safe and effective compound medications to meet the unique needs of their patients.” Through this stringent process of accreditation, PCAB/ACHC has evaluated every series of action we take in the lab,” explained Bill Spear, R.Ph, CCN owner of Hazle Compounding. “This is vital for patient safety, as every product is compounded by hand from formulas uniquely created for each individual patient’s individual needs. PCAB Accreditation recognizes our commitment to provide the highest quality compounded medications for all our patients and maintains that we follow the best practices in the industry.”

Hazleton bank celebrates grand reopening

Submitted photo

PFNonwovens recently presented a $5,000 check to the Downtown Hazleton Alliance for Progress on behalf of the Banking on the Arts Capital Campaign to fund the second phase of renovations to the former Security Savings Bank building on Broad Street, soon to be Hayden Family Center for the Arts. PFNonwoven’s donation is the remaining half of its total contribution of $10,000. From left: Maureen Brown-Fierro, PFNonwovens purchasing and logistics administrator; Krista Schneider, executive director of the Downtown Hazleton Alliance for Progress; Mary Veronica Sweeney, Banking on the Arts Capital Campaign director, and Penny Boyer, PFNonwovens human resource director.

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DECEMBER 2019

submitted photo

The Community Bank N.A. Hazleton Airport Road branch celebrated its grand reopening with a ribbon-cutting ceremony. Bank executives, branch team members, leaders, customers and community members gathered to mark the completion of renovations. Located at 400 Airport Road, the renovated branch offers Hazleton customers enhanced and expanded services. These include two 24-hour ATMs and additional teller windows.


FOCUS ON HAZLETON

by Dave Gardner

Hazleton’s renewal progresses

With decreased civil tension, ongoing development and investment, new entrepreneurs and a renewed arts sector, the greater Hazleton area remains a work in progress where opportunity continues to appear. Visual evidence of Hazleton’s renewal abounds. Numerous renovations to existing downtown real estate are a reality, particularly with commercial buildings, and economic developers are now celebrating the opening of the Penn State Hazleton LaunchBox, a business incubator. Harrisburg has sanctioned use of Enterprise Zone and Keystone Innovation Zone designations to promote investment. Meanwhile, bustling activity can be witnessed at the campuses of both Luzerne County Community College and Lackawanna College. The Downtown Hazleton Alliance for Progress (DHAP), with its Banking on the Arts Capital Campaign, is rebranding the downtown as an Arts & Innovation District. This effort has required the rehabilitation and repurposing of vacant and blighted properties. Progress also is continuing with the Hazleton Art Center. This is located in the former Security Savings Bank building on Broad Street, and will be renamed as the Hayden Family Center for the Arts and become the focal point of arts and culture, plus anchor to the new downtown Arts & Innovation District. All factors considered, Hazleton therefore seems to be a locale of sweeping change. Since 2000, the city has witnessed Pennsylvania’s highest rate of increase with Latino immigration, creating a population that surpassed 50% during 2018. Financial data, however, indicates much work is still to be done before the new Hazleton can be declared a prosperous area. Median an-

nual household income stands at approximately $42,000, placing it well short of the state average of approximately $52,000. Economic conditions with the city itself are even more challenging, with median household income approximately $34,000, and almost 55% of the city’s population considered to be low to moderate income. Quality employment also is limited, because only 11% of the region’s residents have earned a bachelor’s degree or higher, about half of the state average. Strategic plan Krista Schneider, executive director of the DHAP, noted that during 2015, the organization initiated an overall strategic plan to identify the specific goals and strategies necessary to help revitalize the downtown. This has played a role in what Schneider called incremental progress over time, but has also been confronted by a wide variety of physical, monetary and societal obstacles. “The key to progress is unity, and Hazleton has become a good case study of how communities can solve problems at the local level largely independent of politics and often using volunteers,” said Schneider. “Community communication is key.” According to Schneider, more than 50% of the city’s Hispanics are still Spanish-speaking, and it remains vital to engage these youth in community and governmental activities plus higher education. The city’s public schools are also getting “younger” due to immigrant enrollment. A key to the development plan created by the DHAP has been redevelopment of the downtown away from a retail destination into a commercial center offering facilities for education, health care, cultural arts and entrepreneurs. LCCC alone, according to Schneider, now serves approximately 800 students,

while investment and developmental organizations such as CAN DO and the Ben Franklin Technology Partners, plus Penn State, are active in the region. “At the end of day, despite all this, success is often about entrepreneurs and small businesses, along with changing ethnic and racial beliefs that take time,” said Schneider. “What I worry most about is misunderstanding with communication that can cause people to trample progress and be slow to listen.” Solid occupancy George Hayden, president of the Hazleton Development Company, has been an active participant in Hazleton’s redevelopment and now owns five buildings with solid occupancy. His initial project in 2001 involved the old Markel Bank Building which is now called One Hayden Tower at Markel. Hayden is witnessing across Hazleton, besides the renovation of stately buildings, increased numbers of Latino entrepreneurs joining older family business that remain active. He stated that the biggest challenge facing developers is the perception that Hazelton is the home of bad news, drugs and crime, although Hayden emphatically states this is not the case. “Activity deters crime, and our active downtown therefore is quite safe,” said Hayden Hayden. His business plan for real estate development calls for the installation of parking immediately near his buildings, plus ample lighting. Utilizing this strategy, he claimed to be responsible for more than $20 million of investment in the downtown with small business tenants generally utilizing spaces within his building

measuring 500 to 1000 square feet. “If you’re relying on one large tenant and they leave, it may be a disaster,” said Hayden. “Therefore, our plan has been to offer space to a wide variety of smaller tenants.” Arts and economics The development of an arts culture as an economic development tool is a proven tactic for Katherine Bestwick, co-president of the board with the Hazleton Art league. She therefore is an advocate of art classes, gallery exhibits and assorted other forms of cultural expression. “The arts can create a great dollar revitalization across a region while bringing cultures together, which Bestwick is perfect for Hazleton,” said Bestwick. “Language differences also can fuel difficult cultural problems, and involvement with the arts can help with this.” Mounting financial challenges, however, are a reality that can deter use of the arts to increase quality of life. Volunteers at art events are becoming increasingly difficult to find as work demands continue to inhibit the time available for art enthusiasts to serve nonprofit organizations, resulting in needs for paid staff. Tax code changes are also discouraging donation to non-profits by artists. Hazleton’s existence as a low-income area can make consumer spending for arts events a tough sell. “This lack of discretionary income for the arts makes participant scholarships vital,” said Bestwick. Ple ase se e Renewal, Page 6

Partnering in Downtown Hazleton’s Revitalization For decades, CAN DO has led Greater Hazleton’s economic development, resulting in thousands of jobs for area residents. Today, positive change is taking shape in Downtown Hazleton and we’re proud to be playing an instrumental role, partnering with the Downtown Hazleton Alliance for Progress and the Greater Hazleton Chamber of Commerce. CAN DO and the Gottstein family are in the process of transforming one downtown building into the future home of a modern eatery and garden patio. One S. Church Street, Suite 200 Hazleton, PA 18201

570.455.1508 www.hazletoncando.com

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SUBMITTED PHOTO

We’re growing our entrepreneurial community LaunchBox is a robust, no-cost business accelerator that can help transform business concepts into start-up companies. The Hazleton LaunchBox helps community members and students turn their ideas into venture with no-cost programs and support. The Hazleton LaunchBox offers: • Training programs and workshops in the areas of innovation and entrepreneurship • Hands-on experience with prototyping equipment, such as 3D printing and design • Local, regional and national entrepreneurship competitions • Professional advice in areas such as finance, legal, technology and marketing • Mentorships from local business and community leaders • Co-working space, meeting rooms and video conferencing • Networking and social events to connect you to local resources and celebrate innovation and entrepreneurship To get the resources and support you need to create the business you’ve always dreamed of or grow the business you already have, contact: William Andahazy Entrepreneurship Coordinator wma5073@psu.edu 570-450-3135

Hazleton LaunchBox 13 West Broad Street Hazleton, PA 18201

Find out more at hazleton.launchbox.psu.edu

LaunchBox is a signature program under Invent Penn State, an initiative to leverage Penn State’s entrepreneurial spirit to bring to market ideas, products and services. Through innovative partnerships, Invent Penn State aims to drive job creation, economic development, and student career success. Get involved: invent.psu.edu

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DECEMBER 2019

A ribbon-cutting ceremony celebrated the opening of the Hazleton LaunchBox, 13 W. Broad St., Hazleton, on Sept. 18. The Hazleton LaunchBox is a no-cost startup accelerator and co-working space designed to provide early-stage startup companies with the support and resources needed to build a sustainable business and a viable plan for growth. From left: Lisa Schugardt, chair, Penn State Hazleton Council; Richard Vilello, deputy secretary community affairs and development, Pennsylvania Department of Community and Economic Development; Neal DeAngelo III, president, Downtown Hazleton Alliance for Progress; Jeff Cussat, Hazleton mayor; David Kleppinger, member, Penn State Board of Trustees; Jocelyn Sterenchock, coordinator of entrepreneurial services, CAN BE; Eric Barron, Penn State president; Linda Schiavo; Madlyn Hanes, vice president for Penn State Commonwealth campuses; Gary Lawler, Penn State Hazleton chancellor; Krista Schneider, executive director, Downtown Hazleton Alliance for Progress; State Sen. John Yudichak and Christopher Pavlick, constituent outreach specialist, district office of State Representative Tarah Toohil. FROM PAGE 5

Thriving parks On the industrial front, the greater Hazleton area continues to reap the benefits from its location on the Route 80-81 corridor, plus the national economic progress that unfolded after the Great Recession retreated into history. Jim Cummings, vice president of marketing with Mericle Commercial Real Estate, calls the past a prologue to the future and expects investment in the Humboldt and Valmont Industrial Parks to continue. According to Cummings, Mericle now has 13 buildings operating within Humboldt offering 4.5 million square feet of space, along with five buildings in Valmont with five million square feet. “It’s all about location, and in many ways, this is the crossroads of the east,” said Cummings Cummings. He also explained that the 80-81 corridor is benefiting from changing market conditions within nearby urban areas, as labor costs there rise and worker shortages become acute. This contrasts with conditions along the 80-81 corridor where both problems are more manageable. In a way, the hilly terrain along NEPA’s highways is also helping conditions within the industrial parks. According to Cummings, the resultant lack of flat space for ongoing development has served as a break and deterred rapid industrial accelera-

tion, thereby avoiding the horrific traffic jams in areas such as within Allentown’s Route 22 and Route 78 corridors. “Speak to any company functioning outside of NEPA and they’ll tell you all of these problems, including tax burdens, are less of an issue here,” said Cummings. He added that Mericle has had expanding success within the industrial parks with the development of spec projects, where structures are created before tenants are under contract. In addition, all of Mericle’s industrial parks are plumbed to use the region’s ample and economic supply of natural gas. Vital communication Fermin Diaz, a civil engineer from the Dominican Republic along with his wife, are professionally licensed American citizens offering their services in Hazleton. He called it absolutely vital for Hazleton’s inhabitants to Diaz continue efforts with communication aimed at bridging ethnic differences in the region, while also expanding involvement in higher education. He sometimes becomes discouraged at the number of trained and licensed professional peers that leave Hazleton for greener pastures, and also has called for expanding efforts to provide technical skills education and entrepreneurship knowledge. “Unfortunately, there are still some people here that polarize, and have held back even better progress that could have been made,” said Diaz.


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FEATURE

A year in review: Business trends of 2019

fundamentally see the world differently “Of course, fundamental change to the way business is done takes time, and it may take years for us to see real improvement to the way government operates,” said Ooms. HR advancements Several trends surfaced during 2019 indicating that the business world is changing its human resource practices, according to Lucyann Vierling, executive director with the Wayne Pike Workforce Alliance. Leading the way are rising compensation packages that increasingly offer, in addition to wage adjustment, career expanding options Vierling such as training and tuition reimbursement. “Our businesses, as a whole, are increasingly recognizing the costs of turnover and financial losses from a lack of employee skills,” said Vierling. “Applicants who can learn are in great demand.” Vierling has also noticed that business is accepting the value of professional coaches for human development. She declared that professional coaching is a different process from case management. Comprehensive economic plans being used in the region during 2019 also helped created pockets of excellence in areas such as transportation, infrastructure, workforce education and community development. According to Vierling, this marks a departure from the past where development was less organized. “There also has been an increased understanding that you can’t just have work to succeed,” said Vierling. “You need a broader context that produces a superior quality of life so that people can truly thrive.” lysts for downtown renewal. Mixed signals According to Ooms, her organization is also finding Calendar year featured solid investment, but that major foundations such as Scranton, Weinberg also unsettling signals for and Moses Taylor are now banding together in a business, according to cohesive regional fashion to address problems. Larry Newman, executive “The applicants for grants are also showing director of the Diamond collaboration, and this helps to reduce duplication City Partnership. These of efforts,” said Ooms. metrics have indicated the As she eyes the new female leadership within presence of decreased corruption-scarred Scranton resulting from the No- unemployment coupled vember election, Ooms is optimistic. She believes with workforce shortages, Newman this could be a turning point with new blood who the existence of people

by Dave Gardner

Changes within employment, leadership, ongoing investment and market demands marked the evolving trends that confronted the regional business arena during 2019. Several metrics from the 2019 edition of the Indicators Report for Lackawanna and Luzerne counties, created by The Institute for Public Policy & Economic Development, paint a picture of a region departing its last connections to the dusty coal mining past. The unemployment rate, long a source of regional frustration, has dropped at least four points since 2012 with approximately 13,000 business units now operating regionally. According to the report, regional GDP exceeds $23 billion, and is witnessing a 2.2% annual growth. This rate stand in contrast with the statewide GDP expansion total that was listed as exceeding 4%. The median price for real estate rose to $135,500, fueling a market that has rebounded since the dark days of the Great Recession. Additionally, one in five regional residents were age 65 or older, requiring a bustling health care arena. Vibrant downtowns According to Teri Ooms, Institute executive director, downtown resurgence continued as a major trend during 2019. These areas are relatively safe, and now include a vibrant mix of students, millennials, and older residents who have relocated to downtown apartments for convenience or may reside there during the weekdays. She credits programs such as Wilkes-Barre Connect and the establishment of business incubators, plus development accomplishments such as the Marketplace at Ooms Steamtown, as being cata-

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DECEMBER 2019

choosing not to work or unable to do so, and pressure on employers to increase wages for a long overdue compensation correction. “The metrics seems to indicate many economic indicators are not moving in tandem, said Newman. “We also are no longer isolated within NEPA from global economic conditions.” Investment continued at a solid pace within downtown Wilkes-Barre, and Newman said this indicates confidence in the city’s economic fundamentals. The downtown now has its first private business accelerator, business startups continue, angel and venture capital is flowing, and visual evidence continues to prove a vibrant downtown with intellectual capital has been established. Demand for downtown residency is also expanding. Waiting lists for precious downtown apartments may extend years into the future. “Another positive sign we’re witnessing is that many employers are beginning to realize that the millennials as employees are the norm, and their generational behaviors must be accepted,” said Newman. “This is particularly true in the startup companies.” He added that the valley’s colleges, which can serve as a key resource for business startups, remained anchored during 2019. Investment and expansion within these schools continued, as witnessed by the new King’s College engineering center that has attracted both students and economic activity. Demand-oriented Consumer demand, as opposed to product supply, directed business activity at an ac-

celerating rate during 2019, according to John Mellon, Ed.D., associate professor of business at Misericordia University. He described how the expanding number of restaurants in the region, including national franchises, has been made possible by a strong regional appetite to dine outside of the home. Educational opportuniMellon ties for employees by business management is also increasing, as employers across the spectrum of commerce look beyond current employee skills and strive to help them grow professionally and with life skills. This development demand is creating new markets for the educational community, including traditional classroom and seminar formats. “We’re even teaching some management education,” said Mellon. “Lifelong learning is now vital, and there’s a Connecticut model with less emphasis on degrees and more on certificates and direct skill training as technologies such as robotics advance in use.” Mellon also was pleased that, during 2019, identification was achieved of the need for increased public transportation, particularly during “off” hours so that workers on night shifts can get to and from work. The regional need for public transportation for the elderly also is high, making public transit more important than ever and a vital part of economic development.


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FEATURE

Holiday shopping starts early by Joe Sylvester

Black Friday, the traditional start of holiday shopping, came later this year because Thanksgiving also was later. Not all shoppers waited to find gifts at local small businesses, though. Nationally, more than half of consumers who shopped at businesses of all sizes already started their holiday shopping by the third week in November and nearly a quarter of purchases were already made, according to survey by the National Retail Federation and Prosper Insights and Analytics. Some small businesses in Scranton and Wilkes-Barre reported seeing some uptick in holiday shoppers, though there hasn’t been the influx that usually happens that hyped-up day after Turkey Day. “I’m seeing some early shoppers,” said Marshall Rosenberg, owner of Tuck’s Army Navy Store on Penn Avenue in Scranton. “It’s not as busy as it will be.” The longtime downtown Scranton business sells jeans, T-shirts, military items, work clothes, heavy duty coats and camouflage clothing. “We sell a lot of clothing for cold weather this time of year, anyway,” Rosenberg said. “Scarves, hats, lot of military clothing, coats. Not many stores around here sell that.” He added, “There’s probably something here you want, but you don’t know you wanted it.” Rosenberg is hoping to draw new, as well as longtime, customers. “New customers are welcome, but to our old customers who’ve been shopping here the last 50 years — we’re still here.” Dotty Kenyon, working at her daughter Vikki’s business, Vikki’s Nuthouse, in The Marketplace at Steamtown, said business has picked up some as the holiday approaches. “We just listed all our gift items online,” Dotty Kenyon said. “Because we’re a food item, they wait.” The business, which won the contest to receive $20,000 in perks and free vendor space at the marketplace for a year, sells various flavored nuts, such as chocolate and cinnamon almonds and pecans. Vikki’s goes to fairs, including the Bloomsburg Fair, where it sells nuts out of three stands, and Ple ase se e Holiday, Page 11

Information provided by the National Retail Federation.

Joe Sylvester Photos / For Business Journal

Marshall Rosenberg, owner of Tuck’s Army Navy Store in Scranton.

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DECEMBER 2019

Howard Balbach, manager of Top of the Slope Ski Shop in downtown Wilkes-Barre.


F R O M P A G E 10

the Pittston Tomato Festival. It’s also present at the Outdoor Expo and the wine festival events at the Bloomsburg Fairgrounds. “We typically get busy about two weeks before Christmas, because it’s food,” Kenyon said. “We have a lot of orders we deliver the first and second week of December.” The business is based in Plains Township, where its licensed kitchen is located. Business there is by appointment only. Down the road in Wilkes-Barre, business at the Top of the Slope Ski Shop on South Main Street was about the same as last year in mid-November, said Manager Howard Balbach. “It’s as busy as last year,” Balbach said. “Some people wait till it snows.” He said the chamber of commerce and downtown business association has been promoting the downtown and the city changed the lights and redid the sidewalks. Also along South Main Street in downtown Wilkes-Barre at The Video Game Store, business is about the same as it was during the same period last year. “They’re waiting for Black Friday,” said store Manager John Karpien. “We’ve been waiting all year for Black Friday. Summers are boring. Once

Black Friday comes, it’s busy till tax season.” Overall, though, downtown Wilkes-Barre has been busy early, this holiday shopping season. “We don’t have money to do a scientific survey, but I’ve noticed additional people walking around downtown,” John Maday, president of the Downtown Wilkes-Barre Business Association, said just before Thanksgiving. He said one sign of more shoppers downtown is the number of cars in municipal parking lots and the Boscov’s parking lot. He said they have been more crowded. According to NRF, the survey found 56% of consumers asked during the first week of November had already begun their holiday shopping, about the same as the past few years. That was up from 48% who had already started at the same point a decade ago. On average, consumers had completed 24% of their shopping, the highest level in the history of the survey and up from 16% in 2009. Only 4% had finished shopping. NRF defines the holiday season as Nov. 1 through Dec. 31 and has forecast that sales will total between $727.9 and $730.7 billion. Consumers expect to spend an average $1,047.83 – including purchases made earlier – for an increase of 4% over last year, according to NRF’s annual survey released in October.

Joe Sylvester / For Business Journal

Dotty Kenyon at her daughter’s Vikki’s Nuthouse business at The Marketplace at Steamtown. There are only 26 days between Thanksgiving and Christmas this year, down six days from last year and the shortest number possible, but

NRF does not expect that to make a difference in spending given the number of people who begin shopping earlier.

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FEATURE

2019 report: Slight rise in charitable giving by Phil Yacuboski

Americans, foundations and corporations gave more than $425 billion dollars in charitable giving, according to Giving USA and its annual report on philanthropy in the U.S. The organization, which tracks charitable giving, said giving rose .7% in 2018. Many nonprofits and charities throughout our area rely on the holiday season for people to give before the end of the year. “One of the ways to give is to use the community foundation as a vehicle for that giving,” said Laura Ducceschi, president and CEO of the Scranton Area Community Foundation. She said people can start a fund, which begin at $5,000 (lower for non-endowed funds) and people can give to the foundation, who then manage the fund. “We have the knowledge of what the community needs are so people can learn what those needs are,” said Ducceschi. “People can also give to a community needs fund, which allows people to give to a fund so that we determine where the needs are most valuable.” She said year-end giving is most popular and

businesses are using the foundation to do their giving. “Any type of business – small business, large business or family business – instead of using their own business, they use us to establish their own foundation,” she said. “We will also provide a match to that fund. We do all of the work.” The Scranton Area Community Foundation, which is in 65th year, distributes the money through charities throughout northeast Pennsylvania. Ducceschi said there’s always a need. “I think we live in a very philanthropic community,” she said. “Irrespective of the income levels here, I think we have a very generous culture. The need is not shrinking. As a region, we are probably above the poverty line in the state and the challenges are significant – transportation, food insecurity, housing – but I don’t ever say we don’t have a generous community.” One of the big programs Outreach does around the holidays is their ‘Toyland Workshop,’ said Angela Seibert, the private, nonprofit’s program director. “It’s an internal program that is geared for

people within our existing programs,” she said. “We accept new toys from donors and we take selected, gently used toys. We open the workshop to people in our program where parents can shop for their children and children can shop for their siblings.” Seibert said there is need that seems to be growing. “We have definitely seen an increased need for services,” she said. “There’s a lot of people who are working and working several jobs and

still having a hard time making ends meet, especially when you have an illness or there’s a vehicle issue. People don’t have a solid safety net even when they are working. We’ve seen an uptick over the last 10 years.” Giving USA found that charitable giving through foundations is on the rise – as much as 18% with the number of individual donors down slightly. It also found that corporate giving rose 5.4% in 2018, which accounts for a $20.5 billion rise in giving over the previous year.

HEALTH CARE

Pennsylvanina looks to state-based health care exchange by Phil Yacuboski

The shift is on to a state-based health care exchange, and a recent study by the Urban Institute found Pennsylvania is one of 17 states making the shift in order to save money and make a better customer experience. “We want to make sure Pennsylvania’s families do shop on the exchange. They should look at their plans that they have currently, shop on the exchange and to make sure it fits their needs,” said Jolene Calla, vice-president of health care finance and insurance for the Hospital and Healthsystem of Pennsylvania. Pennsylvanians have until Dec. 15 to buy a plan through the federal exchange. It’s the last time consumers will go through healthcare.gov to buy a plan. Under a bill signed by Governor Tom Wolf, that creates a state-based exchange in 2021, it is set to be operational by 2021. “There’s not really a downside,” she said.

“It also gives us the ability to tailor the needs to Pennsylvania’s constituents.” She said under the federal program, open enrollment is on their terms. In Pennsylvania, if a particular group is low in the enrollment numbers, they have the ability to extend the dates. “We can do targeted outreach,” she said. “We want to make sure whoever is eligible for coverage can enroll.” The Pennsylvania exchange will also be cheaper. Governor Wolf’s administration expects costs to be 5% to 10% lower under a Pennsylvania-run plan. Twelve states currently have their own state exchanges; four other states are in the process of building their own exchanges. When the ACA first began, all states had to figure out if they were going to use the federal exchange or if they were going to use their own state-based exchange. At that time in Pennsylvania, because of both the timing and the cost to build

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the infrastructure, Pennsylvania didn’t do a state exchange at the time, but they were going to reevaluate the possibility of doing one in the future. “Fast forward a few years and everything has shifted,” said Calla. “The IT platform that is needed to run these sorts of things is much less expensive than it was that first time around. The user fee that we and other states pay has gone up over time and it’s to tune of $98 million that we are sending to Washington, D.C.” Calla said she believes consumers are kept at the forefront. “There has been a lot of stakeholder engagement in all of this with everyone who is affected,” she said. “As Pennsylvania makes this transition, it’s important for people to have a good experience.” She said there’s been research and outreach to doctors and hospitals about how the whole system would work.

Calla said it’s an aggressive timeline to get the system up and running, and she expects it to happen. According to recent numbers provided by the state, the number of Pennsylvanians who do not have health insurance has fallen to 5.5% - the lowest on record.


Wells Fargo donates backpacks

AllOne supports pediatric hospice initiative

Submitted photo

Members of Wells Fargo Bank present backpacks filled with school supplies to Wyoming Valley Children’s Association. From left, Kevin Engelman, Wells Fargo district manager; Nina DeiTos Zanon, WVCA executive director; Michael Rotell, branch manager Kingston and JD Alberola, branch manager Edwardsville.

submitted photo

Hospice of the Sacred Heart recently received a $10,000 grant from AllOne Charities to support a pediatric patient initiative called the Kids Kloset. From left, John P. Moses, Esq., chairman, AllOne Foundation and Charities; Diane Baldi, CEO, Hospice of the Sacred Heart; and John W. Cosgrove, executive director, AllOne Foundation and Charities.

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Business Journal NORTHEAST

PENNSYLVANIA

Honoring the best The Top 20 Under 40 awards are the Northeast Pennsylvania Business Journal’s annual salute to the best and brightest young business stars in the region. Hundreds of successful professionals have been nominated since the awards kicked off in 2002. The honorees come from a variety of backgrounds and career fields, from health care, to construction, retail, law, education, finance and beyond. Many common attributes, however, are shared among them including expert knowledge of and passion for their professions, a drive for excellence and a bent toward volunteerism and community service. Each honoree was nominated by at least one superior, colleague, client, friend or family member and chosen by the Business Journal team through a careful selection process. Top 20 Under 40 nominations open in late-August and close in mid-October. Look for the announcement in the September and October print editions and on the Business Journal’s Facebook page at facebook.com/ biz570.

TOP 20 UNDER 40

20 40

under

Adam Davis

Age: 39 Title: Realtor Company: Classic Properties

T

o Adam Davis, excellence is not about being the best at a job, but doing your best at the job. As a Realtor with Classic Properties in Clarks Summit, he tries to do just that every day. Davis graduated from Bishop Hannan High School, attended The Art Institute of Fort Lauderdale, and graduated from the Pennsylvania State

s n o i t a l u t a r Cong

University with a bachelor’s degree in marketing and management. Davis became a licensed real estate agent in 2005, and has helped hundreds of buyers and sellers throughout northeast Pennsylvania since. He has sold more than $50,000,000 in sales volume. He enjoys working in all aspects of real estate transactions, marketing and staging and developing customized strategies for his clients. His mentors include Diane Calabro and Steven Farrell of Classic Properties. “They both took me under their wings and gave me the tools and support to make me the Realtor I am today,” he said. “They took a chance on a 25-year-old kid with no experience and instilled the confidence in me to succeed in a very competitive business.” Davis attributes his success to treating everyone with respect and giving everything his best effort. “If you cannot stop thinking about it, do not stop working for it,” he said, adding he applies this to both his personal and professional life. He is especially grateful for the support of his husband, Steven Wallace, and his entire family, including his parents, Nancy Kulick Davis and Paul Davis. He is actively involved with the Greater Scranton Board of Realtors and served as the 2017 president of the board of directors. He has been a member of

“They [Diane Calabro and Steven Farrell of Classic Properties] both took me under their wings and gave me the tools and support to make me the Realtor I am today. They took a chance on a 25-year-old kid with no experience and instilled the confidence in me to succeed in a very competitive business.”

Adam Davis

various committees including the Community Service Committee on which he volunteers for St. Joseph’s Center Telethon and the Ronald McDonald House Gourmet Gala, among others. He was awarded Realtor of the Year in 2017 by the Greater Scranton Board of Realtors, has been a member of the Classic Properties Presidents Circle since 2006 and received the Scranton Times Readers’ Choice award in 2015. Davis resides in the Green Ridge section of Scranton. Outside of work, he enjoys renovation projects, landscaping and traveling.

EST. 1983

ADAM DAVIS

On being selected as one of NEPA’s Top 20 under 40. 570.587.7000 NORTHEAS T P ENNS YLVANIA BUS INES S J OURNAL DECEMBER 2019 15

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Andrew Snyder

TOP 20 UNDER 40

Age: 27 Title: Scranton Regional Office Manager Company: AAA North Penn

tors, a phenomenal group of highly respected business leaders across an 11-county territory, he feels fortunate to ndrew Snyder believes in order to be suchave a relationship cessful, one must be resilient. with this group of “You may fail multiple times, and you people who are so may receive criticism, but, in the end, it comes knowledgeable and down to you – how you handle failure and critiwell-respected in cism. Neither of these are bad things, and my their fields. These, he said, are his mentors. success has come from being able to accept these He lives by Henry Ford’s philosophy, “whether things and to move on,” Snyder said. you think you can or think you can’t, you’re right.” As the Scranton regional office manager at Snyder feels beyond fortunate to have a family AAA North Penn, it is his responsibility to oversee that supports him every step of the way, especially the member services department. He also serves his wife, Jen. as the assistant secretary to the AAA North Penn “It is true when they say behind every great board of directors, and for the past five years, man is an even greater woman, and that is my he has held the position of driving improvement wife,” he said. “Having her support and a part of instructor for the business. my life makes me try a little harder every day.” “I help senior drivers to acquire new skills and The businessman recently became a mentor in driving techniques that will help them on the road,” the Keystone College Mentoring Initiative program, he said. which is designed to connect Keystone College Snyder began working at AAA North Penn in students to community mentors for professional the emergency road service department when he development purposes. was 16 years old. “As a Keystone College alumnus, it is great to “It is funny to look back and think how a weeknot only give back to the college but also engage end part-time job evolved into a career,” he said. with students who are in the process of beginning “I think that says a lot about AAA North Penn and their professional career,” he said. their leadership as a company. It is because of AAA Snyder serves as a board member and public that I went back to school and finished my degree. relations chair for the Irish Cultural Society of The opportunities AAA has provided me over the years have allowed me to grow and evolve into the Scranton; on the staff parish relations committee at the Elm Park United Methodist Church and a professional I am today.” board member of the Keystone College Alumni After having had the opportunity to work closely with the AAA North Penn board of direcAssociation.

A

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Matthew Vough

Age: 27 Title: Luzerne County Councilman/ Sales Team Lead Company: Luzerne County/Keystone Automotive Operations

he said. “It is crucial for us to make the customer’s experience as easy as possible.” While he has worn many hats at Keystone, he began hree years ago, Matthew Vough decided he as a marketing wanted to run for Luzerne County Council manager, transiand help make the county a better place to tioned to an outside live and work. While many of his friends moved salesman and then to his current position. away after high school, he said he loves the area As a councilman, his duties are primarily to and wanted to help make great progress in it. work to make the budget as efficient as possible And he is. Two years into being a county councilmember, and to create a safe, economically sound place to live and work for all. Vough says council is creating jobs and lowering Having graduated from Scranton Preparatory the deficit, and he is personally trying to fight the School in 2010, he obtained a bachelor’s degree in opioid epidemic. marketing from The University of Scranton in 2014. “As such a young member of council and seeVough says he would not be where he is today ing so many young people affected by this disease, without the support of his family and friends who are I felt like I had to do something,” Vough said. always there for him in the pursuit of his dreams. He first toured many recovery centers and Without a doubt, he admitted, his greatest figured the best thing he could do was educate mentors are his parents, Cindy and Mike Vough. the public about the severity of the problem and “With aspiring to help people and this area, how the public plays a role. He hosted multiple I could not ask for two better mentors,” he said. substance abuse forums across the county with educated panels and the opportunity for the public “My father is a Luzerne County judge, and I get my work ethic from him. My mother is the nicest, to ask questions. He plans to travel to all areas of most caring person I have ever met. She teaches the county to continue to host these forums. At his daytime employment at Keystone Auto- me every day to treat others with respect, and it motive Operations, Vough is a sales team lead for has made me a better person.” He attributes his success to the support of his the account development division. He and his team family, including his three siblings – Mike, Nick are responsible for onboarding new customers and Jess – and believes life is a team sport, and and driving new business. “We work to build up the new accounts so that without a team, you cannot win. In his spare time, he has coached eighth-grade they are familiar with the way we do business, and boys basketball at Wyoming Area. then we pass them off to our senior sales team,”

T


TOP 20 UNDER 40

Andrew Shumlas Age: 33 Title: Attorney Business: Cefalo Law in West Pittston

Dr. Kaitlyn Connors

“I aid my clients to receive compensation for their injuries and lost wages as a result of an injury they may have sustained.”

Andrew Shumlas

A graduate of the Pennsylvania State University in 2007 and Syracuse University College of Law in 2013, he has been employed at the Cefalo ttorney Andrew Shumlas is not afraid to work hard. He attributes his success to this Law firm since 2015. Shumlas said his current position as a lawyer work ethic and his lack of fear in taking on enables him to fulfill his childhood dream of helpadded responsibilities to get the job done. ing people. This is one reason Cefalo Law firm is a As an attorney with Cefalo Law in West Pittston, Shumlas represents injured workers and good fit for him professionally. personal injury plaintiffs. “‘The People’s Law Firm.’ It’s not a slogan,” “I aid my clients to receive compensation states cefalolawfirm.com. “It’s a philosophy. At for their injuries and lost wages as a result of an Cefalo Law, we are dedicated to helping people. injury they may have sustained,” he said. We’ll treat you as an individual. We’ll call you by According to its website, Cefalo Law began name. We work for people every day.” as a small firm more than 20 years ago and has He is grateful to his wife, Laura, who offers since grown into “one of the largest personal him wonderful support, both in his career and his injury law firms in Northeastern Pennsylvania private life. The couple welcomed their daughter, serving an 18 county region surrounding WilkesEmelia, into the world on Aug. 31. Barre and Scranton.” “They are my everything,” he said of his “The firm’s six lawyers and support staff family. handle cases such as auto and truck accidents, Shumlas serves on the parish committee at slip and fall injuries, medical malpractice, workers’ Holy Mother of Sorrows Polish National Catholic compensation and defective products,” the webChurch in Dupont and volunteers at the church’s site reads. “The firm also handles cases involving dinners and other activities throughout the year. swimming pool, airplane and boat accidents. All He is also treasurer of Holy Mother of Sorrows of our attorney’s give free consultations and free Men’s Society and a vice president of the Polish legal advice. If you can’t come to us, we’ll come National Catholic Church United Y.M.S. of R. to you.”

A

Age: 31 Title: Chiropractor Company: Northeast Rehabilitation Associates / Pittston Chiropractic Clinic

“It was an immediate fit,” she said. She then returned to her hometown and began her practice in Pittston, while commuting from Quakertown where she was employed at another practice. She eventually returned to the area full time to her current practices. Her brother is her mentor. “He is someone who I always look to for advice within our careers,” she said. “It is a lot of fun having a family member in the same profession and being only 18 months apart in age. We have a lot of the same ideas and run our practices very similar.” Her success, she admits, is largely due to her parents. Her father, Patrick Connors, principal officer Dr. Kaitlyn Connors cares for her patients as if they of Teamsters Local 401, instilled in her from a young age the importance of a good work ethic. Her mother, were members of her own family, and at the end of Christine Connors, retired from PNC Bank, always each day she finishes knowing she did her best and encouraged her children to be the best they could be her best is good enough. when it came to school, athletics and family. “Success doesn’t happen overnight and not by “I cannot help but to think without their continued accident,” Connors said. “It takes hard work, perseverance, learning, sacrifice and most importantly the love support, I would not be where I am today,” Connors said. She also receives tremendous support from her of what you are doing.” As a chiropractor at Northeast Rehabilitation Asso- fiance, Damon Tanona, who is always encouraging ciates and her own practice, Pittston Chiropractic Clinic, her to follow her dreams. Connors was named the Greater Wilkes-Barre she provides chiropractic care for patients of all ages, Chamber of Commerce’s STEM Professional of the from newborns to her oldest patient at the age of 94. Following high school, Connors chose to continue Year. She is an international certified chiropractic sports physician, a DOT Certified medical examiner her academic and athletic career at Susquehanna and a certified independent chiropractic examiner and University, majoring in biology while playing field holds an advanced certificate in whole foods nutrition. hockey and softball. She is a member of the Pennsylvania Chiropractic “I always knew I wanted to go into health care,” she said. “I just was not sure what path, but being an Association, the American Chiropractic Association athlete helped me discover chiropractic and eventually and the American Board of Independent Medical Examiners. lead me into this profession.” She is also the head field hockey coach at She attended New York Chiropractic College, Pittston Area High School and volunteers at local where her brother, Dr. Patrick Connors was studying at the time. health fairs and community events.

Congratulations Andy Shumlas Your #1 Workers Compensation Attorney Under 40

Personal Injury Workers Compensation Medical Malpractice NORTHEAS T P ENNS YLVANIA BUS INES S J OURNAL DECEMBER 2019 17

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TOP 20 UNDER 40

Brianna (Brii) Florovito

Age: 25 Title: Workforce and Entrepreneurial Development Specialist Company: The Greater Scranton Chamber of Commerce

B

rianna Florovito approaches life full of joyful curiosity. “I achieve success every day by appreciating all the great and wonderous people around me and taking the time to listen to their experiences,” Florovito said. “Success is not only achieved when you are handed an award or a recognition.” As a workforce and entrepreneurial development specialist at the Greater Scranton Chamber of Commerce, she is responsible for fostering collaboration among businesses, educational providers and community partners to develop a workforce and create opportunities for job seekers in Lackawanna County. She coordinates and manages Educators in the Workplace, a program involving a five-day industry immersion experience of the breadth of job opportunities in local businesses and raises student awareness of career pathways and job opportunities in Lackawanna County. She manages the Engage! program, a state-wide initiative through which she connects with local businesses. She also manages the customized workforce data and labor market information at the chamber and assists with two of the chamber’s incubator facilities under the Ignite program. The young woman also teaches GED classes at Lackawanna College, is involved in the Scranton Chamber’s Young Professionals Group and is a local speaker on entrepreneurship at area functions. She earned her bachelor’s degree from Rutgers University in sociology with a minor in criminology. She studied abroad in Budapest, Hungary and is certified in women’s entrepreneurship from eCor-

nell. Following college graduation, she entered the workforce as a business services representative with PA CareerLink. In February 2019, she accepted her current position at the chamber. “I simply do the best I can by giving 100 percent of my effort 100 percent of the time, and I surround myself with amazing people who live and work in the community,” Florovito said. Her mentors include John Loughney at PA CareerLink Lackawanna County, who set an example on how to be a true leader, and Amy Luyster, vicepresident at the Scranton Chamber, who teaches her about economics and creating opportunities for young women like herself to have a voice in the industry. “To me, success is about helping others find their purpose,” Florovito said. “I am extremely lucky that I have a career that allows me to do that on a regular basis. When you take that approach, every situation becomes an opportunity, not just for yourself, but others as well. No matter how knowledgeable I am on a certain subject, I will never know it all. Every person I meet is an opportunity to learn something new regardless of their background, education or social status.” Her parents, Brian and Lori Florovito, are an invaluable source of support to her. “They are there to guide me, lift me up and redirect me during those difficult moments,” she said. “I would not be where I am today without them.” Her daughter, Delaney, is also her driving source of motivation to do what she does. The young woman has visited 15 countries. She has three Great Danes, Berlioz, Izzy and Winston.

Michael Magistro

Age: 26 Title: Marketing Manager Company: The Slocum Firm, P.C.

M

ichael Magistro is not always found on the road most traveled. “The really great experiences in life are not found on predetermined tracks and streets, but on the side streets and alleys one often overlooks,” Magistro said. “Basically, there’s no need to rush life; things will happen as they do, and there’s no reason to not explore everything while you can.” As the marketing manager at the Slocum Firm in Scranton, Magistro collaborates with the principal owner of the company to strategize and execute marketing plans that cover multiple mediums for clients and seeks to innovate the marketing process within the legal industry. He also assists on the legal side by helping guide cases from initial intake through settlement or trial. The businessman takes time to teach people how to cook authentic Chinese and Spanish dishes, particularly paella valenciana. He works with the local Hispanic population to help coordinate legal assistance and to help their businesses rise to be the best they can be. A northeast Pennsylvania native, Magistro attended Marywood University earning an undergraduate degree in Spanish and Chinese. He moved to New York for a short while only to return home where he began working in the health care field. “That experience helped me realize I wanted to pursue graduate education,” he said. “It was during that time that I became involved with my current place of employment as an intern and later

Congratulations Brianna! The Greater Scranton Chamber of Commerce congratulates Brianna Florovito as a 2019 “20 Under 40” honoree! We are honored and proud to have her on our team. scrantonchamber.com

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as a full-time employee.” His mentors include his current employer, Matthew Slocum, Esq., and Jason Daenons. Viewing everything as interconnected, the young man has used that mindset to understand that everything comes as a result of multiple factors, rather than one cause. “It is sort of like a Venn diagram where success is the spot where every ring overlays,” he said. “I like to properly contextualize situations before doing anything major and keep my ears open to those whose opinions I respect to help guide me.” He also believes his linguistic background helps him in many ways, although they are not always obvious. “Language acquisition forces the brain to function differently, always seeking out different solutions and relating everything to context in order to properly translate,” he said. “I apply that to my everyday life to better analyze and solve issues.” Magistro said his wonderful mother has supported him in the decisions he made to get to where he now is. He added he has an incredible partner who constantly challenges him to further growth and to be a better version of himself. Magistro received the Wanda Persechetti Medal for Excellence in foreign language and placed in the top five of Techbridge Collegiate Business Plan Competition in 2019. He is co-chair of the Young Professionals committee at the Scranton Chamber of Commerce. He earned his MBA from Marywood University in 2019.


TOP 20 UNDER 40

James Cooney Age: 37 Title: Vice President Skilled Nursing Facility Operations Company: Allied Services Integrated Health System

rehabilitation services, the facility offers a ventilator unit, which is unique to the area. Patients seekames Cooney works hard and looks ahead. He ing ventilator sets a goal, and when he achieves it, he sets services would another that is even more challenging. have to travel ei“I believe in identifying opportunities and acting ther to Allentown on them when timing is right and trying each day to or Philadelphia if learn something new about my business,” Cooney it were not for the care provided at Allied. said. “I want to be a better administrator than I was In addition to Cooney’s responsibilities at the the day prior.” facility, he oversees four other facility administrators As vice president at Allied Services Integrated at two skilled nursing facilities and two personal care Health System’s skilled nursing facility, Cooney is homes in Wilkes-Barre, all under the Allied Services responsible for all operations including the clinical, umbrella. financial and regulatory aspects of the facility. He is A graduate of Scranton Preparatory School the lead administrator at Allied Services Skilled Nursand The University of Scranton, Cooney earned his ing Center in Scranton, a 369-bed nursing facility, bachelor’s degree in media and information technolthe largest of its kind in the area. ogy. During high school and college, he worked in In addition to traditional skilled nursing and

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the kitchen of a nursing home, washing dishes in the evening hours for spending money. He realized he did not want to leave the nursing home business, but instead, learn more about it. He accepted a management position there, and through the next few years, he returned to school to earn his license to function as a nursing home administrator. He worked in various departments, roles and facilities gaining the experience required to operate successful facilities providing quality care to residents. An opportunity to open a new, short-term skilled nursing unit, now named Allied Services Transitional Rehab Unit, was presented to him at a great time, and he jumped on it. “I haven’t looked back,” he said. “It’s been a great ride.” He said his superiors at Allied Services, specifically the president and CEO, Attorney William Conaboy, and the CFO, Michael Avvisato, are his professional mentors. They provide him with sound advice while showing patience and trust in him as he strives to continue the company’s mission of delivering compassionate care.

“I believe in identifying opportunities and acting on them when timing is right and trying each day to learn something new about my business.”

James Cooney

“Their unwavering support is not only a testament to their strong character, but it is also paramount to the success I have had at Allied Services,” Cooney said. He attributes his success to the careful and compassionate upbringing by his parents. “My parents instilled a strong work ethic in my siblings and in me, and have supported me throughout my life,” he said. “I would not be where I am today without them.” His education also gave him a strong foundation as a spring-board into a career that he loves.

Congratulations, James, on your Top 20 under 40 honor and on earning your Health Services Executive qualification from the National Association of Long Term Care Administrators Boards. Thank you for your leadership in skilled nursing and your dedication to Northeastern Pennsylvania.

James Cooney, NHA Vice President, Allied Services Skilled Nursing Facilities

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Eric Fino

Age: 25 Title: Work Zone Coordinator Company: Pennsylvania Department of Transportation

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TOP 20 UNDER 40

“I was taught nothing is given to you for free; you have to go out and earn it.”

Eric Fino

ric Fino lives by the philosophy of treating others as he himself would like to be treated. In his day-to-day dealings with people, he keeps a positive attitude and is always kind and compassionate with his fellow man. As the work zone coordinator at the Pennsylvania Department of Transportation, he is responsible for reviewing traffic control plans for upcoming construction projects and supporting ongoing construction projects. He oversees the proper setup of work zones in construction; designs emergency bridge closure detour routes; reviews highway occupancy permit traffic control plans, superload routes and traffic management plans; participates in planning future projects; enters information into the road condition reporting system which uploads traffic information into PA511 and participates in yearly training for construction and maintenance personnel. Fino believes he is where he is today due to working hard and staying focused on what he wanted his future to be. “Throughout my high school career, I tinkered with everything I could get my hands on, from working on cars to helping put together stage equipment for my high school’s Christmas play,”

he said. “I learned early that I was a hands-on learner. Upon graduation from high school, he attended Pennsylvania College of Technology for its hands-on civil engineering program. Throughout college, he spent his summers interning at PennDOT applying that year’s book knowledge to the field he found so interesting. Jonathan Eboli has been a great mentor to Fino during his career at PennDOT. “He [Eboli] pushed me and continues to have me strive to further my career,” said Fino. He attributes his success in life to the dedication of his parents and their goal for him to succeed. “I was taught nothing is given to you for free; you have to go out and earn it,” he explained, adding he followed that belief throughout his life. Fino’s entire family was supportive of him as he pursued his engineering career, and to this, he is grateful. Fino attained the rank of Eagle Scout; was named employee of the month by PennDOT for June 2019; and placed second at the Northeast Fair for a metal sculpture he designed. In the community, the engineer assists the local Boy Scout troop with its community service projects and is an active member at the Pittston YMCA. He also assists Lynnettes Twirlerettes in local parades and events, sometimes dressing up as the “heat miser” in the Scranton Santa Parade.

Stephen Kopko

Age: 34 Title: Associate Attorney Company: Cummins Law

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rom a young age, Stephen Kopko’s parents instilled in him a hard work ethic, which he attributes as the reason for his success. “I am the first member of my family to become a lawyer, and their encouragement guided me during the difficult process that was law school and the bar exam,” he said. As an associate attorney at Cummins Law, he represents members of the community as well as local businesses in matters involving automobile accidents, trucking accidents, slip or trip and fall events and property damage claims. The civil litigation attorney also provides legal analysis and opinions to insurance companies as it pertains to coverage issues. “I handle each stage of the lawsuit from when it is first filed until trial,” he said. “I also engage in settlement negotiations in many of my cases on a daily basis.” He and his partner, Daniel Cummins, also write articles that are published in the Pennsylvania Law Weekly, Pennsylvania Lawyer Magazine and the Pennsylvania Defense Institute’s publication, Counterpoint about trends in the law of personal injury. He is a 2004 graduate of Seton Catholic High School; 2008 Magna Cum Laude graduate of King’s College and 2011 graduate of Syracuse University College of Law. While he had many mentors along the way including teachers from high school, professors from college and basketball coaches, his current mentor is Daniel Cummins, the founding partner of Cummins Law and author of the legal blog, Talk. “Dan is one of the leading civil litigation attorneys in the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania, and

is regarded as an ethical, thorough, intelligent and aggressive lawyer by both the judges and other attorneys,” Kopko said. “Mediocrity is the scourge of our society,” is the philosophy by which he lives. His wife, Julia, is a constant support and provides him with the ultimate guidance to achieve success. “Whether it is listening to my opening or closing argument while I prepare for trial, or providing me with key insights on a case, my wife is the most intelligent person I know and has helped me become the lawyer that I am today,” he said. Kopko and his wife recently had a daughter, Imogene. “I am amazed at how great of a mother my wife is to our daughter,” he said. His parents, Steve and Peg Kopko, are also great support systems in his life and provided him with the encouragement, guidance and support he needed to pursue his dreams as he was growing up. Kopko is a co-chair of the Our Lady of the Snows Country Bazaar, which takes place every August. He is responsible for the oversight of all of the operations of the bazaar and organizing the vendors and the many volunteers. The Country Bazaar is the largest fundraiser for the Our Lady of the Snows Parish in Clarks Summit and is now in its 27th year. “It attracts thousands from all over Pennsylvania, and is a gathering of the Abington Community for fun and fellowship,” Kopko said.

Congratulations to all of NEPA’s “TOP 20 UNDER 40” Especially our alumni Kathleen Barry ’10

James Cooney ’05

Joshua Braddell ’08, G’15

Matthew Vough ’14

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scranton.edu


John McGloin

TOP 20 UNDER 40

Age: 36 Title: Project Manager Business: Apollo Group Inc.

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ohn McGloin believes in finding humor and enjoyment in everyday activities, including work. “If you enjoy the work you are doing and the people you surround yourself with, you are much more likely to achieve success,” McGloin said. As the project manager at Apollo Group Inc., the businessman is responsible for the leadership and management of small and large commercial construction projects. From coordinating schedules to daily oversight of project activities, and ensuring projects are completed on time and within budget, his job requires him to prioritize tasks and handle a multitude of duties. After graduating from West Scranton High School, he attended Lackawanna College for two years, earning his associate’s degree in liberal arts and the opportunity to continue his education at Lehigh University. There, he earned a bachelor’s degree in architecture, and upon graduation, immediately began working in the field. After a few years working in the architectural field, he transitioned to management and has worked in construction for the past eight years. Since then, he has successfully managed nearly 70 projects totaling more than $40,000,000. “Construction management has provided me with an environment where I can utilize all of my strengths while remaining involved in the design field,” he said. “Since I began working at the Apollo Group, I’ve found more success, which I attribute to a supportive working atmosphere. I truly enjoy working with my colleagues, which makes it easy to go to

Dan Pittman

Age: 29 Title: Artistic director/owner Company: Act Out Theatre Group LLC

of Ages. He also choreographed/directed in KISS Theatre, Act Out and Music Box Dinner Playhouse. The former owners of Act Out approached him an Pittman believes people are much more about purchasing the busicapable as performers when they do not ness in 2017. give in to the “can’t, don’t or won’t” of new “After working with them on various producexperiences in the creative arts. tions for nine months, I ultimately fell in love with “It puts a limitation on your abilities, and the atmosphere they created and working with the we are capable of so much more than we give young performers,” he said. ourselves credit for,” said the artistic director and The building was sold in April 2018 and the comowner of Act Out Theatre Group LLC in Dunmore. pany reopened Act Out only 19 days after moving to The young man works with children and its new location on Grove Street in Dunmore. teens from age 4 to seniors in high school who William Thobaben, Pittman’s high school have a passion for theater and performing. He is theater director, was a great mentor to the young responsible for all of the theater operations includ- man, and instilled the passion he has for theater ing show direction, choreography, construction today. More recently, Jessica Suda became a menof sets, maintaining the front lobby and many tor and role model. administrative duties. He attributes his success to the confidence his Pittman began his theater career at the age of 10. workshop participants and their parents have in him. He majored in musical theater at Desales University He says he is ahead in his long-term goals, already and graduated in 2012. After a few odd jobs and ran- owning the performing arts business at age 29. dom acting gigs, the performer settled in as a crew Having a supportive mother has a positive member at Chipotle Mexican Grill in Chambersburg. impact on his life, as well. Throughout his tenure at Chipotle, he worked his way “She never gave up or stopped believing in up the management chain to kitchen and then service me,” he said. manager. He also worked in other locations such as Healsobelievesfriendsarethefamilyonegetsto Penn State, Lehigh Valley and both King of Prussia choose,andhischosenfamilyisespeciallysupportiveofhis locations. That journey took him to be part of openendeavors.Hisroommateandbestfriend,KalenChurcher, ings in new restaurants in Christiana Mall, Carlisle, volunteershertimetohelpworkwiththechildren. Baltimore and Wilkes-Barre. Pittman was a Northeast Pennsylvania Theatre After two years at Chipotle, the young man left Alliance (NEPTA) award nominee for Best Choto teach dance full time and substitute teach on the reographer (2016 and 2017). He belongs to the side. He then took on a choreography job at the Publicity Committee and the Music Box Players Little Theatre of Wilkes-Barre, working on Rock and is an event host for QueerNEPA.

D work every day and achieve success.” As many children in this area do, McGloin grew up playing sports with his brothers and friends. Fortunate to have remained involved in sports as an adult – volunteering at local baseball camps through his brother’s baseball academy, Electric City Baseball and Softball Academy, and as an assistant coach for several local baseball teams – he believes youth sports teach children a sense of responsibility to others and foster leadership skills. His parents and brothers have always been his number one fans, he said. “They have pushed me to achieve more and more and supported me when I failed,” he added. His wife is also a constant source of support and challenges him to travel outside his comfort zone. And more recently, the birth of their first child, Claire, has provided him with new inspiration. McGloin is a member of the American Institute of Architects (AIA) and recently passed the exam for Construction Management Certification (CCM). He is also actively involved in his brother’s local foundation, assisting with fundraisers and various charity events throughout the year. He is a 2012 graduate of Leadership Lackawanna and an active participant in his church.

LACKAWANNA COLLEGE proudly congratulates

Athletics Director and Head Women’s Basketball Coach Joya Whittington

on being named one of the Northeast Pennsylvania Business Journal’s

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TOP 20 UNDER 40

Joya Whittington

very young age I wanted to be a coach and stay in basketball as long as I possibly could,” she said. The high school standout received a scholarship to Seton Hill University, where she majored in business and minored is psychology, with a specialization in sport management. Upon graduation, she began her coaching career as a graduate assistant on the Seton Hill women’s basketball bench. She also completed her MBA with a specialization in entrepreneurial studies during that time. After two years as an assistant, Whittington was offered an opportunity to come back to her roots and began a head coaching career at Lackawanna College. After spending a season as the part-time head women’s basketball coach, she was offered a full-time position in the athletic department. She was then offered a job as an Age: 31 assistant coach with Lamar University, an NCAA Title: Director of Athletics and Head Division I school in Beaumont, Texas. After 10 Women’s Basketball Coach months in the south, the young woman realized Company: Lackawanna College that her roots were in northeast Pennsylvania and the East Coast. oya Whittington believes the success in her Lackawanna College immediately offered life comes from servant leadership – the only her a full-time position in athletics along with way to lead. the head women’s basketball job, and she “I believe that we were created to work and accepted the position of athletic director the work hard in all areas of live,” she said. “I also following year. believe in the pursuit of humility every day.” In addition to her father, another great menAs the director of athletics and the head tor in her life has been Ferne Labati, her college women’s basketball coach at Lackawanna coach. College, Whittington oversees 14 sports and Blessed with the ability to lead at a young their head coaches as well as an athletic staff age, she is grateful to her tremendous parents with five employees. She performs responsibili- who knew how to put truth and grace into her ties such as recruiting and day-to-day sport life every day. program functions and meeting with the col“My family is the rock of my foundation as a lege’s coaches to help ensure programs are run woman,” she said. at the highest level of collegiate athletics. She She was named to the E-Magnify Women in also oversees athletic department marketing Business and District O Coach of the Year for and social media management in collaboration two years, and she received the 2019 National with the college’s advancement department and Championship Sportsmanship award. She has collaborates with other major departments at been a member of the WBCA since 2013. the college in order to build relationships and The coach is proud of the extensive volunresources for the coaches, staff and student teer work the women’s basketball program perathletes. forms in the community including at Park Hill At Carbondale Area High School, of which Church’s A Night to Shine, basketball camps she is a graduate, she played varsity basketball for the PA Virtual Charter School, basketball for four years under the direction of her father practices at community schools and Lackawaand head coach, Patrick Whittington. nna College’s Out of the Blue and Somebody’s “Coaching is in my blood, and I knew at a Someone.

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Glynis Johns

Age: 26 Title: Founder, and CEO Company: Black Scranton Project

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hen Glynis Johns performs a task, you can rest assured her heart is in it. She always pushes through, because she believes there is triumph on the other side of adversity. As the founder and CEO of the Black Scranton Project, the young woman is an advocate for her community. The project is dedicated to archiving and celebrating the African American history of Scranton. As a native of Scranton, where her family has resided for many generations, Johns was determined to uncover the rich history of African Americans since the 1800s. “I have made it my mission to re-stitch their narratives and black heritage back into the cultural fabric of Scranton,” she said. “I do this because I think about the kids who look like and feel out of place or cultural-less despite being born and raised right here.” Johns spends a lot of time representing and advocating for the black community, marginalized communities and students of color in the region. With a great team of board members, she deferred some of her many jobs but is still responsible for social media pages and maintenance of a growing archive. And she is the

brain behind all the research and organization of events and programs. When Johns began working on her master’s degree in sociology at St. John’s University, the Black Scranton Project was her graduate thesis, investigating why the black community is overlooked and seen as transient in Scranton. After its completion, she returned to Scranton to share the research with her community. She began speaking at universities and businesses and was awarded a grant from the Willary Foundation – a step forward for Black Scranton’s Black History Month exhibit, which attracted more than 1,600 visitors. Finding herself invested, she decided to pursue her Ph.D in African American history. “I found so much to be proud of,” Johns said. “It is a labor of love, but I love how the work I do inspires others to value local history and local narratives. I think that is what makes the city ‘electric.’” Her mentors have been Dr. Natalie P. Byfield of St. John’s University and Dr. Erica Armstrong Dunbar at Rutgers University. Johns attributes her success to Louise Tanner Brown (1883-1955), who she likes to say found her in the archives. “She lived her life as a successful businesswoman here in Scranton, an activist of early 20th century civil rights movements, educator, public speaker and humanitarian,” Johns said. “She’d often say black folks only want the rights to which they are entitled. So I continue her legacy and activism.” Johns’ late father, Waverly Johns, who loved Scranton more than anyone the historian has ever met, was her biggest cheerleader and never let her give up on anything. Her mother, Sonia Morgan, is her rock, and the first to know all of her historical discoveries. Her brothers, Denzel and Garrett, her incredible friends and the community are important facets of her life. Johns was recently appointed to the Scranton Public Library Authority, the Lackawanna County Arts and Culture Council, Scranton Mayor’s Art and Culture Commission, the Association for the Study of African American Life and Culture (ASALH) and is a Rutgers University first-year Ph.D. student.


Todd Pousley

TOP 20 UNDER 40

Age: 35 Title: Neighborhood Revitalization Manager Company: NeighborWorks Northeastern Pennsylvania

of Kentucky, post-Katrina New Orleans and Guatemala to help others in need,” he said. While still in school, he joined the board of Habitat for Humanity of Lackawanna f you know your why, you can surely endure the County, leading the organization as board president for six years. how, according to Todd Pousley. “That experience – as challenging as it was – As the Neighborhood Revitalization Manager convinced me that the nonprofit sector was where for NeighborWorks Northeastern Pennsylvania, his belief is important in the work he performs every day. I could have the greatest impact,” he said. Pousley serves on two boards: Friends of the By collaborating with local government officials, community organizations and residents, the Poor (since 2015) and Leadership Lackawanna (since 2018). He chairs Leadership Lackawanna’s young man plans improvements in communities selection committee and has served as a group throughout Lackawanna County. He is currently project advisor for three years. He previously spent leading the development of a 10-year neighborseven years on the board of Habitat for Humanity hood revitalization plan for West Scranton, where of Lackawanna County, including his presidency, he lives. He is also directing two home repair and two years on the board of the American Adverprograms for Scranton residents: the Scranton tising Federation (AAF) of Northeast Pennsylvania. Homebuyer Assistance Program and Beautiful Jesse Ergott, NeighborWorks’ CEO, was his Blocks. In addition, he oversees NeighborWorks’ mentor long before he became Pousley’s boss. website, social media, newsletter and other mar“He provided a lot of valuable advice for leading keting efforts. a struggling, all-volunteer organization like Habitat for He earned his bachelor of fine art in graphic Humanity,” Pousley said. “Later, when I decided to shift design and his master of public administration my career focus from marketing to nonprofit manageboth from Marywood University. He is a graduate ment, he guided me through the transition, helping me of Leadership Lackawanna’s Core Program and develop career goals and job opportunities.” earned his nonprofit leadership certificate from He receives tremendous support from his The University of Scranton this past year. parents, Tim and Patrice Pousley; his 8-year-old He believes his success is due to a clear, daughter, Addison and his four younger siblings. uncompromising focus on improving his comHe was named Leadership Lackawanna’s Advisor munity and helping others, which was sparked by of the Year in 2019 and received the Walton medal for volunteer experiences in college. “As an undergraduate at Marywood, I particiexcellence in public administration and the Sister M. pated in numerous national and international serMargrete Kelley medal for distinction in community vice trips to places like the Appalachian Mountains service, both from Marywood University.

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Congratulations Todd Pousley

Top 20 under 40 Honoree

Lawrence Nicolais Jr.

Age: 36 Company: Constantino’s Catering and Events Inc. Title: President/owner

his brother’s business, which became the namesake for Constantino’s Catering and Events. After graduating from Scranton Prep, he attended ver the past 12 years, Constantino’s Catering the University of Pittsburgh and Events grew from three to 60 employees. and earned his bachelor’s “The success of our business is directly degree in business administration with a concentied to the quality of hard-working people who tration in finance. choose to spend their weekends, holidays and eve“The four years I spent in Pittsburgh, the friends nings being part of our team and making our cus- I made and my membership in the Sigma Chi Fratertomers’ special days and occasions successful,” nity gave me the growth and maturity that became said Lawrence (Larry) Nicolais Jr., president and the foundation for the life I live today,” he said. owner of the business. “As much as I owe to all of During his college years, his family departed the the people who have influenced me throughout my food business, but he insisted on staying in the game, life, I would never have been successful without catering golf tournaments during the summer and the amazing staff working for us every day.” dinner before the theatre at the SCC for Fidelity Bank. Nicolais oversees the day-to-day operations of Nicolais bought the former Lettieri Bakery in the business. He manages the kitchen staff, food Dunmore in 2009 and turned it into an off-prempreparation and execution of the food service. He ises catering hub and soon came to occupy four is also in charge of the finances and bookkeeping more buildings there, housing an office, comand the weekly staff scheduling. missary, showroom and catering warehouse. He Constantino’s is a community partner for bought the former Patsel’s Restaurant in Glenburn numerous events and supports the Waverly Com- Township in 2016 and turned it into a full-service munity House, Scranton Preperatory School, the wedding and events venue. The initial construction Scranton Cultural Center at the Masonic Temple project won a Pride and Progress award for the (SCC), Friends of the Poor and numerous religious best interior renovation in 2017 and was voted organizations in the area. best place to have a wedding by Times-Tribune Nicolais grew up in Dunmore, and his family readers in 2018 and 2019. owned many area businesses. The biggest influence Nicolais resides in Dalton with his wife, Caitlin, on his career was the Green Ridge Club, owned and and daughter, Claire. operated by his parents from 1977-2004. “They are my everything,” he said of his family. “I grew up in that business happily washing His wife helps maintain the venue’s gorgeous dishes, busing tables, cooking, bartending and caring feel, inside and out, and his father-in-law, Michael maintains the venue and gardens, keeping them for the building,” he said. pristine. He also worked making pasta and baskets for

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The only secret sauce in life is the one made from hard work.

congratulations pients! Larryy & the 2019 recip

catering & events nwnepa.org

570.963.1691 | ConstantinosCatering.com

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Joshua Braddell

TOP 20 UNDER 40

ton, where he earned a bachelor’s degree in nursing. He returned home only to go back to Scranton in 2009 to begin work at Geisinger Community Medical Center as an RN. He returned to the university for his master’s degree in nursing. He began work for The Wright Center after graduation and has been there since. His professors and preceptors at the University – including Dr. Joanne Nicoteri and Dr. MaryJane Hanson, who worked diligently to prepare their students to be exceptional health care providers – have been his mentors. Braddell’s mother and father were both nurses, and he was inspired by how the lives of essential strangers are made better by nurses. This is what drew him to the profesAge: 34 sion of nursing. After the untimely passing of Title: Certified Registered Nurse his father, he was raised by his single mother Practitioner and Director of Nurse who worked tirelessly to care for his brother, Practitioner and Physician Assistant sister and him. Services “She instilled in us the desire to succeed at what we care about,” Braddell said of his Company: The Wright Center for mother. “We were taught not to give up and Community Health to pursue our dreams.” The undying support of his wife is his oshua Braddell tries hard not to take life too lifeline. While working and attending school seriously. full time, he and his wife, Sarah, got married “I want to be able to look back on and had their first son. my actions and be proud of what I have “Honestly, I do not know how we made done,” Braddell said. “I want my children to be proud of their father and see that how we it some days, but without my wife, I do not treat people is most important.” know where we would be,” he said. As a certified nurse practitioner and The couple now has two sons, Landon, director of nurse practitioner and physician 5, and Lucas, 2, and is expecting their third assistant services at The Wright Center for child soon. Community Health, the young man noted In addition to work, Braddell spends as his first and foremost responsibility is to his much time as he can with his family, and patients. they are active members in their church In his director role, he oversees the nurse and community. He volunteers for his son’s practitioners and physician assistants who youth sports and participates in a number of work at The Wright Center’s various locacommunity events. He is a former volunteer tions, and is responsible for 14 NPs and PAs fire fighter. He also works at The University of at six different clinics between Lackawanna Scranton as part time faculty in their underand Luzerne counties. He also serves as graduate nursing program. He spends time a preceptor to many of the local NP and with local hospice organizations as well. PA programs students, a responsibility he Braddell is a member of the American enjoys. Academy of Nurse Practitioners and PennsylHaving grown up in northeast New Jersey, Braddell attended The University of Scranvania Coalition of Nurse Practitioners.

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Cyrus Entezam

Age: 25 Title: Videographer and Graphic Designer Company: MCR Design Group

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yrus Entezam believes in keeping a creative mind every day in order to attain success in one’s life. The 25-year-old also believes in dedication and performs a job until it is done and done well. As a graphic designer and the lead videographer of MCR Design Group, Entezam travels to a lot of venues and records major events. He also contracts out his work to record concerts and corporate commercials. According to its website, MCR Design Group is “an elite group of professionals based out of Northeastern Pennsylvania specializing in bringing

your events to life.” “With a team that is ready to work for you on every creative aspect of your future event, MCR has the knowledge, the resources and the reputation to make your event one that will stand out from all the others,” the website reads. “With an outstanding track record in weddings, corporate events, concerts and even music conferences, MCR Design Group is your one-stop source for every aspect of your event.” The company specializes in production, rentals, design and wedding and event coordination. After studying drawing and design at Old Dominion University, Entezam was employed at a retail store in Virginia while acquiring freelance jobs filming weddings and music videos for local artists. He made Pennsylvania his home after being accepted onto the MCR team. His brother and his current employer have mentored him throughout his life. Through his jobs and routes in life, his mentors have always been major supporters and teachers, helping him learn many new talents and teaching him to profit from his many talents in his career field. He believes in staying humble and uses this philosophy every day. Entezam is grateful to his parents, who have always been his biggest fans and have always been there for him through his accomplishments and as well as downfalls. He is an entrant in the 2019 VA Film Festival - 9 Pillars Hip/Hop music video showcase. He is working on a major music video production in the Wilkes-Barre and Pittston areas with a full cast, make-up team, crew and sets. The young man is always open to aiding aspiring videographers and creative minds in the area.

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Kat Sokirka

Age: 23 Title: Special Events & Social Media Manager Company: Scranton/Wilkes-Barre RailRiders

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at Sokirka has always been told you can be taught a lot of skills, but you cannot teach the type of attitude you bring to work every day. So, the young woman comes to the Scranton/ Wilkes-Barre RailRaiders as a special events and social media manager with a positive attitude and the realization that working in her field should be fun as well. “Everyone who knows me, knows I love cracking jokes and being sarcastic,” Sokirka said. “In my opinion, that type of work environment lends itself to dynamic communication and relationship-building.” In charge of all of the RailRiders’ social media accounts and all non-baseball related events held at the ballpark, she works most of the 70 home games and has a ton of fun along the way. “Minor League Baseball is undoubtedly a grind with the great amount of hours we work and the amount of hats we wear, but the people I work with have become family over the past five-and-ahalf years, so it makes it worth it,” she said. Sokirka attended Bucknell University, where she was actively involved in Bison Athletics. She served as the Coca-Cola marketing intern for three years, and was the on-court emcee during men’s and women’s basketball and football games. She was also the undergraduate executive intern for athletics for two years.

TOP 20 UNDER 40

“Both internships truly gave me an amazing college experience,” she added. Having grown up in a family surrounded by sports performed by her three older brothers and then by her and her younger sister, she soon realized she did not have to leave athletics behind, and could actually embrace that passion through a career in professional sports. After her freshman year, she interned with the RailRiders in the summer 2015, and has been with the organization since. Sokirka is board member of Little Eric’s Foundation, an organization dedicated to raising awareness and funds for pediatric and childhood cancers through fundraising events in the community. Jourdan Fraser has been a great mentor to the young woman as a student at Bucknell University, and since has also become an amazing friend. Her family has been incredibly supportive of her for her entire life. “Through sports, school and my career, my parents and siblings have always pushed me to do my best,” she said. “They are always there for me when things don’t go as planned and have always helped me get through new stages of life.” Her friends are a great source of inspiration in her life as well. Over the past few months, the young woman became actively involved in The Greater Scranton Chamber of Commerce, is a cochair of the chamber’s Young Professionals Program and recently became a LIFE Incorporator.

Kathleen Barry

Age: 31 Title: Manager of Primary Care and Dental Services Company: The Wright Center for Community Health

K

athleen Barry was raised to be a hard worker, and as a result, she has always worked multiple jobs and balanced many responsibilities in her life. These skills are valuable to her position as manager of primary care and dental services at The Wright Center for Community Health in Jermyn. She oversees the day-to-day operations of the Mid Valley practice, which operates 365 days a year and 83 hours a week. She works to maintain schedules for medical and dental providers and staff and works to help increase access and services for patients in the community. “I work for an organization that is communityfocused,” Barry said. “Every day I am at work my focus is on the patient, whether I am directly helping one patient or helping to coordinate a community event for many patients.” Barry earned her undergraduate degree from The University of Scranton in exercise sciences and sport with a concentration in nutrition. She then went on to earn her master’s degree at St. Joseph’s University in long-term care administration. “My passion has always been helping others,” she said. “I am a people person and like to help others. I had to find my niche, which is coordi-

“My passion has always been helping others. I am a people person. ... I had to find my niche, which is coordinating, project management and working with others.”

Kathleen Barry

nating, project management and working with others.” The young woman’s grandparents are her mentors. “I spent a lot of time with them growing up and listening to their stories, experiences and taking their advice,” she said. “Their involvement in my life has been key in making the person I am today.” While she lives her life by a few different philosophies, the most important to her is that if she is not happy, she makes a change. “I am always in pursuit in finding my happiness,” she said. “I am a true believer that you need to continuously look and work toward your happiness. I also believe you need to be able to adapt as well in order to achieve it.” Barry’s parents, Robert and Shirley, are also big supporters of the young woman and her career. Her sister, Erin, and brother, Peter, as well as her extended family, have also been there for her and offer her inspiration in her life when she needs it most. Barry is also on the Keystone Health Information Exchange (KeyHIE) board and is a member of the Lackawanna County Elder Justice Multidisciplinary Team.

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Clarks Summit | Jermyn | Kingston | Scranton | Wilkes-Barre

Congratulations to this year’s

Top 20 Under 40 We are proud to recognize Joshua Braddell, Certified Registered Nurse Practioner, and Kathleen Barry, Manager of Primary Care and Dental Services, for embodying our mission to improve the health and welfare of our community through inclusive and responsive health services and the sustainable renewal of an inspired, competent workforce that is privileged to serve.

We Provide Comprehensive Healthcare Services — Integrating Physical, Behavioral and Oral Health — for Children and Adults

TheWrightCenter.org As a Federally Qualified Health Center Look-Alike and safety-net provider, The Wright Center for Community Health offers comprehensive and affordable healthcare services regardless of insured status or inability to pay.

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DECEMBER 2019

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AGRICULTURE

Farming a plan

by Phil Yacuboski

Agribusiness is big business in Pennsylvania. With more than 59,000 farms and an annual economic impact of more than $136 billion, according to the Pennsylvania Department of Agriculture, the state is a national leader in the production of apples, cherries, peaches, grapes, mushrooms, and countless other fruits and vegetables and yes – Christmas trees. Farming is 18% of Pennsylvania’s gross state product. It’s one of the reasons Pennsylvania has set up the Pennsylvania Agricultural Business Development Center, as part of the Farm Bill signed into law by Governor Tom Wolf. “There’s always a discussion about planning,” said Pennsylvania Secretary of Agriculture Russell Redding, when he talks with farmers and those in the agricultural business. “When the Center for Dairy Excellence did their survey, they found that only 17% of respondents said they had a formal business plan. It’s how we came to this Ag Business Development Center. We want it to be inclusive, but it’s focus is on having a center that’s a portal to the services of planning.” Under the legislation, the center will help farmers with planning – whether it’s when they are starting out or in helping the family diversify their farm – marketing and even through transition periods. Secretary Redding said it’s those tools that are lacking for today’s farmers. He said the legislation is to help established farmers and those who entering the farming business. “It is our hope that the center will be a resource,” he said. “Our goal is to have a limited staff that can get you to the right service.” Among the highlights, the legislation also creates

the Conservation of Excellence Grant Program, which offers financial and technical help to provide farmers with ‘best management practices.’ It also provides a quick response to agricultural disasters and helps dairy farmers transition to more organic farming. Secretary Redding said Pennsylvania farmers are struggling in several areas. “The dairy industry for three plus years has been in a really tight spot,” he said. “We’ve lost a number of farms in Pennsylvania and we continue to lose farms because they are financially pressed and they are running negative margins for two to three years. It’s one sector that really sees a need in the planning.” He said the dairy industry is a ‘perfect example’ of how the center can help. “They might want to stay in agriculture, but just not in dairy,” Secretary Redding said. “They might want to do something else, and we can help them do that.” He said two other areas that need attention in farming are making the switch to organic and those transitioning. “There’s this convergence in farming that means something different to everyone,” said Secretary Redding. “It’s changing.” While an apple farm years ago may have sold just apples and cider – now there are hayrides, mazes, pumpkins – almost like a mini tourist attraction. “There’s retail opportunity for farmers to do direct sales,” he said. “You have technology that’s changing things to allow them to sell online and then there’s the agri-tainment component.” For more information, farmers can contact the Pennsylvania Department of Agriculture.

EDUCATION

STEM education moves NEPA forward by Thomas J. Botzman, Ph.D.

More than 100 years ago, the Sisters of Mercy worked with local citizens to purchase a large swath of wooded uplands between Wilkes-Barre and Harveys Lake in the Back Mountain to begin constructing Luzerne County’s first four-year college. Although significant events both locally and abroad delayed their vision for the institution of higher education, the Sisters of Mercy officially broke ground for the Administration Building in 1921 – some seven years after buying more than 99 acres of land. Three years later, College Misericordia opened its doors, housing the entire academic experience, including 37 members of the first class, in what today is Mercy Hall. Today, Mercy Hall remains the largest academic building on Botzman campus, but a complex of modern buildings and amenities surround it to serve more than 2,700 students, the campus community and local neighbors. This summer, however, visitors have noticed a dramatic change afoot as construction of the state-of-the-art Frank M. and Dorothea Henry Scienter Center has begun after six years of thoughtful planning and fundraising. The first phase of the facility will open in August 2020. When completed, it will stand as our largest academic building and a gateway to enhanced STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Math) education. Our investment in STEM education is important for many reasons, but in particular for our students, and for the future of the university and region. STEM supports students with career destinations in the life, physical and social sciences in addition to a number of computer and technology-related fields. The physical sciences are the base for careers that are the goal of about one-half of our current students. Physics underpins medical imaging and sonography. Biology and chemistry are the basis for many

of the fields in health sciences, including nursing, speech-language pathology, occupational therapy, physician assistant and physical therapy. As the largest provider of health care professionals in Northeastern Pennsylvania, we must continue to improve our capacity and capability to deliver a base of liberal arts and sciences to every student. Furthermore, the ability to expand our natural science enrollments will support the growing need for STEM professionals in the region. Just as we painstakingly planned and designed our new Henry Science Center, the university has simultaneously continued to develop our academic programs and research base. Our Summer Undergraduate Research Fellowship (SURF) program, for example, has supported more than 100 students working directly with faculty mentors to search and explore the unknown across many academic disciplines since its inception in 2014. This summer’s SURF projects include research on the effect of Schwann cell growth, the effect of metabolism on green tea polyphenols, the oxidation of benzaldehyde without using heavy metal oxidants and much more. While I am familiar with green tea, and less familiar with the rest of the research, much of what we are studying indicates a high level of linking classroom theory to the laboratory and realworld applications. SURF builds a student’s confidence and capability, while contributing to the creation of new knowledge by both the student and faculty mentor. The new Henry Science Center will further demonstrate our interest in expanding our teaching and research boundaries. Misericordia University is proud to be an innovative and creative success story for nearly a century. We look forward to another 100 years and more of service to our community and students. Please visit us soon on our campus where all are welcome. Thomas J. Botzman, Ph.D., is president of Misericordia University in Dallas, the oldest four-year institution of higher education in Luzerne County.

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CELEBRATING WOMEN ENTREPRENEURS

Amber Cipriani by Jaclyn Riefenhauser

Amber Cipriani shares her passion for art with both children and adults as the owner of the Electric City Art Studio. In addition to running the studio, Cipriani is a full-time art teacher for students in grades three through six in the Hazleton Area School District. From murals to paintings to custom pieces, she is not hesitant to share her knowledge and creativity with others. Cipriani was driven to open her own business by her desire to nurture and grow her students’ love for art. She teaches approximately 600 students each week. It is difficult to be dedicated to each student when you see 30 kids for only 40 minutes each week. The minimal time Cipriani had with her students motivated her to open a studio. The Electric City Art Studio allows students who are especially interested in the arts to have more one-on-one instruction with the owner. With the benefit of providing students assistance and direction for their love of art, Cipriani knew running her own business was the appropriate decision. She discovered an open studio space while walking through The Marketplace at Steamtown and realized it was the perfect moment to fulfill her dream. Even though she was hesitant at first, Cipriani was confident she had the potential to convert her vision into a reality.

The Electric City Art Studio is an environment where both children and adults are encouraged to embrace and extend their creative side. Cipriani focuses on the creative process itself rather than the final product. In her view, life is about the journey, not the destination. The studio allows customers “to let their imaginations run wild.” Examples of this include “mix paints together, put globs of glue on paper, smoosh the paint onto your hands, and pour glitter and sparkles all over.” Parents love this program because kids can make a mess in the studio instead of at home. Cipriani provides a special events on the weekend, known as the “open studio.” This is a time anyone can come in, create whatever they want, with whatever supplies they want, on Saturdays and Sundays from noon to 3 p.m. The cost for open studio is $8 per half hour or $12 per full hour, which includes all supplies and paper. Canvas and wooden paint tables can also be purchased at an additional cost. Cipriani also offers private lessons, birthday parties, pre-k classes, family paint nights and adult workshops upon registration. Owning and running the studio is a learning experience for Cipriani. She is discovering what people are looking for in her studio, how to reach her target audience through social media and how to be a successful businesswoman. She said in the future, she wants to have her “own space with a full schedule that accommodates all ages, learning styles, abilities and disabilities.” This space would be large enough to store supplies and organize more activities. Overall, Cipriani is proud of her accomplishment of opening a studio while working as a full-time teacher. She has the determination and ambition to expand her studio events to people of all ages. She advises entrepreneurs to “just go for it, have an end goal and don’t stop working toward it.” Discover the Electric City Art Studio’s offerings through its Facebook page or on Instagram, @electriccityartstudio.

Jaclyn Riefenhauser is a University of Scranton Submitted photo Women’s Entrepreneurship Center (WEC) intern WEC Intern Jaclyn Riefenhauser, left, and working under the supervision of Donna Simpson, Consultant Manager. Amber Cipriani, business owner.

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DECEMBER 2019

ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT

New chapters in Scranton’s story Tomorrow spearheaded Scranton’s Every city, every community first Small Business Saturday, a and every neighborhood has nationwide program created by a unique story. In Scranton, American Express, in 2011. Since particularly in its downtown, the then, it has continued to grow in evolution is exciting to watch. It’s popularity, creating an opportunity even more invigorating to be part for Scranton Tomorrow to develop Collins of an organization serving as a a comprehensive holiday campaign catalyst for positive change in the that includes promotions before and region, and that’s where Scranton after Small Business Saturday. More Tomorrow fits into the story. than 50 businesses participated in multiple For more than 25 years, Scranton holiday promotions this year, providing a Tomorrow has been dedicated to fulfilling much-needed boost to the local economy. this important role in the greater ScranDeck the Downtown continues through ton community. A nonprofit, non-partisan December with the 25 Days of Downtown, organization, Scranton Tomorrow was born and the annual Holiday Window Decoratfrom a grass-roots effort in the early 1990s ing Showcase. A social media campaign to improve the quality of life for those who featuring the latest holiday specials in the live and work in Scranton. Through commu- Downtown Scranton Business District, 25 nity partnerships and support from business Days of Downtown counts down to Christleaders, property owners and volunteers, mas on Scranton Tomorrow’s Instagram and the organization has progressed and grown Facebook pages. along with the city it serves. While 25 Days of Downtown is a new Today, its mission is refined to include a promotion, the Holiday Window Decorating focus on economic development, establishShowcase has grown into a seasonal tradiing Scranton as the premier urban center of tion. Dozens of businesses decorated their northeast Pennsylvania. storefronts with winter scenes and festive Through this new monthly column, read- lights, highlighting the downtown busiers will have the opportunity to learn more ness district’s intrinsic charm. The Holiday about a diverse list of projects and initiatives Window Decorating Showcase will be on shaping the future of the region – from eco- display through Jan. 3. Download a map nomic development programs, to beautifica- at scrantontomorrow.org, and take in the tion efforts, downtown living and walkability, picturesque scenes of holiday cheer while seasonal promotions, exciting new events dining, shopping and celebrating in downand more. town Scranton. As part of this year’s holiday promoThanks to all the business and comtions, Scranton Tomorrow launched Deck munity partners who have come together the Downtown, an integrated marketing to make this holiday season extra special campaign encouraging people to shop in downtown Scranton, and to those who and dine in the downtown. The program support shop local initiatives. It’s encouraglaunched on social media in November with ing to see increased participation in Small a “Give Thanks” video series featuring local Business Saturday and holiday promotions, business owners. (For those who missed it, which are prime examples of the positive videos are posted on Scranton Tomorrow’s changes that Scranton has embraced in the Instagram and Facebook pages). past few years. Local business owners opened their Happy holidays! hearts by sharing video messages of Leslie Collins is the executive director of gratitude before opening their doors for Scranton Tomorrow, a non-partisan, non-profit economic development organization in Black Friday, Small Business Saturday, Scranton. Reach her via email at leslie@scranCyber Monday and the dining specials tontomorrow.org. To learn more about highlighted in Flurry of Feasts. Scranton Scranton Tomorrow, visitscrantontomorrow.org. by Leslie Collins


ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT

A joint special operations command

responses that can overcome adversity. If this idea is good enough for What does a Joint Special military use, it may be effective for Operations Command (JSOC) have domestic usage in geographic areas to do with the Pocono-Northeast? such as this region. The difference is In “Relentless Strike,” a book of that the domestic usage would not be 540 pages, author Sean Naylor talks a secret entity, but would have some about the federal JSOC function that of the same characteristics that make Grossman permeates the military of this great JSOC unique and a techniques that can nation and outlines its role in military be replicated across boundary lines life. The words come forth about Team 6, special that are often parochial and difficult to maneuver. task forces and much more, citing ways in which Some of the actors who could become part of a JSOC has been a strong addition to the ability of regional JSOC might be political, environmenthe United States to meet the defense or counter tal, economic, community minded, weather terrorism across the world in such places, as So- specialists, social service personnel, emergency malia, Iraq, Afghanistan and many other locations. medical, emergency management, community Imagine, if you will, what this region might organizers, technical specialists and more. The do with a JSOC operation that would be available makeup can be studied and developed as a way for domestic use as the region competes with to focus attention on what many other places, in the nation and the world for role the domestic JSOC economic and community development or has a would play. A precise stateneed to handle very difficult situations. A domes- ment of purpose, when it tic JSOC that highlights a regional approach to would become elevated for meeting specific needs has a place in the means action, who responds and to overcome negative events that occur from time how their regular employto time in this region. ment role can enable them This region has faced many obstacles that to become a fashionable have affected the economic life of jobs, leaderJSOC mechanism. ship skills and talent, community responses to Looking back in history, downtown deterioration, environmental degrada- a military JSOC became tion and more. Putting a Command Team torelevant in Panama, the gether to respond to future obstacles would be a Balkans, the Middle East means to enhance the ability to focus attention on and countries already menemergencies and actions which can drive positive tioned previously as well as some others. A JSOC would change. The idea would be to have in place, a be a constructive measure regional special operations command structure to move toward immeof trained individuals who have the knowledge, skill and professionalism to immediately provide diacy, have a well planned by Howard J. Grossman, AICP

Open enrollment ends Dec. 15

capability to respond to negative factors that are extraordinary issues that require cooperation, partnerships, a larger response team, and are identified as being the type of issue that a JDOC can be functional. The Public Administration word PODSCORB applies, defined as Planning, Organizing, Directing, Staffing, Coordinating, Reporting and Budgeting. To some extend, this approach was useful in the ears following the 1972 Tropical Storm Agnes disaster which led to a team effort to overcome adversity with that flood, and eventually the use of a czar from Washington, Frank Carlucci, to pull together the response effort, It became a mini JSOC commitment. Therefore, the opportunity now exists, based upon the military JSOC, to establish a regional system that uses the best techniques found across the many places that JSOC has had. Now, what happens militarily cannot always be applied in a domestic setting, however, some of the efforts can be transferred to domestic setting. Conceptually, a regional JSOC process could include the following. ■ Identify examples in the region where a JOSC could have been utilized as an effective tool for meeting a need. Various flood conditions may be such examples. ■ Create a lost of categories that can be included in a JSOC and identify

specific people who possibly can be tapped for participation. ■ Use PODSCORB as a means to be as inclusive as possible and develop a plan that spells out each of these words. ■ Leadership is essential, and therefore, a leader or a group of potential leaders should be identified ahead of time. This was key to the Agnes effort in the 70s, even though there was conflict between the flood victims and those who were ready to respond to the flooding. ■ Teams and task forces became essential to the military JSOC and this theme may be important domestically. ■ Try an identify areas of interest in when a domestic JOSC would and should be utilized. Some may be easily stated, but others may take some further thinking. ■ There is a statement in the book that says “ it takes a network to overcome a network.” In other words, make sure thee is network for a JSOC that works together and despite different opinions, respect for everyone’s views is critical. Militarily speaking, the various branches sometime all want in, and this concept needs to be respected and thought of in a domestic setting as well. ■ Every part and sector of this region needs to become responsive to a JSOC approach, and therein lies a principle which requires great thought and building a network that truly reaches all geographic areas and all sectors of regional life – including the public, private and nonprofit sectors. All of these elements, and others, can become the framework for a Joint Special Operations Command JSOC in the Pocono-Northeast in coming years.

BANKING & FINANCE

pare health plans for benefits and prices and to select a plan that fits People (including families) may now apply their needs. Dec. 15 is the deadline for new health insurance, switch to a different to enroll in or change plans for new health-care plan, or re-enroll in their current coverage to start Jan. 1, 2020. For plan through a Health Insurance Marketplace those who fail to meet the Dec. 15 under the Affordable Care Act (ACA). People deadline, the only way to enroll in a can use Health Insurance Marketplaces to com- Marketplace health plan is during a by Keith Kleinman

Kleinman

special enrollment period. To qualify for special enrollment, one must have a qualifying life event such as a change in family status such as marriage, divorce, birth or adoption of a child; change in residence or loss of other health coverage such as loss of employer-based coverage, loss of

eligibility for Medicare or Medicaid. Only plans sold through a Health Insurance Marketplace qualify for cost assistance. If you don’t apply for health insurance during the open enrollment period — and don’t qualify for special enrollment — your Ple ase se e Enrollment, Page 30

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BUSINESS BRIEFS Schools sign agreements Keystone College and Salus University signed articulation agreements enabling Keystone students to pursue professional degrees in Salus’ doctor of optometry program and its physician assistant studies master of science program. The OD program, referred to as the “three plus four” program, is composed of two phases: the pre-optometry curriculum at Keystone and the doctor of optometry degree program at Salus. Students who successfully complete a minimum of 90 credit hours in the pre-optometry program at Keystone and meet all additional requirements may apply for admission into Salus’ Pennsylvania College of Optometry’s doctor of optometry program.

Health center recognized The Wright Center for Community Health Mid Valley was recognized by the National Committee for Quality Assurance with a Distinction in Behavioral Health Integration. Based on the Patient-Centered Medical Home care model, practices that follow medical evidence to deliver high-quality, coordinated care and are committed to continuous improvement over time are eligible for a variety of NCQA distinctions.

board of directors. The chamber’s Cultural Event Committee held a Back to Woodstock dance at the Irem Country Club Pavilion on Aug. 30, where the library was recognized for its longtime dedication to the community through access to information, ideas and knowledge in the form of books, programs and other resources. A plaque and the $1,000 donation were recently presented at the Library’s board of directors’ meeting.

Cancer institute honors firefighter The Northeast Regional Cancer Institute and the Board of Ambassadors and Associate Board announce the 2019 Tribute to Courage Honoree, firefighter Ryan Robeson. Robeson is the son of the late Scranton Fire Capt. James Geisinger hospital receives honors and Linda Robeson. Upon the passing of his father, Geisinger Community Medical Center earned the Joint Ryan Robeson began traveling the country, successfully Commission’s Gold Seal of Approval for Total Hip and participating in physically demanding races and competiKnee Replacement, Total Shoulder Replacement and Hip Dental companies to collaborate Fracture Certification by demonstrating continuous comDental Intelligence, a leader in helping dental practices use tions, which is where he found true solace. This year at the sixth annual Scranton Half Marathon, he attempted pliance with its performance standards. The certifications actionable data to improve patient care, team collaborato set a Guinness world record for running 13.1 miles in recognize health care organizations that provide clinical tion and practice profitability, aligns with Benco Dental, approximately 50 pounds of full firefighter gear, all while programs across the continuum of care. The certifications the nation’s largest independent dental distributor, based breathing from a self-contained breathing apparatus. evaluate how the hospital uses clinical outcomes and per- in Jenkins Twp. Their shared goal: helping all dentists Robeson was honored at the eighth annual Spirit of Hope formance measures to identify opportunities to improve in the United States grow in ways that are important to Celebration on Nov. 8 at Mohegan Sun Pocono in the care, as well as to educate and prepare patients and their them and their patients. The Pleasant Grove, Utah-based Keystone Grand Ballroom. caregivers for discharge. company connects to a doctor’s practice management software, then analyzes instantly, automates, finds opGeisinger hospital receives honors Scranton/W-B makes sports list portunities and communicates. Dental Intelligence smart Street & Smith’s Sports Business Journal tabbed Scrantools work to make sure nothing falls through the cracks, Geisinger Community Medical Center earned the Joint Commission’s Gold Seal of Approval for Total Hip and ton/Wilkes-Barre as a Top-10 minor league sports market while saving time, helping more patients and increasing in its latest rankings. The RailRiders and Wilkes-Barre/ Knee Replacement, Total Shoulder Replacement and Hip production. Scranton Penguins Northeast Pa. community is eighth Fracture Certification by demonstrating continuous comout of 211 markets across the United States, with a Tire dealer earns top award pliance with its performance standards. The certifications composite score of 81.40 out of 100. John McCarthy Jr., president of McCarthy Tire Service recognize health care organizations that provide clinical Co. Inc., is the recipient of Modern Tire Dealer magazine’s programs across the continuum of care. The certifications Hospital earns certifications 2019 Tire Dealer of the Year award. It is the top award evaluate how the hospital uses clinical outcomes and perGeisinger Community Medical Center earned the Joint presented to any tire dealer in the country. There are more formance measures to identify opportunities to improve Commission’s Gold Seal of Approval for total hip and knee than 29,000 independent tire dealers in the United States care, as well as to educate and prepare patients and their replacement, total shoulder replacement and hip fracture eligible for the honor. McCarthy is a third-generation tire caregivers for discharge. certification by demonstrating continuous complidealer, and since 1997 he’s served as president of the ance with its performance standards. The certifications company his grandfather started in 1926 in Wilkes-Barre. Hospital launches new department recognize health care organizations that provide clinical The accredited Geriatric Emergency Department at programs across the continuum of care. The certifications University receives $88,000 grant Wilkes-Barre General Hospital is one of three accreditation evaluate how Geisinger uses clinical outcomes and perThe Moses Taylor Foundation awarded an $88,000 grant emergency departments in Pennsylvania — and the only formance measures to identify opportunities to improve to The University of Scranton’s Nursing Department for one in northeast Pennsylvania — to achieve accreditation care, as well as to educate and prepare patients and their the purchase new simulator equipment for its laboratory. from the American College of Emergency Physicians. caregivers for discharge. Through the support, the university acquired Newborn ACEP’s Geriatric Emergency Department Accreditation Tory S2210, an advanced newborn patient simulator; Local campus receives grant Pediatric Hal S3005, a 5-year-old pediatric simulator; and program promotes the goals of quality care for older adult Penn State Scranton’s music program recently received a a Simcart Rx, a simulation medication dispensing system. patients: enhanced staffing and education, geriatricfocused policies and protocols including transitions of financial boost from the Schwartz Mack Foundation. “Tory” looks and feels like a real infant, with supple care, quality improvement and outcomes and preparation The foundation awarded a $7,500 grant to the program. skin, lifelike vitals and realistic sounds. “Hal” can track The funds can be used for programming and other needs students’ actions in response to life-threatening situations of the physical environment. over the next year, and a portion has already been used and even speaks, thanks to an extensive library of voice Submit Business briefs to business@ for the music program’s spring concert, held April 27 at responses. timesshamrock.com or The Times-Tribune, 149 the Theater at North in Scranton. More than 600 people Penn Ave., Scranton, PA 18503. attended the concert. The Schwartz Mack Foundation Geisinger earns spot on list gift was made in memory of David J. Nicoteri, the late The health system was recognized for its commitment to son of David and Michelle Nicoteri. Michelle Nicoteri is U.S. military veterans and their families by being named administrative support assistant for student programs to VIQTORY’s 2020 list of Military Friendly Employand services on campus. ers. Further strengthening this commitment, Geisinger also announced a new, two-week paid leave benefit for Hospital staff earns accreditation employees serving in the Reserves or the National Guard, Wayne Memorial Hospital’s imaging department received effective Sept. 15. Under the new leave policy, service the American College of Radiology’s full three-year acmembers employed by Geisinger will be paid for time at creditation in computed tomography, or CT. The CT team annual trainings, encampments and drills. Both part- and underwent a rigorous review to meet criteria in clinical full-time personnel employed by Geisinger for at least six image quality, phantom image quality and radiation dose months are eligible for the benefit. limits for children and adults. In addition to image quality, the criteria included personnel qualifications, adequacy of Chamber donates $1,000 to library facility equipment, quality control procedures and quality The Back Mountain Chamber honored the Back Mountain assurance programs. Memorial Library and made a $1,000 donation to its Dealership donates to fire department MotorWorld Toyota donated $1,580 to the Wilkes-Barre City Fire Department for electronic vehicle classroom training. Plus, firefighters visited the MotorWorld campus to learn about electronic vehicles from MotorWorld’s manufacturer-trained technicians.

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DECEMBER 2019

EnrollmEnt: Insurance tips F R O M P A G E 29

options are generally limited to employerbased coverage or purchasing private, commercial insurance, short-term health insurance, Medicaid, or the Children’s Health Insurance Program (CHIP). Additional information about Obamacare While the ACA (commonly referred to as Obamacare) has not been repealed or replaced, there have been changes to the law. The biggest change is the repeal of the tax penalty for failure to have qualifying health insurance. Though the individual mandate requiring that most people have minimum essential health insurance coverage still exists (unless an exception applies), the tax penalty for failure to have insurance has been reduced to $0, effectively repealing that penalty. In addition, states have additional flexibility in how they select their essential health benefits. In effect, states may elect to sell short-term health insurance policies with coverage terms of up to one year. These plans may offer fewer benefits compared with the 10 Essential Health Benefits covered under the ACA. Also, California, Colorado, Massachusetts, Minnesota, New York, Rhode Island and Washington, D.C. have extended open enrollment dates beyond Dec. 15. Check with the state’s department of insurance for specific open enrollment dates. The federal government no longer runs the marketplace for the Small Business Health Options Program (SHOP). As an alternative, small business employers may be able to contact insurance companies directly or work with a broker who is certified to sell SHOP policies. The fate of Obamacare Currently, the fate of the ACA is somewhat uncertain. At the end of 2018, a Texas federal judge ruled the Affordable Care Act unconstitutional. However, the judge ordered a stay pending appeals, so the ACA remains in place for the time being. Keith Kleinman is first vice president/wealth management, financial advisor at Janney Montgomery Scott LLC, 270 Pierce Street, Kingston. Reach him at 570-283-8140 or visit janney.com for more information.


PERSONNEL FILE BENCO DENTAL

Lindsay Pross, events department supervisor, is one of only 17 event professionals in the United States to earn Planner of the Year recognition from Smart Meetings. Pross oversees internal sales trainings, incentive trips, award shows, customerfacing seminars and trade shows for the nation’s largest independent dental distributor. PROSS Smart Meetings’ annual Planner of the Year Awards recognize event professionals who are leading the way with innovative, transformational programming. Pross joined the company in 2014, bringing more than a decade of corporate event planning to her role.

COMMUNITY BANK NA

Matthew Dougherty was promoted to commercial team leader in Scranton. In his expanded role, Dougherty will manage the bank’s Northeast Pennsylvania commercial lending team. He will develop new business from existing and prospective commercial loan customers in Northeast Pennsylvania and DOUGHERTY Upstate New York. In addition, he will oversee portfolio and risk management to ensure they are within overall bank objectives and risk thresholds. Dougherty brings to the position 17 years of experience in the financial industry. He has been with the bank since 2002 and most recently he served as senior vice president of commercial lending.

COORDINATED HEALTH

Orthopedic and sports medicine surgeon Lisa O’Brien, DO, has joined the physician staff and will be seeing new patients in Lackawanna and Luzerne counties, specifically at clinics in Pittston, Scranton and at the newest medical facility at Humboldt Station in Hazleton. O’Brien completed a fellowship in orthopedic surgery O’BRIEN sports medicine at Wake Forest Baptist Health. During her time at Wake Forest, she was a team physician for Wake Forest University Athletics, Winston Salem State University Athletics and the University of North Carolina School of the Arts. She currently serves as the team physician for North Pocono School District.

DISTASIO & KOWALSKI LLC

Michael J. Kowalski, a partner in the Wilkes-Barre personal injury law firm, has been selected for inclusion in the Best Lawyers in America for 2020. This is Kowalski’s second year for inclusion in the publication. This year, he was recognized for his work in the areas of medical malpractice

KOWALSKI

law and personal injury litigation. Since it was first published in 1983, Best Lawyers has become universally regarded as the definitive guide to legal excellence. The Best Lawyers in America rankings are based solely on peer-review surveys in which tens of thousands of attorneys confidentially evaluate their colleagues.

ESSA BANK & TRUST

The bank has expanded its information technology team in the Stroudsburg market and promoted Maria Kelly in its Wilkes-Barre/Scranton market areas. Ronald Gaddy has joined the bank as a network engineer. He has more than 20 years of experience in business analytics and project management. He has KELLY served as a senior applications developer, production services supervisor and systems analyst. Alexandros Psitos has joined the bank as a network engineer. He is a recent graduate of Pennsylvania State University, where he received his degree in information sciences and technology. He previously completed several internships where he was responsible for a team of intern developers. James Peter Hinkle has joined the bank as a technology services specialist. He has more than 13 years of experience across multiple information technology disciplines and holds several industry leading certifications. Most recently, he served as senior IT specialist for an IT consulting firm and a Level 3 support specialist for a regional educational institution. Nancy Schrader has joined the bank as consumer loan processing manager. She has more than 34 years of experience in loan processing, underwriting and system administration. She most recently served as vice president, commercial fulfillment team lead at BB&T. In her new role, she will oversee all processing and document preparation for Mortgage and Consumer Lending. Maria Kelly, branch manager of the bank’s Scranton office, will also assume responsibility for the bank’s Wilkes-Barre office. She will now lead both teams in growing existing relationships and servicing customers in the Scranton/Wilkes-Barre market area. Kelly resides in West Pittston. She currently serves on the board of Dress for Success Lackawanna, is actively involved in Habitat for Humanity and regularly volunteers at the St. Francis of Assisi food pantry.

The Chartered Financial Analyst credential is a globally recognized professional designation given by the CFA Institute, which measures and certifies the competence and integrity of financial analysts. One of the most highly respected designations in finance, the CFA charter is widely considered to be the FENNIE gold standard in the field of investment analysis. He has served the bank since April 2018.

FOLEY LAW

The museum announced the appointment of six new board members: Tara Atkins, attorney Catherine Gallagher, Emily Karam, Valerie Kiser, Thomas Millard and Mike Muller. Brian Benedetti, the immediate past chairman, and Carol Curtis McMullen will each serve a one-year presidential appointment. Serving as new board leadership will be attorney Donald J. Fredrickson Jr., chairman of the board of trustees; Amanda Frieder, chairwoman-elect; Caroline Munley, vice chairwoman; Ken Marquis, treasurer; Linda Lynett, secretary; and Rod Azar, assistant treasurer. Aurore Giguet is executive director of the museum.

Attorneys Thomas J. Foley Jr., Michael J. Foley, Thomas J. Foley III and Terrence R. Nealon Jr. have been selected by their peers for inclusion in the 26th edition of the Best Lawyers in America. Thomas J. Foley Jr. was selected for his work in the areas of Medical Malpractice Law — Plaintiffs, Personal Injury T. Foley Jr. Litigation — Plaintiffs, Railroad Law and Workers’ Compensation Law — Claimants. He founded the law firm in 1979 and has been named to Best Lawyers in America since 2010. He was previously named “Lawyer of the Year” for Medical Malpractice Law — Plaintiffs, Allentown, in 2018. Michael J. Foley was selected M. FOLEY for his work in Medical Malpractice Law — Plaintiffs, Personal Injury Litigation — Plaintiffs and Workers’ Compensation Law — Claimants. He has written many scholarly articles and papers on Pennsylvania civil procedure, constitutional law, medical negligence, Pennsylvania auto law, workers’ compensation and federal disability law. Thomas J. Foley III was T. Foley III selected for his work in the area of Personal Injury Litigation — Plaintiffs. He is a member of the Monroe and Lackawanna County bar associations, the American Association for Justice and the Pennsylvania Association for Justice. Terrence R. Nealon Jr. was selected for his work in the areas of Personal Injury Litigation NEALON — Plaintiffs and Workers’ Compensation Law — Claimants. Nealon, who sits on the Pennsylvania Civil Procedural Rules Committee, was also recently named to the Top 40 Under 40 Civil Plaintiff Trial Lawyers in Pennsylvania by the National Trial Lawyers.

FIDELITY BANK

GEISINGER

EVERHART MUSEUM

William J. Fennie III, assistant vice president and trust investment officer, has been awarded the CFA charter by the CFA institute.

Recognized for his work and efforts surrounding diversity and inclusion between the LGBTQ community and medicine, Aliasgar Chittalia, M.D., MHA, was recently

honored with the 2019 Pennsylvania LGBT Leadership Award at the Pennsylvania LGBTQ+ Unity Summit in Pittsburgh. Matthew Walsh was appointed to the position of executive vice president and chief operating officer, effective Oct. 1. Walsh, who joined the health system in 2017 as chief operating officer for the clinical enterprise, joins the executive leadership team following more than two years of progressive leadership for its 1,300plus physicians, 13 hospital campuses and more than 100 outpatient and ambulatory clinics. In his new role, Walsh will continue progress toward creating a seamless, user-friendly experience for everyone in the communities Geisinger serves.

CHITTALIA

WALSH

HONESDALE NATIONAL BANK

Eric W. Jensen has joined as branch manager of the South Abington Township office located at 651 Northern Blvd. As branch manager, Jensen will be directly supporting personal banking and business banking needs for the area. He’ll also work closely with customers to highlight HNB’s capacity to support 360-degree comprehensive banking solutions through mortgage, lending, cash management, financial planning and wealth management resources.

HOWARD GARDNER MI CHARTER SCHOOL

TreeAnne McEnery was recently appointed as assistant principal at the school. McEnery previously served in academic administrative positions at Circle of Seasons Charter School (principal), Green Meadow Waldorf School (administrator) and River Valley Waldorf School (pedagogical administrator). She additionally has 10 years of MCENERY classroom teaching experience at the elementary and middle school levels. McEnery is currently pursuing her doctorate in educational leadership at Wilkes University.

JACOBI CAPITAL MANAGEMENT LLC

Robin MacKellar recently joined the company as a communications associate and will be focusing her energy on brand development to help expand the firm’s presence both digitally and in the surrounding area. She earned her bachelor’s degree from Dickinson College, having completed several consulting projects. She brings with her a fresh perspective on marketing and an entrepreneurial

MACKELLAR

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PERSONNEL FILE F R O M P A G E 31 spirit. MacKeller now resides in Scranton and will be located in the firm’s Wilkes-Barre headquarters.

LAWRENCE A.J. SPEGAR

Attorney Lawrence A.J. Spegar was part of the faculty training and educating fellow attorneys nationwide on the topic of “End Distracted Driving” at the American Association for Justice annual convention in July in San Diego. The “End Distracted DrivSPEGAR ing” program is designed to bring awareness to and prevent distracted driving across the country. Spegar has offices in Jessup and Pocono Summit.

LUZERNE BANK

The bank board appointed Robert Gill as its newest director. He is a CPA and partner at Thomas M. Gill & Co., specializing in servicing entrepreneurs and businesses based in Northeast Pennsylvania. In addition to his new role as a director on the board, Gill currently serves on several local boards, such as the Luzerne Foundation, Frank Martz Coach Co., Metz Culinary Management Inc. and the Pulverman Technologies Corp. board.

MINORA, KROWIAK & MUNLEY

The American Institute of Family Law Attorneys has recognized the exceptional performance of family law attorney John Williams as a 2019 10 Best Family Law Attorney for Client Satisfaction. The American Institute of Family Law Attorneys is a third-party attorney rating organization that publishes an annual list of the Top 10 Family Law Attorneys in each state. AIOFLA’s annual list was created to be used as a resource for clients during the attorney selection process.

MISERICORDIA UNIVERSITY

Kathleen Scaler Scott, Ph.D., CCC-SLP, BCS-F, professor of speech-language pathology, recently had her scholarly article, “Cluttering Symptoms in School-Age Children by Communicative Context: A Preliminary SCALER SCOTT Investigation,’’ published in the International Journal of SpeechLanguage Pathology. Scaler Scott is a practicing speech-language pathologist, and board-certified specialist in fluency disorders. She has been a practicing clinician since 1993 in hospital, school and private practice settings, including the Misericordia University Speech-Language and Hearing Center in John J. Passan Hall. She has been a faculty member since 2009. James Siberski, M.S., C.M.C., CRmT, assistant professor and coordinator of the geriatric care manager certificate program, recently collaborated with Carol Siberski, M.S., CRmT, C-GCM, a geriatric care manager, to write the article, “Geriatric Education Today & Tomorrow: Who are the Providers?’’ in the SIBERSKI September/October issue of

Today’s Geriatric Medicine. The authors outline the importance of introducing gerontology, geriatrics, and health and disease associated with aging education to the nation’s school systems in the bimonthly trade magazine. The university recently named Kristin Hoffman, M.S., S.E., as the director of the Autism Center in the College of Health Sciences and Education. Hoffman will be responsible for the administration and overall operation of the program, including budget development, marketing and coordination of programs, development and HOFFMAN maintenance of working relationships with service partners, oversight of group facilitators and other staff, and compliance with all state and federal regulations. Hoffman formerly served as the special education lead teacher and local screening committee chair for Fairfax County Public Schools in Virginia. The university and the Conference for Mercy Higher Education recently elected Linda Thomas-Hemak, M.D., F.A.C.P., F.A.A.P., Barbara A. Maculloch and Mark J. Oberstaedt, J.D., to the university’s board of trustees. They began their threeyear terms in October. Thomas-Hemak is a triple board-certified internal medicine, pediatrics and addiction medicine primary care physician, and medical educator who teaches, practices medicine and resides in THOMAS-HEMAK her hometown of Jermyn, concurrent with her responsibilities as an executive. She currently serves the Wright Center for Community Health as chief executive officer and the Wright Center for Graduate Medical Education as president. She returned to the area in 1998 to practice primary care and joined the Wright Center in 2000. Thomas-Hemak graduated as a Michael DeBakey Scholar from Baylor College of Medicine in Houston, and completed Harvard’s combined internal medicine/pediatrics residency in Boston. Maculloch of Wyoming is the president of Pennsylvania Banking for Community Bank, NA, and a 1994 graduate of Misericordia University with a Bachelor of Science degree in MACULLOCH business administration with a concentration in banking. Prior to becoming president, she was the senior vice president and Pennsylvania market director for Community Bank Wealth Management. A graduate of Leadership Wilkes-Barre, she was honored in 2007 with the Distinguished Alumni Award. She is also a graduate of Lackawanna Executive Leadership. In addition, the Northeastern Pennsylvania Business Journal recognized her as one of the Top 25 Women in Business in 2015. Oberstaedt is a partner in the OBERSTAEDT

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law firm Archer & Greiner in Haddonfield, New Jersey, and a 1989 graduate of Misericordia University with a bachelor’s degree in history, summa cum laude. He graduated magna cum laude in 1992 from Seton Hall Law School, where he served as editor-in-chief of the Seton Hall Law Review. A shareholder in the firm’s litigation department and assistant chairman of the business litigation group, his practice covers all aspects of trial and appellate work relating to commercial litigation and business disputes in the federal and state courts in New Jersey, Pennsylvania and other courts throughout the country.

NORTHEASTERN REHABILITATION ASSOCIATES PC

Dr. Paul Stoko has joined the office and will be treating patients in the Scranton location. Stoko graduated from the Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation residency at Penn State Hershey Medical Center, where he also completed an STOKO internal medicine intern year. He received both a master’s degree in biomedical science and a doctorate in medicine from the Commonwealth Medical College in Scranton. Stoko has experience and has done research in transcranial direct current stimulation and traumatic brain injuries.

O’DONNELL LAW OFFICES

Attorney Gerard W. Gaughan has joined the team of experienced and skilled personal injury and medical malpractice attorneys. He will champion individuals and families throughout the region, focusing on car and truck GAUGHAN collisions, workers’ compensation and Social Security Disability. Gaughan attended Scranton Prep, Penn State and Penn State University School of Law. He comes to the firm after clerking for Judge Terrence R. Nealon, Lackawanna County Court of Common Pleas, for two years.

PENNSYLVANIA INSTITUTE OF CERTIFIED PUBLIC ACCOUNTANTS

The institute recognized Diana L. Davis, CPA, Maggie M. Donato, CPA, and Carolyn Chupko with 2019 Young Leader awards. They received this distinction for demonstrated leadership skills that will propel their success in a profession committed to protecting the public interest. Davis, of Peckville, is a partner with Eckersley and Ostrowski LLP in Scranton. She is treasurer of PICPA’s Northeastern Chapter and serves on its Emerging CPAs Committee. Donato, of Dunmore, is controller of Penn East Federal

DAVIS

DONATO

Credit Union in Scranton. She is secretary of PICPA’s Northeastern Chapter and serves on its Emerging CPAs and Corporate Finance Roundtable committees. Chupko, of Madison Twp., is the business/CIS division chairwoman and an accounting faculty member at Lackawanna College in Scranton. She serves CHUPKO on PICPA’s Northeastern Chapter Schools and Colleges Committee, as well as the statewide High School Scholarship and Relations with Schools and Colleges committees. The association’s Young Leader Awards program recognizes members under the age of 40 who demonstrate a commitment to the CPA profession through active PICPA or community volunteer leadership. This year’s group was honored Sept. 19 at PICPA’s annual Leadership Conference in Harrisburg.

SWIFT KENNEDY & ASSOCIATES INC. William Fleming has been hired as an insurance consultant at the Wilkes-Barre branch of the insurance brokerage firm specializing in employee benefits, senior insurance plans, voluntary benefit solutions and FLEMING individual policies. His responsibilities will include providing businesses with strategic reviews of their benefit plans and offering solutions to help them meet their goals. He will also advise clients about how to comply with federal regulations and introduce them to new services, such as claims analysis tools and digital benefit administration. Fleming formerly served as a director of workplace solutions DZUREC at Mass Mutual Life.

UNIVERSITY OF SCRANTON

The university granted promotions and/or tenure to 15 faculty members effective at the start of the 2019-20 academic year. Six faculty members have been promoted to professor: Marzia Caporale, Ph.D., world languages and cultures; David Dzurec, Ph.D., history; Meghan Rich, Ph.D., sociology, criminal justice and criminology; Susan Méndez, Ph.D., English and theater; Darryl DeMarzio, Ph.D., education; and Rebecca Dalgin, Ph.D., counseling and human services. Katherine Stumpo, Ph.D., chemistry, was named associate professor.

CAPORALE

RICH

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PERSONNEL FILE F R O M P A G E 32 Five faculty members were named associate professor and granted tenure: Adam Pratt, Ph.D., history; Julie Cerrito, Ph.D., counseling and human services; Arthur Catino, Ph.D., chemistry; Duane Armitage, Ph.D., philosophy; and James Boyle, Ph.D., accounting. Three faculty members were granted tenure: Benjamin Willis, DALGIN Ph.D., counseling and human services; Michael Azar, Ph.D., theology and religious studies; and Yibai Li, Ph.D., operations and information management. Caporale received her master’s and doctoral degrees from the University of NebraskaLincoln. She has worked for the university since 2007. Dzurec received his bachelor’s degree from Fairfield STUMPO University, his master’s degree from the University of Connecticut and his doctorate from the Ohio State University. He has worked for the university since 2008. Rich received her bachelor’s degree from the University of Maryland, her master’s degree from the University of Wisconsin and her doctorate from the University of Delaware. She has worked for the university since 2007. Méndez received her bachelor’s degree from Pace University, her master’s degree from Fordham University and her doctorate from the University of California. She has worked for the university since 2008. DeMarzio received his bachelor’s degree from Drew University, his master’s degree from Montclair State University and his master’s and doctoral degrees from Columbia University. He has worked for the university PRATT since 2007. Dalgin received her bachelor’s degree from Quinnipiac University and her master’s and doctoral degrees from Syracuse University. She has worked for the university since 2005. Stumpo received her bachelor’s degree from the University of Northern Iowa and her doctorate from Texas A&M University. She has worked for the university CERRITO since 2015. Pratt received his bachelor’s degree from Clemson University and his master’s and doctoral degrees from Georgetown University. He has worked for the university since 2013. Cerrito received her bachelor’s degree from Bloomsburg University, her master’s degree from the University of Scranton CATINO and her doctorate from the Pennsylvania State University. She has worked for the university since 2013. Catino received his bachelor’s degree from Franklin &

Marshall College and his doctorate from the University of Arizona and the University of Maryland. He has worked for the university since 2013. Armitage received his bachelor’s degree from the University of Scranton, master’s degree from Boston College and doctorate from the New School for ARMITAGE Social Research. He has worked for the university since 2015. Boyle received his bachelor’s and master’s degrees from the University of Scranton and his doctorate from Kennesaw State University. He began working at the university in 1999 as an internal auditor. He has taught part time at the university since 2009 and full time since 2012. Willis received his bachelor’s, BOYLE master’s and doctoral degrees from the University of North Carolina. He has worked for the university since 2013. Azar received his bachelor’s degree from Colorado Christian University, his master’s degree from St. Vladimir’s Orthodox Theological Seminary and his master’s and doctoral degrees from Fordham University. He has WILLIS worked for the university since 2013. Li received his bachelor’s degree from Jilin University in China, his master’s degree from Oklahoma State University and his doctorate from Washington State University. He has worked for the university since 2013. The university has appointed 22 new full-time faculty members for the 2019-2020 academic AZAR year. Sinchul Back, Ph.D. cand., of South Korea, was named instructor in the criminal justice department. He previously was an instructor of criminology and criminal justice at Florida International University in Miami. He was a researcher at the Center for Cybercrime and Cybersecurity at Boston University; LI the Colombian National Police Academy of Information Technology in Bogota, Columbia; and the Cybercrime and Investigation Research Center at Far East University in South Korea. He is a Ph.D. candidate in international crime and justice at Florida International University. Michael Bermudez, Ed.D., was named assistant profesBACK sor in the occupational therapy department. He has worked as an occupational therapist in New York and New Jersey since 2000. Bermudez earned his doctorate in educational technology leadership from

New Jersey City University, a master’s degree in educational technology from New Jersey City University, a bachelor’s degree in occupational therapy from the University of Texas Health Science Center in San Antonio and a bachelor’s degree in biology from the University of Santo Tomas in the Philippines. BERMUDEZ Deborah E. Budash, Ph.D., of Clarks Summit, was named assistant professor in the occupational therapy department. She chaired the Master of Medical Science Program and the Master of Health Science Program at St. Francis University in Loretto from 2014 to 2019, where she also served as program director of the MMS and MHS and as BUDASH a tenured associate professor. She has authored several articles and reviews, as well as a book titled “Achieving Persistence in Online Programs: Reflections of Graduate Learners and Faculty.” Budash earned a doctorate in education from Northcentral University in Scottsdale, Arizona. Marleen Cloutier was named assistant professor and cataloging and metadata librarian in CLOUTIER the Weinberg Memorial Library. She previously worked for Backstage Library Works on-site at the Peabody Essex Museum Phillips Library in Peabody, Massachusetts. She has a Master of Science in Library and Information Science from Drexel University with a concentration in digital libraries and a Bachelor of Architecture from the Wentworth COCIERU Institute of Technology. She is currently pursuing a master’s degree in human resources management at the University of Scranton. Ovidiu C. Cocieru, Ph.D., of South Abington Twp., was named assistant professor in the management, marketing and entrepreneurship department. He has taught at the University of Massachusetts Amherst and has held marketing and management positions in Romania. Cocieru has co-authored two journal articles and conducted/ co-conducted several peer-reviewed presentations. He earned a doctorate in management from University of Massachusetts at Amherst, a master’s degree in sport management from the University of Massachusetts at Amherst and a bachelor’s degree in marketing from Alexandru Ioan Cuza University in Romania. Nicole Ferentino, D.C., of Pittston, was named lecturer in the biology department. She is president and doctor of chiropractic at the Advanced Chiropractic Clinic in Pittston. Ferentino has taught as an adjunct professor at Scranton since 2017. She earned a doctorate from New York Chiropractic College in Seneca Falls, New York, and a bachelor’s degree from the University of Scranton. FRISSELL

Nathaniel A. Frissell, Ph.D., was named assistant professor in the physics and electrical engineering department. He earned a doctorate and a master’s degree in electrical and computer engineering from Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University in Blacksburg, where he also served as an adjunct instructor. He earned a bachelor’s degree in physics and music education from Montclair State University in New Jersey. Frissell has co-authored refereed INGBER journal publications and coconducted many presentations. He leads an international citizen science space physics research collective, the Ham Radio Science Citizen Investigation. Paul E. Granahan was named lecturer in the philosophy department. Since 1984, he has taught philosophy courses as an adjunct faculty member at KEMP the university and at Keystone College. He earned a master’s degree with distinction in philosophy from Boston College and bachelor’s degrees in philosophy and theology, summa cum laude, from the University of Scranton. David Ingber, Ph.D., was named faculty specialist in the biology department. He previously was a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Delaware. Ingber has conducted presentations at a variety of venues and co-authored several journal publications. He earned a doctorate in entomology and wildlife ecology from the University of Delaware, a master’s degree in entomology from Iowa State University in Ames, and a bachelor’s degree in zoology from SUNY Oswego. Gail N. (King) Kemp, Ph.D., of Scranton, was named assistant professor in the psychology department. She has worked as KIM a visiting assistant professor and an adjunct faculty member in the psychology department at the university. Kemp has coauthored several journal publications and has conducted and co-conducted several presentations. She earned a doctorate and a master’s degree in clinical psychology from Boston University, a master’s degree in maternal and child health from the Boston University School of Public Health, and a bachelor’s degree in African-American studies from Harvard College. Kaeun Kim, Ph.D., of Scranton, was named assistant professor in the management, marketing and entrepreneurship department. She has co-authored several journal publications and co-conducted presentations. She earned a doctorate in marketing from the University of Massachusetts, Amherst; and a master’s degree in cognitive science and management and a bachelor’s degree in economics from Yonsei University in South Korea. LUND Sonja K. Lund, Ph.D., of Norfolk, Virginia, was named Ple ase se e Personnel, Page 34

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PERSONNEL FILE F R O M P A G E 33 assistant professor in the counseling and human services department. She earned a doctorate in counselor education, a master’s degree in education and a bachelor’s degree in psychology from Old Dominion University in Norfolk, where she held counseling and teaching positions in various departments. Lund conducted several presentations and workshops and took active roles on several committees and initiatives. Tracy L. Murray, J.D., CRNA, of Mountain Top, was named faculty specialist in the nursing department. She has held several positions with health care organizations in Northeast Pennsylvania since 2000, including Moses Taylor Hospital in Scranton and Mercy Hospital in Wilkes-Barre. She earned a doctorate from Widener University CommonMURRAY wealth Law School in Harrisburg, a master’s degree in nursing and nurse practitioner certification at the University of Pittsburgh and nurse anesthetist certification at the University Health Center of Pittsburgh School of Anesthesia for Nurses. Gregory B. O’Connell, J.D., of Waverly, was named faculty specialist in the Management, Marketing and Entrepreneurship Department. He has served as an adjunct faculty member at the University since 1992, teaching undergraduate and online MBA courses. Since earning a juris doctorate at John Marshall Law School in Chicago in 1981, he has held several legal positions in the public and private sectors, including his own practice. O’Connell earned a bachelor’s degree in history from the University of Pennsylvania. Ian O’Hara of Scranton was named assistant professor in the Weinberg Memorial Library, where he has been a serials/electronic resources clerk since 2013. He previously was a library assistant at Geisinger Commonwealth Medical College. Currently working on a master’s degree in software engineering from the University of Scranton, he earned a master’s degree in library science from Clarion University of Pennsylvania and a bachelor’s degree in O’HARA elementary education from the University of Scranton. Richard C. O’Hara was named faculty specialist in the accounting department. A chartered financial analyst, he brings more than 20 years of experience in data analysis for a variety of companies based in the Chicago area. He earned an MBA in finance from the Stern School PEARSON of Business at New York University and a bachelor’s degree in accounting from Pennsylvania State University. Paul H. Pearson Jr. of Honesdale was named faculty specialist in the physics and electrical engineering department. He has worked as an adjunct faculty member at the university and a physics and mathematics teacher at Scranton Preparatory School. PELLEGRINO

He earned a master’s degree in secondary education and a bachelor’s degree in physics at the university. Joseph K. Pellegrino, Ph.D., was named assistant professor in the exercise science department. He formerly held instructing positions at Rutgers University and the University of Montana. He has co-authored numerous scholarly articles in exercise science and nutrition publications. Pellegrino earned his doctorate in physiology and biochemistry of nutrition at Rutgers University; a master’s degree in exercise physiology and health and human performance from the University of Montana in Missoula; and a bachelor’s degree in biology and exercise science from Rutgers University. Leila Soleimani, Ph.D. cand., was named assistant professor in the management, marketing and entrepreneurship department. She previously worked as a marketing specialist, a research and development supervisor, and a research and project manager at various companies in Tehran, Iran. A Ph.D. candidate in strategy and entrepreneurSOLEIMANI ship at the Haskayne School of Business at the University of Calgary, she earned an MBA from Malek Ashtar University of Technology in Tehran and a bachelor’s degree in industrial engineering from the K. N. Toosi University of Technology in Tehran. Manar Sanad Soliman, Ph.D., was named lecturer in the biology department. She previously worked as an assistant professor in the zoology department of Cairo University, as an adjunct professor in the natural sciences department of Middlesex Community College in New Jersey and was a visiting SOLIMAN scholar at the Center for Vector Biology, Rutgers University in New Jersey. She also holds certification as a professional trainer from the University of Missouri and has led training sessions for the Faculty Leadership Development Center at Cairo University. Soliman earned a Ph.D. in mosquito biological control from Cairo University. Andrew M. Stranieri, of Scranton, was named lecturer in the exercise science department. He was a graduate teaching assistant and a graduate research assistant at the University of Rhode Island, where he earned a master’s degree in kinesiology. He was a research assistant at STRANIERI the College of New Jersey in Ewing, where he earned a bachelor’s degree in health and exercise science. David A. White, Ph.D., of Clarks Summit, was named faculty specialist in the philosophy department. He has been an adjunct professor at the University of Scranton and Marywood University since 1998 and worked as an editor in the field of online career education. He earned a doctorate in philosophy from Marquette University; an MBA in international business and accounting from the University of Scranton; a master’s degree in history from Trinity International University in Deerfield, Illinois; and a bachelor’s degree in history from Bryan College in

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Dayton, Tennessee.

She was formerly a faculty member of the Wilkes-Barre Career and Technical Center Practical Nursing Department and was a clinical nurse manager for Bayada Home Health WEBER GALLAGHER Ross J. Ventre, an associate at the Scranton law firm, Care-Pediatrics. Brenda Gruver has joined the Nesbitt School of was recently appointed as a board member of PennsylPharmacy as an assistant professor of pharmacy practice. vania’s Motor Truck Association — Northeast Chapter. Gruver earned the doctor of pharmacy degree from Ventre is a longtime member of the PMTA — Northeast Wilkes University. She was formerly a clinical assistant Chapter and dedicated to serving its mission and helping professor of pharmacy at Campbell University in North other members. Carolina. Gruver completed post-graduate pharmacy resiPMTA is a national integrated network of trucking dencies at Wingate University in Wingate, North Carolina, associations and affiliates. They identify the key issues and at St. Luke’s University Health Network in Bethlehem. impacting the trucking industry and fight to preserve Mark Johnson has joined the performing arts departand strengthen the trucking industry and its jobs in ment as assistant professor of music. In addition to Pennsylvania. teaching, he will direct the university’s Marching Colonels and other ensembles. Johnson earned a doctorate of muWEIS MARKETS sical arts in wind conducting at the University of Southern Matt Burke was promoted to regional vice president. Mississippi. He was formerly a graduate assistant at the In this position, Burke oversees the day-to-day operations University of Southern Mississippi, where he managed of 67 stores located in Binghamton, New York; Northeast logistics for the 285-member Pride of Mississippi MarchPennsylvania, the Poconos, Northern New Jersey and the ing Band and conducted several other university bands Central Susquehanna Valley, including Sunbury and State and ensembles. College. Danielle Kieck has joined the Nesbitt School of Burke joined the company in 2016 as district manager Pharmacy as an assistant professor of pharmacy for the Central Susquehanna Valley/Sunbury. He has more practice. Kieck earned the doctor of pharmacy degree than 25 years of store and multi-unit retail management from the State University of New York at Buffalo. She experience. completed a post-graduate pharmacy residency teaching in the Ohio State University College of Pharmacy and WILKES UNIVERSITY was a community-based pharmacy resident at Uptown The university welcomed 16 new faculty members at Pharmacy in Columbus, Ohio. She was formerly a precepthe start of the 2019-20 academic year, including tenuretor for student pharmacists at the Ohio State University track faculty, visiting professors and faculty of practice. College of Pharmacy, Ohio Northern University Raabe Saroj Adhikari has joined the electrical engineering College of Pharmacy and Cedarville University College of and physics department as a visiting assistant professor Pharmacy. of physics. He received his doctorate in physics from Na-Yoon Kim has joined the Sidhu School of Business Penn State University and his bachelor’s degree in physics and Leadership as an assistant professor of management. from the University of Central Arkansas. Prior to joining Kim earned a doctorate in organizational behavior from Wilkes, he was a postdoctoral research fellow at the Cornell University’s School of Industrial and Labor RelaUniversity of Michigan. tions. He earned a master’s degree in management and a Timur Akhunov has joined the department of bachelor’s degree in psychology from Yonsei University mathematics and computer science as a visiting assistant in Seoul, South Korea. Prior to joining Wilkes, Kim was professor of mathematics. He holds a doctorate in a visiting fellow in the School of Industrial and Labor mathematics from the University of Chicago and earned Relations at Cornell. Leesa Levy has joined the performing arts department master’s and bachelor’s degrees in mathematics from the State University of New York at Buffalo. He was formerly a as visiting assistant professor of music. Levy has taught voice at the university since 2013, serving as principal visiting assistant professor of mathematics at Binghamvoice instructor in the musical theater program. Earlier ton University and the University of Rochester. He also in her career, Levy was associate professor of music at was a post-doctoral fellow at the University of Calgary. Valley City State University in North Dakota. She also George Bruhn has joined the electrical engineering taught music at schools in New York and in Germany and and physics department as a visiting assistant profesmaintained a career as a soprano soloist. Levy earned sor of physics. Bruhn earned a doctorate and a master’s a doctorate in performance and literature from North degree in physics from Johns Hopkins University. He Dakota State University. was formerly a visiting assistant professor of physics Han (Anna) Ma has joined the Sidhu School of at Millsaps College and at the University of Alabama at Business and Leadership as an assistant professor of Birmingham. He also was a postdoctoral research fellow marketing. She earned a doctorate in marketing from the in physics at Johns Hopkins University. University of Texas at Arlington and earned the Master of Dwight Camillucci has joined the performing arts Business Administration degree from New York Institute department as assistant professor of theater. He earned of Technology. She was formerly an instructor at the a Master of Fine Arts degree in theater design from Utah University of Texas at Arlington. State University. He was formerly a theater instructor at Jennifer Moses has joined the Passan School of Utah State University, where he also served as technical Nursing as faculty of practice in its graduate nursing prodirector and assistant technical director on a number of grams. She has been an adjunct clinical instructor in the its theater productions. Camillucci also held technical Passan School’s Master of Science in Nursing program theater positions at Trollwood Performing Arts and Lyric since 2014. Moses is a nurse practitioner providing palRepertory Company. liative care to patients at Allied Services in Scranton, and Misty Cook has joined the Passan School of Nursing previously held nursing positions with Geisinger Health as an assistant professor. Cook is a nurse educator with System. She earned her master’s degrees in nursing clinical background in medical-surgical units, mental at Florida Atlantic University and the Doctor of Nursing health, community health, medically fragile neonatal and pediatric care and long-term care. She earned a doctor of Practice degree from Bloomsburg University. education degree from Walden University and a Master of Ple ase se e Personnel, Page 35 Science in nursing from Chamberlain College of Nursing.


PERSONNEL FILE F R O M P A G E 34 Shuo (Andy) Ren has joined the integrative media, design and art department as an assistant professor. He holds a doctorate and a master’s degree in modeling, simulation and visualization engineering from Old Dominion University. Ren earned a bachelor’s degree in electrical engineering from Virginia Tech. He was formerly a graduate teaching and research assistant at Old Dominion University. Amy Sopcak-Joseph has joined the global cultures department as an assistant professor of history. She earned a doctorate and a master’s degree in history from the University of Connecticut and a bachelor’s degree from Dickinson College in English and history. She previously served as a lecturer in history at the University of Connecticut. Earlier she was education coordinator for the American Antiquarian Society in Worcester, Massachusetts. Benjamin Toll has joined the political science department as an assistant professor. He earned a doctorate and a master’s degree in political science from Indiana University in Bloomington, Indiana, and a bachelor’s degree in political science and sociology from Taylor University. He was formerly an assistant professor at Lake Superior State University since 2016. Earlier, he was a visiting assistant professor of political science at Miami University. Frances Turner joined the Sidhu School of Business and Leadership as an assistant professor of marketing. Turner earned the Doctor of Business Administration degree from Grenoble Ecole de Management in Grenoble, France. She was a visiting fellow at Oxford University’s Hams Manchester College Summer Research Institute. She was formerly an assistant professor of marketing at Menlo College and a visiting assistant professor of marketing at Bucknell University. Letitia N. Warunek has joined the Nesbitt School of Pharmacy as an assistant professor of pharmacy practice. Warunek earned the Doctor of Pharmacy degree at Wilkes University with a minor in Spanish. She formerly taught at the Buffalo University School of Pharmacy and Marshall University School of Pharmacy, earning teaching certificates at both institutions. She completed post-graduate pharmacy residencies at the Huntington Medical Center in Huntington, Virginia, and with Kaleida Health at the Buffalo General Medical Center in Buffalo, New York.

FOR THE RECORD DEEDS

123 mJ Enterprise llC. Property Location: Scranton. Seller: Green Tree Realty Partners LLC. Amount: $650,000. Columbia County KJmSam llC. Property Location: Scranton. Seller: mark H Hess and Jean D Johnson. Property Location: Chip Realty LLC. Amount: $250,000. Millville. Seller: Rolland B and Ann L Zeisloft. Amount: DDC lackawanna llC. Property Location: Scranton. $475,000. Seller: Rosado Headquarters LLC. Amount: $525,000. Direkt Group llC. Property Location: Hemlock Twp. Karen l thomas. Property Location: S. Abington Twp. Seller: Booth Scrap Yard & Recycling LLC. Amount: Seller: Fred J Kirijan. Amount: $320,000. $725,000. Joseph Scolere. Property Location: S. Abington Twp. Daniel S and mary K Fisher. Property Location: Seller: Mona R Griffer. Amount: $270,000. Greenwood Twp. Seller: Amos S and Sylvia M Stoltzfus. Robert Washington Rutty. Property Location: S. Amount: $480,000. Abington Twp. Seller: Outlook Design & Construction Inc. adam and Patricia b Comstock. Property LocaAmount: $563,245. tion: Mifflin Twp. Seller: James P and Jennifer A Seeley. ann o Farias. Property Location: S. Abington Twp. Amount: $370,000. Seller: Mark Lewis Johnson. Amount: $445,000. leonard G and Vicky m baker ii. Property Location: yee Wing tung. Property Location: S. Abington Twp. Scott Twp. Seller: Estate of Gerard J. Dullea. Amount: Seller Charles Heim. Amount: $313,000. $302,000. Kaylan Routhu. Property Location: S. Abington Twp. Jason and Stephanie Worhach. Property Location: Seller: Frank J Perna. Amount: $590,000. Cleveland Twp. Seller: Stone Financing LLC. Amount: Peter G Fazio. Property Location: S. Abington Twp. $300,000. Seller: Thomas J Cesarini. Amount: $341,500. William R and alison m miller. Property Location: Carlin Shea. Property Location: W. Abington Twp. Hemlock Twp. Seller: Wayne M and Victoria F Butler. Seller: Sean James Grady. Amount: $307,500. Amount: $348,000. James J Conaboy. Property Location: W. Abington Twp. Seller: June Regni Est. Amount: $335,000. laCKaWanna County michael J Jenkins. Property Location: W. Abington Paula m Perry. Property Location: Covington Twp. Twp. Seller: Patrica A Heil. Amount: $325,000. Seller: Eri Schmidt. Amount: $325,000. JKm Realty inc. Property Location: W. Abington Twp. Carl barsigian. Property Location: Dalton. Seller: Ellen Seller: Joseph G Pannick. Amount: $350,000. Co Marotta (TR). Amount: $345,000. Fast Realty llC. Property Location: W. Abington Twp. 1330 berger Holdings llC Property. Location: Seller: Two Cat Realty LLC. Amount: $300,000. Dickson City. Seller: Mid Valley Fuel Sales Inc. Amount: James H Chadwick Jr. Property Location: W. Abing$1,000,000. ton Twp. Seller J Ward Fitzpatrick. Amount: $260,000. Christina m Schultz. Property Location: Dunmore. arthur C miller. Property Location: W. Abington Twp. Seller: Michael J Coyer. Amount: $310,000. Seller: Linday Zipay. Amount: $310,000. Robert J Koester iii. Property Location: Jefferson Shirley Granger. Property Location: W. Abington Twp. Twp. Seller: Thomas V and Elizabeth A Gilboy Irrev. Fam. Seller: Kenneth Powell. Amount: $288,600. Tr. Amount: $600,000. Catherine Pope. Property Location: W. Abington Twp. bret D naugle. Property Location: Jefferson Twp. Seller: Kenneth Powell. Amount: $250,125. Seller: Daniel M Soderberg. Amount: $327,700. Frances Guzzetta. Property Location: Jefferson luzERnE County Twp. Seller: Outlook Design & Construction Inc. Amount: Eric R Huff. Property Location: Dallas Twp. Seller: $349,900. David Harrison. Amount: $339,900. Jeffrey J Krisiak. Property Location: Jessup. Seller: Russell b Gisewhite. Property Location: Lake Twp. Karen L Ross. Amount: $271,500. Seller: Linda J. Royer. Amount: $325,000. andrew Charles Knife. Property Location: Madison lawrence J Roke. Property Location: Fairview Twp. Twp. Seller: Thomas A Garubba III. Amount: $339,000. Seller: Todd Lee Miller Sr. Amount: $326,000. SUBMIT PEOPLE ON THE MOVE items to busibC Property Holdings llC. Property Location: Maybay Head. Property Location: Pittston Twp. Seller: ness@timesshamrock.com or The Times-Tribune, field. Seller: Joan Ofcharsky. Amount: $250,000. Pittston Twp. Volunteer Fire Department No. 1. Amount: 149 Penn Ave., Scranton, PA 18503. tegna broadcast Holdings llC. Property Location: $319,000. Moosic. Seller: PA Moosic 16 Montage Mtn. Road LLC. travis a Sciandra. Property Location: Lake Twp. Amount: $1,047,000. Seller: William James Michaels. Amount: $288,000. J michael tedesco. Property Location: Moosic. Seller: matthew J moss. Property Location: Huntington Twp. Leah E Klena. Amount: $460,000. Seller: Gary P. Boberick. Amount: $259,000. michael l brown. Property Location: Moosic. Seller: nicole m Emerick. Property Location: Wright Twp. Jeannine Miller. Amount: $770,000. Seller: James Elias, Amount: $250,000. mary t Dunleavy. Property Location: Moosic. Seller: anthony biscotto. Property Location: Duryea. Seller: Alexander Kumming Chang. Amount: $307,500. Joseph F Andrews. Amount: $335,000. William R barker. Property Location: Moscow. Seller: Kerry George. Property Location” Fairview Twp. James Pehanick. Amount: $499,000. Seller: Kerry Swiech. Amount: $323,000. michael a Crider. Property Location: Moscow. Seller: matthew montville. Property Location: Laflin. Seller: Elwood Wesley Perry III. Amount: $255,000. Christopher J. Menedez. Amount: $340,000. Vincent Cosimo Russo. Property Location: Moscow. Robert anastasio. Property Location: Lake Twp. Seller: Frank W Hubbard. Amount: $375,000. Seller: Bobbie J Patla. Amount: $263,500. Kevin Davis. Property Location: Newton Twp. Seller: Jessica J Pwalowski. Property Location: Dallas Twp. Dennis J Battle (NBM). Amount: $265,000. Seller: Holly Keefe. Amount: $327,500. Joseph a Hampton. Property Location: Olyphant. Jennifer breitenbach. Property Location: Forty Fort. Seller: Salvatore B Cerra. Amount: $280,000. Seller: Terry Smith. Amount: $300,000. timothy mcandrew. Property Location: Roaring matthew V benzinger. Property Location: Forty Fort. Brook Twp. Seller: Allison Thomas. Amount: $400,000. Seller: Jennifer Breitenbach. Amount: $332,180. brook Street Holdings llC. Property Location: ScranCartus Financial Corp. Property Location: Kingston ton. Seller: Astro Equipment Co. Amount: $725,000. Twp. Seller: Collburn Joint Revocable Trust. Amount:

$489,900. Holly E Keefe. Property Location: Kingston. Seller: Cartus Financial Corp. Amount: $489,900. leonard m Evans. Property Location: Bear Creek Twp. Seller: T. Colin Trebilcock. Amount: $375,050. Sean m Clark. Property Location: Kingston. Seller: Bruce D. Lefkowitz. Amount: $525,000. michael o bowser. Property Location: Butler Twp. Seller: Joseph Zelenack. Amount: $290,000. Jagpal Deo. Property Location: Hazle Twp. Seller: Hazleton DG LLC. Amount: $1,558,000. ariele Domashinski. Property Location: Huntington Twp. Seller: Frank Dipino Jr. Amount: $260,000. Richard Cardoni. Property Location: Fairview Twp. Seller: Walden Estate Inc. Amount: $284,630. aJt Properties llC. Property Location: Butler Twp. Seller: Luzerne County Sheriff. $278,289. andrew Judge. Property Location: Dallas Twp. Seller: Gandolfo Taravella. Amount: $420,000. Khushbu D Desai. Property Location: Laflin. Seller: Patrick J Patte. Amount: $320,000. anthony D bruno ii. Property Location: Harveys Lake. Seller: John D. Brougher. Amount: $322,000. Evergreen mHC llC. Property Location: Lake Twp. Seller: Mooretown Properties LLC. Amount: $950,000. Sarah block. Property Location: Bear Creek Village. Seller: Martin B Fried. Amount: $600,000. albert michael namey. Property Location: Fairview Twp. Seller: Bolek Construction LLC. Amount: $276,800. Glenn R Willis. Property Location: Butler Twp. Seller: Sand Springs Development Corp. Amount: $352,394. Evergreen mHC llC. Property Location: Lake Twp. Seller: Mooretown Properties LLC. Amount: $950,000. Shmuel Hershkop. Property Location: Kingston. Seller: Joseph P Narins. Amount: $310,000. Sarah block. Property Location: Bear Creek. Seller: Martin B Fried. Amount: $600,000. albert michael namey. Property Location: Fairview Twp. Seller: Bolek Construction LLC. Amount: $276,800. Glenn R Willis. Property Location: Butler Twp. Seller: Sand Springs Development Corp. Amount: $352,394. 90 union St. LLC. Property Location: Wilkes-Barre. Seller: Thomas C Co. Amount: $931,000. 90 union St. LLC. Property Location: Wilkes-Barre. Seller: Thomas C Co. Amount: $931,000. 64 union St. LLC. Property Location: Wilkes-Barre. Seller: Thomas C Thomas Co. Amount: $399,000. brenda Jordan. Property Location: Fairview Twp. Seller: Larry J Whitehead. Amount: $287,700. Daniel H Kallal. Property Location: Black Creek Twp. Seller: Andrew Townes Smith. Amount: $530,000. Daniel John Dallas Jr. Property Location: Conyngham. Seller: Kenneth J. Temborski. Amount: $1,480,000. Joshua E mason. Property Location: Dallas Twp. Seller: Paul Darling. Amount: $337,500. laura J Kapalka. Property location: Duryea. Seller: James J. Pliska. Amount: $260,000. David W Sincavage. Property Location: Bear Creek Twp. Seller: Mark Murphy. Amount: $415,000. yonne S Krashkevich. Property Location: Bear Creek Twp. Seller: Artur Manasyan. Amount: $368,000. Kong Qiang Chen. Property Location: Hazle Twp. Seller: Churchview Realty Inc. Amount: $371,332. John anthony mcHale. Property Location: Exeter Twp. Seller: Laurie Gunshore. Amount: $320,000. Robert bell. Property Location: Dallas Twp. Seller: James H Ashenfelter. Amount: $300,000. Guy tolerico. Property Location: Sugarloaf Twp. Seller: Cheryl M Pecora to Guy Tolerico. Amount: $270,000. Justin michael metz. Property Location: Black Creek Ple ase se e Record, Page 36

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FOR THE RECORD F R O M P A G E 35 Twp. Seller: Thomas A. Smith. Amount: $290,000. Rivka Kleinman. Property Location: Kingston. Seller: NEPA Property Investors LLC. Amount: $270,000.

GAO Global LLC. Amount: $950,000. Jan Bulinsky. Property Location: Smithfield Twp. Seller: Marek Morawiec Est., Daiana and Elizabeth Morawiec (exec.). Amount: $322,000. HFICo LLC. Property Location: Tobyhanna Twp. Seller: Charlene Walter. Amount: $347,000. MonRoe CounTy Turning Wheel enterprises LLC. Property Location: HFICo LLC. Property Location: Tunkhannock Twp. Pocono Twp. Seller: Debra and Curtis Herman. Amount: Seller: Robert and Jane Clawson. Amount: $395,000. $313,000. Thurston and Kelly Reinhart. Property Location: Pre-Insulated Metal Technologies Inc. Property Tobyhanna Twp. Seller: Bryan Fuerst and Dennis Forde Jr. Location: Stroud Twp. Seller: Northwoods Commercial Amount: $355,000. Properties Inc. Amount: $5,500,000. Jessica and Rosemary Padilla. Property Location: natalie George. Property Location: Price Twp. Seller: Jackson Twp. Seller: JHJF Properties LLC. Amount: LTS Homes LLC. Amount: $332,143. $365,000. Liberty one Realty LLC. Property Location: TobyJacques Jean. Property Location: Price Twp. Seller: DE&S Properties Inc. T/A Classic Quality Homes. Amount: hanna Twp. Seller: 383 Ventures LLC. Amount: $443,000. eric Powders. Property Location: Tobyhanna Twp. $329,900. Abraham Goldstein. Property Location: Middle Smith- Seller: Spartak Holding Group LLC, Oval Management of PA LLC (managing member). Amount: $303,000. field Twp. Seller: Owen Lee. Amount: $430,000. Tiffany Guirand. Property Location: Stroud Twp. Jeannine Leager and Russell Dunbar III. Property Seller: Joel Anthony Inc. Amount: $343,000. Location: Middle Smithfield Twp. Seller: Kevin and Jill Joan Maniaci and Melissa Clarke. Property Location: Miller. Amount: $327,000. Jackson Twp. Seller: Thomas and Joyce Flattery. Amount: Arby’s Properties LLC. Property Location: East $430,000. Stroudsburg. Seller: Sybra LLLC F/K/A Sybra of Michigan 296 Washington Street LLC. Property Location: LLC SB/M Sybra Inc. Amount: $1. Tax basis: $559,551. David Camp and Gwen Borowsky. Property Location: East Stroudsburg. Seller: Shiva Real Estate Investors and Management LLC. Amount: $862,500. Tobyhanna Twp. Seller: Arthur and Andrea Jennerich. 260 Great Bear LLC. Property Location: Middle Price: $575,000. Smithfield Twp. Seller: James and Anne Neitzel. Amount: Bernice Claxton-Stapleton and Frankie Stapleton. $300,000. Property Location: Middle Smithfield Twp. Seller: Classic Beltzville enterprises LLC. Property Location: Barrett Quality Homes. Price: $308,500. Twp. Seller: Hollow Enterprises Inc. Amount: $850,000. Jaime and Jessica Hidalgo. Property Location: Sterowski’s Car Wash LLC. Property Location: Coolbaugh Twp. Seller: Michael Delcampt Trust. Amount: Tobyhanna Twp. Seller: Mountain Car Care LP, Geryville $420,000. Associates LLC. Amount: $600,000. David obiesie. Property Location: Tobyhanna Twp. Richard and Samantha Kim. Property Location: Seller: Classic Quality Homes. Amount: $304,500. Tobyhanna Twp. Seller: Paul and Carolyn Rodriguez Trust. Piotr olejnik and Paulina Galik. Property LocaAmount: $299,000. tion: Jackson Twp. Seller: Stephen and Donna Hallberg. Ronald and Kathy Papera. Property Location: TobyAmount: $380,000. hanna Twp. Seller: Avram Hornik and Katharine Damora. Peggy and Rodney Merwine. Property Location: Amount: $825,000. Hamilton Twp. Seller: Mario and Illise Arvelo. Amount: niagale Fofana. Property Location: Ross Twp. Seller: $330,000. Classic Quality Homes. Amount: $313,500. Justin and Christine Bove. Property Location: TobyPaul and Jennifer Ferry. Property Location: Tobyhanna Twp. Seller: Joshua and Kristin Shannon. Amount: hanna Twp. Seller: Michael and Jayne Klem. Amount: $378,500. $424,000. nP 830 LLC. Property Location: Stroudsburg. Seller: Richard and Larisa Leist. Property Location: BarLaurel Beverage Co. Amount: $450,000. rett Twp. Seller: Gregory and Suzanne Muth. Amount: Michael and Brandie Carter. Property Location: $720,000. Paradise Twp. Seller: Adrian Martens. Amunt: $299,900. Christopher and nancy Fan. Property Location: Polk PIKe CounTy Twp. Seller: Stanislaw Wnorowski and Thomas Gontarz. yanbulat and Dinara Iskhakov. Property Location: Amount: $317,500. Blooming Grove Twp. Seller; Mary Paluzzi. Amount: Leigh Hopkins and Jacqueline Junkins-Hopkins. $300,000. Property Location: Tobyhanna Township. Seller: William Charles Scott Mainor. Porperty Location: Delaware MacMillan III and Donna Wood. Amount: $850,000. Twp. Seller: Gail Brown Wershing Liv. Tr., Brown Wershing Leonid Ivanov and Alexis Santiago-Cabanas. Property Location: Stroudsburg. Seller: David and Lynette & Diane L Despopoulos Sheibley. Amount: $299,000. Matthew Patrick and Margaret Louise Gowland. Quaresimo. Amount: $399,000. Property Location: Delaware Twp. Seller: Virginia Carbone. Vladimir Leibson and Raisa Reznikas. Property Amount: $260,000. Location: Stroud Twp. Seller: RJA Development Corp. Iourii R Minenko. Property Location: Delaware Twp. Amount: $292,200. Gosia Sobieszczuk. Property Location: Hamilton Twp. Seller: David Schlossberg Est. by Peter Schlossberg. Property Location: Delaware Twp. Amount: $305,000. Seller: Central Penn Capital Management LLC. Amount: Jason T and Amber Desane. Property Location: $309,175. Delaware Twp. Seller: Kevin and Rosanna Fratto O’Connell. erik Paige and Cheryl Hall-Paige. Property LocaAmount: $250,000. tion: Middle Smithfield Twp. Seller: Joun and Choon An. Douglas and Melanie Martin. Property Location: Amount: $332,500. Delaware Twp. Seller; James A and Catherine A Stillittano. HFICo LLC. Property Location: Stroudsburg. Seller: Amount: $260,000. Lamplighter Associates. Amount: $372,000. Gene and Patrica J Gillen. Property Location: DingJay and Donna Galaini. Property Location: Coolbaugh man Twp. Seller: Cezary and Agnieska Potyrala. Amount: Twp. Seller: Joyce Mennella. Price: $330,000. $280,000. HFICo LLC. Property Location: Pocono Twp. Seller:

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John A and Jennifer R Moeller Jr. Property Location: Dingman Twp. Seller: ATD Park Slope LLC. Amount: $344,000. Luis and Diane o’Campo. Property Location: Dingman Twp. Seller: Art and Aida Benshoof. Amount: $340,000. John L and Laura D Strika. Property Location: Dingman Twp. Seller: Scott Dalrymple, Melissa McCole. Amount: $649,000. John and Lorraine Gillen. North. Property Location: Dingman Twp. Seller: Gene A and Patricia Gillen. Amount: $343,000. Barlas and Candis Rene yuce. Property Location: Dingman Twp. Seller: Martin Devaney. Amount: $385,000. Storage Land PA LLC. Property Location: Dingman Twp. Seller: Resort Construction Co., Inc. Amount: $550,000. Amy Marciano, Maria Cuartas. Property Location: Greene Twp. Seller: Dominic J Mastri Jr. Amount: $325,000. Roy Allen and Gretchen Margaret Finney Jr. Property Location: Greene Twp. Seller: PAR Associates Profit Sharing Plan FBO Phillip H Zaks. Amount: $310,000. Christopher and Kelly Holtz. Property Location: Lackawaxen Twp. Seller: G.A. Homes Inc. Amount: $325,750. Melissa and Joseph Galli. Property Location: Lackawaxen Twp. Seller: Eleanor K Hunderfund. Amount: $310,000. ASDIP LLC. Property Location: Lackawaxen Twp. Seller: Charles W Kerri Ann Lockwood Jr. Amount: $750,000. John and Laura Zebitsch. Warren and Bernard Melone. Property Location: Lackawaxen Twp. Seller: Matthew and Lauren Angelo-Seltzer. Amount: $675,000. Matthew and Lauren Angelo Seltzer, Joseph and eileen Koretz Giampaolo. Property Location: Lackawaxen Twp. Seller: Christopher Kasler. Amount: $260,000. Christian and Stephanie Soucher. Property Location: Lackawaxen Twp. Seller: William and Elaine Akley. Amount: $337,000. John and Sheila Vaccaro. Property Location: Lackawaxen Twp. Seller: Edward S and Sonia M Sperduto. Amount: $365,000. Janice Roven. Property Location: Lackawaxen Twp. Seller: Michael and Kimberly A Desau. Amount: $365,000. Gold Medal Properties LLC. Property Location: Lackawaxen Twp. Seller: Jadwin Associates. Amount: $1,052,000. equity Trust Co, Robert Kaufman (IRA). Property Location: Lackawaxen Twp. Seller: Woodloch Pines inc. Amount: $589,900. John and Tracey Murphy. Property Location: Lackawaxen Twp. Seller: Toby G and Nissen Frishman. Amount: $303,500. The Conservation Fund. Property Location: Lehman Twp. Seller: John Paul Volpe, Steven Daryl Guthrie. Amount: $253,200. Krista Von Werne, Kalynne Von Werne. Property Location: Lehman Twp. Seller Louis M and Jan A Bruno. Amount: $275,000. Tracey e Vitchers. Property Location: Milford Boro. Seller: David and Susan Novak. Amount: $300,000. Robert Radley. Property Location: Milford Boro. Seller: Edgar B and Kathleen A Brannon. Amount: $420,000. Arthur Zeroulias, Belinda Doyle. Property Location: Milford Boro. Seller: Scott N and Karen L Cowern. Amount: $393,000. Matthew and Jean Confusione. Property Location: Milford Boro. Seller: Joseph and Denise R Fretta. Amount: $669,000. Robert W and Patricia A Harmon. Property Location:

Milford Twp. Seller: Maryanne Monteodorisio. Amount: $299,000. John P and Mary T Shea. Property Location: Palmyra Twp. Seller: Brian H Wright. Amount: $465,000. Frederick C and Maria D Velazquez. Property Location: Palmyra Twp. Seller; Ronald L and Lee Emerson. Amount: $280,000. Frank and Aleta Loweree. Property Location: Palmyra Twp. Seller: Eric L Domin (TR), Estate of Domin Survivors. Amount: $327,500. Robert J and Jennifer Myers. Property Location: Palmyra Twp. Seller: Gina Tasselmeyer, Gina and John J Fauzio. Amount: $272,000. James A and Kara L Cleffi. Property Location: Palmyra Twp. Seller: David M and Shannon F McCormick. Amount: $485,000. Heather and Bruce Greenspan. Property Location: Palmyra Twp. Seller: Edward and Genevieve Fays. Seller: $395,000. Christopher R and Jean e Ritchie. Property Location: Palmyra Twp. Seller: Paul F, David F, Carolynn R, & Mark L Stoddard, Virginia Lee Stoddard DeLoach, Fox’s Laier LLC. Amount: $1,400,000. Christopher W Giltz. Property Location: Palmyra Twp. Seller: Stephen and Cynthia McClelland. Amount: $499,500. Anne Allende. Property Location: Shohola Twp. Seller: Peggy B Bruton. Amount: $695,000. Anthony B and Paura A Scott. Property Location: Shohola Twp. Seller: Barbara, Patrick, Luann & Frank Giordano. Amount: $365,000. Alena A and Anthony Verderame. Property Location: Shohola Twp. Seller: Thomas S Taylor, Nicolas Lesbros. Amount: $345,000. edlyn K and James C Richelderfer. Property Location: Shohola Twp. Seller: Graig and Elise D Finch Henriques. Amount: $310,000. Roger e and Carolyn A Gerber. Property Location: Westfall Twp. Seller: Rita Colaiaco. Amount: $252,000. Dexter and eileen Bardney. Property Location: Westfall Twp. Seller: Nora T Hoffman. Amount: $420,000.

SCHuyLKILL CounTy

SMM Holdings, LLC .Property Location: South Manheim Twp. Seller: Ruggiero Family Ltd Partnership, Mary T.Ruggiero, General Partner. Amount: $445,000. Carl and nancy Wenrich. Property Location: South Manheim Twp. Seller: Josef Oggier. Amount: $775,000. Andrew and Rebecca netzhik. Property Location: Orwigsburg. Seller: Matthew and Hannah Wheeler. Amount: $385,800. Matthew edmonds and Kayla edmonds. Property Location: West Penn Twp. Seller: Justin Magluido. Amount: $299,000.

WyoMInG CounTy

Joseph e and elaine S Brennan. Property Location: Eaton Twp. Seller: Borel Builders Inc. Amount: $330,758. Daniel James and Tiffany Marie Cross. Property Location: Eaton Twp. Seller: Paul J and Colleen M Healey. Amount: $319,500. Mark and Kathleen Slywka. Property Location: Lemon Twp. Seller: F. Patrick, Francis R & Gladys G Bernet. Amount: $470,000. Scott and Holly Arnold. Property Location: Tunkhannock Twp. Seller: Jeffrey E and Elizabeth K Bluhm. $409,000. David Jayne. Property Location: Braintrim Twp. Seller: Gary L Seymour, Gila Lehigh Seymour Beers, Gayle Ple ase se e Record, Page 37


FOR THE RECORD F R O M P A G E 36 Marie Seymour Lehto, Gene Allen Seymour. Amount: $295,385.38. Michael E and Patti A McGonagle. Property Location: Factoryville. Seller: Jay Francis Scala, Mark Jude Scala, Joseph John Scala, Marilyn J Scala. Amount: $286,652. Lonewood Farms LLC. Property Location: Monroe Twp. Seller: Grand Stride LLC. Amount: $311,664.91. Leonard Crawford Electric LLC. Property Location: Tunkhannock Boro. Seller: Lori Terrana. Amount: $270,000.

MORTGAGES

CoLuMbiA County

Claudia J and Arlin R thrush. Property Location: Main Twp. Lender: First Columbia Bank & Trust Co. Amount: $452,000. Eric C and Melissa S benscoter. Property Location: North Centre Twp. Lender: First Keystone Community Bank. Amount: $640,000. Michael Scott and Erin S Snyder Jr. Property Location: Briarcreek Twp. Lender: MERS. Amount: $356,839. John A and Alice C bizzak Jr. Property Location: Madison Twp. Lender: Muncy Bank and Trust Co. Amount: $521,500. Direkt Group LLC. Property Location: Hemlock Twp. Lender: Booth Scrap Yard & Recycling Center LLC. Amount: $850,000. James A and Jennifer R Hyde. Property Location: Briarcreek Twp. Lender: First Columbia Bank & Trust Co. Amount: $320,150. bloomsburg (Columbia) DG LLC. Property Location: Scott Twp. Lender: Sterling Bank. Amount: $1,222,000. Daniel S and Mary K Fisher. Property Location: Greenwood Twp. Lender: AgChoice Farm Credit. Amount: $400,000. Adam H and Patricia b Comstock. Property Location: Mifflin Twp. Lender: First Columbia Bank & Trust Co. Amount: $351,500. Joshua J Gross. Property Location: Beaver Twip. Lender: First Columbia Bank & Trust Co. Amount: $338,000. Leonard G and Vicky M baker ii. Property Location: Scott Twp. Lender: MERS. Amount: $308,493. brian Klingerman. Property Location: North Centre Twp. Lender: NBT Bank. Amount: $350,000. Kurian Enterprises LLC. Property Location: Montour Twp. Lender: First Columbia Bank & Trust Co. Amount: $300,000

LACKAwAnnA County

Dina Gaughan. Property Location: Carbondale Twp. Lender: Fidelity Dep & Disc Bank. Amount: $396,000. Paula M Perry. Property Location: Covington Twp. Lender: Quicken Loans. Amount: $281,250. Ronald Donati. Property Location: Covington Twp. Lender: Peoples Security Bank & Trust. Amount: $260,000. Lackawanna Executive Park LLC. Property Location: Dickson City. Lender: FNCB Bank. Amount: $2,500,000. 1330 berger Holdings LLC. Property Location: Dickson City. Lender: M&T Bank. Amount: $952,200. John P Casey. Property Location: Dickson City. Lender: Stifel bank & Trust. Amount: $275,000. nicholas J Colarossi. Property Location: Dunmore. Lender: Peoples Security Bank & Trust. Amount: $385,000. Christina M Schultz. Property Location: Dunmore. Lender: Residential Mortgage Services Inc. Amount: $263,500. Marti J Pane. Property Location: Elmhurst. Lender: Fidelity Dep & Disc Bank. Amount: $480,000.

Alessandra M Striefsky.. Property Location: Greenfield Twp. Lender: MERS. Amount: $368,286. ian R Farr. Property Location: Jefferson Twp. Lender: Citizens Savings Bank. Amount: $365,000. Derek Felsman. Property Location: Jefferson Twp. Lender: ESSA Bank & Trust. Amount: $352,500. bret D naugle. Property Location: Jefferson Twp. Lender: Home Point Financial Corp. Amount: $298,160. Robert Moran. Property Location: Jermyn. Lender: Fidelity Dep & Disc Bank. Amount: $380,000. AtR LaPlume LLC. Property Location: La Plume Twp. Lender: Wayne bank. Amount: $800,000. Andrew Charles Knife. Property Location: Madison Twp. Lender: USAA Federal Savings Bank. Amount: $346,288. Andrew Howe. Property Location: Madison Twp. Lender: PS Bank. Amount: $308,000. wayne R butler. Property Location: Madison Twp. Lender: Community Bank. Amount: $400,000. bC Property Holdings LLC. Property Location: Mayfield. Lender: Dime bank. Amount: $250,000. J Michael tedesco. Property Location: Moosic. Lender: Peoples Security Bank & Trust Co. Amount: $368,00. Joseph Amato Rev tr. Property Location: Moosic. Lender: Bank of America. Amount: $1,000,000. Michael L brown. Property Location: Moosic. Lender: Finance of America Mortgage LLC. Amount: $577,500. Maria barker. Property Location: Moscow. Lender: Weichert Financial Services. Amount: $495,337. Vincent Cosimo Russon. Property Location: Moscow. Lender: Fidelity Dep & Disc Bank. Amount: $275,000. Michael J Arcangelo. Property Location: Newton Twp. Lender: Wells Fargo Bank. Amount: $364,000. Linda R bush. Property Location: N. Abington Twp. Lender: PNC Bank. Amount: $260,000. Mortgage & Security Agreement. Property Location: Old Forge. Lender: FNCB Bank. Amount: $2,950,000. Steven P brzozowski. Property Location: Olyphant. Lender: Quicken Loans Inc. Amount: $261,600. Shayna Chuff. Property Location: Olyphant. Lender: Quicken Loans Inc. Amount: $319,000. Joseph A Hampton. Property Location: Olyphant. Lender: Quicken Loans. Amount: $266,000. Stephen A wzorek. Property Location: Olyphant. Lender: Citizens Savings Bank. Amount: $264,300. Robert S Griffin. Property Location: Olyphant. Lender: Wells Fargo bank. Amount: $250,000. Earl Harvey. Property Location: Ransom Twp. Lender: PS Bank. Amount: $344,000. timothy McAndrew. Property Location: Roaring Brook Twp. Lender: Deephaven Mortgage LLC. Amount: $340,000. Ronald Donati. Property Location: Roaring Brook Twp. Lender: Peoples Security Bank & Trust Co. Amount: $260,000. Jason Holly. Property Location: Scott Twp. Lender: Honesdale National Bank. Amount: $256,000. David Samaniego. Property Location: Scranton. Lender: Homebridge Financial Services Inc. Amount: $279,228. Powderly industries LLC. Property Location: Scranton. Lender: PS bank. Amount: $1,000,000. timothy J Moran. Property Location: Scranton. Lender: Peoples Security Bank & Trust Co. Amount: $320,000. Allied Services Personal Care inc. Property Location: Scranton. Lender: FNCB Bank. Amount: $20,000,000. brok Street Holdings LLC. Property Location: Scranton. Lender: Dime Bank. Amount: $580,000. 123 MJ Enterprise LLC. Property Location: Scranton. Lender: Velocity Commercial Capital LLC. Amount:

$487,500. tara Russo. Property Location: Scranton. Lender: Wayne Bank. Amount: $800,000. AtR Properties LLC. Property Location: Scranton. Lender: Wayne Bank. Amount: $800,000. LRV Holdings LLC. Property Location: Scranton. Lender: PS Bank. Amount: $350,000. J Alberta Enterprises LLC. Property Location: Scranton. Lender: Peoples Security Bank & Trust Co. Amount: $850,000. John M Dougherty. Property Location: Scranton. Lender: Fidelity Dep & Disc Bank. Amount: $410,000. John M Dougherty. Property Location: Scranton. Lender: Fidelity Dep & Disc Bank. Amount: $410,000. John M Dougherty. Property Location: Scranton. Lender: Fidelity Dep & Disc Bank. Amount: $410,000. John M Dougherty. Property Location: Scranton. Lender: Fidelity Dep & Disc Bank. Amount: $410,000. John M Dougherty. Property Location: Scranton. Lender: Fidelity Dep & Disc Bank. Amount: $410,000. John M Dougherty. Property Location: Scranton. Lender: Fidelity Dep & Disc Bank. Amount: $410,000. John M Dougherty. Property Location: Scranton. Lender: Fidelity Dep & Disc Bank. Amount: $410,000. John M Dougherty. Property Location: Scranton. Lender: Fidelity Dep & Disc Bank. Amount: $410,000. nicholas J Colarossi. Property Location: Scranton. Lender: Peoples Security Bank & Trust Co. Amount: $385,000. PVn inc. Property Location: Scranton. Lender: Century 3 Main Partners LLC. Amount: $300,000. Allied Health Care Services. Property Location: Scranton. Lender: FNCB Bank. Amount: $20,000,000. Michael A Viola iii. Property Location: Scranton. Lender: NBT Bank. Amount: $256,000. Joseph Scolere. Property Location: Scranton. Lender: Honesdale National Bank. Amount: $256,500. nicole Shaffer. Property Location: Scranton. Lender: Fidelity Dep & Disc Bank. Amount: $390,000. Robert washington Rutty. Property Location: Scranton. Lender: Quicken Loans Inc. Amount: $478,758. yee wing tung. Property Location: Scranton. Lender: Loandepot Com LLC. Amount: $250,400. Robert A Russini. Property Location: Scranton. Lender: Fidelity Dep & Disc Bank. Amount: $484,350. bijan Reza Ahmadzadeh. Property Location: Scranton. Lender: Peoples Security Bank & Trust Co. Amount: $452,000. Hung M La. Property Location: Scranton. Lender: Honesdale National Bank. Amount: $260,000. Joel M Shapiro. Property Location: Scranton. Lender: Suntrust Bank. Amount: $261,600. Sean P Castellani. Property Location: Scranton. Lender: Amerisave Mortgage Corp. Amount: $332,000. Colby Kalinowski. Property Location: Scranton. Lender: Fidelity Dep & Disc Bank. Amount: $543,940.13. Joseph John Gaughan iii. Property Location: Scranton. Lender: Freedom Mortgage Corp. Amount: $287,439. Kalyan Routhu. Property Location: Scranton. Lender: Fidelity Dep & Disc Bank. Amount: $590,000. Michael Joseph Speranzo. Property Location: Scranton. Lender: Stearns Lending LLC. Amount: $318,400. Peter G Fazio. Property Location: Springbrook Twp. Lender: NBT Bank. Amount: $273,200. Jeffrey Alan Radle. Property Location: Throop. Lender: Peoples Security Bank & Trust Co. Amount: $285,000. James J Kuzmak. Property Location: Throop. Lender: PS Bank. Amount: $280,000. Carlin Shea. Property Location: W. Abington Twp. Lender: Finance of America Mortgage LLC. Amount: $301,929.

Paul D Griffing. Property Location: W. Abington Twp. Lender: Fidelity Dep & Disc Bank. Amount: $282, 279. James J Conaboy. Property Location: W. Abington Twp. Lender: PS Bank. Amount: $268,000. Michael J Jenkins. Property Location: W. Abington Twp. Lender: Residential Mortgage Services Inc. Amount: $308,750. JKM Realty inc. Property Location: W. Abington Twp. Lender: PNC Bank. Amount: $280,000. Mario Costa. Property Location: W. Abington Twp. Lender: Peoples Security Bank & Trust Co. Amount: $361,000. Rodman Charles Azar. Property Location: W. Abington Twp. Lender: Quicken Loans Inc. Amount: $601,600. Richard Reddock. Property Location: W. Abington Twp. Lender: PA State Employees Credit Union. Amount: $270,000. Matthew orr. Property Location: W. Abington Twp. Lender: Fidelity Dep & Disc Bank. Amount: $425,000. Vincent M Munley. Property Location: W. Abington Twp. Lender: Freedom Mtge Corp. Amount: $260,149. Cloverleaf Developers LLC. Property Location: W. Abington Twp. Lender: Peoples Security Bank & Trust Co., Amount: $400,000. Arthur C Miller. Property Location: W. Abington Twp. Lender: M&T Bank. Amount: $263,500. Michael G Sheruda. Property Location: W. Abington Twp. Lender: Honesdale National bank. Amount: $477,000.

LuzERnE County

Gerald D Gunster ii. Property Location: Harveys Lake. Lender: MERS. Amount: $300,000. Ple ase se e Record, Page 38

Relocation Opportunities Wanted

Bring us any and all potential locations. We will determine if we can develop or relocate to your site. Pennsylvania Counties of Interest Include: • Bradford, Bucks, Carbon, Columbia, Lackawanna, Lehigh, Luzerne, Lycoming, Monroe, Northampton, Pike, Schuylkill, Sullivan, Susquehanna, Tioga, Wayne, Wyoming

Types of Locations Wanted: • End Cap, In-Line, Drive-Thru, Free Standing PLEASE CONTACT Abbie Muto muto_a@sdepa.com Cheryl Green green_c@sdepa.com (610) 366-8120 • www.sdepa.com

Member of International Council of Shopping Centers

NORTHEAS T P ENNS YLVANIA BUS INES S J OURNAL DECEMBER 2019 37 TS_CNG/NPBJ/PAGES [B37] | 12/03/19

18:19 | FARRELLSHE


FOR THE RECORD

F R O M P A G E 37 Sean Thomas. Property Location: Fairview Twp. Lender: ESSA Bank & Trust. Amount: $350,000. Russell B Gisewhite. Property Location: lake Twp. Lender: MERS. Amount: $310,337. Lawrence J Roke. Property Location: Fairview Twp. Lender: MERS. Amount: $260,800. Travis A Sciandra. Property Location: Lake Twp. Lender: MERS. Amount: $273,600. Matthew J Moss. Property Location: Huntington Twp. Lender: Mortgage America Inc. Amount: $261,616. Kerry George. Property Location: Fairview Twp. Lender: MERS. Amount: $258,400. Jessica R Frohman. Property Location: Franklin Twp. Lender: MERS. Amount: $254,500. Matthew Montville. Property Location: Laflin. Lender: First Keystone Community Bank. Amount: $323,000. Robert Anastasio. Property Location: Lake Twp. Lender: MERS. Amount: $263,500. Judith A Sterowski. Property ocation: Ross Twp. Lender: MERS. Amount: $264,000. Jessica J Pawlowski. Property Location: Dallas Twp. Lender: MERS: Amount: $924,750. Charles S Brown. Property Location: Jenkins Twp. Lender: MERS. Amount: $855,000. Jennifer Breitenbach. Property Location: Forty Fort. Lender: MERS. Amount: $450,000. Jennifer Breitenbach. Property Location: Forty Fort. Lender: Federal Housing Commissioner. Amount: $450,000. Matthew V Benzinger. Property Location: Forty Fort. Lender: MERS. Amount: $298,500. Holly E Keefe. Property Location: Kingston Twp. Lender: MERS. Amount: $318,435.

John Ormando. Property Location: Kingston Twp. Lender: Quicken Loans Inc. Amount: $389,300. Raymond D Guy III. Property Location: Bear Creek Twp. Lender: MERS Amount: $250,000. Sean M Clark. Property Location: Kingston. Lender: Jersey Shore State Bank. Amount: $420,000. Arielle Domashinski. Property Location: Huntington Twp. Lender: MERS. Amount: $252,200. Robert Bejeski. Property Location: Duryea. Lender: Fidelity Deposit & Discount Bank. Amount: $282,000. James A Wood. Property Location: Harveys Lake. Lender: MERS. Amount: $444,200. Kelly Malarkey. Property Location: Dallas Twp. Lender: Jersey Shore State Bank. Amount: $290,165. Donald Behm. Property Location: Kingston Twp. Lender: MERS. Amount: $260,000. RFJB Development Group LLC. Property Location: Pittston. Lender: Dime Bank. Amount: $275,000. Andrew Judge. Property Location: Dallas Twp. Lender: MERS. Amount: $320,000. Khushbu D Desai. Property Location: Laflin. Lender: Luzerne Bank. Amount: $320,000. Jeffrey A Sewesky. Property Location: Jackson Twp. Lender: Fidelity Deposit & Discount Bank. Amount: $331,000. Danielle L Bruno. Property Location: Harveys Lake. Lender: Landmark Community Bank. Amount: $257,600. Evergreen MHC LLC. Property Location: Lake Twp. Lender: Wayne Bank. Amoount: $760,000. Robert Ference. Property Location: Jackson Twp. Lender: MERS. Amount: $478,000. Davison Monk Holdings LLC. Property Location: Hanover Twp. Lender: First Keystone Community Bank. Amount: $350,000.

BUY 3 OR MORE & GET AN ADDITIONAL

25% OFF RETAIL!!!

1620 Highway 315 Wilkes-Barre,PA 18702 570-654-5707 • www.jackwise.com Monday - Friday 10am to 4pm • Saturdays by appointment SHOP AT HOME - CUSTOM MADE

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18:18 | FARRELLSHE

DECEMBER 2019

DM & DM Real Estate LLC. Property Location: Wilkes-Barre. Lender: First Keystone Community Bank. Amount: $350,000. Sarah Block. Property Location Bear Creek. Lender: MERS. Amount: $400,000. Larissa Aguilar. Property Location: Dallas Twp. Lender: MERS. Amount: $433,600. TFP Limited III LP. Property Location: Wilkes-Barre Twp. Lender: FNCB Bank. Amount: $4,400,000. Nancy Ziomek. Property Location: Dennison Twp. Lender: MERS. Amount: $313,300. 380 Scott Street RE LLC. Property Location: WilkesBarre. Lender: Covenant Bank. Amount: $470,000. Pennsylvania Child Care LLC. Property Location: Pittston Twp. Lender: S&T Bank. Amount: $25,000,000. TFP Limited II LP. Property Location: Wilkes-Barre Twp. Lender: FNCB Bank, Amount: $500,000. 90 Union Street LLC. Property Location: WilkesBarre. Lender: Landmark Community Bank. Amount: $1,084,000. 64 Union Street LLC. Property Location: Wilkes-Barre. Lender: Landmark Community Bank. Amount: $1,084,000. LAER Holdings Group LLC. Property Location: Wilkes-Barre. Lender: PS Bank. Amount: $350,000. LRV Holdings LLC. Property Location: West Pittston. Lender: PS Bank. Amount: $350,000. David L Elston. Property Location: Lehman Twp. Lender: MERS. Amount: $351,300. Gary Jordan. Property Location: Fairview Twp. Lender: MERS. Amount: $273,762. Denzal Construction Co LLC. Property Location: Duryea. Lender: Honesdale National Bank. Amount: $270,000. Adam Boyce. Property Location: Kingston Twp. Lender: Citizens Bank. Amount: $275,500.

John A Costello. Property Location: Dallas Twp. Lender: Fidelity Deposit & Discount Bank. Amount: $464,000. Thomas Stephen Franko II. Property Location: Lehman Twp. Lender: Fidelity Deposit & Discount Bank. Amount: $328,500. Scott F Linde. Property Location: Kingston. Lender: Honesdale National Bank. Amount: $250,000. Hawk’s Lair LLC. Property Location: Foster Twp. Lender: Luzerne Bank. Amount: $440,000. Edward J Wilson. Property Location: Jackson Twp. Lender: Jersey Shore State Bank. Amount: $447,500. Robert J Lenahan Jr. Property Location: Dallas Twp. Lender: MERS. Amount: $306,000. Daniel H Kallal. Property Location: Black Creek Twp. Lender: MERS. Amount: $339,000. Michael P Strenchock. Property Location: Hazle Twp. Lender: MERS. Amount: $265,500. DHD V LLC. Property Location: Hazleton. Lender: Branch Banking and Trust Co. Amount: $600,000. CAPA Holdings LLC. Property Location: Pittston. Lender: Fidelity Deposit & Discount Bank. Amount: $572,000. Boreal Properties LLC.property Location: Kingston. Lender: Lima One Capital LLC. Amount: $304,960. Jerome E Soroka. Property Location: Jackson Twp. Lender: Jersey Shore State Bank. Amount: $423,000. Nicholas M Daddio. Property Location: Lehman Twp. Lender: Luzerne Bank. Amount: $267,000. Wei Du. Property Location: Dallas Twp. Lender: Citizens Savings Bank. Amount: $310,000. Joshua E Mason. Property Location: Dallas Twp. Ple ase se e Record, Page 39

1½ + acres of corner commercial property available on Rt. 315 in Pittston! Owner Financing Available call 570-650-6265 for info


FOR THE RECORD F R O M P A G E 38 Lender: MERS. Amount: $309,065. David A Ladonis. Property Location: Hollenback Twp. Lender: First Keystone Community Bank. Amount: $285,000. David W Sincavage. Property Location: Bear Creek Twp. Lender: MERS. Amount: $315,000. Yvonne S Krashkevich. Property Location: Bear Creek Twp. Lender: Service 1st Federal Credit Union. Amount: $294,400. Joseph J Dominick. Property Location: Wyoming. Lender: MERS. Amount: $252,000. Doyle Commercial Real Estate LLC. Property Location: Duryea. Lender: Luzerne Bank. Amount: $300,000. Sutton Holdings Limited Liability Co. Property Location: Ashley. Lender: NBT Bank. Amount: $300,000. Justin Michael Metz. Property Lcoation: Black Creek Twp. Lender: Navy Federal Credit Union. Amount: $296,235. Charles A Thennes. Property Location: Hanover Twp. Lender: Citizens Bank of Pennsylvania. Amount: $348,000. Joseph L Riviello. Prperty Location: Duryea. Lender: PS Bank. Amount: $350,000. Sander R Gottlieb. Property Location: Kingston Twp. Lender: MERS. Amount: $448,000. William M Beekman III. Property Location: Duryea. Lender: Citizens Savings Bank. Amount: $397,385. ARA Management LLC. Property Location: Foster Twp. Lender: Luzerne Bank. Amount: $409,500. Falls Deli & Gas LLC. Property Location: Hanover Twp. Lender: Landmark Community Bank. Amount: $263,000. Tri-Mountain Realty I LLC. Property Location: Hazle Twp. Lender: PNC Bank. Amount: $6,300,000. J Daniel Hanley. Property Location: Sugarloaf Twp. Lender: MERS. Amount: $303,500. Joseph Delia. Property Location: Nuangola. Lender: MERS. Amount: $375,000. James A Brogna. Property Location: Fairview Twp. Lender: Citizens Savings Bank. Amount: $314,000. Rivka Kleinman. Property Location: Kingston. Lender: MERS. Amount: $265,109.

Amount: $302,800. oM Shrim Inc. Property Location: Pocono Twp. Lender: First Keystone Community Bank. Amount: $650,000. nP 830 LLC. Property Location: Stroudsburg. Lender: Walter Pula. Amount: $700,000. James and Susan Benn. Property Location: Pocono Twp. Lender: First National Bank of Pennsylvania. Amount: $341,964. Kollar Properties LLC. Property Location: Coolbaugh Twp. Lender: Wayne Bank. Amount: $300,000. Henry and Suzan Guberman. Property Location: Smithfield Twp. Lender: ESSA Bank & Trust. Amount: $350,000. Leonid Ivanov, Alexis Santiago-Cabanas. Property Location: Stroudsburg. Lender: Pentagon Federal Credit Union. Amount: $379,050. Pocono Summit Realty LLC. Property Location: Mt. Pocono. Lender: Branch Banking and Trust Co. Amount: $6,000,000. Gregory Jones and Patricia Medina-Jones. Property Location: Middle Smithfield Twp. Lender: Cardinal Financial Co. LP. Amount: $328,928. Gosia Sobieszczuk. Property Location: Hamilton Twp. Lender: Summit Mortgage Corp. Amount: $303,574. Exeter Blakeslee Lot 110 Land LLC, Exeter operating Partnership IV LP, Exeter Industrial REIT IV LLC. Property Location: Tobyhanna Twp. Lender: Bank of America NA. Amount: $161,400,000. James and Lisa Flanagan. Property Location: Middle Smithfield Twp. Lender: Quicken Loans Inc. Amount: $331,000. Shawnee Power LLC. Property Location: Middle Smithfield Twp. Lender: MUFG Union Bank NA. Amount: $1,400,000. HFICo LLC. Property location: Pocono Twp. Lender: Wayne Bank. Amount: $650,000. Givi and Irma Lauren. Property Location: Tobyhanna Twp. Lender: Pentagon Federal Credit Union. Amount: $300,000. Henry and Susan Walker. Property Location: Barrett Twp. Lender: ESSA Bank & Trust. Amount: $350,000. Donna Porcino. Property Location: Price Twp. Lender: Luzerne Bank. Amount: $480,000. MonRoE CounTY Magnolia Properties LP, Truc Do (gen partner). ABC Pocono Properties LLC. Property Location: Property Location: Stroudsburg. Lender: PNC Bank NA. Coolbaugh Twp. Lender: Sharestates Investments DACL Amount: $300,000. LLC. Amount: $405,000. Liberty one Realty LLC. Property Location: TobyWilliam Kiraly. Property Location: Hamilton Twp. hanna Twp. Lender: PNC Bank NA. Amount: $310,100. Lender: Quicken Loans Inc. Amount: $360,000. Mario and Mary Scavello. Property Location: CoolJacques Jean. Property Location: Price Twp. Lender: baugh Twp. Lender: Peoples Security Bank and Trust Co. Acre Mortgage & Financial Inc. Amount: $318,889. Amount: $400,000. Abraham Goldstein. Property Location: Middle SmithTiffany Guirand. Property Location: Stroud Twp. field Twp. Lender: Quicken Loans Inc. Amount: $365,500. Lender: Apex Home Loans Inc. Amount: $320,336. Russell Dunbar III and Jeannine Leager. Property Michael Miller, 296 Washington Street LLC. Property Location: Middle Smithfield Twp. Lender: ESSA Bank & Location: East Stroudsburg. Lender: ESSA Bank & Trust. Trust. Amount: $310,650. Amount: $645,000. David Camp and Gwen Borowsky. Property Loca260 Great Bear LLC. Property Location: Middle tion: Tobyhanna Twp. Lender: WSFS Mortgage. Amount: Smithfield Twp. Lender: Loan Funder LLC Series 9962. $459,952. Amount: $273,000. Bernice Claxton-Stapleton and Frankie Stapleton. Darrell Carter, Michelle Foster-Carter. Property LoProperty Location: Middle Smithfield Twp. Lender: Acre cation: Middle Smithfield Twp. Lender: Mortgage America Mortgage & Financial Inc. Amount: $302,911. Inc. Amount: $332,634. Jaime and Jessica Hidalgo. Property Location: Beltzville Enterprises LLC. Property Location: Barrett Coolbaugh Twp. Lender: Evesham Mortgage LLC. Amount: Twp. Lender: New Tripoli Bank. Amount: $680,000. $336,000. Sterowski’s Car Wash LLC. Property Location: Hannig Development LLC. Property Location: Tobyhanna Twp. Lender: First Keystone Community Bank. Tobyhanna Twp. Lender: First Keystone Community Bank. Amount: $480,000. Amount: $281,250. Pennsylvania Properties LLC. Property Location: Peggy and Rodney Merwine. Property Location: Pocono Twp. Lender: Finance of America Commercial LLC. Hamilton Twp. Lender: PNC Bank NA. Amount: $313,500. Amount: $301,000. Christine and Justin Bove. Property Location: James Schwartz III. Property Location: Pocono Twp. Tobyhanna Twp. Lender: Guaranteed Rate Affinity LLC. Lender: Lakeview Loan Servicing LLC. Amount: $461,646.

CMBK Resort Holdings LLC. Property Location: Pocono Twp. Lender: Wells Fargo Bank NA. Amount: $70,000,000.

PIKE CounTY

Tracey E Vitchers. Property Location: Milford. Lender: MERS. Amount: $255,000. John P and Mary T Shea. Property Location: Palmyra Twp. Lender: Wayne Bank. Amount: $372,000. Anthony B and Laura Scott. Property Location: Shohola Twp. Lender: MERS. Amount: $250,000. Vincent F and Susan Lepore. Property Location: Dingman Twp. Lender: MERS. Amount: $329,696. Jay R and Helen T Benson. Property Location: Westfall Twp. Lender: Wells Fargo Bank. Amount: $250,000. Charles Scott Mainor. Property Location: Delaware Twp. Lender: MERS. Amount: $293,584. Christopher and Kelly Holtz. Property Location: Lackawaxen Twp. Lender: Honesdale National Bank. Amount: $260,600. Levi F Travis. Property Location: Blooming Grove Twp. Lender: Wayne Bank. Amount: $268,439. Amy Marciano, Maria Cuartas. Property Location: Greene Twp. Lender: Dominc J Mastri Jr. Amount: $344,160. John A and Jennifer Moeller. Property Location: Dingman Twp. Lender: MERS. Amount: $337,555. Patricia D and Daniel L Welch. Property Location: Palmyra Twp. Lender: MERS. Amount: $269,000. Joseph and Victoria Becker. Property Location: Matamoras. Lender: MERS. Amount: $281,000. Mihaela nistor. Property Location: Shohola Twp. Lender: MERS. Amount: $515,539. John M and nicole R Wagner. Property Location: Milford Twp. Lender: MERS. Amount: $396,500. Teresa olimpaito. Property Location: Palmyra Twp. Lender: Honesdale National Bank. Amount: $415,000. Jerry Heying. Property Location: Dingman Twp. Lender: Newtek Small business Finance LLC. Amount: $330,000. Iourit R Minenko. Property Location: Tannersville. Lender: MERS. Amount: $299,475. Mary Monaghan and Douglas F Barnes, Jeffrey Monaghan. Property Location: Palmyra Twp. Lender: Honesdale National Bank. Amount: $470,000. Jozef and Dale E Kozek. Property Location: Delaware Twp. Lender: PNC Bank. Amount: $380,800. Peter Fabricant (TR), Son McLaren (TR), Peter Fabricant Liv. Tr. Lender: MERS. Amount: $900,000. Warren and Bernarda Melone, John and Laura Zebitsch. Property Location: Lackawaxen Twp. Lender: MERS. Amount: $475,000. James A and Kara L Cleffi. Property Location: Palmyra Twp. Lender: MERS. Amount: $388,000. Lawrence and Teresa o’Leary. Property Location: Milford. Lender MERS. Amount: $328,560. Polise Group LLC. Property Location: Palmyra Twp. Lender: Dime Bank. Amount: $250,000. Michael John and Jacqueline C Shewchuk (TR). Property Location: Palmyra Twp. Lender: United Nations Federal Credit Union. Amount: $270,000. Garrin Craig and Brittany Saccento. Property Location: Dingman Twp. Lender: MERS. Amount: $388,248. Matthew M and Lorene C Hartigan. Property Location: Palmyra Twp. Lender: MERS. Amount: $430,000. Richard J and Daphne M Besten. Property Location: Dingman Twp. Lender: MERS. Amount: $340,000. Scott Stiner (TR), Douglas Toth (TR), Karen Tomaine 2017 Irrev TR. Property Location: Palmyra Twp. Lender: MERS. Amount: $880,000. Steven and Carmella Cameron. Lender: Citibank. Amount: $448,000.

Anthony and Danielle Trochiano. Property Location: Dingman Twp. Lender: Hudson Valley Federal Credit Union. Amount: $359,000. Kaylynne and Krista Vonwerne. Property Location: Lehman Twp. Lender: MERS. Amount: $270,019. Christian and Stephanie Soucier. Property Location: Milford. Lender: MERS. Amount: $254,249. Peter T and Amy J Coelho Kowal. Property Location: Milford. Lender: Citizens Bank. Amount: $280,000. Barlas and Candis Rene Yuce. Property Location: Dingman Twp. Lender: MERS. Amount: $308,000. Heather and Bruce Greenspan. Property Location: Palmyra Twp. Lender: MERS. Amount: $316,000. Janice Roven. Property Location: Lackawaxen Twp. Lender: Dime Bank. Amount: $292,000. Milissa and Richard R Wenzel. Property Location: Dingman Twp. Lender: MERS. Amount: $253,000. Storage Land PA LLC. Property Location: Dingman Twp. Lender: Wayne Bank. Amount: $445,000. Frank and Tina Cirri. Property Location: Blooming Grove Twp. Lender: Wayne Bank. Amount: $260,000. Frank and Dianna Broussard. Property Location: Lackawaxen Twp. Lender: MERS. Amount: $464,620. Christopher W and Jean E Ritchie. Property Location: Palmyra Twp. Lender: Wayne Bank. Amount: $552,000. John A Feola. Property Location: Lackawaxen Twp. Lender: MERS. Amount: $303,000. John A Feola. Property Location: Lackawaxen Twp. Lender: MERS. Amount: $303,000. Peter A and Dina Williams. Property Location: Dingman Twp. Lender: MERS. Amount: $255,416. Christopher Giltz. Property Location: Palmyra Twp. Lender: MERS. Amount: $399,600. Cory Brian and Jennifer Marie Musselman. Property Location: Palmyra Twp. Lender: Wayne Bank. Amount: $479,700. Belinda Doyle, Arthur Zeroulias. Property Location: Milford Boro. Lender: MERS. Amount: $314,000. Matthew and Jean Confusione. Property Location: Milford Boro. Lender: Joseph and Denice R Fretta. Amount: $559,200. Eileen n and Dexter Bardney. Property Location: Westfall Twp. Lender: JP Morgan Chase Bank. Amount: $336,000.

SCHuYLKILL CounTY

David High. Property Location: Eldred Twp. Lender:1st Citizens Community Bank. Amount: $450,000. Shree RK, Realty, LLC. Property Location: Tamaqua. Lender:1st Columbia Bank. Amount: $738,000. Andrew and Rebecca netzhik. Property Location: East Ridgeview Drive. Lender: Mortgage America, Inc. Amount: $365,700.

WYoMInG CounTY

Daniel James and Tiffany Marie Cross. Property Location: Eaton Twp. Lender: MERS. Amount: $303,525. Mark and Kathleen Slywka. Property Location: Lemon Twp. Lender: Fidelity Deposit & Discount Bank. Amount: $370,000. Kurt J and Lisa R Fetterman. Property Location: Northmoreland Twp. Lender: MERS. Amount: $292,500. Scott and Holly Arnold. Property Location: Tunkhannock Twp. Lender: Wells Fargo Bank. Amount: $266,750. Steven Fritz, Erica Lipton, Bart Edward Lipton. Property Location: Eaton Twp. Lender: MERS. Amount: $368,100. Lonewood Farms LLC. Property Location: Monroe Twp. Lender: Robert C Friedman. Amount: $313,898. Robert Hivner. Property Location: Nicholson Twp. Lender: MERS. Amount: $290,168.

NORTHEAS T P ENNS YLVANIA BUS INES S J OURNAL DECEMBER 2019 39 TS_CNG/NPBJ/PAGES [B39] | 12/03/19

18:19 | FARRELLSHE


40 NORTHEAS T P ENNS YLVANIA BUS INES S J OURNAL TS_CNG/ADVERTISING/AD_PAGES [ADB40] | 12/03/19

DECEMBER 2019

18:18 | FARRELLSHE

Profile for CNG Newspaper Group

Northeast Pennsylvania Business Journal, December 2019  

Top 20 Under 40 edition

Northeast Pennsylvania Business Journal, December 2019  

Top 20 Under 40 edition

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