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Business Journal NORTHEAST

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January 2020 VOL. 35 NO. 1

WILKES-BARRE FOCUS

Wilkes-Barre economic update by Dave Gardner

Diversity, investment and a push for urban renewal are the trends as conditions within the river-bound City of Wilkes-Barre flow into 2020. New Mayor George Brown, a Wilkes-Barre native, BROWN is committed to promoting a message that Wilkes-Barre can become an inviting place, inviting to raise kids and grandchildren, as well as a location for the continuation of successful investment. Before his election, Brown worked as a regional HR and organizational management specialist in both the financial and manufacturing sectors, where he promoted team philosophies that were workforce-oriented. Central to Brown’s approach are his plans to continue listening to the desires expressed by the city’s residents. This list now includes deterrence of neighborhood crime, cleanup of the city itself, removal of condemned structures, pothole repair and solutions to the city’s street-bound homeless. “These all are typical urban problems,” said the optimistic Brown. “My job is to make progress with these issues and sell the city and its various neighborhoods.” Brown is acutely aware of the investment that has already been achieved within the downtown. Business organizations that include Berkshire Hathaway GUARD Insurance Companies and Mc-

Carthy Tire Service operate headquarters there, and opportunities for entrepreneurs continue to multiply as the downtown morphs into a hybrid business and residential district. “There actually is a waiting list for housing within the renovated high rises that offer loft and luxury apartments,” said Brown. According to Brown, as mayor he will create advisory panels for five city-locale districts, offer meet the mayor days and push for increasing transparency with local press access. He calls this a public approach to governing and will include transparency of public meetings. Brown has also voiced concerns about the municipal debt situation in Wilkes-Barre, where the city’s four employee pensions are only financed in the 56%-58% range. Keeping these pensions solvent therefore is one of the biggest fiscal challenges facing city hall as he also strives for creation of an urban environment that is safe, clean and well-kept. “We will promote a message that this is the place to invest, and that we are not an Act 47 distressed city,” said Brown. “This is not the WilkesBarre of decades ago that was a declining former coal town.” Downtown investment Teri Ooms, executive director with The Institute for Public Policy & Economic Development, was hesitant to cite census data from Wilkes-Barre because the information is now almost a decade old, but she readily pointed to downtown investment as a

key feature of the advancing Wilkes-Barre economy. Specifics of this now include creation of a private business accelerator, as well as capital development on the campuses of King’s College and Wilkes University. “Hospitality and storefront investment within the city are similar to what’s been happening for a while in Scranton, although Scranton OOMS is a little farther ahead with this transition,” said Ooms. Ooms added that few developers or civic officials forecasted the current appetite for downtown residences in both Scranton and Wilkes-Barre. However, the availability of older commercial building to renovate into housing has played right into satisfying this demand. Wilkes-Barre has been among numerous American cities with downtowns struggling from the cumulative effects of business loss, declining population and a lack of investment, noted Larry Newman, executive director of the Diamond City Partnership. However, Newman is now eyeing new realities for Wilkes-Barre, where the painful out-migration of the coal-scarred city’s historic settlers is replaced by new groups and varied ethnic populations. “Opportunity now exists,” said Newman. “Our Please see Update, Page 19

BANKING & FINANCE: SEE PAGES 4-5

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PeNNSylVaNia

Vol. 35, No. 1 • JaNuary 2020 149 PeNN aVe., ScraNtoN, Pa 18503 www.biz570.com The Northeast Pennsylvania Business Journal is a member of Times-Shamrock Publishing Division

CNG MANAGING EDITOR elizabeth baumeister — ext. 3492 CNG SALES MANAGER alice manley — ext. 9285 CONTRIBUTING REPORTERS Dave Gardner Phil yacuboski FiND uS oNliNe: www.Biz570.com facebook.com/570 • twitter.com/biz570

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NPbJ is protected under the federal copyright act. reproductions of any part by any means or facsimiles without the express written permission of the publisher are not permitted. reprints of NPbJ articles are available. Northeast Pennsylvania Business Journal cannot be responsible for the return of unsolicited materials — manuscripts or photographs — with or without the inclusion of a stamped, self-addressed return envelope. information in this publication is gathered from sources considered to be reliable, but the accuracy and completeness of the information cannot be guaranteed. No information expressed herein constitutes a solicitation for the purchase or sale of any securities. Northeast Pennsylvania Business Journal (iSSN 1078-5698) is published monthly except twice in the month of may by The Scranton Times from offices located at 149 Penn Ave., Scranton, PA. Periodicals postage paid at Scranton, PA. The Journal serves business owners, managers and professionals in a 10-county region. Subscriptions are available for $28 per year, $49 two years or $64 for three years. PoStmaSter: Send address changes to Northeast Pennsylvania Business Journal, 149 Penn Avenue, Scranton, PA 18503.

wilkes-barre insurance brands ramp up the funny economic update by Dave Taylor

when GEico introduced the gecko mascot with a British accent in 1999, they fired off the first jokes of what has become an all-out battle to build insurance brand preference using humor as a main ingredient. As GEico grew, it ran first one, then two, then as many as three different ad campaigns at once and has successfully drilled home their message of “15 minutes can save you 15 percent…” well, you know. many of their campaigns have become advertising lore, with the gecko, the sensitive caveman and a camel celebrating wednesday as a few all-time favorites. GEcio has grown its brand impressively in this time going from just under $5 billion in revenue in 1999 to more than $25 billion by 2017. As GEcio has closed in on its largest competition, State Farm, Allstate, Progressive, Farmers, Liberty mutual and, even Nationwide have all responded with laugh fests of their own. And while GEcio remains the undisputed king of insurance comedy, its competitors have begun closing the gap. Here’s my take on where most of these brands rate on the insurance Yuks Scale of one to five stars: liberty mutual: ok, guys, what’s with the emu? Quirky? Yes. funny? Not very. the bird and his somewhat nerdy handler are provoking quizzical looks, Mark Moran / Citizens’ Voice file photo even from the people in the ads with them. Some A pedestrian passes by the Wilkes-Barre City other spots feature over-the-top characters (a biker Christmas Tree on Public Square in November. with gigantic calf muscles is one) standing in front of the Statue of Liberty that is kinda, sorta funny. FEATURES rating: 2 stars. A ‘one-stop shop’ ....................... 6 allstate: This company still runs occasional Economic forecast ..................... 7 down-to-earth spots with Dennis Haysbert, its deepModern marketing ...................... 8 voiced pitchman since 2003. But beginning in 2010, Women entrepreneurs ................. 9 the brilliantly funny character known as mayhem stole The younger workforce .............. 14 the spotlight. He’s the embodiment of why you should

Winter business....................... 14

EXECUTIVE SUITE

Brand ..................................... 2 Banking & finance ................... 4-5 Economic development .......... 10-11 Education .......................... 15-16

BUSINESS BULLETINS

Business briefs................18, 20-21 Personnel File..................... 22-27 Deeds ............................... 28-29 Mortgages ......................... 29-31

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BRAND

ON THE COVER

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S U B S C R I P T I O N

Business Journal NortHeaSt

buy insurance in the first place, yet his hilarious slapstick has us rooting for him to survive and wreak more havoc. in the race to be GEico-funny, this could be the best sustained effort. rating: 4.5 stars. Progressive: You must admit, Stephanie courtney, the actress who plays Flo (and sometimes other roles in the same spot), is talented and versatile. Since she first portrayed the slightly too enthusiastic insurance rep in 2008, the cast of other characters has grown around her into a family of oddballs in aprons. The spots are usually funny but often get away from their core promise of comparing premiums. rating: 3 stars. Farmers insurance: oscar winning J.K. Simmons plays Professor Nathaniel Burke in a series of quirky insurance claims based on real events. Burke never cracks a smile as he matter-of-factly explains strange claims. The humor is subtle but the examples are a bit like the mayhem spots – they make a point about the need for coverage. Not the funniest, but at least on message. rating: 3 stars. Nationwide: Even the staid insurance brand with the long running slogan “Nationwide is on your side” has ventured into humor with a series of spots featuring Peyton manning, its long time spokesman, opposite country music’s brad Paisley. they raise a few laughs, but rely mostly on their star power for impact. manning is easily the most marketable NFL player in the last 20 years. Paisley has broad appeal as well. The spots are mildly funny, but they work. rating: 2 stars (no pun intended). GEico started the funny, but the rest of the big brands have turned insurance marketing into a comedy festival. And some are laughing their way to the top.

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“Matt knows the industry, There’s a reason Meshoppen Stone is the largest stone wholesaler in its market: Its president, Bill Ruark, has a reputation for making quick, efficient business decisions. He expects the same from his bank. Matt Dougherty took the time to understand Bill’s and Meshoppen Stone’s needs, providing solutions at the speed Bill’s business requires. That’s how we treat our customers at Community Bank. We get

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BANKING & FINANCE

Saving and investing: Three advantages of automated plans

If you want to start saving but aren’t sure where to begin, then an automated plan might be what you need. Here’s why.

1

It makes saving easier. Saving small sums is easier than trying to put large chunks of money aside. You can start with a manageable amount like $50 a month, and then increase it as your situation allows. You can also reduce the amount if you need to.

2

It enforces good habits. By arranging for a pre-determined portion of your income to be deposited into a savings account, you’re creating a habit. And if you automate these payments, you won’t be tempted to spend the money you intend to save. In addition, many such accounts impose penalties for withdrawals or prevent them altogether. Even if you’re tempted to dip into your

savings, you won’t be able to unless you jump through a few hoops first.

3

You can benefit from compound interest. Aside from your regular savings account, you should also put a portion of your money into an investment portfolio. This allows you to benefit from receiving compound interest. Your investment’s interests are periodically added to the invested capital, meaning that they’ll start accumulating interest as well. For instance, at an average yield of 3%, saving $150 a month for five years will net you $700 in compound interest.

To learn more about automated savings plans, talk to a representative at your bank or a financial planner.

Hiring a tax professional saves money

Every April, taxpayers rush to get their taxes in before the deadline. While it’s possible to save money by doing your taxes yourself, here are two important reasons why you shouldn’t. You’ll avoid mistakes and omissions When people file their own taxes, even with the help of software, they often make mistakes. These errors typically involve failing to claim certain types of tax credits or claiming credits that don’t apply to the person filing. The first kind of mistake will cost you money, but the second may be considered a form of tax evasion. While a mistake doesn’t mean you’ll be convicted of tax fraud, you could be audited, which is a lengthy and inconvenient process. You may also have to pay a fine. Furthermore, people who are self-employed, especially when working at a home-based business, often aren’t aware of the complicated rules governing their tax situation. Merely being in business for yourself is oftentimes enough to flag the interest of the Internal Revenue Service. You’ll get all the credits you’re owed There’s a staggering number of tax credits and finding out which ones you’re eligible for

can be a herculean task. Keeping up to date with those credits every year is simply not possible for most people. A good tax accountant will be aware of all the credits you’re entitled to, ensuring that you don’t pay a cent more than you absolutely have to. This is especially important if your financial situation is complicated or you’re self-employed. The bottom line is that filing your taxes with the help of a professional means you’ll benefit from every credit you’re entitled to while avoiding costly mistakes.

While it’s possible to save money by doing your taxes yourself, there are some reasons not to.

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Automated plans can help people save money.

How investors can gauge their risk tolerance Some rewards may not be possible without risk. Even novice investors know that the potential rewards of investing one’s money cannot be reaped without first accepting the risk that comes with investing. Successful investors know that recognizing and acknowledging their risk tolerance is an important part of their success. The U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission notes that all investments involve some degree of risk. While all investors might love to embody the stereotype of the financial maverick who pushes all of his or her chips into the middle of the proverbial table, many investors would admit to having a relatively low risk tolerance. Learning to gauge your risk tolerance can be an important step to becoming a successful investor. The following are some strategies prospective investors can employ to determine their risk tolerance. ■ Recognize the differences between investors. Investors come from all walks of life, and no two investors are the same. The SEC defines aggressive investors as those who are willing to risk losing money in the hopes that their investments will garner extraordinary returns. On the flip side of that coin, conservative investors favor investments that maintain their original investments. Many investors fall somewhere in the middle between aggressive and conservative, and there are plenty of investments that suit such men and women. To determine where on the spectrum you fall, ask yourself how comfortable you might

be if you lost money on an investment. If the idea of losing money would make you lose sleep at night, then you might be best served investing conservatively. If a loss would affect you but not make you shy away from investing in the future, then your risk tolerance is likely somewhere in the middle. If a loss would only make you want to invest more the next time, then you might be an aggressive investor. ■ Utilize the tools at your disposal. Many financial firms, including Vanguard, offer free questionnaires on their websites to help people determine their risk tolerance. These tools can be invaluable, particularly for novices who have never before considered their comfort levels in terms of risk. ■ Recognize that investing approaches change. Just because you’re an aggressive investor today does not mean you have to stay that way. In fact, many financial advisors recommend becoming more conservative with age. Doing so protects your assets as you get closer to retirement age. Investors also can change their approaches with individual investments. For example, investors who are traditionally conservative may believe in a specific fund or investment opportunity so much that they’re suddenly willing to take on more risk than they otherwise would be. That’s perfectly alright, but such investors should be comfortable knowing that aggressive investing can sometimes lead to big losses. Gauging risk tolerance is an important part of becoming a successful investor.


BANKING & FINANCE

Retirement readiness for millennials by Peter D. Shelp

Millennials have fallen behind prior generations when it comes to a range of financial measures, including retirement readiness. However, there are steps millenniShelp als can take to improve their retirement planning efforts. With decades of working years ahead of them, millennials still have plenty of time to lay the financial groundwork for a comfortable retirement. With decades of working years ahead of them, millennials still have plenty of time to lay the financial groundwork for a comfortable retirement. Nonetheless, the findings of a recent study, “Will Millennials Be Ready for Retirement?” conducted by Alicia H. Munnell and Wenliang Hou via the Center for Retirement Research at Boston College, may serve as something of a wake-up call. Falling Behind Using government data, researchers from the Center for Retirement Research at Boston College looked at the segment of millennials who were age 25 to 35 in 2016 (born 1981-1991) and compared their situations to Gen Xers (born 1969-1979) and late baby boomers (born 1954-1964) when they were the same age. The researchers found the millennials lagging on several measures: ■ Median earnings ■ Employer-sponsored retirement plan participation ■ Access to employer-provided health insurance coverage ■ Homeownership And while the millennial group had surpassed earlier generations in terms of educational attainment − with larger percentages of both men and women having a college degree − many (46%) of them were carrying student loan debt. The median balances outstanding on those student loans amounted to more than one-third (34%) of the millennials’ median earnings. By contrast, the Gen Xers had a student loan debt-to-income ratio of 25% and the late baby boomers just 14%. A look at overall net wealth compared to

income (median) also revealed a shortfall for the millennials, with that ratio standing at 40%. It was 53% for the Gen Xers and 47% for the late baby boomers at the same age. The study’s conclusion: Due to labor market challenges and the burden of high student debt, the millennial group has fallen behind its earlier-generation counterparts in preparing for retirement. But that doesn’t mean that 20- and 30-somethings should give up on retirement planning. Moving Forward The strategies that follow may be helpful to millennials in their planning efforts. ■ Stick to a budget. Mobile apps and other tools make it easy to track daily spending and take control of cash flow. ■ Live an affordable lifestyle. It can be tempting to buy an expensive vehicle or home as soon as earnings increase, but bigticket purchases like these should be carefully considered. Taking on large amounts of debt prematurely can cause unnecessary financial stress. ■ Put saving on autopilot. Instead of waiting to see how much money is left at the end of the month for saving − and risk coming up short − it can be simpler and more effective to have a set amount of pay automatically transferred to a savings account and/or retirement savings plan, such as a 401(k). ■ Say “yes” to the match. 401(k) and similar workplace retirement plans that provide employer-matching contributions offer eligible employees an opportunity to build additional savings simply by contributing enough to the plan to qualify for the maximum match. ■ Don’t shy away from investing. Understanding the risks and potential rewards of different types of investments − as well as one’s individual goals, risk tolerance, and time horizon − is critical to developing an appropriate investing strategy. Working with a knowledgeable financial advisor can make the process less intimidating. Peter D. Shelp, AWMA, ChFC, CFP, CRPC, is first vice president/wealth management, branch manager at Kingston Retirement Group of Janney Montgomery Scott LLC, 270 Pierce St., Kingston. Reach him at 570-283-8140 or learn more at kingstonretirementgroup.com.

Wayne Bank celebrates milestones

submitted photo

Wayne Bank recently held a luncheon and awards presentation to recognize employees celebrating years of service milestones with the bank. Twenty-seven employees were honored at the luncheon, which was held at The Honesdale Golf Club on Oct. 23. From left: Robert J. Mancuso; John Koczwara; William S. Lance, executive vice president, chief financial officer; James F. Burke; Ann Crane; Kristine Malti; Dawnette Hotaling, senior vice president, NY Retail Banking Market manager; Bonnie Lockett; John F. Carmody, executive vice president, chief credit officer; Kimlyn M. Michalek; Gerald J. Arnese; David F. Yamialkowski; Melinda S. Gorton; Ronald P. DePasquale; Amanda L. Hall; Lewis J. Critelli; Christine Routledge; Teresa Hynes; Andrea Bartow; Brenda Gesell; Briana J. Scholl; Alison G. Menotti; Joseph A. Castrogiovanni, senior vice president, PA Retail Banking Market manager; Kerry Snyder; and Debra Renwick.

The Dime Bank contributes to library

submitted photo

The Dime Bank recently contributed $24,000 to the Wayne County Public Library (WCPL) toward approved innovative educational programs. Mary Fritz, left, WCPL outreach coordinator and WCPL board member, and Stacy Gager, The Dime Bank assistant vice president and deposit operations supervisor.

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FEATURE

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Opening a business just became much easier in Pennsylvania thanks to a new online tool that allows entrepreneurs to file paperwork and complete other tasks online from the comfort of a desk chair. “The focus is all businesses services,” said Sonya Smith, associate state director, Pennsylvania Small Business Development Center. “It will be used for new businesses and established businesses. The concept is that an entrepreneur can go there to get all of the resources they need to be successful.” Licenses, permits, forms and contact information are just some of the resources that will be available at business.pa.gov. “The registration checklist allows entrepreneurs and small business owners to feel confident in the preliminary steps of registering their business, which can be an overwhelming process,” said Governor Tom Wolf. “The PA Business One-Stop Shop was created with exactly that intention – to take out the guess work and ensure that resources are collectively available and can be accessed with ease.” Before, business owners had to reach out to a number of different agencies to seek out the different forms. The process began in October of 2018 with the passage of legislation simplifying business forms. “It makes things easier,” said Smith. “Especially when that small business owner needs contact information for the state and for local municipalities to make sure they are in compliance.” The website helps entrepreneurs flush out an

actionable business plan, register the business, explore small business diversity programs and view employer responsibilities when operating a business. “For any of us getting work done on our car, per se, it’s easier to go to one place to get tires, brakes, an oil change,” she said. “It’s the same concept.” “It’s encouraging that the Governor is taking steps to simplify processes for small businesses – this has been needed for a long time,” said Lisa Hall-Zielinski, director, The University of Scranton Small Business Development Center. “Aspiring entrepreneurs still need guidance in determining the feasibility of an idea, figuring out how much it will cost, learning business skills and so on. The PA SBDC network is still the place to go for that type of assistance and beyond.” According to the state, small businesses in Pennsylvania employ half of the state’s private workforce and about 99.6% of all businesses in Pennsylvania are small businesses. “Governor Wolf tasked agencies with simplifying state government by cutting red tape to bolster business development and growth,” said Department of Community and Economic Development Secretary Dennis Davin. “By streamlining the Business OneStop Shop process, we are giving entrepreneurs the peace of mind they need to take their business from concept to reality in a personalized, efficient way.” The changes will also make user data more secure and safe, according to the state. There’s also a single phone number for access to different information.

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The new website, business.pa.gov, offers a one-stop shop for Pennslyvania business owners.

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FEATURE

2020 economic forecast

provided one keeps an eye on the variables swirling about, according to Rodney Ridley, Ph.D., director of the Allan P. Kirby Center for Free Enterprise and Entrepreneurship at Wilkes University. He pointed out that, both nationally and regionally, RIDLEY low interest rates and high employment will remain the norm along with a healthy financial sector. “The fundamentals look good, but this scenario could be derailed by something unknown happening,” said Dr. Ridley. He called the new municipal leadership coming to power in both Wilkes-Barre and Scranton fascinating, and forecasts that in particular the females elected to power positions are bound to be very different than their predecessors. This new leadership, despite the problems they must confront including financial debt woes, are inheriting a local economy with healthy underpinnings that include ample development projects, industrial park expansions and a thriving educational infrastructure. In particular, Dr. Ridley noted that new Wilkes University president Greg Cant, Ph.D., has international experience and is the correct person to take over just as the educational environment is becoming disrupted by declining population and rising costs. These variables are creating an environment where the traditional model of education must change, and Dr. Ridley therefore applauds the way Wilkes hired a business leader with educational ties. “This selection is the opposite of how college presidents are traditionally selected, where educational experience is ranked ahead of business expertise,” said Dr. Ridley. Dr. Ridley also forecasted that NEPA’s huge educational community must meet evolving student demands to make educational programs more marketable with the job skills produced. Increasingly, larger numbers of employers are now looking for certification in specific skills over broad degrees, and the required programs can be taught by four-year schools. “Another thing I do worry about that could affect every one of us is the $1 trillion deficit Washington is running up now every year,” said Dr. Ridley. “This debt has grown out of control since the big tax cut, and eventually the bill for all this government borrowing will come due and perhaps be catastrophic Getty Freedom Images for the economy.”

“It’s hard to believe, but the country is still importing Russian natural gas despite the plentiful supply As winter descends upon within Pennsylvania’s Marcellus shale,” said Barr. NEPA and the region plows “What we need is the pipeline infrastructure to really forward into 2020, a variety of move our gas here to market.” key issues are sure to affect Specifics for other business sectors within Barr’s the regional business comeconomic forecast include an ongoing workforce munity, according to a lineup shortage of skills fueled by changing demographof watchful participants. ics, declining numbers of youth and inadequate job Gene Barr, president and applicant training. Other indicators identified by Barr BARR CEO of the Pennsylvania for 2020 include an excellent employment rate but Chamber of Business and persistent problems with the participation rate in the Industry, remarked that if a person listens to the workforce fueled by problems such as a lack of mass national reports, he or she would believe the next transit and quality child care. recession is right around the corner. These predictions “People that were involved in the criminal justice of gloom, according to Barr, are somewhat fueled by system and are now looking for a second chance can President Trump’s brashness, his unpredictability and have a real problem with being hired,” said Barr. “I the instability of Washington politics. suspect our economic boom would be better if we However, Barr is not buying into any dark addressed these issues.” economic forecasts, and instead commented that Select Pennsylvania commercial sectors will also a collection of new conditions for business are continue to prosper during 2020. These include healthdeveloping around the globe. Fortunately, history has care fueled by the eternally increasing numbers of proven that Pennsylvania in general, and northeast seniors, and the manufacturing sector although these Pennsylvania in particular, does not experience the companies may suffer because of the trade tariffs highs and lows inherent in great economic shifts, inflicted by Washington. creating a sort of protection within the region for the Barr added that explosive levels of federal debt, business community. which will reach almost $1 trillion for 2019 alone, must be addressed. He explained the energy sector is somewhat of a “Not one legislator I talk to seems to want to admicro chasm for the developing economic situation as it creates conflicting signals. Energy prices are cur- dress this complex debt problem,” said Barr. “All they rently moderately relative to the cost of living, creating keep doing is kicking the debt can down the road.” Healthy fundamentals depressed levels of supplier investment but favorable Calendar year 2020 looks favorable for business, product buying conditions. by Dave Gardner

Fresh leadership Overall optimism, plus a wish list that includes a regional small business initiative, mark the New Year’s list from Jill Murray, Ph.D., president-elect of Lackawanna College. She has concluded that a regional change is “afoot” with the election of fresh and extremely capable MURRAY females to several regional leadership positions within Scranton, and is pleased these new leaders understand the need for sustainability with the decisions they make. On the business front, Dr. Murray has noted that the millennials are becoming the largest group of consumers in economy, creating a vast number of potential customers that need to be served by business. This huge group of buyers, as a whole, are concerned about the social impact of who they do business with, and in contrast to their consumer predecessors often exhibit no brand loyalty. “The merchants who understand these kids during 2020, and who as adults may now be inheriting large sums of money from their parents, will prosper,” said Dr. Murray. “The young consumers expect their buying experiences to be positive or they change where they buy.” According to Dr. Murray, any analysis of the millennials as buyers must recognize that they have a different view of capitalism from their parents and do not support greedy capitalists. Their personal philosophies are not compatible with supply side economic models where every possible nickel flows up to the affluent. “I would call the millennials wandering capitalists,” said Dr. Murray. “Catering to their corporate social consciousness is vital for a seller.” NEPA historically produces large numbers of youth with a zero percentage of education after high school, and according to Dr. Murray this group will continue to produce challenges during 2020. The public schools, dealing with unending numbers of crisis students, do not have the counseling resources to reach many of these kids, with the scenario stoked by poverty, youth who have immigrated and social difficulties. “The societal perception also continues that our fine tech and trade schools do not provide quality post k-12 educations, and there’s no quick fix for this, because family influences are always vital,” said Dr. Murray.

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FEATURE

Antique market, modern marketing

For Norman Fayne, owner of the Olde Engine Works Antique Marketplace, business and story go hand in hand. Which is why he decided to launch a blog. “People love a great story. ... especially when the story is full of interesting history and fascinating details,” Fayne said. The Stroudsburg businessman has collected and sold antiques for decades. He operates his business inside a 116-year-old building, and he loves finely made antique furniture. “The digital blog format is new for us, but we’ve been sharing stories about interesting antiques for years,” he said. “We thought, ‘why not try telling these stories online?’” With this seed of an idea planted, that’s exactly what the Olde Engine Works (OEW) team did. Starting in December, they officially launched a new website showcasing the rarest and most fascinating antiques that come

through the marketplace. “The response so far has been wonderful,” Fayne said. “Our regular customers love reading these blogs over morning coffee, but in particular, it’s the people who live too far to visit regularly who have been enjoying this glimpse into life at the OEW.” What goes into a blog? “We work with all of our vendors to compile a detailed history about the item we’re sharing, and we make sure to include any interesting facts we can find,” said Fayne. “Taking high-resolution photographs is also a huge help and really enables us to convey the story of these rare items even better.” So far, the blog has featured items such as an 1860s specimen cabinet with a secret hinge used to hide a brass locking mechanism. It was used by wealthy people to house collections of rare and exotic bugs. “Up next, we’re featuring an ultra-rare item from the Lionel Train company,” Fayne

said. “It’s a hand-crafted prototype binnacle from World War II. This was a time when the company was forced to cease train production to help with the war effort. This one-ofone prototype was handmade by the famous Lionel Train inventor Frank Pettit and was shared with us by his son.” Fayne didn’t reveal what else was in the pipeline, but he smiled and assured the best is yet to come. “We’ve got some exceptional items coming up,” he said. “Everyone in this building is completely passionate about antiques and treasures. ... Between all of us, we’re able to share wonderful stories. Most of the items coming up have never been published on the internet before. We really have fun creating these (blog posts).” Thanks to the blog, it’s easier than ever to Submitted photos learn the stories behind the fascinating items A specimen cabinet was used by wealthy coming through the Olde Engine Works. To people in the 1860s to house collections of learn more, visit OldeEngineWorks.com. rare and exotic bugs.

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A hand-crafted prototype binnacle from World War II.


CELEBRATING WOMEN ENTREPRENEURS

Jennifer Saunders “Do your homework, believe in yourself, surround yourself For most of her life, Jennifer with positive people and go for it,” she says. Saunders envisioned opening Northern Light has been her own coffee shop. After located in the historic Scranton working for corporate America Life building since 2002. Its misfor 17 years, she decided it was sion is to make its customers feel time to become boss. She purlike they are at home. Customers chased Northern Light Espresso are welcomed by the smell of Bar and Cafe, 536 Spruce St., freshly brewed coffee and baked Scranton, in November, 2018. goods from the moment they walk When Saunders purchased through the door. The shop’s cofNorthern Light, which serves fee offerings are locally roasted by coffee, tea and baked goods, Damiani Coffee Roasters, which she took the first month or so to does business with a variety of compose a list of changes she importers from around the world. wanted to make to improve its Northern Light recently introoverall facade. Some changes Submitted photos duced its new house coffee, called included updating the shop’s Jennifer Saunders, owner, “Aurora.” As the coffee shop menu, expanding its social meNorthern Light Espresso Bar continues to expand, Saunders dia presence and modernizing and Cafe in Scranton. has several plans in mind for her the cafe’s appearance. business’ future. She is currently Saunders grew up in the Clarks Summit area planning to get more involved with her community, and lives in Jessup. She has three children and a and her long-term goals include developing a collie. She loves the beach, reading, people and mobile app and opening a second location. coffee. Her favorite aspects of being a female The cafe also hosts art events with live music entrepreneur are learning about herself and her throughout the year including First Friday events. daily customers. For more information on the Northern Light She admits she faces obstacles like all busiEspresso Bar and Cafe, visit: northernlightesnesses do, and is determined to overcome any presso.com. challenges that cross her path. Daniela Salcedo is a University of Scranton Saunders shares some advice for those who Women’s Entrepreneurship Center intern working for Donna Simpson, Consultant Manager. want to start their own business someday: by Daniela Salcedo

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ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT / LOCAL

Visions of the future do come true by Leslie Collins

A recent review of the Scranton Tomorrow archives revealed something noteworthy and inspiring: the vision of its founding members – many of whom are still active board members today – has been realized, or is well underway. Crafted in the early 1990s, the vision statement painted a picture of a new downtown honoring the region’s historic past while progressing into the future. It included: ■ A historic, revitalized central business district offering a wide array of shopping, professional offices, financial services and human/ social services ■ A vibrant residential neighborhood accessible to a variety of arts and cultural venues, fine dining and entertainment ■ Downtown institutions of higher education, health care and worship to foster life-long learning, and support the physical and spiritual health of the community ■ Nearby recreational and heritage venues to support a high-quality live, work and play environment that truly makes Downtown Scranton “electric” How exciting to consider that what was once

a lofty vision is now reality. Inspired by the start of a new year – one whose digits point to a period of clarity – here are a few wishes for the future of the City of Scranton: Wish 1: A new Pocket Park will enhance the Downtown landscape. In partnership with the City of Scranton and Lackawanna County, Scranton Tomorrow is developing a pocket park to enhance the Downtown Business District with much-needed greenspace on the corner of Wyoming Avenue and Linden Street. The project is made possible with funding from a $400,000 Keystone Communities grant, and support from the City of Scranton, the Scranton family estate, Lackawanna County, and the office of Senator John Blake and the Pennsylvania Department of Community & Economic Development. The project is slated for completion this fall. Wish 2: Pedestrians will discover a more walkable downtown business district. Scranton is taking a step in the right direction by partnering with Jeff Speck, a city planner and urban designer, to create a more pedestrian-friendly downtown. The community was first introduced to Mr. Speck in December of 2018 at a lecture and booksigning at The University of Scranton. He is the author of “Walkable City: How Downtown Can Save America, One Step

Chamber announces SAGE winners

The Greater Scranton Chamber of Commerce announced the winners of the 2019 SAGE Awards (Scranton Awards for Growth and Excellence), which honor outstanding local businesses for their talent, creativity and innovation. The winner of each award category was publicly announced at The Chamber Gala at the Hilton Scranton & Conference Center. More than 100 applications were received. A group of volunteer community leaders and professionals teamed up to review applications and select finalists. The winners, in each category, are: Best Practices in Community Involvement: Northeastern Rehabilitation Associates Best Practices in Customer Service: Penn Foster Best Practices in Marketing/Communications: Posture Interactive

Business of the Year: Woodloch Resort Fastest Growing Company: Bedrock Technology Hometown Star: Scranton Fringe Festival, “Big Gay StorySlam” New and Emerging Business Of The Year: CaPAA of NEPA, LLC Non-Profit Organization of the Year: Discovery MI Preschool Pride and Progress: Exterior Renovations: Borough of Dunmore (Schautz Stadium) Pride and Progress: Interior Renovations: Penn State Scranton Pride and Progress: New Construction: AAA North Penn and FNCB Bank (tie) Small Business of the Year: Lavish Body & Home People’s Choice: United Sports Academy

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JANUARY 2020

at a Time” and “Walkable City Rules: 101 Steps to Making Better Places.” This project is critical to the vitality of downtown businesses and residences. Wish 3: There will be a renewed sense of pride in “Historic Downtown Scranton.” Late last year, Scranton City Council passed legislation proposed by (former) Mayor Wayne Evans to expand the footprint of the downtown’s historic district. Scranton is blessed with beautifully detailed and unique architecture, a source of pride for all who live and work in the city. This new designation creates greater opportunities to promote the downtown for its historic significance. Wish 4: Public art will find a permanent home in the Downtown. Scranton Tomorrow has been a long-time proponent of the arts, dating back to one of its earliest projects, First Night Scranton. A celebration of art and culture on New Year’s Eve, this annual tradition continued for nearly 20 years, setting the stage for today’s First Friday events. In this spirit, public art would be a welcome addition to the downtown landscape. Public art creates opportunities for economic growth, enhances a community’s identity, adds to the depth of cultural understanding and gives people a sense of pride in their community. Scranton is ready to put its creativity on display

for all to view and enjoy. Wish 5: Residents and business owners in Scranton will continue to see the results of Scranton Tomorrow’s Economic Development Strategic Plan in action. In 2021, Downtown Scranton will move toward becoming a formal Business Improvement District (BID). That makes 2020 a pivotal year in terms of economic development. Scranton Tomorrow will continue to collaborate with public officials, business and property owners and community leaders to develop new opportunities for economic growth, including events and projects that make Scranton the economic hub of Northeastern Pennsylvania. While this is certainly not a formal vision statement or plan, this list is designed to plant the seeds for a new era of growth and prosperity in a city that deserves to reach its greatest potential. Through the support of community leaders, partners and dedicated volunteers, these aspirations – and more – can come true. Happy New Year to all those who make the Electric City shine. Leslie Collins is the executive director of Scranton Tomorrow, a non-partisan, non-profit economic development organization in Scranton. Reach her via email at leslie@scrantontomorrow. org. To learn more about Scranton Tomorrow, visitscrantontomorrow.org.

CornellCookson expands production facility

Submitted photo

CornellCookson, a leading U.S. manufacturer of rolling door and grille products designed for commercial, industrial, institutional and retail use, has announced the expansion of its facility in Mountain Top. This growth comes just a few years after the company celebrated the opening of its new office and 163,000 square foot manufacturing facility in Goodyear, Arizona.


The grand experiment by Howard J. Grossman, AICP

Democracy in the United States has been called many names, but perhaps the one that has reverence is “ the grand experiment.” It has been attributed to many people, including George Grossman Washington, Thomas Jefferson, other Presidents, Alexander Hamilton in Federalist Paper 9, Alexis-Charles-Henri Clerel deTocqueville, and perhaps others, but studies have shown that none of these may be correct, yet part of this legend may be true. The latter wrote two major volumes about America, and they formed the powerful statement of what this nation had become with Volume 1 in 1835 and Volume 2 in 1840, Even Abraham Lincoln in the Gettysburg Address has some attribute associated with this process. Needless to say, perhaps the modern version of this “grand experiment” could be the future of the Pocono-Northeast. While not a governmental body and clearly made up of many local governments and counties, regional governance in this region could be a means to focus attention on its growth and development over the next 50-100 years. Having seen the way this region has changed and diversified its economy, its population, its environment and its social capability over the last 50 years, its future should be bright and promising and become the grand experiment for regional governance, at least on the east coast. Minnesota and other places have seen new experiments for tax sharing and other avenues of change, and while there are some potentially areas that have experimented with positive change, nothing seems to stand out at a regional level. Therefore, the ground may be open for experimenting in this region with a number of steps that can be beneficial to a region undergoing constant competition for economic and community development. The global setting, which dominates how and when economic development occurs, is a radical departure from how this topic was covered and carried

ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT

out historically. Therefore, an examination of new ideas would seem to be a powerful tool for future use in the Pocono-Northeast. How to utilize these is a process which deserves action steps and a plan that should involve as many agencies and entities as possible. Here are a few suggestions. ■ Adopt the Allegheny County regional asset district in this region which has a staff, funding, project development for libraries, cultural enhancements and more and is funded through a special 1% sales tax in that county. Think of what that brings to regional life if such actions were to be implemented inside this region. It would be a grand experiment unlike any other function and bring much value to the astonishing future which lies ahead. It would cause an expanded quality of life across the entire region. Whether or not a new tax could ever be enacted is questionable, however, in that county, it has worked for more than 20 years. ■ Adopt a regional sister city program that has a local government adopt a city or community from another nation and work closely and harmoniously to utilize this approach for the benefit of both the local government and the foreign government. There are sister cities in this region, but not many. Much more could be accomplished if many governments were to undertake a sister city relationship. Many topics could be discovered that could benefit the opportunity to fashion such partnerships and demonstrate ways that both the countries involved as well as the communities could improve and exchange ideas, visits, interests and many other activities. ■ Create ways that this region could generate specialized technology and organize travel visits to places that have evaluated and undertaken new experiments in governance that could then be applied inside the region. For example, a number of publications exist that deal with technology and its use in meeting ways for government to pattern a system that is valuable for citizen involvement and these instances could be shaped and established for regional life. This region has all types of governments that could be utilized as grand experiments

in meeting opportunities for regional development. ■ Write something akin to The Federalist Papers that highlights the various governmental options that exist and further private-public and nonprofit partnerships across the region. Our versions of Alexander Hamilton, John Jay and James Monroe who collectively wrote the dramatic Federalist Papers could extend the role that The Regionalist Papers could have on the next decades. There is sufficient talent in the various higher educational institutions in the region to innovate this process along with other skilled writers within the PoconoNortheast. Use this result to enhance how and when appropriate changes in governmental life could occur. ■ Embrace the future by recasting what had existed in the past with a chapter of the World Future Society and developing focus groups that can generate new ideas and thoughts regarding the next 50-100 years

in regional life. Headed by a staff member at the time from the Economic Development Council of Northeastern Pennsylvania (EDCNP), now called NEPA Alliance, together with a local college, many meetings were held between the 1980s and early 1990s that helped bring new thoughts to national, international and regional issues. Such a grouping should become a valid focal point for futurism in coming regional years. In fact, there are ways that quite a few colleges could be involved in this process throughout the region. Representatives from the World Future Society could be asked to visit the region. The Grand Experiment, which was and still is democracy in the United States, certainly can be replicated throughout this region in many different ways. Some of the ideas mentioned could be examined in depth and others could be structured so that the future becomes reality in meeting opportunities that can generate a new quality of life.

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NORTHEAST PENNSYLVANIA BUSINESS JOURNAL JANUARY 2020 11 TS_CNG/NPBJ/PAGES [B11] | 01/08/20

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LOCAL

Tobyhanna Army Depot’s past performance leads to bright future

Tobyhanna Army Depot’s continued success has led to several exciting new opportunities, strengthening its grasp on future Department of Defense (DoD) maintenance requirements. The depot recently welcomed its newest workload, the U.S. Navy RIM-7 Sea Sparrow, a ship-borne anti-missile weapon system. The Sea Sparrow is considered a critical component of naval defense systems and is valuable against seaskimming missiles. “Sea Sparrow came to us based upon the success of our RAM Launcher Program,” said Rob Fried, a logistics management specialist in the Production Management Direcorate. “It was great to see that our job well done resulted in a happy customer and increased workload.” The Sea Sparrow program is currently funded for 21 assets this current fiscal year and increases workload for Tobyhanna’s overhaul and refinishing cost centers. The depot’s Sustainment Planning Division is in the process of preparing for additional new workload. The test and repair maintenance program for the components of the U.S. Army AN/TPQ-53 radar will arrive later this year. Like its predecessors, the AN/TPQ-36 and AN/TPQ-37 medium range radars, the AN/TPQ-53 aids troops by detecting, classifying, tracking and locating enemy attacks.

Leadership Lackawanna Class of 2019

New workload opportunities were also the topic of discussion during the September Association of the United States Army luncheon. The luncheon’s panel discussion featured Dr. Portia Crowe, chief data officer, Army Futures Command’s Network Cross-Functional Team and Lt. Col. Brandon Baer, product manager for Helicopter and Multi-Mission Radios, project manager, Tactical Radios.

submitted photo

Leadership Lackawanna announced its 2019 Executive Program graduates during a recent celebration at Arcaro and Genell in Old Forge. The Executive Program assists professionals in becoming more engaged in the community, broadens their social network and increases their overall knowledge of the Greater Scranton region. The 2019 Executive Program graduates include from left, first row: Joshua Klonoski, First National Bank; Robert A. Lantka II, Tobyhanna Army Depot; Loretta Daubert, Leadership In Action, LLC; Sandy Cameli, SAC Empowerment, LLC; Susan Troy Connors, Troy Mechanical, Inc.; Christine R. Ostroski, Penn State Scranton; and David B. Wintermute, Landmark Community Bank. Second row: Anthony F. Rusnak, Commonwealth Charter Academy; Patrick R. Murphy, Marywood University; Eric Jensen, The Honesdale National Bank; Andrew Plank, Blue Eagle Logistics, Inc.; Wayne Stump, Greater Scranton YMCA; Alicia Zazzera, Carbondale Housing Authority; and David Jadick, Tobyhanna Army Depot. Gregory Moran, Commonwealth Health; and James Sullivan, Marywood University; were also part of this year’s class. Submitted photo

Senator Casey visits NeighborWorks NEPA

Submitted photo

During a recent visit to Scranton, U.S. Senator Bob Casey (D-PA) spent time visiting with clients of the Aging in Place program of NeighborWorks Northeastern Pennsylvania. The three clients, all of whom own homes in Scranton, met Senator Casey during an early afternoon stop at the home of Mr. Joe Paris, a client in the program. From left: Joseph McDonnell, Senator Submitted photo Bob Casey, Betty Via and Joe Paris.

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Tech careers continue to boom Technology has changed the world in numerous ways, including creating entirely new industries and a vast array of career options that didn’t exist as recently as two decades ago. In its Cyberstates report, CompTIA, which publishes a steady stream of new research on IT topics, recently shared some key findings that are news for those who work in tech. ■ Around 11.8 million people are employed in tech in the Unites States, and 261,000 new jobs were added in the past year. ■ Software and web developers make up the largest and fastest-growing segment of tech jobs. ■ The estimated direct economic output of the tech industry equals $1.8 trillion. The Bureau of Labor Statistics predicts technology careers are on the rise, with expected growth of 12% between 2014 and 2024. Specific fields within the tech industry are expected to experience even stronger growth, as high as 27%. There’s never been a better time to work in tech, particularly for those who have a knack or affinity for computer operations and networks. Here’s a look at some of the promising tech careers, including some of the more lucrative, courtesy of U.S. News’ “Best Technology Jobs of 2019” report. These jobs boast low employment rates and high salaries. 5. Database administrator: A database administrator sets up databases. These highly trained individuals use specialized software to store and organize data. Some key roles include planning, installation, configuration, design, as well as migration. DBAs also will troubleshoot and enhance database security. Median pay is $87,020. 4. Information security analyst: Concerns about security breaches continue to grow as criminals become ever more savvy. Information security analysts find the best security solutions and carry out measures to protect a company’s networks and systems. The professionals maintain systems by updating software and recommending security updates to management. Median pay is $95,510. 3. IT manager: IT managers are in high demand thanks to increasingly digital workplaces. These individuals coordinate all computer-related activities for an organization. Some jobs include recommending software and hardware needs, securing networks and searching for new technologies. Median salary is $139,220. 2. Computer systems analyst: A computer systems analyst helps organizations utilize computer

TECHNOLOGY

How digital technology has leveled the business playing field

Small businesses have historically had an uphill battle when competing with large corporations. Deeper pockets meant large businesses simply had more capital to devote to advertising and marketing. However, thanks to advancements in technology over the last 15 years or so, small businesses are increasingly closing the gap between themselves and their larger competitors. Phil Simon, a tech consultant and author There’s never been a better time to work of “The New Small: How a New Breed of Small in tech, particularly for those who have a knack or affinity for computer operations and Businesses Is Harnessing the Power of Emerging Technologies,” feels that technology has given networks. small business owners not only a voice, but vast technology efficiently and effectively. They make options at their fingertips, helping them handle suggestions on new technology. Sometimes called everything from marketing to automating operasystems architects, computer systems analysts tions. Here are some ways technology benefits often study existing computer systems and design small businesses. more efficient options. Median salary is $88,270, ■ Social media: Getting the word out about a lower than some other IT jobs, but there are 54,400 business used to mean expensive mailers or teleprojected jobs in this area. vision spots on local television. But the vast reach 1. Software developer: A software developer of the internet enables small business owners to has the highest rate of projected new jobs, and at reach many people without that much spending. a median salary of $101,790, it can be a secure A Clutch 2018 Small Business Survey found 52% career in the tech field. These developers write new of small businesses post on social media daily, code, fix software bugs, find solutions to outdated 79% weekly and 94% monthly. Regular exposure programs, and must be both creative and technical. gets brand names out there. Small businesses Some developers may specialize in one area of can use social media in conjunction with news computers or serve as generalists who write code outlets’ digital and print advertising solutions to reach a wide audience. for various types of software. ■ Online services: A proliferation of online No matter the position, working with technolbusinesses means that small businesses can look ogy involves finding creative solutions in a fastpaced, ever-growing environment.

to other small businesses for their needs. Web hosting, printing services and content-producing freelancers can be found online. Small businesses and freelancers who provide such services don’t have the overhead of larger businesses that offer similar products, helping small business owners get their messages out without breaking the bank. ■ Open application programming interface: Thanks to open API, savvy small businesses do not have to develop proprietary solutions to their various business needs. Open API is a publicly available application programming interface that gives developers access to change and program software applications that already exist. With OPI, businesses can create new applications or connect applications without having to invest a lot of money or time developing from scratch. Sometimes all an existing app may need is a small tweak to make it work for a particular need. Businesses can create apps to streamline specific processes. ■ Mobile workers: Technology has made it possible for businesses to keep qualified staff without the need for a physical office. Fast internet connectivity means remote workers can log into central servers and essentially work from anywhere. This means small businesses can cut down on office rental overhead and attract talented professionals from anywhere. Advancements in technology has made it possible for small firms to swim with the big fish of the business world.

Did you know? The tech sector continues to experience record growth. Cyberstates, a report compiled by CompTIA that analyzes data from the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, the U.S. Bureau of Economic Analysis, the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office, Economic Modeling Specialists International (EMSI), Burning Glass Technologies, Hoovers, PwC/CBInsights, MoneyTree, and more, paints a promising picture for careers in technology. According to the report, there were 3.7 million tech job postings in 2018. Popular jobs in the industry included IT services and custom software services, telecommunications and internet services and tech manufacturing. The three states with the highest net percentage of tech jobs are California, Texas and New York.

There are many ways technology benefits small businesses.

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FEATURES

Millennials, Generation Winter means business Z and the workforce by Phil Yacuboski

by Phil Yacuboski

For millennials and Generation Z, it’s more about what is in the benefit package for a future employer than what is in the paycheck, according to a new study. Traditional benefits and a good retirement plan are what employers need to attract and keep young people. “This is the largest group in the workforce today, and they are going to have a huge influence on how companies are structuring benefits because of the sheer number of employees that are in the workplace and because more and more are moving into positions of power,” said Eric Reisenwitz, chief operating officer of Lincoln Financial Group’s Group Protection Business, based in Radnor. “They are the ones who will be making these decisions about benefits.” The company recently commissioned the study along with the Center for Generational Kinetics. “A lot of the preconceived notions that this group is more style than substance are looking like they are wrong and they are concerned about what they are doing with their finances,” he said. Gen Z’s oldest members are 23 years with the oldest millennials topping out at age 37. More than one in three people employed in the workforce are millennials, according to the Pew Research Center and an analysis of U.S. Census data. Millennials surpassed Gen Xers in 2016. In the mid-1980s,

baby boomers made up the largest portion of the workforce; now they account just a quarter of that total, according to the research. “Almost two-thirds of millennials would take a job that pays less but offers better benefits and the number of Gen Z people who are the kids coming up out of college, that number was 60%,” said Reisenwitz. “That’s significant.” Forty-four percent of millennials have turned down a job because the benefits were not to their liking, according to the research. “Sixty percent of millennials want something to do with their retirement plan,” he said. “They want to have an avenue for putting away money for the future. That’s not something I was thinking about when I was in my early 20s or mid-30s. A little more than half think dental insurance is important and 50% say life insurance is important.” Reisenwitz said, after salary, 73% of millennials’ benefits were most important and 57% have stayed in a job longer than they wanted (even a job they didn’t like) because the benefits were good. “Employers need to think about these groups in a few ways,” he said. “It’s challenging in attracting and retaining people. I’d tell employers that benefits are something they need to think about across their workforce. I think they intend to downplay that on the younger population. Medical benefits are a must have, but it’s just not enough.”

Getty Freedom Images

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Businesses that welcome tourists are getting ready for a busy winter season with many hoping that Mother Nature can add some cold winter weather and piles of snow for a rustic ambiance. “The weather has been good for us so far this year,” said Jim Tust of the Shawnee Mountain Ski Area. “We got some good cold weather in early November, and we took advantage of it by making snow and getting the mountain open early the weekend before Thanksgiving. We are in pretty good shape.” Tust said they are hoping for a better season than last year. “We get excited this time of year,” he said. “And with Christmas falling in the middle of the week, that gives us two weekends to really take advantage of the crowds.” The other big ski weekends are the Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. holiday weekend and Presidents’ Day Weekend. “Those weekends are big for us, and it’s very important for us to have snow and cold weather,” he said. Tust said the resort has been spending a lot of money on automated snow-making, which means all of the snow guns are operated by computer. If people aren’t skiers or snowboarders, there are plenty of other outdoor activities people can take part in during the winter months. “We have our UTV tours running, and we rely on snow from Mother Nature to do our snowmobiles,” said Danielle Loverdi, Pocono Outdoor Adventure Tours. The company rents snowmobiles and off-road all-terrain vehicles (equipped with roll cages, net restraints and seatbelts) where customers can roam the thousands of private acreage on the property of the Pocono Manor Resort.

“We typically get the most snow in February and March, which is when everything seems to pick up for us,” she said. “We did have some snow earlier in the season, so we did get the snowmobiles out on the trails for about a week. I’m hoping that it’s a good indication that we do get some snow this winter.” She said most of the business involves weekend treks with groups of people. At the Pocono Environmental Education Center in Dingmans Ferry, summer guests abound, but the facility is also open during the winter months. “We have a program called ‘Mad Science,’ which is geared toward kids, where they can make slime, bottle launchers, and kids can learn about experimentation they can do at home,” said George Johnson, weekend manager and volunteer coordinator for the PEEC. He said they’ll also hold two eagle watches where there are established eagle nests. “People will hopefully get to see to a lot of our national bird out in the wild,” he said. “They are beautiful and majestic to see in the wild.” “The winter is definitely our slow time, but we still get visitors,” he said. “But it’s a great time to come and visit. Even if the weather is particularly warm, it’s a great time of year to get out and about.” The PEEC is a nonprofit that partners with the Delaware Water Gap National Recreation Area. It takes groups or the general public and offers cabin rentals to the public. “We are looking for a good winter crowd,” he said. The Pocono Mountain Vacation Bureau spent about $1.5 million on advertising during the winter months last season – slightly more than it did during the summer months, according to the PMVB annual economic impact report.

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EDUCATION

Johnson College adds welding classes Johnson College announced its Welding Technology Certificate will be offered beginning in the spring semester. Since 2012, the college has offered the twosemester, 30-credit certificate program. In previous years, the certificate was only offered in the fall semester which led to interested students having to wait to begin their coursework if they did not enroll by the summer. The Welding Technology certificate course prepares students for entry-level work in the welding industry. Students learn about safety, hand tools, oxyacetylene torches, plasma arc, shielded metal arc welding (stick), gas metal arc welding (MIG), gas tungsten arc welding (TIG), flux cored arc welding, metallurgy, print reading and weld symbols. This indemand major at Johnson College starts a full cohort every year, and the college is proud of its placement rate of these students each year.

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From left: Zach Fawcett ’19, Nicholson; Dean Snyder ’19, Scott Township; Torie Evans ’19, Dunmore; Everett Leschingski 19; Noah Koeller ’19, Hawley; and Nick Koch ‘19 Moscow.

Future business leaders attend conference at The University of Scranton

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The University of Scranton’s first Path to Business Excellence Conference, held in November on campus, was attended by 119 top high school students with an interest in business. The students represented 86 high schools and six states. The conference included interactive experiences with members of the Kania School of Management’s faculty, alumni and current students. In addition to general and team-building sessions, the conference included tracks for students interested in accounting, business administration, business analytics, economics, entrepreneurship, finance, international business, operations management, marketing and management. In previous years, the university offered a Future Accountants Leadership Conference. This year, the conference was expanded to include all business majors offered in the Kania School of Management.

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Private higher education is a good investment for students, taxpayers

EDUCATION

bachelor degrees include more Across the country, numerous than 11,000 science, technology, state and federal proposals are engineering and math degrees on the table to provide students from AICUP institutions, comwith free tuition at public univerpared to less than 10,000 for sities. While free sounds enticstate-related universities and less ing, it is not a very good deal for than 3,000 for the state system of taxpayers who will pick up the BotzMan higher education. tab and for students who will face The AICUP report also limited options. disputes the perception that students Oftentimes, students are eligible for routinely graduate with higher levels of publicly funded, need-based financial aid student debt, compared to public schools. at the federal or state level. Federal aid is Between 2012-13 and 2016-17, average most often in the form of the Pell Grant student loan debt for graduates of AICUP or Supplemental Educational Opportunity institutions was lower than that of the Grant (SEOG). In the Keystone State, the public institutions in four of the five years. primary support for college students is the On average, AICUP graduates accrue about Pennsylvania Higher Education Assistance $37,000 in debt to finance their college Agency (PHEAA). Students and their famidegrees – less than $400 more than their lies combine their contribution with Pell, peers from public colleges. A combinaSEOG, PHEAA and a variety of subsidized tion of generous institutional financial aid, and unsubsidized loans to pay for college. Let us use the state grants as an exam- donor scholarships, and better four-year graduation rates make for the dead heat. ple of how this works for taxpayers, who Misericordia University students, for fund both public higher education, and to example, typically finish a four-year degree a lesser extent, private higher education. in four years (in the 2018-19 academic The Association of Independent Colleges year, the average student completed his or and Universities of Pennsylvania (AICUP) her degree in 4.1 years). Less time to earn 2017-18 data indicates the cost per degree a degree equates to more time working in awarded is $17,786 for the Pennsylvania State System of Higher Education, $15,998 their chosen career path, again providing a greater return to the taxpayer. The perfor state-related universities, and $2,206 for the private colleges and universities in ceived debt disadvantage for both private the state that comprise AICUP. college students and taxpayers who supSince AICUP schools do not receive port those students simply is not real. direct state appropriations, the state funds Taxpayers invest in higher education are the sum of the Institutional Assistance to prepare for a more prosperous and Grant and the PHEAA state grants that successful society. Our investment in all follow the student to his or her college of students, including those attending private choice. Public institution students also are higher education, provides a solid base for eligible for the PHEAA state grant. These all of us. The smart choice is to continue figures do not include capital spending attaching funding to students, thus givfor facilities, which is also more generous ing them the choice of which brand of toward public institutions. education aligns best with their hopes and Another way to view this data is that capacity. 10% of state funding goes to AICUP institutions that enroll 42% of the students Thomas J. Botzman, Ph.D., is president of Misericordia University in Dallas, the oldest and award 47% of the bachelor degrees four-year institution of higher education in Luzerne County. statewide, according to AICUP. These

Misericordia staff members recognized

by Thomas J. Botzman, Ph.D.

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Misericordia University recently recognized four staff members for exceptional service to the university during the sixth annual presentation of the Jeff “Woody” Woodworth Awards for Exemplary Service. Those honored were Dominick de Matteo, area coordinator for residence life; David Johndrow, Jr., manager of user services, information technology; Christine Radvanyi, systems manager, admissions; and Jesse Smith, lead groundskeeper. Misericordia President Thomas J. Botzman presented the awards at a staff and faculty assembly. From left, first row: Lisa Woodworth, Wilkes-Barre; Botzman; and Joshua Woodworth, Wilkes-Barre. Second row, award recipients Johndrow, Avoca; Smith, Lake Silkworth; de Matteo, Dallas Twp., and Radvanyi, Shavertown.

autism Center holds Grand opening

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The Autism Center at Misericordia University recently held a grand opening so people could tour the facility at 50 Lake St., in Dallas Borough, and meet with staff, administration and friends of the program. From left: John P. Moses, chairperson, AllOne Foundation Board; President Thomas J. Botzman, Misericordia University; Dean Barbara Schwartz-Bechet, College of Health Sciences and Education, Misericordia University; John Graham, member, AllOne Foundation Board; Kristin Hoffman, director, Autism Center at Misericordia University; and John W. Cosgrove, executive director, AllOne Foundation.


LOCAL

CAN BE clients recognized Two clients associated with CAN BE received awards as part of the Greater Hazleton Chamber of Commerce’s 2019 Business and Community Awards program. Halogen Hair Company owner Ashley Evert, who was one of the first business owners CAN BE officials worked with outside of its incubator as part of The Hazleton Innovation Collaborative (THInC) program, won the Young Entrepreneur of the Year award, which is sponsored by CAN BE. American Eagle Solutions, which is co-owned by Shane Acernese and Robert Bradley and located in the CAN BE Innovation Center in the Valmont Industrial Park, was one of two recipients of the Green Business of the Year award.

Greater Wilkes-Barre Chamber Donates to Family Service Association of NEPA

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The Greater Wilkes-Barre Chamber of Commerce recently donated $2,000 to Family Service Association of Northeastern Pennsylvania. At the recent Greater Wilkes-Barre Chamber Annual Dinner, Family Service Association was honored as the Charitable Organization of the Year. A portion of the proceeds raised from the annual dinner were donated back to Family Service Association. From left: Amber Loomis, chief advancement officer, FSA NEPA; Lindsay Griffin, COO/vice president, Greater Wilkes-Barre Chamber; and Gertrude McGowan, Esq., chief executive officer, FSA NEPA.

BB&T supports scholarship program

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Halogen Hair Company owner Ashley Evert, left, received the Greater Hazleton Chamber of Commerce 2019 Young Entrepreneur of the Year award, which is sponsored by CAN BE, from CAN DO Coordinator of Entrepreneurial Services Jocelyn Sterenchock.

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James Gorman, right, senior vice president, business services officer for Branch Banking and Trust Company (BB&T) visited King’s College campus to present Rev. John Ryan, Kings College American Eagle Solutions was one of two winners of the Greater Hazleton Chamber of Commerce 2019 president, a check for $8,000 in support of the college’s Pre-Kindergarten Scholarship ProGreen Business of the Year award. From left: George Hayden, representing award sponsor Hayden Elec- gram. BB&T donated to King’s as part of the state’s Educational Improvement Tax Credit (EITC) tric; American Eagle Solutions co-founders Shane Acernese and Robert Bradley; and Dr. Gary Lawler, Program, which is administered by the Pennsylvania Department of Community and Economic president of the Greater Hazleton Chamber of Commerce Board of Directors. Development.

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BUSINESS BRIEFS U of S ranked among top colleges The Wall Street Journal/Times Higher Education ranked the University of Scranton No. 232 among the 801 “Top U.S. Colleges” included in its 2020 listing. Scranton’s highest scores were in the area of student engagement, where it placed at No. 104 in the nation. Scranton also ranked at No. 195 for student outcomes, scoring well for salaries of graduates, adjusted for student, location and other characteristics, and graduation rates. The Wall Street Journal and Times Higher Education ranking is based on an analysis of 15 performance metrics in the categories of resources, student engagement, outcomes and campus environment. Store opens beer and wine eatery Giant Food Stores announced the opening of its 104th Beer & Wine Eatery in Pennsylvania at its Dickson City store at 1550 Main St. The store celebrated the grand opening with beer and wine tastings on Oct. 4. Dickson City customers will find hundreds of domestic, imported and craft beers coupled with an immense wine selection in the Beer & Wine Eatery. Customers currently have a “mix-a-six” option, where they can create their own six-packs from a variety of craft beers. Customers can also choose from eat-in and take-out selections offered, including sandwiches, wraps, subs and salads. Johnson College receives grant Johnson College received a $4,500 grant from the PPL Foundation. These funds will support the Solar USB Charger Workshop program. Faculty and staff will learn how to create a solar USB charger. Participants will then recreate the workshop for Lackawanna County middle and high school students, so they can share the lesson with their students. The solar power USB charger will also be incorporated into Johnson College’s STEM outreach work with middle and high school students. The PPL Foundation awards annual grants through a competitive application and review process. Marywood earns national ranking The university’s Early Childhood Education Program ranks among the best in the country in a recent listing of Study. com’s Best Early Childhood Education Schools. Sitting at No. 26 from the hundreds of schools evaluated, Marywood ranked among the 50 schools that offered exceptional early childhood education programs selected. The schools on the list all have early education programs that prepare students for state certification and outperform the competition in terms of field hours, student organizations, classes, financial aid and more. Pharmacy school receives award Wilkes University Nesbitt School of Pharmacy was awarded the 2019 Public Relations and Awareness Award from the Pennsylvania Pharmacists Association. The students were recognized at the organization’s annual conference held at Seven Springs Resort on Sept. 21 in Champion, Pennsylvania. Cody Morcom, Scott Twp., and Nicole Hughes, Olyphant, were part of the student team to receive the 2019 Public Relations and Awareness Award. University receives national ranking The University of Scranton ranked among the nation’s “Best Colleges” in an online 2020 listing by College Factual of colleges and universities that meet high standards and provide quality outcomes to students. The university ranked No. 177 in the national ranking of 1,727 schools. In a listing of 123 “Best Colleges” in Pennsylvania, Scranton ranked No. 19. College Factual also listed the university at No. 22 in the nation in its ranking of “Best Religiously Affiliated,” which listed just 182 schools in the country. In addition, several University of Scranton

programs ranked in the top 15% in the nation, including accounting, biochemistry, biophysics and molecular biology, business administration, criminal justice, international business, marketing, nursing, and philosophy and religious studies. Restaurant opens dealership shop Zuppa! Del Giorno Café opened a new location in the Toyota of Scranton showroom. The restaurant, with an existing location on Ash Street in Scranton, is popular for its gourmet breakfast items, sandwiches, soups and salads. Poconos chamber announces awards The Chamber of the Northern Poconos hosted its annual Community Awards Banquet on Oct. 10 at the Inn at Woodloch Pines. This year, the chamber honored Al and Robin Beck of Beck, Gogolski, Poska & Co. Inc., as Business Person of the Year. Also honored was Paul Edwards, Wayne County Community Foundation, with the Community Achievement Award. The ninth annual Green Business of the Year was presented to Dave Edwards and Barbara Winsko of the Car Wash on Route 6. Tobyhanna earns accolade A partnership designed to train and employ students earned Tobyhanna Army Depot recognition by the National Technical Institute for the Deaf last week. The 2019 “Center on Employment Outstanding Employer Partner Award” recognizes employers who have a sustained record of hiring NTID deaf or hard of hearing co-op students/graduates. NTID is one of nine colleges on the Rochester Institute of Technology campus and more than 1,200 students enroll in their programs each year. Tobyhanna’s partnership with NTID dates back to 2012. To date, Tobyhanna has hired five NTID graduates as full-time employees. Law firm honored Hourigan, Kluger & Quinn PC has been named to the 2020 US News and World Report and Best Lawyers Best Law Firms. Hourigan, Kluger and Quinn received an Allentown Tier 1 designation: Medical Malpractice Law — Plaintiffs, Personal Injury Litigation — Plaintiffs, Product Liability — Plaintiffs, and Workers’ Compensation — Claimants; and an Allentown Tier 2 designation, Employment Law — Management. Metropolitan Tier 1 and 2 include Northeastern Pennsylvania and Allentown Lehigh Valley. Firms included in the 2020 “Best Law Firms” list are recognized for professional excellence with persistently impressive ratings from clients and peers. Geisinger facilities recognized Geisinger’s health care equality and inclusion efforts are recognized by the Human Rights Campaign Foundation with nine Geisinger hospitals earning top honors for care surrounding the LGBTQ community. For 2019, eight Geisinger hospitals received the highest designation possible, the “LGBTQ Health Care Equality Leader” designation, and one hospital earned a “Top Performer” designation. According to this year’s report, seven of Geisinger’s Pennsylvania hospitals earned Leader designations, the most Leader designations of any health care system in the commonwealth. Locally, they include Geisinger Bloomsburg Hospital, Geisinger Community Medical Center, Geisinger Medical Center, Geisinger Shamokin Area Community Hospital and Geisinger Wyoming Valley Medical Center, each of which earned Leader designations. Geisinger Marworth Treatment Center received the Top Performer designation. Hospitals earning the Leader designation scored 100, the highest score possible, on responses to questions about

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LGBTQ-inclusive policies and practices. Question topics included nondiscrimination and staff training, patient services and support, employee benefits and policies, and patient and community engagement. Funeral home receives honor Sheldon-Kukuchka Funeral Home Inc. has been honored by the National Funeral Directors Association with the 2019 Pursuit of Excellence Award. Only 160 firms from around the world and five in Pennsylvania have received the prestigious recognition, placing the funeral home among an elite group of funeral service providers. Pursuit of Excellence Award recipients raise the bar on funeral service excellence by adhering to the highest ethical and professional standards and providing unsurpassed service to families and communities. The funeral home started serving local families in 1959. Foundation opens 2 recovery centers The Clear Brook Foundation celebrated the official grand opening of two new Recovery Connect Centers located in Wilkes-Barre and Scranton with a ribbon-cutting ceremony attended by colleagues, providers, educators, judges, law enforcement and government officials from Lackawanna and Luzerne counties. Recovery Connect provides individuals and families experiencing the devastating effects of drug and alcohol addiction with guidance, confidential assessments and referrals to the appropriate level of care. Funded through the 2018 sale of Clearbrook Manor and a grant from the AllOne Foundation, all services provided to the community through Recovery Connect are free. Surveying company to relocate office JHA Companies announces the relocation of its Delhi, New York, office around the corner to the late Ronald Mullenix Land Surveying office in downtown Delhi. With the purchase of the building, JHA also acquired the surveying records and plans of Ronald Mullenix Land Surveying, enabling a smooth transition for Mullenix’s previous clients. JHA Companies is a full-service civil engineering and land surveying firm with local offices in Moosic, Montrose and Honesdale. JHA has a highly qualified team of engineers, surveyors, environmental scientists, GIS technicians and support staff with many years of experience. Cancer institute receives award The Northeast Regional Cancer Institute was recently recognized by the Pennsylvania Commission for Women and Adagio Health as a 2019 Pennsylvania Breast Cancer Partner Recognition Award winner. The award commended the Cancer Institute’s continued commitment to improving access to breast cancer screening, treatment and care. Cancer Institute staff accepted the award at the second annual Breast Cancer Awareness Month Breakfast in October at the Governor’s Residence in Harrisburg.

Women’s club opens membership Business and Professional Women’s Foundation celebrated National Business Women’s Week during the third week of October. This year’s National Business Women’s Week provided an excellent opportunity for the Scranton Business and Professional Women’s Club to open its membership to young professional women and seasoned professionals to join free of dues for 2020 and 2021. The club’s December Holiday Social Hour will be held Dec. 11 at 5:30 p.m. at the Radisson Hotel Lackawanna Station for a meet-and-greet opportunity with appetizers, along with a designer handbag raffle basket. The opportunity to join for two years with free membership will be presented by the club’s president, Lindsey Reinheimer Loss, at the celebration; contact Sharon Thauer, 570-344-5947, for an open invitation to join. Health system holds Mammothon Commonwealth Health conducted its eighth annual Mammothon on Oct. 24 at three locations. Ninety-five volunteers from Commonwealth Health’s hospitals and clinics made telephone calls to women who are past due for their annual mammograms, offering to schedule the critical screenings or to give a gentle reminder about the importance of yearly mammograms. The volunteers convened from Berwick Hospital Center, Moses Taylor Hospital, Regional Hospital of Scranton, Wilkes-Barre General Hospital and Commonwealth Health Physician Network. This year, more than 3,000 telephone calls were made from TPS Pavilion, Kingston; Berwick Hospital Center, Berwick, and Moses Taylor Hospital, Scranton. During the three-hour Mammothon, the volunteers scheduled over 4,000 mammograms and provided vital information regarding annual screenings. Mead Crafters competition held As one of the fastest-growing categories in the alcohol industry, mead has distinguished itself as an alternative beverage enjoyed by millennials and baby boomers alike. To celebrate the rising popularity of the beverage, the National Honey Board hosted its first Mead Crafters Competition recognizing the top professional mead makers in the United States. Response to the competition was overwhelming, with more than 340 meads submitted to be judged in 25 categories ranging from dry metheglins to sweet traditional meads. After judging was finished, Pennsylvania-based Space Time Mead & Cider Works took home the gold in the Specialty Semi-Sweet category for its Peach Melomel, made in collaboration with Honey Hole Winery.

Teacher’s skills aid businesses Ryan McCloskey, a former Philadelphia-area Spanish teacher with a special aptitude in technology, used his bilingual and tech skills to launch Power Move Payment Solutions to enable businesses and organizations throughout Northeast Pennsylvania to accept electronic payments anywhere at any time. U of S recognized for sustainability The Princeton Review recognized the University of Scran- Mountain Top-based company Power Move Payment Solutions offers Point of Sale hardware and software ton and 412 other colleges worldwide for expressing “strong commitments to green practices and programs” integration for businesses and institutions with a focus on by inclusion in the 2019 edition of The Princeton Review in-person customer service for English- and SpanishGuide to Green Colleges. Most of the schools selected for speaking customers. The independently operated POS provider services customers in Lackawanna, Luzerne and the guide, which was published online in October, are in Carbon counties. the U.S., with 16 schools from Canada, one from Egypt Power Move Payment Solutions provides POS, terminal and one from Greece also listed. This is the third consecutive year the University of Scran- and mobile payment processing devices in addition to software integration with merchants’ websites or existing ton has made this list. software, including QuickBooks for easy accounting. The Princeton Review analyzed more than 25 data points to determine the final selection of colleges for the guide based on information from surveys of nearly 700 Please see Briefs, Page 20 schools.


WILKES-BARRE FOCUS

UPDATE: City economics FROM PAGE 1

Times Leader building on N. Main Street that will community suffered through be renovated to academic space,” said McAndecades of economic decline drew. “We also have had renovation of the former and a lack of investment in Woolworth building to a combined Barnes & Noble infrastructure and services, King’s/Wilkes bookstore.” but this is being reversed. For Healthy financial sector example, 15 years ago Hazle Senior management with Street had numerous vacant Luzerne Bank commented storefronts, but now this area that conditions within their NEWMAN has a few legacy businesses market area are generbut also a vibrancy and a lot of ally in fine shape from the new storefront signs in Spanish.” standpoint of commercial, Work remains to be done to accelerate this inindustrial and small business vestment and handle the city’s fiscal problems, but investment. Newman approves of the civic vision communicated EDGERTON Robert Edgerton Jr., by Mayor Brown. According to Newman, Brown’s president and CEO, described understanding that solidarity and talent are vital for that the Wilkes-Barre area real estate market is problem solving is a major asset. “pretty good.” Applicable sales are being aided by “When you look at how the city is now evolving, the nation’s low interest rate environment which he the downtown loft apartment phenomena certainly expects to continue into 2020. is interesting,” said Newman. “So many people now He also forecasted healthy consumer loan want to live downtown and not depend on a car transactions will continue into 2020, although the for transportation all the time. This trend involves totals for these loans have flattened a bit since preferences and differing lifestyles.” peaking during the 2016 to 2018 time frame. Health Diamond City has been granted renewal for care and workforce issues continue to be voiced its business improvement program, and Newman to Edgerton by the bank’s commercial customers, pointed out that the downtown’s old Hotel Sterling although he proudly points to employment stability site will become the Gateway Center. This is part of within his organization. an overall downtown skyline rehabilitation plan that “Fortunately, we have always had low turnover also includes improvements to Public Square which and haven’t had to do a lot of hiring over the years,” needs to be refreshed and made more attractive. said Edgerton. “In particular, our senior manage“We also need an expanded range of housing ment has been extremely stable.” products to help with the diversified demands in the Jack Jones, regional president, described how community,” said Newman. the Luzerne Bank branch on Wilkes-Barre’s Public College town Square maintains a healthy Segments of Wilkes-Barre’s “brand” as a college consumer base with a town with ongoing educational investment in the growing number of business downtown was detailed by John McAndrew, director accounts. The office serves of public relations at Kings College. During the past many customers who enjoy decade, the college invested $20 million and transthe convenience of banking formed two abandoned buildings on N. Main Street close to their employment. to O’Hara Hall, housing a privately-owned combined The large number of JONES daycare, plus academic space and college housing. millennials who now work, King’s also acquired the former Ramada Inn on visit or live downtown also have Public Square and through an $11.5 million renova- created an expanding market for Luzerne Bank to tion transformed it into academic space for its serve. health sciences programs and a residence hall for “These young people are very happy with students. The building was re-named the Richard numerous bars, restaurants and attractions now Abbas Alley Center for Health Sciences, and inavailable within the downtown,” said Jones. “In realcludes artwork depicting the history of regional coal ity, we did not put the branch in central city just for mining, a Miners Memorial and a room dedicated to these potential customers, but the number of milthe accomplishments of Father Jozef Murgas. lennials who are now there are quite a surprise and “Most recently, the college acquired the former they love the convenience of us being right there.”

TOP 25 WOMEN IN BUSINESS I N N O RT H E A S T P E N N S Y LVA N I A

Every March, the Northeast PA Business Journal honors the 25 Top Women in Business in our area. These women are innovative leaders, decision-makers and/or owners of their companies. They are raising families, improving their communities and mentoring and encouraging other women. In February, nominations are reviewed and the winning individuals emerge from their nominator’s descriptions of personalities, innovations, assets, successes and awards. Below is the nominating form. Please email your nominations to the Business Journal at biz570@timesshamrock.com by January 31, 2020 and check out the March edition to see if your nominee was chosen. Thank you. Elizabeth Baumeister

EDITOR, NORTHEAST PENNSYLVANIA BUSINESS JOURNAL

Name of Nominee: _____________________________________________ Business/Cell Number of Nominee: ____________________________________ Email of Nominee: ________________________________________________ Name of Nominator: ____________________________________________ Business/Cell Number of Nominator: ___________________________________ Email of Nominator:_______________________________________________ Tell us why your nominee is deserving of the honor of Top 25 Women in Business: _____________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________ PLEASE RETURN COMPLETED SUBMISSIONS BY JANUARY 31, 2020

149 PENN AVENUE, SCRANTON PA 18503 570.348.9185 • BIZ570@TIMESSHAMROCK.COM NORTHEAST PENNSYLVANIA BUSINESS JOURNAL JANUARY 2020 19

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BUSINESS BRIEFS FROM PAGE 18 The company is also able to offer avenues to business and personal insurance, 401(k) and benefit plans, buy/sell agreements, staffing services and digital marketing.

Tunkhannock clinic restores hours Just in time for flu and cold season, Geisinger Careworks in Tunkhannock is restoring hours and is open seven days a week. The Tunkhannock Careworks is open Monday through Friday from 9 a.m. to 8 p.m. and Saturday and Sunday from 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. Located at 10 Trieble Drive (off Route 6), Careworks is staffed with advanced practitioners who treat patients older than 1 year old. This year, patients can walk into the Tunkhannock Careworks and receive a flu shot without an appointment. The Tunkhannock Careworks will also offer rapid flu testing, which provides a result in about 20 minutes. Patients can visit Careworks locations for minor health issues that can be resolved in a single visit. These include cold and flu symptoms, allergies, earaches, tick removal, sprains and minor cuts.

Company honors veterans at stores Round Room LLC, the nation’s largest Verizon authorized wireless retailer, recognized veterans at nearly 550 of its TCC stores in honor of Veterans Day. On Nov. 9-11, each participating TCC location hosted a Veterans Appreciation Event to honor veterans for their service. Employees were on-site to answer questions about service contracts and identify qualifying promotions. Each veteran who attended the event received a TCC water bottle, along with other giveaway items. Veterans also had the opportunity to apply for an Honor Flight trip in-store through the Honor Flight Network, which transports veterans to Washington, D.C., to visit memorials dedicated to the service and sacrifices of the military.

Company unveils expanded space Precision Software Innovations recently hosted a ribbon-cutting ceremony for its newly expanded space at the TekRidge Center. The company is a graduate of the chamber’s IGNITE business incubator program and has now expanded its office space within the building. Precision Software Innovations provides technology solutions to help restaurants achieve growth in a competitive market. Through the development of custom software solutions, their products can replace outdated legacy systems or add new information technology infrastructure to an established or growing restaurant business. Their multipronged approach includes cloud point of sale, online ordering, kiosks, loyalty and thirdparty integrations.

Pharmacy receives accreditation Hazle Compounding pharmacy received accreditation from the Pharmacy Compounding Accreditation Board, a service of Accreditation Commission for Health Care. The accreditation demonstrates commitment to the highest industry standards for quality and safety. PCAB assesses pharmacies that compound medications by combining, mixing or altering drug ingredients to create a medication as prescribed for an individual patient. The accreditation process includes an extensive onsite survey conducted by an independent expert and annual verification to ensure compliance with the pharmacy compounding process defined by the U.S. Pharmacopeial Convention guidelines.

Health system achieves high score The Endless Mountains Health System achieved the highest score of any area hospital in eight out of 10 cat-

egories in the latest Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems Survey to measure patients’ perspectives of hospital care. The survey asks a random sample of recently discharged patients to give feedback about topics like how well nurses and doctors communicated, how responsive hospital staff were to patient needs and the cleanliness and quietness of the hospital environment. The overall results, which earned Endless Mountains Health Systems the highest local summary rating of four stars in the October survey, showed patient satisfaction met or exceeded other area facilities, as well as national averages, and state averages for Pennsylvania and New York. Rehab centers earn top rating U.S. News & World Report recently released the 20192020 Best Nursing Homes report. To produce the report and its online Nursing Home Finder tool, U.S. News evaluated more than 15,000 homes nationwide. The ratings draw on data from Nursing Home Compare, a program run by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, the federal agency that sets and enforces standards for nursing homes. For the second consecutive year, Allied Services Transitional Rehab in Scranton and Heinz Transitional Rehab in Wilkes-Barre received the survey’s top rating of High Performing for Short-Stay Rehabilitation, earning them the title of Best Nursing Homes. They were two of only three facilities in Northeast Pennsylvania to receive this ranking. Allied Services Transitional Rehab Unit and Heinz Transitional Rehab Unit have consistently earned top marks for their patient care, receiving the U.S. News & World Report Best Nursing Home title six years in a row. Local manufacturer of windows honored The Associated Builders and Contractors of Connecticut Inc. informed Thermolite Inc., a Scranton-based vinyl window manufacturer, that the Residence at Selleck’s Woods in Darien, Connecticut, has been selected for an Excellence in Construction Award. The general contractor was Wohlsen Construction Co., and Thermolite supplied all the vinyl windows for the project. The project was selected as a winner by an independent panel of judges consisting of owners, architects and engineers. The selection of this project is a testament to the work performed by Wohlsen Construction in concert with Thermolite, its window supplier, the company said. The awards dinner was held Oct. 24 in Southington, Connecticut.

Waste service firm wins contracts Local waste service company J.P. Mascaro & Sons, a solid waste industry leader in the region, continues to grow its business in the municipal sector. Recently, Mascaro was awarded approximately $5.8 million in competitively bid municipal waste collection and recycling contracts in Lackawanna County. All of the municipalities will be serviced out of Mascaro’s Wyoming Valley Division located in Nanticoke. J.P. Mascaro & Sons is a privately owned, family-operated waste service company headquartered in Montgomery County. It has over 50 years of experience in performing municipal contracts; it owns and operates collection divisions, landfills, recycling facilities, transfer stations and composting facilities in Pennsylvania and the mid-Atlantic region. Johnson to offer welding program Johnson College announced its welding technology certificate will now be offered beginning in the spring semester, starting in January. Since 2012, Johnson College has offered the two-semester, 30-credit certificate program. In previous years, the certificate was only offered in the fall semester, which led to interested students having to wait to begin their coursework if they did not enroll by the summer. The welding technology certificate course prepares students for entry-level work in the welding industry. Students learn about safety, hand tools, oxyacetylene torches, plasma arc, shielded metal arc welding, gas metal arc welding, gas tungsten arc welding, flux cored arc welding, metallurgy, print reading and weld symbols. The in-demand major at Johnson College starts a full cohort every year, and the college is proud of its placement rate of the students each year. The class of 2018 was 100% employed.

Car dealership makes donation MotorWorld Toyota recently made a $5,000 donation to support the Commission on Economic Opportunity/Harry & Jeanette Weinberg Northeast Regional Food Bank’s College earns national ranking Thanksgiving Project and general food distribution. Lackawanna College ranked No. 19 among 100 companies to win a designation as one of the “Best Places Bank contributes $24K to library to Work” in Pennsylvania. The college has earned the Dime Bank recently contributed $24,000 to the Wayne County Public Library toward approved innovative edu- recognition five of the last six years. cational programs. The libraries of Wayne County strive This year’s list represented roughly 25,000 employees of 49 small, 27 medium and 24 large-sized companies. to support students in the three local school districts, Businesses began the application process in March, and as well as home-schooled students, to ensure they get once registered, a survey was administered to both emthe help they need to improve their grades, increase ployees and employers at hundreds of companies across their confidence and encourage them to expand their the commonwealth. educational explorations. The donation, which was made through the Educational The Best Places to Work in Pa. is a program of the Central Penn Business Journal, Team Pennsylvania, the Improvement Tax Credit Program, will provide funds for several programs, such as Learning@theLibrary and Pennsylvania Department for Community & Economic Development, the Pennsylvania State Council and the Teen Tech@theLibrary. Both include the purchase of Tutor.com, Teen Health and Wellness, Learning Express Society for Human Resource Management. The process is managed by Best Companies Group, an independent Library and Financial Literacy Programs.

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Health system earns recognition For the 10th consecutive year, Allied Services Integrated Health System’s Home Health Division has been named a Top Agency of the 2019 HomeCare Elite, a recognition of the top-performing home health agencies in the United States. The ranking is developed by ABILITY Network, a leading information technology company helping providers and payers simplify the administrative and clinical complexities of health care. Allied Services Home Health serves patients in Luzerne, Lackawanna, Monroe, Pike, Susquehanna, Wayne and Wyoming counties, bringing medical care to patients in their own homes. The service combines the health system’s more than 30 years of nursing and rehabilitation experience to provide skilled nursing and rehab medicine, including physical, occupational and speech therapy, along with medical social services and home health aides.

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research firm. University ranked again for business The Princeton Review listed the University of Scranton’s Kania School of Management among the nation’s “Best Business Schools” for 2020, marking the 15th consecutive year that Scranton has been included in the list of 248 elite business colleges in the nation. Scranton was included among the list of “Best On-Campus MBA Programs,” which was published online in November. The list of business programs is compiled from an analysis of institutional data and survey data from students attending the business schools. The data incorporates career outcomes, academic rigor, admissions selectivity and other factors. The Princeton Review also listed Scranton in its 2020 edition of the “Best 385 Colleges,” ranking Scranton among the nation’s “Best Science Labs” (No. 7), “Best Campus Food” (No. 10) and “Best Run Colleges” (No. 20). The Princeton Review also included Scranton in its 2019 “Guide to Green Colleges.” Depot announces new opportunities Tobyhanna Army Depot’s continued success has led to several exciting new opportunities, strengthening its grasp on future Department of Defense maintenance requirements. The depot recently welcomed its newest workload, the U.S. Navy RIM-7 Sea Sparrow, a ship-borne anti-missile weapon system. The Sea Sparrow is considered a critical component of naval defense systems and is valuable against sea-skimming missiles. The depot’s Sustainment Planning Division is in the process of preparing for additional new workloads. The test and repair maintenance program for the components of the U.S. Army AN/TPQ-53 radar will arrive later this year. Like its predecessors, the AN/TPQ-36 and AN/TPQ-37 medium range radars, the AN/TPQ-53 aids troops by detecting, classifying, tracking and locating enemy attacks. Architecture firm receives awards Bohlin Cywinski Jackson was honored recently by the American Institute of Architect’s Northeastern Pennsylvania chapter with four design awards for their work on several projects. The new Admission House at Susquehanna University in Selinsgrove, received the Award for Excellence. The new building creates a more welcoming and exciting initial impression for the Office of Admission that better aligns with the University’s culture. Hamptons Residence, located near East Hampton, New York, was one of four projects selected for an Honor Award. The custom home is nestled within the preserved agricultural lands, sits parallel to the shore, and uses a calm palette of natural materials that will weather as the house ages. The Sustainability Lodge at the Pocono Environmental Center also took home an Honor Award for an Unbuilt Project as well as the award for Outstanding Local Project. Realty company opens in Hawley A leader in the Hazleton, Scranton and Wilkes-Barre markets, Lewith & Freeman’s reach now extends to Wayne and Pike counties with the opening of the Hawley office. Located in the historic Hawley Silk Mill, Lewith & Freeman will continue to connect buyers and sellers throughout the region. Lewith & Freeman officially opened the doors with a ribbon cutting ceremony Nov. 7. Please see Briefs, Page 21


BUSINESS BRIEFS FROM PAGE 20

Hospital makes biopsy available Wayne Memorial Hospital is offering an advanced step in the detection of breast cancer, a stereotactic biopsy procedure. The procedure is recommended when a mammogram reveals an abnormality, such as a suspicious lump, breast structure irregularities, changes in tissue or calcium deposits. A small sample of tissue is removed for examination under a microscope to see if cancer is present. A specialized mammography machine provides X-rays from two angles to help pinpoint the suspicious tissue. The two sets of images guide the physician to the area of concern, where a needle in a hollow tube can be inserted to remove the tissue for analysis. AllOne Charities matches funds On Giving Tuesday, Dec. 3, the national day of giving, AllOne Charities partnered with 33 nonprofits to complement their fundraising efforts. More than $84,000 was raised from over 500 donors to support the health care issues affecting the region and support caregiving organizations. AllOne Charities supported each organization that raised over $1,000 with a match of $1,000. U of S eyes lower emissions The University of Scranton will purchase carbon-neutral electricity for 2020 to reduce the school’s carbon footprint and greenhouse gas emission generation. The university will use Carbon-Zero 24/7, a new, 100% emission-free product from Talen Energy, a privately owned independent power producer based in Allentown. Backed by Emission-Free Energy Certificates issued by PJM Environmental Information Services, Carbon-Zero 24/7 ensures that the electricity supplied to the university is from a source that does not directly emit any air pollution — sulfur dioxide, nitrogen oxide, carbon dioxide — which can help the university reduce emissions associated with its electricity usage. Bank supports schools program Dime Bank recently contributed $1,000 to the Wayne Pike Schools and Homes in Education Afterschool Program. Administered through the Wayne Pike Workforce Alliance working with community stakeholders, the program serves students in the school districts of Wallenpaupack Area, Western Wayne and Wayne Highlands. Its goal is to improve academic performance, behavior and attendance, increase knowledge in science, technology, engineering and mathematics principles, and increase family involvement in student learning and family literacy. New hotel opens in Abingtons Best Western Hotels & Resorts announced the opening of the newly renovated Best Western Plus Clarks Summit Scranton Hotel, located at 820 Northern Blvd. in South Abington Township. Owned by Harry Patel, Gary Patel and Rak Patel, the hotel features 103 guest rooms, including eight suites. Amenities at the fully renovated hotel include a heated indoor pool, 24-hour fitness center, guest laundry facility, complimentary hot breakfast, free wireless internet and 3,500 square feet of meeting and event space. Each room is equipped with brand new bedding, furniture and fixtures, large flat-screen televisions, microwaves and mini fridges. Suites feature kitchenettes and separate living rooms. For business travelers, the business center offers complimentary printing, scanning and faxing.

Local university receives ranking Marywood University was recently ranked No. 27 in the Top 45 Master’s in Higher Education Programs and as the best program at a Catholic University by Intelligent. com. According to its website, Intelligent.com believes education is a lifelong commitment to continuous improvement. The website was developed to help students connect to the best resources and to provide them the best advice in a way that is easy to analyze and digest. Marywood’s fully online Master of Science in higher education administration program prepares students for a variety of midlevel careers in public and private colleges and universities. Alliance donates to project The Northeastern Pennsylvania Alliance presented Artists In Motion To Go LLC with a loan. Artists In Motion To Go LLC received a loan through the NEPA Alliance Tri-District EDA loan fund for the purchase of land and building to expand its business. Other project funds consisted of loan funds from Miners Bank and an equity injection from the owners. Artists In Motion To Go LLC started as a vision more than five years ago and has since grown from a mobile dance program into a premier performing arts studio. They offer an all-encompassing range of performance technique to students of all ages. They were previously located in a renovated church building before receiving assistance. The business had quickly outgrown the existing studio space and needed to expand to a second location. The new building added three additional classrooms, private voice/acting lesson rooms and a 300-seat theater used for live performances of plays and musical productions. They now service 250 active students and more than 500 total students.

College accounting professionals are offering free help to businesses and nonprofits starting in January. If you would like to participate, please email a description of your data analysis needs to tarashawver@kings.edu by Jan. 1. Up to 12 organizations will be chosen for this program, with preference given to smaller and newly created organizations whose needs most closely fit the scope of the project. Contact Dr. Tara Shawver at tarashawver@kings.edu or 570-208-5900, ext. 5455 for more information. Advocacy center receives grant The Children’s Advocacy Center of Northeastern Pennsylvania announces the award of a $10,000 grant from the NEPA Healthcare Foundation. The grant was made through the foundation’s Critical Needs program in response to CAC/NEPA’s suddenly failing forensic interview equipment. The forensic interview is a key component of the CAC model. Children speak with a trained forensic interviewer while the team listens. The interview is videotaped to minimize the number of times a child must detail their trauma and to increase the accuracy of the information provided. Groups form safety network Representatives from the Public Safety Training Institute at the Luzerne County Community College, the Wilkes-Barre Area OSHA office, PA OSHA Onsite Consultation Program from Indiana University of Pennsylvania, and local environmental, safety and health

professionals associated with various businesses, industries and educational centers throughout Northeast Pennsylvania have formed the Northeast Pennsylvania Safety Network. The mission of NEPSN is to create a forum and network of resources for workplace safety, health and the environment available to all businesses and organizations in Northeast Pennsylvania. NEPSN is currently accepting no-obligation memberships from all interested parties including students, business and industry, professional organizations, service organizations, logistical settings, governance, construction firms, labor unions, and individuals interested in workplace safety and health. There is no fee for membership in NEPSN, nor are there any requirements for meeting attendance; participation is entirely voluntary. Attendance at NEPSN meetings and activities is open to the public free of charge. The first public meeting will be held Jan. 17 at the Luzerne County Community College Public Safety Training Institute on Middle Road in Nanticoke. The snow date for the event is Jan. 24. The meeting will start promptly at 8 a.m. and will focus on the introduction of NEPSN to participants and a presentation by the PA OSHA Consultation program from the Indiana University of Pennsylvania.

SUBMIT PERSONNEL FILE items to business@ timesshamrock.com or The Times-Tribune, 149 Penn Ave., Scranton, PA 18503.

Bank offers holiday help Employees from FNCB Bank, locally based for more than 100 years, recently donated $1,700 and 220 gifts to 17 local families as part of the bank’s “Adopt-AFamily” holiday project. More than 200 FNCB staff members participated this year in Adopt-a-Family, the Bank’s signature holiday gift-giving event. The program matches local families in need from the Catherine McAuley Centers of Lackawanna and Luzerne County, Children and Youth Services of Wayne County and Victims Intervention Program in Honesdale with those wishing to donate. The Adopt-a-Family project is part of FNCB’s larger Community Caring initiative. As a local community bank, FNCB is making a difference through volunteerism, donations and outreach programs. Bank opening Hallstead location The Honesdale National Bank announced the opening of its Hallstead Office located at 313 Main St. in Hallstead (at Rose Street and Route 11). This location expands HNB’s branch office network to 12 full-service locations and marks the bank’s second office in Susquehanna County. The office is equipped with a drive-up featuring a 24-hour ATM and night depository. Geisinger program opens enrollment Geisinger’s groundbreaking precision medicine project, MyCode, has enrolled more than 250,000 participants in Pennsylvania and New Jersey, reaching a major landmark in the project. With DNA sequence and health data currently available on 145,000 of these participants, MyCode is the largest study of its kind in the world. College offers free help to businesses In partnership with the Wilkes-Barre Chamber, King’s

Getty Freedom Images

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PERSONNEL FILE ALLIED SERVICES

The health system announced the advanced certifications of two of its administrators. James Cooney, NHA, vice president of Allied Services Skilled Nursing Facilities, and Travis Davis, MHA, NHA, administrator of Allied Services Transitional Rehab in Scranton, earned the title of Health Services Executives Qualified COONEY Administrators as recognized by the National Association of Long Term Care Board Administrators. NAB is the nation’s leading authority on licensing, credentialing and regulating administrators of organizations along the continuum of long-term care. Cooney joined in 2014, when he led the opening of the new 55-bed Transitional Rehab Unit located in the Allied Services Rehab Hospital, Scranton. Cooney, a graduate of the University of Scranton, is a Pennsylvania Licensed Nursing Home Administrator with more than 19 years of professional experience in health care. Davis joined in 2014. He earned his master’s degree in health administration from the University of Scranton, and brings with him a strong background in marketing, business management and health care referral source collaboration. The health system recDAVIS ognized four recipients of the Charles Luger Memorial Award, which recognizes an employee or employees for their outstanding commitment and dedication to Allied Services and their embodiment of the organization’s ideals and mission. Jeff Snyder of South Abington Twp., director of operations, Burnley Employment and Rehabilitation Center, began his career at Allied in 2005. He previously worked as a program manager in the Developmental Services Division, assisting residents with disabilities. He enjoys his role working with community partners to create new opporSNYDER tunities for employment and vocational advancement. Margy Fiscus of Scranton, director of vocational services, joined Allied in 1982 as a direct care worker in the Developmental Services Division. Over three decades, Fiscus has become known for her depth of experience and commitment to assisting individuals with disFISCUS abilities. In her current position, she oversees the Community Employment Program, the William Warren Work Services Facility and the Adult Day Program. She has been instrumental in developing therapeutic and recreational programs for individuals served by the Adult Day Program. Bob Ames of Peckville, vice president, community services, has demonstrated a commitment to serving individuals with disabilities during his almost 30-year

career at Allied. He began as director of accounting before being promoted to executive director of vocational services. Today, he oversees staff and programs that deliver a variety of vital services across Northeast and Central Pennsylvania, including the Behavioral Health Division, Developmental AMES Services Division, Vocational Division and Waiver Coordination Services. Lori Ashman Williams, PT, MS, IMT, CLT, of Jefferson Twp., clinic director, Allied Services Dickson City Rehab Center, worked as an occupational therapist for nine years at Allied Services and also in the Pittsburgh area. AshmanWILLIAMS Williams has been part of the Allied family for more than three decades, helping countless patients to maximize their abilities and improve their quality of life. Jeff Snyder, BS, was announced as executive director of Burnley Employment and Rehabilitation Center and Waiver Coordination. He began his career at Allied Services in 2005 and for many years worked as a program manager in the Developmental Services Division. At Burnley in Stroudsburg, Snyder ensures individuals with disabilities are given specialized training and supervision and learn key work-related skills. Within the Waiver Coordination program, he oversees staff that assist consumers with access to home and community supports and services, which are tailored to their individual and varied needs. Snyder resides in South Abington Twp. Travis Davis, MHA, NHA, was announced as assistant vice president of the Transitional Rehabilitation Unit in Scranton. Davis, who joined Allied Services in 2014, earned his master’s degree in health administration from the University of Scranton, and also holds a Health Services Executive qualification. Davis brings with him a strong background in marketing, business management and health care referral source collaboration. He has been instrumental in several areas of the health system, most recently serving as administrator of the Transitional Unit. Travis lives in Waverly Twp. Joe Brudzinski was announced as network analyst. Within the Information Systems Department, the network analyst ensures network connectivity and analyzes network activity throughout the system to reduce downtime. Brudzinski joined Allied Services in 2016 BRUDZINSKI as an operations analyst. He brings more than 17 years of experience in information technology to his role at Allied Services. He resides in Scranton. Matt Lewis, BS, was announced as the manager of Technology Services. In his new role, Lewis will continue managing all mobile devices, LEWIS applications and telecom-

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munication throughout the organization with the addition of developing and maintaining all new technology services. Lewis joined Allied Services in 2013 as a student intern while earning his Bachelor of Science in information technology from Keystone College. He resides in Clifford Twp. BOLCAVAGE Christina Bolcavage, BS, was announced as systems analyst IV. In this role, Bolcavage will provide technical guidance and leadership to system development staff and oversee department projects. She will also be responsible for completing system analysis, verifying program changes, complete testing and implementation of existing and new systems. Bolcavage earned her Bachelor of Science in management information systems from Misericordia University and has been with Allied Services for more than 11 years. She resides in Clifford Twp. April James, RN, BSN, was announced as director of nursing and professional services for the health system’s Home Health division. April earned her Bachelor of Science in nursing from Wilkes University and will earn her master’s in nursing in February. She has been a member of the Home JAMES Health team for 10 years, most recently serving as a clinical care team supervisor. She resides in Kingston. Lisa Mortimer, PT, DPT, COS-C, was announced as manager of rehabilitative services for the health system’s Home Health division. She earned her master’s degree in physical therapy from Misericordia University and her doctorate in physical therapy from Utica College. She has been a physical therapist at Allied Services since 2009, serving in both outpatient and MORTIMER inpatient settings. Mortimer resides in Bear Creek Twp. Melissa Palermo, LPN, was announced as unit coordinator at the Allied Services Skilled Nursing and Rehabilitation Center in Scranton. Palermo’s journey with the Skilled Nursing Center began in 2003, when she was hired as a certified nurse’s aide. Through the use of Allied Services’ weekPALERMO ender program, she became a licensed practical nurse almost three years later. She is currently enrolled at Excelsior College and is expected to graduate in the coming weeks as a registered nurse. Palermo resides in Old Forge. Melissa Pedriani, BSW, was announced as assistant director of social services. She attended Millersville University and PEDRIANI

earned a bachelor’s degree in social work and psychology. While she has been an employee of Allied Services Skilled Nursing Center for five years, she brings more than 10 years of experience working in a skilled nursing setting. Prior to joining the Allied family, she spent four years as a director of social services and three years as a social worker specializing in dementia care. She resides in Jermyn. Laura Marion, RN, BSN was announced as assistant vice president of Allied Services Hospice and Palliative Care. In her three years with Allied Services, she has been responsible for the research, development and rollout of the health system’s Palliative Care program and oversaw MARION the development, credentialing and opening of Allied Services Hospice Center. She earned her Bachelor of Science in nursing from the University of Scranton. She lives in Clarks Summit. Suzanne Corby, RN, BSN, was announced as clinical director of Allied Services In-Home Hospice Care. Suzanne has more than 14 years’ experience in nursing, with more than nine years dedicated to hospice nursing. She graduated from Misericordia University with a Bachelor of Science in nursing and also CORBY holds a Bachelor of Science in dietetics and nutrition. In addition to hospice nursing, she has served patients in acute care, long-term care and skilled nursing care settings. Corby lives in Tunkhannock. Kelly Langan, RN, BSN, CHPN, was announced as clinical director of Allied Services Hospice Center. She coordinates care for patients that transfer to the center from the in-home hospice care team and also new admissions. She manages the staff at the Hospice Center to ensure the best quality of care for patients and their families. She graduated from Misericordia University with a Bachelor of Science in nursing and has more than 23 years’ experience as a hospice nurse. Langan lives in Scranton. Joyce Wizda, LSW, MSW, LANGAN was announced as social worker and bereavement coordinator for the Hospice program. Wizda holds a Master of Social Work from Marywood University. In her role, she will provide support to current patients and families. She also provides bereavement support to family members for up to a year after a loss. She brings WIZDA more than 35 years of hospice experience to her role at Allied Services. Prior to joining Allied Services, Wizda was a social worker for Hospice St. John. She lives in Peckville. Please see Personnel, Page 23


PERSONNEL FILE FROM PAGE 22 Gerlin Valencia, MDiv, ThM, Ph.D., was announced as the new chaplain for the Hospice program. Valencia holds a Bachelor of Arts in psychology from Bluefield College, as well as a Master of Divinity in pastoral counseling with specialization in marriage and family therapy, a Master of Theology in the psychology of VALENCIA religion and New Testament language and literature, and a Doctor of Philosophy in psychology of religion and pastoral care and counseling from Southern Baptist Theological Seminary. In his role, he will serve as a spiritual companion to patients and their families as they face the challenges of end-of-life care. Prior to joining Allied Services, Valencia was a spiritual care coordinator and chaplain for Heartland Hospice. He lives in West Pittston. Jamie Overholser, MA, was announced as the new bereavement coordinator and spiritual care coordinator for the Hospice program. Overholser holds a Master of Arts in spiritual formation and leadership from Spring Arbor University. In his role, he will provide support services OVERHOLSER and spiritual care to bereaved families and individuals after the passing of a loved one. He brings more than 30 years of hospice experience to his new role at Allied Services. Prior to joining Allied Services, Overholser was a bereavement coordinator for Heartland Hospice. He lives in Clarks Summit.

BETTER HOMES AND GARDENS REAL ESTATE WILKINS & ASSOCIATES

Dennis A. Mooney, a senior vice president and associate broker, was appointed to a three-year term on the board of directors for Monroe County Habitat for Humanity at its October meeting. For five years prior to Mooney’s appointment, he served on the organization’s board of directors. For the past MOONEY seven years, Mooney has been chairman of the MCHFH annual golf tournament. Mooney has been both a volunteer and donor to MCHFH. He has also served on the board of directors for the Arthritis Foundation and the Pocono Mountains Association of Realtors.

BORTON-LAWSON

David Reese has joined the board of directors as an external director. Reese brings a diverse skill set to the team that includes entrepreneurial success and proven business expertise in the technology arena. Reese serves as chairman of API Systems Inc., a leading provider of IT solutions, train-

REESE

ing and consulting services. He also serves as chairman of API Media, a digital media company whose clients include the Professional Golfers Association and the United States Golf Association.

C.A. LEIGHTON CO. INC.

Patty Leighton joined her husband, Tom, as a licensed real estate agent at the company earlier this year. A member of the Luzerne County Association of Realtors and its Multiple Listing Service, the 98-yearold family firm offers professional selling, listing and purchasing of residential and commercial real estate, along with providing auto, home, flood and business insurance, property management services and appraisals. Leighton is a member of the Pennsylvania Association of Realtors. She perfected her customer service skills as a successful small business owner at the Bee Hive Gift Shop in downtown Wilkes-Barre.

CAMP HAVAYA

Andrew Kaplan, board chairman of the camp in South Sterling, won the JCamp 180 Outstanding Board Leadership Award. The award is given in recognition of an individual camp board member whose leadership has produced significant improvement in a camp’s governance, fundraising and strategic planning. JCamp 180 is a program of the Harold Grinspoon Foundation, which provides consultation and support to Jewish camps around the country.

CHAMBER OF THE NORTHERN POCONOS

Holly Przasnyski has been appointed interim executive director. As the interim executive director, she will oversee the staff of the chamber and she will be responsible for office operations, member benefits and community outreach.

CLASSIC PROPERTIES

Ellie Rancont has joined the Kingston office. She was raised and currently lives in Freeland with her family. Rancont has an associate degree from Lackawanna Junior College and currently works as a full-time legal assistant for DBI Services in Hazleton. She recently earned her real estate education at Vintage Real Estate Academy in Hazleton. Brooke Rowe has joined the Kingston office. Raised in Forty Fort, she graduated from West Side Career and Technology Center. Rowe spent the last eight years in customer service and two years designing kitchens and bathrooms. She recently earned her real estate license online with Real Estate Express. Gerard Burke has joined the Clarks Summit office. He is a native of Scranton and currently lives in West Scranton. Burke’s previous career was working as a senior shipping coordinator with M.T.F. Biologics in Jessup, and he was a part-time Realtor. He recently reactivated his real estate license. Dawn Rossignol has joined the North Pocono office. She earned an associate degree as

a medical laboratory technician and currently works as a dialysis technician after 12 years as an insurance agent. Rossignol recently completed her real estate education with Vintage Real Estate Academy. She currently resides in Lake Ariel. Paula Perry has joined the North Pocono office. She ROSSIGNOL graduated from North Pocono High School and has degrees in history and political science. Perry worked for more than 20 years in the resort property management industry. She recently earned her real estate license from the University of Scranton. Jackie Lewandoski has joined the North Pocono LEWANDOSKI office. She created and hosts a home, cooking, gardening and crafting-themed program for more than 20 years on an area television station. Lewandoski was raised in Duryea and currently lives in Moscow. She possesses a Bachelor of Arts in mass communications, Master of Science in human resources and recently completed her real estate education at Penn State. Brooke Rowe has joined the Kingston office. She was raised in Forty Fort and graduated from West Side Career and Technology Center. Rowe spent the last eight years in customer service and two years designing kitchens and bathrooms. She recently earned her real estate license online with Real Estate Express. Ellie Rancont has joined the Kingston office. She was raised and currently lives in Freeland with her family. Rancont has an associate degree from Lackawanna Junior College and currently works as a full-time legal assistant for DBI Services in Hazleton. She recently furthered her real estate education at Vintage Real Estate Academy.

COMMONWEALTH HEALTH

RANCONT

ROWE

BURKE

Wilkes-Barre General Hospital’s third-quarter DAISY Award was presented to Christopher Jones, R.N., who works on clinical services telemetry at Wilkes-Barre General Hospital. The DAISY Award is a nationwide program that rewards and celebrates the extraordinary clinical skill and compassionate care given by JONES nurses every day. The DAISY, which stands for Diseases Attacking the Immune System, Award was started by the DAISY Foundation, which formed in 2000, after J. Patrick Barnes, then 33, died of complications of idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura, an auto-immune disease. Renata A. Meyer, M.D., has joined the physician network’s primary care team. She is an active member of the medical staff at Commonwealth Health Moses Taylor Hospital. Meyer is board certified by the American Board of Internal MEYER Medicine. She received her

medical degree from Medical University of Vienna, Austria, in 2007. Meyer completed a post-doctoral fellowship in hematology in Vienna, Austria, in 2009 and concluded an internal medicine residency at the Wright Center for Graduate Medical Education, Scranton, in 2019. Meyer speaks several languages, including English, German, Slovak, Hungarian, Czech and Russian.

COMMUNITY BANK NA

Lori Roth and Steve Stranburg were recently honored by the Pennsylvania Bankers Association for 40 years in the banking industry. Roth and Stranburg both serve as vice president, branch manager. Roth has been with the bank since 2013 and has served the Northeast Pennsylvania region for her entire career. Outside of the office, she is involved with Lattimer United Methodist Church and serves on its finance and administrative committees. Stranburg has been with the bank since 2010 and has served the region for more than 30 years. He is involved in his community as treasurer of South Milford Baptist Church and sits on the board of directors for the Montrose Chamber.

ROTH

STRANBURG

DISTASIO & KOWALSKI LLC

The personal injury firm founded by partners Daniel J. Distasio and Michael J. Kowalski has been ranked as a “Best Law Firm” by U.S. News & World Report and Best Lawyers. Firms included in the 2020 “Best Law Firms” list are recognized for professional excellence with persistently impressive ratings from clients and peers. The firm ranked in Personal Injury Litigation – Plaintiffs. To be eligible for a ranking, a firm must have a lawyer recognized in The Best Lawyers in America, which recognizes the top 5% of private practicing lawyers in the United States. Achieving a tiered ranking signals a unique combination of quality law practice and breadth of legal expertise.

DISTASIO

KOWALSKI

GEISINGER

Kenneth Altman, M.D., has been named chairman of the health system’s Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery. Novoa Altman most recently served as a professor of otolaryngology at Baylor College of Medicine and as chief

ALTMAN

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FROM PAGE 23 of otolaryngology at Baylor St. Luke’s Medical Center. He earned his medical degree from Duke University and completed an internship in general surgery and a residency in otorhinolaryngology-head and neck surgery at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania. He also completed a fellowship in laryngology and care of the professional voice at Vanderbilt University Medical Center.

GREATER SCRANTON CHAMBER OF COMMERCE

Amy Luyster, vice president, graduated from the U.S. Chamber of Commerce Foundation’s premier business leadership program. The inaugural Business Leads Fellowship Program trained and equipped leaders from state and local chambers of commerce with resources, access to experts and a network of peers to build their capacity to address the most pressing education and workforce challenges. Upon completion, BusiLUYSTER ness Leads Fellows join the U.S. Chamber of Commerce Foundation’s dedicated network of 200 chambers of commerce and statewide associations from around the nation who regularly engage on education and workforce initiatives.

HONESDALE NATIONAL BANK

Luke Woodmansee, vice president, chief credit officer, was recognized for 30 years of service at the bank’s annual employee recognition dinner. Woodmansee joined the bank in 1989 as a loan officer. He was promoted to the position of vice president and senior loan officer in 1991, and at that time also assumed the position of vice president, treasurer and secretary of HONAT Bancorp Inc., the bank’s holding company. Since 2001, Woodmansee has served in several critical leadership and officer capacities for the bank. Employees, each with 20, 15, 10 and five years of service, were recognized at the bank’s annual employee recognition dinner held at Lukan’s Farm Resort. Celebrating 20 years: Kathy Enslin, vice president, compliance officer; and Elizabeth Hazen, assistant vice president, loan review officer. 15 years: Kate Bryant, vice president, chief financial officer; Doreen Campfield, head teller, Lake Wallenpaupack office; and Laurie Harrington, assistant vice president, commercial loan officer.

WOODMANSEE

10 years: Randy Donovan, commercial loan officer; Robert Ferraro, assistant vice president, branch manager II/ loan officer, Hamlin office; Amy Gregory, mortgage adviser; Stephen Homza, vice president, commercial loan officer; Brian Wilken, assistant vice president, business developWILKEN ment officer. Five years: Emily Barton, loan operations team leader; Alfred Beck, HNB board of directors; Alyssa Herzog, mortgage adviser; Robert Hughes, systems analyst; Christopher Novoa, associate financial consultant, HNB Financial Services; Nancy Richards, branch supervisor, Lackawaxen office; Emily M. Zielinski, deposit processing clerk.

JOYCE INSURANCE GROUP

Jack Joyce recently joined the commercial insurance team as a business insurance consultant working in the Pittston and Allentown offices. Within this role, Joyce will develop insurance programs and coverage recommendations for commercial prospects, leveraging the agency’s strong relationship with JOYCE carriers, to ensure the best coverage and pricing options for clients. Joyce brings with him more than six years of experience in the insurance industry. In his role before joining Joyce Insurance Group, Joyce worked as a production associate at All Risks Ltd. in Conshohocken, where he specialized in insuring New York construction risks.

KING’S COLLEGE

HAZEN

HARRINGTON

DONOVAN

Dr. Michele McGowan, associate professor and graduate program director of health care administration, recently received notice that her submission to the Institute of Management Accountants Educational Case Journal, “Internal Medicine Associates: Decision Analysis in an Evolving Healthcare Environment,” MCGOWAN was chosen the third-place winner of the Summer Case Writing Competition. As the bronze winner, McGowan will receive a monetary award and her case will be submitted for publication review in the journal. The submission calls on students to provide an analysis of the financial sustainability of a physician practice. Dr. Bernard Prusak, professor of philosophy and director of the McGowan Center for Ethics and Responsibility, was PRUSAK recently published in Commonwealth magazine. His article, “Start with Safe: The Ethics of Harm Reduction,” seeks to address the moral and ethical dilemma of providing safe-injection sites to addicted people. The article focuses on the role that the Catholic

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Church should play in helping to heal addicted people and also highlights the efforts of Jesse Harvey, a graduate of King’s, to combat the opioid crisis. Harvey, a recovering addict, opened Journey House, a nonprofit that oversees recovery houses in Maine, in 2016. Lauren Pluskey McLain has been appointed associate vice president for institutional advancement and senior director of development and campaign. Pluskey McLain will be responsible for planning and managing the daily operations of the fundraising and development component of the PLUSKEY college’s Institutional AdvanceMCLAIN ment Division, including leading the college’s comprehensive capital campaign. She is responsible for directing fundraising professionals in the areas of annual giving, major giving, planned giving and grants. Before joining the college, she was managing director of the F.M. Kirby Center for the Performing Arts.

LEADERSHIP LACKAWANNA

The Core Program class of 2019-2020 recently held its first session at Montage Mountain. In the 10-month Core Program, participants gain leadership, interpersonal and managerial skills, as well as an enhanced understanding of the issues relevant to the Scranton area, through monthly sessions. Areas of focus include community development, economic development, government, health care, law, education, quality of life, sustainability, history and media, with sessions featuring widely recognized specialists. Members of the class also devote a large portion of their time to developing and implementing community projects, hence enhancing their leadership abilities, fostering teamwork and benefiting local nonprofit organizations. The Program class of 2019-2020 includes: Benjamin Segall, Penn East Federal Credit Union; Eric Schab, Commonwealth Health/Moses Taylor; Cara Sherman, United Neighborhood Centers of NEPA; Megan Kofira, Weiler Abrasives Group; Katheryn Kennington, Montage Mountain Resorts; Suzanne Kennedy, Community Bank NA; Alonzo Baker, Penn Foster; Mariah McAndrew, Penn Foster; Aubrey Rachel Fick; Dawn Talley, St. Joseph’s Center; Matthew Heimlich, Procter & Gamble; Elizabeth McGrath Ardizoni, the Wright Center for Community Health; Hans Christianson, Geisinger Health Foundation; Adam Witinski, Gertrude Hawk Chocolates; Dana Bilotta, Tobyhanna Army Depot; Peter Gentile, NBT Bank; Nicolette Stine, Tobyhanna Army Depot; Brittany Colon, First National Community Bank; Patrick Lindmeier, Mitsubishi Chemical Advanced Materials; Meghan Burns, Greater Scranton YMCA; Lauren Stroble, Girl Scouts in the Heart of PA; Autumn Granza, Penn Foster; Jasmine Ahuja, Jasmine Ahuja Realty; Mary K. Nolan, Tobyhanna Army Depot; Joseph Paulowskey, Benco Dental; Maura Mark, United Neighborhood Centers of NEPA; Anthony Monastra, Geisinger; Karen Lipnichan, Lackawanna College; Mary Elizabeth Endrusick, NeighborWorks Northeastern PA; Dharti Ray, Penn State Scranton; Justin Collins, Geisinger Commonwealth School of Medicine; Sarah Weber, NET Credit Union; Aditi Phalak, Barry Callebaut; Amber Walko-Ray, PPL Electric Utilities; Lauren Luongo, Fidelity Bank; Henry Matute Coello, Penn State Scranton; Michael DePietro, Benco Dental; and Keith Danielowski, Prudential Financial.

LEWITH & FREEMAN REAL ESTATE INC.

President and CEO Virginia Simms Rose has been appointed to Drexel University’s board of trustees. Rose is also a managing member of Moonglow Press and Moonglow Marketing, and an officer of San Ysidro Land Holdings. The realty firm is a regional real estate company with seven offices and over 100 real estate professionals. Its services include residential, land and commercial sales. The firm also offers added services through its affiliation with Templeton Abstract and its membership in the Leading Real Estate Companies of the World.

LONGHORN STEAKHOUSE

Jamie Bonsall, a bartender at the Wilkes-Barre location, took home the regional win after participating in the Bar Stars Series, a competition that tests the teams’ knowledge at the bar and celebrates the top bartenders in each restaurant. Bonsall is one of 58 team members from across the country to achieve this distinction, out of thousands who were invited to participate in the competition. Bonsall, a Kingston resident, has worked at LongHorn for five years. The first annual Bar Stars Series awards cash prizes totaling more than $50,000 and celebrates the restaurant’s commitment to serving quality in a glass every day.

MARYWOOD UNIVERSITY

Stephanie Wise, M.A., ATR-BC, ATCS, LCAT recently co-authored a book, “Healing Trauma in Group Settings: The Art of Co-Leader Attunement.” The book went on sale Nov. 12. Wise and her co-author, WISE Emily Nash, LCAT, graduate and senior clinical affiliate of the integrative trauma studies program at the National Institute of Psychotherapies, set out to write a book about healing trauma in group settings and co-leaders working together. For Wise, partnerships and collaborations among groups and copartners are at the heart of successful therapy. Wise also recently coauthored a chapter in the book “Narrating Practice with Children and Adolescents.”

MISERICORDIA UNIVERSITY

Misericordia University recently honored staff and faculty for service during the 40th annual Awards Dinner in Sandy and Marlene Insalaco Hall. Part of the Mercy Heritage celebration, the 61 honorees were recognized for five-year increments of service, including a special recognition for Elaine Halesey of Hanover

HALESEY

BOZINSKI

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PERSONNEL FILE FROM PAGE 24 Twp., professor of medical imaging, who was commended for 35 years of service. Glenn Bozinski of Kingston Twp., vice president of enrollment management, was honored for 30 years of service. Also recognized were Jerry Bradford, Shavertown; Dawn Evans, Hanover Twp.; Ronald Hromisin, Dallas; Sharon HuEVANS dak, Forty Fort; George Hunter, Mountain Top; Jennifer Luksa, Luzerne; Annmarie Narcum, Dallas; Georgia Young, Exeter; and Metz Culinary Management employees Bonnie Major, Shavertown, and Cindy Mulloy, Dallas, for 25 years of service. Employees honored for 20 years of continuous service included Grace Fisher, Dallas; NORDSTROM Jo Anna Naylor, Shavertown; Tammy Sponenberg, Dallas, and George Young, Exeter. Recognized for 15 years of service were James Clarke, Hanover Twp.; Jill Dillon, Mountain Top; Michelle Donato, Plains Twp.; Brian Herron, Luzerne; Alicia Nordstrom, Drums; Bernadette Rushmer, Shavertown; Mark Van Etten, VAN ETTEN Dallas, and Metz employee Paul Hill, Shavertown. Employees honored for 10 years of service were Alyson Harvey, Harveys Lake; Michelle Hawkins, Bear Creek Twp.; James Hedglin, Dallas; Matthew Hornak, Dallas; Joseph Redington, Scranton; Sameera Redkar, Clarks Summit; Kathleen Scaler Scott, Flemington, HEDGLIN New Jersey; Scott Woolnough, Wilkes-Barre; Anne Zaborny, Drums, and Metz employee Frank Varvaglione, Pittston. An additional 27 employees were honored for five years of service. They are Catherine Becker, Shickshinny; Jennifer Black, Shavertown; Laurie Brogan, Pittston Twp.; Rita Carey-Nita, Shavertown; SCALER SCOTT Karen Cefalo, Wyoming; Lori Charney, Duryea; Dominick De Matteo, Dallas; Joseph Donahue, Pittston Twp.; Nicola Edwards, Kingston; Matthew Hinton, Forty Fort; Paul Hurn, Trucksville; Kristen Karnish, Nesquehoning; Joseph Krasson, Plymouth; Elizabeth Lipski, Shavertown; Charles Makar, Shavertown; BROGAN Patricia Maloney, Hanover Twp.; Matthew Mihal, Dallas; John Mokychic, Monroe Twp.; Rita Molino, Kingston; Patricia Ross, Dallas; Morgan Sadowski, Hunlock Creek; Jeffrey Stephens, Dallas; Tif-

fany Wiernusz, Forty Fort, and Jennifer Yarnell, Stillwater. Also honored were Metz employees Cynthina Porasky, Falls, and Betty Ward, Dallas. Susan McDonald, Ph.D., L.S.W., assistant professor and chairwoman of the Department of Social Work at Misericordia University, recently had a chapCHARNEY ter included in the book “Narrating Practice with Children and Adolescents,’’ published by Columbia University Press in September. McDonald, a Kingston resident, and co-author Stephanie Wise wrote the chapter “Creating Spaces for Sam: A Story of Healing Trauma through Narrative Means and Art Therapy.’’ DONAHUE In it, the authors examine case study with a child who had experienced pre-verbal trauma. The interprofessional collaboration between the social worker and the art therapist provided the necessary therapeutic tools for Sam to recover from his past trauma. The American Society of Radiologic Technologists FounHINTON dation and American Registry of Radiologic Technologists recently presented Elaine Halesey, Ed.D., R.T. (R)(QM), professor of medical imaging and director of the Patient Navigation program, with an Advancing Your Profession: Education and Professional Growth Grant. The national organizaMCDONALD tions selected Halesey after writing the essay, “How Does Acquiring and Maintaining Certification Improve Patient Care?’’ The grant, awarded to one person per state affiliate, covers state affiliate membership dues and reimburses her for professional development conferences and continuing education efforts in her field of study.

NORTHEASTERN GASTROENTEROLOGY ASSOCIATES

David A. Talenti, M.D., a partner of the Honesdale practice, was elected by a statewide group of physicians to serve as vice president of the Pennsylvania Medical Society. Talenti’s election took place during PAMED’s annual House of Delegates in Hershey. He begins his new position TALENTI immediately and will serve a one-year term. After another one-year term as president-elect starting in October 2020, Talenti will be inaugurated as the organization’s president in October 2021. He will be the first physician from Wayne County to serve as PAMED president in the organization’s 171-year history. A congressional committee will review a scholarly

research article by a university education professor as it works toward setting federal regulations and funding guidelines for active transportation in the country. Assistant professor Tif Mulally, Ph.D., collaborated with Torsha Bhattacharya, Ph.D., and Kevin Mills, J.D., to MULALLY write the report, “Active Transportation Transforms America: The Case for Increased Public Investment in Walking and Biking Connectivity,” for the October edition of Rails-to-Trails Conservancy. The research addresses the importance of developing inclusive active transportation networks — biking, hiking and walking trails — so people can connect to popular destinations, their communities and society at large.

PENN STATE SCRANTON

Assistant chief academic officer and associate teaching professor of nursing Dr. Michael Evans was recently promoted to assistant dean of undergraduate nursing education at the Commonwealth Campuses. In his new role, Evans will oversee the operations of the undergraduate nursing program at various Penn State campuses. Among other duties, he’ll ensure curricular consistency and quality across the campuses, assist in the development and implementation of effective strategies to recruit a diverse pool of high-quality students and collaborate with faculty and administrators to fairly, promptly and effectively resolve student and faculty issues.

PENNSYLVANIA ADVOCACY AND RESOURCES FOR AUTISM AND INTELLECTUAL DISABILITY

Sara Wolff has been selected as the self advocate employee of the year for Pennsylvania’s northeast region by the organization, the commonwealth’s leading disability provider and advocacy association for people with autism and intellectual disability. Wolff has worked as a law clerk at O’Malley & Langan Law Offices for more than 13 years. Wolff remains active in the community. She is on the board of directors for the Arc of Northeastern Pennsylvania and other advocacy groups. In addition, she has spoken publicly to raise awareness about disability-related issues. In 2002, the National Down Syndrome Society honored Wolff alongside journalist Barbara Walters. Danielle O’Malley has been selected as the direct support professional of the Year for Pennsylvania’s northeast region by the organization. O’Malley is being recognized as a champion of happiness, advocacy and respect for the eight men she supports in a group home. She began her career at Keystone Community Resources as a direct support professional in 2014 and is known as the epitome of hard work and dedication. She strives to ensure that the quality of care given to the individuals she serves is nothing short of exceptional while working alongside other staff as a supportive coach and mentor. They received their awards at the PAR Annual Solutions Conference “We Are Worth It.” Awards Ceremony on Oct. 21 in Harrisburg.

REALTY NETWORK GROUP

Cheryl Gerrity has joined the realty firm. A lifelong resident of Northeastern Pennsylvania, she was born in Scranton and spent the last three decades residing in the Abingtons. She earned bachelor’s degrees in com-

puter science and business administration, and worked 17 years in corporate America before attaining her real estate license. Justin Gerrity, a Realtor serving the Scranton area, has joined the company. He’s been a licensed agent for several years and looks to his new “home” as providing him more opportunities for his clients. Before real estate, the Northeast Pennsylvania native spent his time in the service industry caring for people’s needs.

C. GERRITY

ROSENN, JENKINS & GREENWALD

Attorney Lee S. Piatt of J. GERRITY the business and finance department was awarded the eighth annual Pennsylvania Bar Association W. Edward Sell Business Lawyer Award. The award was presented at the 2019 Business Law Institute in Philadelphia on Nov. 21-22. Piatt was the first practicing lawyer outside of Philadelphia and Pittsburgh to receive the award. Presented by the Pa. Bar Association Business Law Section, the award honors contributions to the practice of business law at the highest level, a great honor for award recipients. The award is named after the late W. Edward Sell, a driving force behind the enactment of business corporation law in Pennsylvania.

TOBYHANNA ARMY DEPOT

Jessica Carter was selected supervisor of the quarter. As chief of the production management directorate’s intelligence surveillance and reconnaissance program management division, she is responsible for one of the largest system portfolios on the Army installation. Carter accepted a temporary assignment as chief of the directorate’s sustainment planning division prior to receiving the third-quarter award. The award recognizes her ability to manage the cost, schedule and scope for a multimillion-dollar portfolio that includes interservice air traffic control and landing, counter fire, air defense and range threat systems.

UNITED NEIGHBORHOOD CENTERS OF NORTHEASTERN PENNSYLVANIA

Maura Mark was recently promoted to director of community services. Mark has been a housing counselor since 2016. She brings nearly 20 years of experience in counseling diverse client populations and managing various programs MARK in several local human service agencies. Mark will oversee 14 community service programs provided out of UNC’s Olive Street location in Scranton, including basic needs assistance, crisis intervention services, housing and homeless support, self-sufficiency programs and cross-county outreach. Mark will assess emerging needs in the community to develop programs as needed and evaluate results to ensure Please see Personnel, Page 26

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PERSONNEL FILE FROM PAGE 25 programs are effectively meeting community needs.

UNIVERSITY OF SCRANTON

The university has named five individuals to its board of trustees: Rachele Mackin Browning ’84; Kathleen Sprows Cummings, Ph.D. ’93, G’93, H’19; the Rev. Ryan J. Maher, S.J.; John R. Mariotti, D.M.D. ’75; and Steve Sandherr ’80. BROWNING As managing director of SEI’s institutional group, Browning is responsible for new client outreach and business development in the United States for health care, nonprofit and the corporate markets. Prior to working for SEI, a global provider of asset management, investment processing and investment operation solutions that she joined in 1995, Browning was a commercial lender at CoreStates Bank responsible for business development in the United Kingdom and its U.S. subsidiaries. She later was responsible for the sales and marketing of the derivatives desk in CoreStates Capital Markets Group, hedging corporate client portfolios. Cummings is the William W. and Anna Jean Cushwa director of the Cushwa Center for the Study of American Catholicism at the University of Notre Dame and the Rev. John A. O’Brien Professor of American Studies and History. In addition CUMMINGS to directing the Cushwa Center, Cummings presently oversees the History of Women Religious, an academic organization devoted to the historical study of Catholic sisters. Her teaching and research interests center on the history of Catholicism in the United States, the study of American women and the relationship between religion and American society. A native of Phoenix, Maher has served as the president of Scranton Preparatory School since 2015. Previously, he served as executive director of the University of Scranton’s Jesuit Center, a resource center he founded to help faculty and staff understand and engage MAHER more fully in the Catholic and Jesuit mission of the university. During his career, Maher has taught in Jesuit high schools in Philadelphia and Washington, D.C., and served for 11 years as an associate dean and professor at Georgetown University. He also worked for three years on Capitol Hill as a legislative assistant in the United States Senate. Mariotti has worked as an orthodontics and dentofacial orthopedics practitioner for 35 years. He is certified by the American Board of Orthodontics in the specialty of orthodontics. In the past few years, he has been chosen to be a fellow of the International College of Dentists and to the MARIOTTI Pierre Fauchard Academy.

Both societies honor doctors throughout the world who aspire to excellence. He is an Army veteran and was commissioned as an officer with the rank of captain in the Army Dental Corps. He has also served as an active member of the Medical Alumni Board at the University of Scranton. SANDHERR Since 1997, Sandherr has served as chief executive officer of the Associated General Contractors of America, the nation’s largest commercial construction trade association with more than 27,000 member firms across the country. In that capacity, he leads efforts to protect and promote the construction industry in ConMARCY gress, federal agencies and the courts. For the past 12 years, the newspaper The Hill has named Sandherr as a top association lobbyist. He has also served as labor and small-business counsel for the National Association of Home Builders and practiced law with the firm of Thompson, Mann and Hutson. Three accounting department faculty members, Amanda Marcy ’10, G’11, Ashley Stampone ’10, G’11, and David Salerno, Ph.D. ’97, G’06, and economics and finance department faculty member, John Ruddy, D.P.S. ’91, recently had their research featured by a professional organization and cited in a Texas Supreme Court decision. Marcy and Stampone’s STAMPONE work, titled “Emerging Technologies Will Impact More Than Office Duties,” was featured in an article by the Pennsylvania Institute of Certified Public Accountants concerning how technological advancements will bring changes to CPA licensing and the CPA exam. Marcy, assistant professor of accounting, received her bachSALERNO elor’s and master’s degrees from the university, where she is pursuing her D.B.A. She joined the accounting faculty in 2015 and is a certified public accountant. Stampone, faculty specialist in accounting, received her bachelor’s and master’s degrees from the university. She is also pursuing her D.B.A. A certified public accountant, she has taught at Scranton since 2016. Salerno and Ruddy’s work, “Defining and Quantifying Pension Liabilities of Government Entities in the United States,” published in the Journal of Corporate Accounting and Finance and was cited by the Supreme Court of Texas in rendering a government employee pension decision involving the Dallas police and fire pension system. Salerno, associate professor of accounting, received his bachelor’s and master’s degrees from the university and his doctoral degree from Kent State University. A certified public accountant, he joined the faculty full time in 2007. Ruddy, assistant professor of economics and finance, received his bachelor’s degree from the university, his master’s

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degree from George Washington University and his doctoral degree from Pace University. A certified public accountant and a chartered financial analyst, he joined the faculty full time in 2013. The university has named Gerald Zaboski ’87, G’95, vice president for enrollment management and external affairs. In this position, Zaboski will provide overall strategic direction to the university’s admissions and enrollment activities, financial aid, branding and marketing efforts, news and media relations, and ZABOSKI community and government relations. He will also continue to serve as a member of the university’s Cabinet and as the leader for the university’s Incident Management Team. Zaboski joined the staff in 1988. During his career at Scranton, he has served as executive assistant to the president, vice president for external affairs and vice president for alumni and public relations. Ismail Onat, Ph.D., assistant professor of sociology, criminal justice and criminology, has received the 2019 Rutgers Center on Public Security Kaleidoscope Award. RCPS specializes in applying geospatial technologies to scholarly research and addressing crime, terrorism and other threats to public security. ONAT It presents the Kaleidoscope Award each year to a recipient who has demonstrated innovative applications of Risk Terrain Modeling, which diagnoses environmental conditions that lead to crime, that advance research and practice for the public good. Onat joined the faculty at Scranton in 2016.

USHYDRATIONS

The Pittston beverage manufacturer announced four recent promotions: Joseph Lapchak of Drums, a 17-year veteran with the company and most recently the VP/CFO, was promoted to executive vice president. Lapchak, a graduate of King’s College, has extensive experience in the banking and finance setors. In addition to overseeing the company’s LAPCHAK business development and financial strategies, he will now also be responsible for monitoring the company’s daily operations and reporting to its board of directors. Joseph Peters of Laflin has been promoted to vice president of operations. In his new role, Peters will oversee all engineering, production, processing and sanitation operations for the company. He has over 20 years of experience in beverage manufacturing. Peters joined USHydrations in 2016 and most recently served as director of operations. Jennifer Verry of Dallas, who recently celebrated five years with the company, has been promoted to director of human resources. Verry joined the company in 2014 as human resources manager. She has over 18 years of management and human resources-related experience and will oversee the company’s HR initiatives,

systems and strategies. Verry also serves as a member of the Greater Pittston Chamber of Commerce board of directors. Joseph McGeer of Mountain Top, who is the longest-serving employee with the company, has been promoted to director of logistics. McGeer began his career with the company at its MCGEER inception in 1999 and most recently served as logistics manager. In his new role, he will oversee all warehouse operations, fleet management and inventory control.

WAYNE BANK

The bank recently held a luncheon and awards presentation Oct. 23 to recognize employees celebrating years of service milestones with the bank. Employees recognized for five years of service included Gerald J. Arnese, assistant vice president and installment lending officer; Andrea Bartow, Stamford community office customer service representative; James F. Burke, executive vice president and chief lending officer; Karolyn Frey, Marshalls Creek community office head teller; Brenda Gesell, Franklin community office manager; Melinda S. Gorton, Lakewood community ofARNESE fice branch specialist; Lorraine A. Holt, Lackawanna County teller; John Koczwara, vice president and Central Scranton and Clarks Summit community office manager; Robert J. Mancuso, executive vice president and chief operating officer; Kimlyn M. Michalek, mortgage underwriting associate; and Kimlyn M. Michalek, assistant MANCUSO vice president and Roscoe community office manager. Honored for 10 years were Norma J. Kuta, Narrowsburg community office head teller; Sandra Lawler, Effort community office teller; Alison G. Menotti, commercial loans administrative assistant; Linda A. Meskey, credit analyst; Briana J. Scholl, credit analyst manager; and Kerry Snyder, Roxbury community office branch specialist. Milford community office head teller Maria Maceri celebrated 15 years of service. Twenty-year honorees included Ronald P. DePasquale, facilities and security officer; Amanda L. Hall, vice president and financial reporting manager; Kristine Malti, vice president and deposit operations and electronic banking manager; and Julie A. Swingle, Hawley community office teller. Hamden community office Manager Debra Renwick was honored for 25 years of service. Teresa Hynes, assistant vice president and Roxbury community office manager, and David F. Yamialkowski, facilities specialist, celebrated 30 years. Honored for their milestone 35 years of service were Ann M. Crane, accounting specialist, and Bonnie Lockett, assistant vice president and credit analyst. Vincent O’Bell, senior vice president and commercial loan officer at the bank, was recently recognized by the Pennsylvania Bankers Association for his 40 years of service to the banking industry. Please see Personnel, Page 27


PERSONNEL FILE FROM PAGE 26 He was honored at the Pennsylvania Bankers Association Group 3 meeting Oct. 8. O’Bell has served the banking industry in various senior roles for four decades. He holds an associate degree in banking and finance from Lackawanna Junior College and a graduate degree from the Stonier Graduate School of Banking.

WAYNE MEMORIAL COMMUNITY HEALTH CENTERS

Stacy Comer, DO, a board-certified internist, is now providing primary care services at the Honesdale VA Outpatient Clinic located at 600 Maple Ave., Suite 2, in Honesdale. Comer earned her medical degree from West Virginia College of Osteopathic Medicine, Lewisburg, West Virginia. Her military service spans over 11 years, beginning in the Army Reserves and ultimately leading to active duty in the Army. She completed her internal COMER medicine residency at Walter Reed National Military Medical Center, Bethesda, Maryland, and her internship at the Dwight D. Eisenhower, Army Center, Fort Gordon, Georgia.

WILKES UNIVERSITY

Six faculty and staff members were honored with the 2019 President’s Awards for Excellence. The awards, which were presented by interim President Paul S. Adams at the university’s fall convocation, recognize individuals who reflect excellence in their work based on the university’s core values. This is the fourth year for the awards program. Abas Sabouni, associate professor of electrical engineering, was the recipient of the President’s Award for Excellence in Scholarship for his efforts in advancing knowledge through discovery and research to better educate Wilkes constituents. Sabouni was recognized for contributions, including his work in the development of diagnostic and therapeutic technologies for biomedical applications. Heather Bowman, electronic resource librarian, and Josh Savitski, associate director of enrollment services, each received the President’s Award for Excellence in Innovation for their efforts in promoting programs, ideas and sustainable practices. Bowman was recognized for her efforts to expand access to and increase numbers of peer-reviewed electronic journal collections in the university’s E.S. Farley Library. Bowman has grown the journal collection from 30,000 titles to 80,000 titles. Savitiski was recognized for his work related to the new customer relationship management software, which has been implemented in the admissions office. Mildred Urban, associate director of advancement, was honored with the President’s Award for Excellence in Community for her efforts in collaborating with others on campus with mutual respect to foster a sense of belonging. Urban’s recognition included her leadership as a member of the University Staff Advisory Committee to help redesign, reinvigorate and reintroduce the Colonel Quarterly Staff Recognition Awards and for her work on campus events. Deb Chapman, faculty of practice in biology, received the President’s Award for Excellence in Mentoring for her efforts in nurturing individuals to understand and act on their abilities while challenging them to achieve great things. Chapman was recognized for

contributions that include her work as a student academic adviser, which has earned her the TREC Award for outstanding adviser in the College of Science and Engineering, and her work mentoring young women to consider careers in the sciences through the Women Empowered by Science Program, which she leads. Heather Sincavage, assistant professor and director of the Sordoni Art Gallery, was honored with the President’s Award for Excellence in Diversity for her efforts in embracing differences and uniqueness through sincerity, awareness, inclusion and sensitivity. Sincavage was recognized for contributions that included her work featuring artists and their work representing diverse perspectives in the Sordoni Art Gallery and in her teaching. In both areas, Sincavage has worked to increase awareness of diverse groups on campus, in the community and in the arts.

THE WRIGHT CENTER FOR COMMUNITY HEALTH

Maura Connor has been named senior vice president of integrated services and chief administrative officer of the organization and its affiliated entity, the Wright Center for Graduate Medical Education. In this role, Connor serves as an integral part of the executive leadership team as she oversees the strategic execution of organizationwide initiatives that unify departments across clinical, educational and administrative CONNOR environments, with an overarching goal to create inspiring and unprecedented synergy and team harmony. Connor previously served as chief operating officer of Hayes Inc., a TractManager Co. Concurrent with her role at Hayes, she led operations for the MD Buyline Division of TractManager.

WYOMING COUNTY CORONER’S OFFICE

Deputy Coroner Louis Marcho is the first in the county to receive his certification from the American Board of Medicolegal Death Investigators. Medicolegal investigators conduct forensic death investigations and serve as the eyes and ears of forensic pathologists. This national certification assures that the death investigator is proficient in all areas of death investigation. Before being allowed to even sit for the examination, an individual must currently be employed in MARCHO a medical examiner, coroner office or equivalent federal authority with the job responsibility to conduct death scene investigations or supervise such investigations at time of application and examination. Deputy Coroner Louis Marcho is the first in the county to receive his certification from the American Board of Medicolegal Death Investigators. Medicolegal investigators conduct forensic death investigations and serve as the eyes and ears of forensic pathologists. This national certification assures that the death investigator is proficient in all areas of death investigation. Before being allowed to even sit for the examination, an individual must currently be employed in a medical examiner’s, coroner’s office or equivalent federal authority with the job responsibility to conduct death scene investigations or supervise such investigations at time of application and examination.

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FOR THE RECORD DEEDS

Columbia County

Red oak mHC llC. Property Location: Briarcreek. Seller: Red Oak MHP LLC. Amount: $650,000. Frank C baker. Property Location: South Centre Twp. Seller: Mary P. Baker. Amount: $540,807. meade Pipeline Company llC. Property Location: Cleveland Township. Seller: Transcontinental Gas Pipe Line Co. LLC. Amount: $624,401. meade Pipeline Company llC. Property Location: Orange Twp. Seller: Transcontinental Gas Pipe Line Co. LLC. Price: $25,609,435. meade Pipeline Company llC. Property Location: Hemlock Twp. Seller: Transcontinental Gas Pipe Line Co. LLC. Amount: $404,922. meade Pipeline Company llC. Property Location: Sugarloaf Twp. Seller: Transcontinental Gas Pipe Line Co. LLC. Amount: $1,342,071. Eciffo office llC. Property Location: Bloomsburg. Seller: Betsy J. Hancock. Amount: $285,000. laura Grace and Joseph a adams. Property Location: Bloomsburg. Seller: Mark Allan and Karena Beth Tapsak. Amount: $302,000. mark H Rohrbach. Property Location: Catawissa Twp. Seller: ABCO. Amount: $300,000. 7 SC Scott town Center llC. Property Location: Scott Twp. Seller: PR Scott Town Center LP. Price: $10 f-m-v $6,469,011.36. mcDonalds Corp. Property Location: Bloomsburg. Seller: Robert W. and Renee M. Dillon. Amount: $600,000. alvin E Klinger. Property Location: Scott Twp. Seller: Bloomsburg (Columbia) DG LLC. Amount: $10 f-m-v $459,081. DHRt investments llC. Property Location: Hemlock Twp. Seller: Orion NRD Ruby JB LLC. Amount: $1,929,000. Karyn l and Dominic J Ford Jr. Property Location: Scott Twp. Seller: David J. and Nora L. Dula. Amount: $409,000.

laCKawanna County

Dylan Cerra. Property Location: Carbondale. Seller: Dominick L Nati. Amount: $265,000. brian Cresswell. Property Location: Dalton. Seller: Charles M Stivala. Amount: $325,000. anthony barrett. Property Location: Dickson City. Seller: Vera Paulishak. Amount: $265,000. olya mottur. Property Location: Dunmore. Seller: Mark Gerchman. Amount: $262,500. ashley n Saresky. Property Location: Dunmore. Seller: Fannie Mae, per atty in fact. Amount: $266,666. 1218 monroe avenue llC. Property Location: Dunmore. Seller: Paul C Woelkers. Amount: $460,000. michael R Desau. Property Location: Dunmore. Seller: Rose Sember. Amount: $295,000. michael appleton. Property Location: Fell Twp. Seller: John Cerra. Amount: $750,000. Edward J Farber. Property Location: Greenfield Twp. Seller: Sean P McGraw. Amount: $250,000. Kelly ann williams. Property Location: Jessup. Seller: Joseph H Roginsky. Amount: $320,000. Jenstar of Scranton ii llC. Property Location: Jessup. Seller: Meya Development Co. Amount: $371,000. alan wayne ives. Property Location: Madison Twp. Seller: Joseph J Kuchinski Sr. Amount: $450,000. Performance buildings lP. Property Location: Moosic. Seller: BP&S Holdings Co. Inc. Amount: $1,400,000. Robert a Ritterbeck. Property Location: Moosic. Seller: John S Pappadakis. Amount: $350,000. Jay Reviello. Property Location: Moosic. Seller:

Kenneth Powell. Amount: $357,737. ann a bannister. Property Location: Moscow. Seller: Patrick J Hellen. Amount: $505,000. Jahan tabatabaie. Property Location: Moscow. Seller: Kevin Wevodau. Amount: $327,000. Edward E Volovitch Jr. Property Location: Newton Twp. Seller: Mark E Vaughn. Amount: $330,000. morgan C Pensak. Property Location: Newton Twp. Seller: Ronald D Pensak. Amount: $287,500. Jamie medallel. Property Location: Old Forge. Seller: Karen A Graytock. Amount: $292,000. Eric Pleska. Property Location: Scranton. Seller: Patrick J Dunleavy. Amount: $257,500. Joshua Davis. Property Location: S. Abington Twp. Seller: William Thomas Botke. Amount: $255,000. Zhongxiang Zhu. Property Location: S. Abington Twp. Seller: Outlook Design & Construction Inc. Amount: $435,000. Shang Jian Jiang. Property Location: Springbrook Twp. Seller: Roland Cuellar. Amount: $299,000. Donald ward. Property Location: Vandling. Seller: J Scott Miscovsky. Amount: $254,000. Rita ann matos. Property Location: W. Abington Twp. Seller: Kenneth Powell. Amount: $319,000. Stephen Richard orzel. Property Location: W. Abington Twp. Seller: Joseph P Durkin. Amount: $425,000. James Vanwert iii. Property Location: W. Abington Twp. Seller: Jacquelyn M Evans-Shield. Amount: $254,500. John m Kleback. Property Location: W. Abington Twp. Seller: Cloverleaf Developers LLC. Amount: $252,000. benjamin D Jones. Property Location: W. Abington Twp. Seller: Timothy Brownell. Amount: $257,800. Jon C beckley Sr. Property Location: W. Abington Twp. Seller: Gregory S Matthews. Amount: $318,750. Geoffrey Joseph musti. Property Location: W. Abington Twp. Seller: Dilwyn Edward Symes. Amount: $315,000. Joshua R braddell. Property Location: W. Abington Twp. Seller: Subhash Chander Arora. Amount: $425,000. Cartus Financial Corp. Property Location: W. Abington Twp. Seller: Joshua E Seldin per agent. Amount: $319,900. David C Parfrey. Property Location: W. Abington Twp. Seller: Cartus Financial Corp. Amount: $319,000.

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luZERnE County

James Ganter. Property Location: Rice Twp. Seller; Presidential Land Company Ltd. to James Ganter. Amount: $429,280. tK Realty Holdings llC. Property Location: Kingston. Seller: Wilkes-Barre Racquet Club Limited Partnership. Amount: $1,037,000. william Ragona. Property Location: Bear Creek Twp. Seller: Daniel Boychuck. Amount: $400,000. Joseph a agolino. Property Location: Jenkins Twp. Seller: Angelo Answini. Amount: $280,500. Pocono Hotels inc. Property Location: Plains Twp. Seller: Plains Hotel Associates. Amount: $8,400,000. michael K Duricko. Property Location: Hazle Twp. Seller: John McCarrie. Amount: $380,000. Jeffrey Scott Simpson. Property Location: Wright Twp. Seller: Yvonne Krashkevich. Amount: $349,000.

monRoE County

HFiCo llC. Property Location: Tunkhannock Twp. Seller: Robert and Jane Clawson. Amount: $395,000. thurston and Kelly Reinhart. Property Location: Tobyhanna Twp. Seller: Bryan Fuerst and Dennis Forde Jr. Amount: $355,000. Jessica and Rosemary Padilla. Property Location: Jackson Twp. Seller: JHJF Properties LLC. Amount: $365,000. Jacques Jean. Property Location: Price Twp. Seller: DE&S Properties Inc. T/A Classic Quality Homes. Amount: $329,900. abraham Goldstein. Property Location: Middle Smithfield Twp. Seller: Owen Lee. Amount: $430,000. Jeannine leager and Russell Dunbar iii. Property Location: Middle Smithfield Twp. Seller: Kevin and Jill Miller. Amount: $327,000. arby’s Properties llC. Property Location: East Stroudsburg. Seller: Sybra LLLC F/K/A Sybra of Michigan LLC SB/M Sybra Inc. Amount: $1. Tax basis: $559,551. David Camp and Gwen borowsky. Property Location: Tobyhanna Twp. Seller: Arthur and Andrea Jennerich. Amount: $575,000. bernice Claxton-Stapleton and Frankie Stapleton. Property Location: Middle Smithfield Twp. Seller: Classic Quality Homes. Amount: $308,500. Jaime and Jessica Hidalgo. Property location: Coolbaugh Twp. Seller: Michael Delcampt Trust. Amount: $420,000. David obiesie. Property Location: Tobyhanna Twp.

Seller: Classic Quality Homes. Amount: $304,500. Piotr olejnik and Paulina Galik. Property Location: Jackson Twp. Seller: Stephen and Donna Hallberg. Amount: $380,000. Peggy and Rodney merwine. Property Location: Hamilton Twp. Seller: Mario and Illise Arvelo. Amount: $330,000. Justin and Christine bove. Property Location: Tobyhanna Twp. Seller: Joshua and Kristin Shannon. Amount: $378,500. nP 830 llC. Property Location: Stroudsburg. Seller: Laurel Beverage Co. Amount: $450,000. michael and brandie Carter. Property Location: Paradise Twp. Seller: Adrian Martens. Amount: $299,900. Christopher and nancy Fan. Property Location: Polk Twp. Seller: Stanislaw Wnorowski and Thomas Gontarz. Amount: $317,500. leigh Hopkins and Jacqueline Junkins-Hopkins. Property Location: Tobyhanna Twp. Seller: William MacMillan III and Donna Wood. Amount: $850,000. leonid ivanov and alexis Santiago-Cabanas. Property Location: Stroudsburg. Seller: David and Lynette Quaresimo. Amount: $399,000. Vladimir leibson and Raisa Reznikas. Property Location: Stroud Twp. Seller: RJA Development Corp. Amount: $292,200. Gosia Sobieszczuk. Property Location: Hamilton Twp. Seller: Central Penn Capital Management LLC. Amount: $309,175. Erik Paige and Cheryl Hall-Paige. Property Location: Middle Smithfield Twp. Seller: Joun and Choon An. Amount: $332,500. HFiCo llC. Property Location: Stroudsburg. Seller: Lamplighter Associates. Amount: $372,000. Jay and Donna Galaini. Property Location: Coolbaugh Twp. Seller: Joyce Mennella. Amount: $330,000. HFiCo llC. Property Location: Pocono Twp. Seller: GAO Global LLC. Amount: $950,000. Jan bulinsky. Property Location: Smithfield Twp. Seller: Marek Morawiec Est., Daiana and Elizabeth Morawiec (exec.). Amount: $322,000. HFiCo llC. Property Location: Tobyhanna Twp. Seller: Charlene Walter. Amount: $347,000. turning wheel Enterprises llC. Property Location: Pocono Twp. Seller: Debra and Curtis Herman. Amount: $313,000. Pre-insulated metal technologies inc. Property Location: Stroud Twp. Seller: Northwoods Commercial Properties Inc. Amount: $5,500,000. natalie George. Property Location: Price Twp. Seller: LTS Homes LLC. Amount: $332,143. liberty one Realty llC. Property Location: Tobyhanna Twp. Seller: 383 Ventures LLC. Amount: $443,000. Eric Powders. Property Location: Tobyhanna Twp. Seller: Spartak Holding Group LLC, Oval Management of PA LLC (managing member). Amount: $303,000. tiffany Guirand. Property Location: Stroud Twp. Seller: Joel Anthony Inc. Amount: $343,000. Joan maniaci and melissa Clarke. Property Location: Jackson Twp. Seller: Thomas and Joyce Flattery. Amount: $430,000. 296 washington Street llC. Property Location: East Stroudsburg. Seller: Shiva Real Estate Investors and Management LLC. Amount: $862,500. 260 Great bear llC. Property Location: Middle Smithfield Twp. Seller: James and Anne Neitzel. Amount: $300,000. beltzville Enterprises llC. Property Location: Barrett Twp. Seller: Hollow Enterprises Inc. Amount: $850,000. Please see Record, Page 29

JANUARY 2020


FOR THE RECORD FROM PAGE 28 Sterowski’s Car Wash LLC. Property Location: Tobyhanna Twp. Seller: Mountain Car Care LP, Geryville Associates LLC. Amount: $600,000. Richard and Samantha Kim. Property Location: Tobyhanna Twp. Seller: Paul and Carolyn Rodriguez Trust. Amount: $299,000. Ronald and Kathy Papera. Property Location: Tobyhanna Twp. Seller: Avram Hornik and Katharine Damora. Amount: $825,000. Niagale Fofana. Property Location: Ross Twp. Seller: Classic Quality Homes. Amount: $313,500. Paul and Jennifer Ferry. Property Location: Tobyhanna Twp. Seller: Michael and Jayne Klem. Amount: $424,000. Richard and Larisa Leist. Property Location: Barrett Twp. Seller: Gregory and Suzanne Muth. Amount: $720,000.

PiKe CouNty

Alexander and Diana Smartenko. Property Location: Blooming Grove Twp. Seller: Martin and Maureen Rykowski McCarthy. Amount: $637,500. Sean and Casie Robinette. Property Location: Blooming Grove Twp. Seller: John A and Olivia M Lieto. Amount: $256,000. Jason and Ashlie eckert. Property Location: Blooming Grove Twp. Seller: Philip M and Kathleen Giaquinto. Amount: $275,000. Paul C and Carol e Matlow. Property Location: Blooming Grove Twp. Seller: Mark H and Betty C Gross. Amount: $560,000. Sebastien Raphaelan. Property Location: Dingman Twp. Seller: Joana Kurija. Amount: $263,500. James Wang, Danielle A Rainer. Property Location Dingman Twp. Seller: Cawley Family Trust by Donald J Case, exc. Amount: $275,000. Scott R Fischer, Natasha Lay Peng Soh. Property Location: Dingman Twp. Seller; Nischoff Holdings LLC. Amount: $331,500. Amy Rowland, Aaron Gregory Demark. Property Location: Dingman Twp. Seller: Jesse and Stan Tashlik. Amount: $335,000. Jeffrey J opitz Jr. Property Location: Delaware Twp. Seller: Christopher, Nicholas S, Geoffrey Crowell. Amount: $465,000. edward and Jacqueline Jones. Property Location: Westfall Twp. Seller; Thomas and Jeri Lamb. Amount: $269,000. Richard G and Mimi C Hohn. Property Location: Westfall Twp. Seller: Rivers Edge L.P. Amount: $319,900. thomas H Maellaro Jr., Katrina Foster. Property Location: Milford Boro. Seller: Robert and Karen K Berner. Amount: $285,000. Joseph F Rutz. Property Location: Porter Twp. Seller: Joseph and Nicoletta Guddemi. Amount: $285,000. Anthony and Sheena Finamore. Property Location: Shohola Twp. Seller: Joseph A and Angela McCabe. Amount: $320,000. Karen and timothy Larson. Property Location: Shohola Twp. Seller: Anne Allende. Amount: $520,000. Richwine Properties LLC. Proprty Location: Palmyra Twp. Seller: Timothy L and Brenda J Winters. Amount: $590,500. Jennifer Maria and Alan James Slade. Property Location: Palmyra Twp. Seller: Raymond c and Maryann F Merrell. Amount: $543,500. Gary N and Lynn Susan Buss. Property Location: Palmyra Twp. Seller: John J and Lora A Young. Amount: $562,500. John S snd Maureen Saggio. Property Location:

Palmyra Twp. Seller: Keith R Frey. Amount: $545,000. Steven Cabibbo, Colette e Baruth. Property Location: Palmyra Twp. Seller: Stephen M McClain, Jennifer A Borovicka. Amount: $499,900. Aleksey Solovkov, Svetlana Atomyeyeva. Property Location: Palmyra Twp. Seller: Rafeal Adoni. Amount: $332,000. Joseph and Roseanne Gagliardo. Property Location: Greene Twp. Seller: Ernest and Mary Henzi. Amount: $455,000. timothy D Buckley. Property Location: Lackawaxen Twp. Seller: G.A. Homes Inc. Amount: $364,000. Michael and Jennifer Ann Grella Jr., Michael Christopher Grella. Property Location: Lackawaxen Twp. Seller: Robert V and Frances Woods Pisani. Amount: $280,000. Shaun Gerald and Diana Rosella Hinklein. Property Location: Lackawaxen Twp. Seller: Delta Properties Inc. Amount: $560,000. Steven Alan and Wendy L Walsh. Property Location: Lackawaxen Twp. Seller: G.A. Homes Inc. Amount: $349,449. Anthony F Campagna. Property Location: Lackawaxen Twp. Seller: Carol Guereiri and Martin Fishman. Amount: $319,000. Attilio and Mileah Giue. Property Location: Lackawaxen Twp. Seller: Claudio and Deborah Gallina. Amount: $312,450.

WAyNe CouNty

Peter Kolanksoki, Rachel Michos. Property Location: Canaan Twp. Seller: Jessica L Roberts. Amount: $318,000. John e and theresa L Morton. Property Location: Damascus Twp. Seller: John E and Theresa L Makarewicz. Amount: $535,000. Christopher M Hojnacki. Property Location: Dyberry Twp. Seller: Nykea LLC. Amount: $256,000. Matthew J Sapet, Lauren englert. Property Location: Lake Twp. Seller: Karen R Nat. Amount: $259,900. edward C and Rosalie Rempel. Property Location: Lake Twp. Seller: Judy M Weeks. Amount: $280,000. James A and Anne M Dabrow Woods. Property Location: Lake Twp. Seller: Sandra Knechtgoldfrab Rev. TR, Sandra M Goldfarb TR. Amount: $330,000. James K Cutler. Property Location: Lake Twp. Seller: Michael and Kimberly Goldstein. Amount: $360,000. Michael and Rhonda Walsh. Property Location: Lake Twp. Seller: Peter P Dohanich Jr., Jack S Ventimiglia. Amount: $250,000. Michale J and Claire e Reilly. Property Location: Lake Twp. Seller: Gary C Frey. Amount: $290,000. Paul t and Carrie G Colaiezzi. Property Location: Lake Twp. Seller: George S and Elaine W Simons. Amount: $387,000. Cactus Financial Corp. Property Location: Lehigh Twp. Seller: Paul and Christine McLean. Amount: $500,000. Michael S Hoagland, Michael A eaton. Property Location: Lehigh Twp. Seller: Cactus Financial Corp. Amount: $500,000. Lee R and teresa Depersia. Property Location: Lehigh Twp. Seller: Diane A and Jonathan S Corle. Amount: $624,900. timothy D Duhaime, tanya M Harris. Property Location: Lehigh Twp. Seller: Neil Michael Werner, Tanya M Harris. Amount: $593,000. Andrew S and Melissa A Currier. Property Location: Manchester Twp. Seller: Gale L Dingwell, Melissa A Currier. Amount: $255,400. Sonia i Atanacio, Porfirio and Daniel Rovira. Property Location: Mt. Pleasant Twp. Seller: Vincent P

and Gail C Nanarone. Amount: $250,000. Kevin Patrick and Victoria Decker. Property Location: Palmyra Twp. Seller: Vitaly and Valentina Zaslav. Amount: $365,000. Lakeside Realty LLC of PA. Property Location: Palmyra Twp. Seller; Stanley J Hallowich Jr. Amount: $325,000. Russell Hume. Property Location: Paupack Twp. Seller: Susan G Shaver Liv. Tr. Amount: $500,000. Pamela Gifford. Property Location: Paupack Twp. Seller: Mary Beth Decataldo, John Thomas Corbett. Amount: $275,000. timothy and Marisa Dukovich. Property Location: Paupack Twp. Seller: Peter D and Susan Clark. Amount: $330,000. Vincent e and theresa A Decesare. Property Location: Paupack Twp. Seller: Theodore R and Laurie E Couillou. Amount: $450,000. Kim F and and Ann C Fackler. Property Location: Paupack Twp. Seller: David W Cottell. Amount: $320,000. Rosalyn Cohen, Beth L Moss. Property Location: Paupack Twp. Seller: SNIP. Amount: $275,000. Brian and Anne Kiernan. Property Location: Paupack Twp. Seller: Siegfried and Heidi Schneider. Amount: $360,000. Brian Hopkins and Heather Wright. Property Location: Paupack Twp. Seller: Deborah A Flickinger. Amount: $975,000. Ronald and Darla Vogel. Property Location: Salem Twp. Seller: Christina H Fehlner. Amount: $330,000. Stephen James Sheridan, Jessica D Lyle. Property Location: Salem Twp. Seller: John E Davis, Seigfried and Arlene D Higgins. Amount: $525,000. Robert C Potter, Patricia A Loux. Property Location: Salem Twp. Seller: Charles J and Diane H Durkin. Amount: $615,000. James C Bokor Jr. Property Location: Starrucca Boro. Seller: Adelheid Hazleton. Amount: $400,000. First Baptist Church of Waymart, Waymart Church. Property Location: Waymart. Seller: NRG Realty Holdings. Amount: $670,000.

WyoMiNG CouNty

Northwood investments LLC. Property Location: Overfield Twp. Seller: David and Deborah Botscheller. Amount: $440,000. Lynn M Arkis. Property Location: Falls Twp. Seller: Gery M and Diane M Franko. Amount: $288,400. George Dobrinski. Property Location: Tunkhannock Twp. Seller: Wyoming County Sheriff, Bernard C Scranta. Amount: $411,397.45. Jennifer Lynn and Dennis Zimmerman. Property Location: Northumberland Twp. Seller: Thomas M and Lynn M McGlynn. Amount: $350,000. Meade Pipeline Co. LLC. Property Location: Clinton Twp. Seller: Transcontinental Gas Pipe Line Co. LLC. Amount: $3,771,247. Meade Pipeline Co. LLC. Property Location: Clinton Twp. Seller: Transcontinental Gas Pipe Line Co. LLC. Amount: $4,933,700. Daniel A and Ashley M Dymond. Property Location: Tunkhannock Twp. Seller: Alberta L and Sandra Dymond Jr. Amount: $250,000.

MORTGAGES

CoLuMBiA CouNty

Red oak MHC LLC. Property Location: Briarcreek. Lender: Wayne Bank. Amount: $600,000. Briar Creek Manor MHC LLC. Property Location: Briarcreek. Lender: Wayne Bank. Amount: $492,000. Jeffrey and Maura Ann Brunmeier. Property Location: Bloomsburg. Lender: MERS. Amount: $336,782.

John Z and Fannie S Stoltzfus. Property Location: Greenwood Twip. Lender: Central Susquehanna Community Federal Credit Union. Amount: $300,000. Jack L Breech. Property Location: Catawissa Twp. Lender: Northumberland National Bank. Amount: $452,000. tami R and Carl Richard Savage iii. Property Location: Greenwood Twp. Lender: First Columbia Bank & Trust Co. Amount: $309,000. Marr Residential Sales LLC. Property Location: Mifflin Twp. Lender: First Columbia Bank & Trust Co. Amount: $412,588. MSP Properties of Pennsylvania LP. Property Location: Berwick. Lender: Ameriserv Financial Bank. Amount: $750,000. Shawn M and Jennifer L Fester. Property Location: Bloomsburg. Lender: First Keystone Community Bank. Amount: $401,721.50. 7 SC Scott town Center LLC. Property Location: Scott Township. Lender: Citi Real Estate Funding Inc. and Wells Fargo Bank. Amount: $97,000,000. RKK Realty LLC. Property Location: Bloomsburg. Lender: First Columbia Bank & Trust Co. Amount: $330,000. DHRt investments LLC Property Location: Hemlock twp. Lender: First Columbia Bank & Trust Co. Amount: $1,328,000. Karyn L and Dominic J Ford Jr. Property Location: Scott Twp. Lender: MERS. Amount: $338,550. toby S and Michelle L Wagner. Property Location: Madison Twp. Lender: AgChoice Farm Credit. Amount: $1,700,000. Foughts Disposal Service inc. Property Location: Scott Twp. Lender: Branch Bank and Trust Co. Amount: $748,000. Scott C and Ann M Fought. Property Location: Fishingcreek Twp. Lender: Branch Banking and Trust Company. Amount: $748,000.

LACKAWANNA CouNty

Wayne Peiffer. Property Location: Clifton Twp. Lender: Fidelity Dep & Disc Bank. Amount: $250,000. Shannon Mary Warner. Property Location: Covington Twp. Lender: PS Bank. Amount: $372,000. Sean Jennings. Property Location: Covington Twp. Lender: Fidelity Dep & Disc Bank. Amount: $385,000. Brian Cresswell. Property Location: Covington Twp. Lender: MERS. Amount: $319,113. idle Hours Realty inc. Property Location: Dickson City. Lender: NBT Bank. Amount: $384,000. Dileo Real estate Holdings LLC. Property Location: Dickson City. Lender: Peoples Security Bank & Trusst Co. Amount: $487,500. Dileo Real estate Holdings LLC. Property Location: Dickson City. Lender: Peoples Security Bank & Trust Co. Amount: $403,000. Pooja 1 LLC. Property Location: Dunmore. Lender: Landmark Community Bank. Amount: $450,000. eric S Saresky. Property Location: Dunmore. Lender: United Wholesale Mortgage. Amount: $253,332. 1218 Monroe Ave. LLC. Property Location: Dunmore. Lender: Luzerne bank. Amount: $404,000. Mark DeStefano. Property Location: Dunmore. Lender: Fidelity Dep & Disc Bank. Amount: $1,000,000. Michael Appleton, per agent. Property Location: Elmhurst Twp. Lender: Draper & Kramer Mortgage Corp. Amount: $600,000. eric William Martinelli. Property Location: Glenburn Twp. Lender: Net Federal Credit Union. Amount $336,000. Please see Record, Page 30

NORTHEAST PENNSYLVANIA BUSINESS JOURNAL JANUARY 2020 29 TS_CNG/NPBJ/PAGES [B29] | 01/08/20

13:36 | BAUMEISTER


FOR THE RECORD

FROM PAGE 29 Deana M Kilmer. Property Location: Greenfield Twp. Lender: PA State Employees Federal Credit Union. Amount: $470,000. Joseph Frank Leo. Property Location: Jefferson Twp. Lender: Fidelity Dep & Disc Bank. Amount: $276,000. Kelly Ann Williams. Property Location: Jessup. Lender: JP Morgan Chase Bank. Amount: $280,000. Barry Lupini. Property Location: Jessup. Lender: FNCB Bank. Amount: $250,000. Joshua Maddox. Property Location: Madison Twp. Lender: Mortgage Research Center LLC. Amount: $282,292. Restora Properties LLC. Property Location: Moosic. Lender: Lendinghome Funding Corp. Amount: $278,500. Angelo J Parente. Property Location: Moosic. Lender: Fidelity Dep & Disc Bank. Amount: $334,000. Karen Tomaine 2017 Ir Tr. Property Location: Moosic. Lender: UBS Bank USA. Amount: $600,000. Sean C Volack. Property Location: Moosic. Lender: Wells Fargo Bank. Amount: $308,900. Performance Building LP. Property Location: Moosic. Lender: Honesdale Nationa bank. Amount: $750,000. Jay Reviello. Property Location: Moosic. Lender: Broker Solutions Inc. Amount: $320,336. Gerald S Lefever. Property Location: Moscow. Lender: Peoples Security Bank & Trust Co. Amount: $322,000. Christophe G Liekens. Property Location: Moscow. Lender: ESSA bank & Trust. Amount: $479,750. Brooke Beier. Property Location: Newton Twp. Lender: FNCB Bank. Amount: $550,000. Edward E Volovitch. Property Location: Newton Twp. Lender: Better Mortage Corp. Amount: $264,000. Joseph J Gentile Jr. Property Location: Newton Twp. Lender: FNCB Bank. Amount: $276,000. Jamie Medallel. Property Location: Old Forge. Lender: United Northern Mortgage Bankers Ltd. Amount: $286,711. Julia Insalaco. Property Location: Old Forge. Lender: Citizens Savings Bank. Amount: $251,378. R&A LLC. Property Location: Old Forge. Lender: First National Bank of Pa. Amount: $525,000. Richard G Kalinowski. Property Location: Olyphant. Lender: FNCB Bank. Amount: $288,000. Anthony Barrett. Property Location: Olyphant. Lender: Stearns Lending LLC, Amount: $251,750. Joseph E Caputo. Property Location: Olyphant. Lender: Peoples Security Bank & Trust Co. Amount: $334,000. Nicholas A Sokalsky. Property Location: Olyphant. Lender: NET Federal Credit Union. Amount: $250,000. Sean Sholtes. Property Location: Olyphant. Lender: Fidelity Dep & Disc Bank. Amount: $332,500. R&A LLC. Property Location: Olyphant. Lender: First National Bank of PA. Amount: $525,000. Shelley A Fayocavitz. Property Location: Ransom Twp. Lender: PS Bank. Amount: $426,720. Edward Zelinka. Property Location: Ransom Twp. Lender: Quicken Loans. Amount: $288,958. Jason J Pearce. Property Location: Roaring Brook Twp. Lender: PA State Employees Credit Union. Amount: $254,722. Idle Hours Realty LLC. Property Location: Scranton. Lender: NBT Bank. Amount: $384,000. James L Griffith. Property Location: Scranton. Lender: Wayne Bank. Amount: $534,000. North American Manufacturing Co. LLC. Property Location: Scranton. Lender: Live Oak Bank. Amount:

$952,000. Ryan Patrick Vance. Property Location: Scranton. Lender: Quicken Loans. Amount: $270,000. Skeeps OB LLC. Property Location: Scranton. Lender: Corevest American Finance Lender LLC. Amount: $4,558,600. 700 Vine Realty LLC. Property Location: Scranton. Lender: Peoples Security Bank & Trust Co. Amount: $450,000. R&A LLC. Property Location: Scranton. Lender: First National Bank of PA. Amount: $525,000. Foxys Inc. Property Location: Scranton. Lender: PS Bank. Amount: $550,000. Zhongxiang Zhu. Property Location: S. Abington Twp. Lender: Loandepot Com LLC. Amount: $348,000. Amanda Forgione. Property Location: S. Abington Twp. Lender: NBT Bank. Amount: $292,000. Charles J McAvoy. Property Location: S. Abington Twp. Lender: Freedom Mtge. Corp. Amount: $279,787. Stephen Sorokanich Jr. Property Location: S. Abington Twp. Lender: FNCB. Amount: $320,000. Skeeps Ob LLC. Property Location: S. Abington Twp. Lender: Corevest American Finance Lender LLC. Amount: $4,558,600. 1101 Northern Blvd. LLC. Property Location: S. Abington Twp. Lender: First National Bank of PA. Amount: $12,100,000. Jeffrey Faris. Property Location: Springbrook. Lender: Northwest Bank. Amount: $284,050. Chelsea Lynn Harrison. Property Location: Taylor. Lender: ESSA Bank & Trust. Amount: $265,800. Foxys Inc. Property Location: Throop. Lender: PS Bank. Amount: $550,000. Stephen Richard Orzel. Property Location: W. Abington Twp. Lender: Residential Mortgage Services Inc. Amount: $425,000. Gavin Davis. Property Location: W. Abington Twp. Lender: People Security Bank & Trust Co. Amount: $292,000. Salman Mirza. Property Location: W. Abington Twp. Lender: Fidelity Dep & Disc Bank. Amount: $484,000. Salman Mirza. Property Location: W. Abington Twp. Lender: Fidelity Dep & Disc Bank. Amount: $741,000. Marl Antonio. Property Location: W. Abington Twp. Lender: Citizens Savings Bank. Amount: $600,000. Benjamin D Jones. Property Location: W. Abington Twp. Lender: Mortgage Research Center LLC. Amount: $263,342. Tiona A Beckley. Property Location: W. Abington Twp. Lender: PS Bank. Amount: $255,000. Geoffrey Joseph Musti. Property Location: W. Abington Twp. Lender: NBT Bank. Amount: $252,000. George Lynett Jr. Property Location: W. Abington Twp. Lender: Fidelity Dep & Disc Bank. Amount: $484,350. George Lynett Jr. Property Location: W. Abington Twp. Lender: Fidelity Dep & Disc Bank. Amount: $331,650. Joshua R Braddell. Property Location: W. Abington Twp. Lender: Residential Mortgage Services Inc. Amount: $403,750. Lyndsay M Parfrey. Property Location: W. Abington Twp. Lender: Vantage Trust Federal Credit Union. Amount: $255,900.

LuZERNE COuNTy

John D McCarthy Jr. Property Location: Kingston Twp. Lender: Landmark Community Bank. Amount: $500,000. James Ganter. Property Location: Rice Twp. Lender: MERS. Amount: $416,402.

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JANUARY 2020

TK Realty Holdings LLC. Property Location: Kingston. Lender: Anthony J. Salvaggio. Amount: $900,000. TK Realty Holdings LLC. Property Location: Kingston. Lender: Christopher Chadwick Ghigiareli. Amount: $500,000. Matthew Moore. Property Location: Dallas Twp. Lender: Pennsylvania State Employees Credit Union. Amount: $309,000. Joseph Dileo. Property Location: Exeter. Lender: Fidelity Deposit & Discount Bank. Amount: $264,400. Michael Collins. Property Location: Harveys Lake. Lender: FNCB Bank. Amount: $526,500. Joseph Delia. Property Location: Nuangola. Lender: MERS. Amount: $375,000. James A Brogna. Property Location: Fairview Twp. Lender: Citizens Savings Bank. Amount: $314,000. Rivka Kleinman. Property Location: Kingston. Lender: MERS. Amount: $265,109. John D McCarthy Jr. Property Location: Kingston Twp. Lender: Landmark Community Bank. Amount: $500,000. James Ganter. Property Location: Rice Twp. Lender: MERS. Amount: $416,402. TK Realty Holdings LLC. Property Location: Kingston. Lender: Anthony J Salvaggio. Amount: $900,000. TK Realty Holdings LLC. Property Location: Kingston. Lender: Christopher Chadwick Ghigiareli. Amount: $500,000. Matthew Moore. Property Location: Dallas Twp. Lender: Pennsylvania State Employees Credit Union. Amount: $309,000. Joseph Dileo. Property Location: Exeter. Lender: Fidelity Deposit & Discount Bank. Amount: $264,400. Michael Collins. Property Location: Harveys Lake. Lender: FNCB Bank. Amount: $526,500. James A Wood. Property Location: Jackson Twp. Lender: Wells Fargo Bank. Amount: $500,000. Pocono Hotels Inc. Property Location: Palins Twp. Lender: Heartland Bank. Amount: $8,953,600. MH Brenner Real Estate LLC. Property Location: Hazleton. Lender: Landmark Community Bank. Amount: $1,073,000. Michael K Duricko. Property Location: Hazle Twp. Lender: Pennsylvania State Employees Credit Union. Amount: $342,000. Jeffrey Scott Simpson. Property Location: Wright Twp. Lender: Citizens Bank. Amount: $279,200. Jared L Spaide. Property Location: Salem Twp. Lender: First Keystone Community Bank. Amount: $388,000. Martin E Smith. Property Location: Dallas Twp. Lender: Citizens Savings Bank. Amount: $320,000. William Desrosiers. Property Location: Dallas Twp. Lender: MERS. Amount: $360,000. Baljeet Singh. Property Location: Kingston Twp. ESSA Bank & Trust. Amount: $250,000. Lenet J Guidry. Property location: Dallas Twp. Lender: MERS. Amount: $264,546. Michael Paul Peet. Property Location: Duryea. Lender: Fidelity Deposit & Discount Bank. Amount: $303,000. Derek Janowski. Property Location: Jackson Twp. Lender: MERS. Amount: $293,073. Theresa M Baseski. Property Location: Forty Fort. Lender: Citizens Savings Bank. Amount: $280,000. Sandor D Rudin. Property Location: Kingston. Lender: Citizens Bank of Pennsylvania. Amount: $250,000. Alan M Pugh. Property Location: Dallas Twp. Lender: Fidelity Deposit & Discount Bank. Amount: $484,000. Mercedes M Figueroa Santiago. Property Loca-

tion: Hazleton. Lender: MERS. Amount: $255,192. Jagpal S Deo. Property Location: Hazle Twp. Lender: City National Bank of West Virginia. Amount: $925,000. SAI Pittston Hotel LLC. Property Location: Pittston Twp. Lender: FNCB Bank. Amount: $390,000. Saurabh Patel. Property Location: Sugarloaf Twp. Lender: MERS. Amount: $301,150. Samantha R Abod. Property Location: Kingston Twp. Lender: Jersey Shore State Bank, Amount: $484,350. Eric D Klimek. Property Location: Jackson Twp. Lender: Luzerne Bank. Amount: $262,400. Nicholas S Mathis. Property Location: Laflin. Lender: Navy Federal Credit Union. $329,858. Andrew Long. Property Location: Dallas Twp. Lender: Citizens Bank. Amount: $337,250. PSP NE LLC. Property Location: Hanover Twp. Lender: FNCB Bank. Amount: $15,400,000. Pittston Fleet Associates LLC. Property Location: Pittston Twp. Lender: Citi Bank. Amount: $190,000,000. Klaus Meine Lawas. Property Location: Butler Twp. Lender: MERS. Amount: $340,000. Richard D Rome. Property Location: Jackson Twp. Lender: Luzerne Bank. Amount: $350,000. Aimee Nicole Fritzges. Property Location: Dallas Twp. Lender: Honesdale National Bank. Amount: $300,000. ETK Ventures LP. Property Location: Kingston Twp. Lender: Fidelity Deposit and Discount Bank. Amount: $1,500,000. Joseph J Solano. Property Location: Kingston. Lender: FNCB Bank. Amount: $275,000. Curtis M Crossin. Property Location: Jackson Twp. Lender: MERS. Amount: $378,000. ETK Ventures LP. Property Location: WilkesBarre Twp. Lender: Fidelity Deposit & Discount Bank. Amount: $1,500,000. Kuharchik Construction Inc. Property Location: Exeter. Lender: Landmark Community Bank. Amount: $4,500,000. Kuharchik Construction Inc. Property Location: Exeter. Lender: Landmark Community Bank. Amount: $320,000. Quentin Reese. Property Location: Dallas Twp. Lender: Citizens Savings Bank. Lender: $438,900. Langan Street LLC. Property Location: Pittston Twp. Lender: Peoples Security Bank & Trust Company. Amount: $326,450. James P Kinsman. Property Location: Wright Twp. Lender: MERS. Amount: $300,000. Home E Berlew. Property Location: Jackson Twp. Lender: Peoples Security Bank and Trust. Amount: $250,000. Jeffrey Kristopher Ference. Property Location: Fairview Twp. Lender: Citizens Savings Bank, $392,000. Matthew L Wincek. Property Location: Dallas Twp. Lender: Fidelity Deposit & Discount Bank. Amount: $290,175. John P Corgan. Property Location: Kingston Twp. Lender: MERS. Amount: $297,750.

MONROE COuNTy

Warren and Robin Hirsch. Property Location: Smithfield Twp. Lender: ESSA Bank & Trust. Amount: $564,000. W Peter Ahnert Jr and Patricia Schiavone. Property Location: Hamilton Twp. Lender: Peoples Security Bank and Trust Co. Amount: $400,000. Bartonsville Travel Center Inc. Property Location: Stroud Twp. Lender: ESSA Bank & Trust. Amount: $2,242,500. Please see Record, Page 31


FOR THE RECORD FROM PAGE 30 Exchange 10 LLC. Property Location: Coolbaugh Twp. Lender: Wilmington Savings Fund Society FXB. Amount: $938,000. Javier Rosa. Property Location: Polk Twp. Lender: Quicken Loans Inc. Amount: $337,776. Christine and Michael Herrington. Property Location: Tobyhanna Twp. Lender: Citizens Savings Bank. Amount: $299,000. Neal McLeod and Jeanette Hill. Property Location: Paradise Twp. Lender: Flagstar Bank FSB. Amount: $304,009. Dharmesh and Nainisha Patel. Property Location: Hamilton Twp. Lender: M&T Bank. Amount: $312,000. Anthony Ciliento, Virginia Ciliento (agent). Property Location: Pocono Twp. Lender: Veterans Research Center LLC D/B/A Veterans United Home Loans. Amount: $369,783. Anatoliy Bezpalko. Property Location: Jackson Twp. Lender: Dime Bank. Amount: $917,000. AVB Group LLC. Property Location: Chestnuthill Twp. Lender: Dime Bank. Amount: $917,000. Wayne Smith and Lisa Schiefert. Property Location: Coolbaugh Twp. Lender: Stearns Lending LLC. Amount: $344,000. Mohamed Mohamed and Soad Bassiouni. Property Location: East Stroudsburg. Lender: Peoples Security Bank and Trust Co. Amount: $372,287. Michael and Kathleen Tracy. Property Location: Tobyhanna Twp. Lender: New American Funding. Amount: $344,268. Hidden Hollow Springs LLC. Property Location: Jackson Twp. Lender: Goldman Sachs Bank USA. Amount: $750,000. Elizabeth Kish and Ann Watson. Property Location: Smithfield Twp. Lender: ESSA Bank & Trust. Amount: $318,000. Great Wolf Lodge of the Poconos LLC. Property Location: Pocono Twp. Lender: JP Morgan Chase Bank NA, Bank of America NA, Deutsche Bank AG. Amount: $1,700,000,000. Jason and Kelli Carr, R. Kent and Janice Ellis. Property Location: Barrett Twp. Lender: Freedom Mortgage Corp. Amount: $387,000. David Steinmetz Sr. Property Location: Tobyhanna Twp. Lender: ESSA Bank & Trust. Amount: $950,000. ABC Pocono Homes LLC. Property Location: Coolbaugh Twp. Lender: DLP Lending Fund LLC. Amount: $95,300 and $162,240 and $94,900. PocoLake LLC. Property Location: Tobyhanna Twp. Lender: Mark Tieszen. Amount: $355,000. R&F Stroudsburg LP. Property: Stroud Twp. Lender: Liberty Bank. Amount: $9,206,250. Joan Vican. Property location: Paradise Twp. Lender: First Keystone Community Bank. Amount: $360,000. Kip Bunting. Property Location: Middle Smithfield Twp. Lender: Cardinal Financial Co. Amount: $317,983. Melinda Williams. Property Location: Tobyhanna Twp. Lender: Finance of America Mortgage LLC. Amount: $324,000. Eric Morrissey. Property Location: Polk Twp. Lender: Wells Fargo Bank NA. Amount: $350,000. Aastha Real Estate Investments LLC. Property Location: Coolbaugh Twp. Lender: Mofin Lending Corp. Amount: $443,625. ETK Ventures LP. Property Location: Coolbaugh Twp. Lender: Fidelity Deposit and Discount Bank. Amount: $1,500,000. Carol and Pierre Muentnich Sr. Property Location: Smithfield Twp. Lender: Wells Fargo Bank NA. Amount: $354,337.

PIKE CouNTy

Calvin and Roseanne y Tallman. Property Location: Westfall Twp. Lender: MERS. Amount: $262,405. Matthew and Kathleen Wagner. Property Location: Dingman Twp. Lender: MERS. Amount: $263,786. Michael J and Deborah A Chaplo. Property Location: Greene Twp. Lender: Wells Fargo Bank. Amount: $309,000. Mitchel Stein. Property Location: Blooming Grove. Lender: MERS. Amount: $279,990. Gerard P and Jennifer L Weis Jr. Property Location: Dingman Twp. Lender: MERS. Amount: $257,600. Jennifer Maria and Alan James Slade. Property Location: Palmyra Twp. Amount: $439,200. Anthony and Sheena Finamore. Property Location: Shohola Twp. Lender: MERS. Amount: 330,560. Alexander and Diana Smartenko. Property Location: Blooming Grove. Lender: Consumers Federal Credit Union. Amount: $510,000. Parker and Parker Consulting Inc. Property Location: Lackawaxen Twp. Lender: Dime Bank. Amount: $250,000. Paula D Conklin. Property Location: Dingman Twp. Lender: MERS. Amount: $268,156. Robert J Maroney. Property Location: Milford. Lender: MERS. Amount: $306,854. Teresa A Smith. Property Location: Lackawaxen Twp. Lender: MERS. Amount: $253,500. Jeffrey J opitz. Property Location: Delaware Twp. Lender: Christopher B, Nicholas S, and Geoffrey B Crowell. Amount: $265,000. Eva C Rossi. Property Location: Dingman Twp. Lender: MERS. Amount: $278,405. William Ercoland. Property Location: Delaware Twp. Lender: Wells Fargo Bank. Amount: $280,000. othmar and Emily Rose Mayer. Property Location: Dingman Twp. Lender: MERS. Amount: $299,650. Gary N and Lynn Susan Buss. Property Location: Palmyra Twp. Lender: Arlington Cemetery Co Lot Holder Trust Fund. Amount: $520,000. Shaun Gerald and Diana Rosella Hinklein. Property Location: Lackawaxen Twp. Lender: Wells Fargo Bank. Amount $420,000. Robert E and Cheryl L Dill. Property Location: Palmyra Twp. Lender: Republic First Bank. Amount: $589,000. Guy G and Sarah B Sappah. Property Location: Delaware Twp. Lender: MERS. Amount: $276,500. Alcides Lucas Alcides. Property Location: Dingman Twp. Lender: MERS. Amount: $296,499. Pradeep Ravindra. Property Location: Palmyra Twp. Lender: MERS. Amount: $398,451. Steven Alan and Wendy L Walsh. Property Location: Lackawaxen Twp. Lender: Hudson Heritage Federal Credit Union. MAount: $279,560. Anthony F Campagna. Property Location: Lackawaxen Twp. Lender: MERS. Amount: $255,000. Steven Cabibbo and Colette E Baruth. Property Location: Palmyra Twp. Lender: MERS. Amount: $399,900. Robert J and Phyllis Keyes. Property Location: Palmyra Twp. Lender: Wayne Bank. Amount: $250,000. Karen and Timothy Larson. Property Location: Shohola Twp. Lender: MERS. Amount: $416,000. Sean and Caste Robinette. Property Location: Blooming Grove Twp. Lender: MERS. Amount: $251,363. Valerie J Martin, Douglas H King. Property Location: Greene Twp. Lender: Lakeland Bank. Amount: $1,000,000. Jeffrey M and Sari M Skier. Property Location: Lackawaxen Twp. Lender: Dime Bank. Amount:

$524,800. Edward J and Jacqueline Jones. Property Location: Westfall Twp. Lender: MERS. Amount: $274,783. Scott R Fishcer, Natasha Lay Peng Soh. Property Location: Dingman Twp. Lender: MERS. Amount: $265,200. Amy Rowland, Aaron Gregory Demark. Property Location: Greene Twp. Lender: Branch Banking & Trust Co. Amount: $301,500.

SCHuyLKILL CouNTy

Russell and Sarah Williams. Property Location: East Union Twp. Seller: Michael and Lisa Ghetti. Amount: $279,000. Craig and Linda Girard. Property Location: Eldred Twp. Seller: John and Pamela Melick. Amount: $355,000. Jeffrey and Jennifer Parrish. Property Location: Rush Twp. Seller: Lisa Price. Amount: $260,000.

WAyNE CouNTy

Stephen K and Susan I Calles III. Property Location: Lehigh Twp. Lender: MERS. Amount: $409,000. Michael S Hoagland, Michael A Eaton. Property Location: Lehigh Twp. Lender: Citizens Bank. Amount: $400,000. Stephen James Sheridan, Jerrica Lyle, by agent. Property Location: Salem Twp. Lender: MERS. Amount: $420,000. Matthew J Sapet, Lauren Englert. Property Location: Lake Twp. Lender: MERS. Amount: $252,103. Jeffrey and Christy Bause. Property Location: Paupack Twp. Lender: MERS. Amount: $300,000. John and Teresa Niles. Property Location: Salem Twp. Lender: Honesdale National bank. Amount: $252,000. Eric and Christina Siepiela. Property Location: Palmyra Twp. Lender: Honesdale National Bank. Amount: $344,000. Buselli Land Holdings LLC. Property Location: Honesdale Boro. Lender: Wayne Bank. Amount: $467,200. James K Cutler. Property Location: Lake Twp. Lender: MERS. Amount: $297,500. Lee R and Teresa Depersia. Property Location: Lehigh Twp. Lender: JP Morgan Chase Bank. Amount: $480,000. Charles W and Amy Redpath. Property Location: Salem Twp. Lender: JP Morgan Chase Bank. Amount: $250,000. Timothy D Duhaime, Tanya M Harris. Property Location: Lehigh Twp. Lender: MERS. Amount: $400,000. Victoria and Kevin Patrick Decker. Property Location: Palmyra Twp. Lender: NBT Bank. Amount: $292,000. Timothy and Marisa Dukovich. Property Location: Paupack Twp. Lender: MERS. Amount: $264,000. Valarie J Gavin, Edward J Howie. Property Location: Berlin Twp. Lender: Dime Bank. Amount: $387,000. Peter Kolankoski, Rachel Michos. Property Location: Canaan Twp. Lender: MERS. Amount: $254,400. Robert C Potter, Patrica A Loux. Property Location: Salem Twp. Lender: MERS. Amount: $461,250. George C and Margaret Thonnesen Murphy. Property Location: Canaan Twp. Lender: MERS. Amount: $514,434. Martin and Kathleen opromollo. Property Location: Palmyra Twp. Lender: MERS. Amount: $531,250. Christopher W and Jean E Ritchie, by agent; John F Spall, agent. Property Location: Paupack Twp. Lender: Wayne bank. Amount: $552,000. James C Bokor Jr. Property Location: Starrucca. Lender: Honesdale National Bank. Amount: $320,000.

David T Williams. Property Location: Cherry Ridge & Texas Twps. Lender: Honesdale National Bank. Amount: $172,000, $172,000. Brian Hopkins and Heather Wright. Property Location: Paupack Twp. Lender: MERS. Amount: $780,000. Lakeside Realty LLC of PA. Property Location: Palmyra Twp. Lender: Honesdale National bank. Amount: $280,000. Andrew S and Melissa A Currier. Property Location: Manchester Twp. Lender: MERS. Amount: $250,774.

WyoMING CouNTy

D&C Fuel Sales Inc. Property Location: Washington Twp. Lender: PS Bank. Amount: $2,250,000. Northwood Investments LLC. Location: Overfield Twp. Lender: Fidelity Dep & Disc Bank. Amount: $352,000. Tunkhannock Hospital Co LLC. Property Location: Tunkhannock Twp. Lender: Credit Suissse AG. Amount: $1,600,809,000. Jennifer Lynn and Dennis Zimmerman. Property Location: Northmoreland Twp. Lender: MERS. Amount: $332,500. Steven B and Robin D Kaminstein. Property Location: Monroe Twp. Lender: Luzerne bank. Amount: $300,000. Earl C Thomas. Property Location: Falls Twp. Lender: PS Bank. Amount: $310,000. Sicklers Appletree Plaza LLC. Property Location: Tunkhannock Twp. Lender: Peoples Security Bank & Trust Co. Amount: $503,000. Ellis E and Sheila M Wilner. Property Location: Overfield Twp. Lender: PS Bank. Amount: $256,000.

Relocation Opportunities Wanted

Bring us any and all potential locations. We will determine if we can develop or relocate to your site. Pennsylvania Counties of Interest Include: • Bradford, Bucks, Carbon, Columbia, Lackawanna, Lehigh, Luzerne, Lycoming, Monroe, Northampton, Pike, Schuylkill, Sullivan, Susquehanna, Tioga, Wayne, Wyoming

Types of Locations Wanted: • End Cap, In-Line, Drive-Thru, Free Standing PLEASE CONTACT Abbie Muto muto_a@sdepa.com Cheryl Green green_c@sdepa.com (610) 366-8120 • www.sdepa.com

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Northeast Pennsylvania Business Journal, January 2020  

Northeast Pennsylvania Business Journal, January 2020  

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