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Business Journal NORTHEAST

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MAY 2017 VOL. 32 NO. 5

Health insurance dilemma ‘exhausting’ Insurance increases and administrative costs draw on company time, profits, employee wages

Executive Spotlight

Recognizing inspirational leaders in our community. SEE PAgES 23-30

ALSO INSIDE:

By Dave Gardner

America’s financial dilemma with health insurance is intensifying despite a national debate and reported behind-the-scenes wrangling to get the ACA repealed and replaced before the president’s 100 days in office on April 29. According to the Medical Expenditure Panel Survey (MEPS), the average annual premium for a health insurance plan in 2001 was $2,889 per employee which would total $3,886 after being adjusted for inflation. By 2015, this per-employee premium total had reached $5,963. Deductibles are another alarming issue. The MEPS reported that the average deductible for an individual health insurance plan in 2001 was $446, which would total $597 after inflation adjustment, and $602 for businesses with fewer than 50 employees. During 2015, this average deductible cost had soared to $1,541 for all businesses and $1,964 for businesses with fewer than 50 employees. The National Federation of Independent Business (NFIB) Research Foundation has reported that companies with more than 50 employees offering health insurance has remained steady at approximately 96 percent over the past 15 years. However, the number of companies with fewer than 50 employees that offer insurance have declined significantly. According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, insurance is now a very costly component of employee compensation packages. Private sector employer costs for insurance benefits average $2.59 per hour worked, with as much as 70 percent of health care spending attributed to employee

Celebrating Women Entrepreneurs

Rock Steady Boxing reaps therapeutic rewards. behavioral and lifestyle choices. Gene Barr, president and CEO of the Pennsylvania Chamber of Business and Industry, referred to the unfolding national health insurance debate as both simple and complex, but also exhausting to business. According to Barr, insurance is a finance player but health care is a delivery system, creating differing situations and goals for each side as annual price increases, insurance carriers drop out, pharmacology use escalates, and litigation and defensive medicine litter the road. “Extensive pharmacology use is increasingly not a cure, just alleviates symptoms,” Barr. “This involves the use of long-term maintenance drugs, which is very costly.” According to Barr, the health insurance debate, in its current form, will find no easy answers. Congressional attention has often been fixed on

abolishing mandates and the limited effects of the Accountable Care Act (ACA), while the business community cries out for help with premium costs. “Despite these cries for help from business, we are not hearing demands for a single-payer system,” Barr said. “Business does not trust government.” Medicaid expansion is another costly issue which deeply troubles Barr. He explained that this social service program was intended to temporarily assist the needy for a short period of time, but has expanded into a huge and costly entitlement that government has not figured out how to pay for. “Annual increases for medical insurance are also a major player in the country’s wage stagnation,” Barr said. “When you have high increases in policy costs, year after year, that are not passed along to the employees, it appears that salaries are stable when total compensation actually is escalating.” Draining resources The mechanics of America’s health insurance situation are now placing employers in a very bad spot, according to Roger Howell, owner of Howell Ple ase se e DILEMMA, Page 34

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SEE PAgE 28

globalization

What’s in the future for travel and trade? SEE PAgE 5

FIND US ONLINE AT BIZ570.COM


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Vol. 32, No. 5 • MAY 2017 149 PeNN AVeNue ScrANtoN, PA 18503 www.biz570.coM

On THE COvER

A nOTE FROM THE EDITOR

Health insurance Dilemma

Business wants employees who play well with others

The Northeast Pennsylvania Business Journal is a member of Times-Shamrock Publishing Division

EDITOR christine Fanning — ext. 5415 cfanning@timesshamrock.com

Insurance is a very costly component of employee compensation packages.

COnTRIbuTIng REpORTERs Dave Gardner, Kathy ruff, Phil Yacuboski

FEATuREs The Actuarial system .................. 4 Trends in Tourism .......... 5,16,19,20 Workers Comp Insurance .............. 7 sbA and Export lenders ............... 9 Honing Your Marketing program ... 11 Crystal Windows & Door systems .. 14 golf and business..................... 29

ADvERTIsIng sAlEs ExECuTIvE Judy S. Gregg — ext. 5425 jgregg@timesshamrock.com Cng MAnAgIng EDITOR tom Graham — ext. 3492 Cng sAlEs MAnAgER Alice Manley — ext. 9285 FiND uS oNliNe: WWW.BIz570.COm facebook.com/570 • twitter.com/biz570

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NPBJ is protected under the federal Copyright Act. Reproductions of any part by any means or facsimiles without the express written permission of the publisher are not permitted. Reprints of NPBJ articles are available. Northeast Pennsylvania Business Journal cannot be responsible for the return of unsolicited materials — manuscripts or photographs — with or without the inclusion of a stamped, self-addressed return envelope. Information in this publication is gathered from sources considered to be reliable, but the accuracy and completeness of the information cannot be guaranteed. No information expressed herein constitutes a solicitation for the purchase or sale of any securities. Northeast Pennsylvania Business Journal (ISSN 1078-5698) is published monthly except twice in the month of may by The Scranton Times from offices located at 149 Penn Ave., Scranton, PA. Periodicals postage paid at Scranton, PA. The Journal serves business owners, managers and professionals in a 10-county region. Subscriptions are available for $28 per year, $49 two years or $64 for three years. POSTmASTER: Send address changes to Northeast Pennsylvania Business Journal, 149 Penn Avenue, Scranton, Pa.18503.

Executive spotlight....... 23,26,27,30 vacation guide........................ 21 business & The law .................. 32

REgIOnAl nEWs banking................................ 8,9 Energy .................................. 10 Real Estate ............................ 12 Regional................................ 17 Health .............................. 22,25 Education .............................. 24 Celebrating women entrepreneurs .. 28 small business spotlight ............ 28 Economy................................ 31 Made in nEpA ......................... 33

ExECuTIvE suITE

Your gateway to growth ............. banking & Finance ................... Marketing .............................. Economic Development.............. strategic planning....................

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busInEss bullETIns For The Record .................... 40-43 personnel File..................... 37,38 business notes........................ 39

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There has been much conversation in business and government about the future of the American work force. Ready Nation Council for A Strong America endorses pre-Kindergarten education because the foundation of adult character skills is built in early childhood. Those social-emotional skills known as soft skills involve managing emotions and impulses, solving problems, taking initiative, being flexible, communicating in teams, perseverance and resilience and empathy. Data from the National Survey of Children’s Health show that many young children in Pennsylvania experience adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) (including poverty, divorce, death and violence) which hinder emotional growth and later success in the workforce. A Wall Street Journal survey of 900 business executives, reported that 93 percent hold character skills as important, or more so, than technical skills and 89 percent reported difficulties in finding employees with these abilities. Speaking out on the importance of investing in early learning programs is a governor-appointed group of about 70 Pennsylvania business leaders with members in NEPA and Lehigh Valley. The PA Early Learning Investment Commission (PA - ELIC) is co-chaired by Pete Danchak, president of PNC Bank. Studies show that 3-to 4-years- old who participate in high-quality pre-kindergarten perform better in school, graduate at higher rates and earn more throughout their working lives compared to peers that do not have access to early learning programs, Danchak said. “Statistics show kids are ready to learn, are more apt to stay in school, out of drugs, go to college and be productive citizens if they have high-quality early childhood education. And a huge payback is that for every $1 spent in keeping kids out of the system, $17 returns to society.

s u b s C R I p T I O n

Business Journal NortHeASt

This is an issue dear to employers everywhere who are intent on building a healthy workforce of “employees who play well with others.” “I’ll tell you why those social-emotional skills matter to my business, said Jack Brennan, chairman emeritus, former CEO and senior advisor of Vanguard. “Above all else, successful financial professionals must have a genuine sense of empathy that enables them to understand each client’s individual needs and goals. They must also work well with all of the other people who are instrumental to meeting these goals.” Since 2003, PNC has supported early learning through “Grow Up Great,” a $350 million program dedicated to helping prepare America’s youngest learners for great things in school –- and life. In 2003 the company focused its philanthropy on early learning. “It’s heavily data driven and its benefits affect all of us,” he said. The program involves advocacy; financial partnerships with organizations PNC serves, for example Head Start; Education: since PNC began the program in 2004, PNC Grow Up Great has distributed more than $121 million in grants to help young children prepare for school by focusing on readiness in vocabulary development, math, science, financial education and the arts; and volunteerism: PNC employees who volunteer get paid time off. “It’s important to invest in kids, Danchak said. Write to the governor, your state senator and representative.” This is especially important now since the Pennsylvania house has voted to move the budget bill to the senate with cuts to the governor’s $75 million boost to pre-Kindergarten programs. Learn about the early education efforts of PNC at pnc.com and Ready Nation Council For A Strong America at strongnation.org.

— Christine

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FEATURE

Health insurance and the actuarial system

generating a margin of three percent to five perpeople who will contribute through rates and not withdraw funds through medical claims. This was cent. According to Day, this data firmly indicates Deep within the swirling debate about health that public claims about huge profits being generone of the prime reasons why the ACA insurance care costs is a public disconnected from the reali- mandate was created, although for many ated by his industry are simply false. ties of how insurance costs are calculated within “The onset of the ACA also raised young and healthy adults the mandate America’s $3 trillion health care system. some costs because every policy has tax penalty has been cheaper than a Kurt Wrobel, CFO and chief actuary with the to include a list of essential benefits purchase of insurance. Geisinger Health Plan, emphasized that any discuswhether or not the policy holder “A group of 25-year-olds have onesion of health insurance costs must center around eighth the claim costs of 62-year-olds,” wanted them,” said Day. “In addition, the complex science of actuarial principles. All inthe ACA ended medical underwriting, said Wrobel. “Therefore, when you surance products are priced in this system, which drain the young people from the pool of which had allowed an individual’s Wrobel examines historical claims and then compiles a health information to be part of their insured policy holders, it has an upward detailed examination of costs. premium rates.” effect on overall costs. “The actuarial system is the Actuaries forecast what the costs will be for the Day also is Cash reserves for coming year, keeping in mind that the insurance foundation for all insurance and skeptical of efforts insurance carriers are company can only sell a competitive product which also a reality, because in to reduce employeeall of the products sold by the must be financially sustainable. If a product being the event of mass claims directed regulations insurance carriers . . . it’s all sold loses money, the situation obviously can’t be with high pay outs, the from the ACA, about actuarial principles.” sustained for any length of time. plus abolition of insurance company must — Kurt Wrobel, chief financial officer and chief “This actuarial system is the foundation for the ACA-demands be protected against cash actuary, Geisinger Health Plan all insurance and all of the products sold by the for employers to exhaustion. Wrobel pointed insurance carriers,” said Wrobel. “Yes, there are compile scores of out that Harrisburg creates differences in rules based upon the type of insurdata. He noted that these reserves guidelines ance being sold, but at the end of the day it’s all during 2015 America spent $1 billion on regulation which an insurance company must comply about actuarial principles.” compliance, but in view of the fact that the nation with and the cash reserve total is not a number According to Wrobel, after creating a product spent a minimum of $3 trillion on health care, the designed to enrich the carriers. or desiring a rate change, an insurance must regulatory total is a drop in the ocean. Wrobel is firm that ACA insurance is not imwork with Harrisburg as the product is externally He noted that an honest evaluation of cash flow ploding. He said 95 percent of the involved insurreviewed. Public hearings may also be part of the within health insurance indicates that costs for ance products are behaving as expected and are process. financially stable. Yet, the ACA did mandate that all pharmacology are troublesome. Up to 20 percent In the case of Geisinger, annual policy costs in- insurance products be compliant with regulations of total spending is now being directed at pharcreases have generally been less than five percent and benefit levels, thereby creating cost increases macology purchases, but Day forecasts that this overall for years. With Medicare and Medicaid, a total could easily increase to 50 percent by 2025, for some products not sold over the exchange. more modest increase of three percent has been requiring carriers to balance their books through “Virtually all cost increases involve higher paythe norm. outs for pharmacology, technology, and lifestylerelated illness, such as obesity, alcohol use, Internet products smoking and sedentary behavior,” Wrobel said. The rate situation with Affordable Care Act “We take this very seriously and have programs to (ACA) policies sold through the internet has been help manage behavior as we focus on the delivery different. According to Wrobel, when carriers of cost-effective quality care.” began selling on the internet, they had no data about the type of claims they would receive for Emotional issue that pool of people. Insurance prices have become a highly “We were all in the dark with no actuarial data emotional issue for employers and the insured, to work with,” Wrobel said. “However, there is data acknowledged Dan Day, regional vice president of now about costs for this insured group and this sales with Highmark. He reported that the national information has been central to revised pricing for debate, for all of its fury and rancor, has not adACA policies.” dressed the core issue that high usage of insurActuarial science also dictates that for best ance creates high payouts by carriers that must be policy pricing, an insurance product must covered through policy costs. include a substantial population of healthy young In addition, health insurance as a whole is only By Dave Gardner

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higher premiums. “So much of modern pharmacology only can deal with symptom management versus cures, creating a situation where prescription purchases are ongoing,” said Day. Calculation factors Michael Costello, MBA, J.D., assistant professor and online graduate health administration program director with the University of Scranton, added that for any commercial insurance product administrative costs, marketing, and a regulated allowance for reserves all play a part in product costs. If the company is chartered as for-profit, this necessity must also be a part of rate calculation. “It’s true that the state regulations are strict about the percentage of cash which must go for care versus reserve,” said Costello. “Maintenance of a cash reserve is therefore not price gouging. All risks must be covered, and the higher number of people within an insured pool the more accurate forecasts will be.” Costello does take issue with the stated reasons behind the price increases for some ACA exchange policies. He questions if the carriers set their initial prices below costs to generate market share for this group, thereby grabbing a share of the available business with the knowledge that policy process would escalate because the initial premiums were not sustainable. “However, at the end of the day, with all health insurance, the real costs for care must be covered by policy rates,” Costello said.


TOURISM & TRADE

Specter of changes in globalization impacts travel and free trade their production for that new product.” Analysts agree Britain will also see changes to Globalization has ebbed and flowed for millenits trade environment over the next few years. nia, intermittently expanding or reducing. Britain’s “Businesses that have subsidiaries in the U.K. decision to withdraw from the European Union will experience more and more difficulty over time (a/k/a Brexit) and the election of Donald Trump selling goods and services in the EU,” said Brian as president of the U.S. mark a turning point for Schaitkin, senior economist with changes to globalization. The Conference Board, New Observers remain uncertain what will occur in- York. “In addition, a large ternationally, but many agree the world will change. part of the reason why “As far as Brexit is concerned, our trade with you’re seeing this them is not going to be that much disrupted,” hard Brexit is the said Michael Horvath, senior international busiU.K.’s desire ness development manager for the Northeastern to control imPennsylvania Alliance, Pittston. “But if a company migration from was using U.K. as a landing place for their products EU countries. to go into Europe, then that could be somewhat As a result, of a problem because England is going to have to transferring establish trading agreements with the European workers Union and maybe each individual country.” between According to Horvath, a recent decline in trade Britain-based between the U.S., England and Europe resulted subsidiaries and from a sluggish economy and a more favorable subsidiaries based exchange rate of the euro compared to the dollar. on the continent is “(Tourism) was a bargain a year and a half ago going to become harder when the euro was at $1.20 to $1.30 versus the once Brexit is fully impleU.S. dollar,” he said. “It was very cheap to come mented and Britain is outside over and enjoy what the U.S. had to offer as far as of the EU.” tourism attractions and things like that.” Schaitkin also expects AmeriCombined with lower exchange rates, President can firms using London-based banks to encounter Trump’s travel ban and immigration stance could more difficulties conducting certain types of also deter some European travelers from coming business without England’s privileged access to the to the U.S. EU’s financial markets. According to the U.S. Travel Association’s Travel “So from the financial perspective, from transTrends Index, international travel to the U.S. actuferring worker perspective and from a non-tariff ally grew faster than domestic travel in February. barrier perspective, those are all going to be issues But the association’s economists predict a drop-off companies that operate both in Britain and on the in the international travel industry going forward. continent are going to have to face.” “As far as trade goes, there are winners and Companies may also face trade challenges in losers on both sides,” Horvath said. “It could hurt the U.S. as Trump revamps its trade policies. the auto industry because a lot of parts have to “It’s not necessarily a new direction in terms come in from overseas to be incorporated into the of trade policy,” said Schaitkin. “Early on there had auto that’s being manufactured either by a U.S. been a realization that international supply chains manufacturer or by a foreign manufacturer. Then are delicate and that disrupting trade relations there are going to be some companies that will would have adverse effects on the economy. As definitely benefit by having things purchased in the a result, you have not seen as dramatic a deparUnited States if they could find a manufacturer to ture of previous trade policies as you might have purchase those things or have somebody ramp up expected. However, I won’t expect any new trade By Kathy Ruff

agreements to be ratified down the road.” Observers expect changes to Britain’s trade agreements as it moves forward with its exit from the European Union. “In the short-term, we’re seeing spotty demand,” said Frank Mataro, vice president of sales and marketing for Silberline Manufacturing Co., Inc., Hometown, Schuylkill County. “Europe is still reeling from what were pretty sluggish economic conditions over the last couple of years. The Brexit thing isn’t helping. Consumer confidence is not high.” Mataro sees some effects today on Silberline’s business because of softening currencies. “With the Brexit vote coming out, the pound has weakened,” he said. “We have seen weakening in the euro also, which makes a strengthening dollar, which makes our products more expensive for export.” Silberline has a plant in Scotland, where its manufacturing costs are in pound sterling, as well as one in China and three in the U.S. “What was a relatively easy move from a plant in the U.K. to the EU may be harder when Brexit is complete because trade conditions between the U.K. and the EU may change. “ Mataro said. “We may have a different set of rules to work under and we don’t know what those are going to look like yet. The good part is we have a plant in that theater. The bad part is that things are changing.” What does that change mean for American companies in or anticipating entering the global marketplace? “If you’re going to be exporting products from the U.S. to anywhere else in the world, you better understand your value proposition,” said Mataro. “You better understand why those customers are

going to buy from you. With all the associated freight and duties, in order to get the kind of returns you need, you better be offering products that customers want and that has a value proposition that exceeds what they can buy locally.” Schaitkin also offers some guidance for companies to succeed internationally despite changing conditions. “It’s critical that businesses figure out how they would adapt links in their supply chains if trade policies changed and as a result reliable suppliers are no longer accessible, to have scenarios of how you can move more of your supply chain,” Schaitkin said. Planning for alternate contingencies may ensure business continuity. “There is no magic bullet,” NEPA’s Horvath said. “If you are just an exporter, I don’t think it’s too much to worry about. If they are on the import side, it’s going to be affected and how much a company realizes on imported products.” The Northeastern Pennsylvania Alliance offers assistance to companies that are considering going global or expanding abroad to understand the benefits and challenges of international trade and navigate through all the rules and regulations that go with doing that. “If it’s a newer company, learn as much as you can,” he said. “Get to market and develop your relationships. If you’re already involved in international trade and see the benefits, if you know what you’re doing, keep on doing it and don’t stop. Figure out ways that you can still make your product cost-effective and competitive for consumers in that market that you are in to be able to continue to buy your product. Stay on top of everything that affects your particular industry and the product that you manufacture.” While companies going global may face ongoing challenges, Mataro remains optimistic. “The good part is there are still opportunities,” he said. “There’s growth potential (with) 300 million people in Western Europe and there are lots of opportunities for offering the right products and services. It’s just going to take a somewhat different perspective than we might have from all of the uncertainty that’s coming from all of this activity.”

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Portrait by renowned illustrator Joseph Adolphe.

WILMINGTON TRUST RENOWNED INSIGHT

“You’ve built a strong team for your business. Have you done the same at home?” As a business owner, you likely spend time promoting a sense of teamwork, collaboration, and unity among your employees. But are you doing the same within your family? Establishing a strong sense of team at home is crucial if you hope to pass on your business to future generations. The dilemma. Parents in high-net-worth families face the challenge of preparing the next generation to tackle wealth-related issues, while also worrying about entitlement and lack of motivation. They often spend a great deal of time preparing their money for their family, but rarely focus on preparing their family for the money. Many business owners who come to us have fallen into this trap. We see them devoting significant resources to off-site company retreats, where abilities and shared values are identified, and the company’s mission for the future is discussed at length. But when asked if they are doing the same with their families, there’s likely silence and a shrug. Interdependence is often overlooked. By the time you realize that your family is fragmenting into a group of independent, self-interested individuals, it can be very difficult to reverse the trend.

Thomas C. Rogerson Senior Managing Director and Family Wealth Strategist Tom is a recognized leader and pioneer in family governance, assisting families with communication, philanthropic vision, legacy planning, succession, and education. He incorporates these critical issues into a client’s comprehensive wealth management plan, helping not only to prepare the money for the family, but also to prepare the family for the money. For access to knowledgeable professionals like Tom and the rest of our team, contact Dan Driscoll at 717-237-6257. F I D U C I A R Y

S E R V I C E S

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The answer. We have a five-step process that can help you build a strong family team, and it’s based on some of the same tools you’d use within your company. It involves education, communication, shared values, philanthropy, and governance. The tools and strategies employed at each stage can help families start encouraging the skills needed to make positive, intelligent decisions regarding family wealth long into the future.

90%

O F H I G H - N ET-WORT H FA M IL I E S LOS E T HE I R W EA LT H BY T HE T H IR D G EN E R AT I O N Source: The Williams Group Wealth Consultancy

Wilmington Trust has extensive experience helping successful business owners and their families develop critical communication skills and build family unity. For insight into how we can help you create your own “home team advantage,” visit wilmingtontrust.com/nextgen.

M A N AG E M E N T

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P R I VAT E

B A N K I N G

This article is for informational purposes only and is not intended as an offer or solicitation for the sale of any financial product or service. This article is not designed or intended to provide financial, tax, legal, accounting, or other professional advice since such advice always requires consideration of individual circumstances. If professional advice is needed, the services of your professional advisor should be sought. Private Banking is the marketing name for an offering of M&T Bank deposit and loan products and services. Investments: • Are NOT FDIC-Insured • Have NO Bank Guarantee • May Lose Value Wilmington Trust is a registered service mark. Wilmington Trust Corporation is a wholly owned subsidiary of M&T Bank Corporation. Wilmington Trust Company, operating in Delaware only, Wilmington Trust, N.A., M&T Bank, and certain other affiliates provide various fiduciary and non-fiduciary services, including trustee, custodial, agency, investment management, and other services. International corporate and institutional services are offered through Wilmington Trust Corporation’s international affiliates. Loans, credit cards, retail and business deposits, and other business and personal banking services and products are offered by M&T Bank, member FDIC. ©2017 Wilmington Trust Corporation and its affiliates. All rights reserved.

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STATE

Workers’ comp insurance rate cut Wolf Administration cabinet secretaries for the Insurance Department and Labor & Industry announced last month Pennsylvania businesses will see another cut in workers’ compensation insurance rates while maintaining benefit levels for injured workers. Insurance Commissioner Teresa Miller and Labor & Industry Secretary Kathy Manderino made the announcement at an event at Global Advanced Metals in Boyertown. Workers’ comp insurance rates dropped 6.21 percent, effective April 1, reducing a key expense for many companies and saving Pennsylvania businesses an estimated $150 million this year. “Today’s reduction will further help business owners create jobs that pay in Pennsylvania and at the same time, maintain fair benefits for workers injured on the job, something that is vital for families’ financial well-being and peace of mind,” Gov. Wolf said. Today’s rate cut announcement comes following a national study released last November, showing Pennsylvania improved its standing

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among states in workers’ comp insurance costs under the Wolf Administration, dropping from 17th highest to 26th highest from 2014 to 2016. The Oregon Department of Consumer and Business Services conducted the study comparing workers’ comp insurance rates for 50 selected employment classes based on methods that put states’ workers’ comp rates on a comparable basis with a constant set of state-specific risk classifications. Commissioner Miller said her department under Gov. Wolf’s leadership is working to maintain a vibrant and competitive workers’ compensation insurance market, helping keep costs down. “More than 325 companies offer workers’ compensation insurance coverage in Pennsylvania,” Miller said. “This means employers are able to find attractive, cost-efficient options for this vital insurance.” The rate reduction follows the insurance department’s approval of the Pennsylvania Compensation Rating Bureau’s annual loss cost filing. These loss costs are used to determine the premi-

$795,000

NEW LISTING

WILKES-BARRE TWP

FORTY-FORT

High volume sub shop for sale! Very high traffic, parking for 25-30 cars! Beer license, equipment, recipes….everything is included! Also included is a modern 2BR apartment upstairs! MLS# 17-1245 JIM 715-9323

All brick, modern, 1 level building in excellent condition w/over 6600SF on 1.14 acres. High traffic area. 180’ frontage on Wyoming Ave. Handicap accessible, multi use, 4BA, parking.

$795,000

NEW LISTING

DALLAS

An artistic opportunity! This 2300SF (plus) Barn offers natural light, HWY exposure, 3 levels of possibilities. Ideal for retail, café, showroom, co-op and more! By appointment only. MLS# 16-4767 JUDY R. 714-9230

$185,000

WILKES-BARRE

Kingston: 570.288.9371 Shavertown: 570.696.3801

MLS# 16-6333 RAE 714-9234

$350,000

NEW LISTING

Stately brick 3-Story building w/off street parking. Functional office spaces, reception area, conference room and kitchen. Handicap accessibility. Easy access from WB Blvd. MLS# 17-1288 JUDY 714-9230

ums businesses pay for workers’ compensation insurance. The premium savings for an individual employer will vary based on the employer’s risk classification, claims experience and other factors. Not all employers will see a decrease. This is the sixth consecutive workers’ compensation insurance cut in as many years and brings the cumulative savings to $720 million for the past six years. Workers’ compensation insurance covers the cost of medical care and rehabilitation for injured workers and lost wages and death benefits for the dependents of those killed in work-related accidents. The other important component of last month’s announcement is that benefit levels have been maintained for injured workers. Labor & Industry Secretary Manderino said certified workplace safety committees, overseen by her department, are key for both cost and safety. More than 11,220 state-certified workplace safety committees have been established since March 1994, protecting more than 1,463,000 workers. Additionally, employers with certified

$169,500

FREELAND

MLS# 17-773 CATHERINE 501-7587

NEW LISTING

CONYNGHAM

Rare find! Automotive garage on Main St, Conyngham w/rented house in rear. 12mo turn key business available. MLS# 17-172 ANITA 501-7583

$350,000

FOR LEASE

Amazing opportunity! Double w/store front and 2BR apartment upstairs. Parking lot in back included in sale. Great location!

$149,900

Mountain Top: 570.474.9801 Wilkes-Barre: 570.822.1160

workplace safety committees have saved close to $604.2 million in workers’ compensation premiums. These savings in insurance costs are due solely to the five percent premium discount provided to businesses that have these committees. Global Advanced Metals has a long-standing certified workplace safety committee and won a Governor’s Award for Safety Excellence in 2016. Global is a manufacturer of high performance tantalum metallurgical and powder products to the electronics, aerospace, automotive and chemical manufacturing industries. Manderino said her department’s Bureau of Workers’ Compensation Health & Safety Division provides employers with the most up-to-date and relevant safety information and benefits possible for employees. Employers should contact their insurance company or agent for more information about how their workers’ compensation premiums will be affected. More information on Pennsylvania insurance products is available at insurance.pa.gov.

KINGSTON

Great location between Kingston Corner & Gateway Shopping Center. Parking in rear of building for approximately 11 cars. MLS# 17-1269 MATT 714-9229

$270,000

FOR LEASE

PLAINS

FORTY FORT

Avenue exposure! Two suites being 2125 SF & 2400 SF. Open space w/reception area and offices. Plenty of parking.

MLS# 16-6544 MARIBETH 696-0882

MLS# 16-6214 & 16-6215 JUDY 714-9230

Clarks Summit: 570.585.0600 Scranton: 570.207.6262

MLS# 16-625 PAT S. 696-6670

$199,000

FOR LEASE

Prime location for your desired business! Recently remodeled with handicap accessible restrooms. Open space inside to suit any business. Parking for 40+ cars. High traffic area.

$2000/M

KINGSTON

Create your own business opportunity in nearly 9000SF; price includes building & land only. See MLS# 15-2880 for furniture, equipment.

11/SF

WILKES-BARRE

Newly painted and ready to occupy! Two units 800 & 1000SF. Ideal for retail, office or showroom w/display window. Parking and good exposure! MLS# 16-1671 JUDY 714-9230

Drums: Hazle Twp:

$800/M

570.788.1999 570.501.7575

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BANKING

Female leaders on the rise in banking Maculloch also believes it is all about aligning yourself with the right people. “It’s truly all about When it comes to banking, the common culture and surrounding yourself with smart perception is that the industry is dominated by people. Community Bank N.A. looks for the talent men — holding the highest leadership roles, in the person — gender doesn’t matter. earning more and dominating boards. I love working with a team that’s full of However, according to a recent study talented men and women.” by PricewaterhouseCoopers, the tide is As leaders at Community Bank N.A., shifting, with more women in leadership Maculloch and Steele now serve young roles than ever before. talent as the female mentors they lacked This is big news for an industry earlier in their careers. Each feel it’s traditionally led by men and can be seen crucial to relay the idea that gender is locally at Community Bank N.A., which an asset rather than a hindrance. Toczko-Maculloch recently announced Barb Maculloch as In fact, Steele looks at being a president of Pennsylvania Banking and woman as an advantage. “I find that it appointed Sally Steele as the new chair sets you apart, gets you noticed and of its board of directors. opens doors that then allow you to Maculloch and Steele have experiprove your capabilities and talents as a enced the evolution of women in their professional.” profession firsthand. Maculloch joined While Steele and Maculloch have the industry in January 1980 as a teller seen growth of women in their field, for Wyoming National Bank while taking they both say there is still progress to Steele night and weekend classes at Miseribe made. As a result, they both want cordia University. Meanwhile, Steele to use their new positions not only to joined the board of Grange National Bank in 1991 serve as role models, but to maintain Community in addition to working as an attorney. Bank N.A.’s culture — one that is kind and sincere Throughout their careers, both experienced to customers and welcoming to all individuals. familiar challenges to varying degrees — lower In addition, they want to work together with the salaries than male counterparts, struggles after entire Community Bank N.A. team to strategically maternity leave, a dearth of female mentors or grow the bank, increase market share and enhance simply having to work harder to prove their capashareholder value. bilities. When Maculloch joined the industry, the “I don’t want women to think there are any highest position she’d ever seen a woman occupy limits on what they can achieve, whether they want was commercial team leader. to be in the banking industry or another profes“Men were at the top and most women were sion,” Steele said. “If you want something, stay in positions such as tellers when I first started, but focused and work really hard and you can achieve that’s not necessarily true anymore,” Maculloch anything, regardless of your gender.” said. “The tide has definitely started to shift.” Sarah Christ is public relations coordinator at ComBoth women attribute this shift to the percent- munity Bank NA. age of women today receiving college degrees. Community Bank System Inc. (CBSI) operates more Forty years ago, women fell vastly behind men, than 190 customer facilities across Upstate New with only 12 percent in the United States finishing York and Northeast Pennsylvania through its banking four years of college. Fast-forward to today, wom- subsidiary, Community Bank N.A. With assets of approximately $8.7 billion, the DeWitt, New Yorken are more likely to obtain a bachelor’s degree, headquartered company is among the country’s 150 with 32.7 percent completing their undergraduate largest financial institutions. In addition to a full range of retail and business banking services, the company studies, contrasted to 32.3 percent of men. offers comprehensive financial planning, insur“There is a generational change happening ance and wealth management services. Community and you’re starting to see women moving up the Bank System Inc. is listed on the New York Stock ranks,” Steele said. “It may take time as women Exchange and the company’s stock trades under the symbol CBU. Visit communitybankna.com or http:// need to first attain roles of responsibility and ir.communitybanksystem.com. leadership; however, there is demand for talent regardless of gender.” By Sarah Christ


STATE

SBA recognizes export lenders Small businesses make up 98 percent of all exporters

The U.S. Small Business Administration last month honored BB&T and First American Bank as the 2017 SBA Export Lenders of the Year, respectively for large and small lending institutions during a ceremony at the 10th annual SBA Export Lender Roundtable in Washington, D.C. During the event, World Trade Finance Inc. was recognized as SBA’s Export Working Capital Champion, for providing international trade financing to small businesses since 1997. BB&T senior vice president William Browning and First American Bank vice president Alan Lane-Murcia received the awards on behalf of their respective institutions. World Trade Finance founder and former president Bernd Hermann, and co-founder/managing director Irene Kuo received the Export Working Capital Champion award. “American small business exporters need capital to access overseas markets, fund their export sales and expand local operations. BB&T, First American Bank and World Trade Finance have been invaluable partners toward this end,” SBA administrator Linda McMahon said. “I want to congratulate and thank these lenders for helping small business exporters expand, create high-wage jobs for American workers and advance small business innovation.” “Because U.S. exports are vitally important to the nation’s economy, I am pleased to see these banks embrace international lending to small business. Small businesses make up 98 percent of all exporters and no small business should want to be left in the proverbial cloud of dust when it comes to exporting,” said Robert Elsas, regional manager, SBA Office of International Trade. “Because SBA export lenders play a pivotal role in helping small business exporters to compete and succeed in the global market, I applaud lenders like BB&T and First American Bank.” Based in Winston-Salem, North Carolina, BB&T is one of the largest financial services holding companies in the United States, operating 2,196 financial centers in 15 states and Washington, D.C. In fiscal year 2016, BB&T made a strong commitment to ensure that its small business exporters had access to financing. As a result, BB&T recorded remarkable growth in SBA export financing, moving from $7 million of Export Working Capital Loans in fiscal year 2015 to $30.6 million in fiscal year 2016.

First American Bank is an Illinois-chartered, privately-held, full-service bank with 50 locations in Illinois and Florida and more than $3.4 billion in assets. First American uses all three of the SBA’s core export loans, which has resulted in a significant increase in their support for small business exporters in fiscal year 2016, going from $8.9 million in fiscal year 2015 to $13.2 million in fiscal year 2016. World Trade Finance Inc. is a California-chartered, privately-held lender that is now a subsidiary of ExWorks Capital LLC, with offices located nationwide. Since 1990, World Trade Finance has delivered boutique-trade finance solutions to underserved U.S. exporters and qualified international buyers, providing more than $250 million of financing to small businesses and supporting over $750 million of U.S. exports. An early champion of the SBA’s Export Working Capital Loan program, World Trade Finance since 1997 has made 162 of these loans for a total of $116 million, which supported more than $300 million in exports. The SBA Export Lenders Roundtable is an annual event sponsored by the SBA’s Office of International Trade. At this event, lenders, trade financiers and trade industry professionals have an opportunity to meet and learn about the SBA’s International Trade Finance Programs, which are designed to help small businesses develop new markets, finance export transactions, and expand production capacity to meet overseas demand. Visit sba.gov/international.

BANKING & FINANCE New survey says Americans confident in financial skills Nearly two-thirds of adults (62 percent) consider their own financial literacy to be good or excellent, according to a new survey conducted by Morning Consult on behalf of the American Bankers Association. However, their perception of the average American isn’t quite as favorable. Only 29 percent of respondents perceive the average American’s financial literacy as good or excellent. Reality falls somewhere in between. An S&P Global study found that 57 percent of American adults could be classified as financially literate – putting the U.S. in 14th place for financial literacy behind countries like Israel, Canada and Germany. “Financial knowledge is a critical component to leading a successful and stable life,” said Corey Carlisle, executive director of the ABA Foundation. “It’s also an area of improvement for many Americans. By taking the time to brush up on our money management skills, we can put ourselves on a path toward a stronger financial future.” The ABA Foundation asks five questions to

test consumers’ knowledge of key financial concepts. “Credit, interest, compounding interest, diversification and inflation are real-world financial concepts that must be understood in order to be financially capable,” Carlisle said. How confident are you in your financial literacy skills? Try your hand at these questions. Credit: Q: What is generally considered a good credit score? A: Credit scores can range from 300 to 850. Generally, anything over 700 is considered a good score. Factors like payment history, types of credit, and outstanding debt can influence your score. Interest: Q: Let’s say you need to borrow $200. Would you rather pay back $205 or $200 plus 5 percent interest? A: You’d rather pay back $205 because $200 plus 5 percent interest comes out to $210. Ple ase se e SURVEY, Page 25

Enrolling for Summer & Fall

*** The U.S. Small Business Administration (SBA) was created in 1953 and since January 13, 2012, has served as a Cabinet-level agency of the federal government to aid, counsel, assist and protect the interests of small business concerns, to preserve free competitive enterprise and to maintain and strengthen the overall economy of our nation. The SBA helps Americans start, build and grow businesses. Through an extensive network of field offices and partnerships with public and private organizations, the SBA delivers its services to people throughout the United States, Puerto Rico, the U.S. Virgin Islands and Guam. To learn more, visitsba.gov.

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ENERGY: NATIONAL

NARUC establishes natural gas access and expansion task force

National Association of regulatory utility commissioners president Robert F. Powelson and its executive committee have established a new Presidential Natural Gas Access and Expansion Task Force. Pennsylvania Commissioner John Coleman and Mississippi Commissioner Brandon Presley have been appointed as co-chairs, with North Dakota Commissioner Julie Fedorchak serving as vice-chair. The task force will be charged with developing best practices and recommendations regarding natural gas service for underserved and unserved areas of the country, including, but not limited to rural communities. Many rural communities, which comprise residential, industrial and commercial customers, lack access to low-cost natural gas because of infrastructure issues — local distribution lines and gas utility services are unavailable. These communities must rely on bottled propane, heating oil and other more expensive fuels. The Natural Gas Access and Expansion Task Force will analyze the potential demand for the service extension and expansion of natural gas infrastructure and identify alternative or unconventional approaches to reaching these unserved and underserved areas. The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission regulates the rates set for transportation and storage, as well as the operating terms and conditions of interstate pipelines. However, within state boundaries, the gas distribution through pipeline systems owned by local gas distribution companies is regulated by NARUC’s members. Moreover, NARUC passed a resolution during its recent 2017 winter meeting on Natural Gas Pipeline Siting Review, member Information Sharing and Tool Kit Initiative, which specifically resolves to ensure continued member education and initiatives on issues relating to the appropriateness of expedited review of interstate natural gas pipeline siting. Other previous resolutions note the need to “explore, examine and consider adopting alternative rate recovery mechanisms as necessary to accelerate the modernization, replacement and expansion of the nation’s natural gas pipeline systems.” “The work of this task force will be extremely beneficial to NARUC members and their communities, as we undertake this comprehensive study of residential, commercial and industrial access and expansion of natural gas distribution infrastructure,”

Powelson said. “We will better understand the demand for natural gas service in unserved and underserved areas, the barriers and obstacles to such access and expansion (e.g., consumers’ inability to pay for access or conversion to natural gas service) and provide relevant economic information on the costs and benefits to expand infrastructure.” During the eight-month term of the task force, the group’s main focus will be to prepare an analytical report that will: • study current access, expansion and service extension policies for underserved and unserved areas; • examine the need for access and expansion including case studies and review of the barriers and obstacles to such access; • recommend potential mechanisms to address the benefits and opportunities for access and expansion and identifies alternative or unconventional approaches to reaching unserved and underserved areas; and • compile a national “best practices” collection on natural gas access and expansion to underserved and unserved areas. Also, the task force will coordinate with NARUC’s Committee on Gas to identify opportunities for engagement at NARUC meetings and collaborate with NARUC-affiliated organizations for best practices. The following state commissioners have been invited to serve on the task force: Ken Anderson (Texas), Stephen Bloom (Oregon), Julie Brown (Florida), Robert Hayden (Massachusetts), Kim O’Guinn (Arkansas), Norman Saari (Michigan), Dianne Solomon (New Jersey), Nick Wagner (Iowa) and Dallas Winslow (Delaware). There are three vacant positions to be filled at the discretion of the NARUC president. The Committee on Gas Chair Stan Wise (Georgia) and co-vice Chair Diane X. Burman (New York) will serve as active liaisons to the task force. *** NARUC is a non-profit organization founded in 1889 whose members include the governmental agencies that are engaged in the regulation of utilities and carriers in the fifty states, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands. NARUC’s member agencies regulate telecommunications, energy, and water utilities. NARUC represents the interests of state public utility commissions before the three branches of the federal government.

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ENERGY: STATE

Gov. announces opening of natural gas fueling stations Governor Tom Wolf announced on April 20 the opening of the first of 29 Compressed Natural Gas (CNG) fueling stations planned as part of a publicprivate partnership (P3). PennDOT deputy secretary for multimodal Toby Fauver and P3 office director Mike Bonini joined officials from Trillium CNG, Cam Tran and state and local officials in Johnstown today to mark opening of the facility. “This innovative P3 is allowing us to help transit agencies save money and take advantage of plentiful supplies of natural gas produced right here in Pennsylvania,” the governor said. “We applaud Trillium for reaching this first milestone and look forward to continued progress on this initiative.” Through the $84.5 million statewide project, Trillium will design, build, finance, operate and maintain CNG fueling stations at 29 public transit agency sites through a 20-year P3 agreement. Following today’s opening, other stations will be constructed over the next five years and Trillium is also making CNG-related upgrades to existing transit maintenance facilities. CNG fueling will be accessible to the public at six transit agency sites, with the option to add to additional sites in the future. The CNG station in Johnstown is available to the public, including for trucks. PennDOT will receive a 15 percent royalty, excluding taxes, for each gallon of fuel sold to the public, which will be used to support the cost of the project. The team has guaranteed at least $2.1 million in royalties over the term of the agreement. Using the P3 procurement mechanism allows PennDOT to install the fueling stations faster than if a traditional procurement mechanism was used for each site, resulting in significant estimated capital cost savings of more than $46 million. When the project is completed, the fueling stations will supply gas to more than 1,600 CNG buses at transit agencies across the state. A list of agencies participating in the P3 project, in order of construction-start timeline, follows: • Cambria County Transportation Authority, Johnstown Facility (2017), includes public fueling. • Central Pennsylvania Transportation Authority, York Facility (2017), includes public fueling.

• Mid Mon Valley Transportation Authority (2017). • Cambria County Transportation Authority, Ebensburg Facility (2017). • Westmoreland County Transportation Authority (2017). • Centre Area Transportation Authority (2017) • Beaver County Transportation Authority (2017). • Crawford Area Transportation Authority (2017). • New Castle Area Transportation Authority (2017), includes public fueling. • Lehigh and Northampton Transportation Authority, Allentown Facility (2017). • County of Lebanon Transportation Authority (2017). • Altoona Metro Transit (2017). • Central Pennsylvania Transportation Authority, Gettysburg Facility (2017). • Butler Transportation Authority (2018). • Indiana County Transportation Authority (2018), includes public fueling. • County of Lackawanna Transportation System (2018), includes public fueling. • Erie Metropolitan Transportation Authority (2018), includes public fueling. • Mercer County Regional Council of Governments (2019). • Fayette Area Coordinated Transportation System (2019). • Monroe County Transportation Authority (2019). • Area Transportation Authority of North Central PA, Bradford Facility (2019). • Area Transportation Authority of North Central PA, Johnsonburg Facility (2019). • DuBois, Falls Creek, Sandy Township Joint Transportation Authority (2020). • Lehigh and Northampton Transportation Authority, Easton Facility (2021). • Luzerne County Transportation Authority (2021). • Schuylkill Transportation System (2021). • Transit Authority of Warren County (2021). • Capital Area Transit (2021). • Port Authority of Allegheny County (2021).


HONING YOUR MARKETING PROGRAM

Real growth is hiding where you aren’t looking By Taddy Young, Eddie Yoon and Linda Deeken

After years of researching and advising clients around the world on innovation and growth strategy, we have made this observation. Nearly everyone wants innovation and growth. There is general consensus that the very best way to innovate and to grow is to “make the pie bigger” — that is, to grow categories and expand markets — instinctively recognizing that carving incremental market share out of the hide of your competition is a messy business Surprisingly few companies systematically pursue true pie-growing strategies. In general we find clients engaging across a range of activities — some fruitful, some less so — to drive desired growth. With a solid existing product in hand, most clients begin by transitioning further and further upmarket, striving for (and often realizing) incremental pricing power and margin realization. This works for a while, until further growth is sought and then clients often turn to increased specialization at the premium end. A proliferation of customized and specialized products to address profitable niche markets and extract yet further value from the market is often how this plays out in the market. When that strategy begins to lose steam, clients turn to the lower end of the market and work feverishly making lemonade from lemons. The lemonade in these situations will often take two forms, either the development of new business models designed to enable profit realization at the lower end of the market or mechanisms to fundamentally unlock non-consumption. And when those approaches collectively fail to drive further incremental growth, one is flummoxed and struggling to find desired growth. We’d argue that it’s not that growth potential is not there, it’s just hiding where they aren’t used to looking. Let’s introduce two concepts that we find helpful in surfacing these opportunities from the often over-looked areas of the market. Concept 1: Superconsumers. Who are they? They are the high-passion, high-profit consumers found in every category. They spend three to seven times more than the average person in a category. They are knowledgeable on the category (and passionate), willing to pay a higher price per unit and enthusiastically share their expertise and

knowledge with others. Concept 2: Jobs Theory. It represents a fundamental shift in our thinking. Consumers do not buy brands and products, instead, they HIRE them in order to create desired experiences and make progress in their lives. Successful innovations fundamentally identify people with important jobs to be done that have only incomplete or inadequate solutions — and then deliver solutions that enable the desired progress people seek. Some jobs are “executive-level” jobs meeting rational, emotional and social benefits and others are more “entrylevel” jobs, addressing primarily rational benefits. The most successful innovations are fueled by converting non-consumers into consumers and intermittent customers into regular, profitable ones. What happens when one overlays these concepts? New growth opportunities are brought to the surface. Traditional approaches and frameworks consistently highlight the intersection of superconsumers and executive-level jobs as the key area for margin growth and just as many highlight opportunities to convert non-consumers into consumers via successful delivery of entry-level

jobs, often by category disruptors. Very few, however, surface the remaining two quadrants, but as we’ll describe via several case studies, companies overlook those opportunities at their own peril. Consider for a moment Keurig. One often immediately jumps to a focus on consumers who love coffee and spend more than $600 per year on it. That focus is intuitive and clearly benefits margin potential. But that’s not really the Keurig story. Instead, Keurig successfully delivered the executive-level job of non-consumers and the entry-level job of superconsumers. Really, you say? Consider the following. A dinner party, hosted by a non-coffee consumer, seeking to complete a splendid dinner party with a coffee course, but with little to no knowledge of how to deliver it. Enter Keurig. A great cup of coffee, completely customizable, a perfect finish to a meal and a re-affirmation of your exceptional hosting skills. Executive-level job of a non-consumer, satisfied by Keurig. For the coffee superconsumer the ask of Keurig is decidedly different. For a true coffee superconsumer Keurig does not deliver their executive-level “craft coffee” experience, but rather

their entry-level quick cup of coffee on a schedule. entry-level job of a superconsumer, satisfied by Keurig. The reality, such market opportunities are hidden in plain sight all around you. They are terribly difficult to spot however, until viewed through the superconsumer/jobs theory lens. Only with this understanding can one truly see the “Jobs” for which consumers are hiring, and the progress they are seeking to make in their lives and only with that understanding can innovators meet consumers where they are with solutions people will predictably buy, use and celebrate.

Eddie Yoon is a principal with The Cambridge Group, with offices in New York and Chicago. He helps companies find and fully monetize Super Consumers. He is the author of the book, “Superconsumers: A Simple, Speedy and Sustainable Path to Superior Growth.” Linda Deeken is the chief marketing officer of The Cambridge Group. She has been published in Harvard Business Review, among other publications and has been a key contributor to several books recently released by The Cambridge Group. Taddy Hall is a principal and leader of Strategic Innovation at The Cambridge Group. He is a jobs theory pioneer and practitioner, as well as an authority in marketing, innovation, branding, and competitive strategy.

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REAL ESTATE

Apollo Flow Controls to consolidate distribution operations in CenterPoint East

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Apollo Flow Controls will consolidate Northeast U.S. distribution operations for three of its affiliates into a building recently constructed by Mericle Commercial Real Estate Services in CenterPoint Commerce & Trade Park East, Jenkins Township. Part of Aalberts Industries of Langbroek, Netherlands, Apollo Flow Controls produces and sells the line of flow control products in the commercial and industrial markets. The company has operations across the U.S. with manufacturing in North Carolina, South Carolina, Indiana, and Tennessee. The project will consolidate distribution operations for Apollo Valves, Elkhart Products Corp. and LASCO Fittings Inc., which will distribute products from a 232,500-square-foot building constructed on speculation by Mericle at 500 Keystone Avenue. LASCO Fittings has been a tenant of Mericle’s in the Hanover Industrial Estates since 2003. Local Service Center operations manager Jack Novitski said being located in Northeastern Pennsylvania will make it possible for the companies to get their products to northeast customers within one business day. “When Apollo Flow Controls decided to consolidate distribution operations, LASCO’s prior success in Northeast Pennsylvania did not go unnoticed,” he said. Novitski said Apollo will employ approximately 30 people in the building once the full product lines of the three companies are ready for distribution.

Mericle vice president Bob Besecker coordinated the real estate transaction along with Cushman & Wakefield executive director Gerry Blinebury and senior director Leah Balerno of the firm’s Harrisburg and Philadelphia’s offices and Britt Casey of the firm’s Rosemont, Illinois office. Mericle constructed the building on speculation on 22.72 acres immediately adjacent to Interstate 81. The building features 30-foot to 36-foot four-inch ceiling clear heights, 26 loading doors and energy-efficient utilities. The building is approximately one mile from Interstate 81 and Interstate 476. Besecker said the project is another example of the importance of having a wide variety of space available when companies show interest in Northeastern Pennsylvania. “Besecker said Mericle started construction on the speculative building last October on one of the company’s ReadyToGo! Sites. The site had been fully prepared for future construction well in advance of this project Besecker said. “We’ve seen more than 40 companies move into CenterPoint in just the past 10 years,” said Pat Stella, president of the Greater Pittston Chamber of Commerce. “There is no doubt that Greater Pittston’s strategic location, highly productive workforce and affordable business costs are combining with Mericle’s speculative development program to attract jobs and investment to our area.”


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ECONOMY

Why we chose to do business in NEPA and the greater Scranton area

year off production startup, compared to a scenario requiring construction of a completely new buildCrystal Window & Door Systems is a national ing. As we modify the building, we are seeing that manufacturer of vinyl and aluminum Northeast Pennsylvania construction windows and doors with five production costs are lower than New York City’s by facilities and distribution in more than perhaps 30 percent, another factor in the 40 states around the country. While our region’s favor. main factory and corporate headquarSince our Northeast Pennsylvania ters are located in New York City, we factory will integrate its operations with have expanded production operations our New York plant, proximity to New over the past 30 years to Chicago; York City is critical and Lackawanna Chen Riverside, California; St. Louis; and now County has that going for it. The travel Benton Twp. in Lackawanna County. time between the two facilities by car In October 2015, Crystal Windows acquired a or truck is approximately three hours. A round 226-acre industrial property off Interstate 81 with trip with time for a meeting, material delivery or an existing 336,000-square-feet building. Since finished window pickup can easily be made in a that time, we’ve renovated a significant part of the regular workday. building, begun production operations and hired 50 The Scranton area also offers extraordinarily workers from the local community. Five-year plans good highway access. Interstates 81, 380, 84 call for further building renovations, expansion and 80 all serve the region, making many major of production and a workforce of perhaps 350 to metropolitan areas well within a day’s drive for 400 employees. Tens of millions of dollars will be delivery of finished products. The great highway invested in the facility and will be generated in new system and Crystal Window’s very close proximity economic activity for the area. in Benton Twp. to I-81 exits 201 and 202 also make Great news, of course, but why did Crystal Win- it convenient for employees commuting to work. dow choose Northeast Pennsylvania for this large The Lackawanna economic development ofexpansion? What can be learned from Crystal’s ficials and the Greater Scranton Chamber of Comdecision-making process that might be useful for merce have been superbly helpful. Without their attracting other major firms to the area? I’ll try to involvement, Crystal might never have been aware explain some of the reasons why Crystal, a New of the real estate opportunities in the area. They York City-based manufacturer has decided to grow also played a proactive role in the final real estate in Lackawanna County. purchase closing, which was invaluable. First is the area’s availability of large industrial Their knowledgeable, experienced staff underproperties at affordable prices. In New York City and stands the needs of businesses and know ho to much of its surrounding environs, it is impossible assist dynamic, growing companies. Through their to find properties for manufacturing that exceed introductions, Crystal has made dozens of valuable 50 acres. Smaller spaces go for wildly exorbitant contacts with the local business community, conprices since industrial property competes with tractors, material suppliers, professional services commercial, retail, office and multi-family housing and government officials. real estate. For example, a recent review of existing The Greater Scranton/Wilkes-Barre area, with industrial buildings for sale in New York City reveals more than 500,000 residents, provides Crystal an average list price per square foot of $627, Windows with a great potential workforce. We’ve compared to $30 to $55 per square foot for existing hired more than 50 to date and plan on hiring hunindustrial buildings for sale in Lackawanna County, dreds more in the next few years. New employees The existing building on the new Crystal come to us with a strong work ethic, initiative, property, while not immediately suitable for our knowledge, skills and in many cases practical operations, has a usable quality construction build- manufacturing experience. Workers who undering envelope. This enabled us to shave at least a stand, appreciate and are interested in manufacturBy Steve Chen

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Crystal Window & Door Systems’ Northeast Pennsylvania manufacturing plant is in Benton.

ing are increasingly hard to find in many areas of the country. A company is only as good as its employees and we are very happy that Northeast Pennsylvania offers workers so positively inclined toward manufacturing. Beyond these reasons, the region offers many benefits yet to be realized. Transportation of raw materials by rail to our new factory in larger bulk quantities may provide cost efficiencies far beyond what trucking provides. The Scranton area offers such transportation options, and we’ve begun preliminary exploration of possible rail line extensions to our facility. Also the area abounds with institutions of higher education. Through internships, graduate recruiting or production and logistics joint projects, local two-year and four-year universities and colleges will surely play a future role in Crystal Windows’ growth and success. Northeast Pennsylvania stands in stark contrast to New York City which has innumerable direct and indirect costs of doing business. Taxes, regulations,

mandates, fees, tolls and other costs that come with manufacturing in New York City challenge us daily. Things like high local sales tax, municipal income taxes on employees, restrictive and unnecessary labor mandates, exorbitant bridge tolls and unrelenting traffic congestion are the straws that broke the camel’s back and contributed to Crystal’s decision to expand in the greater Scranton area and not in New York City. All the advantages Northeast Pennsylvania offers reflects a region with an extremely supportive business climate and one especially focused on manufacturing. These regional attributes are important to promote. Manufacturing and other industrial businesses forced out of rising cost metropolitan areas like New York and Philadelphia, or states like Connecticut or New Jersey, are seeking new locations with just such a supportive business climate. Crystal Windows is delighted to have chosen Northeast Pennsylvania and is enthusiastic that other manufacturers make the same great choice. Steve Chen is chief operating officer, Crystal Window & Door Systems Ltd. Visit crystalwindows.com.


Our health coaches are with your employees every step of the way. When your employees are healthier, they’re happier and more productive. That’s why we have health coaches like Stephanie who team up with members like Cortne. Cortne was at risk for diabetes, so Stephanie suggested a plan that helped her lose 50 pounds — so far. And Stephanie even calls her regularly and meets her every month for a walk, to keep her on track and motivated. Members who get help from health coaches are #LivingProof.

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TOURISM: BUSINESS TRAVEL

Hazleton professor completes Fulbright in Iceland

Sherry Robinson, associate professor of business at Penn State Hazleton, was selected as a recipient of a 2016-17 Fulbright scholarship to Iceland and spent the fall 2016 semester at Bifrost University in Bifrost, Iceland. The Fulbright Program is the U.S. government’s flagship international educational exchange program, allowing American professors the opportunity to work with students abroad. Penn State was recognized by the U.S. Department of State’s Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs as one of the U.S. colleges and universities that produced the most Fulbright Scholars in the 2016-17 awards cycle. Robinson was among 11 scholars from Penn State who received Fulbright grants for 2016-17, tying the university for second place as one of the U.S. colleges and universities that produced the most Fulbright Scholars for the year. “The Fulbright program provides a unique cultural experience in which we are pleased Dr. Robinson had the opportunity to participate,” Chancellor Gary Lawler said. “She was able to discuss academic and cultural knowledge from Penn State Hazleton with people from all over the world and bring back their perspective to share insights with her students here.” As a Fulbright scholar, Robinson co-taught an International Business class to 24 students from 12 countries in Europe and Asia. Her Fulbright project, “Integrating Learning Games into Blended Courses: A Cross-cultural Comparison of Student Responses to Learning Games,” guided her teaching during the semester. She taught with Ingo Arnarson, an assistant professor at Bifrost, partnering by taking the materials he traditionally used in his class and turning them into learning games. Robinson said she learned a great deal from her students, explaining, “The students were highly intelligent and hard-working, but they were also kind and supportive. The classroom atmosphere was so positive that it was an utter joy to go to class and interact with the students.” In working with the students abroad, she incorporated activities that she had developed at Penn State Hazleton. Robinson also worked with adults, co-teaching a session on creativity and innovation during an “Empowering Women” weekend held by the university’s continuing education department

Sherry Robinson, associate professor of business at Penn State Hazleton, spent the fall 2016 semester at Bifrost University in Iceland as a Fulbright recipient. Here she stands in front of the Gullfoss waterfall in the Golden Circle cluster. and teaching a seminar entitled “Learning Games Toolbox” to Bifrost faculty at the Reykjavik office. During the seminar, she explained the design of learning games and compared the results of her current research with Bifrost students with past research involving Hazleton students. Her semester in Iceland concluded with her formal presentation to a group that included members of the Fulbright Board of Directors and representatives from the United States Embassy. Highlights of Robinson’s experience included seeing the Northern Lights, baking American treats for her students and igniting her interest in photography. She took nearly 23,000 pictures during the semester, with her photos so well received that she was asked to publish the calendar celebrating the 60th anniversary of the U.S. — Iceland Fulbright

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Program. Along with other Fulbright scholars and staff, Robinson had the opportunity to visit Iceland’s president, Guðni Jóhannesson and his wife, Eliza Reid. The group toured the presidential home, including the basement, where Viking antiquities were found a few years ago. Robinson previously received a Fulbright scholarship for the 2008-09 academic year, teaching business courses and performing research at Buskerud University in Norway. She first visited Norway in 2004 as part of Rotary International’s Group Study Exchange. She began studying Norwegian, returning to the country several times and becoming fluent in the language. After the conclusion of her recent Fulbright in Iceland, she gave a presentation about her time there to the Rotary Club of Greater Hazleton. She also

recently served as part of the “Fulbright as a Form of Cultural Diplomacy” panel during a one-day Fulbright Conference at University Park. The conference brings past Fulbright recipients and potential applicants together to discuss the Fulbright program. Since its inception in 1946, the Fulbright program has provided more than 370,000 participants, chosen for their academic merit and leadership potential, with the opportunity to exchange ideas and contribute to finding solutions to shared international concerns. More than 1,100 U.S. college and university faculty and administrators, professionals, artists, journalists, scientists, lawyers, and independent scholars are awarded Fulbright grants to teach and/or conduct research annually. The Fulbright U.S. Scholar Program operates in more than 125 countries throughout the world.


REGIONAL

“Your Business... is Our Business”

Toyota of Scranton and local police ‘spring into action’

The Region’s Award-Winning Source of Business News and Information

Judy Gregg

Toyota of Scranton, in conjunction with local law enforcement announced, last month, the launch of “Spring Into Action,” a major Community Policing platform, with the donation of 12 brand new 2017 police patrol bicycles. The bikes will be presented to Blakely, Archbald, Old Forge, Taylor, Carbondale and the Lackawanna County sheriff’s office. Each of the patrol bikes carry the same design as the motor vehicles in each of the receiving departments’ fleet. The bikes are patrol ready with emergency LED lighting, siren, headlight, utility bag and helmet. The bikes will be used to strengthen the community policing efforts by each department. Bike officers can better engage the public through direct, in-person communication to forge stronger community relationships. Community policing is a philosophy that promotes organizational strategies that support the systematic use of partnerships and problem-solving techniques to proactively address the immediate conditions that give rise to public safety issues such as crime, social disorder and fear of crime. Community policing, recognizing that police rarely can solve public safety problems alone, encourages interactive partnerships with relevant stakeholders. The range of potential partners is large, and these partnerships can be used to accomplish the two interrelated goals of developing solutions to problems through collaborative problem solving and improving public trust. The public should play a role in prioritizing and addressing public safety problems. The key stakeholders in community partner-

ships which make community policing efforts such as “Spring Into Action” successful are: • Community Members/Groups Individuals who live, work, or otherwise have an interest in the community — volunteers, activists, formal and informal community leaders, residents, visitors and tourists and commuters — are a valuable resource for identifying community concerns. • Nonprofits / Service Providers Advocacy and community-based organizations, such as neighborhood groups, that provide services to the community and advocate on its behalf can be powerful partners. • Private Businesses For-profit businesses also have a great stake in the health of the community and can be key partners because they often bring considerable resources to bear in addressing problems of mutual concern. Businesses can help identify problems and provide resources for responses. • Media The media represents a powerful mechanism by which to communicate with the community. It can assist with publicizing community concerns and available solutions, such as services from government or community agencies or new laws or codes that will be enforced. In addition, the media can have a significant impact on public perceptions of the police, crime problems and fear of crime. Toyota of Scranton President, Greg Gagorik, said, “We are proud to be a strong supporter of our law enforcement community. It’s an honor to assist the local police departments with their community policing initiatives.

For Advertising 570-207-9001 ext. 5425 jgregg@timesshamrock.com

Christine Fanning

For Editorial 570-348-9100 ext. 5415 cfanning@timesshamrock.com

149 Penn Avenue, Scranton, PA 18503 • 75 North Washington Street, Wilkes-Barre, PA 18711 For subscription information: mrade@timesshamrock.com

Upcoming Special Editions! • • • • •

Profiles in Medical Excellence

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Perpetuating Greatness...the First 100 Days!

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Who’s Who in NEPA

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Publishing: July • Ad Deadline: June 15

Adult Education Guide

Publishing: August • Ad Deadline: July 17 Contact Judy Gregg today for advertising information! 570-207-9001 ext. 5425 • jgregg@timesshamrock.com

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YOUR GATEWAY TO GROWTH

Wow. Book Now.

By Jeff Blackman

In November of 2014, I had a short, yet successful business trip to Bend, Oregon. It was incredibly enhanced by my stay at The Oxford Hotel. (A tale worth sharing, especially since this month’s issue of the Business Journal, has stories related to tourism and vacations.)

While I was there for only two nights and less than 48 hours, The Oxford and my experience were truly unforgettable. How come?

While at many hotels, even the boutiques, a polite request is answered with a polite “No,” or a “Wish we could, but that’s against our policy.”

When I returned in the afternoon, she handed me the magazine along with an Oxford Hotel 9x12 envelope to mail it. AND she already added stamps! AND she then refused my offer to pay for postage!

At The Oxford, EVERY request was greeted with a “Yes,” or “Absolutely,” or “We’ll see how we can make that work or happen.”

6. Make the answer to any reasonable request, “Yes.” or “Absolutely.” 7. Be punctual. Jason, a gracious and personable bellman, who drove me in the hotel van to and from meetings, was always on-time.

seconds or minutes of downtown Bend’s coffee shops, restaurants, pubs, antique stores, art galleries, theatres, shopping, parks, water and scenery.

Within 15 hours of my return home, it was done. (And as of this writing, it has been read by more than 1,102 readers.)

Does a Ritz-Carlton deliver? You bet. Every time. Can other “non-luxury” hotels also deliver? Absolutely. Yet at The Oxford, it happens in an intimate setting and in a personal way. Folks are friendly and focused. I knew their drivers, concierges,

The owner’s dog is perched smack dab in the middle of the small, inviting lobby and greets you upon arrival.

MAKE YOUR MARK 04/ 26/ 17

Ten lessons for your business:

1. Know a customer’s name and use it. 2. Smile and show sincere interest in a customer or client. 3. Provide individualized attention. 4. Ask polite questions, that always help you discover how you can make a difference in one’s personal or professional life. 5. Surprise people and exceed expectations. For example, I asked one of the concierges, Connie, in the morning before I left for a speaking engagement, if it was okay for me to get one more complimentary copy of the in-room magazine on

8. Hire people of strong character, who are passionate and committed. (You can always teach skills.) 9. Be willing to “give” in return, not just “take.” Connie asked, “If you were pleased with your stay, would you mind submitting a review to TripAdvisor?” I quickly answered, “Have never done it before, yet it’ll be my pleasure.”

10. Immediately buy a Bernese mountain dog! They make quite a first impression.

VISTAGE

NEPA

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Jeff Blackman is a Hall of Fame speaker, Vistage Fast-Track Speaker of the Year, bestselling author, success coach, broadcaster and lawyer. His clients call him a businessgrowth specialist. If you hire speakers, please contact him at 847-998-0688 or jeff@ jeffblackman.com. And visit jeffblackman.com to learn more about his other business-growth tools and to subscribe to his FREE e-zine, The Results Report. Blackman’s bestselling books include Stop Whining! Start Selling! and Peak Your Profits. You can also stay connected with Blackman via Facebook, LinkedIn and Twitter: @BlackmanResults.

Every bank strives to impress its customers in the most positive way. Whether it’s through service, guidance, or just a smile, the team at Landmark Community Bank wants to impress our customers with our dedication to their financial security. Stop in today to find out how we can demonstrate that commitment to you.

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Bend. (I wanted to send it to a valued friend and client, yet I also wanted it mailed from Bend.)

Oh, while most of these talented Oxford hospitality pros walk on two legs, one of ’em welcomes spacious bright room with a comfy sitting area and you from four legs. The owner’s dog, Remingroomy work space, complimentary Wi-Fi, plentiful ton, is a gorgeous Bernese mountain dog, that’s perched smack dab in the middle of the small, amenities, two monster in-room flat screens, a inviting lobby and greets you upon arrival. “welcome” in-room goodies bag, enough pillows Remington is almost a metaphor for this fine to build a dam, plenty of pint-sized shampoo, conproperty, giving you a little hint, this sojourn will be ditioner and bath and shower gel bottles to start unlike any other. The only thing missing, was my your own retail store, and a quality on-premise wife. She’s already asking, “When are WE going to restaurant. Bend and staying at The Oxford?” Plus, it’s literally within a walking distance of

Yet what really distinguishes this gem, is its Like many boutique hotels I’ve had the privilege people. Everyone, and I mean EVERYONE, is helpto stay at across the U.S., Canada and Europe, The ful, attentive and sincere in their desire to make Oxford delivers big time; i.e., an inviting lobby, a your visit memorable.

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front-desk team and bellmen by name. They of course, always greeted me by name.

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TRENDS IN TOURISM

Travel Better Club helps travelers make sustainable choices Sustainable Travel International, the leading nonprofit working to protect environmentally and culturally sensitive destinations and improve the lives of the people who live there, recently launched the “Travel Better Club” — an online club for travelers wanting to make more sustainable choices in how and where they travel and share experiences with other like-minded travelers. To enroll, travelers take a 30-minute online course that explains how the choices they make about everything from hotels and transportation to the activities they do and the meals they eat on their trips can more positively impact the places they visit and the people who live there. Travelers who complete the course receive a personalized Travel Better certificate and can become members of the Travel Better Club. In addition to offering an online community for sustainability-minded travelers to share experiences, members receive exclusive benefits and discounts on tours, lodging, travel gear, visa and passport processing, and more. With more than one billion people traveling

each year, it is increasingly important that travelers be aware of the positive and negative impacts their choices can have on the destinations they visit and the people who live there. Some 60 percent of all leisure travelers in the United States have taken a “sustainable” trip in the last three years, according to a 2016 research report, “The Role of Sustainability in Travel & Tourism,” by Sustainable Travel International and Mandala Research. Compared to the typical leisure traveler, these travelers spend significantly more money, stay longer and are more likely to believe they have a responsibility to ensure their trips don’t harm a destination’s people, environment or economy. While an increasing number of travelers want to make a difference, many don’t know where to begin: Travel Better is that beginning. “Achieving conservation goals and improving lives through the power of tourism requires that destinations, tourism companies and travelers all do their part,” said Geoff Bolan, Sustainable Travel International CEO. “As an organization with more

than 14 years’ experience protecting sensitive environments and improving living conditions in destinations around the globe, the company wanted to use its expertise to equip travelers with the knowledge and tools they need to be a force for good. By making sustainable travel guidance and advice much more accessible through Travel Better, they hope this will help grow the community of travelers who feel empowered and inspired to take action that positively impacts the people and places they visit.” Sustainable Travel International invites the travel industry, other businesses and consumers to join the Travel Better effort. Companies wishing to promote the program to customers and offer special benefits to travelers will receive complimentary access to the Travel Better course and community. In addition, sponsorship opportunities are still available for the Travel Better program as a whole. Travelers can access the Travel Better course and join the Travel Better Club online at travelbetterclub.org. Contact Brian T. Mullis at brianm@ sustainabletravel.org.

dles s EnMount Mountains OF

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FEATURE

Heritage tourism builds image and reinforces identity By Dave Gardner

Tourism involving cultural heritage is booming around the world, including within NEPA. Susan Estler, executive director of Lackawanna County Convention and Visitors Bureau, pointed out that Scranton’s industrial history was once a vital part of the American economy, making the region prime ground for modern cultural tourism. “Yes, people hear the story of steam, coal and iron in school, but they must see it to genuinely understand it,” Estler said. She cited the dark, damp and cold conditions experienced while visiting the Lackawanna Coal Mine Tour, the huge size of Scranton’s iron furnaces, the historic downtown architecture in Scranton and Wilkes-Barre and the region’s extensive collection or railroad-related attractions and relics, including Steamtown. Antique machinery also can create a tourist draw at local fairs. “You can read about all of this, see it on television and listen to presentations, but until you see it first-hand it’s impossible to appreciate the real worth of heritage tourism,” Estler said. Heritage and identity The draw of heritage tourism tells us something about ourselves, said Natalie Gelb, former executive director of the Lackawanna Heritage Valley National and State Heritage Area. She said a society has to know where it came from to appreciate its identity, making heritage attractions a key segment of the concept of self. The NEPA region is also a microcosm of Europe and an immersion in heritage tourism can lead back to that land, people and industry. Through heritage tourism, NEPA has retained and preserved many of these historical traditions, creating a patchwork quilt of culture that time would meld without historic preservation. “When many of the baby boomers retire they seem to have a great interest in heritage attractions,” Gelb said. “The competition for those tourism dollars may be historical locations versus the casinos, but NEPA has authentic historical attractions that are not just recreations. We therefore have an advantage over many other places.” The biggest challenge for founding and maintaining historical attractions, according to Gelb, remains the acquisition of adequate funding. In addition, manpower and expertise for the operation

Heritage tourism can achieve this in different ways, according to Hall and shock value can also be present. “At Eckley Miner’s Village they display baby Global industry coffins, which were a total shock to my children,” Heritage tourism is global in scale. John MadHall said. “They knew nothing about the high child den, owner of Travelworld, explained that he deals with huge demand for heritage trips to Ireland, and mortality rate in that era,and were quite horrified by the reality they were looking at.” to a lesser degree, Italy. He said that 80 percent The mechanical aspects of heritage tourism of NEPA’s Irish population has its roots in the also have a gender-specific appeal. Hall joked economically-poor county of Mayo and that many of these families originally left Europe to escape the that she has toured every historic battleship and submarine on the east coast and that despite her potato famine just before the American Civil War. limited interest in these attractions, the mechanics Most of NEPA’s travelers to Ireland, according to Madden, are older and do not purchase inclusive of these creations draw men in large numbers. NEPA’s public, according to Hall, is comprised trips. Instead, they use a fly-and-drive system of two varying “camps” when it comes to heritage where a car is waiting upon arrival, allowing them attractions. One group wants to keep the region’s to explore the Irish isle as they see fit. history alive through protection and restoration, “Often, they trace their Irish relatives because while the other wants to bury the past, including people are finding their ancestry very interestsegments of the region’s historic architecture, ing,” said Madden. “They will meet people and along with its negative stigma and move on. visit graveyards and actually return with pictures “We need to instill a sense of pride in those who of long-dead relatives because the ability to do research over the internet makes them prepared the are not interested in heritage and the accomplishments of our forefathers,” Hall said. “People living moment they land.” outside of NEPA often appreciate what we have Madden added that the Cobh Heritage Center, here more than the residents do.” outside of Cork, marks the location where scores of Irish people left their homeland for a new life in America. This location’s fabulous center details the Historical places to see stories of many of immigrants and illustrates the Endless Mountains courage and ambition they possessed. The Endless Mountains are a chain of mountains in northeastern Pennsylvania.The Generational aspects region includes the counties of Bradford, Sullivan, Janet Hall, executive director of the LuSusquehanna and Wyoming. zerne County Convention and Visitors Bureau LuCASS - Center for Anti-Slavery Studies zerne, has come to recognize that heritage tourism 395 Church St., Montrose includes some generational aspects. Often, the Susquehanna County millennials don’t seem to be interested in history, 570-278-3199 but Hall has not given up on this group as customLearn about Underground Railroad/modern ers because maturity seems to create a connection slavery. Events, programs, school trips. to the importance of history. Hoover One-Room Schoolhouse “Some people develop an interest in history 2236 State Route 2014, Clifford Twp. much earlier than others, and family influences Susquehanna County probably are a part of this,” Hall said. “Nostalgia 570-679-2870 also is a big part of an interest in the past.” The Oldest House — Laceyville Heritage tourism, to be successful, must have 297 East Main St., Laceyville adequate funding plus an emotional aspect and Wyoming County Hall clearly has recognized this. She cited how 570-869-1679 the Lackawanna Mine Tour communicates the Oldest house in four counties; genealogy hisfundamental nature of the anthracite coal miners as tory events throughout the year. tough and gritty men who had the ability to endure Eagles Mere Museum horrific working conditions with no end in sight. 288 Eagles Mere Ave., Eagles Mere of sites such as Steamtown is becoming increasingly difficult to find.

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Sullivan County (570) 525-3155 Eagles Mere is on the National Registry of Historic Places and its museum illustrates its unique development. “The Town Time Forgot” and has a 200 year history. Pocono Mountains The Pocono Mountains is located within driving distance of most major East Coast cities. This region offers history year-round with cultural tours, art exhibitions, antique shopping and festivals. With 2,400 square miles encompassing Northeast Pennsylvania’s Carbon, Monroe, Pike and Wayne counties, the Pocono Mountains region has mountain terrain, waterfalls, woodlands and 170 miles of winding rivers. The Asa Packer Mansion Museum P.O. Box 108, Jim Thorpe PA 18229 Phone 570-325-3229; Hours 11 a.m. - 4 p.m. Carbon County Courthouse 4 Broadway Jim Thorpe, PA 18229 Built in 1893; Refurbished in 1993 but retaining Victorian furnishings. The Delaware & Lehigh National Heritage Corridor 2750 Hugh Moore Park Road Easton, PA 18042 Phone: (610) 923-3548 The pathway that carried coal and iron from Wilkes-Barre to Philadelphia is preseved and connects nature, culture, communities, recreation and the industrial heritage. Lackawanna County • Lackawanna Historical Society 232 Monroe Ave; 570-344-3841 • Steamtown National Historic Site National Park Lackawanna Ave at Cliff St. 570-340-5200; Open until 4 p.m. • Scranton Iron Furnaces 159 Cedar Ave; 570-963-4804 Open until 5 p.m. Luzerne County • Luzerne County Historical Society 49 S Franklin St, Wilkes-Barre, PA 18701 Open 12–4 p.m. 570-823-6244


VACATION GUIDE

Traveler’s checklist for business and personal trips abroad A trip requires careful planning. Here are some important steps to prepare for a safe trip outside the United States: • Read up on your destination at travel.state. gov. Learn about visa requirements, local laws, customs and medical care in the countries you are visiting. Some travelers, such as those with disabilities, women and LGBTI persons, may face additional challenges when abroad. • Be aware of any travel warnings or travel alerts for your destination country, which describe risks to you and may affect your travel plans. Also check the website of the U.S. embassy or consulate where you will be traveling for the latest security messages. • Find out about health precautions. The U.S. Centers for Disease Control (CDC) and the World Health Organization (WHO) provide recommendations for vaccinations and other travel health precautions for your trip abroad. • Prepare to handle money overseas. Before you go, notify your bank and credit card company of your travel and check exchange rates. For information about using cash, debit/credit cards, and ATMs, read about your destination. • Carry contact details for the nearest U.S. embassy or U.S. consulate with you, in English and the local language. The U.S Department of State, Bureau of Consular Affairs provides help for emergencies 24 hours a day, seven days a week, overseas and in Washington, D.C. (888-407-4747 or 202-501-4444). Read more about what the Department of State can and cannot do for you in an emergency. (travel.state.gov/content/passports/ en/emergencies/crisis-support.html)

identity when you return to the United States. For many land or sea trips, this means you can travel using the new U.S. passport card instead of a normal passport book. Read more about U.S. passport requirements. • You may need to get a visa before you travel to a destination. Contact the embassy of the foreign countries you will be visiting for more information. • Get a letter from your doctor for medications you are bringing. Some countries have strict laws, even against over-the-counter medications, so read about your destination before you go. • If you are traveling alone with children, foreign border officials may require custody documents or written consent from the other parent. Check with the embassy of your foreign destination before traveling. • Make two photocopies of all your travel docu-

ments in case of emergency. Leave one copy with a trusted friend or relative at home and carry the other separately from your documents in case of loss or theft.

Get Insured Make sure you have health insurance whenever you are traveling abroad. If your U.S. health care plan does not cover you overseas, consider buying supplemental insurance to cover medical costs and Get Enrolled emergency evacuation. Foreign hospitals and docSign up for the Department of State Smart Trav- tors often require payment in cash and emergency eler Enrollment Program (STEP) at step.state.gov. medical evacuation can cost up to $100,000. Social You can receive travel and security updates about Security and Medicare does not provide coverage your destination and it will help the department outside of the United States. Learn more at Your contact you in an emergency. Health Abroad. Watch a video about STEP at youtube.com/ Also check if you have coverage for trip interwatch?v=hq6MM85LX5c ruption/cancellation and loss or theft, to help pay for unexpected expenses. If your family needs to reach you because of an emergency at home, they can call Overseas Citizens Services in Washington, D.C. at 888-407-4747 (from Source: travel.state.gov/content/passports/en/ the United States and Canada) or 202-501-4444. go/checklist.html

Get Required Documents • Apply early for a passport, or renew your old one. It should be valid for at least six months after you return home and needs to have two or more blank pages. Otherwise, some countries may not let you enter. Check all family members’ passports because those for adults are valid for 10 years, but children’s passports only for five. U.S. citizens must use a U.S. passport to leave and come back to the United States. • If you are traveling by land or sea, you must show proof of both your U.S. citizenship and your

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HEALTH

HEALTH FOCUS: STROKE

National Nurses Week is May 6-12

Nursing is the protection, promotion, and optimization of health and abilities, prevention of illness and injury, facilitation of healing, alleviation of suffering through the diagnosis and treatment of human response and advocacy in the care of individuals, families, groups, communities and populations. National Nurses Week begins each year on May 6 and ends on May 12, Florence Nightingale’s birthday. These permanent dates enhance planning and position National Nurses Week as an established recognition event. As of 1998, May 8 was designated as National Student Nurses Day, to be celebrated annually. And as of 2003, National School Nurse Day is celebrated on the Wednesday within National Nurses Week each year. Florence Nightingale was born in 1820 in England. She was a statistician and social reformer who was the founder of modern nursing. Nightingale was put in charge of nursing British and allied soldiers in Turkey during the Crimean War. She spent many hours in the wards and on night rounds giving personal care to the wounded which established her image as the “Lady with the Lamp.”

Her efforts to formalize nursing education led her to establish the first scientifically based nursing school — the Nightingale School of Nursing, at St. Thomas’ Hospital in London (opened 1860). She also was instrumental in setting up training for midwives and nurses in workhouse infirmaries. She was the first woman awarded the Order of Merit (1907). International Nurses Day, observed annually on May 12, commemorates her birth and celebrates the important role of nurses in health care. The nursing profession has been promoted by the American Nurses Association (ANA) since 1896. Each of ANA’s state and territorial nurses associations promotes the nursing profession at the state and regional levels. Each conducts celebrations on these dates to recognize the contributions that nurses and nursing make to the community. The ANA supports National Nurses Week recognition programs through the state and district nurses associations, other specialty nursing organizations, educational facilities and independent health care companies and institutions. Sources: nursingworld.org; Britannica.com

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Dunmore resident battles stroke

Thomas Notchick suffered a hemorrhagic stroke in December. Quick recognition of symptoms by his wife Patty, at right, and other family members and immediate calling for an ambulance was instrumental in his recovery.

was too risky to attempt a surgical closure of the bleeding vessel in Notchick’s brain and his blood Thomas Notchick awoke in an pressure was medically lowered to ambulance and his return to consciousdecrease the bleeding and allow the ness marked the beginning of a battle to circulatory system to heal. rebuild his life. After five days in Geisinger’s intensive Notchick, 53, a Dunmore resident care unit and another six days in the syswho was working as a manager in the tem’s neuro unit, Notchick’s consciousfood service industry, had spent an eveness returned during his transport to ning this past December in his garage. Allied Services. Zand He began to feel “woozy,” presented with “I returned to reality very slowly, a drooped face and speech problems. but really woke up in the ambulance,” Family members recognized that the symptoms Notchick said. “I had speech loss and some loss of could be a stroke and immediately called 911. Medi- understanding when spoken to, plus no feeling on cal examination revealed his body’s right side to be my right side.” non-functional, his blood pressure was topping 245 and a brain imaging study confirmed a stroke. Silent stroke survival A stroke is caused by an interruption of blood The recovery, under the supervision of Allied, flow to an area of the brain. This is serious, because progressed quickly. Notchick had occupational and brain cells that are deprived of oxygen begin to die at speech therapy and in a big surprise he learned that unpredictable rates and damage depends on where imaging studies revealed he had a silent stroke in the stroke occurs in the brain. past. The most common type of stroke, called an “I had to start all over again at Allied, including ischemic, occurs when a vessel carrying blood how to do basic hygiene and chew foods again,” to the brain is blocked by a blood clot. However, Notchick said. “Each day would start at 6 a.m. and Notchick had suffered a hemorrhagic stroke, where I eventually began to speak simple words. I also a brain aneurysm or weakened blood vessel had learned how to walk again and now do quite a bit of burst, creating an internal brain bleed and a strong walking, although I use a wheelchair when I’m tired.” possibility of death. A true family effort with rehabilitation also helped The attending medical team had determined it By Dave Gardner

Ple ase se e ST ROKE, Page 25

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DOWNTOWNS

EXECUTIVE SPOTLIGHT

Why revitalize?

Drew Taylor, The Kirby Center

Pennsylvania Downtown Center (PDC) leads the movement to ensure that core communities of all shapes and sizes continue to prosper and that communities that are experiencing social or financial difficulties are provided the tools to reclaim their vitality. Downtowns have a special place in the minds of Americans. We have fond memories of colorful Fourth of July parades down Main Street, shopping trips spent gazing at holiday storefront displays, and pleasant strolls along bustling pedestrian-crowded avenues. For many Pennsylvania communities, these are not mere memories but a continuing way of life within vibrant downtowns. Residents of these cities and towns know firsthand that such details invaluably enhance and encourage community spirit.

Community leaders and citizens across the commonwealth work to ensure that their downtowns and surrounding neighborhoods remain vital places to live and work. Motivated by the goal of retaining or regaining a sense of place increasingly lost to suburban sprawl, these citizens desire to live and work in places that they are proud to call home. Since 1987, PDC has provided local groups with the techniques and strategies necessary to recapture or sustain their downtown or neighborhood as a vibrant civic, social, and economic hub. PDC’s diverse membership and directorship is comprised of: • Main Street and Elm Street managers and boards;

• Improvement districts and authorities; • Neighborhood revitalization organizations; • Economic development corporations; • Municipal officials; • Cities, boroughs, and townships; • Community volunteers; • Corporate advisors; and • Partnering statewide organizations. PDC’s revitalization philosophy identifies ongoing professional management as a critical component of a thorough revitalization plan. Objective assessments, educational and training programs, publications, and resource library are designed to offer assistance to downtowns and residential neighborhoods and the organization’s dedicated professional staff and board are committed to providing useful and timely information.

named The Paramount. In the ’70s, the AgDrew Taylor, director of operations at nes flood and the rise of the multiplex thethe FM Kirby Center at Wilkes-Barre’s aters took a toll on the Paramount. It was Public Square has entertained quite a few rescued by a group of residents, celebrities over the years as they waited to go on stage. Two famous retail magnate Albert Boscov and comedians, however, made him the community. Renamed the FM a little nervous as he anticipated Kirby Center for the Performing their acerbic wit directed at him. Arts, in honor of Fred M. Kirby “Joan Rivers and Don Rickles and the Kirby Foundation, the theater opened again in 1986 and were a big surprise. I thought has been refitted to its former Art they would eat me alive but they were two of the nicest people I Deco glory. Taylor ever dealt with,” Taylor said. Taylor was born in WilliamThere’s a lot of anticipation sport, but considers Dallas — where his family moved in 1961 — home. among the staff of the Kirby Center on He left the area early in his career but show days. The visiting performers are a benefit of Taylor’s position — his work always wanted to come back. never gets dull. As director of operations, “This area has the four seasons, state he’s in charge of the building, staff, bars, parks, the arena, the amphitheater (at the technical department and more. He Montage Mountain), the Scranton Cultural has been with the Kirby Center for 15 years Center and of course the Kirby Center. We and has an appreciation for the history are strategically located. We can’t comof the former Comerford Movie Theater plain about things to do,” he said. which opened in 1938. Taylor is married to Ruthann Taylor In the ’40s the movie theater was reand they make their home in Dallas.

PDC’s programs and services provide affordable outreach and technical assistance to communities, uniquely tailored to their unique economic and social environments. A healthy downtown and surrounding residential neighborhoods can: spur business development; increase the local tax base; create jobs; stimulate the housing market; increase occupancy rates; fight sprawl; draw investors; rehabilitate empty buildings; reflect the history of the community; promote civic pride; utilize existing infrastructure; increase community involvement; and reaffirm commitment and inspire involvement from local leaders. Visit padowntown.org.

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TIMES-SHAMROCK Communications

EDUCATION

Misericordia University serves as host for Collaborative Care Summit

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Misericordia University served as one of seven host sites for the 8th Annual Collaborative Care Summit that featured more than 850 students and 148 faculty facilitators from 12 colleges and universities in Northeast and Central Pennsylvania. Facilitators participating in the program are, first row from left, Laurie Brogan, Misericordia; Julie Cleary, LCCC; Dana Cacioppo, LCCC; Bethany Francis, Misericordia; Pam MacNeely, King’s College; Susan Barker, Misericordia; Jack Goble, Jr., Misericordia; Christine Shatto, PSU-Hazleton; Randy Shatto, PSU-Hazleton and Gina Capitano, Misericordia. Second row, Darlene Donnelly, Misericordia; Tianna Bolmsky, PSU-Hazleton; Maureen Savner, LCCC; Nicole Evanosky, Misericordia; Noreen Brzozowski, LCCC; Michelle Schmude, Geisinger Commonwealth School of Medicine, and Vicky Shah, Wilkes; third row, Rita Cross, Kings College; Lynn Blazaskie, Misericordia; Lorraine Novinger, King’s College; John Conrad, LCCC; Matthew Toniatti, King’s College and Kathleen Gelso, Misericordia; fourth row, Dawn Evans, Misericordia; Jean Denion, King’s College; Lori Charney, Misericordia; Jennifer Dessoye, Misericordia; Rita Carey, Misericordia and David Hage, Misericordia .

Misericordia University recently served as one of seven host sites for the 8th annual Collaborative Care Summit that featured more than 850 students and 148 faculty facilitators from 12 colleges and universities in northeastern and central Pennsylvania. Sponsored by the Northeastern/Central Pennsylvania Interprofessional Education Coalition (NECPA-IPEC), the conference promotes interprofessional approaches to health care. The coalition is comprised of Johnson College, King’s College, Lackawanna College, Lock Haven University, Luzerne County Community College (LCCC), Marywood University, Misericordia University, Geisinger Commonwealth School of Medicine, Pennsylvania College of Technology, Penn State-Hazleton, The University of Scranton and Wilkes University. The mission of NECPAIPEC is to provide vision and leadership to foster and support interprofessional education in health care. The program also was hosted at King’s College, Marywood University, The Pennsylvania College of Technology, Geisinger Commonwealth School of Medicine and the University of Scranton. Facilitators, working in small,

interprofessional groups of students discussed the importance of working in cooperation with health care providers and others who contribute to or support the delivery of health care services. They also compared and contrasted the roles and responsibilities of other health care providers and how interprofessional teams work together to provide safe and effective patient care. Participants recognized the importance of patient-centered care and reflected upon individual interpersonal communication skills, such as active listening, encouraging ideas, and opinions of team members as well as respecting others. The conference brought together students studying health and medical sciences at participating institutions. At Misericordia University, students majoring in diagnostic medical sonography, exercise science, medical imaging, medical physician, nursing, occupational therapy, paramedic, pharmacy, physical therapy, physician assistant, social work, and speech-language pathology learned from each other with a collaborative approach to patient care. NECPA-IPEC was founded in 2008 as a collaborative effort between local colleges and universities that offer health care programs.


of things as you do today. Inflation, or the rate at which the price of goods and services rises, causes Compounding Interest: cost of living to go up. Your buying power stays the Q: You have $1,000 in a savings account earnsame when inflation and your income rise at the ing 2 percent interest a year. After two years, how same rate. much would you have? About the survey A: The savings account would grow to Morning Consult, on behalf of the American $1,040.40 by the end of the second year because Bankers Association, conducted an online survey of your interest will compound over time. That means 2,223 adults from Feb. 16-19, 2017. Results from the the account holder earns interest not only on full survey have a margin of error of +/- 2 percent. the money they’ve saved but also on the interest The American Bankers Association is the voice earned in prior years. of the nation’s $17 trillion banking industry, which Diversification: is composed of small, regional and large banks that Q: If you’re investing money, is it safer to put that together employ more than 2 million people, safemoney into a single asset or into multiple assets? guard $12 trillion in deposits and extend more than A: It’s safer to put money into multiple assets. $9 trillion in loans. Through its leadership, partnerThis is the investment principle of diversification. ships, and national programs, ABA’s Community Your risk of losing money decreases when money Engagement Foundation (dba ABA Foundation), a is spread across multiple investments. 501(c)3, helps bankers provide financial education Inflation: to individuals at every age, elevate issues around Q: Over the next 15 years, the cost of living and affordable housing and community development, your income double. Will you be able to buy more, and achieve corporate social responsibility objecthe same or less than you can today? tives to improve the well-being of their customers A: You will be able to buy the same amount and their communitie SURVEY FROM PAGE 09

STROKE FROM PAGE 22

make the call lack the knowledge of the applicable risk factors and physical signs, or they may be weighing Notchick after his discharge. He does tire but said subsequent financial cost factors. unlike many stroke patients, he has not suffered “Brain cell death depends on the specifics of the from depression and anxiety, although the possibility patient’s situation and the time they are deprived of that another stroke could occur does enter his mind. oxygen,” Zand said. Notchick is quick to acknowledge that quality Treatment of an ischemic stroke usually involves healthcare and health insurance played a key role the use of chemicals by medical staff to dissolve in his treatment, along with the supportive efforts the clot. Or, a catheter may be inserted through the of his family. Sometimes he is a bit confused upon circulatory system and the clot physically removed. awakening and takes a cocktail of medication to help “The subsequent outcomes for this depend on relieve brain pressure. age, brain side where the damage occurred, and the “If I had it to do over again, I would have kept specifics of the patient’s situation,” Zand said. my eye on my blood pressure,” Notchick said. Options with hemorrhagic stroke treatment are “Now, I have it read twice a day.” limited. The favored approach, as was used with Notchick’s battle with stroke is not unique. Notchick, lowers the blood pressure thereby allowing Each year nearly 800,000 people experience a new the bleed to ebb and the broken blood vessel to heal. or recurrent stroke, making the condition the fifth “Once again, the situation is influenced by the size leading cause of death in the United States where and location of the bleed,” Zand said. “In most cases stroke-related death occurs every four minutes. we work to control and stabilize the bleeding.” More than two-thirds of stroke survivors will Prevention also plays a key role in stroke mansuffer from some sort of disability, making stroke agement, but if a stroke occurs, the brains recovery the leading cause of American adult disability. Yet, is influenced by the patient’s neuroplasticity. This up to 80 percent of strokes can be prevented involves the remaining brain cells re-routing electrical signals around the dead neurons, and greatly Call an ambulance! varies by person and whether the central command Ramin Zand, M.D., neurology director of clinical structure of the brain was damaged. stroke operations and northeastern regional stroke “At one time, it was thought brain cells would director with the Geisinger Health System, explained never regenerate, but this has been proven to be that the medical community’s biggest challenge with wrong,” Zand said. “Some areas do regenerate, stroke involves people calling an ambulance when such as involved with memory, creating additional stroke symptoms appear. Perhaps people who don’t hope for recovery.”

HEALTHCARE IN THE STATE

New healthcare company to enhance value-based health The Care Centered Collaborative, a new Harrisburg-based health care company founded by thousands of Pennsylvania physicians statewide, is now open for business and says it has the tools to help independent physicians enhance the patient experience through higher quality care, cost savings and greater customer satisfaction. “We are in a new health care world that is evolving every day,” says Jaan Sidorov, M.D., president and chief executive officer of the Care Centered Collaborative. “As healthcare delivery becomes more focused on value, both physicians and their patients are keenly interested in having access to care options that reduce the burden of chronic disease and improves well-being.” Formed by the Pennsylvania Medical Society (PAMED), the leading advocate for Pennsylvania patients and their physicians, the Care Centered Collaborative supports the provision of valuebased care by Pennsylvania physicians. One new service will enable care excellence in the federal government’s Quality Payment Program (QPP). Established by the landmark Medicare Access and CHIP Reauthorization Act of 2015 (“MACRA”), QPP is designed to promote high-quality healthcare for Medicare beneficiaries. In addition to fostering excellence in QPP, officials say Care Centered Collaborative will partner with physicians to gain greater efficiencies to build superior access to care and services for Pennsylvania’s patients including accurate insurance claims handling, care management services and health informatics technology. Joint programs designed to improve patient care with other health care organizations are also planned. “Today’s health care is about providing high quality care at the lowest costs possible while increasing patient satisfaction,” Sidorov says. “That’s what we all want and that’s why we’ve built a Pennsylvania-specific company with local expert staff who know the Keystone State’s health care environment inside out. Through the Care Centered Collaborative, we’ve made a very a strong commitment to advancing access to high quality care for our friends and neighbors … the citizens of the Commonwealth.” Sidorov says this company will improve care because they fully understand how ever-changing regulations are forcing independent medical

practices to transform, while still preserving physician-led team-based care and the doctorpatient relationship. Care coordination becomes the linchpin of this health care environment. “The culture of health care is transforming,” he says. “Physicians were once service providers and now they need to be clinical managers, handling the most complicated cases but also supervising day-to-day care and management by other clinicians.” According to Sidorov, funding by PAMED for up to $15 million for the Care Centered Collaborative was preceded by months of advance work and preparation. This set the foundation before the PAMED House of Delegates, representing 18,000 members of the organization, unanimously voted to move forward with the new company. The Care Centered Collaborative will be headquartered at 777 East Park Drive in Harrisburg, and currently is growing to include 10 full-time employees. “There is growing evidence that physician-led care through a team of health care professions is excellent care and this can create value to patients, payers and health care professionals,” said Charles Cutler, M.D., president of PAMED. “As we look into the future and what it holds, we believe the Care Centered Collaborative will be an asset to Pennsylvania’s physicians and their patients. We’re very excited to see this new company up and running.” What is Value-Based Care? This healthcare model attempts to replace fee-for-service reimbursement which pays healthcare providers based on bill charges or annual fees. Value-based care connects payments for service to the quality of care patients receive and assigns rewards to practitioners for efficiency and desired results. Value-based care has emerged as a solution for rising healthcare costs, clinical-inefficience and duplication of services. A value-based method is created around the needs of the patient. Healthcare teams focus in on the patient and considers the type of treatment whether acute, chronic or preventive across the healthcare system. Source: news.aetna.com

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EXECUTIVE SPOTLIGHT

John Loyack, King’s College When John Loyack agreed to return successful business career. to his alma mater in 2012 to serve as A native of Northeastern PennsylKing’s College’s chief financial officer vania, Loyack graduated from King’s (CFO), he had a pretty good idea what in 1985 with a BS degree in accounting lay ahead. From his student then earned an MBA from days, Loyack knew all about Lehigh University. the quality of a King’s educaBefore returning to King’s, tion, but the College unforhe was president and chief tunately was facing many of executive officer of Optim the fiscal headwinds that were Energy, Irvin, Texas. He also plaguing other small colleges. served as president and chief Established in Wilkes-Barre executive officer of CPG in 1946 by priests and brothInternational in Scranton, Loyack ers of the Congregation of and senior vice president and Holy Cross (CSC) from the chief financial officer for PNM University of Notre Dame, the mission Resources, a utility company serving of King’s always has been to provide New Mexico, Texas and the Southwest. a broad-based liberal education in a In 2012, King’s president, Fr. John J. Catholic, Holy Cross tradition. Ryan, C.S.C., and the College’s board While consistently achieving acaasked Loyack to serve as the executive demic excellence, the College faced vice president for business and adminfinancial challenges driven by rising istrative affairs at the College. costs and changing demographics, and To head off the the Great Receslooming crisis, The net result of sion of 2008 only Loyack worked made things worse. King’s College’s “March to with President For King’s, the Sustainability” is financial Ryan, the board financial situation of directors and stability. Since the start came to a head in senior managers, of the program in 2012 2012: the College staff and faculty to through 2016, the College’s implement a fivewas experiencing annual operating total assets have increased step strategic relosses of over a structuring process 36.4 percent. million dollars a called the “March year and faced a to Sustainability” projected loss of four million dollars that focused on stabilization through in 2013. process improvement and efficiency, At this critical time, the College ap- creating new resources through cost rationalization, and investing in new proached Loyack for guidance on the programs. strength of his extensive and highly

The “March to Sustainability” rolled out in five phases covering the creation of new resources through improved operations, debt restructuring, new pricing and enrollment strategies, and investing in the College’s essential services and infrastructure, including the creation of new academic and athletic programs. Thanks to these improvements, the College experienced a corresponding increase in interest by prospective students as well as increased contributions from alumni and friends of the College. As a result, the College’s endowment has grown steadily since 2012. The net result of the College’s “March to Sustainability” to date is financial stability. Since the start of the program in 2012 through 2016, the College’s total assets have increased 36.4 percent (from $145.6 to $198.6 million). As of 2016, the College enjoyed an operating surplus of $1 million, rebounding significantly from a deficit of $1.2 million in 2012, and is on track to realize a $1.75 million operating surplus for the 2017 fiscal year. The College’s fiscal stability is a direct result of the personal commitment and business acumen of CFO John Loyack, who’s talented efforts have helped ensure that King’s will continue to fulfill it’s mission to the sons and daughters of coal miners and anyone else who comes to King’s seeking to learn how to make a living and how to live.

EDUCATION

Community Poetry The work of local poets featured in transit

Poetry In Transit, an award-winning community program will feature poems from community writers on Luzerne County Transportation Authority (LCTA) buses. The theme for the 2017 program is Migration and poems submitted reflect some aspect of this theme. Poetry In Transit displays poetry in advertising space inside LCTA buses. The poems stay up for one year, with a monthly rotation so that riders can see all poems over time. The project was started in 2007 by Mischelle Anthony, Wilkes University associate professor of English, who continues to coordinate the program. An advisory board from five area colleges – Kings College, Misericordia University, Penn State Wilkes-Barre, Luzerne County Community College, and Wilkes University took part in choosing winners. Poetry in Transit is inspired by the rejuvenated Poetry In Motion on New York’s Transit System and on London’s Poems on the Underground program. The Luzerne County project began in 2007 with 12 placards featuring the work of established and canonized poets such as Wordsworth, Dickinson and Frost. The work of local poets was introduced to the project in 2008. Visit wilkes.edu.

About Poetry in Motion Launched in 1992 by the Poetry Society of America and the Metropolitan Transportation Authority, Poetry in Motion is one of the most popular public literary programs in American history. Poetry in Motion places poetry in the transit systems of cities throughout the country, helping to create a national readership for both emerging and established poets.

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EXECUTIVE SPOTLIGHT

Daniel J. Santaniello:

Cultivating a culture of excellence has provided over $2.6 million in financial Fidelity Bank is proud to be an active contributions to local charities and commember of the community for 115 years. munity organizations, including nearly Headquartered in Dunmore, the Bank $380,000 to schools, colleges and universiputs emphasis on “making a difference ties which leveraged the state’s in Northeastern Pennsylvania.” education improvement initiaThe management team, under tives in 2016. Through its “volunthe leadership of chief executive teer time-off” program, Fidelity officer Daniel J. Santaniello, has Bankers contributed nearly 900 created a clear direction and a hours of service to over fifty mission they simply refer to as local, non-profit organizations “Best Bank.” benefitting women and children “With the rapid pace of change in crisis, the arts, healthcare, and in technology, the world of bankSantaniello economic development. ing is evolving. Fidelity Bank A lot of time and effort is recognizes the highest standard is required, which is to be the “Best Bank” also devoted to creating financial literacy. Each spring Fidelity Bankers go “back to for employees to work at, customers to school” to share lessons in saving money bank with, shareholders to invest in and for the community to prosper,” Santaniello and entrepreneurship with over 1000 children during the Bank’s “Teach Children said. This mission is part of the strategic plan to Save” campaign. It also hosts Fidelity Bank Financial Academy, a web-based and the culture of Fidelity Bank which financial literacy curriculum which has stems from a vision that was collectively provided over 2600 learning hours to more accomplished by all 180 Fidelity Bankers. than 1200 local students since its inception. Several years ago all employees particiFor seven years Fidelity Bank has pated in sessions that outlined exactly what led Lackawanna County in residential was important for them in building a mortgages and has been the area’s top shared vision of the future. “The employcommunity bank lender. In 2016 the Bank ee’s input, along with the evolving nature originated $68.8 million in mortgages of banking, created a very clear direction alone, financing the dream of home ownfor our management team,” Santaniello ership for 346 local families. “Responsible said. Industry trade associations took notice home ownership builds a community from the foundation up and creates a stable base of the evolution. American Banker, for for the economy to prosper,” explained the fourth year in a row, honored Fidelity Bank by naming it a “Top 200 Community Santaniello. Fidelity Bank is unique in the marketBank in the Country” based on a threeplace, as it touts “Anytime” banking as year Return on Average Equity. Bauer another key to its success. Technology Financial, an independent firm that rates all banks and credit unions, awarded Fidel- like Digital Wallet, Mobile Banking App and Online Banking provide customers ity Bank with a Five Star Bauer Rating — unparalleled convenience, control and setheir highest possible ranking. More importantly, local accolades rolled curity to access Fidelity Bank any time or anyplace. However “Anytime” doesn’t just in: The Scranton Times and The Triboro mean access through technology seven Banner named the bank, “Best Bank” for days a week. It also means that you can call three years in a row. “Being recognized for the Bank’s good work is gratifying, but a live person even on Sunday. Santaniello summed up the Bank’s role: it’s the hard work we’ve put into creating a Our goal is to provide resources to make structure around the way we bring value to our clients and community that is most our corner of NEPA a great place to live, work and prosper. We do it with every important,” said Santaniello. Fidelity Bank has forged strong commu- tool available to us — not only money and nity bonds, giving back in time, talent and expert financial advice, but the time and treasure. Over the last five years, the Bank talent of our amazing employee base.”

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We’re here to help! BANK bankatfidelity.com 570.342.8281 800.388.4380

*Guarantee of loan decision is within 5 business days pending receipt of completed loan application. Loan Guarantee is available for loans up to $250,000 (total business lending relationship can not exceed $500,000) and must be used for business purposes only. Five days start when customer submits completed application which is defined by 2 – 3 years of financial statements on borrower and guarantor, rent roll, and any additional information deemed necessary to make a loan decision. All decisions are subject to “satisfactory underwriting standards.”

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AdvertoriAl

SMALL BUSINESS SPOTLIGHT IS ON...

Tiddlywinks Boutique

Rock Steady Boxing reaps therapeutic rewards By Denise Rizzo

tiddlywinksboutique.com Member since 2016

When Jessica Bredbenner, owner and founder of Tiddlywinks Boutique, first began selling her handmade items on Etsy, she didn’t realize that she was embarking on a journey just as unique as her store. The mobile and online boutique recently opened a brick-and-mortar storefront in Dunmore. What sets your shop apart from other children’s boutiques? Besides having our new storefront in Dunmore, Tiddlywinks Boutique has the ability to travel to different locations with our mobile boutique. We also have the ability to customize certain items and services we can provide for events and birthday parties. Along with special occasion dresses, parents can also find everyday items for their little girl that you may not typically find in other boutiques. A lot of our accessories are handmade and we also carry some items that are handmade from local crafters, other than our own Tiddlywinks brand. What inspired you to create your business? Before I started the boutique, I was mainly selling my handmade items on Etsy. I started Tiddlywinks when I was on maternity leave from another job and, after careful thought, I decided to follow my dreams and take on the boutique full-time. While growing, my online presence continued and sales began to increase. During a business trip to the West Coast for my previous career, I saw a women’s mobile boutique parked outside and thought it was different. That boutique inspired me — so much so, that I found my 1976 Dutchcraft camper for a steal on Cragslist and that is when my dreams became a reality. What kind of items do you sell? We sell clothing and accessories for little girls ranging from three months to eight years old. We sell a variety of styles, from vintage to whimsical to sparkly. We are always adding new items as seasons change.

What types of events do you offer? We offer private parties such as birthdays, holiday parties or even just weekend shopping parties. We travel to homes or locations from our region as far as Philadelphia and parts of New Jersey. Customers have the chance to reserve the boutique for birthday parties or any type of event and we come on location. We will offer a discount to shop for everyone and also a complimentary dress for the birthday girl/ hostess. We also offer a fun day of private shopping where we come to your location or we can host your party in our store. Some of our packages include a princess dress up, garden fairy, mermaids, baking and tea parties. We can customize your party to any type of theme, too. What is your Sparkle Club? Our Sparkle Club is a monthly subscription of little girls’ stylish clothing delivered right to your door. The items in the box are carefully selected and range from dresses to swimsuits to outfits and more. There is no commitment and can be canceled at any time with no fees. As a new business, how do you envision the Chamber helping you grow? Even though Tiddlywinks has only been in business for about a year, the Chamber has already helped us grow in different ways. They promoted us on their social media during Small Business Saturday and have connected us with wonderful resources. I know that I will continue using all that the Chamber has to offer and that they will continue to help us grow.

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CELEBRATING WOMEN ENTREPRENEURS

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Kathy Reap, owner of Rock Steady Boxing Northeast PA, never really considered owning her own business — until her husband was diagnosed with Parkinson’s disease in 2015. This life-changing event drove Kathy to be proactive in helping with the treatment of the disease and subsequently, she became an entrepreneur. Reap attended the University of Scranton and graduated with a bachelor’s degree in physical therapy. Originally from New York, she met her husband at the University and decided to pursue her career in physical therapy here in the Scranton area. She was a physical therapist for almost 30 years, until she decided to begin to explore other interests. About one year prior to her husband’s diagnosis Reap was between jobs and was still trying to figure out what she wanted to do. Her four children were grown so,taking the time to decipher what she was really interested in was something she could afford to do. Reap did research on treatment for Parkinson’s and came across something quite unique: Rock Steady Boxing, a non-contact boxinginspired fitness program designed specifically for people with Parkinson’s disease. A national organization, Rock Steady Boxing started in 2006, and there are now affiliates all across the country, including at Reap’s gym in Old Forge. There are a few things needed in order to open an affiliate gym. Becoming a certified Rock Steady Boxing instructor comes in at the top of the list. To become a certified instructor, Reap visited headquarters in Indianapolis to be trained. She received her certification in June of 2016. She paid an affiliate fee, which gives her the right to use the name, collect information, connect with other affiliate gyms, and get ideas for different exercises. The toughest part for Reap was finding gym space that was large enough, easily accessible and affordable. The gym in Old Forge was a perfect find, Reap said, notong she really lucked out. Along with finding the gym, learning the ins and outs of running it was equally as important too. In order to educate herself, Kathy attended the University of Scranton Women’s Entrepreneurship Centers’ Start-Up program. Here she learned about financing, marketing, legal information and managing a small business. Something that she took from the Start-Up program was marketing her business. She visited local neurolo-

gists, Parkinson’s support groups, Facebook, and was on WNEP twice to help promote her business. She is in business eight months now. Just like other entrepreneurs, Reap faced struggles. She worried about no one coming to her gym; and that she would not be able run the business successfully. In spite of the challenges Reap tells aspiring entrepreneurs “once you find something you’re passionate about, pursue it with everything that you have and it will work out.” Reap was able to combine her knowledge of the body from physical therapy with her love of helping people and came up with something pretty great. She offers four levels of classes to people of all ages with all stages of Parkinson’s disease. She makes the plans and teaches all classes. Rock Steady Boxing Northeast PA can be found on Maxson Drive in Old Forge. Call Reap at 570-817-4307 for more details on classes or email RSBoxingNEPA@gmail.com. Denise Rizzo is a University of Scranton Women’s Entrepreneurship Center intern who works under the supervision of Donna Simpson, consultant manager.


FEATURE

On the links between golf and business ships form and conversations that lead to trust and interest happen. Try spending four and a half hours Coming in “under-par” is my (and every other with someone and not get a good picture of who they professional golfer’s) goal. However, in are and what they represent. Not even terms of pay equality, being “under par” Boyden, a top head-hunting agency, could is a bad score. devise a better litmus test for employers. As a young girl growing up in NorthGolf is the best networking tool that I’ve east Pennsylvania, I spent a considerable experienced, but how do more women amount of time on the golf course; I also get to a point where they can use it to spent a lot of time around men. These advance in business? men were socializing and conducting Some of the solutions to overcoming Scarpetta business on the course while I was in pigthe wage and opportunity gap — that tails on the putting green. I have always powerful women like Sheryl Sandberg, felt that my place and presence was welcome — COO of Facebook suggests — can be navigated provided I hit the ball well enough. It’s a testament to more organically and rapidly by growing the female the men at the clubs I grew up playing on, because golfing population. I can honestly say, it’s never taken more than one One specific fact referenced in Sandberg’s book, well-hit driver for me to win over a man on the golf “Lean In,” is that women do not negotiate their salacourse and if it ever does, I’ll just wave him through. ries as much as men. Being poor at negotiating will However, I can see a real history of exclusion certainly result in getting paid less than men, even if at the country club — not just to women but to you have the same title. Sandberg presents a study certain ethnicities, races and religions — as a place which looked at starting salaries of students graduwhere women, regardless of how accomplished ating with a master’s degree from Carnegie Mellon they are in their professional field, still feel they University. The report found that 57 percent of male don’t belong. Many women take up the game students, but only 7 percent of female students, tried later in life, so they may experience the anxious, to negotiate for a higher offer. She is quick to menspotlight-effect feeling all golfers face, because they tion the cause: “women often have a good reason feel like they can’t catch up. to be reluctant to advocate for their own interests, Believe me, everyone hits more bad shots than because doing so can easily backfire.” (This author good ones. No one is exempt even if they’ve been hopes this article is not one such occurrence.) playing their whole life. It also doesn’t take long to Sandberg nails down the sweet spot: combine realize that what drives competitive people to the niceness with insistence. This is a style that Mary game is the fact that you are your own competition. Sue Coleman, president of the University of MichiThis realization is when most fall for the game and gan, describes as “relentlessly pleasant.” become life-long players and fans. A great way to practice being “relentlessly Golf still carries enough baggage for women to pleasant” is to play golf properly. Playing “properly” hesitate picking up a club. This is sad, because the doesn’t mean having a perfect swing or knowing game is the only sport that is set up for different skill every complex rule and decision; it means reading and age levels to play together. Basketball doesn’t and aspiring to adhere to the guidelines in the first adjust the three-point line to take into account for section of the Rules of Golf, entitled, “Etiquette.” This arthritis and aging, but golf actually does. There are section comes even before the “Definitions” section. tee-boxes of various lengths and handicaps that alThis ordering of the index is intentional and suggests low everyone to be competitive and have fun. These that “Etiquette,” is comprehensible for even the nonelements set the stage for good company. No other golfer. The only rival to the “Little League Pledge,” sport has the reputation for being more exclusive as far as inspiring sports vows go, is the second than golf, but at the same time, no other sport is paragraph, which describes “The Spirit of the Game.” actually set up to be more inclusive than golf. The overlap of golf and business extends fur“Golf is played, for the most part, without the ther, because a round of golf takes several hours, supervision of a referee or umpire. The game relies but only about fifteen minutes are spent hitting the on the integrity of the individual to show considerball. This time in-between shots is when relationation for other players and to abide by the Rules. All By Kate Scarpetta

players should conduct themselves in a disciplined manner, demonstrating courtesy and sportsmanship at all times, irrespective of how competitive they may be. This is the spirit of the game of golf.” If those words don’t draw a tear or make you wish everything was like golf, then the game isn’t for you. “The Spirit of the Game” is a prescription for being an ethical and likable businessperson: don’t cheat and don’t be someone that no one wants to spend four and a half hours with. Any golfer, even if his or her own etiquette is not paragon, will always prefer the company of a player with good etiquette. The characteristic even trumps talent, because sharing company with someone who throws clubs or cheats in a $5 Nassau gets old quickly. The “Etiquette” section wraps up with: confidence. Introduce your sisters, daughters and granddaughters to golf so that they can use it to “If players follow the guidelines in this section, it their advantage on and off the course. will make the game more enjoyable for everyone.” Girls don’t have the luxury of being socially intimidated and a great way to overcome this is by There’s nothing suggestive about this statespending time on a golf course. When more girls ment. Follow these guidelines and you’ve done it and young women start playing and acquire golf right. This means that women can enter and be etiquette, (aka “relentless persistence”) women and “business-golf-ready” sooner than they think. golf will improve their scorecards. More women in business need to play golf. Kate Scarpetta is a professional golfer and founder of Period. These first four pages on “Etiquette” are the 2017 PA Women’s Open. She said “The 2017 PA Women’s Open Tournament I am running is actually a prescriptive way to be welcomed and respected making history. It’s the first professional golf tournaby any golfer. When playing with clients or one’s ment to have a larger purse for women than for men. boss, a woman will get ahead by being “relentlessly We’ve also partnered with Geisinger Health System pleasant,” which, recall, is a skill people like Sheryl to raise money for their Autism and Developmental Medicine Institute. It’s a great project and it will be a Sandberg think women need to master anyway, if truly awesome event.” they want to lean in effectively. Golf needs women too. Women make up half of 2017 PA Women’s Open the population and only account for 19 percent of Valley Country Club golfers, according to The National Golf Founda79 Country Club Lane, Sugarloaf, PA 18249 tion. Numbers-wise, the game is in decline by 30 May 24-27 percent in the number of golfers ages 18 to 34, and • There will be 78 players, consisting of the world’s having more girls and women pick up a club can best professionals and amateurs help fix this problem. Incentives for more women • Tournament Purse: $100,000 to play and take an interest in golf couldn’t be more • First Place: $20,000 attractive or logical. • Title Sponsor: Computer Aid Inc. Personally, my confidence in negotiating and • Benefits Geisinger Health System’s Autism and interacting with men and women who are successDevelopmental Medicine Institute ful comes less from my college degree than it does from early interactions with people who are older Schedule of Events than me on the golf course. • Wednesday, May 24 — 18 Hole Open Qualifier, The golf course is a setting where being young Women’s Clinic, Cocktail Pairings Party and female, at least for now, means you’re in the • Thursday, May 25 — Pro-am, Jr. Clinic, BBQ minority. Navigating this type of setting on your • Friday, May 26 — Round 1 own increases your self-esteem, people skills and • Saturday, May 27 — Final Round, Award Ceremony

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EXECUTIVE SPOTLIGHT

Peoples Security Bank & Trust Co.

WELCOMES...

PICTURED (L to R): Edward J. Gilmartin, MBA Managing Director, Retirement Plan Services, Accredited Investment Fiduciary®; Thomas P. Tulaney II, Vice President, Retirement Plan Services

THOMAS P. TULANEY II Peoples Security Retirement Plan Services*, the 401k professionals for Northeastern Pennsylvania, has strengthened our team by adding a seasoned veteran in Tom. With years of experience assisting business owners plan for their employees’ retirement, Tom will be a valued addition. Contact Tom TODAY at 570 346 7741 x2392.

Retirement Plan Services

psbt.com | 888 868 3858 *Securities and advisory services offered through LPL Financial, a registered investment advisor, Member FINRA/SIPC. Insurance products offered through LPL Financial or its licensed affiliates. The investment products sold through LPL Financial are not insured Peoples Security Bank and Trust Company deposits and are not FDIC insured. These products are not obligations of the Peoples Security Bank and Trust Company and are not endorsed, recommended or guaranteed by Peoples Security Bank and Trust Company or any government agency. The value of the investment may fluctuate, the return on the investment is not guaranteed, and loss of principal is possible. PEOPLES SECURITY RETIREMENT PLAN SERVICES IS A TRADENAME UNDER PEOPLES SECURITY BANK AND TRUST COMPANY.

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Thomas P. Tulaney II,

Peoples Security Bank & Trust Co. For example, he explained, an employer Thomas P. Tulaney took part in the exodus of young talent from NEPA early in his that offers a retirement plan can do so for a modest cost and it may encompass career. Business calls it brain drain when features, such as a match, Roth component, new graduates set out looking for fortune profit sharing, loan provisions, in other areas. He had earned a etc. degree in accounting from King’s College but he felt he wasn’t cut These benefits help to incentivout for tax returns and audits. ize and retain employees. Not “What I did learn, though, is to mention, an employer may that nothing motivates me more receive tax deductions when makthan trying to help someone else ing discretionary contributions to achieve a goal,” he said. participants. From the employees’ Tulaney found his calling in perspective, at a minimum, you Tulaney Scottsdale, Arizona, where he are being offered a diversified, began working in securities with tax-deferred savings vehicle for a Merrill Lynch. modest cost. “A director taught me the ropes of this “Oh, by the way,” he said, “you may business at an early point in my career, receive a dollar-for-dollar match for your exposing me to opportunities and circum- contribution up to a certain percentage stances that I’d never imagined possible,” and if you’re lucky, possibly a profit sharhe said. After a stint with a large adviing contribution to boot. Where else can sory team in Pinnacle Peak, Arizona, he you possibly gain access to such incenreturned home. tives? Bottom line: take advantage.” “I’m from the Scranton area — the All retirement plans are not created majority of everyone I know and love still equally. Every employer has the ability to reside in NEPA. Needless to say, after more customize features and components within than four years in sunny Arizona, I made its plan, as long as the design complies the decision to come back home…and I’m with stringent rules and regulations. happy I did.” Recent communication from the DepartHis work as vice president — Retirement of Labor (DOL) clearly foreshadows ment Plan Services with Peoples Security additional scrutiny of retirement plans on Wealth Managament Group/Peoples the horizon, which will further tighten the Security Wealth Advisors requires him reigns on this industry. Clearly underto solidify his organization’s footprint as standing how to navigate this ever-changa leader in the retirement plan services ing environment is critical. industry. “From the top down, Peoples is “Our mission is to drive the industry an incredible organization, and I couldn’t forward, embracing fiduciary education be more excited to be a part of this team,” at all levels and providing specialized he said. resources for businesses and participants. Speaking of retirement, he said that now, We aim to help mitigate employer liability through the implementation of plan polimore than ever, there is significant emphacies and procedures, and strive to assist sis for individuals and families to save for retirement. Whether you’ve just begun this participants in making informed decisions journey or may quickly be approaching the for their futures,” he said end of your working career, your ability to “Our strong leadership, innovative accumulate wealth for life after 10- hourtechnology and world-class service afford workdays has never been more crucial. us the opportunity to work with a variety “How will you survive without a paycheck of successful businesses and wonderful for 30 years?” he asked. people in this community,” he said. Tulaney resides in Waverly Twp. with Today, nearly 80 percent of employers offer a 401(k) or some other form of retire- his wife, Courtney and son Thomas, 18-months. The family is expecting a baby ment plan, he said. Participation in these girl in June. He can be reached at 570-969vehicles provides advantages for both 0242. Email thomas.p.tulaney@psbt.com. employers and employees.


ECONOMY

Ben Franklin to invest $292,260 in regional companies Since beginning operation, BFTP/NEP has helped start 492 new PA companies

The Ben Franklin Technology Partners of Northeastern Pennsylvania’s (BFTP/NEP) board of directors has approved the investment of $292,260 in support of regional economic development. BFTP/ NEP’s goal is to help lead Northeast Pennsylvania to a better economic future by building partnerships that develop and apply technology for competitive advantage. To achieve this goal, Ben Franklin staff concentrate their efforts on three key areas: • developing and growing early-stage technology-oriented companies; • helping established manufacturers creatively apply new technology and business practices to achieve industry leadership; and • promoting an innovative community-wide infrastructure that fosters a favorable business environment for high-growth companies. The following early-stage company investment is provided in the form of loans with warrants. • American Paper Bag LLC, Wilkes-Barre, Luzerne County Ben Franklin Investment: $100,000 Support marketing and sales efforts at this producer of customizable and environmentally friendly paper bags. Currently, most retail carrier bags in the U.S. are plastic and produced in China. APB’s paper bags are greener and provide users with many distinctive branding opportunities. Its proprietary manufacturing process and new shape gives APB a competitive advantage over other U.S. bag producers. • Columbia County Bread & Granola columbiacountybread.com, Bloomsburg, Columbia County Ben Franklin Investment: $50,000 Finalize a sales and marketing strategy and implement a digital marketing campaign for this baker of sprouted grain foods that target healthconscious individuals and people with dietary constraints. There is surging market interest for the minimally processed foods that Columbia County Bread & Granola provides. Ben Franklin announces the following established manufacturer company investment. Ben Franklin provides 1:1 matching funding for work with a college or university partner on technologybased manufacturing innovation in established manufacturers. • FMI fragrancemfg.com, Allentown, Lehigh County

University Partner: Lehigh University’s Enterprise Systems Center Ben Franklin Investment: $25,000 Upgrade FMI’s Enterprise Resource Planning system to accommodate growth so the company can operate more efficiently and access new opportunities with larger customers. FMI provides contract manufacturing for a wide range of clients in the skin care, personal care, hair care, and pet care markets. • Interstate Building Materials interstatebldg.com, Pittston, Luzerne County University Partner: Lehigh University’s Enterprise Systems Center Ben Franklin Investment: $25,000 Develop labor time standards that will allow the company to develop more accurate labor costing at this manufacturer of custom windows and doors made from vinyl and composites. • JSM jetsonmarketing.com/, Kutztown, Berks County University Partner: Lehigh University’s Enterprise Systems Center Ben Franklin Investment: $25,000 Increase productivity in the laser imaging department at this full-service marketing communications company. The work will enhance manufacturing and technology processes designed to improve quality and customer return on investment in various print and mail campaigns. • Spray-Tek Inc. spray-tek.com, Ben Franklin TechVentures, Bethlehem, Northampton County College Partner: Northampton Community College’s Emerging Technology Applications Center Ben Franklin Investment: $25,000 Complete development of a new encapsulation process at this provider of contract spray-drying for consumer goods companies. Spray drying transforms liquid suspensions into a free-flowing, ultra-fine powder by drying with a hot gas in less than 20 seconds. The method is utilized in the production of many thermally sensitive materials such as foods and pharmaceuticals. • Unicast Company, unicastco.com, Boyertown, Berks County College Partner: Northampton Community College’s Emerging Technology Applications Center Ben Franklin Investment: $17,260 Conduct an energy assessment of the entire

operation at this custom manufacturer of grey iron castings and provide environmental assistance. Energy is a significant cost for foundries, so energy reduction and other cost savings measures will help Unicast to remain globally competitive. • Wacker Chemical Corp, wacker.com, Allentown, Lehigh County University Partner: Lehigh University’s Enterprise Systems Center Ben Franklin Investment: $25,000 Employ advanced analytics tools to create a predictive maintenance system to improve manufacturing operations at this producer of polymeric binders and additives. These products are used in a variety of products including paint, adhesives, and textiles. The predictive maintenance system will provide the company with significant savings. More than 44,000 job creations reported Also, BFTP/NEP has reported that 4,052 northeastern Pennsylvania jobs were created or retained as a result of its work in 2016, for a cumulative total of 44,799 job creations or retentions since the program’s inception in 1983. Client companies raised an additional $38 million in follow-on funding from angel investors, venture capitalists, and other investors in 2016, for a total of more than $1.462 billion in follow-on investment received since 2007. These results were accomplished in BFTP/NEP’s 21-county service area, including Berks, Bradford, Carbon, Columbia, Lackawanna, Lehigh, Luzerne, Lycoming, Monroe, Montour, Northampton, Northumberland, Pike, Schuylkill, Snyder, Sullivan, Susquehanna, Tioga, Union, Wayne, and Wyoming counties. Impact results are a summation of the accomplishments of Ben Franklin’s work as reported by client companies. Clients credit the impact figures as having been a direct result of Ben Franklin funding and support. Results are reported by Ben Franklin to the Pennsylvania Department of Community and Economic Development, which funds the statewide Ben Franklin program. “Creating and retaining technology-based jobs is our primary mission,” said R. Chadwick Paul, Jr., President and CEO of BFTP/NEP. “High-paying, sustainable jobs are the foundation of a strong economy.” The Ben Franklin Technology Partners of Northeastern Pennsylvania links clients with

universities, funding, and other resources to help them prosper through innovation. BFTP/NEP’s strategy encompasses three key areas: developing early-stage, technology-oriented companies; helping established manufacturers creatively apply new technology and business practices; and promoting an innovative community-wide infrastructure that supports a favorable business environment for high-growth companies. The northeastern center is part of a four-center, state-funded economic development initiative. BFTP/NEP is headquartered in, owns, and manages Ben Franklin TechVentures®, an award-winning technology business incubator/post-incubator facility on Lehigh University’s Mountaintop Campus in Bethlehem. BFTP/NEP also owns and manages the Bloomsburg Regional Technology Center. Both incubators are members of the BFTP/NEP-led, 15-member Ben Franklin Business Incubator Network. This network is among the largest in the United States. The Ben Franklin Technology Partners of Northeastern Pennsylvania reported the following 2016 results: • Created 429 new jobs; • Retained 3,623 existing jobs; • Started 10 new companies; and • Developed 158 new products and processes. BFTP/NEP was established in 1983 and has achieved the following cumulative results: • Created 17,415 new jobs; • Retained 27,384 existing jobs; • Started 492 new companies; and • Developed 1,591 new products and processes. In 2016, BFTP/NEP assisted 303 companies. Since 2007, the organization has assisted a total of 2,768 client firms. An independent study produced by the Pennsylvania Economy League shows that Pennsylvania’s investment in Ben Franklin Technology Partners statewide from 2007 to 2011 returned $3.60 in new tax revenue for each $1 spent. The study also concluded that, since 1989, Ben Franklin statewide network has created 51,000 additional jobs in client firms and has boosted the Pennsylvania economy by more than $23.5 billion. Jobs created by Ben Franklin’s clients pay 36 percent more than the average non-farm wage in Pennsylvania.

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BUSINESS & THE LAW

EEOC provides laws and guidance to businesses

The U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) is responsible for enforcing federal laws that make it illegal to discriminate against a job applicant or an employee because of the person’s race, color, religion, sex (including pregnancy, gender identity and sexual orientation), national origin, age (40 or older), disability or genetic information. It is also illegal to discriminate against a person because the person complained about discrimination, filed a charge of discrimination or participated in an employment discrimination investigation or lawsuit. Most employers with at least 15 employees are covered by EEOC laws (20 employees in age discrimination cases). Most labor unions and employment agencies are also covered. The laws apply to all types of work situations, including hiring, firing, promotions, harassment, training, wages and benefits.

Authority and Role The EEOC has the authority to investigate charges of discrimination against employers who are covered by the law. Its role in an investigation is to fairly and accurately assess the allegations in the charge and then make a finding. If EEOC finds that discrimination has occurred, the authority tries to settle the charge. If not successful, it has the authority to file a lawsuit to protect the rights of individuals and the interests of the public. The authority does not, however, file lawsuits in all cases where it finds discrimination. EEOC also works to prevent discrimination before it occurs through outreach, education and technical assistance programs. The EEOC provides leadership and guidance to federal agencies on all aspects of the federal government’s equal employment opportunity program. EEOC assures federal agency and department compliance with EEOC regulations, provides technical assistance to federal agencies concerning EEO complaint adjudication, monitors and evaluates federal agencies’ affirmative employment programs, develops and distributes federal sector educational materials and conducts training for stakeholders, provides guidance and assistance to its administrative judges who conduct hearings on EEO complaints and adjudicates appeals from administrative decisions made by federal agencies on EEO complaints. EEOC carries out its work through headquarter

offices in Washington, D.C. and through 53 field offices serving every part of the nation. Regulations implement federal workplace discrimination laws. They are voted on by the Commission after the public has a formal opportunity to provide comments to EEOC. EEOC Subregulatory Guidance expresses official agency policy and explains how the laws and regulations apply to specific workplace situations. EEOC seeks and obtains input from the public in a variety of ways for these documents before they are voted on by the Commission. Commission Decisions concern a specific charge of discrimination where the Commission votes to express official agency policy to be applied in similar cases by EEOC. They should not be confused with EEOC’s federal sector appellate decisions in federal employee complaints of discrimination. Memoranda of Understanding (MOUs) explain how two or more agencies will cooperate and interact when their enforcement responsibilities overlap. MOUs involving other federal agencies must be approved by a majority of the Commissioners. EEOC also enters into MOUs with foreign embassies and consulates to enhance cooperation on matters involving employment discrimination. EEOC Resource Documents assist the public in understanding existing EEOC positions. Since they do not create new policy, they are not voted on by the Commission.

Workplace laws enforced by other agencies: Federal laws prohibiting discrimination or regulating workplace issues that are not enforced by the EEOC: • The Civil Service Reform Act of 1978 (CSRA). Enforced by both the Office of Special Counsel (OSC) and the Merit Systems Protection Board (MSPB). • The Immigration Reform and Control Act of 1986 (IRCA). Enforced by Immigration and Naturalization Service (INS). • Executive Order 11246. Enforced by The Department of Labor’s Employment Standards Administration’s Office of Federal Contract Compliance Programs (OFCCP). • Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964. Enforced by the Office for Civil Rights. • Title II of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA ). Enforced by the U.S. Department of Justice.

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• Title III of the ADA. Enforced by the U.S. Department of Justice. • The Family and Medical Leave Act (FMLA). Enforced by the Wage and Hour Division (WHD) of the Department of Labor. • The Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970 (OSHA). Enforced by The Office Of Federal Agency Programs (FAP) within the Directorate of Enforcement Programs. • Section 503 of the Rehabilitation Act. Enforced by the U.S. Office of Federal Contract Compliance Programs (OFCCP). • Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act. Enforced by OCR, a component of the U.S. Department of Education. • Section 508 of the Rehabilitation Act. Section 508 was originally added to the Rehabilitation Act in 1986; the 1998 amendments significantly expand and strengthen the technology access requirements in Section 508. • The Social Security Act. Enforced by the Department of Health and Human Services. • The Fair Labor Standards Act. The Wage and Hour Division (WHD) of the U.S. Department of Labor (DOL) administers and enforces the FLSA. • National Labor Relations Act. Enforced by the National Labor Relations Board. • Section 1981 of the Civil Rights Act of 1866. Enforced by Enforced by the U.S Department of Labor’s Civil Rights Center. • Workers Compensation Law. Enforced by Office of Workers’ Compensation Programs, U.S. Department of Labor. • Title I of Genetic Information Nondiscrimination Act. Enforced by the U.S Department of Labor’s Civil Rights Center. Discrimination by Type The authority provides links to the relevant laws, regulations and policy guidance as well as fact sheets, Q&As, best practices and other information regarding age; disability; equal pay/ compensation; genetic information; harassment; national origin; pregnancy; race/color; religion; retaliation; sex and sexual harassment at EEOC.gov. Employers rights and responsibilities The U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission enforces federal laws prohibiting employment discrimination. These laws protect employees and job applicants against employment

discrimination when it involves: • Unfair treatment because of race, color, religion, sex (including pregnancy, gender identity, and sexual orientation), national origin, age (40 or older), disability or genetic information. • Harassment by managers, co-workers, or others in the workplace, because of race, color, religion, sex (including pregnancy), national origin, age (40 or older), disability or genetic information. • Denial of a reasonable workplace accommodation that the employee needs because of religious beliefs or disability. • Retaliation because the employee complained about job discrimination, or assisted with a job discrimination investigation or lawsuit. Not all employers are covered by the laws EEOC enforces and not all employees are protected. This can vary depending on the type of employer, the number of employees it has, and the type of discrimination alleged. An employee or job applicant who believes that he or she has been discriminated against at work can file a “charge of discrimination.” All of the laws enforced by EEOC, except for the Equal Pay Act, require employees and applicants to file a charge of discrimination with EEOC before they can file a job discrimination lawsuit against their employer. Also, there are strict time limits for filing a charge. The fact that the EEOC has taken a charge does not mean that the government is accusing anyone of discrimination. The charging party has alleged that an employer has discriminated against him or her and it is the EEOC’s job to investigate the matter to determine whether there is reasonable cause to believe that discrimination has occurred. Other Requirements The laws enforced by EEOC require employers to keep certain records, regardless of whether a charge has been filed against them. When a charge has been filed, employers have additional recordkeeping obligations. The EEOC also collects workforce data from some employers, regardless of whether a charge has been filed against the company. Employers are required to post notices describing the federal laws prohibiting job discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex (including pregnancy), national origin, age (40 or older), disability or genetic information. Visit EEOC.gov.


Each month, we recognize one of the region’s top manufacturers with the aid of NEPIRC, the Northeastern Pennsylvania Industrial Resource Center. Since 1988, NEPIRC has been working with manufacturers to improve their productivity, profitability, competitiveness and long-term viability through consultative services.

Family operated manufacturer celebrates 125 years The A. Rifkin Co.’s history spans 5 generations, multiple, ever-evolving product lines and a commitment to superior customer service, quality and innovation.

their CashTrack™ device, which looks like a stack of cash and sits inside the cash register of a bank or retail establishment. In the event of a hold up, the device is thrown into a bag with all of the other cash and enables the robbers to be tracked through GPS. According to Lantz, the company remains A. Rifkin Co. is a family-owned innovative by really talking with customers manufacturer and international distributor and trying to see how they can help of security and multi-use reusable fabric solve any problems that their customers bags and related products such as locking might encounter. Lantz sees the company A. Rifkin Co.’s corporate headquarters and manufacturing facility in Wilkes-Barre, PA. night deposit bags, courier bags, document continually expanding into new and larger security bags, and other banking supplies, markets including the federal government. As document security needs including GPS asset tracking devices. The company also does contract continue to be more critical to businesses, A. Rifkin sees a continued need for sewing, as needed, for a multitude of industries, including making habits for their products, noting that not all industries are going paperless. nuns and re-upholstering scooter seat covers. NEPIRC has been a long-standing partner with the A. Rifkin Company. NEPIRC Their manufacturing facility and corporate headquarters are located in provided assistance in acquiring Wilkes-Barre, PA. They also have a sister company located in Roseto, PA, education training grants and has which manufactures Class A Police & Fire Uniforms. Collectively, both consulted on long-range strategic locations employ 90 people. planning and various lean initiatives. According to Paul D. Lantz, President, “Our workforce is excellent in both They also participate in NEPIRC’s locations. We attribute our success to superior service and quality, and we Executive Network and MFG Day achieve those by having the best people working for us.” activities. “NEPIRC has always been Their money bag products can be used in virtually every department of there for us and we look forward to a business. They hold a patent on a seven-pin lock called the Arcolock-7 ®. working with them as we continue to More recently, they developed grow and expand our business.” Samples of A. Rifkin’s security bag systems a patented zipper locking device used on their bags known as Keyless Security™ This feature is sponsored by... which eliminated the hassle of key management. This closure system shows at-a-glance evidence if the contents of a bag have been tampered with and is ideal for election ballots and document chain of custody. Another unique invention is CashTrack™ device uses GPS to track down robbers.

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the top line items we are paying for with claims, DILEMMA FROM PAGE 01 making employer-provided EAP programs very Benefits. The vast majority of employers are not important,” said Howell. “Most employers don’t in the health care business, but large amounts of emphasize these benefits as they should.” time, resources and money are being drawn away As the insurance business evolves, Howell is from business operations to insure employees as marketing a new software product that is being uncertainty increases about costs increases and administrative burdens for government regulations. utilized by major carriers such as The Harford. He said this product reduces weeks of administrative “The ACA moved dollars to the work to a matter of hours, making carriinsurance companies, which may ers more efficient with lower costs. have been the best idea,” said Howell. “This software creates quick infor“In particular, older workers who are mation compiling and transfer to the unemployed with no insurance are carriers” Howell said. getting clobbered with ACA policies and Michael Costello, MBA, J.D., assismay wind up dumped into pools with tant professor of online graduate health inferior products. Expanding Medicare administration and program director or competitive government options for Costello at the University of Scranton, said the high-risk would have been a better idea current health care system including the for this group of uninsured people.” ACA guarantees conflict because Washington is Howell also cited how President Trump promattempting to demand insurance through a governised insurance for everyone, which Howell finds ment mechanism, despite America’s historic prointeresting because a single-payer national system motion of personal freedom. Coverage mandates would greatly decrease administrative costs. The ACA addressed high policy costs with premium sub- infringe upon this freedom, but to make insurance sidies for the internet-based exchange products, but work the system needs as many people as possible did not inspire overall health care costs to decrease. to be insured. Costello also said that since the birth of MediHowell added that wage increases versus payment for rising policy costs is a dilemma virtu- care and Medicaid in 1965, spending levels for the programs have changed and today Medicaid has ally every employer is facing. Because wages are become the costlier of the two. This reality must be taxed and insurance coverage is not, payment for part of any effective changes to the nation’s insurpremiums gives employers better compensation ance system, particularly since 65 to 70 percent of value, which then must be communicated to the Medicaid’s spending pays for nursing home costs. employee base. “Today, 21 percent of the national population is Other facets of the health insurance debate, according to Howell, are not receiving the attention involved with Medicaid,” said Costello. “That is an enormous number of people. Many of the conserthey deserve. Only 20 percent of his clients take vatives believe we can eliminate costly coverage wellness seriously, despite the fact that poor lifestyles and obesity drives up claims as carriers pull like this and our problems will just go away, but Medicaid cannot simply be eliminated.” out of the market because of cost problems. “Mental illness and addiction and among

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Historic partners Dan Day, regional vice president of sales with Highmark, noted that health insurance and government regulation are old partners. From Medicare’s creation in 1965 to managed care of the 1980s to the ACA, Washington has had an active hand with similarities that mirror the evolving regulatory mechanisms in banking. “What has recently changed is how much of the ACA regulations often fall upon the employer,” Day said. In view of the fact that 160 million people are now insured within group plans and another 60 million are in self-funded organizations, Day agrees that use is the true regulator for insurance costs. Within this system, the business community desires financial stability and accessibility, but cost increases lead back to insurance utilization levels. Unfortunately, the historic metrics of health care costs appear to be unsustainable. According to Day, during 1989 healthcare costs totaled 9 percent of payroll dollars and employers were expressing fear that costs would rise to 15 percent. Today, health insurance costs are consuming 20 percent of compensation packages, with the total varying by geographical region and the specifics of business cash flow. “Management of insurance costs in the future are going to require some big societal decisions, including how to pay for the American lifestyle,” Day said. “Technology, pharmacology and insurance usage are all prime factors in cost formulas.” With questions about Medicaid’s future a vital part of the health insurance debate, Day explained that the program has a fluid population of insured recipients unlike the numerical stability of Medicare. In addition, Medicaid was never intended to be a lengthy entitlement program for a recipient, but it has evolved into such a system making proposals to finance the program with block grants to the states questionable. “The states would then find themselves in a situation of how to capture enough block grants to finance their programs,” Day said. “Medicaid was never intended to be a permanent program, but in states such as West Virginia it has evolved into just that.” The promotion of good health to drive down insurance costs is of prime importance with the Geisinger Health Plan, according to Allison Hess, director of wellness programs. She explained how her organization offers a variety of programs such as employer-based health fairs and classes, plus phone and on-line coaching. Geisinger also works with programs such as Medicaid and through a community outreach. “Yes, wellness is effective in reducing claims which lower costs,” said Hess. “Employers often

will struggle with employee participation, but to some degree the effectiveness of a wellness program is tied to the amount of incentives it offers to those who are insured.” According Hess, a steep employee incentive for wellness participation can achieve 70 percent employee participation. As more dollars become involved employee interest increases and specific facets such as health fairs have been proven to produce better clinical metrics that include a lowered risk for stroke, decreased diabetes, successful tobacco cessation, improved cholesterol levels and reduced body mass. “Wellness that is sustainable is vital if we are to lower insurance costs,” Hess said. Band aid debate Michelle Grushinski, past president of the NEPA chapter of The Society of Human Resources Management, said that, despite its intense nature, the debate about health insurance and the specific conflict involving the ACA has been largely a distraction. The conversation should involve ways to drastically reduce costs for health care and Grushinski sees no value in the leadership of President Trump because he has “no clue” what he is actually doing. “To understand this very complex situation with health care, a person must have detailed information, which Trump obviously doesn’t,” Grushinski said. “He should have created a task force and utilized the expertise of the various think tanks, which he didn’t.” The stagnant situation in Washington, according to Grushinski, is leaving business with no new options. Human resource managers must continue to vigorously negotiate policy price carriers, despite the fact that the carriers have limited economic room to maneuver. Specific types of business, such as the temporary agencies, will continue to be hit hard in the ongoing environment. Businesses of 50-plus employees also are considering changes in personnel from full-time to part-time. Grushniski noted that when a job offer is made, the cost of health care is included in the compensation evaluation and annual benefit cost increases are recognized as part of these forecasts as employers, by nature, try to keep their labor costs as low as possible. “The fundamental cost for health care is the root problem and thats what the national debate should be about,” Grushinski said. “Business wants to be able to purchase health insurance that is a good value with adequate coverage, affordable prices and decent benefits, but increasingly this is no longer available because of increasing costs.”


BANKING & FINANCE

Life lesson: Start saving when you’re young By Adam D. Shelp

When you’re in your 20s and just starting out in your career, saving for retirement might not be a high priority. It can be hard to save for retirement when you have so many other demands on your money. But getting a head start on saving while you’re young could have a significant impact on your future financial security.

lect the investments that fit your risk tolerance and time frame. As a young investor with many years before you plan to retire, you may want to consider including stock investments* in your portfolio. While the stock market can be volatile in the short term, historically stocks have produced higher long-term returns than the other major asset classes and have stayed ahead of inflation. (Past performance is no guarantee of future results.)

Welcome to the real world Getting a head start If you’ve just started working at your Making contributions to your retirefirst real job, you may be earning more ment plan account while you’re young Shelp money than ever before. But you also could have a significant impact on the could have new expenses, too. If this is amount of money you may be able to your first time living independently from your paraccumulate by the time you retire. ents, you’re now the one responsible for paying the rent and utilities, groceries, gas, insurance, and all Age you start making contributions your other living expenses. Plus, you may be pay25 30 35 ing off your student loans and saving to buy a new Monthly contribution car. Setting aside money for a far off retirement $100 $100 $100 might not seem to be a sensible thing for you to do Average annual total return right now. But this really is the ideal time to save. 7% 7% 7% Time is on your side Saving for retirement while you’re in your 20s will give your savings more time to benefit from potential compounding. Compounding happens when the money you set aside for retirement generates investment earnings. Those earnings are added to your plan balance and reinvested. You then have the potential to earn a return on your contributions and your earnings. The longer the compounding process has to repeat itself, the larger your account balance may be at retirement. The money you save now could have 40 or more years to benefit from potential compounding.

Years invested 40 35 Account value at age 65 $262,481 $180,105 Earnings $214,481 $138,105 Contributions $48,000 $42,000

30 $121,997 $85,997 $36,000

This is a hypothetical example used for illustrative purposes only. It is not representative of any investment vehicle. It assumes monthly compounding. Your investment results will be different. Tax-deferred amounts accumulated in the plan are taxable on withdrawal, unless they represent qualiYour plan makes it easy to save fied Roth distributions. Saving for retirement is very convenient with your * Stock investing involves a high degree of risk. employer’s plan. You don’t have to make a special Stock prices fluctuate and investors may lose money. trip to the bank or write a check each month. Your Contact Adam D. Shelp, CRPC, Kingston Retirement plan contributions are automatically deducted from Group of Janney Montgomery Scott LLC your paycheck each pay period and put into your plan 270 Pierce Street, Kingston 18704. Call (570) 283-8140 or visit kingstonretirementgroup.com. Janney Montaccount. Because you don’t receive that money, you gomery Scott LLC is a member NYSE, FINRA, SIPC. aren’t tempted to spend it instead of saving it. Try to increase your contribution whenever you can. Janney Montgomery Scott LLC, its affiliates, and its Built-in plan benefits Your employer’s retirement plan also offers you a number of investment options. These funds or portfolios are professionally managed. You just se-

employees are not in the business of providing tax, regulatory, accounting, or legal advice. These materials and any tax-related statements are not intended or written to be used, and cannot be used or relied upon, by any taxpayer for the purpose of avoiding tax penalties. Any such taxpayer should seek advice based on the taxpayer’s particular circumstances from an independent tax advisor. Source: DST Systems, Inc.

MARKETING

Branding from the inside out

Five signs of a strong internal brand culture workplace awards, there is often a strong correlation between those that focus on their employees We expect the leadership of a company to be and those that pay attention to the brand and passionate about its brand. That’s their job, after what it stands for. all — build the brand. This applies particularly to But one of my favorite sayings is, companies that have a major service “Leaders need followers.” And that’s component to their business. The the real question—does a company quality of that service is usually critical have a strong brand culture that emto competing. Making it different from ployees want to join? Or is it just a job and better than the competition often to them? Do they feel that working for comes from an internal brand culture a particular brand is special, or could that is committed to getting everyone they simply go across the street and Taylor on the same page. do exactly what they are doing over there without missing a beat? • It’s self-correcting. Here are some signs of a strong brand culture Strong internal brand cultures are good at that can mean greater success at growing and staying the course. They reward thinking that supmaintaining a brand: ports the brand strategy and correct (or reject) By Dave Taylor

• High-level brand awareness among all employees. In a strong brand culture, every employee understands the brand. They can explain it in a few words. This often starts with a thorough brand orientation when they are hired. New workers are expected to learn about the history of the company and basics of the brand. In strong cultures, it’s self-perpetuating. This is not to be confused with the general concept of team building that is often a part of employee training. And a strong brand culture can increase the sense of team unity, as well.

thinking that gets off track. Ideas and actions have to pass the important question of “Is it on brand?” If the answer is no, a new or revised solution or behavior has to take its place.

• A proactive alumni program. Companies usually understand that most employees will probably end up working somewhere else as their careers progress. But those with a long-term vision for their brand often see ex-employees as an opportunity. It becomes part of their brand culture to create an alumni program that supports former employees and gives them value in exchange for the expectation that they will • Employees are avid ambassadors for be ongoing ambassadors. Of course, not everythe brand. one will leave on good terms, but ex-employees I don’t just mean the sales force or the market- can become great referral sources and sometimes ing team, I mean virtually all the employees. They even clients. A strong brand culture recognizes love the brand and talking about it. Companies this and invests in it for the long run. with a strong brand culture tend to organically create people who can articulate their brand in glowDave Taylor is president of Taylor Brand Group, a ing terms. For firms that depend on networking company that focuses on developing brand strategy and referrals to generate new customers, having and ongoing brand marketing. Based in Lancaster, Taylor Brand Group works with national and regional many brand ambassadors can be a boost. • People want to work there. Whether or not a company competes for

clients. He can be reached at 717-393-7343. Visit taylor brand group.com.

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ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT

Clarifying terms

What is the real cause of employee turnover?

fect economic and community development. The role of a Sister City in establishing a relationship globally Words thrown about, especially in the election year could have a very positive affect and generate more of 2016, concerning globalization, industrialization and interest in globalization, industrialization, trade agreeoutsourcing encourage reflection on economic dements and other related matters. A staff member from velopment. The word globalization brings the Sister Cities program should be invited fear to some and to others it is a normal to the region to tell the story. process. It signals that outsourcing has Expansion of international studies created panic among those who have lost would be a step toward evaluating the role their jobs to moving industries overseas, of international trade and how the combut on the other hand it signals how the munities of the region could benefit. Think world has embraced manufacturing and of the Partners of the Americas program technology and other economic activity. where a state (in Pennnsylvania’s case) Grossman To some, industrialization means that could have a partner relationship between manufacturing has been declining and a state in Central America, South America, perhaps lost completely. In this region, manufacturor the Caribbean. ing may have diminished but by no means has it left Eastern Pennsylvania has a partner with Bahia, the region. Talking to the experts at the Northeastern Brazil and that has been the case for scores of years. Pennsylvania Industrial Resource Center (NEPIRC) In fact, the then Economic Development Council of and it becomes clear about these important terms. Northeastern Pennsylvania (EDCNP), now called Globalization and industrialization are twin isNEPA Alliance, had this relationship and helped sues that need clarification and while jobs continue to create similar organization in Bahia which still to be outsourced, they by no means are completely exists today. Western Pennsylvania has a partner due to trade agreements since the nation started relationship with another Brazilian state. There are to lose these jobs long before NAFTA and other educational, health, economic, sports and many trade agreements. These may have accelerated the other topics that are partnered. movement of jobs overseas but are not the whole A study of manufacturing conditions that have reasons why this has occurred. a global setting should be accomplished in this Trade agreements are likely to change as a region. This can be conducted by NEPIRC, perhaps result of the 2016 elections and what this means to in association with other entities and developed so regions such as ours remain to be seen. The region that globalization can be structured for the benefit is strong in exporting products and some services, of economic development in the region. Foreign but how this is affected by trade agreements is students attending high school or colleges in the unclear, yet, we need to review the trade agreement region should be asked to lend their views regarding situation. In fact, it would be helpful to have a senior doing business with their home country. This would trade agreement professional come to the region to establish a closer relationship with the nation and discuss the situation and help move the region in the help develop ways to reach out to that country in a appropriate direction. business and trading sense. Outsourcing affects almost every part of the nation The globalization theme represents a way to esand deserves more attention by economic leaders. tablish connections that can be an important factor in Perhaps, bringing together higher educational institu- evaluating the means to focus attention on the growth tions such as the economics and international trade of a global economy. departments would be an appropriate action. The Tom Friedman wrote, in his book “ The World region has much talent to encourage detailed discus- is Flat,” that the association of nations including sions. The Institute of Public Policy and Economic the United States has made the global economy an Development could conduct an analysis of many of important element for many sectors and that includes these types of topics regionally. the Pocono-Northeast. The time is here to take all One of the areas of interest might be the Sister appropriate steps to measure what a global economy City Program. Here, some of the regional communimeans to the future of this region. ties are sister cities and have a relationship with some Howard J. Grossman is the former executive director of cities of the world. Imagine if this was significantly EDCNP, now NEPA Alliance. Email him at GrossmanHJ@ expanded to 100 communities and how this would af- aol.com By Howard Grossman

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STRATEGIC PLANNING

MAY 2017 F ANNI NGCHR

By Biagio “Bill” Sciacca

• Mission Driven. How many of you reading this work for a company with a mission statement? How many of you know what that mission statement is? How about your employees? Here is a suggestion: Print your mission statement and at your next staff meeting ask your employees how congruent are their daily activities to the mission statement. (More on missions in the months to come) This may lead to some very interesting discussions and possibly changes to job descriptions.

Recently, during a leadership training program a high-level manager asked me this question: “What is the REAL cause of turnover?” I don’t think he was too thrilled with my answer, but I wasn’t there to win a congeniality contest; I was there to explore ideas and change minds. I answered: “You.” He leaned back in his chair with a palpable backward momentum, almost Sciacca as if I shoved him. So, I continued: • Trust. If you hire someone to Here is a rule that I do a job, then let them Here is a rule that I have have followed in my own do it. Ronald Reagan followed in my own businesses said it best, “Trust, but businesses, and a rule that I have been training verify.” The letters EMM and a rule that I have been on for several decades: training on for several decades: have two meanings, End People go where they are Micro Management and People go where they are wanted and stay where Empowered Motivational wanted and stay where they are they are appreciated. Management. Interesting appreciated. Of course, we make thing is that those terms — Biagio “Bill” Sciacca people feel wanted during are synonymous. the interview process, I have opted to that’s easy, but apprecreate two months of ciation is a long-term concept that needs to be dialogue on this topic and, as such, I have kept focused upon daily. this instalment short so that you can ponder and So how do we develop a strategy for apprecia- hopefully apply them to your daily business life. tion with the goal of reducing turnover? Please think about the above four ideas in terms I’ve got a few ideas for you to consider: of reducing turnover. Accountability Questions: • Pay your employees well. 1. Which of the four topics covered this Very often you hear that workers are not in month is the most important to you? it for the money. What a crock. I don’t care how 2. Do you have control over that? engaging a job is, try not paying me and see how 3. If not, can you at least exert some level long I last. Oh, sure there are exceptions; there of control? are careers that naturally pay less than others, 4. What will you do over the next month and there is volunteer work, but if your employees to move this topic forward in your company? have developed that nasty habit called “eating” Please, feel free to send me your ideas at bill@ then you need to pay them. And paying your em- intelligentmotivationinc.com ployees well is a great start to reducing turnover. We will continue this important discussion next month. • Keep your employees involved in the Biagio “Bill” Sciacca, Ph.D., has been a university decision-making process. And, I don’t mean professional for more than three and a half decades. asking them what toppings they want on the pizza He is the author of “Goals Book: Embracing Personal Responsibility In An Age of Entitlement,” and “Goals for lunch on Friday. Simple things like options Book 2 The Fieldbook: Putting Goal Setting To Work.” on the new copier, changing flex time to be more ciacca is also CEO of Intelligent Motivation Inc. and is accommodating, input into hiring decisions, etc. widely known as a speaker and trainer in leadership, strategic planning and executive education, goal setMake them feel like they are part of the system.

ting, management and communications. Contact him at bill@intelligent motivationinc.com or 570-430-9303.


PERSONNEL FILE ACTiOn LiFT inC.

Chris Moore has been appointed Warehouse Solutions manager at Action Lift Inc., a locally-owned materials handling equipment supplier based in Pittston. Moorehas been with the company more than 17 years, most recently as the allied sales representative. Through his skill and expertise, Action Lift has seen continued growth in the warehouse solutions division. Chris will manage the sales team in their efforts to expand warehouse solutions, including allied products and commercial dock and door busiMoore ness opportunities.

BArry iSETT & ASSOCiATES

Barry Isett & Associates Inc., a multidiscipline engineering firm with offices in Hazleton and WilkesBarre, has hired new associates within the departments of project management and construction services (PMCS); mechanical, electric, and plumbing (MEP); and structural engineering. William “Bill” Leitner, of Bethlehem, joined the PMCS group as a full-time associate following graduation from Northampton Community College’s construction management program. He previously Leitner worked with Isett as an intern in the PMCS and Special Inspections departments. Prior to his experience with Isett, Leitner served in the U.S. Air Force for more than five years. In the past year, he worked as an engineer apprentice for the U.S. Air National Guard. In addition to his education at Northampton Community College, Leitner is currently studying toward an Zuidema associates in construction technology at Community College of the Air Force. He will graduate in spring 2017. Mark Zuidema, PE, has joined Isett’s MEP department. After graduating from Pennsylvania State University in 2010, Zuidema pursued mechanical engineering with Aecom Technology in Arlington, Virginia. PreviPeiffer ous to Isett, Zuidema served as a mechanical engineer for Precis Engineering in Ambler, Pennsylvania. His background focuses on HVAC system design, the design of mechanical, electrical, and structural systems, and construction management. Zuidema holds a B.S. in architectural engineering with a minor in architecture. John Peiffer, PE, was hired as a senior project manager within the structural department. His experience in the field extends over 10 years, with work largely performed in Colorado and Wyoming. Before returning to Pennsylvania, he was employed at Martin/Martin Consulting Engineers, of Lakewood, Colorado, as a structural project engineer. John holds a B.S. in mechanical engineering from Pennsylvania State University and a master of engineering from Rensselaier Polytechnic Institute. In more recent years, he attended University of Wyoming

where he earned a B.S. in architectural engineering and a M.S. in Civil Engineering. Visit barryisett.com.

GirL SCOuTS in THE HEArT OF PEnnSyLVAniA

Valerie Whyman, Williamsport, was appointed major gifts officer, Girl Scouts in the Heart of Pennsylvania. Whyman raises essential support to build girls of courage, confidence and character who make the world a better place throughout a 21-county area in Central and Northeast Pennsylvania, which includes: Carbon, Centre, Clinton, Columbia, Huntingdon, Juniata, Lackawanna, Luzerne, Lycoming, Mifflin, Montour, Monroe, Northumberland, Pike, Schuylkill, Snyder, Sullivan, Susquehanna, Union, Wayne and Wyoming counties. She brings more than 30 years experience in fundraising and education to GSHPA. Girl Scouts in the Heart of Pennsylvania serves over 17,000 girls in 30 counties in central and northeastern Pennsylvania. GSHPA’s mission is to build girls of courage, confidence and character who make the world a better place. Girls in grades K-12 are welcome, as well as adults interested in volunteering. For more information visitgshpa.org or call 1-800-692-7816.

JOyCE inSurAnCE GrOuP

Joyce Insurance Group, a Pittston-based insurance agency, hired A.J. deLucca to its commercial business team. DeLucca a graduate of King’s College, earned a bachelor’s degree in business administration. Following graduation, he began his insurance career at GUARD Insurance Group, Wilkes-Barre He spent more than 10 years at GUARD serving as an in-house marketing representative and then as a field representative servicing DeLucca agencies in PA, NJ, DE, and NY. He received his property and casualty insurance license and has been a producer for the past five years. Visit joyceinsurance.com.

MOTOrWOrLd ACurA

Philip Verini, a senior sales and leasing consultant with MotorWorld Acura, Wilkes-Barre, was recently awarded Gold Master Status in the 2016 Acura Council of Sales Excellence. The Acura Division of American Honda Motor Co., Inc., named Philip Verini as one of its top sales consultants in the nation for providing outstanding care and sales solutions to his clients. Philip Verini was one of 115 sales consultants to earn this high honor. More than 2,000 Acura sales consultants participated in the program. Verini Acura — known for its precision crafted performance vehicles — annually recognizes extraordinary performers from across the nation that reflect exceptional performance in the areas of sales, client treatment, and professional development. To achieve Gold Master Status, Verini achieved Gold status for three consecutive years and earned membership in the Council of Sales Excellence with Acura which is a rare achievement. Verini is a valued team member at MotorWorld where he serves area Acura owners.

TOByHAnnA ArMy dEPOT

Christopher Brooks is chief of the Information Man-

agement Division at Tobyhanna Army Depot. He supervises employees who provide information management/information technology services for the depot. Prior to his current position, Brooks was the chief information officer for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Transatlantic Division in Virginia. Brooks He began his depot career in November. Brooks served more than five years in the Air Force performing air transportation duties while stationed at installations in New Jersey, Saudi Arabia and Germany. His decorations include the Southwest Asia Service Medal. He is working toward a degree in information management-security. Stephen Audritsh is chief Audritsh of the Law Enforcement Branch here. As chief he supervises police and security guards responsible for the security of Tobyhanna Army Depot. Prior to his current position, Audritsh was the director for plans, training, mobilization and security for the U.S. Army Garrison, Okinawa, Japan. He began his depot career in December 2016. Audritsh served on active duty in the Army for 20 years, retiring in 1995. He spent nearly 29 years in Germany before taking an assignment at the former Fort McPherson/Gillem, Georgia, in 2004, and then assumed duties as director of operations in Japan in 2010. His awards and decorations include the Commendation Medal, Achievement Medal, Noncommissioned Officer Professional Development Ribbon, Good Conduct Medal, Overseas Service Ribbon, Superior Civilian Service Award, two Commander’s Award for Civilian Service, and Civilian Achievement Medal.

WyOMinG VALLEy CHiLdrEn’S ASSOCiATiOn

The Wyoming Valley Children’s Association will honor Edward W. Stanks. Jr., C.P.A. with the 2017 “Making A Difference” award for his continued support of the WVCA kids. The award will be presented at the Wyoming Valley Children’s Association’s “Gala in Wonderland” on Saturday May 13 at the Woodlands Inn and Resort, Wilkes-Barre. All proceeds benefit the WVCA kids. Stanks was born and raised in Kingston, He graduated in 1975 from King’s College with a B.A. in accounting. He has worked as a C.P.A. for more than 37 years for a variety of clients and comStanks panies, from Coopers & Lybrand (now Price Waterhouse Coopers) to the local accounting firm of Baron, Strassman, & Co. (now Kronick, Kalada, Berdy & Co., P.C.) He has served as the treasurer of the Wyoming Valley Children’s Association Board for 15 years and has given countless hours of his time to help the WVCA kids. Tickets for the event are available at $125 per person. For questions or sponsorship information, call WVCA at 570-714-1246 or email info@wvcakids.org. WVCA is a non-profit organization that provides early childhood education programs to ensure the greatest development potential of all children. Visit wvcakids.org.

ESSA BAnk &TruST

Peter Gray, executive vice president of ESSA Bank & Trust was appointed director of Strategic Initiatives. Prior to joining ESSA, Gray served as senior vice president and market president at BB&T, with responsibility for five counties in Pennsylvania. Gray joins ESSA with more than 29 years of banking experience in a variety of capacities including credit administration, commercial and retail banking, wealth management and treasury management. At ESSA, he will focus on various strategic initiatives aligned with growth objectives Gray earned his bachelor’s degree from Kutztown University and an MBA in corporate finance from Fairleigh Dickinson University. Active in the community he currently serves on the board of directors at the Greater Lehigh Valley Chamber of Commerce, the State Theatre of Easton and DeSales University. ESSA Bancorp Inc. stock trades on the NASDAQ Global Market (SM) under the symbol “ESSA.” Lisa A. Hutchins, ESSA Bank & Trust vice president, commercial lending manager was named as an honoree for the 2017 Women of Influence Awards. Among other accolades, Lisa was selected for her work in leading the bank’s initiative to expand its commercial loan and commercial services presence throughout Eastern Pennsylvania. As part of this strategy, Hutchins recently helped open a new limited-purpose regional office serving suburban Philadelphia. The new Plymouth Meeting location serves small business and Hutchins middle-market companies with a broad array of business focused products and services.The Women of Influence Awards honor female business leaders for their contributions to their companies, industries, and communities. Winners were selected by an independent panel of judges for their solid reputation based on experience, integrity, leadership, and proven track record of accomplishments. The award program is presented by Cedar Crest College.

FidELiTy BAnk

Jill Marie Valentini, retail branch manager of the Fidelity Bank, Green Ridge ofice was presented with the award for “2017 Fidelity Banker of the Year,” by Fidelity Bank president & CEO, Daniel J. Santaniello who said she was chosen by her peers in the bank because she exemplifies the bank’s core values: Relationships, Integrity, Commitment, Passion, Innovation and Success. These values represent our foundation for success and represent the standards we have set for how the bank gives back to its employees, customers, shareholdValentini ers and the community.” Valentini has been with Fidelity Bank since 2008 where she served as teller services supervisor as well as assistant branch manager at both the Abington and Green Ridge offices before she assumed her current position. Valentini is a graduate of the Leadership Lackawanna, Class of 2015 and currently serves on their executive board. She is also a graduate of Penn State University. Two other bankers were also honored for their excellence and outstanding performance. kristin Grow, Fidelity Bank customer care center manager received the “2017 Outstanding Customer Service Partner” Award and June A. Capooci, Customer Service Representative; Fidelity Bank Dunmore branch was honored with the “2017 Excellence in Customer Service” Award.

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PERSONNEL FILE EDUCATION

BUSINESS NOTES

cognition and development fom Rutgers University, New Brunswick, New Jersey. Visit misericordia.edu/slp.

Kings College

Dr. William irwin, Herve A. LeBlanc Distinguished Service Professor and chair of the Philosophy Department at King’s College, was recently the subject of an author-meets-critics-session for his book, “The Free Market Existentialist: Capitalism without Consumerism,” at the Central Division Meeting of the American Philosophical Association meeting in Kansas City. The book was published in 2015 by WileyBlackwell. Irwin’s first novel, “Free Dakota,” was published in June by Roundfire books. A Irwin professor at King’s since 1996, Irwin currently teaches courses on aesthetics, eastern philosophy, existentialism and phenomenology, among others. Irwin is series editor of “The Blackwell Philosophy and Pop Culture Series,” former series editor of Open Court’s “Popular Culture and Philosophy” series and the author of numerous articles on popular cultural topics.

WilKes University

amber Flynn, of Exeter, received the 2017 Outstanding Adult Learner Award for Wilkes University at the Luzerne County Council on Adult Higher Education dinner on March 20, 2017. Flynn joined the accelerated bachelor of business administration at Wilkes University in 2015. She will complete her business degree along with a sustainability management certificate in the spring 2017 semester. Flynn maintained a 3.4 grade-point average throughout her studies. Flynn is a full-time student, mother of two children and wife of a Pennsylvania State Police officer. Flynn never missed an opportunity to bring her children with her to Wilkes to show them the importance of education, regardless of age.

MiseriCorDia University

abriel r. McCann of Swoyersville, a speech-language pathology graduate student at Misericordia University, was awarded the 2017 Von Drach Memorial Scholarship by the Pennsylvania SpeechLanguage-Hearing Association (PSHA) at the 58th annual Convention in Harrisburg.Misericordia University SLP students have received nine out of the last 10 Von Drach scholarships awards. The prestigious award is presented annually to an outstanding student from one of the state’s 14 SLP schools in McCann honor of Dr. Robert Von Drach. Recipients are students who exhibit strong leadership abilities, outstanding academic performance, exceptional clinical skills, and scholarship within the profession. McCann’s journey into the specialty field of communicative sciences and disorders began during her senior year in high school when she saw the emotional toll bullying and teasing had on her young cousin because he stuttered. Visit misericordia.edu/slp. ellen Mclaughlin, ed.D., o.t.r./l., B.C.P., associate professor of occupational therapy at Misericordia University, was appointed to the American Occupational Therapy Association’s (AOTA) Roster of Fellows which recognizes members of AOTA who have used their knowledge and expertise to make a significant contribution to the continuing education and professional development of members of the association. McLaughlin is the director of the doctoral program in occupational therapy. She McLaughlin joined the program in 1990 as an assistant professor. During her career at Misericordia University, she has served as associate division chair of health sciences, chair of the Department of Occupational Therapy and interim dean of the College of Health Sciences. She earned her bachelor’s and master’s degrees in occupational therapy from Misericordia University, and a doctorate in learning,

HigHMarK

From left: Amber Flynn, Karen Alessi, assistant director of Wilkes University’s MBA program and Abel Adekola, dean of Wilkes University’s Jay S. Sidhu School of Business and Leadership.

HEALTHCARE

geisinger HealtH systeM

laurie gwen Campfield, D.o., has joined Geisinger Mt. Pleasant as a pediatrician providing care for children from infancy to 18. Board certified in pediatrics, Campfield specializes in preventive care and wellness, routine primary care and acute illnesses. She earned her medical degree from Philadelphia College of Osteopathic Medicine and completed a pediatric residency at University Hospital at Stony Brook, New York. Prior to joining Geisinger, Campfield served as attending physician at KidsCare Pediatric Medicine, P.C., in Selden, New York. She is a Fellow of the American Academy of Pediatrics. Campfield sees patients at Geisinger Mt. Pleasant in Scranton. Call the physician and services referral line, for an appointment, at 844-703-4262. Brian Campfield, M.D., has joined Geisinger Community Medical Center (GCMC) as an orthopedic trauma surgeon. A fellowship-trained surgeon, Campfield’s specialties include traumatic orthopedic injuries, pelvic and acetabular fractures, complex fractures and reconstruction of the extremities, including surgical fracture care for patients of the hospital’s Level II trauma center. He also accepts patient referrals for acute traumatic orthopaedic conditions, as well as patients needing late reconstruction and procedures. He also treats limb deformities, as well as extremity fractures and infections that do not heal properly. Campfield earned his medical degree from the Temple University School of Medicine, Philadelphia. He

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completed an orthopaedic surgical residency at Stony Brook University Medical Center, Stony Brook, New York, and a fellowship in orthopaedic trauma at the University of Missouri, Columbia. Call the physician and services referral line, for an appointment, at 844-703-GCMC (4262). glen David Digwood, D.o., has recently joined Geisinger Northeast as the medical director of palliative care. In his role, Digwood will lead a team of two physicians, two nurse practitioners and one physician assistant, overseeing palliative care programs at both Geisinger Community Medical Center (GCMC) in Scranton and Geisinger Wyoming Valley (GWV) in Wilkes-Barre. Palliative care focuses on relieving pain and other symptoms for seriously ill patients. Unlike hospice care, palliative care begins while a patient is undergoing active treatments for a medical illness, regardless of stage of the disease or the patient’s age. Geisinger’s palliative care team provides care to patients at their home, in the hospital, or in inpatient short or long-term care facilities, as well as coordinates care with other providers to support the overall comfort and well-being of the patient and their loved ones. Board-certified in hospice and palliative medicine, as well as internal medicine, Digwood earned his doctor of osteopathic medicine from Lake Erie College of Osteopathic Medicine. He then completed an internal medicine residency at Scranton-Temple Residency Program, and a hospice and palliative medicine fellowship at North Shore University Hospital, Manhasset, New York. Digwood also serves as assistant professor of medicine at the Geisinger Commonwealth School of Medicine. To schedule an appointment with Dr. Digwood or another palliative care specialist, call 570-703-7351.

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Highmark has announced the appointment of Kathleen K. McKenzie to oversee its corporate grants management, community programs and employee volunteerism for central Pennsylvania, the Lehigh Valley and northeastern Pennsylvania. McKenzie was most recently based in Pittsburgh as vice president of Community and Civic Affairs for Highmark, where she was responsible for the functional integration and alignment of Allegheny Health Network’s community affairs McKenzie division into parent organization Highmark Health. She began her career with Highmark in March of 2011 as the vice president of Community and Civic Affairs at Allegheny Health Network and provided strategic management of civic and community relations as a key system leader representing the hospital network’s external interests. Prior to joining Highmark, McKenzie served as Allegheny County Deputy Manager, where she was responsible for the supervision and administration of the county’s operations and the major policy initiatives of the county chief executive. She completed a B.A. in government and law from Lafayette College and received her Juris Doctor from the University of Pittsburgh School of Law.

BUSINESS NOTES

a. Pickett Construction inc. will hold its 23rd annual golf classic on Friday, June 9 at Fox Hill Country Club in Exeter. All money raised will be donated to St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital. Over the past 22 years the company has raised more than $248,000 for fighting all forms of cancer. A. Pickett Construction Inc. thanks everyone who helped in the past. Lunch will be served, and refreshments will be provided throughout the afternoon,

From left: Angela Solano, Attorney John Moses, Joe Solano, Jennifer Hilla, James Solano, Kim Gill, Katelyn Evanick, Dee Solano, Marge Deewees and Robert Obuhosky. as well as a buffet dinner in the evening. Gifts and prizes will be distributed. If interested in participating, contact 570-283-2057. Commonwealth Health has launched a new website that streamlines the process for individuals applying for nursing positions and provides more detail regarding openings at its six hospitals. The new site, CommonwealthHealthNurses.com, supports the health care network’s aggressive recruitment effort launched in February. The hospitals affiliated with Commonwealth Health have begun a multi-county recruitment campaign with the goal of hiring approximately 160 registered nurses and additional support staff this year. The website allows potential applicants to click on an “I’m Interested” tab that encourages them to fill out a form expressing their interest in specific hospital positions. Once applicants submit their interest and/or resumes via the “I’m interested” button, Commonwealth Health promises a prompt response. The hiring managers will reach out to the applicants directly in the method they have indicated, either by phone or email. Commonwealth Health is seeking registered nurses in all specialties and at all experience levels, from graduate nurses to experienced clinicians. Positions will be filled at Berwick Hospital Center, First Hospital, Moses Taylor Hospital, Regional Hospital of Scranton, Tyler Memorial Hospital and Wilkes-Barre General Hospital. Key areas are the emergency department, intensive and critical care, medical/surgical and behavioral health. Hospitals in the health network also are hiring other clinical and nonclinical support staff including licensed practical nurses and nurse’s aides. Each hospital within the health care network offers competitive wages and a benefit package that includes tuition assistance, retirement plan contributions, professional support and opportunities for advancement. To apply for a job at Commonwealth Health, go to: CommonwealthHealthNurses.com Community Bank representatives Robert Matley, and Barbara Toczko Maculloch recently visited Wyoming valley Children’s association (WVCA) to present the school with a $5,000 donation through the Educational Improvement Tax Credit Program. WVCA is a non-profit organization offering early childhood education programs to nurture the development potential of all children. Community Bank, N.A. offers personal banking, business banking, and wealth management services with several locations throughout New York and Pennsylvania. The PA Educational Improvement Tax Credit (EITC) is administered by the Department of Community and Economic Development (the Department). Tax credits may be awarded to operating business firms that make contributions to Scholarship Organizations and/ or Educational Improvement Organizations and/or Pre-K


BUSINESS NOTES Scholarship Organizations contained on a list published by the Department. East Stroudsburg University of Pennsylvania and Lehigh Carbon Community College have signed a dual admission agreement to create a smooth transfer of credits for students who are coming to ESU from Lehigh Carbon Community College with an associates degree. Lehigh Carbon Community College students will be required to complete a dual admissions intent form with their application to ESU for consideration. Students must graduate from Lehigh Carbon Community College with an associates degree and a minimum grade point average of 2.0. A full-time student who has completed the appropriate associates degree program at Lehigh Carbon Community College may be able to complete a bachelor’s degree at ESU within four regular semesters. ESU has established dual admission agreements designed to ensure seamless enrollment from an associates degree program at a partnered community college into a parallel bachelor’s degree program at East Stroudsburg University. Lehigh Carbon joins Montgomery County Community College, Bucks County Community College, Luzerne County Community College and Northampton Community College as partner schools of ESU’s Dual Admissions agreement program. Contact 570-422- 3834 for more information.

At the check presentation in front from left are WVCA students Ryan Latoski, Jacek Grad, Cole Venegas and Alex Bellanca. In back are Linda Meshinski, First Keystone Community Bank, James Gorman, First Keystone Community Bank, Amanda Pernot WVCA teacher and Teresa Romano, WVCA director of education and therapy services, holding WVCA student Amelia Zukauskas. First Keystone Community Bank representatives James Gorman, senior vice president and market manager and Linda Meshinski, assistant vice president and community office manager, recently visited the kids at the Wyoming Valley Children’s Association (WVCA), Forty Fort, to present the school with a $2,000 donation through the Educational Improvement Tax Credit Program. WVCA is a non-profit organization offering early childhood education programs to nurture the development potential of all children. Visit wvcakids.org. First Keystone Community Bank (FKYS.ob), has been owned and operated by local men and women since 1864. The PA Educational Improvement Tax Credit (EITC) is administered by the Department of Community and Economic Development (the Department). Tax credits may be awarded to operating business firms that make contributions to Scholarship Organizations and/or Educational Improvement Organizations and/or Pre-K Scholarship Organizations contained on a list published by the Department.

More than 250 business, health care and community leaders gathered on April 8 at the Westmoreland Club in Wilkes-Barre to fight heart disease and stroke at the annual Northeast PA Heart Ball. The Fire and Ice themed gala raised more than $177,000 for the American Heart Association. Commonwealth Health has been the top fundraising organization for the Heart Walk since 2005 and has raised over $100,000 in recent years for the American Heart Association. The evening’s Open Your Heart appeal featured the story of Andrea and Matt Grotzinger of Clarks Summit who gave birth to their first child, Vienna, on Jan. 3, 2016, who was diagnosed with hypoplastic left heart syndrome, a critical congenital heart defect. Vienna died on January 6. In Vienna’s memory, the Grotzinger’s organized a team of over 100 family and friends for the 2016 Northeast PA Heart Walk. In their first year, the Sparkles for Vienna team was the top fundraising community team at the walk. The Grotzinger’s and Sparkles for Vienna team will be returning to the Heart Walk on April 29 this year, this time with their new baby, Jack, born in February. More than $14,890 was raised in personal gifts as high as $2,500 during the Open Your Heart appeal. The Northeast PA Heart Ball is sponsored locally by Commonwealth Health, Geisinger, Wells Fargo, Lehigh Valley Health Network, Highmark, McCarthy Tire Service, Mericle Commercial Real Estate, Metz Culinary Management, North American Partners in Anesthesia, Xanitos Inc., UGI Utilities Inc. and Vision Imaging. Applications are now available for Leadership Lackawanna’s Tomorrow’s Leaders Today Program Class of 2018.The seven-month Tomorrow’s Leaders Today program develops the leadership, interpersonal and managerial skills of high school juniors and provides realworld experiences in the areas of philanthropy, non-profit organizations and community service. In addition to the skills learned and topics explored, the opportunities and challenges of northeastern Pennsylvania are discussed as participants network with community leaders and other high school students. Sessions are held one full weekday each month. Applications from sophomores who attend high school in Lackawanna County or in the Lackawanna Trail and Western Wayne school districts are due no later than 4 p.m. on Wednesday, May 31. Monroe County Habitat for Humanity (MCHFH) is holding its first annual She Nailed It! event on Thursday July 27 at 4 p.m. at MemoryTownUSA, 432 Grange Road, Mount Pocono.The event puts teams of four women in a nail-hammering competition to help MCHFH continue to work toward its vision of everyone in Monroe County having a safe, decent place to live. Area businesses are invited to sponsor a team of four women from their organizations and fundraise with family and friends. Visit HabitatMC.org/She-Nailed-It. The Northeastern Pennsylvania Alliance (NEPA) presented The Scranton School for Deaf & Hard of Hearing Children with a $25,000 Appalachian Regional Commission (ARC) grant. NEPA, in coordination with Pennsylvania Department of Community and Economic Development, assisted The Scranton School in preparation of the grant and recommended the project to ARC for approval. The goal of this project was to enhance technology to meet the unique and individual needs of The Scranton School’s students. The $25,000 grant, combined with $25,000 in matching funds from The Margaret Briggs Foundation, was used to purchase SMART panels, specialized lighting, computers, drone, and editing software that allows deaf and hard of hearing children to improve their skills using technology, expressive communication skills using American Sign Language, Sign-Supported English and Spoken English.

The internal medicine practice of Philip Gutherz, M.D. has become part of Wayne Memorial Community Health Centers (WMCHC), a multi-specialty network of physician offices located throughout Wayne, Pike and Lackawanna counties. Gutherz will continue to see patients in his current office at 600 Maple Ave., Suite13, in the Stourbridge Professional Complex. The practice, established in 1987 and now seeing 3,000 visits annually, will be renamed Gutherz Family Health Center. “Patients won’t Gutherz experience any change in their care,” stated Frederick Jackson, executive director, WMCHC. With the acquisition of Gutherz’s practice, WMCHC will increase its footprint of primary care office sites from nine locations to 10. WMCHC also offers women’s health, dental and behavioral health services, as well as specialties including surgery, cardiology, pulmonary & sleep medicine and neurology. Visit wmh.org/WMCHC or call 570-253-8390.

From left: Karyn Reilly, Reilly Associates; state Rep. Mike Carroll; Tom Reilly, Reilly Associates; Bob Durkin, president, The Greater Scranton Chamber of Commerce; Lackawanna County Commissioner Patrick O’Malley; Tom Reilly, Jr., Reilly Associates; Scranton Mayor Bill Courtright; Joseph Durkin, Reilly Associates; Ken Okrepkie, board chair, SLIBCO; Kristin Magnotta, regional manager, Northeast Pa. office of U.S. Sen. Bob Casey; state Rep. Sid Kavulich; and Larry West, regional director, office of state Sen. John Blake. Reilly Associates, a multidisciplinary engineering, surveying and construction services firm, opened its new Lackawanna County office today at the Scranton Enterprise Center, 201 Lackawanna Avenue. The Pittstonbased company provides a variety of site, civil and municipal engineering services, including roadway design, utility design, water and waste water design, transportation and bridge design, traffic analysis and design, landscape architecture and planning and structural design, as well as construction administration and inspection services. “We made the decision to expand in downtown Scranton in order to more readily respond to our clients in the Scranton area,” said Tom Reilly Jr., president and principal engineer at Reilly Associates. Reilly Associates will occupy suites 309 and 310 in the Scranton Enterprise Center. “The Greater Scranton Chamber of Commerce is excited to welcome Reilly Associates into the Scranton Enterprise Center and downtown Scranton,” said Aaron Whitney, facilities manager. “Reilly Associates’ arrival in

Scranton supports the resurgence of the downtown and the Chamber’s efforts in growing our community.

The University of Scranton’s master’s in health administration (MHA) program ranked No. 1 in the nation for full-time enrolled students in a list published by Modern Healthcare, a health care business weekly magazine. Scranton, with 153 full-time students, was the only Pennsylvania school in the ranking of just 26 U.S. colleges. Two other Jesuit schools were ranked: Xavier University at No. 13 and Georgetown University at No. 15. The ranking is based on information reported in Modern Healthcare’s 2017 Master’s Programs in Health Administration Survey and was published in its March 27 issue. The University’s graduate health administration program is accredited by the Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Management Education (CAHME). The program is based on Healthcare Leadership Competencies and provides students with a comprehensive, practical and interdisciplinary set of core competencies, knowledge, skills and values for health-administration jobs in a variety of health organizations. The program emphasizes applied research, publications and presentations and strives to satisfy the interests of multiple stakeholders while reflecting Jesuit ideals. Wells Fargo Bank has made a gift to the F.M. Kirby Center for the Performing Arts as part of its Wells Fargo Concert and Comedy Series commitment for 2017. This gift will support the Kirby Center’s Young People’s Theater Series, which is a key focus in the venue’s Arts and Education program. As the arts continue to be cut, or eliminated from local curriculums, the Kirby Center remains steadfast in bringing the arts to students and students to the arts. The Young People’s Theater Series provides students in the community with national, touring productions that are both entertaining and educational, and that enrich the lives of area youth and underserved populations. The series is offered free of charge, and each performance comes with its own study guide that brings the lesson from the stage into the classroom. For more information about giving to the Kirby Center contact Lauren Pluskey, director of development at 570-8234599, ext. 234.

From left: Douglas Iracki, business development officer and assistant vice president, Wells Fargo, Lauren Pluskey McLain, director of development, F.M. Kirby Center; Kevin Engelman, district manager and assistant vice president, Wells Fargo, Will Beekman, executive director, F.M. Kirby Center, Greg Collins, area president and senior vice president, Wells Fargo; and Joell Yarmel, membership and corporate sponsorship manager, F.M. Kirby Center.

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FOR THE RECORD DEEDs

Columbia County

Gartek Holdings llC. Property Location: Berwick. Seller: First Columbia Bank & Trust Co. Price: $152,000. landmark Signature Homes llC. Property Location: Bloomsburg. Seller: Arvi Realty LLC. Price: $625,000. ason a mcWilliams and Stephanie a Crawford. Property Location: Bloomsburg. Seller: N.D. LLC. Price: $38,500. Jax-n-mas llC. Property Location: Berwick. Seller: Philip Romeo. Price: $95,000. RFF Partners lP. 2 properties Property Location: Locust Township and Cleveland Township. Seller: Nathan C. and Melissa S. Richard. Price: $406,789.29 and $422,763.30 respectively. Veterans affairs. Property Location: Mifflin Township. Seller: Wells Fargo Bank. Price: $10 f-m-v $81,892.17. SKG Housing llC. Property Location: Bloomsburg. Seller: United Way of Columbia County. Price: $41,000. Veterans affairs. Property Location: North Centre Township. Seller: Wells Fargo Bank. Price: $1 f-m-v $189,964.89. may’s Rentals llC. Property Location: Berwick. Seller: Ryan A. Guyer. Price: $58,000. Devon St Clair. Property Location: Pine Township. Seller: Pine Summit Methodist Church. Price: $23,487.92. Secretary of Housing and urban Development. Property Location: Berwick. Seller: Embrace Home Loan Inc. Price: $1 f-m-v $98,467.65. ballyogan Properties llC. Property Location: Hemlock Township. Seller: Estate of Harry J. Fullmer. Price: $59,000. Duane W and tracey R. Fisher. Property Location: Briarcreek Townsip. Seller: George A. and Carol M. Masich. Price: $375,000. laSalle Renewal lP. Property Location: Berwick. Seller: Bernard Digirolamo. Price: $42,000. GRSW Real Estate. Property Location: Scott Township. Seller: Christopher and Karen Davis. Price: $239,500. Fiorangelo Spezialetti. Property Location: Berwick. Seller: U.S. Bank. Price: $27,000. Elise l Paisley. Property Location: Scott Township. Seller: Shaffer Hollow Investing LLC. Price: $158,500. Carl R Slater Jr. Property Location: Madison Township. Seller: Alfred H. and Sharon M. Pfeiffer. Price: $914,976. textile Properties llC. Property Location: Berwick. Seller: Frank D. and Georgene L. Stenke. Price: $301,000.

laCKaWanna County

John Fofi. Property Location: Carbondale Twp. Seller: Gregory Opalka. Price: $308,500. little acres learning academy inc. Property Location: Covington Twp. Seller: Amazing Grace Bible Baptist Church. Price: $295,000. Jesse a lord. Property Location: Dalton Boro. Seller: Milissa S. Lord. Price: $410,000. Christopher Schank. Property Location: Dunmore Boro. Seller: EE Property Mgt. LLC. Price: $285,000. Clairvaux institute. Property Location: Elmhurst Twp. Seller: Priestly Fraternity of Saint Peter Inc. Price: $1,100,000. Chad Wheeler. Property Location: Madison Twp. Seller: Sally Doll. Price: $250,000. Robert n Demeck. Property Location: Moscow Boro. Seller: Scott Staniszewski. Price: $400,000. Cherry Scranton lP. Property Location: Scranton City. Seller: Ledd Realdy. Price: $545,000. Rudin lP. Property Location: Scranton City. Seller: Teamsters Holding Company LLC. Price: $650,000. Rudin lP. Property Location: Scranton City. Seller: Teamsters Holding Company LLC. Price: $2,300,000. James mcnally. Property Location: Scranton City. Seller: Patrick R. McMullen. Price: $285,000. montage mountain Hospitality llC. Property Location: Scranton City. Seller: Vikat Montage LLC. Price: $5,300,000.

Pertinacity llC. Property Location: Scranton City. Seller: 119 Jefferson Assoc. LLC. Price: $1,250,000. PJm management Services i llC. Property Location: So. Abington Twp. Seller: Boston Land Company Inc. Price: $327,000. marie Eastman. Property Location: So. Abington Twp. Seller: Boston Land Company Inc. Price: $250,000. Samuel Senuk. Property Location: So. Abington Twp. Seller: Wayne M. Snyder. Price: $275,000. Donald H Ryan. Property Location: So. Abington Twp. Seller: Boston Land Company Inc. Price: $258,000. John androski. Property Location: So. Abington Twp. Seller: Boston Land Company Inc. Price: $327,000. Gary a myers. Property Location: So. Abington Twp.. Seller: Gary A. Myers. Price: $535,500. Etikala Praveen Reddy. Property Location: So. Abington Twp. Seller: Weichert Workforce Mobility Inc. Price: $535,500. Frank D beier. Property Location: So. Abington Twp. Seller: Mary Ann Labas. Price: $265,000. blu Wasabi llC. Property Location: So. Abington Twp. Seller: Its Amore Corp. Price: $1,600,000. michelle Kaminski. Property Location: So. Abington Twp. Seller: Edith Stephens. Price: $250,000. moriah Quinn Peters. Property Location: So. Abington Twp. Seller: Anthony J. Quinn. Price: $350,000. Scott Krisiak. Property Location: Unknown. Seller: Leo Zini. Price: $286,900. Paul Edward Jones. Property Location: Unknown. Seller: Neil R. Holland. Price: $385,000. triple J Sisters llC. Property Location: Unknown. Seller: Eugene M. Barrett. Price: $375,000. Stacy lynn Erickson. Property Location: Unknown. Seller: Ronald E. Siniegocki. Price: $477,500. Dana Krenitsky. Property Location: Unknown. Seller: Shah Rahmat. Price: $385,000.

luZERnE County

Elaine m Carrero. Property Location: Hazle Twp. Seller: Francis P. Pellegrino Jr. Price: $275,000. Valley CC llC. Property Location: Sugerloaf Twp. Seller: Valley Country Club. Price: $1,629,481.67. lD3 Holdings llC. Property Location: Hazleton City. Seller: Carolyn Boyer Dryfoos. Price: $260,000. myron y Prawak. Property Location: Dallas Boro. Seller: Mary S. Randolph Revocable Trust. Price: $900,000. timothy b Ebbitt. Property Location: Kingston Twp. Seller: Myron Prawak. Price: $650,000. arthur J Howe Jr Property location: Wyoming boro. Seller: Robert Trottini. Price: $275,000. Rebecca i Kimpel. Property Location: Kingston Boro. Seller: Jay Arlen Goldwein. Price: $250,000. Vipander bhatti. Property Location: Fairview Twp. Seller: David L. Smith. Price: $280,000. Shawn E Rose. Property Location: Fairview Twp. Seller: Raymond P. McGlynn. Price: $340,000. Kevin n Kosakowski. Property Location: Bear Creek Twp. Seller: Robyn L. Ryan. Price: $288,400. Halbing Entrerprises llC. Property Location: Plains Twp. Seller: Luzerne Products Inc. Price: $2,200,000. morington Commercial Properties llC. Property Location: Kingston Boro. Seller: FNCB Bank. Price: $815,000. mary E Cornell. Property Location: Fairview Twp. Seller: Mary E. Cornell. Price: $379,000. alba Properties llC. Property Location: Kingston Boro. Seller: Stellar Machine Inc. Price: $300,000.

monRoE County

Dmitry Petrovski. Property location: Tobyhanna Township. Seller: Lech Sawicki and Malgorzata SiekierskaSawicki. Price: $330,000. Christian and Christina Peters. Property location:

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Tobyhanna Township. Seller: Mystic Hill Properties LLC. Price: $965,000. aastha Real Estate investments llC. Property location: Coolbaugh Township. Seller: Beverly Lyons. Price: $115,000. Stangl Property llC. Property location: Ross Township. Seller: LSF9 Master Participation Trust. Price: $59,900. toolsie and Samwatee Seepersad. Property location: Price Township. Seller: LTS Homes LLC. Price: $340,000. atD Park Slope llC. Property location: Chestnuthill Township. Seller: Bank of America NA. Price: $69,900. Jbb associates llC. Property location: Smithfield Township. Seller: US Bank NA. Price: $119,700. Canadensis land lP. Property location: Barrett Township. Seller: Lisa Dash. Price: $105,000. lGJ Real Estate llC. Property location: Ross Township. Seller: Professional Wall-Coverings Inc. Price: $74,000. anthony and Stephanie Favale. Property location: Hamilton Township. Seller: Edward and Melissa Garrett. Price: $390,000. Juan Cordero. Property location: Middle Smithfield Township. Seller: DE&S Properties Inc. T/A Classic Quality Homes. Price: $337,000. angalina Camacho. Property location: Barrett Township. Seller: Castaldo Vasapolli Estate, John Ragano (exr.). Price: $392,000. Shuk inc. Property location: Coolbaugh Township. Seller: Filippo Investments LLC. Price: $185,000. Hakem and Wanda Siryani. Property location: Middle Smithfield Township. Seller: Northeast Investors Group Inc. Price: $300,000. Kopelson Pa Properties iV llC. Property location: Pocono Township. Seller: Sheldon Kopelson Living Trust. Price: $1. Tax basis: $379,724. V&b Enterprise llC. Property location: Barrett Township. Seller: Mary Martin. Price: $425,000. Dorothy lemon. Property location: Tobyhanna Township. Seller: DE&S Properties Inc. T/A Classic Quality Homes. Price: $320,000. mark and linda Ross. Property location: Middle Smithfield Township. Seller: Christopher Baj and Mia Darling-Baj. Price: $325,000. Robert and Christina tobin. Property location: Paradise Township. Seller: Eleanor Nicolosi Family Trust, Cheryl Billingsley (trus.). Price: $310,000. bad boys for life llC. Property location: Middle Smithfield Township. Seller: Slice of Life LLC. Price: $76,000. JalC llC. Property location: Hamilton Township. Seller: Wells Fargo Bank NA. Price: $151,000. Frederick Ruben and mary Reeves-Hoche. Property location: Barrett Township. Seller: Michael Walters. Price: $312,500. Karine Cambry. Property location: Chestnuthill Township. Seller: Superior Custom Homes Inc. Price: $355,000. nina Penny Prattis. Property location: Price Township. Seller: LTS Homes LLC. Price: $323,100. 66 moore Street llC. Property location: Barrett Township. Seller: Ann and Theodore Takvorian. Price: $1. Tax basis: $107,040. Pardees loop Property llC. Property location: Middle Smithfield Township. Seller: Lawrence Wills. Price: $120,000. alan and lauren Shelley. Property location: Tobyhanna Township. Seller: Rodger and Lauren McKinney. Price: $325,000. Christopher and marilyn moss. Property location: Tobyhanna Township. Seller: Brian and Kasey Nolan. Price: $307,000. lynch Corp. Property location: Coolbaugh Township. Seller: Township of Coolbaugh. Price: $1. Tax basis: $3,122. Gogia Properties llC. Property location: Middle Smithfield Township. Seller: Rohit, Panna and Nilam Shah. Price: $575,000. Sully 5 llC. Property location: Chestnuthill Township.

Seller: Northland Development Corp. Price: $373,300.

PiKE County

Harry Ekonomakos. Property Location: Delaware Twp. Seller: Thomas R. Liscinski. Price: $371,500. Robert Scanlon. Property Location: Delaware Twp. Seller: R. Hain Swope. Price: $294,000. Peter V oberstoetter. Property Location: Delaware Twp. Seller: Lawrence W. Kelley. Price: $450,000. nicholas m Parckys. Property Location: Dingman Twp. Seller: Katalin Jampol. Price: $256,880.+ Denise C Dutton. Property Location: Dingman Twp. Seller: Bruce G. Mihm. Price: $330,000. Paul ian Pochin. Property Location: Dingman Twp. Seller: Bernard F. Corvi Sr. Price: $300,000. thomas Patrick. Property Location: Dingman Twp. Seller: Milford West Development LLC. Price: $300,000. Christopher a Svitek. Property Location: Greene Twp. Seller: Grassie & Sons Inc. Price: $255,000. Robin levinton. Property Location: Lackawaxen Twp. Seller: The Jack J. Cireco 2011 Qualified Personal Resident Trust. Price: $370,000. Frank Vignola. Property Location: Lackawaxen Twp. Seller: David A. Curran. Price: $385,000. michele Digeso. Property Location: Milford Twp. Seller: Thomas J. Hodge III. Price: $340,000. the Conservative Fund. Property Location: Milford Twp. Seller: Delaware Valley School District. Price: $1,550,000. John R Hughes. Property Location: Palmyra Twp. Seller: Robert Hughes. Price: $725,000. lake Region Development iii llC. Property Location: Palmyra Twp. Seller: Paupack Property Management LLC. Price: $700,000. bartholomew tesoriero. Property Location: Shohola Twp. Seller: Eric Mansell. Price: $669,050. John a matthews. Property Location: Westfall Twp. Seller Rivers Edge LP. Price: $279,900. Pike County Environmental Enterprises Holding llC. Property Location: Westfall Twp. Seller: Pike County Environmental Inc. Price: $870,000.

SCHuylKill County

Genotpil llC.Property Location: Chestnut Street, Frackville. Seller: Donna Roman. Price: $39,000. Earl and tiffany Cresswell.Property Location: Orwigsburg. Seller: Samuel and Sheila (Cresswell) Yeager. Price:$355,000. terry and Stephanie Shaner.Property Location: Route 183, Wayne Township. Seller: Riverview Bank.Price: $282,000. Swan’s Haven #4 llC.Property Location: 302, 304 W 3rd St, Mt. Carmel. Seller: Brody Properties LLC. Price: $5,000. William marquardt. Property Location:760 High Road, Ashland. Seller: Abel Guzman. Price: $301,000. Robert W mcDonald.Property Location:Hegins Twp. Seller: Ruth Ann Artz. Price: $230,000. CaCl Federal Credit union.Property Location: Centre Turnpike, North Manheim Township. Seller: Price: $285,000.

WaynE County

Frank V Caccavo Jr. Property Location: Mt. Pleasant. Seller: Cathleen L. DeFeo. Price: $289,000. James C burkavage. Property Location: Texas. Seller: Robert P. Hichreither. Price: $310,000. Donald R Zintel. Property Location: Cherry Ridge. Seller: John E. Tuleya. Price: $267,500. augustin Saric. Property Location: Clinton. Seller: Diane Gerona. Price: $270,000. David n Zmijewski. Property Location: Buckingham. Seller: Charles J. Decristofaro. Price: $290,000. John C legge. Property Location: Paupack. Seller: Brian


FOR THE RECORD S. Oliver. Price: $310,000. Curt R Hogancamp. Property Location: Damascus. Seller: Gerald C. Crum. Price: $463,000. John Alexander Young. Property Location: Paupack. Seller: Carol E. Earle. Price: $260,000. Mark S DeWitt. Property Location: Paupack. Seller: Michael Tomichia. Price: $830,000.

WYOMING COUNTY

2426 Lackawanna LLC. Property Location: Nicholson Twp. Seller: WPX Energy Appalachia LLC. Price: $350,000. Ryan Alfieri. Property Location: Tunkhannock Boro. Seller: Joan U. Ryer. Price: $301,600. Indraloka Animal Sanctuary Inc. Property Location: Falls Twp. Seller: Robert F. Barnack. Price: $700,000.

MORTgagEs

COLUMbIA COUNTY

Gartek Holdings LLC. Property Location: Berwick. Lender: First Keystone Community Bank. Amount: $114,000. Marr Development Mulberry II LLC. Property Location: Berwick. Lender: First Columbia Bank & Trust Co. Amount: $448,000. Landmark Signature Homes LLC. Property Location: Bloomsburg. Lender: West Milton State Bank. Amount: $500,000. Indian River Property Holdings LLC. Property Location: Mifflin Township. Lender: Service 1st Federal Credit Union. Amount: $52,000. Emerson Equities LLC. Property Location: Briarcreek Township. Lender: First Columbia Bank & Trust Co. Amount: $160,000. John Clinton and Renee Rose Klingerman. Property Location: Montour Township. Lender: First National Bank of Pennsylvania. Amount: $735,000. Jax-N-Mas LLC. Property Location: Berwick. Lender: First Keystone Community Bank. Amount: $200,000. Stone Creek Cabins LLC. Property Location: Sugarloaf Township. Lender: Blauch Family Special Needs Trust. Amount: $125,000. NEPA Homes LLC. Property Location: Bloomsburg. Lender: Jeffrey Knorr. Amount: $20,000. Rarig Properties LLC. Property Location: Catawissa. Lender: First Columbia Bank & Trust Co. Amount: $165,000. Hamlin Shopping Plaza Inc. Property Location: Millville. Lender: Peoples Security Bank and Trust Company. Amount: $200,000. John D berger II. Property Location: Scott Township. 2 Mortgages Lender: Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems Inc. Amount: $397,500 respectively. St Luke Lutheran Church of Lightstreet. Property Location: Scott Township. Lender: First Columbia Bank & Trust Co. Amount: $950,000. Tatum Marie Miller. Property Location: Hemlock Township. Lender: Service 1st Federal Credit Union. Amount: $300,000.

LACKAWANNA COUNTY

Donna Dipenice. Property Location: Carbondale Twp. Lender: Peoples Security Bank & Trust CO. Amount: $380,000. John Fofi. Property Location: Carbondale Twp. Lender: PS Bank. Amount: $309,500. Little Acres Learning Academy Inc. Property Location: Covington Twp. Lender: Peoples Security Bank & Trust Co. Amount: $275,000 Judah Whitney. Property Location: Covington Twp. Lender: Allied Mtge. Group Inc. Amount: $298,000. Michael brian Cebulko. Property Location: Covington Twp. Lender: PS Bank. Amount: $376,560.

Jesse A Lord. Property Location: Dalton Boro. Lender: USAA Federal Savings Bank. Amount: $410,000 Justin Abromavage. Property Location: Dunmore Boro. Lender: Peoples Security Bank & Trust Co. Amount: $275,000. Christopher Schank. Property Location: Dunmore Boro. Lender: Finance of America Mortgage LLC. Amount: $279,837. Clairvaux Institute: Property Location: Elmhurst Twp. Lender: FNCB Bank. Amount: $660,000. Salvatore V Marino. Property Location: Greenfield Twp. Lender: Invicta Mortgage Group Inc. Amount: $269.637. bennett & bennett LLC. Property Location: Jermyn Boro. Lender: American Bank. Amount: $500,000. Marion Munley Cartwright. Property Location: Moosic Boro. Lender: Peoples Security Bank & Trust Co. Amount: $300,000. Joseph J Secor. Property Location: Moosic Boro. Lender: M&T Bank. Amount: $292,200. Sarah Vasky. Property Location: Newton Twp. Lender: Vasky Sarah Trust. Amount: $400,000. Mark Cerminaro. Property Location: Old Forge Boro. Lender: Dime Bank. Amount: $368,720. MCG Rentals LLC. Property Location: Old Forge Boro. Lender: Dime Bank. Amount: $368,720. Michael Serniak Jr. Property Location: Olyphant Boro. Lender: FNCB Bank. Amount: $400,000. Thomas C Keegan. Property Location: Roaring Brook Twp. Lender: PS Bank. Amount: $342,500. Clairvaux Institute. Property Location: Roaring Brook Twp. Lender: FNCB. Amount: $660,000. Stefan Strauser. Property Location: Roaring Book Twp. Lender: Citizens Savings Bank. Amount: $340,000. Eugene J Long. Property Location: Scott Twp. Lender: Branch Banking & Trust Co. Amount: $330,000. Eugene J Long. Property Location: Scott Twp. Lender: Branch Banking & Trust Co. Amount: $330,000. Eugene J Long. Property Location: Scott Twp. Lender: Branch Banking & Trust Co. Amount: $330,000. Scranton Cherry LP. Property Location: Scranton City. Lender: PNC Bank. Amount: $550,000. Joellen M Exeter. Property Location: Scranton City. Lender: FNCB Bank. Amount: $225,000. Joellen Investments LLC. Property Location: Scranton City. Lender: FNCB Bank. Amount: $225,000. Vine Street Partners LLC. Property Location: Scranton City. Lender: FNCB Bank. Amount: $394,000. Car Jo Realty Inc. Property Location: Scranton City. Lender: Fidelity Dep & Disc Bk. Amount: $284,000. M C G Rentals LLC. Property Location: Scranton City. Lender: Dime Bank. Amount: $368,720. Rudin Limited Partnership. Property Location: Scranton City. Lender: Toyota Motor Credit Corp. Amount: $2,160,000. Nunzio L Allegrucci Sr. Property Location: Scranton City. Lender: Landmark Community Bank. Amount: $300,000. Jonathan Allegrucci. Property Location: Scranton City. Lender: Landmark Community Bank. Amount: $300,000. Nunzi Allegrucci. Property Location: Scranton City. Lender: Landmark Community Bank. Amount: $300,000. Nunzi Allegrucci. Property Location: Scranton City. Lender: Landmark Community Bank. Amount: $300,000. James McNally. Property Location: Scranton City. Lender: Fidelity Dep & Disc Bank. Amount: $324,000. Wyoming Avenue Development LLC. Property Location: Scranton City. Lender: First National Bank of PA. Amount: $500,000. Montage Mountain Hospitality LLC. Property Location: Scranton City. Lender: Wayne Bank. Amount: $5,580,000. Pertinacity LLC. Property Location: Scranton City. Lender: Peoples Security Bank & Trust Co. Amount: $1,050,000. PJM Management Services II LLC. Property Location: So. Abington Twp. Lender: FNCB Bank. Amount: $281,166.40.

John G Androski. Property Location: So. Abington Twp. Lender: Mortgage Electronic Reg Sys Inc. Amount: $261,600. Neil busti. Property Location: SO. Abington Twp. Lender: Wells Fargo Bank. Amount: $253,050. bLU Wasabi LLC. Property Location: So. Abington Twp. Lender: Celtic Bank Corporation. Amount: $1,440,000. John A Scanland. Property Location: So. Abington Twp. Lender: First National Bank of PA. Amount: $280,000. Moriah A Peters. Property Location: So. Abington Twp. Lender: UBS Bank USA. Amount: $280,000 Richard J Coughlin. Property Location: So. Abington Twp. Lender: Liberty Home Equity Solutions Inc. Amount: $255,000. Richard J Coughlin. Property Location: So. Abington Twp. Lender: USA HUD. Amount: $255,000. John Hrywnak. Property Location: Springbrook Twp. Lender: FNCB Bank. Amount: $350,000. Michele J Krebs. Property Location: Thornhurst Twp. Lender: Berkshire Bank. Amount: $710,500. Megan Horeis. Property Location: Unknown. Lender: Homeside Financial LLC. Amount: $251,799.50. barbara Hickman. Property Location: Unknown. Lender: Wayne Bank. Amount: $300,000. Deborah Piwowarski. Property Location: Unknown. Lender: Bank of America. . Amount: $322,500. James bradley Flickinger. Property Location: Unknown. Lender: FNCB Bank. Amount: $424,100. Triple J Sisters LLC. Property Location: Unknown. Lender: Peoples Security Bank & Trust Co. Amount: $380,000. Stacy Lynn Erickson. Property Location: Unknown. .Lender: Bank of America. Amount: $382,000. John H Smolko. Property Location: Unknown. Lender: Fidelity Dep & Disc Bank. Amount: $359,528.

LUZERNE COUNTY

James Cressman. Property Location: Salem Twp. Lender: Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems Inc. Quontic Bank. Amount: $420,000. 703 Rutter Avenue Partners LLC. Property Location: Kingston Boro. Five Parcels. Lender: Citizens Bank of Pennsylvania. Amount: $3,680,000. James Cressman. Property Location: Salem Twp. Lender Secretary of Housing & Urban Development. Amount: $420,000. DDCS Associates LP. Property Location: Bear Creek Twp. Lender: Firstrust Bank. Amount: $500,000. SWMM Investments LP. Property Location: Luzerne Boro. Edwardsville Boro; Courtdale Boro; Pringle Boro. Lender Covenant Bank. Amount: $1,600,000. Timothy b Ebbitt. Property Location: Kingston Twp. Lender: Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems Inc. First National Bank of Pennsylvania. Amount: $650,000. Turney Sten Oswald. Property Location: Conyngham Boro. Lender: One Reverse Mortgage LLC. Amount $255,000. Turney Sten. Property Location: Conyngham Boro. Lender: Secretary of Housing & Urban Development. Amount: $255,000 Arthur J Howe Jr. Property Location: Wyoming Boro. Lender: Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems Inc. Stearns Lending LLC. Amount: $261,250. Vipander bhatti. Property Location: Fairview Twp. Lender: Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems Inc. New American Financial Corporation. Amount: $274,928. James Jiunta Property Location: Lehman Twp. Lender: Bank of America. Amount: $406,000. Shawn E Rose. Property Location: Fairview Twp Lender: Jersey Shore State Bank. Amount: $255,000. Joseph J bennett. Property Location: Wilkes Barre City. Lender: Wayne Bank. Amount: $7,820,750. Kevin N Kosakowski. Property Location: Bear Creek Twp. Lender: Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems Inc.

New American Financial Corporation. Amount: $273,980. Kevin A Cooney. Property Location: Huntington Twp. Lender: AgChoice Farm Credit. Amount: $250,000. Mark D Gusditis. Property Location: Wright Twp. Lender: Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems Inc. Reliance First Capital LLC. Amount: $300,600. Halbing Enterprises LLC. Property Location: Plains Twp. Lender: LuzVipander Bhatti. Property Location: Fairview Twp. Lender: Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems Inc. New American Financial Corporation. Amount: $274,928. James Jiunta Property Location: Lehman Twp. Lender: Bank of America. Amount: $406,000. Shawn E Rose. Property Location: Fairview Twp Lender: Jersey Shore State Bank. Amount: $255,000. Joseph J bennett. Property Location: Wilkes Barre City. Lender: Wayne Bank. Amount: $7,820,750. Kevin N Kosakowski. Property Location: Bear Creek Twp. Lender: Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems Inc. New American Financial Corporation. Amount: $273,980. Kevin A Cooney. Property Location: Huntington Twp. Lender: AgChoice Farm Credit. Amount: $250,000. Mark D Gusditis. Property Location: Wright Twp. Lender: Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems Inc. Reliance First Capital LLC. Amount: $300,600. Halbing Enterprises LLC. Property Location: Plains Twp. Lender: Luzerne Bank. Amount: $1,760,000. Jayce Inc. Property Location: Kingston Boro. Lender: Luzerne Bank. Amount: $1,058,000. Wide-World RV Center Inc. Property Location: Plains Twp. Lender: PNC Bank. Amount: $500,000. Mornington Commercial Properties LCC. Property Location: Kingston Boro. Lender: Luzerne Bank. Amount: $1,050,240. Robert b Stochel Jr. Property Location: Black Creek Twp. Lender: First Columbia Bank & Trust Company. Amount: $268,000. Joseph Musto. Property Location: Duryea Boro. Lender: Secretary of Housing & Urban Development. Amount: $427,500. Chad M Honeywell. Property Location: Ross Twp. Lender: PNC Bank. Amount: $250,000. Three Guys Dallas LLC. Property Location: Dallas Twp. Lender: Community Bank. Amount: $450,000. SMK Real Estate Dallas LLC. Property Location: Dallas Boro. Lender: Landmark Community Bank. Amount: $600,000. James A brogna. Property Location: Fairview Twp. Lender: ESSA Bank & Trust. Amount: $313,600.

MONROE COUNTY

Flipping Pocono 002 LLC. Property location: Tobyhanna Township. Lender: Isaac Moradi. Amount: $72,000. Christian and Christina Peters. Property location: Tobyhanna Township. Lender: Quicken Loans Inc. Amount: $772,000. Penn Stroud Hotel Inc. Property location: Stroudsburg. Lender: DK Stroudsburg Limited Liability Co. Amount: $225,000. Aastha Real Estate Investments LLC. Property location: Coolbaugh Township. Lender: LendingHome Funding Corp. Amount: $129,500. ATD Park Slope LLC. Property location: Chestnuthill Township. Lender: Montauk Funding Group LLC. Amount: $105,000. Daniel Snyder. Property location: Pocono Township. Lender: ESSA Bank & Trust. Amount: $200,000 and $100,000. Rental Growth LLC. Property location: Coolbaugh Township. Lender: Lafayette Ambassador Bank. Amount: $48,000 and $39,750. LTS Homes LLC. Property location: Price Township. Lender: Wayne Bank. Amount: $198,400. LTS Homes LLC, Eastern Premier Holding Co. LLC.

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FOR THE RECORD

Property location: Stroud Township. Lender: Lafayette Ambassador Bank. Amount: $169,700 and $160,400. LTS Homes LLC, Eastern Premier Holding Co. LLC. Property location: Middle Smithfield Township. Lender: Lafayette Ambassador Bank. Amount: $151,000. Juan Cordero. Property location: Middle Smithfield Township. Lender: Acre Mortgage and Financial Inc. Amount: $306,363. Michael and Linda Teare. Property location: Barrett Township. Lender: Residential Home Funding Corp. and Secretary of Housing and Urban Development. Amount: $315,000. DLP SF Fund II LLC. Property location: East Stroudsburg. Lender: Peoples Security Bank and Trust Co. Amount: $3,250,000. LTS Homes LLC. Property location: Middle Smithfield Township. Lender: Wayne Bank. Amount: $174,320. Shuk Inc. Property location: Coolbaugh Township. Lender: Filippo Investments LLC. Amount: $265,000. Gary and Elizabeth Lewis. Property location: Stroud Township. Lender: Citibank NA. Amount: $297,120. Dein Properties LP, Dein Management Co. LLC. Property location: East Stroudsburg. Lender: Peoples Security Bank and Trust Co. Amount: $400,000. M&M Residential Services LLC. Property location: Chestnuthill Township. Lender: First Northern Bank and Trust Co. Amount: $112,000. LTS Homes LLC. Property location: Price Township. Lender: Wayne Bank. Amount: $250,000. DK Stroudsburg LLC. Property location: Stroudsburg. Lender: Pocono Mountains Industries Inc. Amount: $1,820,549. Kewanee Drumwright and Cheryl Grant. Property location: Middle Smithfield Township. Lender: Peoples Bank. Amount: $310,000.

LTS Homes LLC. Property location: Middle Smithfield Township. Lender: Beneficial Bank. Amount: $195,920. Jomo and Shonette Lake. Property location: Tunkhannock Township. Lender: Wells Fargo Bank NA. Amount: $529,000. David Skerpon and Christopher Baldrige. Property location: Chestnuthill Township. Lender: Orrstown Bank. Amount: $915,000. MWM Residential Services LLC. Property location: Chestnuthill Township. Lender: First Northern Bank and Trust Co. Amount: $100,800. V&B Enterprise LLC. Property location: Barrett Township. Lender: First Keystone Community Bank. Amount: $297,500. ASN LN LLC. Property location: Polk Township. Lender: Mauch Chunk Trust Co. Amount: $140,000. GNJ Homes Inc. Property location: Coolbaugh Township. Lender: Colony American Finance Lender LLC. Amount: $500,000. Bad Boys for Life LLC. Property location: Stroud Township. Lender: First Bank. Amount: $273,700. Another One Bites the Dust LLC, Feeling Good LLC, Ezos Resyek LLC. Property location: Stroud Township. Lender: First Bank. Amount: $358,050. Karine Cambry. Property location: Chestnuthill Township. Lender: Residential Home Funding Corp. Amount: $319,500. BWC Partnership, Leo Castiglioni (gen. partner). Property location: Ross Township. Lender: Gary Wolfe Est., Deborah Wolfe (exec.). Amount: $294,806. Awaytopa LLC. Property location: Paradise Township. Lender: A&D Mortgage LLC. Amount: $84,000. Gary and Debra Kessel. Property location: Stroudsburg. Lender: ESSA Bank & Trust. Amount: $450,000. Gogia Properties LLC. Property location: Middle Smithfield Township. Lender: Wayne Bank. Amount: $400,000. Hemlock Campground and Cottages LLC. Property location: Coolbaugh Township. Lender: Peoples Security Bank and Trust Co. Amount: $400,000.

New Development & Relocation Opportunities Needed

Woodlock Spa Resort LP. Property Location: Lackawaxen Twp. Lender: Peoples Security Bank & Trust Company. Amount: $15,650,000. Michele Digeso. Property Location: Milford Twp. Lender: JPMorgan Chase Bank NA. Amount: $347,310. Jay Levinton. Property Location: Lackawaxen Twp. Lender: Dime Bank. Amount: $296,000. David D Farrington. Property Location: Shohola Twp. Lender: MERS. Amount: $300,000. Masthope Mtn. Community Prop. Owners Council. Property Location: Honesdale. Lender: Wayne Bank. Amount: $2,872,586.84. Katherine L Parckys. Property Location: Dingman Twp. Lender: Citizens Bank NA. Amount: $256,880. Lake Region Developmentt 3 LLC. Property Location: Palmyra Twp. Lender: David W. Kern. Amount: $630,000. Pike County Enviro Enterprise Holding LLC. Property Location: Westfall Twp. Lender: Dime Bank. Amount: $1,100,000. Thomas Patrick Alexander. Property Location: Dingman Twp. Lender: Dime Bank. Amount: $270,000.

Pennsylvania Counties of Interest Include: • Bradford, Bucks, Carbon, Columbia, Lackawanna, Lehigh, Luzerne, Lycoming, Monroe, Northampton, Pike, Schuylkill, Sullivan, Susquehanna, Tioga, Wayne, Wyoming Locations Wanted: • Flexible space requirements • End Cap, In-Line, Drive-Thru, Free Standing

SCHUYLKILL COUNTY

Bring us any and all potential locations. We will determine if we can develop or possibly relocate to your site. PLEASE CONTACT Abbie Muto muto_a@sdepa.com Cheryl Green green_c@sdepa.com (610) 366-8120 • www.sdepa.com

PIKE COUNTY

Member of International Council of Shopping Centers

Eileen and Joseph Pinkey. Property Location: Rush Township. Lender: Mauch Chunk Trust. Amount: $277,800. Michael and Kelly Freed. Property Location: Wayne Township. Lender: Riverview Bank. Amount: $256,000. Michael and Kelly Freed. Property Location: Wayne Township. Lender: Riverview Bank. Amount: $64,000. William and Mary Jo Moss. Property Location: Orwigsburg. Lender: Mid Penn Bank. Amount: $500,000.

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Jason and Amy Landis. Property Location: Wayne Township. Lender: Branch Banking and Trust Co. Amount: $320,000. Thomas Hertog. Property Location: Schuylkill Haven. Lender: National Bank. Amount: $380,000.

WAYNE COUNTY

Bayard J Denoie Jr. Property Location: Lake. Lender: MERS-Finance of America Mortgage FCU. Amount: $318,708. Jessica L Roberts. Property Location: Canaan.. Lender: MERS-Quicken Loans. Amount: $277,034. Matthew Storm. Property Location: Paupack. Lender: Wayne Bank. Amount: $338,412. Krajmer Enterprises LLC. Property Location: Canaan. Lender: The Dime Bank. Amount: $1,808,000. Kevin M Krol. Property Location: Cherry Ridge. Lender: MERS- Quicken Loans. Amount: $291,801. Robert M Bucko. Property Location: Paupack. Lender: MERS-Quicken Loans. Amount: $485,867. Frank T Perano. Property Location: Texas. Lender: Wayne Bank. Amount: $1,492,000 Gerald S McDonald. Property Location: Cherry Ridge. Lender: The Dime Bank. Amount: $284,000. Donald G Erb. Property Location: Paupack. Lender: Wells Fargo Bank NA. Amount: $355,000. Golf Park Properties Inc. Property Location: Salem. Lender: The Dime Bank. Amount: $2,200,000. Monica A Muglia. Property Location: Oregon. Lender: MERS-North American Savings Bank FSB. Amount: $278,015. Curt R Hogancamp. Property Location: Damascus. Lender: MRS—Summit Mortgage. Amount: $393,550. Ingrid Perovic. Property Location: Paupack. Lender: MERS-Quicken Loans. Amount: $285,000. Berwick Gas Sales Inc. Property Location: Lehigh. Lender: M&T Bank. Amount: $2,000,000. Mark S DeWitt & Tracey. Property Location: Paupack. Lender: Univest Bank & Trust Co. Amount: $417,000. William M Trust Jr. Trustee. Property Location: Paupack. Lender: MERS Damascus Community Bank. Amount: $517,800.

WYOMING COUNTY

2426 Lackawanna LLC. Property Location: Nicholson Twp. Lender: NBT Bank NA. Amount: $280,000. Ryan Alfieri. Property Location: Tunkhannock Boro. Lender: Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems Inc. Amount: $286,350. Joann R. Fremiotti. Property Location: Tunkhannock Twp. Lender: PNC Bank. Amount: $300,000. Tarakbhai. M. Patel. Property Location: Tunkhannock Boro. Lender: Wayne Bank. Amount: $1,742,240. Tarakbhai M. Patel. Property Location: Washington Twp. Lender: Wayne Bank. Amount: $1,742,240. Matthew R. Andrews. Property Location: Tunkhannock Twp. Lender: Peoples Security Bank & Trust Company. Amount: $700,000. Chris Zawacki. Property Location: Northmoreland Twp. Lender: Hanmi Bank. Amount: $615,000. Kathi A. Smurkoski. Property Location: Meshoppen Twp. Lender: Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems Inc. Amount: $299,250.

NEW INCORPORATIONS CARBON COUNTY

Gavin Real Estate Investments LLC. Filed: Feb. 8. Real Estate. 75 Beaver St., Lehighton. Ingenious Digital Media LLC. Filed: Feb. 11. General Business & Management Consulting Specialties in Marketing, Business Strategy, Digital Infrastructure. 31 Laurette Dr., Albrightsville. Javanich Realty LLC. Filed: Feb. 13. Real Estate. 300

Commerce St., Weatherly. Landsford Food & Beverage. Filed: Feb. 15. Food Store. 135 W. Tterson St., Landsford. Michael Anthony Cosmetics LLC. Filed: Feb. 17. Sale of Beauty Products. 133 Unionville Rd., Jim Thorpe.

COLUMBIA COUNTY

Greenwood land Holdings LLLC. Filed: Feb. 13. Real Estate. 3010 State Route 42, Millville. Hack Landscaping LLC. Filed: Feb. 16. Landscaping. 20 Sunflower Ln. Millville. Harlem Barbershop. Filed: Mar. 1. Barber Shop. 322 East 2nd St., Bloomsburg. Harry’s Truck Reir Shop Inc. Filed: Feb. 27. Truck Reir. 2330 Duband Ave., Bloomsburg. Hawkeye Distributors Inc. Filed: Feb. 27. Beer Sales. 1528 Brittain St., Berwick. Jelsa Transport LLC. Filed: Feb. 17. Motor Carrier Transportation (Trucking). 330 W. Front St., Berwick. Keep Pedalin’ . Filed: Feb. 7. To Make a Line of Products Online for Book. 175 Mellick Hollow Rd., Bloomsburg. Old P’s Place LLC. Filed: Feb. 6. Restaurant. 163 Dotyville Rd., Benton.

LACKAWANNA COUNTY

Gerrity’s Pharmacy Keyser. Filed: Feb. 10. Retail Pharmacy. North Keyser Ave, Scranton. Goldberg Judaica LLC. Filed: Feb. 24. Production/Sale of Ceramics. 33 Birch Hill Rd., Clarks Summit. Grange Manor LLC. Filed: Feb. 7. Real Estate. 142 Log Cabin Ln., Dalton. Greater Carbondale Pre-Teen rk Association. Filed: Feb. 24. Youth Baseball League. 2 11th Ave., Carbondale. Hemlock Contracting LLC. Filed: Feb. 8. Construction Services. 331 Wilbur Hill Rd., Dalton. Imperial Foods & Market USA. Filed: Feb. 14. Sales of Meat Food and Other Misc. 1826 N. Main Ave., Scranton. Joan Mae Ramos Enterprises LLC. Filed: Feb. 28. Direct Sales. 101 Clarkson Ave., Jessup. Laird St LLC. Filed: Feb. 6. Real Estate. 538 Spruce St., Suite 600. Scranton. Lake Scranton Renew Center LLC. Filed: Feb. 28. Client Screening/Intake Services. 321 Spruce St., Scranton. Las Villas Barber Shop. Filed: Feb. 6. Barber Shop. 106 So. Main St., Scranton. Legg’s Automotive Performance LLC. Filed: Feb. 6. Automotive Reir. 218 Scranton/Pocono Hwy. Covington Twp. LPS Diversified LLC. Filed: Feb. 15. Landscape. 107 Fairway Dr., Clarks Summit. Lucky’s Windows. Filed: Feb. 17. Window Cleaning Services. 28 Little League Blvd., Scranton. MAA Umiya Hospitality LLC. Filed: Feb. 22. Hotel, Motel. 202 Summit Pointe, Scranton. Manu Express LLC. Filed: Feb. 24. Kiosk Retail Sales. 535 Adams Ave., Scranton. MarKoz Holdings Inc. Filed: Feb. 8. Real Estate. 930 Dunmore St., Throop. MarKoz Motorsports Inc. Filed: Feb 8. Equient Rentals. 930 Dunmore St., Throop. MarKoz Properties LLC. Filed: Feb. 8. Construction. 930 Dunmore St., Throop. MarKoz Real Estate Inc. Filed: Feb. 8. Real Estate. 930 Dunmore St., Throop. MarKoz Realty Inc. Filed: Feb. 8. Real Estate Development. 930 Dunmore St., Throop. Medical Office Staffing LLC. Filed: Feb. 8. Staffing Agency. 1637 Summit Lake Rd. Clarks Summit. Michele’s Massage. Filed: Feb. 22. Massage & Therapies. 524 Layton Rd., So. Abington Twp. MMK Productions LLC. Filed: Feb. 22. Design, Editing, Writing, Project Management. 105 Fairview Ave., Clarks Summit. Mud-N-Mascara LLC. Filed: Feb. 24. Sell Beauty Prod-


FOR THE RECORD ucts. 70 Spring St., Carbondale. Municil Capital Recovery LLC. Filed: Feb. 9. Collection of Delinquent Taxes and Fees Owed Municil Governments. 116 N. Washington Ave., Scranton. Nina’s Commissary LLC. Filed: Mar. 1. Restaurant. 919 Norther Blvd. So. Abington. Nita Auto Sales LLC. Filed: Feb. 13. Sale of Automobiles. 156 N. Main St., Old Forge. Northeast Natural Remedies. Filed: Feb. 22. Medical Marijuana Dispensary. 189 N. Gravel Pond Rd. Clarks Summit. The Grid Chemistry. Filed: Feb. 7. Manufacturing & Sales of Beer, Soap & Other Natural Products. 19 Kimberly Lane, Thornhurst. Perfect Fix Contracting. Filed: Feb. 18. Interior & Exterior Remodeling & Reir. 191 E. Edgewood Dr., So. Abington Twp. Pittie Chicks. Filed: Feb. 21. Design & Sale of Clothing for Pit Bull Type Dog Owners. 167 Mill Rd., Covington Twp.

LUZERNE COUNTY

Gator Landscaping LLC. Filed: Feb. 16. Landscape. 150 Crest Rd., Hazleton. GDH Consultants LLC. Filed: Feb. 8. Consulting. 327 Carpenter Rd. Dallas Gerrity’s Pharmacy Hanover. Filed: Feb. 20. Pharmacy. 220 San Souci Pkway, Hanover Twp. Gobind Transport Inc. Filed: Feb. 17. General Freight Trucking. 189 Main St.Side, Avoca. Gold 2 Cash LLC. Filed: Feb. 8. Purchase of Pr3ecious Metals. 280 Laurel Mall. Hazleton. Graham Concrete Construction LLC. Filed: Feb. 27. Stamped Concrete Business. 78 Prospect Rd., Sugarloaf. Green Cuts. Filed: Feb. 28. Grass Cutting. 22 W. Washington St., Nanticoke. Hair 2 There. Filed: Mar. 2. Beauty Salon. 595 Bennett St., Luzerne. Harbin Properties LLC. Filed: Feb. 21. Real Estate. 381 Follies Rd., Dallas. Here We Go. Filed: Feb. 8. Goods, Services & Clothing. 1230 Lantern Hill Rd,. Shavertown. Hidy Ochiai Karagae of Wilkes Barre. Filed: Feb. 28. Martial Arts Training. 760 Jumper Rd., Wilkes Barre. Integrated Graphic Solutions. Filed: Feb. 23. Sourcing & Supplying Integrated Graphic Solutions. 30 E Main St., Plymouth. International order of Rainbow for Girls Wilkes Barre Assembly 45. Association. Filed: Feb. 10. 25 N. Franklin St., Wilkes Barre. J&Y Services LLC. Filed: Feb. 9. Commercial & Residential Cleaning Services. 106 Spring St., Wilkes Barre. Jai Co. Hair. Filed: Mar. 1. Online Retail Sales. 59 Midland Ct., Wilkes Barre. BBT Enterprises LLC. Filed: Mar. 2. Restaurant & Catering Services. 957 St. Johns Rd, Drums. JMR Specialized Inc. Filed: Feb. 28. Trucking/Warehousing. 5672 AW. County Rd., Wapwallopen. K Farrell Trucking LLC. Filed: Feb. 17. Transportation Related Services. 23 Willow St., Plymouth. Kavlick 2G LLC. Filed: Feb. 8. Own/Operate McDonalds Restaurants. 436 N. Hunter Highway, Drums. Ken Pollock Mitsubishi. Filed: Feb. 15. Buying, Selling, Leasing & Reiring Motor Vehicles. 2 Meredith St., Exchange, Carbondale. Keystone Construction Inspections LLC. Filed: Feb. 9. Provide Bldg. Permitting, Inspection & Plan Review Services. 127 W Grand St., Nanticoke. Kingston Kosher LLLC. Filed: Feb. 8. Kosher Food. 335 James St., Kingston. Lamega Taxi LLC. Filed: Feb. 28. Taxi. 62 South Poplar St., Hazleton. Lavender Swirl Soap Company. Filed: Feb. 11. Make/ Sell Handmade Soap & Soap Products. 1830 Murray St., Forty Fort.

LD3 Holdings LLC. Filed: Feb. 17. Real Estate. 25 Lissa Lane, Sugarloaf. Legacy Baking Co. Filed: Feb. 15. Food Services. 50 Reynolds St., Kingston. Main Massage & Wellness LLC. Filed: Feb. 14. Massage Therapy. 294 Main St. Luzerne. Main St. Bakery Works LLC. Filed: Feb. 16. Bakery. 45 N. Main St., Ashley. Malloys Custom, LLC. Filed: Feb. 6. Construction & Maintenance. 103 Poplar St., Kingston. Manheim Eqities II LLC. Filed: Feb. 27. Real Estate 161 Wyoming Ave., Wyoming. Manuel Emnadas. Filed: Feb. 23. Fast Food Restaurant. 35 N. Wyoming St., Hazelton. Merut Construction Corporation. Filed: Feb. 14. Excavation/Drilling/Equient Rental. 324 Dennison St., Swoyerville. Michael Ley Yoga LLC. Filed: Feb. 8. Yoga Business. 59 Laflin Rd. Wilkes Barre. Mihailoff Photogreaphy. Filed: Feb. 16. Photographic & Imaging Services. 374 Osceola Ave., Kingston.

MONROE COUNTY

FX5 Housing Services LLC. Filed: Feb. 13. Restoration of Foreclosed Homes. 397 Blue Ridge Rd., Saylorsburg. Geneva Boys LLC. Filed: Feb. 17. Entertainment & Clothing. 107 Lemond Dr., Saylorsburg. Gennaro’s Construction Services. Filed: Feb. 9. Construction/Contractor. 6263 rk Pl., Tobyhanna. Get Recognized Online LLC. Filed: March 2. Consulting & Marketing. 226 Sunlight Dr., Henryville. Girls Social & Leisure Sports Club. Filed: Feb. 25. Social & Leisure Sports for Girls. 4155 Hemlock Rd., Kunkletown. Glimpses of Time Photo. Filed: Feb. 7. Photography. 12183 Woodland Lake Dr. East Stroudsburg. Global Health Tec. Limited Liability Company. Filed: Feb. 8. Medical Device. 527 Clearview Dr., Long Pond. Good Medicine Choice Inc. Filed: Feb. 10. Retail/Wholesale Sales. 391 E. Brown St., East Stroudsburg. Handyman Pioneers Company. Filed: Feb. 13. Home Improvement/Rehabilitation/Upgrade. 2331 Route 209 Sciota. Hibachi & Supreme Buffet LLC. Filed: Feb. 28. Restaurant. 410 Fish Hill Rd. Tannersville. Higgins & Walters LLC. Filed: Feb. 9. Legal Services. 26 N. 6th St., Stroudsburg. High Point Insurance Solutions. Filed: Feb. 9. Sale of Insurance Products. 36 West Main St., Ste 750, Rochester NY. Jordan’s Baking. Filed: Mar. 3. Bread Wholesaler. 335 Lower Lakeview Dr., East Stroudsburg. KRB Consulting Services LLC. Filed: Feb. 16. Consulting Services. 5303 Bald Eagle Dr., East Stroudsburg. Hacienda Restaurant LLC. Filed: Feb. 27. Full Service Authentic Mexican Restaurant. 2699 Rising Hill Dr., Saylorsburg. LJG Real Estate LLC. Filed: Feb. 10. Real Estate Investments. 129 Karen Glen Way, Brodheadsville. Mascon Global Logistics LLC. Filed: Feb. 20. Buy/Ship Goods i.e. Construction Tools, Vehicles, Machinery, Equipment etc. 3308 Route 940 Ste. 104. Mt. Pocono. Maux Design Studios. Feb. 15. Craft & Candle Business. 96 Maplewood Ave. Dallas. Metal Craft Exteriors LLC. Filed: Feb. 23. Residential & Commercial Remodel Contractor. 1286 Bunny Ln., Brodheadsville Moerealty LLC. Filed: Feb. 10. Real Estate Consulting. 221 Skyline Dr., East Stroudsburg. Mo’R Tennis LLC. Filed: Feb. 10. Sports Management. 221 Skyline Dr., East Stroudsburg. Natural Care LLC. Filed: Feb. 15. Agricultural. PO Box 145, Long Pond. Nicstan Properties LLC. Filed: Feb. 16. Property Holdings. 4112 Devon Dr., Tobyhanna. Osida Restaurant LLC. Filed: Mar. 2. Food Service,

Diner/Restaurant. 5139 Milford Rd., East Stroudsburg. It’s Tree, Lawn & Firewood Services. Filed: Mar. 1. Landscaping. 71 Trader Rd., Marshalls Creek. Peak Land Holdings LLC. Filed: Feb. 15. Real Estate. 5 Shaw Dr., Drums.

PIKE COUNTY

Grand 3 LLC. Filed: Feb. 27. Property Preservation. 108 Blackforest Dr., Milford. Hot Dog Harrys Catering. Filed: Mar. 1. Mobile Food Service. 3659 Hemlock Farms, Hawley. KAD Club. Filed: Feb. 8. Art Illustrations, Design Education. 121 Main St., Greentown. Loch Highlands LLC. Filed: Feb. 17. Real Estate. 133 Ansely Road, UCK Maggie McManus LLC. Filed: Feb. 7. Art, Design, Illustration & Education. 121 Main St., Greentown. Milford Pet Foods & Supply LLC. Filed: Mar. 1. Pet Foods & Supply Retailer. 122 Moon Valley Road, Milford. Milford Cosmetic Dermatology Surgery & Laser Center. Filed. Feb. 18. Medical Office. 301=303 West Harford St., Milford. Om Shivaay Corp. Filed: Feb. 13. Retail. 911 Pennsylvania Ave. Matamoras. Pike County Hypnosis LLC. Filed: Feb. 26. Hypnosis. 113 Juniper Ter., Dingmans Ferry.

SCHUYLKILL COUNTY

Rena’s Mexican & Italian Restaurant. Filed: Feb. 22. Restaurant. 242 Orchard St., Auburn. JBP Photographics & Art. Filed: Feb. 15. Freelance Photo Journalist. 502 W. Market St., Pottsville. Joe Hutta Plumbing & Heating Inc. Filed: Feb. 20. Plumbing & Heating. 9 Valley St., Brocktown. Ketner Chiropractic LLC. Filed: Feb. 16. Chiropractic. 611 Orchard Ave. Schuylkill Haven. Lindsay Transport & Reir. Filed: Feb. 7. Reir, garage & Towing. 725 Penn Dr., Tamaqua. M-K Recycling LLC. Filed: Feb. 10. Recycling of Scrap Mainly From Coal. 128 Rock Rd., Pine Grove. Mt Joy Tropical Diner LLC. Filed: Feb. 14. Restaurant. 54 East Pottsville St., Pine Grove. NGA3 Services LLC. Filed: Feb. 8. Coordinating Services through Leveraging Our Proficiency in Program Management, Analysis and Hiring Practices. 1317 Catawissa Creek Rd., Zion Grove. Orca Resource. Filed: Feb. 16. Sales. 1035 Indian Dr., Schuylkill Haven. PJ’s Soups, Sandwiches & More LLC. Filed: Feb. 28. Sandwich Shop & Deli. 2701 Village Rd., Orwigsburg. Pennacraft Services LLC. Filed: Feb. 13. Logging, Manufacturing, Forestry Services, Lumber. 400 Broad St. Ashland. Pine Hill Printing. Filed: Feb. 17. Screen Printing & Embroidery. 98 Pine Hill Rd., New Ringgold.

SUSQUEHANNA COUNTY

Grateful Granite. Filed: Feb. 10. Fabrication. 811 Lizard Creek Rd.. Andreas. Hickory & Vine Botanicals LLC. Filed: Feb. 17. Health Food Sales & Wellness Consultant. 973 Hinkley Rd, Meshoppen. Lucky Dog Pet Salon. Filed: Feb. 17. Pet Grooming & Sale of Pet Supplies. 503 So. Main St.,Montrose. Monument Land Services. Filed: Feb. 22. To Provide Aeriel sUAS Imagery Date and Professional Land Surveying Services. 4729 Williams Road, Nicholson Mountain Top Koi. Filed: Feb. 28. Retail Sales of Pond Fish and Supplies. 234 Fish Rd., Apt. 1, New Milford.

WAYNE COUNTY

G A Homes Inc. Filed: Mar. 2. Construction. 1095 Imyra Highway, Suite 5, Honesdale.

Hero Development LLC. Filed: Feb. 25. Software Applications. 29 Deer Run Rd, Susquehanna. Hickory Ridge Custom Cuts LLC. Filed: Feb. 28. Butcher/ Meat Processing Facility. 1246 Bridge St., Honesdale. Kathleen Hayes Consulting LLC. Filed: Feb. 8. Early Childhood Educational Materials. 317 Prospect St., Hawley. Kitty Hawk Staffing Services LLC. Filed: Feb. 13. Employment Outsourcing. 1100 Church Living. Harvest Farm. Filed: Feb. 26. Farming. 12 Zig Zag Ln. Damascus. MCW Sales LLC. Filed: Feb. 23. Sales. 21 Vista Terrace, Moscow. Milli’s Confections LLC. Filed: Feb. 10. Cookie Manufacturing. 110 Cove Point Circle, Lakeville. Morning Dove Inc. Filed: Mar. 2. Retail Sales Store. 14 Pin Oak Circle, Hawley. Tty’s Courtland Café Corp. Filed: Feb. 22. Restaurant. 1130 Miller Rd., Lake Ariel.

WYOMING COUNTY

Tinna Trucking LLC. Filed: Mar. 1. Trucking. 573 Nimble Hill Rd., Mehoopany. Auto Rts LLC. Filed: Feb. 23. Used Auto Rts Online Sales. 12 Timber Lane, Tunkhannock.

STOCKS

This report on insider trading activity has been prepared for informational purposes only by James Blazejewski, CFP, senior vice president-investment officer, Wells Fargo Advisors, 672 North River St., Suite 300, Plains, PA 18705. It is based on information generally available to the public from sources believed to be reliable. No representation is made that the information is accurate or complete and it does not constitute a recommendation to buy or sell any particular security. Current information contained in this report is not indicative of future activity. Wells Fargo Advisors is a trade name used by Wells Fargo Clearing Services, LLC. Member FINRA/SIPC. Source of data: Thomson Financial

INSIDER TRADING ACTIVITY ON STOCKS OF LOCAL INTEREST FOR MAY (CZFS – 52.72 ) CITIZENS FINANCIAL SERVICES INC. Robert Landy, director of Citizens Financial Services Inc., purchased 100 shares on March 22 at $53 per share for a total cost of $5,300. Landy controls 15,793 shares directly. (NWFL – 40.12) NORWOOD FINANCIAL CORP. Andrew Forte, director of Norwood Financial Corp., purchased 95 shares on March 22 at $38 per share for a total cost of $3,610. Forte controls 790 shares directly and 5,854 shares indirectly. Over the last six months, insiders of Norwood Financial Corp. acquired 14,821 shares and disposed of 14,171 shares. (PPL – 37.37 ) PPL CORP. Robert Symons, officer of subsidiary of PPL Corp., sold 12,703 shares on March 23 pursuant to a prearranged trading plan (10b5-1) at $37.60 per share for total proceeds of $477,633. Symons controls one share directly. Over the last six months, insiders of PPL Corp. acquired 363,737 shares and disposed of 348,460 shares. (UGI – 49.71) UGI CORP. Robert Beard, officer of subsidiary of UGI Corp., exercised options for 19,500 shares on March 15 (exercised 5.8 years prior to the expiration date) at $21.81 per share for a total cost of $425,295 and sold those shares at $48.52 per share for total proceeds of $946,234. Beard controls 36,827 shares directly and 6,130 shares indirectly. Over the last six months, insiders of UGI Corporation acquired 294,050 shares and disposed of 211,799 shares. Prices as of Close of Business April 4, 2017.

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BACK TAXES NEVER TAKE A DAY OFF.

Your business’s back taxes are always with you. But the Pennsylvania Department of Revenue can help. With Tax Amnesty, pay back taxes for your business and we’ll waive the penalties and cut the interest in half. You can close the books on back taxes. But only for a limited time.

Apply by June 19th at backtax.pa.gov 1-844-PA-STATE-TAX 1-844-727-8283

Commonwealth of Pennsylvania. Paid for with Pennsylvania taxpayer dollars.

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Northeast Pennsylvania Business Journal--05-17  
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