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23, 2010

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MISSISSIPPIAN THE STUDENT NEWSPAPER

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MISSISSIPPI | SERVING OLE MISS

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OXFORD

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INSIDE THIS ISSUE: college essentials page10 getting a pet? things to consider page 12 how to not look like “that” freshman page 14 how to train your roommate page 15

FILE PHOTO | The Daily Mississippian

best places to study page 15

OLE MISS BANS ONCAMPUS FILE SHARING BY KAYLEIGH WEBB The Daily Mississippian

Universities around the country have become a hotbed for the illegal downloading of software files and other forms of multimedia. On-campus high-speed internet connections, originally meant to be a study tool, are often instead being used for copyright infringement. Due to the 2008 Digital Millennium Copyright Act (DMCA), universities are required to install software to block illegal programs that allow students to file-share. If these services are unavailable, an alternative means of preventing downloads must be found. In USA Today, Dexter Mullins wrote that “the products look for file-sharing programs and block

them (shut) down a users’ web access for a period of time, and the user must remove the filesharing program and any files that were downloaded before access is restored.” The consequences for most violators vary, but most come in the form of fines or community service. The ban on campus file-sharing is inconvenient, for those used to downloading music on campus. Freshman Anna Patterson agreed. “While I think iTunes prices are utterly absurd, stealing is stealing. There are other options. Rhapsody, Napster. Or exchange (legally downloaded) mixes with other friends to build up the ol’ library! But if you want to go ahead and use Limewire, don’t come crying to me when the RIAA comes and

cleans out your college fund,” Patterson said. However, Taylor Kamnetz, another freshman, disagreed with the ban, saying “I think we should be able to use it if we want. Our computer, our money-- if anything happens it’s our fault and everyone knows that.” Opinions vary from student to student, but Ole Miss’ IT policy clearly states that file-sharing of any copyrighted material is prohibited. File-sharing softwares and clients should not even be present on a student computer. Even just having peer-to-peer or “P2P” programs like LimeWire and BearShare can allow you to unknowingly share files with other users. The policy also states that students will be responsible for all legal and financial con-

sequences they may face if caught. Instead, the policy recommends purchasing songs from legal online retailers. Though spending more than a dollar on a song may seem expensive, it beats paying fines that could reach $150,000. Movies

PHOTO COURTESY huddle.net

can also be purchased online, or users can subscribe to Netflix for video streaming. A list of popular, legal, feebased and free alternatives can be found at: http://www.educause. edu/legalcontent.


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SUMMER 10 | VOLUME 21


THE INDEPENDENT STUDENT NEWSPAPER OF THE UNIVERSIT Y OF PENNSYLVANIA

SEPTEMBER 2–6, 2010

online at theDP.com

WELCOME BACK WEEKEND

Sorority search down to 12

>> PAGE A8

GREEK LIFE | Twelve sororities are in the running to be added to campus next spring BY TAMARA DE MENT and JARED McDONALD Staff Writer and City News Editor The Panhellenic Council is one step closer to adding an eighth sorority to campus next spring. Out of 18 National Panhellenic Conference sororities not already at Penn, 12 submitted packets to the Panhel extension committee and are currently under review, according to Sta-

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‘WORK OF ART’ WORDS OF WISDOM FROM RECENT GRADUATES

cy Kraus, Panhel advisor and associate director of programming at the Office of Fraternity and Sorority Affairs. The committee will evaluate the packets and choose which sororities will be invited to make presentations on campus. The number of 18 sororities not already on campus does not

ONLINE Check out a timeline of the history of Penn sororities at theDP.com/multimedia

TIMELINE

include Phi Sigma Sigma, which closed its Penn chapter at the end of last academic year. Kraus was unable to provide the list of sororities that submitted packets, but explained that each member of the extension committee — made up of SEE SORORITY PAGE A2

- January: Record sorority rush - March: Panhel extension committee formed - April: Committee votes to add new sorority - May: Following announcement that Phi Sigma Sigma will close, committee votes to bring new sorority to campus in 2011 - Summer: 12 sororities submit apps to be added at Penn, 3-5 of which will be invited to campus to present in October

’14 Points

OPINION | Two members of Penn’s class of 2010 offer freshmen their advice, which includes everything from relaxing to using Van Pelt Library to the fullest. >> PAGE A6

SENIOR POISED TO LEAD THE HUDDLE SPORTS | After repeated injuries kept him on the sideline last year, Garton is ready to be under center. >> PAGE C1

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VISITIN Roast marshmallows with your classmates and listen to music on College Green under the stars. COLLEGE GREEN, 11 P.M. FRIDAY

LATE NIGHT MOVIE

Watch Whip It! and 10 Things I Hate About You, play Guitar Hero and enjoy snacks and giveaways from local businesses. PENN WOMEN’S CENTER, 11 P.M. FRIDAY

ROOT BEER PONG AT THE ‘DP’

Join the staffs of The Daily Pennsylvanian, 34th Street Magazine and Under the Button for a meet and greet, featuring root beer pong. 4015 WALNUT STREET, 11 P.M. SUNDAY

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Each incoming class at Penn is said to be better and brighter than its predecessors, and this is once again true for the class of 2014. Dean of Admissions Eric Furda confirmed the freshman class is “by objective measures, the best class we’ve ever seen.”

1. A record-breaking 26,800 people applied for the class of 2014. 2. Acceptance rate for 2014 was 14.3 percent — Penn’s lowest admit rate ever. 3. Only 52 students were admitted from the waitlist this year — substantially fewer than in previous years. LY PO NO K IN Average EN 2152, up five points from last year. ELT SAT score Pis DRUN4. P N A S V CLAS RY LIBRA 5. 51 percent are female, consistent with the population. 6. 40 percent are of minority background. 100 NE $11 FI7. percent are international students. 8. All 50 states are represented, including Alaska, which wasn’t represented last year. Head to South Philly to taste Pat's or Geno's famous cheesesteaks t e Firs on th th City on s Old ch m Visit ay of ea and shop Frid lleries te ga la when stay open

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BY DARINA SHTRAKHMAN Campus News Editor

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spots study arks landm Philly rhoods neighbo t inmen enterta venues sports ions tradit Penn ing din bars campus

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NEWS | For the first time in recent memory, Columbia University was ranked higher than Penn, which fell one spot — from fourth to fifth place. >> PAGE A3 ILY THE DA

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9. 375 students come from Pennsylvania — the most from any single state. 10. Approximately 200 will be varsity athletes at Penn. 11. 316 are alumni descendants. 12. This is the first class with students from the Posse Foundation — a scholarship program for underprivileged students — from the Miami, Fla. location. 13. Of the 2,420 freshmen, 1,460 are in the College, 390 in Wharton, 360 in the School of Engineering and Applied Science, 90 in Nursing and 120 in coordinated programs. 14. Furda explained that no one of these figures can capture the essence of the class of 2014: “The beauty of this is going to be the chemistry when they’re all together.” Source: Admissions Office and Office of the President

Textbooks made more accessible

TD BANK ROBBED

From e-books to rental services and online marketplaces, students now have diverse options BY BECKI STEINBERG Staff Writer

We’re just looking forward. We’re living in the moment and staying focused on the task that’s lying ahead of us.”

Field hockey coach Colleen Quinn Fink on Penn’s preparation for the season >> PAGE C7

The DP welcomes the class of 2014. Regular publication will resume on the first day of classes, Wednesday, September 8. Until then, check theDP.com for breaking news and sports updates.

With an expanding array of outlets for purchasing textbooks, students will encounter more reasonably priced options when buying course materials this semester. Additionally, a law enacted over the summer aims to make textbooks even more affordable for students. Effective July 1, the Higher Education Opportunity Act included a mandate

that all “bundled” course items be sold individually, that college and university professors publicize a list of requisite textbooks for their courses before classes begin and that book publishers disclose pricing information when offering textbooks to professors. These stipulations — in addiSEE TEXTBOOK PAGE A9

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TD Bank, at 3725 Walnut St., closed briefly after it was robbed Wednesday morning. No one was injured in the incident. >> PAGE A9

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* FastTrack: Limited system quantities available. Orders typically ship out from our factory the next business day, but may be delayed by payment processing or other issues. 5-7 day shipping method standard. Not available for APO/FPO orders. Electronics and accessories may ship separately. See dell.com/fasttrack for details.

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Going from the Lane Train to the Dooley Express

Saturday, August 14, 2010

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‘Amadeus’ among 2010 Clarence Brown Theatre offerings

Issue 01

PUBLISHED SINCE 1906 http://dailybeacon.utk.edu

Vol. 115

I N D E P E N D E N T

S T U D E N T

N E W S P A P E R

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T H E

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T E N N E S S E E

Gov. challenges UT to become Top 25 school Andrea Castillo Staff Writer Already ranking as number 52 among all public universities and number 106 among all national universities for 2010, the University of Tennessee, Knoxville, was challenged by Governor Phil Bredesen, who also serves as chairman of the University of Tennessee Board of Trustees, to become one of the top 25 schools within the next 10 years. A task force, led by Bruce Bursten of the College of Arts and Sciences, was appointed to analyze where UT stood to better understand what needs to be done in order to reach their goal and how to do so. This task force analyzed the universities ranked No. 21 through No. 29 in order to compare and contrast UT's data and that of those 9 other schools. Based on ACT equivalent scores, the UT's new and incoming students have had scores similar to those of students attending more highly ranked schools. However, the findings indicated that although UT is currently ranked 52nd, the six-year graduation rate is 59.8 percent lower than the 27 other schools that were studied, standing at a mere 60 percent as opposed to 75 percent graduation rate. In addition, a number of other findings tend

to indicate that UT is not doing as well as it should be as the retention rate is 6-percent lower than that of the “target groups” retention rate. Gov. Bredesen is asking UT to do something that has never been done before: move up at least 27 slots in ten years in order to become a top 25 ranking school. Chancellor, Jimmy Cheek, says, “I am proud of the challenge because it means that the governor knows what we know-that we are a great university.” Cheek also said that, not only was it what the governor wants, but that it's also what he wants for the university and that it will make UT a better institution for the students educated and a better institution to serve the people of Tennessee. Toby Boulet, engineering professor and 2009-2010 Faculty Senate president, said that he is very happy that the governor appreciates the value of having a top-tier public university in Tennessee, and that he appreciates the Governor's public encouragement for UT to improve its standing. “I can't predict where UTK will be ten years from now,” says Boulet, “but as Chancellor Cheek has stated on several occasions, the value in aiming high is that it sets us on a path

Phillips named interim dean of libraries upon Dewey’s departure

toward being an even better asset to the people of Tennessee.” Boulet also mentioned that the student's part in making a great university is simply to work hard toward graduation. “College is an opportunity to lay the foundation for your future. Take ownership of this process and personal responsibility for finding your way through the college years without unnecessary delays. If you have a seat in a class but don't take full advantage of it, that's a missed opportunity.” On the flip side, UT's graduate programs are ranked among the best in the nation for 2011. U.S. News and World Report, the Princeton Review, Forbes Magazine and the National Jurist Magazine, were just a few that ranked UT as one of the “better” or “best” universities. The students have played, possibly, the largest role in this by having an average core GPA of 3.79, with 40 percent of those students having a 4.0 GPA, as well as bringing in a 26.5 average on the ACT score. The ACT score is the highest ever for an incoming freshman class. The HOPE Scholarship has also contributed to the university by increasing applicants, allowing the university raising the amount of

need-based scholarship programs, and strengthening academic preparedness before college. This has made an impact because of the number of in-state freshman that qualify for the scholarship. Each of the 13 different colleges that the university offers has a variety of programs, advising, and financial aid help for its students while also striving to be the best, each department with their own minimal GPA requirement and course work and are doing well in rankings. The College of Social Work recently had its first distance education master's degree student's graduate, all of whom received the Chancellor's Award for Professional Promise prior to graduation. This year, the college, itself, ranked 26th overall and 15th among public universities in US News & World Report's rankings of graduate schools of social work. The College of Engineering ranked 32nd among public universities and 64th in the nation according to UT News & World Report. The graduate college program ranked 40th among public universities and 68th nationally. In addition, the College of Engineering's graduate program in nuclear engineering is ranked ninth nationally.

Bredesen appoints two new board members Kevin Letsinger

Chris Shamblin Staff Writer

News and Student Life Editor

Linda Phillips, UT Libraries professor and head of scholarly communications, has been named interim dean of UT Libraries. Phillips came to UT in 1977 from the Ohio State University’s Agricultural Technical Institute Library. Phillips is succeeding Barbara Dewey, who has accepted a position as the dean of University Libraries and Scholarly Communications at Penn State University. Dewey said Phillips is a good successor and that she will bring her knowledge and experience to the library program. “Linda Phillips has a broad knowledge and understanding of traditional and 21st century research library programs,” Dewey said. “She is well known among UT faculty and considered a great university citizen. She understands the research and teaching process at a high level.” Phillips believes she can bring a lot to UT Libraries as interim dean through her work and her nearly 40 years experience as an academic librarian. “Much of my work has involved experimentation with new technologies and services,” she said. “So I get excited about helping students and faculty push the boundaries of traditional learning and research.” Phillips’s work encompasses the creation of local digital collections, including digitization of library holdings, the launch of Newfound Press, the libraries’ peer-reviewed digital imprint, and she leads community outreach efforts about the libraries’ scholarly and economic impact on society. “From 1997 to 2007, I managed the library’s collection budget, which offered considerable experience collaborating with librarians and other faculty on getting the most from limited resources,” Phillips said. “We’ll be searching for a permanent library dean, and I’d like UT to be in the best position possible to attract star-quality leaders.” Phillips believes she is well prepared for the position and feels as though her experience and work as the head of scholarly communications will help her as she takes her new position. “As head of scholarly communication, I’ve collaborated with faculty and students across UT’s diverse disciplines to envision how scholarly publishing cultures are changing,” Phillips said. She also said students leading the new undergraduate research journal, Pursuit, are using Trace to publish the journal online. “The UT Scholarly Communication Committee is sponsoring ‘roadshows’ in the departments of its members for faculty and graduate students to discuss scholarly publishing trends in their discipline,” Phillips said. “The library’s digital Newfound Press is publishing peer-reviewed, open-access scholarship and partnering with UT Press. All of these experiences are building community within and beyond UT to provide learners and scholars with maximum access to quality information resources.” Douglas Blaze, dean of the College of Law, is leading the search to find a permanent dean. In the meantime, Dewey feels as though the library program is in capable hands. “She will bring the University Libraries through the transition to a new dean in a smooth and competent way, all the while making sure the libraries continue moving forward in its strategic directions,” Dewey said.

Two new members will join the UT Board of Trustees upon appointment from Gov. Phil Bredesen. J.A.M. “Toby” Boulet, associate mechanical engineering professor, and Carey Smith, senior in political science, will represent the Knoxville campus on the board for the coming term. The board has two faculty members, stated by Tennessee law, and the two members rotate amongst the four campuses. When the rotation comes to Knoxville, it is automatic that the representing member will be the outgoing Faculty Senate president. When a new faculty member is appointed to the position, they claim non-voting status for the first year and are handed such power the second year of the two-year term. The voting member for the upcoming term is from Memphis, while the Knoxville campus perspective will be voiced by the non-voting member. Being new to the board, Boulet offers his experience as outgoing faculty senate president to the new post. “During my year as president, I handled the communication of the stimulus funds,” Boulet said. “We need for people to understand what is going to happen.” There have been multiple meetings on how to lessen the impact of the lack of funds, and Interim President Jan Simek has worked diligently to move people around so that only 60 individuals will lose their jobs. “The original number was

• Photo courtesy of Ellie Amado and Gina Stafford

600,” Boulet said. “He (Simek) has done a great job there.” As for the upcoming search for a new president, Boulet said that even though he is not personally on the search committee, there are two faculty members who are represented, one from the Knoxville campus. “We are well represented,” Boulet said. “The Search

Advisory Council will also play an active role, and there are two or three members represented from Knoxville.” One issue discussed was that of the future president’s compensation. Boulet said that while the university does not pay the most for the position, the president is not paid the least either. The UT trustees approved a recommended compensa-

tion package for the next president that includes a base salary of $420,000 to $450,000, a housing allowance of $20,000 and an expense allowance in the range of $12,000 to $16,000. As far as the budget for the presidential search, $212,375 has been allocated with the goal of electing a new president at the October 2010 board meeting.


dailygamecock.com UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH CAROLINA

FRIDAY, AUGUST 13, 2010

VOL. 102, NO. 73 ● SINCE 1908

INSIDE

Anatomy of a Leader Tight end Patrick DiMarco prepares for a promising football season as team captian.

University makes exceptions in face of sparse housing Keri Goff / THE DAILY GAMECOCK

Shortage of beds due to renovations, record-size class

See page 1C

Josh Dawsey

THE DAILY GAMECOCK

Guide to Columbia Outside the USC campus bubble the Capital city offers many close, vibrant destinations for food, fun and entertainment.

See page 1B

Park Your Eyes on This Stigma of counseling hinders individual mental health

See page 5

Jessica Smith Third-year history student

With a record-breaking freshman class swarming onto c a mpu s t he ne x t few days, USC housing officials are scrambling to f it more t ha n 4,4 0 0 freshmen on campus. This will be the U n i v e r s i t y ’s l a r g e s t f resh ma n class ever by more than 500 students. Couple t hat w it h Pat terson Hall, t he largest on-campus freshman dormitory with almost 700 beds, is closed for rennovations and the University is in a serious crunch for space. T h e Un i v e r s it y ’s actions to fi x the problem include: — Assigning fi rst-year st udent s to g raduate housing — O f f e r i n g upperclassmen the chance to cancel housing contracts without penalty — C o nv e r t i n g m a le beds to female beds across campus and t urning study rooms and a f loor in Capstone House,

prev iously used by t he Board of Trustees, into dorm rooms — Giv i ng 48 fema le resident mentors f irstyear roommates for the Fall. “While a large freshman class is wonderful for the University, it also presents some cha l lenges,” sa id A nd rew Fi n k , d irector o f R e s id e n c e L i f e , i n a n e - m a i l t o r e s id e nt mentors. “The freshman class size has exceeded t he upper limits of our planning scenarios, and we are in a space crunch for women only.” A l m o s t 8 0 0 upperclassmen are on the waiting list for on-campus housing, according t o K i r s t e n K e n n e d y, d i re c t or of u n i ver s it y housing. Students on the l ist have been told it’s u n l i kely t hey ’l l have a bed on campus. “ W h i le ou r w a it i n g list is similar to last year, w e h a v e b e e n a b le t o accommodate fewer from the list into our housing,” Kennedy said. More st udent s are look ing of f campus, according to Jami C a mpb el l , d i re c tor of O f f- Ca mpu s St udent Services.

Keri Goff / THE DAILY GAMECOCK

Patterson Hall, USC’s largest freshman dormitory, is closed for renovations. “ T h i s i s t he bu s ie s t s u m mer I ’ve h ad w it h regards to phone calls or e-mails,” Campbell said. “We’re getting 10 to 15 phone calls or e-mails a day.” Campbell said many of the students don’t want to live off campus but have been told by Universit y officials they might not have a spot on campus. Many off-campus student-geared apartment complexes are filling up this year, Campbell said, while only two or three were full last year.

Police force acts to stop crime hike Not enough music? I f o u r s p ot l i g h t i n g of Columbia bands and recap of summer’s best music isn’t enough, go online to see what The Mix is anticipating this fall.

Online @

www.DailyGamecock.com

(803) 777-3914 (803) 777-7726

Mix

(803) 777-7182 (803) 576-6172

The Daily Gamecock encourages its readers to recycle their copies of the newspaper after reading.

Resident mentors aren’t of f icially allowed to comment on universit y pol ic y w it hout r isk i ng termination. C o n f i d e n t i a l conversat ions bet ween resident s and t heir mentors are crucial, and with no personal living space, it will be tough to keep those talks private. Also, it will leave those 48 RMs without alone time to ref lect, plan and have a personal life that does not involved a resident, Housing ● 2A

Tuition increase aims to fill $26.1 million gap USC takes measures to counteract slashes in state budget

As traffic increases in Five Points, so will safety measures

Ellen Meder

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF

Kristyn Winch NEWS EDITOR

As students return to Columbia, the Five Points area will see vast increases in nightly traffic. The police presence in the popular n ight l i f e a re a w i l l b e ramped up, but for different reasons than past start of school blitzes. Five Poi nt s has seen a pronounced increase in crime recently. During the summer, there were two shootings in Five Points. The first incident occurred May 23 near the Five Points fountain when a gunman shot another man in the foot. A not her shoot ing occurred at 3 a.m. July 24 on Harden Street. Someone fired several shots and hit a bystander in the shoulder in front of Natural Vibrations, which was closed. Witnesses could not describe a suspect and it is unclear whether the shooter was on foot or in a vehicle. Several bullets also struck the Chubby’s Two By Four facade, also on Harden Street. According to reports on the USCPD website there

St udent s l iv i ng w it h R M s w il l move i nto rooms with other f irsty e a r s t u d e nt s a s s o o n a s t h e y ’r e a v a i l a b l e , accord i ng to Ken nedy. The University typically has no-shows, st udents who receive an on-campus housing assignment but never move in. Additionally, RMs will receive extra money for sharing their room with fi rst-year students. B u t m o n e y d o e s n ’t f i x t he problem , some r e s id e nt me nt or s t old T he Da i ly G a meco ck .

Bobby Sutton / THE DAILY GAMECOCK

The Five Points Association has spoken out against proposed city and county regulations that would close bars at 2 a.m. has been an increase in fist fights, violent crimes and robberies over t he summer months in Five Points and the surrounding neighborhoods, and most of the incidents occurred after 1 a.m. Much of the violence was init ially att ributed to gang presence, which prompted t he dispatch and collaboration of the R ichland Count y Gang

Task Force and the Colum bia Gang Task Force in the Five Points area starting i n Ju ne. However, t he actual prevalence of gangs in the area is difficult to determine. I n Ju ne, Colu mbia Cit y Cou ncilwoma n Belinda Gergel proposed an ordinance that would require all bars in the city to close by 2 a.m. each night, Crime ● 2A

USC’s Board of Trustees passed a $1.1 billion budget for the 2011 fiscal year on June 25, which resulted in a 6.9 percent increase in tuition for Columbia campus students. The increase, will serve to help fill a funding gap left by the South Carolina General Assembly’s $26.1 million cut from USC’s budget. The system-wide budget, which went into effect July 1, includes a $434 million operating budget for the Columbia campus. “The state’s bleak budget picture continues to impact us and, once again, we have to make some gut-wrenching choices,” said University President Harris Pastides. “However, it is imperative that we maintain the quality that we are known for and continue to provide an outstanding educational experience for our students.” Pastides said that in order to get this year’s revenue back up to that of the 2010 budget a 16 percent tuition increase would have been necessary, which he said was simply not an option. The tuition increase is expected to yield the University an additional $15,525,000, over $8 million of which will offset the loss of state funding in the academic programs and services portion of the budget. For the 20102011 academic year, in-state undergraduate students will pay $9,786 annually in tuition and fees, up $630 from last year, while out-of-state students will pay $25,362, adding $1,630 to last year’s cost. Graduate student tuition also saw a 6.9 percent increase, bringing resident tuition to $10,890 annually and non-resident tuition to $22,950. The addition of 500 more students to the incoming freshman class, the largest to date, will also mean at least $3 million of additional revenue. College of Charleston and Citadel currently have the largest tuition increases at 14.75 and 13 percent respectively, while others, like Coastal Carolina University, with a 4.9 percent tuition hike, held their increases well below USC’s. Last year the Board of Trustees only OK’d a 3.6 percent Budget ● 4A


BENEATH THE SURFACE THINGS TO DO AROUND ARLINGTON FOR UNDER $10 pg. 25 DON’T GET LOST, USE THIS CAMPUS MAP pg. 22 LOTS AND LOTS OF PARKING pg. 6 RUBBING, SUDS AND MUD SOME OF UTA’S OLDEST, AND DIRTIEST, TRADITIONS pg. 5 FIGHT THE FRESHMAN 15 pg. 16


Page 2

Tuesday, June 1, 2010

THE SHORTHORN Survival Guide 2010

Your life. Your news. T H E

Turning Up the Volume T E X A S

A T

A T

A R L I N G T O N

A R L I N G T O N

www.theshorthorn.com

Painting UTA green

No Mercy

Find out more how Lipscomb Hall won UTA’s RecycleMania competition.

Volume 91, No. 54

NEWS | PAGE 2

www.theshorthorn.com

Since 1919

STUDENT LIFE

Learn the details on the baseball team’s 21-2 loss to No. 2 UT-Austin.

BY JOAN KHALAF The Shorthorn senior staff

The Shorthorn: Rasy Ran

Social work freshman Aishah Bilal, left, and finance freshman Chipo Size laugh at their pictures from the photo booth Tuesday at the Residence Hall Association’s 13th Annual Block Party on the University Center mall. Attractions at the party included an obstacle course, custom dog tags, and small-prize games.

Candy Land comes to life at party Multiple activities greeted students at the 13th annual event. BY LORRAINE FRAJKOR The Shorthorn staff

As “I Want Candy” played in the background, biology sophomore Julian Fontanillas stood on-stage facing the crowd nervously,

Students who live on campus share views

About 900 additional students are expected at this summer’s New Maverick Orientation, and the

university is taking measures to accommodate the record-breaking number of incoming students, said New Maverick Orientation director Michael Knox. Prospective freshmen, transfer students and veterans began registering for New Maverick Orientation on April 15. Spring 2010 en-

rollment was up to 28,826 students — a 19.4 percent increase from last spring alone — and the university expects more students in the fall, said university spokeswoman Kristin Sullivan. Twenty orientation leaders, up six from last year, were hired to have more,

CAMPUS LIFE

In other races, Miriam Zehaie won Ms. UTA, Ricky Irving won Mr. UTA.

with hands shaking, stacking mints using only a chopstick during the residence hall game show “In It To Win It.” “In It To Win It” was just one of many activities that took place at the 13th annual Block Party hosted by the Residence Hall Associa-

BY JOHNATHAN SILVER The Shorthorn assistant news editor

PARTY continues on page 3

The university community has until August 2011 to prepare for the ban. BY JOAN KHALAF AND ALI MUSTANSIR The Shorthorn senior staff

All of UTA will be tobacco-free by Aug. 1, 2011. Students, faculty, staff and visitors will not be allowed to use tobacco products at UTA or other campuses like the UTA/Fort Worth Center after that date, President James Spaniolo announced Friday. In a letter addressing the issue, Spaniolo said the university will focus on vigilant enforcement of the current smoking policy, which doesn’t allow anyone to smoke inside or within 50 feet of all campus buildings, during the time before the ban. The policy in place also prohibits smoking under covered areas, in university-owned vehi-

cles, stadiums and the Maverick Activities Center outdoor areas. Spaniolo said people will be allowed to use tobacco products in their vehicles, but only if the windows are up and products are disposed inside the vehicle or off campus. “This sentiment respects the belief that an individual vehicle is personal property,” university spokeswoman Kristin Sullivan said. “This is the president respecting personal space.” Spaniolo said the reaction he’s gotten so far has been generally positive. Sullivan said a plan to enforce the ban will be drawn up within the next year by a group that includes Jean Hood, chair for the committee that studied and proposed the ban, UTA Police and other administrators. The group DECISION continues on page 3

MORE COVERAGE

SURVEY RESULTS

Page 6 • Read a story about other schools that have gone tobacco-free. • Get an update on the tobacco cessation classes. • Check out what students living on campus think of the ban.

Of 29,000 students, faculty and staff surveyed, 3,198 responded to “Which tobacco products do you use?”

Online • Register to comment on stories and share your opinions about the ban. • Answer a poll about your stance on the ban.

26% Use tobacco products Don’t use tobacco products

74%

Source: Tobacco Free Campus Initiative

has been held in Maverick Stadium, making the venue change to Levitt a first in the event’s history. BY WILLIAM JOHNSON The Dallas Morning The Shorthorn staff News columnist WilA Pulitzer Prize- liam McKenzie graduwinning alumnus will ated from the university give the keywith a Master of note speech at Arts degree in the Maverick political science. Celebration The university, honoring the he said, is where achievements of he decided to the university’s embark on a ca2010 graduates. reer in opinion The event, journalism. formerly called “I want to Graduation Cel- William McKenzie, communicate to ebration, will be The Dallas Morning students not to at 8 p.m. on May News columnist quit,” McKenzie 7 at the Levsaid. itt Pavilion. In recent years, the annual event SPEAKER continues on page 3

Columnist William McKenzie will give the keynote address.

Patrick Camacho, art junior

The Shorthorn: Rasy Ran

Accounting graduate student Muhammad Zakaria smokes on Monday outside of the Central Library. Zakaria said he doesn’t like to smoke, but because of the addiction he continues. President James Spaniolo approved a campus-wide smoking ban Friday that will go into effect August 1, 2011.

POLICIES

Students, faculty react to the tobacco ban Possible issues with the ban include students being late for classes, grad student says. BY VINOD SRINIVASAN AND ANDREW PLOCK The Shorthorn senior staff

Although the university’s tobacco ban won’t be in full effect until Aug. 1, 2011, the university community is already reacting. President James Spaniolo’s decision to make the university tobaccofree has created a wave of response. Those supporting the ban cite health issues and those opposing express concern about personal liberties and the logistics, while still finding time to work or go to class. Thierry Tirado, French graduate student, teaching assistant and a smoker, said he doesn’t agree with the decision because it suggests smoking

outdoors is harmful to people and the environment. “If they ban smoking, they should ban things that have a bigger impact on the environment, like gas-guzzling SUVs,” he said. He said he doesn’t plan on quitting and might be late to his classes because he has to go off campus to smoke. Spaniolo said smoking inside cars in parking lots, with the windows rolled up, will be allowed. International business junior Jorge Negrete, a non-smoker, said he doesn’t understand the need for the ban right now and the university should focus on more important matters. “I don’t think they should enforce this because if they are going to make smokers smoke in their cars REACTION continues on page 3

“Smoking bothers me, but it’s much better here than it is in India.” Subrat Sahu, industrial engineering graduate student

NEW continues on page 6

Voters pick Resendez as new SC President

Pulitzer Prize winner to speak at celebration

“I think this is a symbol of the approach the administration is taking. They’re enforcing a change in people in a negative way versus a positive way.”

smaller groups, Knox said. Leaders help new students get acquainted with the university through answering questions and guiding groups on tours and activities. “We want people to get to know their group,” he said.

STUDENT GOVERNANCE

ALUMNI

Tobacco’s time running out

T E X A S

A T

A R L I N G T O N

Volume 91, No. 86 www.theshorthorn.com

Since 1919

Take a break over Spring Break

Defensive breakdown Catch up on the last men’s basketball home game of the season.

Enjoy off time with friends and family or helping others by volunteering PULSE | SECTION B

SPORTS | PAGE 6

STUDENT SERVICES

More leaders were hired to accommodate the record number of new students.

A university-wide tobacco ban will go into effect by August 1, 2011

O F

Thursday March 4, 2010

ONLINE | THESHORTHORN.COM

UTA revamps freshman orientation

CALLING IT QUITS

U N I V E R S I T Y

Volume 91, No. 109

Since 1919

The Shorthorn: Andrew Buckley

New Student Congress Vice President Annie Liu congratulates new Student Congress President Aaron Resendez for his election victory on Tuesday in the University Center. Resendez won the presidential race against Brian Ravkind by more than 300 votes.

“We both tried our best. We were both out there campaigning at 8 a.m. until the polls closed.” Aaron Resendez, 2010-2011 SC President

A mix of excitement and disappointment defined a crowd Tuesday night as election results came in and Aaron Resendez was declared the next Student Congress president. The majority of voters chose Resendez over Brian Ravkind, 772-432 for Student Congress president. Resendez will transition from SC program director to president next Tuesday. Education sophomore Miriam Zehaie took the Ms. UTA title with 516 votes to social work junior Nikki Boyd’s 483 and social work junior Maggie Garza’s 291. Unopposed, finance junior Ricky Irving won the Mr. UTA title with 1,075 votes and current SC secretary Annie Liu won the SC vice presidential slot with 1,069 votes. A gleaming Resendez was met with piercing ovation and hugs. “I’m excited,” he said. “I’m ready for everything that comes with the job – I don’t know – I’m speechless right now.” Resendez said he and Ravkind worked hard for students’ votes. “We both tried our best,” Resendez said. “We were both out there campaigning at 8 a.m. until the polls closed.” A visibly upset Ravkind said he thought he had the student community behind him, but added he still has a science senator seat, which will be a good buffer and aid for furthering other agendas. Some Ravkind supporters assured him he had

TUITION AND FEES

Regents approve 3.95% tuition hike Increases were approved for each campus for 2010-2011, 2011-2012 school years. BY SHARAYAH SHERROD The Shorthorn Staff

Students will pay 3.95 percent more for school next year with Wednesday’s UT System

can be happy with the 3.95 percent increase. “We’re excited to see the proposal pass, and like we’ve told people, it’s an increase, but it’s one of the lowest in the nation,” Long said. Increases were approved system-wide in amounts re-

that were proposed,” President James Spaniolo said. “I think there was a very positive reaction to the proposals, including the one from UT Arlington.” Student Congress President Kent Long, who presented UTA’s proposal to the board with Spaniolo, said he agreed and that he thinks students

Board of Regents’ approval of a tuition increase. Tuition will then increase by 4.63 percent for 2011-2012, once a student-approved fee for the special events center is added. “We were very encouraged that the board approved all of the tuition and fee increases

The Shorthorn: Rasy Ran

PAINT JOB Psychology junior Farah Khraishi applies henna to a student’s arm Wednesday on the University Center mall. Khraishi, representing part of the Muslim Student Association booth, participated in one of many booths set up throughout MAVfest.

TUITION continues on page 4

SPECIAL EVENTS CENTER

Project transforms from vision to reality F

riday’s groundbreaking for the special events center will take place at 2:30 p.m. in parking lots 42 and 43, which are located between Second and Third streets. John Hall, administration and campus operations vice president, said the university is ready to turn its vision into reality. “Friday’s groundbreaking is a landmark event for UT Arlington and a signal of the great things to come for downtown Arlington and our central business district,” he said. “Our facilities team is thrilled to bring a venue of this caliber to the university, city and our community.” The design layout for the event center are conceptual and could change if necessary, said university spokeswoman Kristin Sullivan.

Athletic Department offices

The academic center will be used as a study and tutoring center for athletes.

The center will have two basketball and volleyball indoor-practice courts.

Locker rooms The men and women’s basketball teams and the women’s volleyball team will have their own locker rooms. Each room will have lockers for each player and showers.

Weight Training Room Athletes can train in the center’s weight training room. The room is expected to hold workout equipment for all athletes to use.

Training Room This room will be used for athlete conditioning. The room may include equipment targeted for aerobic workouts. Commissary

— John Harden

Loading dock/ marshalling Mechanical Contains heating and plumbing equipment and machinery.

Central plant Media Center – Not labeled. The center will be used as a pressbox to cover concerts and other athletic events.

Visitor Locker Rooms

Contains heating and plumbing equipment and machinery.

There will be a men and women’s locker room for the visiting teams. Unlike the home team locker rooms, the visiting team will not have showers.

Event Lounges – Not labeled. The lounges will be used for conferences and special meetings.

Athletic Department offices

Main concourse

Athletic Department offices

Administrative faculty and staff will relocate from Maverick Stadium to offices in the center.

LOT AND STREET CLOSINGS To better the special events center groundbreaking, the university has closed parking lots and roads on the campus’s east side. Parking lots 42 and 43, which are located between Second and Third streets, are closed until 5 p.m. Friday. On Friday, Pecan Street from its intersections with UTA Boulevard and Third Street will be closed from 12:30 p.m. to 5 p.m.

Concession

practice their sport. Skaters, councilwoman This activity has resulted want the future skate park in property damage, citations in downtown Arlington. and arrests, said Matt Young, BY JOHN HARDEN The Shorthorn senior staff

Yesha Patel practices her skateboarding skills in empty parking lots, on sidewalks and in public plazas. Property owners around Arlington chase the undeclared sophomore and her friends away regularly off the public and privately owned property, she said. With no skate park facilities within Arlington, many skateboarders use public places to

Tina Mertes, alumna

JOIN THE DISCUSSION Go online to theshorthorn.com to comment on stories and write letters to the editor.

Arlington Parks and Recreation assistant director. Patel said she has been issued more than five citations for skateboarding on private and public property. “We need more parks around school,” Patel said. “Bicyclists and skaters don’t have a place to call home. And with many bikers and skateboarders on campus, downtown would be perfect for the skate park.” Earlier this year, the city’s park department began to

TIMELINE 2008 - Arlington voters approved a $500,000 bond to design and construct a skate park. This week - The city will begin interviewing for positions on a skate park advisory committee. 2012 - Funding will be available for the park.

accept applications for a fivemember skate park advisory committee. The city has finished accepting applications and will begin interviewing for the positions this week.

The committee will be responsible for brainstorming ideas that can help Arlington’s skate park system work effectively, decide the locations for future skate park sites and help design a master plan. In 2008, Arlington voters approved a $500,000 bond to design and construct a skate park. However, the funding will not be available until 2012. The skate park’s features may include half-pipes, quarter-pipes, handrails, pyramids, banked ramps, bowls, snake runs and stair-sets. SKATE continues on page 6

Restrooms

THE SOUND OF MUSIC

Committee to plan skate park design, location “It’s one of those things where you’re caught between two worlds. I used to be a smoker, so back then I wouldn’t have wanted to be told that I couldn’t smoke.”

Event level

Student Academic Center Practice Courts

ELECTION continues on page 6

ARLINGTON

For the story see page 3

Music media junior Kaylen Cryer plays saxophone on Tuesday afternoon on the University Center mall. A group of musicians banded together to help Nikki Boyd campaign for Student Governance elections.

Restrooms

Concession stands

Retractable seating

There will be an estimated four concession stands built into the events center used during sporting events and theatrical performances.

Seating can be retracted to allow placement of a stage in the front of the arena for events like graduation and the Mavericks Speakers Series.

Concession

UTA Boulevard

Main entrance

Seating bowl

Service/storage

The center can seat up to 6,600 people for basketball games, concerts, theatrical productions, graduations and convocations.

Service/storage

Hospitality suite

Future parking garage and residence hall

Street closed 1st Street

Arlington Hall

2nd Street

Lot 42

Lot 43

Restrooms

Street

O F

T E X A S

3rd Street

Service/storage Concession

The Shorthorn: Aisha Butt

Center

U N I V E R S I T Y

O F

Wednesday April 21, 2010

Pecan Street

T H E

Tuesday November 24, 2009

U N I V E R S I T Y

T H E

Maroon 5 pumps up the sold-out Texas Hall crowd. Read the story on page 6 and see more photos at THE SHORTHORN .com.

special events center site

Photo Illustration: Andrew Buckley Courtesy: UT Arlington

Letter from the editor When the university made the deci- to report and print news that affects sion to go tobacco-free by August 1, our readers, we need to participate in 2011, the announcement didn’t come an ongoing discussion to discover what cold turkey. matters to the community. We have an The Shorthorn was folidea, but sometimes we miss lowing the decision making the mark. process — from feedback Since 1919, the award-winpolls to community meetning student newspaper has ings — months prior. been read by countless students, And when the UT Sysbut each graduating class is as tem approved a 3.95 percent different and unique as the first. tuition increase for 2010We don’t want you to simply 2011, The Shorthorn was read the newspaper, we want the first to publish a breakyou to interact with us — we’re a ing story via TheShorthorn. living breathing entity, too. com. Submit guest columns and Mark Bauer, These stories aren’t cov- Editor in chief letters to the editor for print ered by The Shorthorn to in the paper and on the webbuild student journalists’ site. Send us your photos from portfolios, these stories are various campus events. Tell us written about to help create if we’re doing a good job. Tell an engaged community to us if we’re doing a poor job. We give you, the students, the aren’t as relevant without the information you need to stay in-the- dialogue. know and be successful. Until then, we hope to get you off While updates on the stories on the to a good start at your new school with next page are on our radar, it’s impos- this special Survival Guide issue of The sible to blanket the entire campus, no Shorthorn. matter how diligent we are. In order Enjoy your time at the university!

The Shorthorn After Dark Raising Go online to view footage of the Kenya Safari Acrobats’ act at www.theshorthorn.com.

the Bar

T H E

U N I V E R S I T Y

Learn how one baseball player is assembling one of the most impressive seasons in UTA history. SPORTS | PAGE 8 O F

T E X A S

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A R L I N G T O N

Friday April 9, 2010

Volume 91, No. 103 www.theshorthorn.com

Since 1919 STAFF

Buyout offered to 247 of 2,886

STUDENT LIFE

The Shorthorn: Aisha Butt

A Kenya Safari Acrobat slides under the limbo stick, missing the four sharp knives, at Lost in Africa on Thursday night in Texas Hall. The acrobats brought audience members on stage throughout the performance to assist them.

Acrobats show meaning of ‘hakuna matata’ The troupe delivered humor, jumped through hoops and showed feats of strengths. BY HANNAH DOCKRAY The Shorthorn staff

Students trekked through Kenya and watched a lost traveler create an African circus with wild natives without ever leaving campus. EXCEL Campus Activities sponsored the Kenya Safari Acrobats troupe that performed Thursday night at Texas Hall, delivering humor, feats of strength and acrobatic prowess to an audience of 487. An ominous narration accompanied the performers and the lost traveler on his journey

through the African safari to find the perfect circus troupe. Acrobats wore an array of bright colors, beads and animal prints while jumping rope in an unconventional manner by turning somersaults and completing backflips to cheers and yells from the audience. Lauren Almand, EXCEL Kenya Safari Acrobats chair, said the night was a definite success. “I’m really happy with the turnout,” she said. “It was so cool to see that many people enjoy the event.” Spectators witnessed an acrobat lay on a bed of nails and willingly let another performer place another bed of nails on top KENYA continues on page 4

COMPUTING AND TECHNOLOGY

Store holds sale before takeover 247 staff members are eligible for the buyout. There are 2,886 current full-time staff with benefits.

Voluntary separation to personnel offers $20,000 or half of annual salary. BY SHARAYAH SHERROD The Shorthorn staff

The university is offering buyouts to more than 200 staff as they try to whittle $9 million from UTA’s budget to comply with state mandates. “The university would make a one time voluntary incentive payment of $20,000 or 50 percent of the employee’s base annual salary as of May 31 — whichever is greater,” university spokeswoman Kristin Sullivan said. The Voluntary Separation Incentive Program, which the university will use to try to meet the 5 percent budget reduction mandates, does not apply to faculty, but to administrative, professional and classified

full-time staff only, she said. To be eligible, staff must have a total of 20 years of Texas state service or have a combined total of 80 from their age and their service to Texas, with at least 5 years of service to the state, all of which must be the case by May 31. “This is a step to help UT Arlington achieve the state’s mandatory 5 percent budget reductions over the next biennium,” she said. The university has already been working to make cuts in the budget through saving on expenses like travel, but more had to be done, to make up about $9 million, totaling 5 percent of the budget, Sullivan said. Should everyone who is eligible for the program choose to participate, a net savings of $16 million would result. However, university leaders don’t expect all eligible 247 staff members to participate, Sullivan said. BUYOUT continues on page 6 The Shorthorn: Laura Sliva

UTA Computer Store will be moved in the fall semester to the UTA Bookstore. BY WILLIAM JOHNSON The Shorthorn staff

Everything must go at the UTA Computer Store. A clearance sale is taking place in the campus computer store in preparation for the new store, which will be located in the UTA Bookstore in the fall. Follett Higher Education Group, the same company that owns the bookstore, will own and operate the new store. The Adobe and Microsoft suites will not be taking an additional cut, as the license is already discounted. The book-

store will also not be re-ordering the Adobe suites again this semester, but will keep the Microsoft suites in stock until the end of the semester. “Price cuts on items will vary depending on the day,” computer store manager Pam Tremaine said. Items are marked down based on when they were ordered, for how much they were originally purchased for, and how many are left in stock. Items that have no markdown today could sell for 50 percent off tomorrow, Tremaine said. The university’s decision to change vendors for the comSTORE continues on page 4

LIBERAL ARTS

Cadets face fear, leap out of comfort zone ROTC members swam 15 meters in full uniform and tread water for 5 minutes as part of training. BY RACHEL SNYDER The Shorthorn staff

The Shorthorn: Aisha Butt

Criminal justice junior Aivy Nguyen is greeted by nursing senior Ashley Seguin after finishing a 15-meter gear swim at the Water Combat Survival Training on Thursday afternoon in the Physical Education Building.

With a practice rifle in hand, Cadet Pvt. Tachon McClaine stepped nervously toward the diving board‘s end, looking down at the water with a quick breath before diving in. McClaine was one of about 60 new Army Reserve Officer Training Corps. cadets who were pushed from their

comfort zone and into the water for the first time at the Combat Water Survival Training event on Thursday. The training was held in the Physical Education Building’s indoor pool. During training, cadets jumped from a diving board in full uniform for the unexpected entry event. The equipment ditch required cadets to shed their equipment quickly and swim back to the side of the pool. Trainees also swam 15 meters in full uniform and tread water for five minutes. McClaine participated in the training and said she had fun with the unexpect-

ed entry event despite being nervous. “It’s kind of hard to swim in your uniform,” she said. “You panic when you hit the water.” Cadet Cpl. Alecia Johnson has participated in the event about four times. “It makes sure you can swim with your combat gear on,” she said. The training is required for all ROTC students and for those who want to become an officer by Cadet Command. Cadet Capt. Megan Tracy organized the event, which is held twice a year. She COMBAT continues on page 6

BRIEF SUMMARIES OF THESE FRONT PAGE STORIES continue on the next page

News Front Desk ......................... 817-272-3661 News after 5 p.m........................ 817-272-3205 Advertising ................................. 817-272-3188 Fax ............................................. 817-272-5009 UC Lower Level Box 19038, Arlington, TX 76019 Editor in Chief ......................................... Mark Bauer editor.shorthorn@uta.edu News Editor ........................................... John Harden news-editor.shorthorn@uta.edu

Design Editor .................................... Lorraine Frajkor design-editor.shorthorn@uta.edu Copy Desk Chief ............................... Johnathan Silver copydesk-editor.shorthorn@uta.edu Scene Editor ......................................... Andrew Plock features-editor.shorthorn@uta.edu Opinion Editor.................................... ..... Ali Mustansir opinion-editor.shorthorn@uta.edu Photo Editor ..................................... Andrew Buckley photo-editor.shorthorn@uta.edu

Online Editor .......................................... Scott Snider online-editor.shorthorn@uta.edu Webmaster ....................................... Troy Buchwalter webmaster.shorthorn@uta.edu Student Ad Manager ................................... Mike Love admanager@shorthorn.uta.edu Marketing Manager ............................... Ron Williams marketing@shorthorn.uta.edu Production Manager............................ Robert Harper

FIRST COPY FREE ADDITIONAL COPIES 25 CENTS THE UNIVERSITY OF TEXAS AT ARLINGTON 91ST YEAR, © THE SHORTHORN 2010 All rights reserved. All content is the property of The Shorthorn and may not be reproduced, published or retransmitted in any form without written permission from UTA Student Publications. The Shorthorn is the student newspaper of the

University of Texas at Arlington and is published in the UTA Office of Student Publications. Opinions expressed in The Shorthorn are not necessarily those of the university administration.


Tuesday, June 1, 2010

THE SHORTHORN Survival Guide 2010

Page 3

Crash Course Get caught up on UTA’ s 2009-2010 headlines final designs, costs and naming of the university’s College Park University will ban tobacco project that will sit north of the special events center. use on campus by 2011 The board voted to amend All of UTA will be tobaccothe system’s fiscal 2010-2015 free by Aug. 1, 2011. Students, faculty, staff and Capital Improvement Program visitors will not be allowed to to help pay for College Park, use tobacco products at UTA or which rose in cost from $67 other campuses like the UTA/ million to $80 million. The increase in cost is a Fort Worth Center after that date, President James Spaniolo result of the university’s request to add additional retail announced last fall. In a letter addressing the and office space and 81 apartissue, Spaniolo said the univer- ment units for the university’s growing student sity will focus on vigilant enforce- To read these stories in full visit body, which has seen record ment of the curTHE SHORTHORN .com growth in both rent smoking polfall and spring icy, which doesn’t semesters. allow anyone to The Arlington City Council smoke inside or within 50 feet of all campus buildings, during voted unanimously to foot half the years before the ban. The the $36 million bill for the conpolicy in place also prohibits struction of College Park. Deputy City Manager Trey smoking under covered areas, in Courtesy: UT Arlington university-owned vehicles, sta- Yelverton said the figure, based diums and the Maverick Activi- on current projections, will be split by the university and the The $80 million College Park project is scheduled to be completed in August 2012 and will help connect the university to the ties Center outdoor areas. Spaniolo said people will be city. Both sides would pay $18 surrounding community. allowed to use tobacco products million for the parking garage in their vehicles, but only if the portion of the College Park windows are up and products project over a span of 30 years. Unopposed, finance junior The parking garage is part of for the special events center is as spring election results came are disposed inside the vehicle added. in, and Aaron Resendez was Ricky Irving won the Mr. UTA a mixed-use structure that will or off campus. “We were very encouraged declared the next Student Con- title with 1,075 votes and then “This sentiment respects the also house retail space and ad- that the board approved all of gress president. SC secretary Annie Liu won the belief that an individual vehicle ditional residence halls the tuition and fee increases The majority of voters chose SC vice presidential slot with that were proposed,” President Resendez over Brian Ravkind, 1,069 votes. James Spaniolo said. “I think 772-432 for Student Congress there was a very positive reac- president. State leaders ask institutions tion to the proposals, including Education sophomore Mir- for 5 percent budget decrease the one from UT Arlington.” iam Zehaie took the Ms. UTA AUSTIN, Texas (AP) — Unititle with 516 votes to social versity officials are poised to SEC construction begins work junior Nikki Boyd’s 483 trim any excess from the 2010 Groundbreaking for the spe- and social work junior Maggie budget. It’s a request from cial events center began in the Garza’s 291. state leaders. Gov. Rick Perry, spring and construction and is Lt. Gov. David Dewhurst and scheduled to be complete by House Speaker Joe Straus are December 2011. asking state agencies to submit The special events center, applans for reducing their budproved by UT System Board of gets. Regents a year ago, will seat In a letter to agency heads, 6,500 people for athletic comthe three asked for a plan to repetitions, commencements and duce expenditures by 5 percent other community events. no later than Feb. 15. They also “What we see is that the uniasked departments to minimize versity is a big part of our comthe impact on services. munity, our economy and our University spokeswoman fabric,” Arlington City Manager Kristin Sullivan said the uniThe Shorthorn: File Photo Jim Holgersson said. “I think versity administration already the vision that the city and operates a conservative spendMechanical engineering senior Mohamed El Zein smokes with friends on the the university have is that our ing policy. University Center mall. Attendence to smoking cessation classes have been downtown and our university The current state budget, low since the campus wide tobacco ban went into effect. will one day run together.” which started in September and Mayor Robert Cluck said the extends through August 2011, center will do just that. allocated about $87 billion in is personal property,” university “For too long there has been state money to the agencies. UT System Board of Regents spokeswoman Kristin Sullivan The Shorthorn: File Art a rigid line between the city of approve 3.95% tuition increase said. “This is the president reStudents will pay 3.95 per- Arlington and UTA, and now we Student Congress vice president Annie specting personal space.” cent more for school next year are softening that line with the Liu congratulates new SC president Arlington City Council, UT with UT System Board of Re- special events center,” he said. Aaron Resendez for his election vicSystem Board of Regents ap- gents’ approval of a tuition intory April 20 in the University Center. Aaron Resendez elected prove UTA’s College Park devel- crease. Resendez won the presidential race 2010-2011 Student Congress Tuition will then increase opment President against Brian Ravkind by more than COMPILED BY JOHN HARDEN The UT System Board of Re- by 4.63 percent for 2011-2012, A mix of excitement and dis- 300 votes. news-editor.shorthorn@uta.edu gents unanimously approved the once a student-approved fee appointment defined a crowd

BY THE SHORTHORN STAFF


Page 4

Tuesday, June 1, 2010

THE SHORTHORN Survival Guide 2010

Who’s Who at UTA BY BRYAN BASTIBLE The Shorthorn senior staff

Here’s a quick look at the people on campus that make the decisions that affect you. The campus leaders have different origins, but all have one thing in common: they bleed blue and orange. President James Spaniolo Hometown: Cassopolis, Mich. Favorite UTA feature: “My favorite things about UT Arlington is that it is a large, growing university with a beautiful campus and that there is so much positive energy at the university every day.” Advice for freshmen: “Connect with your academic adviser to get a strong start on your college career and get involved with organizations that match your interests. Doing so will put you on the path to success.” If I wasn’t the UTA president, I’d be: “I can’t imagine doing anything other than what I am now doing. I’ll always want to be associated with a university in some capacity because there is no better place to be.” Provost and Academic Affairs Vice President Donald Bobbitt Hometown: Philadelphia, Pa. Favorite UTA feature: “UT Ar-

lington’s diversity and the lofty goals and dreams of our students. I get emotionally charged watching our students walk across the stage to receive their diploma during commencement.” Advice for freshmen: “Get engaged with the campus, find your passion, embrace the challenges and have fun!” If I wasn’t the provost, I’d be: “Teaching chemistry.” Student Affairs Vice President Frank Lamas Hometown: Syracuse, N.Y. Favorite UTA feature: “I think we have a great student body and university community.” Advice for freshmen: “The next four years are transformative time in your life. Embrace the learning that takes place within and outside of the classroom. Get involved and engaged in cocurricular life and the wonderful university community we live. Get to know your peers, faculty and staff. Become leaders in your career field and university community. Have the best and most enriching educational experience of your life while at UT Arlington.”

Get to know administration and student leaders around campus

If I wasn’t the Student Affairs vice president, I’d be: “I think I would either be a college basketball coach or school superintendent, definitely an educator.” Student Congress President Aaron Resendez Hometown: El Paso, Texas Favorite UTA feature: “My favorite thing about UTA is that there is always something to do on campus. Almost every friend I have met has been through attending something on campus, be it an organization, a program or an event I attended.” Advice for freshmen: “Experience college. Don’t just come to class and go home or back to your residence hall. College is much more than that. Get involved somehow and you will enjoy college that much more.” If I wasn’t the SC president, I’d be: “I would be in SC as a senator. I would also find other ways to be connected to the university through other organizations on campus.” Student Congress Vice President Annie Liu Hometown: Taipei, Taiwan Favorite UTA feature: “I absolutely love the diversity of our campus. Everyone I meet has broadened my view of the world in some

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Favorite UTA feature: “My favorite thing about UTA is its diversity and the students’ open minds towards it.” Advice for freshmen: “My number one advice to freshmen is make the best of UTA, and its never too early to become involved on campus.” If I wasn’t Ms. UTA, I’d be: “If I was not Ms. UTA, I could see myself being involved with Multicultural Affairs.”

Mr. UTA Ricky Irving, Jr. Hometown: Houston, Texas Favorite UTA feature: “My favorite thing about UTA is the diversity.” Advice for freshmen: “One advice I would tell freshmen is to have a balance between academics, being involved and having fun.” If I wasn’t Mr. UTA, I’d be: “I could see myself being involved in EXCEL because I love the events EXCEL does and I like planning events.”

The Shorthorn editor in chief Mark Bauer Hometown: Arlington, Texas Favorite UTA feature: “The dynamic growth in diversity and vision for the future.” Advice for freshmen: “Get involved and participate in functions that the organizations put on. And support our athletic teams — go to a baseball game, or whatever else suits your fancy.” If I wasn’t The Shorthorn editor in chief, I’d be: “Immersed in theology, or writing about culture. Or both.”

Ms. UTA Miriam Zehaie Hometown: Dallas, Texas

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Page 5

THE SHORTHORN Survival Guide 2010

Upholding Maverick Traditions Rituals include mud, racing, rubbing and diversity HOMECOMING The Shorthorn: File Photo

Alpha Tau Omega members participate in the Homecoming Golf Cart Parade on Feb. 24 on the UC mall.

INTERNATIONAL WEEK

BED RACES Every fall, students fill Maverick Stadium for the annual Bed Races. This fall will be the 30th event. The event involves students forming teams and pushing beds for 50 yards, while racing for the best time. Each team has five members — four runners and one rider. In addition to the race, there have been several side events like a bungee bounce and a giant pillow fight. Judy Agwu, EXCEL Campus Activities campus traditions director, said her favorite aspect is the costume contest where teams dress up to a particular theme. “I also really like the costume contest because it’s fun to watch the people all dressed up while racing the beds.”

OOZEBALL The dirtiest tradition at UTA is the fall’s annual Oozeball tournament. Teams gather to play volleyball, but in mud. The tournament runs for most of the day. Student Congress President

The Shorthorn: File Photo

Team Beta Theta Pi streaks down the field during their first run at Bed Races on April 1 at Maverick Stadium. Beta Theta Pi won second place in the men’s division.

Aaron Resendez said his favorite part is after playing, standing by the fire trucks and getting layers of mud washed off — an experience he calls cleansing. “Everybody has to experience it at least once,” he said. “Just to say you did it.”

STORY BY DUSTIN DANGLI

Every spring, multicultural student organizations and the International Student Organization take part in International Week. The week is filled with events like the international banner parade, a food fair and talent and fashion shows. The week ends with Global Extravaganza, an international talent show. “I love watching the various culture groups perform on stage and seeing the various dances and singing as well as the intriguing costumes,” English junior Anna Garcia said. “Everybody is very creative and unique in their presentation.”

Since UTA doesn’t have a NCAA football team, Homecoming takes place during basketball season. Nothing else changes. Students crown a Homecoming king and queen and celebrate with weeklong festivities. “It’s very different from other schools. First it’s different because our homecoming game is in the spring during the basketball game,” Mr. UTA Ricky Irving said. “But the different events during homecoming week makes it worthwhile. My favorite events are The Bash and the Golf Cart Parade.” The Bash is a late-night party that features live music and activities based off a theme. Last year’s theme was superheroes and activities included a bouncy boxing ring and a climbing wall. Organizations decorate a golf part and cruise around the university while handing out candy and freebies.

The Shorthorn: File Photo

Interior design freshman Adonti Wallace serves the ball during the annual Oozeball tournament on Aug. 4, 2008.

The Shorthorn: File Photo

The annual International Week Fashion Show showcases the traditional clothing worn by cultures all over the world.

TRADITIONS continues on page 11


Page 6

Tuesday, June 1, 2010

THE SHORTHORN Survival Guide 2010

Parking lot changes planned for fall Plenty of parking available despite major construction made it a priority to provide sufficient parking. Facilities Management has For new students who will it its goal to make sure begin commuting to school, un- made parking will be available declared sophomore Robert Ro- enough major construction of driguez has one piece of advice. despite of campus, said “Get here early, so you can get the eastern edgeJeff Johnson, Faa good parking cilities Managespot,” he said. ment associate R o d r i g u e z “Students who commute director. said incoming to campus should build With constudents who struction of the commute should in an extra half-hour to $76 million arrive early to special events avoid the morn- their schedule to make center and $80 ing parking rush. sure they have time to million College “If you don’t Park developget here by 9 park and catch the next ment beginning a.m., you’ll have in Lot 40 located available shtutle.” to add some across from the walking time to bookstore, many your commute Kristin Sullivan parking spaces to class,” he said. University Spokeswoman will be lost. “Usually, after More than noon is when 984 commuter parking begins spaces will be to open because a lot of students removed as a result of construcleave after that time.” of the special events center, With student enrollment ap- tion proaching 30,000 and a large but the university is prepared to amount of students commutPARKING continues on page 11 ing to school, the university has

BY JOHN HARDEN

The Shorthorn news editor

The Shorthorn: Alanna Quillen

Lot 40 across from Arlington Hall will be the site of the new parking garage. In fall 2012, UTA will add 1,800 parking spaces. Peak parking time during the school year is between 8 a.m. and 12 p.m. when the parking lots are usually packed but students can also use the Mav Mover shuttle system as an option.

Around the clock security Police services extend well beyond closing time The Shorthorn: Aisha Butt

The University Police Station is located off Davis Street and Greek Row Boulevard. Emergency crews can be contacted in case of medical or auto emergencies.

BY JOHNATHAN SILVER The Shorthorn copy desk chief

The UTA Police department isn’t constrained to the average 9 to 5. Officers are always patrolling the campus, and are a phone call or emergency button away. Any sign of suspicious or out-ofthe-ordinary activity warrants a call

to police, said Assistant Police Chief Rick Gomez. It’s better to be safe than sorry, he said. “They should call when they see something suspicious or out of the ordinary,” he said. “I would rather have them err on the side of caution.” Police can be reached for emergencies or crimes in progress by calling 817-272-3003. To report a

crime or non-emergency, call 817272-3381. University spokeswoman Kristin Sullivan said the university is stressing safety in numbers. Don’t walk alone after dark or in usually unpopulated parts of campus, she said. The university has put into effect many ways for students to reach police. They can go to the police department on the far west side of campus, call in or press an emergency button located all over campus. Police services include bicycle registration, 24-hour security escort services, and the Rape Aggression Defense System course, a self-defense class offered at various times of the year. Bilingual education sophomore

SAFETY TIPS Don’t walk alone after dark If you do, walk in a group. Call police if you observe any suspicious activity. Call police if you would like an escort to go anywhere on campus. For emergencies or crimes in progress, call 817-272-3003. To report a crime or non-emergency, call 817-272-3381

Tatiana Castro took the class in 2009 and said she found it enjoyable. “It was awesome because you got to beat up a guy,” she said. Castro and other classmates were shown how they reacted to a classprovided assailant’s attack. She suggested other female students take the course. “I recommend the class to girls who live alone for the first time and who study late at night,” she said. Go online to the UTA Police web page for more information on crime prevention at www.uta.edu/police. JOHNATHAN SILVER news-editor.shorthorn@uta.edu


Tuesday, June 1, 2010

THE SHORTHORN Survival Guide 2010

Page 7


Page 8

Tuesday, June 1, 2010

THE SHORTHORN Survival Guide 2010

Balancing commitments College life presents new responsibilities for students BY ALYSIA R. BROOKS The Shorthorn staff

For some new students, finding time to balance the workload of classes while maintaining an active social life outside of school can be hard. Scheduling is key, and sticking to the schedule is just as important. Maj. Jeannie Deakyne, Military Science Department executive officer, has three tips to improve timemanagement. “Always communicate with your instructors,” she said. “Instructors are not mind readers. They can only help you as much as you are willing to know that you need help.” Considerations have to be made in order to maintain priorities, she said. Deakyne also advises students, if possible, not to take 8 a.m. classes. She said it is easy to get into a

battle with the alarm clock and the snooze button. Her third tip is to read the syllabus and apply it toward developing a semester-long calendar of all major tests and assignments. Janet Ramirez, an English teaching senior, suggests that students allow for a one- to two- hour break on days when they are taking two or more classes. “This way it gives you a chance to relax, go to the gym or find a place to get a head start on any assignments you may have,” she said. Essayist and sociology instructor Harvest Moon has two pieces of advice for incoming students. First, she said to put dates for important tests and assignments in writing, and second — show up to class. “Your classes will provide you with ready-made structure for most

days of the week,” she said. “If you are disciplined about attendance, within a couple of weeks the routine will feel natural and you will be able to find the optimum times for studying, working, and just hanging out. Once you figure out when those times are, stick to them.” Moon also said to be realistic and sign up only for the number of hours you can handle. “Consider the number of hours for which you register as a minimum commitment,” she said. “Plan on investing an average of five hours outside of class for every three hour course on your schedule. It adds up quickly.”

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Tuesday, June 1, 2010

THE SHORTHORN Survival Guide 2010

Hitting the court after hitting the books Intramural sports help students relieve stress and socialize BY SAM MORTON The Shorthorn staff The Shorthorn: File Photo

Kinesiology senior Jeremy Weathers catches a pass with one hand during a wheelchair football game at the Maverick Activities Center.

GET INVOLVED To get involved with intramural activities, contact the MAC at 817-272-3277.

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take part in their favorite sports and interact with the “diverse microcosm� that is UT-Arlington. Drew Barfield, intramural sports assistant director, said getting involved in intramural sports gives students a stressfree opportunity to have fun and meet new people. “It’s a great stress relief, but more importantly, it gives stuINTRAMURAL continues on page 12

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Traditions continued from page 5

The Shorthorn: Andrew Buckley

Page 11

THE SHORTHORN Survival Guide 2010

HEREFORD’S HEAD One tradition at UTA is rubbing E.H. Hereford’s head before an exam. Students say rubbing the bust’s head in the University Center gives good luck for an exam. Hereford was the university’s president from 1946 to 1958. Ms. UTA Miriam Zehaie said she tries to sneak in a rub before each tests, but remembers one time in particular. “I actually have rubbed his head once before my statistics final and with that and studying, I was able to pull the grade that I wanted,” she said. Students who can’t make it to the UC before an exam can rub a virtual head at www.uta.edu/uac/studentsuccess/good-luck-on-yourexam. Each click comes with a university fun fact.

Students traditionally rub the bronze head of Dr. E. H. Hereford in the University Center before tests for good luck.

Parking continued from page 6

replace the loss of spaces with South Cooper Street and at more parking, said university Maverick Stadium and the spokeswoman Kristin Sulli- shuttle runs every 15 minutes. van. “Students who commute Facilities Management to campus should build in restriped some lots during an extra half-hour to their spring break, adding more schedule to make sure they the 300 parking spaces before have time to park and catch summer. the next available shuttle,” she In addition to the added said. parking, the Sullivan said university plans the university on adding more has enough during the sum- For Mav Mover Shuttle Service parking spaces mer sessions, to accommosummer routes and times visit date students Johnson said. THE SHORTHORN .com and additional The parking lot upgrades parking is on are designed the way. to alleviate reAfter winplace removed ning approval lots during the in May, the uniconstruction of the special versity has begun construcevents center and the College tion of its $80 million College Park development, which is a Park development. parking garage, wrapped with The development includes a residence hall and apart- a parking garage containing ments. at least 1,800 parking spaces, “We have more than which is schedule for comple28,000 students enrolled, but tion in August 2012. they’re not all on campus at the same time,” she said. “So no matter what time of the day it is, there will always be parking available.” Sullivan added that the campus community should remember that parking is JOHN HARDEN available in the far lots off news-editor.shorthorn@uta.edu

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THE SHORTHORN Survival Guide 2010

Intramural

INTRAMURAL SPORTS CALENDER (FALL 2010)

ing intramurals kind of slows things down. It’s easier to make friends that way, rather than when you’re rushing back and continued from page 10 forth from class.” While the team sports usudents a chance to interact with other people in a fun environ- ally cost about $10 to $20, the ment,” Barfield said. “In intra- most a student would pay is just under $7, and murals, you interthat’s for a 3-on-3 act with people you basketball tournawouldn’t usually talk “Playing intramument. to and a lot of times rals kind of slows Psychology seyou strike up importhings down. It’s nior Christine tant friendships.” Smith is a big proFrom flag foot- easier to make ponent of how inball, volleyball, soft- friends that way, tramural sports get ball, racquetball, students actively billiards and table rather than when tennis, there’s an you’re rushing back interacting. “I think they’re intramural event and forth from great,” Smith said. for everyone. With “Anything to help nine team sports class.” get kids involved and 13 individual with the school is events, the intramu- Kyle McGinn great.” ral sports on campus broadcast senior Barfield said inare all opportunities tramural sports tie for students to blow off stress from the hustling to and from the diverse campus together. classes. “It’s a great way for students to get involved because most of us are only here for class and then we’re gone,” broadcast SAM MORTON senior Kyle McGinn said. “Playnews-editor.shorthorn@uta.edu

Team Sports Bowling Pre-Season Flag Football Tournament Flag Football Softball 3-on-3 Basketball Ultimate Frisbee Tournament Indoor Soccer Volleyball 3-on-3 Wheelchair Basketball

Tuesday, June 1, 2010

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Entry Date 9/3/2010 9/7/2010 9/8/2010 9/15/2010 9/22/2010 9/22/2010 10/6/2010 10/20/2010 11/17/2010

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Entry Date 8/31/2010 9/1/2010 9/3/2010 9/3/2010 9/15/2010 9/20/2010 9/27/2010 10/11/2010 10/17/2010 11/10/2010 11/18/2010 12/1/2010 12/17/2010

Special Events IM Open House Freshman Day Oozeball Bed races

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THURSDAY

$2.50 WELL LIQUOR $5.00 DOMESTIC PITCHERS

FRIDAY

$3.00 RED STRIPE, FAT TIRE & BLUE MOON $2.50 RUM & COKE

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Tuesday, June 1, 2010

THE SHORTHORN Survival Guide 2010

Page 13

STUDENT SERVICES

Mav Express card provides access, discounts Present the ID at select locations for cheaper meals and deals near campus BY MARISSA HALL The Shorthorn senior staff

From getting into the Maverick Activities Center to receiving a few dollars off lunch, the Mav Express card is essential to life at UTA. Here’s a guide to the ID card. What is a Mav Express card? The Mav Express card is a photo ID card for students, faculty and staff at UTA. It allows access to facilities, is swiped to use meal plans and is used to print at printing stations across campus. It also can be used as a debit card for Mav Express accounts. How do I get one? Bring a government-issued photo identification to the Mav

Express Office to get your card made. You must be registered for class at least one day before you can get your card made, or you can get it during orientation. “You need to be in our system and you need to be active in our system,” said Pascal Robert, campus card operations director. If you don’t show up in the system, the office will allow you to print a schedule as proof of enrollment. “We try to work with the students,” Robert said. Do I have to pay to get one? The first Mav Express card is included in tuition and fees, and there is a $15 fee to replace it. What are the Mav Express Office hours and location? The office is open from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday-Friday during the summer. It’s open from 8 a.m. to 7 p.m. Monday and Tuesday, and 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Wednesday-Friday

during the fall and spring semesters. It’s located by the north main entrance of the University Center. What if I lose my card or think it’s been stolen? There are two ways to deactivate your card if you think it’s been lost or stolen. You can visit the office in person or visit the office’s website and report a lost card, Robert said. On the website, click on the tab called “Manage my ID” and log on with your NetID and password. From there, you can report it lost or stolen and it will be deactivated. If you find your card after reporting it lost, you can take it to the office and it will be reactivated at no cost, Robert said. How do I use the debit feature of the card? You can put money, called Mav Money, on your card. It can be CARD continues on page 36

Office Hours: Mon-Fri 8-6pm Sat 10-5pm

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The Shorthorn: File Photo

The Mav Express card is a photo ID card that allows students, faculty and staff to access facilities and swipe for meal plans and printing. Students can get the card at the University Center north entrance from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Friday during the summer.


Page 14

THE SHORTHORN Survival Guide 2010

Enjoy the good life! More amenities. More choices. More friends, and much more fun.

700 West Mitchell Circle, Arlington, TX 76013 visit us at: centennialcourtUTA.com telephone: 817.436.4800

Tuesday, June 1, 2010

text MAVERICK to 474rate6s4 apply standard


Tuesday, June 1, 2010

Page 15

THE SHORTHORN Survival Guide 2010

Part of something bigger Greek Life provides solidarity and leadership opportunities BY JOAN KHALAF The Shorthorn senior staff

Frank Lopez didn’t think twice about joining his fraternity. “It never came across my mind,” the undeclared freshman and Alpha Tau Omega fraternity new member said. “But I met the GO GREEK guys at a Greek barbecue and For more they kept tellinformation ing me how they about joining were always Greek Life, there for each go to www. other.” utagreeks. The Alpha Chi Omega girls celebrate their new sisterhood with one another in front of their sorority house on Feb. 1. com. Students will be hosted at the beginning with at least of the semester to help interested nine hours comstudents acclimate to the organizapleted at UTA tions. and a 2.5 cuSeth Ressl, Greek Life and Unimulative grade point average are eligible to join the 32-organization versity Events director, said the reason people turn to Greek Life is no Greek community. Each council — the Interfra- different than why they’d turn to ternity, National Pan-Hellenic, other organizations. “People join Greek Life to conPanhellenic and Multicultural Greek — will hold its orientations nect and be part of a larger comthroughout the beginning of the munity,” he said. “It has networking opportunities because people semester for interested students. that you meet in The orientayour organization tions will inform “It never came across might have differstudents how to my mind. But I met the ent connections.” get involved acRessl said it’s cording to the guys at a Greek barbecue like a comprerespective coun- and they kept telling me hensive business. cil’s rules. The “It’s very pracInterfraternity how they were always tical in the way and Panhellenic there for each other.” of managing a councils hold group of people,” rush weeks in Frank Lopez he said. “It’s tanwhich they re- undeclared freshman and Alpha Tau gible leadership cruit through Omega fraternity new member skills.” events, meals Hillary Green, Alpha Chi and activities. The National PanHellenic and Multicultural Greek Omega sorority member, said councils recruit during their ori- being in her sorority gave her opentations, network throughout the portunities in her personal and semester and then present their professional life. She found her curnew members at showcases at the rent Student Governance and Orend of the semester. GREEK continues on page 17 A Greek Life activities fair also

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Page 16

THE SHORTHORN Survival Guide 2010

Tuesday, June 1, 2010

CAMPUS RECREATION

The rec center offers more than a workout provides a plethora of fitness activities, from an indoor running track to free weights and everything in between. “The MAC is a hallmark buildBY JUSTIN SHARP ing,” Campus Recreation director The Shorthorn staff Doug Kuykendall said. “Facilities Many new college students like this really play a role in imgain weight in their first semester proving campus life. It’s a social due to stress and fast food-orient- outlet for the campus that makes ed diets. This pound-packing is students more engaged in the university.” commonly Kuykendall known as “Facilities like this really play a said when stuthe “freshdents take part man 15,” role in improving campus life.” in recreational though for Doug Kuykendall activities, they some it is Campus Recreation director do better in more like 20 classes and or 30. graduate soonThe university has a center to help stu- er. He also said the MAC contribdents fight the fat. The Maverick Activities Center, utes to the wellness of the student a $34.5 million structure with apMAC continues on page 18 proximately 190,000 square feet,

Other benefits at the 190,000 square feet center include a computer and printing lab.

The Shorthorn: Andrew Buckley

The Maverick Activities Center gives students options to keep the “freshman 15” away with exercise machines, basketball courts and more.

MORE INFO

For complete lists of facilities, equipment and hours of operation, visit www.uta.edu/campusrec/ and click on the MAC tab.

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Tuesday, June 1, 2010

Page 17

THE SHORTHORN Survival Guide 2010

Greek

Multicultural Greek Council

Interfraternity Council

• Provides a fraternal experience for local, regional and national organizations for men and women with diverse backgrounds as part of the Office of Student Governance and Organizations.

• Governing body of the North-American Interfraternity Conference, providing support and services to fraternities as well as representing Greek life to the university and the surrounding community.

• The Greek Life Office provides support to these organizations and offers assistance in chapter operations.

• National and International Social Fraternities for Men comprise the council. Student officers serve on the IFC executive board.

DFW LQF

DAW

DAS

Delta Alpha Sigma

Delta Alpha Omega

KDX WDF

LQA

Delta Phi Omega

Kappa Delta Chi

Lambda Theta Alpha

Lambda Theta Phi

Omega Delta Phi

Sigma Lambda Gamma

SLG

QXW

Theta Chi Omega

National Pan-Hellenic Council • Founded to provide cooperation and communication concerning issues of mutual interest for historically black Greek fraternities and sororities.

AKA AFA DSQ KAY WYF FBS SGP ZFB

Alpha Kappa Alpha

Alpha Phi Alpha

Kappa Alpha Psi

Omega Psi Phi

Sigma Gamma Rho

Zeta Phi Beta

Delta Sigma Theta

Phi Beta Sigma

Panhellenic Council • The coordinating body of the National Panhellenic Conference sororities chapters represented on campus. • The council represents national and international social Greek organizations for women. The council has an executive board, one delegate and one alternate from each member group. The council provides support and services to sororities as well as representing sorority life to the university and the surrounding community.

AXW DDD ZTA

Alpha Chi Omega

Zeta Tau Alpha

Delta Delta Delta

DZ

Delta Zeta National

BQP DY FGD PKA SFE SX SP Beta Theta Pi

Delta Upsilon

Phi Delta Theta

Phi Gamma Delta

Pi Kappa Alpha

Pi Kappa Phi

Sigma Phi Epsilon

Sigma Chi

Sigma Lambda Beta

Sigma Pi

Alpha Tau Omega National

ganizations secretary position through a Greek student. And increased social interactions through Greek Life helped her to break out of her shell. “I wasn’t going to do it at first because I was really shy,” the psychology sophomore said. “But I knew a few of the Alpha Chi girls and we immediately clicked. I called my dad crying because I knew that I couldn’t not do it.” To Lopez, joining the fraternity meant security. “I wanted to be part of something bigger than myself,” he said. “I know that wherever I go, there is guaranteed to be a network of brothers near.” JOAN KHALAF news-editor.shorthorn@uta.edu

GIVE LIFE New and return donors can earn up to $60 in a week for their life-saving donations. New donors are always welcome — Just bring your valid photo I.D., social security card and proof of residency. We look forward to assisting you with your life-saving donation. Call for more information or to schedule an appointment Mon. – Fri: 7:30 a.m. – 5:30 p.m. Sat.: 7:00 a.m. – 3:00 p.m. Biomat Arlington 1519 South Cooper St. Arlington, TX 76019 817-461-4764 Within walking distance from UTA

GIVE PLASMA

• The UTA council serves as the official coordinating agent of the campus NPHC organizations to advance their national programs and promote unity.

ATW FDQ PKF SLB

continued from page 15


News staff —remember to wrap the MAC text around the ladder person!! (cover up this text) Page 18

continued from page 16

body, healthy lifestyles and campus involvement. MAC employee Kenneth Freeman said it’s a great place to form friendships. “You see a lot of people you know, and you get to meet new people here,” he said. But the MAC doesn’t just offer exercise. It also has a computer and printing lab with wireless Internet connections. Kuykendall said there are future plans to dress up the lab space and make it more appealing by adding enhanced wireless capability and group work spaces,

Tuesday, June 1, 2010

THE SHORTHORN Survival Guide 2010

which he hopes to furnish with flat screens to assist students in creating project presentations. Psychology junior Taiwo Adeola said he spends about six hours in the MAC most days, for both the computer lab and the gym. “I can save time by studying and working out in the same place,” he said. After spending four years in the military, regular exercise is a habit for nursing freshman Hannah McGuire. She said when she came to UTA in the spring, she went to the MAC to pay for membership but discovered her student fees covered it. “They have a lot of equipment here,” McGuire said. “There are a lot of cardio machines, so there’s

usually no wait.” She said exercising at the MAC makes her feel connected to the people at the university because students are always there. At the same time, she said, it is also a place where she can exercise without being bothered. Kuykendall said he hopes to add 10 to 20 new machines by the fall and expand the existing corner market.

JUSTIN SHARP news-editor.shorthorn@uta.edu

MAC HOURS

The Shorthorn: Andrew Buckley

Summer

Fall & Spring

Monday-Friday 6 a.m.-10 p.m.

Monday-Friday 6 a.m.-midnight

Above: The MAC’s summer hours, class schedules and more information can be found at www.uta.edu/campusrec.

Saturday noon-8 p.m.

Saturday CLOSED Sunday 2 p.m.-10 p.m.

Left: The MAC is just one of many buildings on campus with spacious study areas and computer labs.

Sunday noon-midnight Source: UTA Campus Recreation website

CLIMB TO NEW HEIGHTS with the UTA Library

We can help you f ind information, access knowledge, create multimedia projects, and more!

We have: > High-end Macs and PCs with multimedia software at the Digital Media Studio > Laptop computers for 24-hour checkout > Research appointments with subject experts > Writing Center Tutors

Have a question? Call the Reference Desk 817-272-3394 http://library.uta.edu/


Tuesday, June 1, 2010

Page 19

THE SHORTHORN Survival Guide 2010

U T A R L I N G TO N H E A LT H S E RV I C E S www.uta.edu/healthservices

817-272-2771

Between the University Center and Business Building Your On-Campus Choice for Health Care!

General Medical Clinic Mental Health Women’s Health Pharmacy Immunization Laboratory X-ray Health Promotion and Substance Abuse Education CLINIC HOURS

Quality health care, without breaking the bank.

Monday - Friday* 8:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m.

PHARMACY HOURS

Monday - Friday 8:30 a.m. - 5:00 p.m.

*By appointment only. Walk-in Saturday Clinic (10:00 a.m. - 1: 00 p.m.) available during Fall and Spring terms.

Be A Healthy Maverick

s n a l p l a e gt

n rli

m

UT

A

on

Dining

uta.edu/dining

Sign up for a meal plan in the Housing Office in the University Center

Meal plans available: - Platinum Plan 304 meals 200 Dining Dollars - Gold Plan 210 meals 190 Dining Dollars

- Silver Plan 175 meals 275 Dining Dollars - Bronze Plan 150 meals 350 Dining Dollars

Locations: Connection Cafe - Freshens Smoothies - Chik-fil-A - The Market - Panda Express - Pizza Hut - Einstein Bros. Bagels - Starbucks - Subway - Central Library Cafe - Sushic


Page 20

THE SHORTHORN Survival Guide 2010

Tuesday, June 1, 2010

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Tuesday, June 1, 2010

Do’s, Don’ts for dorm room living Students must follow university rules when decorating dorms BY ALANNA QUILLEN The Shorthorn senior staff

The time has finally come for students to venture outside the comfort of their parents’ nest and into their very own on-campus abode. With move-in day creeping up in August, new found freedom is just around the corner. Do you know what to do with all of your junk and how to cram it all into one small space? Here are some tips and guidelines to follow when it comes to decorating your “home away from home.”

10 COMMON DORM ROOM MUST HAVES: 1. A large rug 2. A cork board 3. A quarter jar for laundry 4. A mattress topper 5. A full-length mirror 6. Large body pillows 7. A collapsible hamper 8. Shower caddy 9. A handheld vacuum 10. Noise cancelling earmuffs or sleep mask

Think Storage Space is tight in most dorms. Make use of the space underneath the bed to put extra clothes, luggage or other miscellaneous items. Try stacking plastic crates next to your bed or desk for additional storage. To save more space, try collaborating with a roommate to figure out who’s bringing what so that there won’t be doubles on items.

Page 21

THE SHORTHORN Survival Guide 2010

Follow Guidelines According to the 2009-2010 Residence Hall Guide, decorations are encouraged as long as they don’t pose a fire or health hazard or damage to the room. Residents will be charged per damage caused by nails, screws, double-stick tape, tacks or stickers on the walls, furniture or fixtures. Make sure not to decorate the outside of the main dorm door because decorations other than Resident Assistant door decorations are prohibited. ALANNA QUILLEN

UNACCEPTABLE ITEMS • Illegal drugs • Incense/candles with wicks • Large furniture • Extension cords • Waterbed • Flammable room decorations • Alcohol (if under age or living with someone under age) • Explosives/fireworks • Weapons/ammunition • Cooking appliances (except blenders and microwaves) • Pets (except fish in a 10 gallon or less tank) • Halogen lamps • AC/space heater • Hanging items to be nailed to a wall Source: Housing Office

news-editor.shorthorn@uta.edu

DECORATING continues on page 36

Be Organized Use closet organizers like a hanging shoe rack to store your belongings vertically on the closet rack. Try buying a small plastic drawer set, for under $10 at most stores, to slip underneath hanging clothes in the closet. You can find 3M plastic hooks at dollar stores to hang bathrobes, jackets or even towels on the back of your dorm or closet door. Try using the hooks that latch onto the top of the door.

Wall Space Bulletin and French memo boards can hold all your pictures, flyers and notes in just a small section of space on the wall. You can even make your own out of cardboard, fabric and ribbon. Make use of a laundry line or sturdy strand of string to hang pictures, documents or clothing across a section of the room or along a wall. Magnets can be your best friend when decorating metal surfaces like a mini fridge. Dry erase boards are a must for communicating with your roommates or making important notes. Try getting two in one with a dry erase calendar at an office store. Instead of sticking to the standard desk lamp, try stringing white or colored Christmas lights around the room for a more festive effect. Try hanging lights in funky shapes like hearts or stars. Dorm room windows already should have blinds, so you can hang up decorative curtains.

Doctors treat victims aboard the Military Sea Lift Command hospital ship USNS Comfort (T-AH 20) off the coast of Haiti. Comfort is conducting humanitarian and disaster relief operations as part of Operation Unified Response after a 7.0 magnitude earthquake caused severe damage in Haiti on January 12. The Comfort and U.S. Navy are leading a multi-national effort to provide emergency medical assistance in Port Au Prince, Haiti.

For more information about how you can become a Force for Good, call 1-877-NAVY-JOB or email MILL_CNRC_lpt_dallas@navy.mil


Page 22

Tuesday, June 1, 2010

THE SHORTHORN Survival Guide 2010

CAMPUS MAP • UNIVERSITY OF TEXAS AT ARLINGTON F15 36 32

35

F5

28

33

TB

34

F12

31

41

Under Construction

F6 38

F7

F4

39 40 AH

GR

MR F8

30

43

42

SMART 29 27

F1

AO

T

UV

F13

LCN

GARAGE

Information Booth

F9

47

LCS

55

F10 53

46 48

26 AL

49

PARKING GARAGE

52

Under Construction

25 50 51

F17

F16


Tuesday, June 1, 2010

Page 23

THE SHORTHORN Survival Guide 2010

FINANCIAL AID

Websites offer resources for yearlong aid Online search engines can provide other alternative sources for students aid. JOHNATHAN SILVER The Shorthorn copy desk chief

Scholarship season is virtually a year-round enterprise nowadays. When your idea of Expected Family Contribution differs from award letters and Free Application for Federal Student Aid results, financial possibilities don’t stop at the end of those statements. Websites upload new scholarship listings up to the minute, and deadlines per item range all across the calendar. Financial Aid director Karen Krause said her office doesn’t negotiate financial aid awards because they put their best offers up front. If there are changes in students’ circumstances – a death in the family, divorce or loss of a job — then changes to offers may be in order,

she said. There are many external financial aid options, Krause said, but students shouldn’t forget about those offered by the government. “I would definitely not overlook the federal and state aid students can get,” she said. Students have from January until May to apply for funding that starts in the fall and until November for funding for the spring semester only. The following are some alternative online routes to free and borrowed money.

Fastweb.com The free online scholarship, grant, fellowship and contest matching service compiles financial opportunities for high school and college students. Visitors can create a profile and manage results that are based on qualifications and interests ex-

pressed in profiles. According to the website, FastWeb is recommended by 3,600 colleges and universities and the website’s scholarship database of approximately 1.3 million scholarships are worth more than $3 billion.

Findtuition.com Accompanying the blatant name, this site features more than $7 billion in possible aid for students. It shows which avenues students can take to find aid – private loans, government-subsidized loans, scholarships and awards. The site also shares tips on how to maintain good credit when borrowed money is due back. It also explains what happens when payments aren’t made on time and the stresses importance of credit.

Finaid.com

FinAid presents financial aid information applicable to many college students. There are web pages that link to opportunities for people who just need more money, are nontraditional or international students, or are undocumented. Some contests require writing an essay, doing a project, videotaping and recording one’s self or just entering sweepstakes. The website also provides search functions for college internships and jobs.

Scholarships.com This free site, also to the point in its name, hosts information on approximately 2.7 million college scholarships and grants worth, more than $19 billion. It also sponsors its own scholarship opportunities in addition to what other agencies offer. There are many online scholar-

ship search engines, but not all have users’ well-being in mind.

THINGS TO WATCH OUT FOR ACCORDING TO EACH WEBSITE: • Do not pay for help to get FREE money. • Do not give away personal infor mation like credit card numbers and information that could allow someone to steal your identity. • Be patient, pay attention and click with caution. Many ads tend to pop up on scholarship and contest websites and aid seekers accidently subscribe to something they aren’t looking for.

JOHNATHAN SILVER news-editor.shorthorn@uta.edu


Page 24

THE SHORTHORN Survival Guide 2010

Tuesday, June 1, 2010

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Tuesday, June 1, 2010

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THE SHORTHORN Survival Guide 2010

Budgeted Fun Arlington outings for just a few bucks Looking for something cheap and fun is a paradox for most college students, but some UTA student discounts and local establishments geared toward the college crowd make the search a little easier. The Mainstage Theatre is host to student productions and is located in the Fine Arts Building on the ground floor.

The Shorthorn: Will LaVoncher

Nursing senior Mickey Pham plays a game of nine ball Tuesday afternoon in Bowling and Billiards. Prices for bowling: $2 per game per person, $5 per hour per lane up to 4 bowlers with a $1 shoe rental. Prices for billiards: $2 per table per half hour up to four people, $3 per table per hour up to four people.

BOWLING AND BILLIARDS (ON-CAMPUS) Since 1964, Bowling and Billiards has offered a 12-lane bowling alley, a pool hall and a TV room that houses video gaming events. Students can play for $2 per person all day on Thursdays and Sundays.

The Shorthorn: Will LaVoncher

Where: University Center, (817) 272-2674 When: 8 a.m.-10 p.m. Monday – Thursday, 8 a.m.-11 p.m. on Fridays, 3 p.m.-11 p.m. on Saturdays, 3 p.m.-9 p.m. on Sundays Price: Billiards: $2 per half-hour, $3 per hour, up to four people per table. Bowling: $2 per game/per person, $5 per hour, up to four bowlers, $1 shoe rental.

UTA ARTS

ALLEY CATS

The art scene at UTA offers students a glimpse at future performers and artists right here on campus. From Theatre Department productions, music concerts and multiple gallery exhibits, UTA offers art cultivation throughout the year at little or no cost to students.

Putt-Putt’s bowling hall and arcade, Alley Cats, offers laser tag, bowling, pool and a rock wall to add to the amenities signature to their mini-golf roots. Thursday nights are College Night when — from 9 p.m. to midnight — students get unlimited bowling, laser tag and a $5 game card for only $10.

Where: Mainstage Theatre, Irons Recital Hall, The Gallery at UTA, all located in the Fine Arts Building. Price: Theatre shows $7 for students Music recitals free for students Gallery free to students When: Various times throughout the year

Where: Alley Cats 2008 W. Pleasant Ridge Road Arlington, Texas 76015 When: 9 P.M.-midnight on Thursdays Price: $10 with UTA ID

STORY BY ANDREW PLOCK

Alley Cats is located off Pleasant Ridge and Cooper, and offers laser tag, bowling, billiards, arcade and food. The Shorthorn: Will LaVoncher

ACTIVITIES continues on page 28


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Clash of the roommates

Library services can help grades

Roommate disagreements, disputes can be solved without conflicts escalating Services include study, media rooms BY WILLIAM JOHNSON The Shorthorn senior staff

The excitement felt by many first-year college students when they meet their new roommates can easily diminish after encountering the first disagreement. Things will come up between you and your future roommate, but there are specific ways to handle certain situations, said resident assistant Alexa Alarcon. Alarcon is trained in the intervention and mediation of roommate conflicts. “We suggest that roommates first try to communicate problems with each other directly,” Alarcon said. “Then when a mediator is necessary, they should call in their R.A.” Asking before borrowing belongings, keeping the living spaces clean and getting permission before bringing company over are ways to strengthen the relationship with your roommate, she said. Communicating issues that

O O B

KS TE

you have with your roommate and being respectful of your roommates personal space and noise preferences can help avoid conflict before they start. “Communicating what you’re comfortable with is the first thing you should do when settling in with your roommate,” Alarcon said. “It’s really the key to a happy living environment.” When moving in with someone new, one of the first things resident assistants ask students to do is fill out a roommate agreement, she said. This written agreement allows for the roommates to come together and decide what is acceptable behavior in the room. For example, some roommates may feel uncomfortable with members of the opposite sex spending the night, she said. Compromises can be made between the two roommates so both are content in their space. Consequences for not following the agreement can be outlined as well. This agreement allows for residents to refer to it

S K O s O D B C XT

in times of conflict. The next step after filling out the agreement is following it. Alarcon said the purpose of an agreement is to accommodate both roommates needs. Repeatedly breaking the agreement fails to accommodate for your roommate and can cause your roommate to not respect your needs. If a consensus cannot be reached between roommates, a resident assistant can help mediate the problem and suggest possible solutions. These staff members receive training for all types of conflict resolution situations before each semester. she said. In extreme cases, your assistant can help you switch rooms if the problem becomes too much for either party to handle.

WILLIAM JOHNSON news-editor.shorthorn@uta.edu

s S E D V M D A G

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projects.” Spending a dedicated amount of time studying helps improve Every semester, Business Junior he said. Matt Morrison spends most of his grades, “It worked for me and still study time in the UTA Central Li- does,” he said. “Every professor says brary. correlation between Morrison said he passed all of there’s a directstudy habits and his spring classes grades. The more with a B average. time you put in, the An accomplishbetter the grade.” LIBRARY HOURS ment he credits to Some of the lihaving a quite place brary’s resources can The Central Library is to study. be accessed at home open 24 hours - 5 days “If I go home where students, facper week. to study, I would ulty and staff can probably spend It’s open from 9 a.m. take advantage of more time on my Sunday through 8 p.m. the library’s research Xbox than my Friday, and Saturday resources. school work,” he from 9 am until 8 pm. Students and said. those with library He said the limembership can use brary has resources http://library.uta.edu/ the library’s website available for stuto search for books, dents looking to articles, journals and make high marks databases. in class Another useful resource is a “I just love everything that’s program called Text a Librarian. available,” he said. “There are comThe program is a resource for puters everywhere and it’s useful LIBRARY continues on page 29 when doing research on school

BY JOHN HARDEN

The Shorthorn news editor


Tuesday, June 1, 2010

THE SHORTHORN Survival Guide 2010

Page 27


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Tuesday, June 1, 2010

THE SHORTHORN Survival Guide 2010

Activities

PLANETARIUM (ON-CAMPUS)

continued from page 25

The Arlington city lights make it difficult to see the stars, but the UTA Planetarium gives you a look at some of the constellations and planets that mark the Texas sky. If stars aren’t your thing, the Planetarium also offers $2 movies. Where: The Planetarium 700 College St. Arlington, Texas 76019 When: $2 movies 5:30 p.m. Wednesdays and Fridays, 2:30 p.m. on Saturdays Price: Planetarium shows $3 with UTA ID, $2 movies The Shorthorn: Aisha Butt

The Shorthorn: Aisha Butt

The Studio Movie Grill located in the Arlington Highlands sells student tickets for $7.50.

The Planetarium is now showing Unseen Universe: The Vision of SOFIA, One World, One Sky, Violent Universe and Black Holes for six dollars.

MOVIE THEATRES

ICE AT THE PARKS

Studio Movie Grill is one of many movie theatres that offers a discount in the area, but the Arlington Highlands location provides more opportunities for after-hours fun.

Beat the Texas heat with ice skating at The Parks at Arlington skating rink. Located next to The Parks at Arlington 18 movie theater, the rink also serves as the home for a hockey league so mall patrons can catch a game for free in the stands on the upper level.

Where: Arlington Highlands 225 Merchants Row Arlington, Texas 76018 Price: $7.50 for students When: View showtimes at www.studiomoviegrill.com

Where: The Parks 3815 S Cooper St., Arlington, Texas 76015 Price: $6 admission, $3 skate rental When: 9 a.m.-4 p.m. on Mondays, 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Tuesdays-Thursdays, 11:15 a.m.-5 p.m. on Fridays, 12:30 p.m.-9 p.m. on Saturdays, 2 p.m.5 p.m. on Sundays

The Parks Mall in Arlington has numerous shops and food choices, as well as a full size ice skating rink. The Parks Mall is located off of Cooper and I-20.

The Shorthorn: Will LaVoncher

TEXAS RANGERS As home to the Texas Rangers, the Dallas Cowboys and Six Flags Over Texas, Arlington shows signs of being the entertainment spot in the Dallas-Fort Worth Metroplex. One getaway is a Texas Rangers game with Grandstand Reserved tickets at $7. Friday home games are FANtastic Fireworks Fridays with $5 parking and a free firework show after the game. Where: Rangers Ballpark in Arlington 1000 Ballpark Way Arlington, Texas 76011 When: Season ends Oct. 3 Price: $7 Grandstand Reserve tickets

The Shorthorn: WIll LaVoncher

Just $6 gets you into the Ballpark in Arlington to watch the Rangers from Grandstand Reserved seating.

VARIOUS DISCOUNTS College expenditures don’t have to be Ramen and pizza. Establishments in the area offer discounts special to UTA students. Check http://www.uta.edu/studentgovernance/new/mavdiscounts.html for all the discounts for available for UTA students.


Tuesday, June 1, 2010

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THE SHORTHORN Survival Guide 2010

Library

ARBROOK PARK

continued from page 26

students to get help from librarians and reference assistants with questions via text message. Students can text 66746 and start their questions with the keyword ASKUTA for service. Standard messaging rates apply. Information Services coordinator Suzanne Beckett put the program together at UTA and said the program is helpful for students with quick questions, fact-checking on papers or research. “We’re trying to make it easy for students to get a hold of the library and to communicate with students,� Beckett said.

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RESERVED GROUP STUDY ROOMS

IS THE MCNAIR SCHOLARS PROGRAM FOR YOU??

The UT Arlington Library maintains seven reserved group study rooms for use by UT Arlington faculty, staff and students. The rooms are designated for group use and the equipment varies among the rooms. See the current schedule of reserved rooms managed by the Central Library Circulation Desk.

Working with first-generation/low-income or underrepresented undergraduates on graduate school preparation leading to the Ph.D.

LAPTOP CHECKOUT UT Arlington students, faculty, and staff can check out laptop computers from the Circulation Desk at Central Library, Architecture & Fine Arts Library, and Science & Engineering Library. Laptops at the branch libraries must be used within the library. Some of the Central Library laptops have a 24-hour checkout period and may be taken out of the building.

WIRELESS INTERNET ACCESS Wireless Internet access is available in Central Library, Architecture & Fine Arts Library, and Science & Engineering Library. JOHN HARDEN News-editor.shorthorn@uta.edu

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Tuesday, June 1, 2010

THE SHORTHORN Survival Guide 2010

STUDENT SERVICES

Job search help available on campus Students can receive tips on how to organize applications and structure rĂŠsumĂŠs BY ALI AMIR MUSTANSIR The Shorthorn senior staff

The job market can be rough, but some university services allow students to gain valuable work experience in effort to prepare them for post-graduate employment. Students Needing a Part-time Job â&#x20AC;&#x201D; SNAP Job â&#x20AC;&#x201D; and Career Services offer programs to assist students in finding on- and offcampus jobs. Human Resources representative Crystal Anderson said she encourages all students to get a job while in college because of the current state of the job market. She said supervisors from a student job could become beneficial references in the future.

On-Campus SNAP Job, located in the Con-

tinuing Education Building, assists on-campus job could make it difstudents in finding jobs all over ficult for students to find other jobs campus, like support staff jobs. An- elsewhere. Anderson said flexibility and derson said there are usually about 400 work-study jobs also available proximity were other major benefits of on-campus work since some on campus. Anderson said she had an on- students donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have cars, and Arlington doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t campus job in have a public the HR departJOB APPLICATION TIPS transportation ment while system. â&#x20AC;˘ Create a class schedule that cre studying at the â&#x20AC;&#x153;If you are ates consistent three to four hour university, and a student livblocks of time. was hired fulling on campus, â&#x20AC;˘ Put the hours you can work on time when she imagine trying your resume. graduated 10 to find a way to â&#x20AC;˘ Put any volunteer experience on years ago. She your resume work,â&#x20AC;? Andersaid she did not â&#x20AC;˘ List any duties you have had at son said. know what she previous jobs Anderson wanted to do said the only when she enrequirement Source: Crystal Anderson, Human Retered college, sources Representative 1 the SNAP Job but her experioffice has is ence working on that applicants campus gave her must be a studirection. â&#x20AC;&#x153;If you do get a job on campus, dent. To register, students have to cretreat it seriously,â&#x20AC;? Anderson said, adding that a bad reference from an ate an online profile at the SNAP

Job and submit a resume online. Then, they can search the database for available jobs. As of May 26, 32 on-campus and work-study jobs were available. Anderson said the most jobs are available at the beginning of a semester. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Always check the website,â&#x20AC;? Anderson said.

Off-Campus Career Services offers the â&#x20AC;&#x153;Hire A Maverickâ&#x20AC;? program for students and alumni to find off-campus jobs. Cheri Butler, Career Services associate director, said there are 200-300 part-time jobs available for students at any given time and up to 1,000 or more full-time and internships available. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a lot,â&#x20AC;? Butler said. Butler said students eligible for work-study could find jobs at nonprofit groups. She said students not eligible could find work in most fields, including food service, part-

time clerical, office work, retail and United Postal Service. Butler said she advises students to look for jobs that pertain to their major because it can provide an advantage in future job searches. She said many skills, like organization and punctuality, can be transferable, but job-specific skills make a large difference on a resume. For example, an education major may benefit by taking a tutoring position. To register for the Hire A Maverick program, students must visit one of the Career Services offices â&#x20AC;&#x201D; located in The University Center, Davis Hall and College of Business â&#x20AC;&#x201D; register and upload a resume. After which, they can search the database for available positions. Butler said students can register as soon as they have been accepted to the university. ALI AMIR MUSTANSIR news-editor.shorthorn@uta.edu

   

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Tuesday, June 1, 2010

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THE SHORTHORN Survival Guide 2010

Get Cultured UTA has more than 50 multicultural organizations BY MONICA S. NAGY The Shorthorn staff

Students looking to learn about other cultures, or find a campus connection to their own, can do so through more than 50 international and multicultural organizations offered on campus. Spanning various backgrounds, groups ranging from the Fine Arts Society of India to the Russian Culture Society are formed by and made up of students. Members participate in meetings and campus events that foster networking and intermingling of cultures. Multicultural Affairs director Leticia Martinez said by joining an organization, students are given ways to celebrate their culture, meet people of varying backgrounds and take part in campus traditions. â&#x20AC;&#x153;They are all social support networks,â&#x20AC;? she said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;A place to

HOW TO JOIN To join or form an organization, visit the Student Governance and Organizations office at the University Center lower level or call 817-272-2293.

find a home away from home.â&#x20AC;? Multicultural groups participate in a number of events every year like Activities Fair Day, International Week and MavFest. MavFest had its first run when it debuted during Diversity Week last spring. The festival features performances by different student organizations and showcases activity booths. With more than 1,000 students in attendance last year, Martinez said she is excited to give it another go. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We totally expect to have a bigger and better MavFest this CULTURE continues on page 36

The Shorthorn: File Photo

Material science graduate student Alex Huang stirs milk tea during the International Week Food Fair on the University Center mall. Fifteen international organizations represented themselves last years fair and sold foods like Russian cookies, Laotian meatballs, and Hindu vegetarian burgers.

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THE SHORTHORN Survival Guide 2010

Fans of The Shorthorn offer survival tips for new students The Shorthorn RECENT ACTIVITY

We went to the ends of the Earth (really, just our Facebook account) to gather the best advice for incoming freshmen and transfers on how to succeed as a Maverick at UTA. The following tips are from current students and alums who walked the campus — or the online classes — before you. Take note, and comment back at www.facebook.com/shorthorn. You also can Tweet us @UTAShorthorn, or comment on our website at TheShorthorn.com.

AMY WILCOX WILLMANN

ERICA GRAF

Loans have to be paid back, and it takes forever, so only borrow what you need.

Three words ... GO TO CLASS. Seriously, even if it’s not required attendance.

STEPHEN PETERS

ANNA MERCADO

Be involved in your campus and don’t take the time for granted.

Take advantage of the library, the amazing gym, explore the different organizations on campus, and always prepare for tests because they are not easy. So STUDYING DOES MATTER!!!!

TIEN TON

AARON ROCAMONTES It’s not high school, there is no free ride so they expect you to think. To succeed you have to learn time management. Period.

Don’t procrastinate. Seek for help early if needed. Take the CLEP exams to get college credits and save on tuition. Get involved on campus. Believe in yourself. :)

.com

d e t n a w p l e h We are currently accepting applications for the following positions for the summer and fall semesters:

• For more information, call 817.272.3188, visit us online at www.theshorthorn.com or stop by our office in the lower level of the UC. • All positions are paid and for currentlyenrolled UTA students only.

• Reporter • Ad Sales Rep • Classified Ad Sales Rep • Sports Reporter • Photographer/ Videographer

• Editorial Cartoonist • Illustrator • Graphic Artist • Copy Editor • Page Designer • Ad Artist

• Online Content Producer • Columnist • Receptionist • Courier • News Clerk


Tuesday, June 1, 2010

THE SHORTHORN Survival Guide 2010

Page 33

Comment back at www.facebook.com/shorthorn KENNY JACOBS

STEVEN MCCAIN

Create an Excel file once you have a syllabus for each class. Then list every due date/test date for the semester in order. That really helps to manage your time around exams and adjust your study time accordingly.

In addition to the previous advise, I suggest getting and staying involved in the campus community. Become more than just a student. Become a contributing member to the overall experience.

JOSEPH FARAH

Jâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;LIN MCCALLUM Go to class and TAKE NOTES! Take summer and winter classes if you have time for that.

1) Pickaprof.com is awesome. 2) Take easy classes for your first semester - because you need to learn how to study. 3) Donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t skip the classes that you are paying for, take notes, study well, and have fun. 4) â&#x20AC;&#x153;International Law,â&#x20AC;? if it is still offered through the College of Business, is an awesome and fascinating class. You should take it, even though it is a very demanding class. (You might enjoy it so much that you continue on to law school, as I did.) 5) Most importantly: BE IMPRESIVE - you are a Maverick.

BARBARA FARMER

BEAUX GRAHAM

Get involved in a productive activity group. I have some life long friends from my days as a student there. Everybody should try dorm life at least once. It encourages creativity and space saving strategies. Truly.

No more than 12 hours of classes for the first couple of semesters. Take classes during the summer semesters itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s more relaxed and by concentrating on only a couple of subjects for each session, knowledge retention is better.

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THE SHORTHORN Survival Guide 2010

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Tuesday, June 1, 2010

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THE SHORTHORN Survival Guide 2010

WELLNESS

Health Center provides basic healthcare The Health Center provides free HIV testing twice a month, on the first and fourth Tuesdays of the month between 10 a.m. and 1 p.m. by appointment only. The BY WILLIAM JOHNSON Heath Center and is open Monday The Shorthorn senior staff through Friday, by appointment, No matter what side of the na- from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. On Sattional healthcare debate you fall, urdays, only general medicine is as a student you have access to available, but students are able to most services offered by the on- come on a walk-in basis. Pharmacy hours are Monday through Friday, campus clinic â&#x20AC;&#x201D; for free. 8:30 a.m. to The Health 5:30 p.m. Center is an For stuon-campus HOURS OF OPERATION FOR dents who outpatient faTHE FALL AND SPRING TERMS want to get cility available involved in to all students Health Center promoting Monday - Friday and the cost of a healthy 8 a.m. - 5 p.m. basic services campus, (by appointment only) is included in Health Sertuition. The Saturday vices sponclinic practices 10 a.m. - 1 p.m. sors a Stugeneral mental dent Health health services, Advisory womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s health Source: www.uta.edu/healthservices Committee. services, x-rays, Members of laboratory tests, the commitimmunizations, tee act as liaisons between the and substance abuse counseling. While doctor visits are free, Health Services administration students must pay for lab work, and the universityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s student body. unless theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re covered by the Stu- The committee meets on the first dent Health Insurance Policy. The Wednesday of every month to policy is $1100 for the full aca- bring feedback about the Health demic year and is the only insur- Center and organize projects at a ance accepted on campus. The luncheon catered by Health Serclinic can, however, print receipts vices. The next meeting will be for students to give to their insur- September 1. â&#x20AC;&#x153;SHAC is something we really ance carriers for reimbursement. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Students can always call ahead want to push students to do,â&#x20AC;? Mebefore they come in for prices,â&#x20AC;? drano said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We really appreciate said Yvonne Merano, Health Ser- the feedback.â&#x20AC;? The university also is responvices communications assistant.

Students have acess to an on-campus medical center that provides basic needs

sible for making sure all students living on campus receive state required vaccinations. By law, all new students moving into university housing must show proof of a meningitis vaccination 10 days prior to moving in. The Health Center can provide the shot to incoming students for $130, which can be covered by student insurance. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Students may pass it when they come to the university for tours, but weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re here,â&#x20AC;? Medrano said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Students can have their health provider, right here, on campus, in between, before and after classes.â&#x20AC;?

WILLIAM JOHNSON news-editor.shorthorn@uta.edu

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Decorating

Culture

continued from page 21

continued from page 31

PROHIBITED ITEMS/ACTIONS INCLUDE: • Permanently affixing any item to any surface in a room. This includes the use of nails, screws, and adhesives such as glues and double-sided tapes. Items that should not be affixed to surface areas include full-length mirrors, dry erase boards, flags, posters, picture frames, bulletin boards, stickers and etc. • Nothing may be displayed or attached to windows in your residence hall living areas including flags, stickers, foil, cans, bottles, window paint and etc. • Nothing should be hung from or attached to the ceilings, sprinklers, or other fire safety devices and no more than 10 percent of any wall should be cov ered. • Drapes must be made of fire retardant materials and hung using tension rods only. Source: UT Arlington Residence Hall Guide 2009-2010

What’s in it for YOU? UTA students with a valid DFW address are eligible for a free Arlington Public Library card! • •

• • •

Tuesday, June 1, 2010

THE SHORTHORN Survival Guide 2010

Free WiFi access, study rooms, and meeting rooms Tutor.com and Learning Express online tutoring and standardized test prep (GRE/GMAT/LSAT/MCAT) Mango Languages - online language learning for 20 languages Entertainment - free movies, music, and books Service learning opportunities - tutor adults or children to read through our literacy program (www.ArlingtonReads.org)

LESS THAN A MILE FROM CAMPUS! 101 East Abram Street

www.arlingtonlibrary.org

year,” she said. Lauren Cutcher, International Student Organization adviser, said ISO members collaborate with other organizations for events like International Week. “The best thing about ISO is that we have students from all over the country who are passionate and proud of where they are from,” she said. I-Week features a food fair, fashion show and a talent show with performances by different international and cultural organizations on campus. Cultural organizations also offer transitory support.

Card continued from page 13

spent at dining and retail locations on campus, residence hall laundry facilities and a few offcampus locations. You can put money on the card in person at the office or online on its website. How can I use my card to get discounts? Show your card to get student rates at various places around the Metroplex. Student Congress also sponsors the Maverick Discount Program, which solicits businesses to give discounts to UTA students. SC President Aaron Resendez said businesses often contact SC

“They are all social support networks, a place to find a home away from home.” Leticia Martinez

Multicultural Affairs director

Siamak Ardekani, Persian Academic and Cultural Society faculty adviser, said one of the major services the group provides is picking up international students from Iran at an airport and providing them with temporary housing. “A lot of these people who come have nobody here,” he said. Services also include helping international students become familiar with the city and campus. Those interested in becoming a member of a group can

get its contact information from the Student Governance and Organizations website. Martinez said most cultural organizations have a Facebook account. Students who do not see a group that celebrates their culture are encouraged to contact the Student Governance and Organizations office to find out how they can form their own organization.

MONICA S. NAGY news-editor.shorthorn@uta.edu

OFF-CAMPUS LOCATIONS THAT ACCEPT MAV MONEY Buck n’ Loons Chipotle CVS/pharmacy CVS/pharmacy Potbelly Sandwich Shop Potbelly Sandwich Shop Subway The College Store Wendy’s

3517 S. Cooper St. 817-466-2825 1390 S. Cooper St. 817-860-0010 5900 W. Pleasant Ridge 817-478-6041 815 E. Abram St. 817-804-0109 2100 N. Collins 817-303-8500 3900 Arlington Highlands Blvd. 817-466-2985 407 W. Abram St. 817-795-5800 620 W. Park Row Drive 817-795-7323 409 W. Abram St. 817-460-8492 Source: www.uta.edu/mavexpress/Test/beta/

to let them know about discounts. The SC parliamentarian or other SC members also go to businesses and ask about discounts. The parliamentarian updates the list every time a business is added or asks to be taken off. View the entire list at www.uta.edu/studentgovernance/sc/maverickdis-

countprogram.php. As of May 28, the list included 24 restaurants, 16 entertainment venues, 25 personal care stores, 26 retail stores and 9 automotive shops.

MARISSA HALL news-editor.shorthorn@uta.edu


Tuesday, June 1, 2010

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Get Your Money Faster Studen t ID + ATM Ca rd

Have your financial aid refunds and paychecks automatically deposited to your FREE Wells Fargo College Checking® account*. Then access your funds easily and conveniently with your enhanced Mav Express Card.

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Fast and easy access to your financial aid refunds and paychecks The enhanced Mav Express Card. Use it on and off campus: • As your official campus ID • To access campus facilities and events • At Wells Fargo® ATMs for free, including 3 on campus and over 200 in Dallas/Fort Worth • To make purchases using your PIN

Your Free Wells Fargo College Checking account includes: • No monthly account service fee • Free access to Wells Fargo Online® Banking and free Bill Pay at wellsfargo.com • Free Direct Deposit of your financial aid refunds and paychecks

Visit the Wells Fargo Financial Services Convenience Center located in the UTA University Center for more information. Wells Fargo Financial Services Convenience Center Monday - Friday 9:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. • (817) 299-9151 If you already have a Wells Fargo account, you can download the UTA Direct Deposit form at: http://www.uta.edu/policy/forms/accounting/2-13.xls * Eligibility subject to approval. Students must provide proof of enrollment at an accredited institution when the account is opened. $100 minimum opening deposit required to open a new checking account. © 2010 Wells Fargo Bank, N.A. All rights reserved. Member FDIC.


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THE SHORTHORN Survival Guide 2010

Tuesday, June 1, 2010


Tuesday, June 1, 2010

READ THE SHORTHORN: YOUR LIFE, YOUR NEWS

FAQs How often does The Shorthorn publish?

The Shorthorn is your newspaper. We cover your campus, your community. We well you about things you won’t learn from other sources. The Shorthorn is all about you!

NEWS

Be informed. The Shorthorn presents the news you care about daily — in print and online.

SCENE

Be connected. Get a glimpse of what is happening around campus with students just like you. Published every Tuesday.

PULSE

Be entertained. This entertainment and dining guide keeps your finger on the PULSE of the DFW area. Published every Thursday.

OPINION

Sound off! Compare your opinions to those of our columnists, editorial board and other students.

SPORTS

Keep up with everything UTA teams are doing. Published every Tuesday-Friday.

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THE SHORTHORN Survival Guide 2010

In 1919, students at Grubbs Yocational College (UTA) needed a name for their new literary/humor magazine. With a $2.50 prize from the dean as incentive, an ensuing contest yielded such poetic possibilities as KornKob, Swat News and Grubworm. In a 3-ballot election runoff, the student body chose Shorthorn. The first issue — 6 by 9 inches, 48 pages with a bull in a bull’s-eye for a cover — appeared in April 1919. The Shorthorn evolved into a newspaper in 1921 and has thrived in spite of world wars, the Depression, threats and much more. On a campus noted for change, The Shorthorn has been a constant, growing into a daily publication in 1977. It remains one of UTA’s oldest traditions and most-respected sources of news and experience. Make reading The Shorthorn — in print or online — one of your UTA habits. Use it to stay informed — just like your fellow UTA students have since 1919.

• Four times a week: Tuesday through Friday – during the fall and spring semesters • Once a week: Wednesday - during the summer. • It’s also online 24/7 at www.theshorthorn.com

Who decides what goes in the paper?

Student editors have sole control over the content of The Shorthorn. However, our editors welcome story ideas. Anyone can submit a story idea, by either calling a reporter or editor. (817-272-3661)

Do I have to be a journalism major to be on staff?

No. You do have to be a UTA student, and students planning careers in journalism, advertising, photography, design, digital media and related fields find Shorthorn experience invaluable.

Are positions paid?

Yes. Pay varies according to position. An editor or manager is paid a fixed rate, a reporter is paid by the story, a sales representative is paid by commission, etc.

How can I get a Shorthorn staff position?

All positions are filled through and application/interview process. Fill out an application and turn it in, and that will get the process started.

www.theshorthorn.com • 817.272.3188


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THE SHORTHORN Survival Guide 2010

Jo

e Maverick Stampe h t d in

e

WELCOME WEEK ’10 Discover the possibilities of college life during Maverick Stampede. Nearly every day during the Stampede, you’ll encounter events and activities that showcase the traditions of Maverick Country, acquaint you with key faculty and staff on campus, and help you forge your first new college friendships. Make sure to keep up with the latest goings-on during Welcome Week at maverickstampede.com.

Calendar of Events

Visit maverickstampede.com

August

›Big Howdy Party ›Pajama Jam ›Blood Drive ›College of Liberal Arts Water &

23 MON ›Residence Hall Move-In ›

In Hall Events

24 TUE ›“Dude, Where’s My Class”

›Waffelopolis ›Death of a Dancing Queen:

Disco Never Dies Until Tonight

25 WED ›MavsMeet Convocation 26 THU 27 FRI 28 SAT

›MavsMeet After Party ›Classes Begin ›Welcome Back Splash ›EXCEL Welcome Back Movie ›Welcome Back BBQ ›Wings, Wieners, & Water ›Movin’ Mavs Alumni Game

30 MON

2 THU ›Blood Drive

›Floats ’n’ Quotes ›Honors College Games Night: Bowling & Billiards

›Multicultural Mavericks

Snacks Event

31 TUE ›Blood Drive

›Carnival Knowledge: ›

UT Arlington’s Library Fun House UTA HOSTS! Welcome Back Mixer

September

1 WED ›Blood Drive

›Maverick Cookout Featuring ›

Activities Fair Day College of Science Welcome Back Ice Cream Social

DIVISION OF STUDENT AFFAIRS

Kickoff

3 FRI ›Blood Drive 6 MON ›Labor Day 8 WED › College of Engineering

Welcome Bash Cookout

9 THU › Global Ground Coffee Hour 10 FRI › Freshman Day 11 SAT

› PHC Greek Splash › Mavericks on a Mission

MAVS MEET C O N V O C AT I O N

Wednesday, Aug. 25 • 4 p.m. Texas Hall MavsMeet Convocation is the University’s formal gathering that marks the beginning of a brand new academic year. It’s an opportunity to reconnect with old friends and make entirely new ones. You’ll be welcomed by the University president, administration, and faculty and introduced to some of UT Arlington’s rich history and distinguishing characteristics. As soon as the convocation ends, the AfterParty begins with a bang. Join in the fun of live music, plenty of food, and activities in a festival-like atmosphere. Visit uta.edu/mavsmeet for details.


view hill

â&#x201E;˘

of the

A College Heights Herald Special Edition

Summer 2010

A guide to surviving the Hill


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