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*Please  note  that  some  of  the  attached  material  is  for  web  ads  or  posters  for  our   newsstands  where  tear  sheets/pictures/screenshots  are  only  available  upon   request.  The  medium  rectangle  web  ad  showed  on  Lanthorn.com  without  scrolling.   The  posters  were  in  the  stands  located  all  around  the  main  and  downtown   campuses.     Lanthorn  Management    


To  Whom  It  May  Concern:   I  am  proud  to  have  the  opportunity  to  recommend  Danielle  Fritz  for  the  Designer  of  the  Year  position   at  this  years  CNBAM  conference.  In  my  experience  at  the  Grand  Valley  Lanthorn,  I  have  never  had  the  pleasure   of  working  with  such  a  talented  and  hardworking  individual  until  Danielle  was  introduced  to  the  team.     From  the  moment  I  first  interviewed  Danielle,  I  knew  that  she  was  special  and  would  be  a  wonderful   asset  to  the  Grand  Valley  Lanthorn.  Danielle  is  a  very  enthusiastic  worker  who  handles  pressure  well.  The   Campus  Accounts  Manager,  Arianna  Fuoco,  says,  “Dani  is  a  hardworking  individual,  always  willing  to   collaborate  with  others.  Her  positive  mindset  provides  a  constant  helping  hand.”  Danielle  would  work  extra   odd  hours  to  ensure  projects  where  completed  at  the  desired  quality  and  would  even  volunteer  to  help  with   other  operations  of  the  newspaper,  such  as  working  with  the  layout  team.     As  an  illustration  major,  Danielle  has  a  unique  skill  that  is  extremely  valuable.  She  has  the  ability  to   sketch  different  designs,  scan  them  into  the  computer,  and  modify  the  images  digitally.  Because  of  this,  we’ve   been  able  to  save  money  on  stock  images  and  have  Danielle  make  custom  designs  for  our  clients  instead.  For   example,  the  cover  of  our  Housing  Guide  was  one  of  Danielle’s  paintings.     If  there  is  one  thing  that  shines  through  more  then  her  talent  and  optimistic  personality,  it’s  Danielle’s   passion.  She  spends  almost  as  much  time  in  the  office  as  the  Editor-­‐in-­‐Chief  and  I,  the  Advertising  Manager.  I’ll   never  forget  the  time  when  one  of  our  clients  needed  an  advertisement  designed  right  before  deadline.  Danielle   asked  me,  “Do  you  need  me  to  miss  class  and  take  care  of  this?”  This  simply  shows  how  much  Danielle  works  to   make  a  difference  at  the  Grand  Valley  Lanthorn.     Overall,  Danielle  is  by  far  the  best  candidate  for  this  award.  If  you  have  any  questions  or  would  like  to   learn  more,  I  would  love  to  tell  you  about  her.     Best,   Angela  Carollo   Advertising  Manager  at  the  Grand  Valley  Lanthorn   advertising@lanthorn.com   616.331.2484  


0051 KIRKHOF CENTER GRAND VALLEY STATE UNIVERSITY ALLENDALE, MI 49401

To Whom It May Concern, It is an honor to recommend Danielle Fritz, Designer at the Grand Valley Lanthorn, for Designer of the year. I can say with great confidence that Danielle has a work ethic and passion unlike anyone I have ever seen before. Her commitment to the Grand Valley Lanthorn is something that makes her extraordinary in the field. She began working for the Grand Valley Lanthorn during her last full year at Grand Valley State University in August of 2012. Danielle demonstrated right away that she had what it takes to be a designer for the Lanthorn. With an impressive portfolio consisting of illustrations, graphic design, layout demonstration and a true passion for Grand Valley State University, she was a true fit for the team from the beginning. Danielle is the most efficient and innovative designer I have worked with since my start at the Lanthorn. She takes pride in her work without being emotionally involved, and on the rare occasion that a client and Danielle had clashing ideas, she did not let it change her perception; business was business to Danielle. The most unique creative insight she brought to the Lanthorn was her steady ability to hand draw much of her work, scan it into the computer, and touch it up a bit to have a finished product for the client. Danielle was the designer that the majority of the account executives entrusted in; she was efficient, timely and has star-worthy work. This is most likely due to her passion for the Lanthorn and Grand Valley, high energy, experience and innovative techniques in the design field. Please feel free to contact me with any questions. Sincerely, MARISSA WINTER ASSISTANT ADVERTISING MANAGER, GRAND VALLEY LANTHORN ADVERTISING@LANTHORN.COM (616) 331-2462


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JANUARY 10, 2013

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ROBERT MATHEWS | GVL

With help from a friend: Ava Ordman of Michigan State University plays the trombone during a recital at the Cook-Dewitt Center. Ordman was accompanied by pianist Derek Polischuk.

EMMA MOULTON | GVL

Going abroad: Kaylie Miller views the Life in Uganda exhibit in the Red Wall Gallery at GVSU.

Shining light on Uganda BY STACY SABAITIS GVL STAFF WRITER

Guest artist, faculty showcase trombone, piano collaborations BY MARY MATTINGLY GVL STAFF WRITER

Where some musicians rely on cutthroat competition to propel to the top, the trombone collegiate community of Michigan relies, instead, on cooperation – this being culminated in a joint recital, held yesterday in the Cook-Dewitt Center on Grand Valley State University’s Allendale Campus. The recital featured Ava Ordman, an associate professor of trombone at the Michigan State University College of Music and Mark Williams, associate professor of trombone at GVSU, collaborating with Derek Polischuk, associate professor of piano at MSU and Helen Marlais, associate professor of piano pedagogy at GVSU. “(Ordman) has an outstanding reputation as a performer and a teacher, and she has strong ties to the Grand Rapids area,” Williams said. After earning a bachelor’s degree in music performance and a master’s of music from the University of Michigan, Ordman was the principle trombonist of the Grand Rapids Symphony Orchestra and an adjunct professor at GVSU for 24 years. She has also received numerous performance accolades and opportunities, including a solo debut at Carnegie Hall in NYC with the American Symphony Orchestra. She has since affiliated with MSU as an associate professor of trombone, and as a chair of the brass and percussion areas. Ordman and Williams met through mutual friends in the GRSO. Williams said the idea for a joint recital was the brainchild of Ordman. For the past two years, she’s asked MSU alumni what professional trombonists live in Michigan and would share a recital with her. “Mark is a great guy and terrific trombonist,” Ordman said. “But I also thought it would be particularly good because we both teach at universities and could perform on both campuses.” Williams and Ordman have worked together before. As colleagues, they frequently communicate, inviting each other’s students to master classes held at both MSU and GVSU. Through this communication, their students gain exposure to a varied group of professionals. Following the success of last night’s recital, the same program will be presented at MSU this weekend. The recital was divided into two parts, separated by an intermission, with the first half featuring Ordman and Williams play-

ing solo pieces, accompanied by Polischuk and Marlais respectively. Ordman played several movements from “Concerto,” written by Ida Gotkovsky. Williams then followed with movements from Gustav Mahler’s “Songs of a Wayfarer,” transposed by Eric Carlson. The varied repertoire left the recital without a definitive theme, though the music performed was largely of the 21st Century. “These are works we enjoy performing,” Williams said. The recital concluded with Ordman and Williams playing three unaccompanied pieces, “Three Bipperies” by Lowell Shaw. The short and lighthearted pieces showed off the players’ skill and virtuosity. Chris Petersmark, a senior music education major, was well aware of Ordman’s stellar performance reputation before the recital. He expressed his excitement to see her work with his teacher, Williams. “She’s an absolutely flawless trombone player,” Petersmark said. “It was two amazing players getting together and putting on an epic concert.” Seeing her perform live was an excellent model as Petersmark grows in his own technique as a trombone player. “I’m at a stage in my trombone playing where I’m developing as a player. Seeing (Ordman and Williams) play together helped me in my musicality,” Petersmark said. As a teacher, Williams believes in the importance of demonstrating one’s capabilities in recitals such as these. “Any opportunity to model performance concepts for students is a vital part in the pedagogy of teaching instruments,” Williams said. This recital was a demonstration of that competency. “Ava’s a consummate professional,” Williams said. “It’s always exciting to have the opportunity to collaborate with other professional musicians, such as (Ordman), Dr. Polischuk and Dr. Marlais.” Ordman was excited to perform at GVSU again and to be back on the Allendale Campus. “I performed in (the) new chapel a few years ago for the memorial recital for Robert Shechtman and did a solo recital long, long ago in Louis Armstrong Theater” she said. “The campus has really evolved since my time here as adjunct faculty way back in the 1970’s. It’s beautiful.” mmattingly@lanthorn.com

Ken VanderWal is a boiler engineer who controls the temperature throughout the Grand Valley State University Allendale Campus, but he has a passion for traveling to different countries. And now he’s behind the newest exhibition in Lake Ontario Hall’s Red Wall Gallery, “Mukono to Kampala: Life in Uganda.” The exhibit is a collection of photographs VanderWal took during 13 mission trips he took to Uganda starting in August 2004. Henry Matthews, director of galleries and collections, wants students to see things from around the world in the galleries around campus. “When I view these photographs it always makes me want to go and participate in the activities, see the sights, meet the people, smell and taste everything of the region,” Matthews said. Matthews said once the exhibit has finished, the photographs will be scattered around campus to spark the interest of students who want to visit Uganda or other countries like it. During a Jan. 8 reception for the gallery, Meaghann Myers-Smith, a study abroad adviser at GVSU, said there is a study abroad program in Uganda within the School of International Training. “We have had a few students participate in a program that focuses on post-conflict studies,” Myers-Smith said. “I do think that these sorts of things around campus help to inspire that thought and eventually bring people to our office.” While Uganda is often depicted as a poor country, VanderWal tried to photograph the positivity he saw in the native people. The gallery features photographs of Ugan-

dan people with expressions of hope on their faces and includes scenes of daily life, as well as the common disease of malaria that is spread throughout the country. “They show people in different stages of life: young, older, healthy and in sick,” VanderWal said. “But what I feel with these people is they have a hope, they are not depressed, they are not downridden, they have, I want to say, next to nothing. I’ve been in their houses where they are 10-foot square, they have no kitchen, no bathroom in their house, so strictly half of it’s a bed, half of it’s a living area, yet they have a hope, a hope where they want something better than life. They will take care of what they have to send their kids to school if at all possible, because they know an education is very important for the future.” VanderWal said his trips to Uganda were sparked by the pastor at his church and by Hope College students from Uganda. After meeting the college students, VanderWal said they wanted him to come and see their home country. “And really what I started doing from the beginning was going to schools, this is anywhere from elementary to high school to colleges and I’m going there to share the gospel,” VanderWal said. “I really do all speaking engagements and no physical labor as some people need to. I’m not out there building houses or none of that stuff.” After his mission trips there, VanderWal said that he plans to move into the home that was built for him after retirement in the outskirts of Mukono. He stays there during his mission trips. “I have almost a westernized house in the middle of Uganda,” VanderWal said. “I have a three bedroom, two bathroom ranch house with all

NEW YEAR’S RESOLUTION:

be green

the conveniences of home.” He said the process for building and paying for a house in Uganda is different than normally in the United States because of the culture. “Ugandan’s do not use banks,” he said. “Typically what they would do is work for a couple of weeks and get enough money to buy a couple bags of cement, make some bricks, and they would build as far as they could afford. They would continue after they make money. I took the Ugandan way and as I could afford it, I built it. There was never a loan on that house and so it was very convenient.” VanderWal said he’s never felt threatened while in Uganda, but because of the culture, he’s perceived as wealthy and has to use certain security measures. “Unfortunately what they required of me, and I hate to say this, but I have to for clarification, because we are white, we are considered wealthy and because of that, I had to add a security fence around my house,” VanderWal said. While VanderWal captured a lot of positivity in the country, there are a large number of people who continue to die from the country’s No. 1 killer, malaria. He hopes to help prevent that by raising money to purchase and distribute mosquito nets in his neighborhood. Paris Tennenhouse, exhibit and collections design manager at GVSU, worked with VanderWal to shrink down his photographs and prepare them for the gallery. She said that while VanderWal’s day job is a boiler engineer, he has other interests, too, and he wants to share them with the community. The exhibition is on display until March 13. For more information on the gallery, go to www.gvsu.edu/artgallery. ssabaitis@lanthorn.com


YOUR SPACE

JANUARY 10, 2013 Grand Valley Lanthorn

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Mark Elliott

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TRUSS

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McVeigh said, because of the issue’s prevalence and how it affects college-age adults. The organization’s members also address issues such as capital punishment, embryonic stem cell research and euthanasia. “Students for Life is a group that focuses on the importance of protecting human life at all stages,” McVeigh said. He will team up with GVSU freshman Bailey Wright to present the pro-life side, and the two MSU students, Brad Varner and Mitchell Pawlak, will debate from the pro-choice position. Varner, a freshman at MSU majoring in physics and math, met McVeigh over Facebook after posting a status with his opinion

MARCH 14, 2013 Grand Valley lanthorn

on abortion. Through a friend of a friend, McVeigh saw the status, befriended Varner, and a number of “mini-debates” ensued. “Then one day I got a message from R.J. saying he appreciated my debate style,” Varner said. “He wanted to have another abortion debate in person, onstage (and) in front of an audience. I couldn’t say no to that.” For the majority of cases when abortion occurs, Varner holds the belief that it is morally permissible. “I would prefer a world in which we did not need abortions but I understand their benefit,” he said. For Varner, debating is about finding the truth and following the logic and evidence wherever it leads. “Debating means that views are not respected, but the individuals who hold them are,” he said. “The views are to be hacked apart to see

their moving pieces, then reconstructed to see if they live up to expectations, and then taken apart every so often and at any challenge to see if they still maintain integrity.” Senior philosophy major Malachi Sullivan is no stranger to debates. Acting as president of the Philosophy Club on campus, he has participated in other more informal debates and will act as moderator to ensure the debate doesn’t get too heated. “The people that are debating are familiar with each other, so that might help keep things under control,” Sullivan said. The structure of the debate should also help keep things in line, he said. The debate will consist of two panels with two people on each side. The first panel will be allowed 15 minutes

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BRIEFS GV REACHES SETTLEMENT OVER GUINEA PIG Grand Valley State University is to pay a $40,000 settlement to student Kendra Velzen and the Fair Housing Center of West Michigan. Velzen and the organization filed the lawsuit in March of last year after they claimed the university denied her requests to keep her guinea pig, which she used as a support animal to help with depression and health issues in on-campus housing, stating it was in violation of federal housing laws. “We believe it was in the best interest of all parties to come to an agreement and avoid going to trial,” said Mary Eilleen Lyon, associate vice president for News and Information Services. “We are pleased we were able to do that.”

FRENCH DEPARTMENT TO HOST MUSIC/POETRY NIGHT Students and staff from the French department of Modern Languages and Literature is welcoming students to attend an event full of music and poetry. “Melodies” will be held March 14 from 6-9 p.m. in the Cook-DeWitt Center on Grand Valley State University’s Allendale Campus. The event is free and open to the public.

MICHIGAN HISTORY DAY BRINGS MIDDLE, HIGH SCHOOL STUDENTS TO GV There will be a Michigan History Day western regional contest at Grand Valley State University on March 16, from 9:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. in the Kirkhof Center. The West Michigan area middle and high school students will be present at the contest, where they have done research on a specific topic. From this research, students will present their findings through art, literature, music, drama, visual communications and writing. The theme of this year’s contest is “Turning Points in History: People, ideas, events.” For more information, call Sean O’Neill, professor of history, at 616-331-3255.

ART GALLERY APP RELEASES GAMING FEATURE A new gaming feature has recently been added to the Art at GVSU mobile application. Each day, the The Art at GVSU app takes votes on nine of the school’s artworks, where users can vote for their favorites. The user with the most points per week wins a $15 gift card.

at the lanthorn we strive to bring you the most accurate news possible. If we make a mistake, we want to make it right. If you find any errors in fact in the lanthorn, let us know by calling 616-331-2464 or by emailing editorial@lanthorn.com.

executive vice president and a vice president of each of the seven main committees. “Applicants should be sure to review the election’s rules and guidelines which is in the elections packet because there are rules and regulations in regards to campaigning,” Vivano said. She said the role of Student Senate within the context of the GVSU community is to “serve as the student voice of what students want to see accomplished or changed at Grand Valley.” “We are a liaison between the students and faculty and staff. As senators, there are countless opportunities to not only work closely with a wide range of faculty, but also sit on academic committees and have the ability to first hand give opinions and feedback about changes being made,” Vivano said. “As a senator, resolutions can be written and oftentimes they get passed on to faculty governance.”

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tracts,” McLogan said. “We do not believe that there will be any adverse impacts in the current fiscal year, which extends through Sept. 30, the reason being that most of the programs that would potentially be affected are forward-funded.” Programs that are forward-funded are paid for through the current fiscal year, “so the soonest there could be potential impact would be Oct. of 2013 or later,” he added. GVSU President Thomas Haas also said there will likely be no immediate impact on GVSU students from the budget cuts. “There is no impact immediately, and as far as long-term, that’s to be determined,” Haas said. “We are hopeful there will be no long-term effects (for GVSU).” Haas mentioned that though there is no immediate worry for students, cuts to programs like the TRiO program, which helps youth from low-income families prepare for college, may have an effect on future enrollees. McLogan said the university is following developments closely as they roll out, but not every detail is known regarding the sequester’s effects on colleges. “Some of the ways that the sequester

to argue their position, then the second panel will have five minutes to ask questions for clarification. The second panel will then present their position for 15 minutes, followed by five minutes of clarification questions by the first panel. Each side will then have 10 minutes for rebuttal and five minutes for concluding remarks. Questions and answers from the audience will follow the debate. The debate will be held 7:309:30 p.m. in 107 Manitou Hall. The Students for Life organization meets Mondays at 9 p.m. in 1104 Kirkhof Center. For more information on the Philosophy Club and a recently formed Debate Club, attend the organization’s meetings Thursdays at 5:30 p.m. in B 1124 Makinac Hall. rjarvi@lanthorn.com

Voter turnout for the Student Senate elections have historically been low. Though voting saw a slight increase in participation from 2010-2011 - around 2,000 total votes cast in 2010, and 2,125 in 2011 – last year’s numbers dipped below 1,000, with only 980 total students who voted online in 2012. Vivano said senators are utilizing classroom whiteboards to write “save” notes and reminders about election packet deadlines and online voting as well as more social media and, Vivano said, “mostly word of mouth.” “I just want to stress the importance of voting,” she said. “It’s important to have as many voters as possible because Senate is seeking to be a diverse body composed of students from all aspects of student life.” All interested GVSU students can pick up a packet at the Student Senate’s office, located at 0040 Kirkhof Center, or download one off it’s website at gvsu.edu/studentsenate under the “election” tab. editorial@lanthorn.com might roll out affecting educational programs is actually not yet heard – not every detail of this is known,” McLogan said. “This is, I think, still a work in progress, as opposed to some other agencies where the response is already known and in some cases occurring – that has not yet happened (for education).” As far as national cuts to small business loans and research grants, McLogan said he does not believe they will affect upcoming graduates in their job search. Whether or not GVSU will have to make overall sacrifices in the future will be known as more details come to light about the sequester’s cuts to higher education, McLogan said. “The level of detail that I would need to have to answer that question has just not yet been forthcoming from Washington,” McLogan said. “We are mindful and we will watch it closely, but we are not overtly worried at this point.” “I think the impact is going to be elsewhere, beyond (colleges),” he said. “The way this is being rolled out in Washington, it is affecting other government agencies more and education less. I think that’s probably the tone for the foreseeable future, but we’re watching closely.” bspaulding@lanthorn.com

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2012, which was lower than in 2007—50.7 percent and 56.8 percent, respectively. Though the percentages have dropped over the past five years, GVSU management professors still generally earn a higher percentage of administrators’ salaries than those at other universities. WMU business professors earned 36.9 and 59 percent of their president’s and provost’s salaries, and CMU’s numbers were at 32 and 44.3 percent. EMU’s were the closest to GVSU’s at 41.6 and 44.2 percent, respectively. Full professors in the management program at GVSU earned about $118,600, which is above the average salary of management professors at CMU who earned $112,000, but below the others. EMU’s management professors averaged $121,500, and WMU’s averaged almost $135,000 per year. “Salary, benefits and working conditions are key in attracting talented employees in a competitive job market,” said Matt McLogan, vice president of University Relations at GVSU. “We pay attention to compensation packages at comparable institutions.” Compensation rates for faculty and administrative positions are set based on market data for similar positions at other universities, which is assessed locally, regionally and nationally. Internal equity is also a factor when determining salaries, according to GVSU’s human resources website. In addition to market averages, performance, relevant experience, applicable educational credentials and responsibility also influence salaries for staff members. “The university also differentiates pay for merit,” Bachmeier said. “The highest performers within their discipline are rewarded in the salary program.” However, the university can’t underpay some to overpay others. “It is a balance, as underpaying hurts the quality of the university and overpaying is not good use of student tuition dollars,” Bachmeier said. Overall, GVSU’s total expenditures for employee earnings and wages for 2012 was just under $142 million. For the same year, WMU’s total expenditure of salaries and wages was $154.8 million, the highest of the four universities examined. CMU’s was $140.6 million, and EMU’s was $131 million. The General Fund Position List can be viewed by clicking on the Budget and Performance Transparency Reporting link found on GVSU’s homepage. For more information on employee compensation, visit www.gvsu.edu/hro. rjarvi@lanthorn.com

Lanthorn Volume 47, Number 50 the Grand Valley lanthorn is published twice-weekly by Grand Valley State University students 62 times a year. one copy of this newspaper is available free of charge to any member of the Grand Valley Community. For additional copies, please contact our business offices. PoStMaSter: Please send form 3579 to:

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tary personnel. I’m excited to see this program go forward...our department will assist both academies in any way that we can.” Yunker said she is excited to be part of this new program, and expects it to have a positive impact on the GVSU community. “Grand Valley is always looking for ways to serve students and this program is a great way to train

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Hosterman said. Hosterman was primarily responsible for organizing the event. There was also a committee including: Virginia Jenkins, the chair of the art department, Tony Thompson, the head of the School of Communications, Dellas Henke, the head of printmaking in the art department and Rick

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MARCH 21, 2013 Grand Valley lanthorn

civilian law enforcement officers who have military experience,” she said. “The graduates from the program may be employed by local law enforcement agencies and will bring their experience and training to the agency and the community they serve.” She does not, however, expect the program to have much effect on enrollment or the curriculum in the Criminal Justice department, as she only anticipates 10 – 20 students to be in the new program. These re-

cruits will be enrolled in separate sections of the current traditional police academy recruits. “Applications to the program are not due until May 1,” Yunker said. “The acceptance process will be complete by May 31 and the academy session will begin on June 24.” Applications and additional information for the MPBTP are available on the GVSU Police Academy website at www.gvsu.edu/cj/policeacademy. For more information, contact Julie Yunker at (616) 331-8515.

Weis, the head of foundations in the art department. There were also numerous students in both departments that helped in the installation of the exhibit. Submissions were judged by artists from different institutions: Johanna Pass from Central Michigan University, Kate Silvio from Kendall College of Art and Design and Mike Rebholz, from Madison, Wisconsin. Categories for the show included ce-

ramics, graphic designs, paintings, sculptures, drawings, illustrations, photographs, mixed media and electronic works, film and video, metals and printmaking – a student received an honorable mention in each of the categories. The exhibit is located in the Padnos Gallery in the Calder Art Center and will be open through March 28.

VIOLATIONS

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year, DeHaan said. Looking at substance use in high schools can give an idea of what may carry over into college. Alcohol use in teens had reached historically low levels in 2012, with 28.1 percent of twelfth-graders reporting they had gotten drunk in the past month, according to the website for the National Institute on Drug Abuse. The website also reported a rise in marijuana use and a decrease of perceived risk. “I think it would be fair to say that some of that translates into our community as well,” DeHaan said. “We have seen a bit of a change, and that change is specific to an increase in drug offenses, and part of that, the greatest share is marijuana.” The GVPD, Alcohol Campus Education and Services, the Dean of Students office and Housing and Residence Life have all done a good job of messaging the health concerns of substance abuse and underage drinking, DeHaan said, but there has been weaker messaging for marijuana throughout the state. “Marijuana has been softened in the minds of people in the state of Michigan,” DeHaan said. “People are identifying it, and we’re seeing individuals saying, ‘well, marijuana is a medicine and therefore it must be

okay to consume, it’s not that bad of a substance,’ so people consume it.” Last year, voters of Grand Rapids passed a measure to decriminalize marijuana, but the plant is still illegal under federal law. In 2008, marijuana was approved for medicinal purposes in Michigan, but because the university receives federal funding, it is still illegal at GVSU for registered patients to use it. For drugs outside of alcohol and marijuana, people know very little about the shortterm effects and almost nothing about the long-term effects, DeHaan said. Prescription drugs have also become more noticeable on campus, which could result in felony charges for an offender. “It is a crime to possess or use prescription drugs that are not prescribed to you,” DeHaan said. “We as a police department here are concerned with the health of our students, (and) with the overconsumption and abuse of any of these products.” Though drug violations are on the rise, alcohol is still the No. 1 offense on campus, he said. The police department has seen higher intoxication levels and a shift in drinking patterns from consumption of beer and wine coolers to grain alcohol. “This is not a dry campus,” DeHaan said. Tailgating is allowed, and alcohol is permitted in apartments for individuals over 21. However, it is prohibited in freshmen living centers.

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STUDENT

CONTINUED FROM A3

ing center consultant at the preview, said the Knowledge Market is a great resource for students once the new library opens, compiling all three services into one cohesive unit. “The writing consultants at the Knowledge Market will help students organize their content and ideas, how to better improve their writing skills, as well as fixing grammatical errors,” Ross said. Johnson said surveys are conducted after students preview the Knowledge Market. “We are excited to hear from students who participate in our preview and we want to know how best to assist them,” Johnson said. “The questions range from

“We’re concerned with the behaviors that are associated with the overconsumption of alcohol,” DeHaan said, which can lead to larceny, malicious behavior, destruction of property and assaultive behavior. Substance abuse can also affect relationships, mental health and an individual’s ability to function. “For people who are consuming marijuana on a regular basis, a lot of those same issues are manifested,” DeHaan said. Regular use of substances by individuals can increase tolerance, which means you have to ingest more to achieve the effect, said Eric Klingensmith, coordinator of the Alcohol Campus and Education office at GVSU. “Alcohol is a drug, it changes the way our brain works, (and) marijuana is a drug that changes the way our brain works,” Klingensmith said. “You’re putting something in your body that is a drug. If you’re abusing it there are going to be side effects.” In addition to health effects, someone who has been caught consuming marijuana can receive a misdemeanor charge and sentenced to a maximum of 90 days in jail and a $100 fine. Those charged with possession could receive a misdemeanor charge resulting in a maximum of one year in jail and a $2,000 fine. Individuals may also lose access to federal loans. A first-time offender charged with a minor in possession of alcohol can be fined up to $100 and may be required to perform

the type of work the student is doing, to the help they received, and what they like and/or don’t like about how the service works. The feedback we receive will help each program refine their service as we prepare to move into the new library.” The concept of the Knowledge Market was the brainchild of Lee Van Orsdel, who is dean of University Libraries, Johnson said. “She wanted the new library to reflect how students use it, which means there is more open work space, resources, technology and student services,” Johnson said. “The Knowledge Market is just one aspect of the new library, but it serves as a good example of the exciting approach being taken.” assistantnews @lanthorn.com

community service and attend substance abuse assessment and treatment services at the individual’s own expense. If an individual is charged with use or possession of substances on campus, information is sent to the prosecutor’s office and adjudicated through the court system, DeHaan said. In addition, the police department sends a referral to the Dean of Students office for anyone in violation of the student code. DeHaan doesn’t know what the future holds, but he doesn’t see the use of these products changing in the near future. “Health and safety is our number one concern,” he said. “We will continue to engage college students.” Not everyone on campus uses substances, but for those that do, the data only reflects the number of students that have been caught, Klingensmith said. Any students seeking help with substance use or abuse are encouraged to visit the Counseling and Career Center. “As a student you get that for free and you might as well take advantage of that,” Klingensmith said. “Come in, sit down and we’ll figure out if this is a problem or not.” For more information about counseling services, visit www.gvsu.edu/counsel. To view campus crime reports, visit ope. ed.gov/security. rjarvi@lanthorn.com

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JANUARY 24, 2013 Grand Valley lanthorn

B5

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

Simien the Whale returns to the Pyramid Scheme Band overcomes seperation to find early success By SHELBy PENdoWSkI

GVL STaff WRiTER

With members Tory Peterson and Zachary Guy living in Grand Rapids and guitarist Rob Jordan in Chicago, finding rehearsal time can be tough for Simien the Whale. But no matter the distance, the band makes it happen. With a mixture of pop, folk and rock elements, the Grand Rapidsbased band creates a sound that resembles their idols, The Beatles. And as they prepare for their first shows since releasing the selftitled album, “Simien the Whale,” last November, the distance continues to cut into rehearsal and preparation time but they make the most of the time they get. They’ll be taking over the Pyramid Scheme on Jan. 27 with Ramona Falls and The Hounds Below, after playing the Loft in Lansing Jan. 26. Tickets for the Grand Rapids show are $10. “(The Pyramid Scheme) is a good size, 250 people, good for our size band,” Guy said. “The people who run it are local and independent people. They are invested in the music.” Just like Peterson and Guy were in 2006 when they started Simien the Whale. “Troy and I call ourselves the production duo, we are Simien

SIMIEN THE WHALE | COURTESY

To the pyramid: Band members Tory Peterson (left) and Zachary Guy (right) haved partnered with guitarist Rob Jordan to form the rock group Simien the Whale.

the Whale,” he said. “We were in a band together when we were 17 and we split ways, then we missed playing with each other.” Recently, Grand Rapids music columnist and localspins.com owner John Sinkeviks chose their album to be the 2012 Local Spin of the Year. “It feels great we got picked for local spin,” Guy said. “The album got picked out of 150 and it is an honor.” Sinkeviks chose the band after their release party at The Pyramid Scheme last year and Simien the

Whale has since joined the Middle of the Mitten Festival and are touring throughout Michigan. Their album can be purchased on iTunes and found on Spotify. “We are trying to sign some support to spread our album around,” Guy said. “We haven’t had a lot of media support, but looking for it on a regional and national level.” Although the band now books several gigs and tours, they don’t forget the beginning. Guy said it’s difficult to start a band, and it’s the

extras, such as a YouTube Channel, Facebook and marketing, which make a band successful. “It takes a lot of hard work behind the scene, like when we started we thought people would come out and find us,” Guy said. He recommends to bands that are just starting out to “ask bands for advice.” “I know that if someone came up to me after a show, I would help them,” he said. “Take the criticism that you get and work really hard.”

The band still works just as hard by putting all of their effort into every show they play – especially the Pyramid Scheme on Jan. 27. “It is nice because we put all this work into it (and) they are going to get every song from the new album,” Guy said. “We are playing with a national touring band, and I wouldn’t say our album is high energy, but we are trying to replicate the record as well as we can so it can be just as good live.” spendowski@lanthorn.com

Women’s Center looks for brave, bold actors By STACy SABAITIS GVL STaff WRiTER

Talking about brave, bold acts can be difficult for some people, but the Grand Valley State University Women’s Center is giving student, faculty, staff and community members a chance to share their stories. “That Takes Ovaries: Bold Women, Brazen Acts,” is back at GVSU for it’s second year, featuring stories of bravery, courage and strength that tackle a range of emotions. Performances aren’t until March 22 in the Kirkhof Center and March 23 at the Wealthy Theatre in Grand Rapids, but the Women’s Center tried to get people excited with the Jan. 22 event, “Leading A Bold Life: Reading and Open Mic Night,” and is hosting auditions Jan. 25 from 3-7 p.m. and Jan. 27 from 2-5 p.m. in the Kirkhof Center, room 1104.

The reading and open mic night was a preview of the main performance in March. The three production chairs read a story from the play, followed by the open mic, where audience members were able to get up and share stories of a time when they were brave. Karen Libman, co-founder of the Vagina Monologues at GVSU and associate professor of theatre, was the master of ceremonies for the event. “I’m a cheerleader for the event and a big supporter of the Women’s Center and the wonderful work that they do,” Libman said. Before last year, GVSU held the “Vagina Monologues” for more than a decade, Libman said. But unlike the set script of the “Vagina Monologues,” Brittany Dernberger, assistant director of the Women’s Center, said with “That Takes Ovaries: Bold

Women, Brazen Acts,” anyone from the GVSU community can submit their stories. The submissions provide the play with a variety of different stories each year. Kira Smith-Butland, the advertising and public relations chair for the event, got involved because of the gender issue at hand. “Gender justice in general is very important to me, for myself and for my family history so that was a big reason why, but also I love theatre,” Smith-Butland said. She said that half of the scenes from this year’s play were submitted from the GVSU community, with the other half coming from the “That Takes Ovaries” book. “People who audition are just, they’re just showing up to audition,” Butland-Smith said. “They don’t have to have any theatre experience, any acting experience,

they don’t have to have written anything, it’s just a matter of showing up and either wanting to get involved because they want to try out theatre maybe, or maybe they want to become more involved with gender justice or specifically the Women’s Center here at GVSU.” She also said if students are afraid of not being able to memorize their lines, there will be a lot of “behind-the-scenes” people to help them practice, and not to worry. “The people auditioning, they probably won’t be professional actors, but over the course of, you know, the six weeks between auditions and the play, they will have memorized all of their things,” Smith-Butland said. “We have a team of directors already selected and they’ve committed to working with our actors a hundred percent along the way.”

Dernberger hopes people will attend the event in March, which raises money for local organizations, such as the YMCA in Grand Rapids, and the Center for Women in Transition in Holland, Mich. to support their antiviolence programs. For more information on the performance or auditions, email ThatTakesOvariesGVSU@gmail. com. ssabaitis@lanthorn.com

GOT TALENT? Audition for “That Takes Ovaries! Bold Women, Brazen Acts” Jan. 25 from 3-7 p.m. Jan. 27 from 2-5 p.m. Kirkhof Center Room 1104

make your smartphone

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available in the apple and android app stores


JANUARY 24, 2013 Grand Valley lanthorn

B5

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

Simien the Whale returns to the Pyramid Scheme Band overcomes seperation to find early success By SHELBy PENdoWSkI

GVL STaff WRiTER

With members Tory Peterson and Zachary Guy living in Grand Rapids and guitarist Rob Jordan in Chicago, finding rehearsal time can be tough for Simien the Whale. But no matter the distance, the band makes it happen. With a mixture of pop, folk and rock elements, the Grand Rapidsbased band creates a sound that resembles their idols, The Beatles. And as they prepare for their first shows since releasing the selftitled album, “Simien the Whale,” last November, the distance continues to cut into rehearsal and preparation time but they make the most of the time they get. They’ll be taking over the Pyramid Scheme on Jan. 27 with Ramona Falls and The Hounds Below, after playing the Loft in Lansing Jan. 26. Tickets for the Grand Rapids show are $10. “(The Pyramid Scheme) is a good size, 250 people, good for our size band,” Guy said. “The people who run it are local and independent people. They are invested in the music.” Just like Peterson and Guy were in 2006 when they started Simien the Whale. “Troy and I call ourselves the production duo, we are Simien

SIMIEN THE WHALE | COURTESY

To the pyramid: Band members Tory Peterson (left) and Zachary Guy (right) haved partnered with guitarist Rob Jordan to form the rock group Simien the Whale.

the Whale,” he said. “We were in a band together when we were 17 and we split ways, then we missed playing with each other.” Recently, Grand Rapids music columnist and localspins.com owner John Sinkeviks chose their album to be the 2012 Local Spin of the Year. “It feels great we got picked for local spin,” Guy said. “The album got picked out of 150 and it is an honor.” Sinkeviks chose the band after their release party at The Pyramid Scheme last year and Simien the

Whale has since joined the Middle of the Mitten Festival and are touring throughout Michigan. Their album can be purchased on iTunes and found on Spotify. “We are trying to sign some support to spread our album around,” Guy said. “We haven’t had a lot of media support, but looking for it on a regional and national level.” Although the band now books several gigs and tours, they don’t forget the beginning. Guy said it’s difficult to start a band, and it’s the

extras, such as a YouTube Channel, Facebook and marketing, which make a band successful. “It takes a lot of hard work behind the scene, like when we started we thought people would come out and find us,” Guy said. He recommends to bands that are just starting out to “ask bands for advice.” “I know that if someone came up to me after a show, I would help them,” he said. “Take the criticism that you get and work really hard.”

The band still works just as hard by putting all of their effort into every show they play – especially the Pyramid Scheme on Jan. 27. “It is nice because we put all this work into it (and) they are going to get every song from the new album,” Guy said. “We are playing with a national touring band, and I wouldn’t say our album is high energy, but we are trying to replicate the record as well as we can so it can be just as good live.” spendowski@lanthorn.com

Women’s Center looks for brave, bold actors By STACy SABAITIS GVL STaff WRiTER

Talking about brave, bold acts can be difficult for some people, but the Grand Valley State University Women’s Center is giving student, faculty, staff and community members a chance to share their stories. “That Takes Ovaries: Bold Women, Brazen Acts,” is back at GVSU for it’s second year, featuring stories of bravery, courage and strength that tackle a range of emotions. Performances aren’t until March 22 in the Kirkhof Center and March 23 at the Wealthy Theatre in Grand Rapids, but the Women’s Center tried to get people excited with the Jan. 22 event, “Leading A Bold Life: Reading and Open Mic Night,” and is hosting auditions Jan. 25 from 3-7 p.m. and Jan. 27 from 2-5 p.m. in the Kirkhof Center, room 1104.

The reading and open mic night was a preview of the main performance in March. The three production chairs read a story from the play, followed by the open mic, where audience members were able to get up and share stories of a time when they were brave. Karen Libman, co-founder of the Vagina Monologues at GVSU and associate professor of theatre, was the master of ceremonies for the event. “I’m a cheerleader for the event and a big supporter of the Women’s Center and the wonderful work that they do,” Libman said. Before last year, GVSU held the “Vagina Monologues” for more than a decade, Libman said. But unlike the set script of the “Vagina Monologues,” Brittany Dernberger, assistant director of the Women’s Center, said with “That Takes Ovaries: Bold

Women, Brazen Acts,” anyone from the GVSU community can submit their stories. The submissions provide the play with a variety of different stories each year. Kira Smith-Butland, the advertising and public relations chair for the event, got involved because of the gender issue at hand. “Gender justice in general is very important to me, for myself and for my family history so that was a big reason why, but also I love theatre,” Smith-Butland said. She said that half of the scenes from this year’s play were submitted from the GVSU community, with the other half coming from the “That Takes Ovaries” book. “People who audition are just, they’re just showing up to audition,” Butland-Smith said. “They don’t have to have any theatre experience, any acting experience,

they don’t have to have written anything, it’s just a matter of showing up and either wanting to get involved because they want to try out theatre maybe, or maybe they want to become more involved with gender justice or specifically the Women’s Center here at GVSU.” She also said if students are afraid of not being able to memorize their lines, there will be a lot of “behind-the-scenes” people to help them practice, and not to worry. “The people auditioning, they probably won’t be professional actors, but over the course of, you know, the six weeks between auditions and the play, they will have memorized all of their things,” Smith-Butland said. “We have a team of directors already selected and they’ve committed to working with our actors a hundred percent along the way.”

Dernberger hopes people will attend the event in March, which raises money for local organizations, such as the YMCA in Grand Rapids, and the Center for Women in Transition in Holland, Mich. to support their antiviolence programs. For more information on the performance or auditions, email ThatTakesOvariesGVSU@gmail. com. ssabaitis@lanthorn.com

GOT TALENT? Audition for “That Takes Ovaries! Bold Women, Brazen Acts” Jan. 25 from 3-7 p.m. Jan. 27 from 2-5 p.m. Kirkhof Center Room 1104

make your smartphone

ADD SOME

YOGA

YOGA HEAT

to your curriculum with YOGA HEAT STUDENT DEAL:

UNLIMITED YOGA from now until

UNTIL MAY 31 for $250

(valid with student id)

smarter with the new Lanthorn app!

available in the apple and android app stores


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