Integrated Design: Clark Nexsen Sustainability Report and Action Plan 2020

Page 1

I N T E G R AT E D D E S I G N

2020 S U S TA I N A B I L I T Y R E P O R T A N D A C T I O N P L A N


Printed on 100% recycled and FSC certified paper


CONTENTS

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8

INTRO

LETTER FROM CLARK NEXSEN CHAIRMAN OF THE BOARD

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

M E R G I N G O F V I S I O N W I T H I N T E G R AT E D S U S TA I N A B L E D E S I G N

I N T E G R AT E D S U S TA I N A B L E D E S I G N

LEVERAGING A TRANSDISCIPLINARY PRACTICE

2030 C O M M I T M E N T PAT H T O N E T Z E R O

CARBON COMMITMENTS

PAT H T O N E T Z E R O

PROJECTS AND RESEARCH

B U I L D I N G O N S U S TA I N A B L E E X P E R T I S E A N D P R O J E C T E X P E R I E N C E

M A R K E T A N A LY S I S

F U T U R E D E M A N D F O R S U S TA I N A B L E D E S I G N

ACTION PLAN

I M P R O V I N G O U R S U S TA I N A B L E D E S I G N P R O C E S S

2020 CLARK NEXSEN SUSTAINABILITY REPORT



INTRO 2020 was a year of great progress for integrated design at Clark Nexsen. Over the last several years, we have invested time and effort to build a design infrastructure for improving project performance that is data-driven and supported by effective tools. That investment is paying off, as design teams leverage our tools and systems to inform better solutions. In our 2020 Integrated Design Report, you will find updates on our projects, processes, and goals for the future. Significant achievements from 2020 include: •

Committed to the 2030 Challenge for Embodied Carbon

Established an official embodied carbon group with leadership in each office

Developed knowledge of REVIT plug-ins that focus on embodied carbon

Increased use of tools and systems for performance monitoring, including Vision and REVIT- based template “Appendix G”

Completed our Project Road Map, which includes a schedule for the key steps in high performance design to act as a guide for design teams

Developed a Sustainable Workplace Checklist for our internal operations and formed sustainability committees in each office to reduce our environmental impact

In many ways, 2020 was a very difficult year as well. The world experienced its worst pandemic since 1918, and much of life as we knew it came to a halt. The abrupt transition to remote work and the subsequent drop in commuter traffic also offers some lessons learned about the impact of emissions on our environment. As we reviewed the firm’s data, we discovered that just our own reduction in company travel saved 600 metric tons of CO2 emissions. These insights will play a role as we develop office action plans for sustainability. Looking ahead to the future of sustainable design, we are prioritizing the reduction of embodied carbon. We kicked off 2021 by committing to the Structural Engineering 2050 Challenge, which calls all structural engineers to eliminate embodied carbon in their projects by the year 2050. To support this goal, we are developing a company system for specifying healthy, low carbon materials and structural systems. We also continue to produce videos and provide internal training to ensure the firmwide adoption of the many systems and tools we’ve developed to improve project performance. Together, our ecosystem of tools positions our design teams to rapidly advance integrated design and deliver benefits for our clients and the environment. The coming years hold tremendous opportunity to address human-driven climate change, and we believe that together, we can preserve and improve our world for future generations. Sincerely,

Clymer Cease, FAIA, LEED AP Chairman of the Board 2020 CLARK NEXSEN SUSTAINABILITY REPORT



EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

M E R G I N G O F V I S I O N W I T H I N T E G R AT E D S U S TA I N A B L E D E S I G N

“TOGETHER WE DISCOVER, INSPIRE, AND SHAPE IDEAS THAT TRANSFORM OUR WORLD” Integrated Design defines our approach to continuously elevating the performance of our projects. We see sustainable design as inherent in our vision to discover and shape ideas that transform the world. By leveraging our interdisciplinary practice to capitalize on the intersections between internal disciplines, we share expertise, gain new insights, and uncover innovative solutions to meet the challenges of sustainability and resilience. Our architects, engineers, planners, interior designers, and support professionals serve a wide range of industries including federal, higher education, science and technology, K-12, industrial, healthcare, transportation, and infrastructure. Our 2020 Integrated Design Report captures key progress from the last year, including how we're applying our tools and systems in the design process and highlighting recent projects with strong reductions in pEUI. The last year has seen us emphasize embodied carbon alongside operational carbon, joining the 2030 Challenge for Embodied Carbon and the Structural Engineering 2050 Challenge. We familiarized our teams with REVIT plug-ins that aid in reducing embodied carbon and support overall sustainability in material selection. In general, we are moving into a strong implementation phase, leveraging the tools we've developed to elevate project performance quickly. Throughout this report, you will see evidence of our commitment to leveraging data to continuously improve our design methodology and project results. Better performance tracking, post occupancy data, and carbon tracking (both embodied and operational) will be central to our ability to achieve the 2030 Challenge. Of equal importance in our industry is the need to provide practical financial data to clients debating sustainable design elements; a blend of cost estimating, projections, and proven post occupancy figures enables us to demonstrate how and where both upfront and long-term cost savings exist. The achievements of 2021 serve as a springboard for what’s to come. The design infrastructure we have established and continue to build on is the foundation for achieving a carbon-neutral design portfolio by 2030. We recognize there is more work to be done to accomplish this lofty goal, and our ongoing action items will guide us as we design for a better, brighter, more sustainable future.

2020 CLARK NEXSEN SUSTAINABILITY REPORT


TRANSDISCIPLINARY Our design professionals include architects; interior designers; mechanical, electrical, plumbing, fire protection, civil, structural, and transportation engineers; and landscape architects and master planners. With 78 LEED Accredited and/or Green Globes Professionals, every discipline incorporates sustainable design expertise and works with intersecting disciplines to develop innovative strategies for more sustainable projects.


n Globes and Well by Discipline None, LEED Green Assoc, LEED AP, LEED AP BD+C, Green Globes and Well by Discipline

LEED AP BD+C

Green Globes

Well

None

SUSTAINABLE EXPERTISE

None, LEED Green Assoc, LEED AP, LEED AP BD+C, …

LEED Green …

LEED AP

40

60

Well

60%

40%

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None, LEED Green Assoc, LEED AP, LEED AP BD+C, Green Globe

None

LEED Green Assoc

LEED AP

LEED AP BD+C

Green Globes

Well

None

None, LEED Green Assoc, LEED AP, LEED AP BD+C, …

EED AP

Architectural

Mechanical

Electrical

Bridge

Structural

Civil

Transportation

Interior Design

Fire Protection

LEED Green …

80%

60%

40%

20%

0%

l l e ral ica ridg ica ctu han ctr B Ele ec M

ite

0

20

40

60

80

LEED AP

100%

ch Ar

2020 CLARK NEXSEN SUSTAINABILITY REPORT


BUILDING SCIENCE GROUP The Building Science Group serves as a companywide resource for energy modeling and analysis with core goals to improve project performance and generate long-term operating cost savings for our clients. Providing dedicated, full-time access to energy modeling from concept design to construction documents, this group is integral to informing design decisions and improving Energy Usage Intensity (EUI) outcomes. Within the greater picture of our integrated design effort, this achievement is central to reducing environmental impact and meeting the 2030 Challenge.


ENERGY MODELING Complex design solutions require robust analysis. Our energy modelers provide high level early analysis, deep dive analysis, and compliance modeling to complement and inform the design process from kick off to completion. High level analysis supports early concept design and may include massing/orientation studies, daylighting optimization, and energy analysis. Deep dive analysis assesses and answers more challenging questions that require thorough investigation – envelope constructions, building systems, moisture transmittance, and computational fluid dynamics, among others. Compliance modeling creates full scale energy models for code compliance or certifications such as LEED or Green Globes.

Option 1: Square

Option 2: Rectangle

Option 3: U Shape

Energy Use Intensity (EUI)

56

56

57

Annual Operating Cost

$253k

$259k

$261k

48 % sDA 19 %ASE (Glare)

81% sDA 33%ASE (Glare)

100 % sDA 42 %ASE (Glare)

Energy Use Profile Gas Heating Equipment Hot Water Cooling Lighting

Peak Cooling Load

Daylighting Daylight Overlit / Glare Underlit

Note: All Results based on ASHRAE 90.1-2010 Baseline

2020 CLARK NEXSEN SUSTAINABILITY REPORT


INTEGRATING BUILDING PERFORMANCE WITH SITE DESIGN Our goal is to integrate the unique qualities of any given site with the building and site infrastructure systems in order to maximize energy performance while protecting natural resources. Using a careful bioclimatic analysis combined with passive solar strategies and renewable energy sources, our team works to minimize energy usage while restoring the environment. Our approach is to focus on helping clients optimize their building systems to increase reliability and resilience, lower costs, and protect the environment.


2020 CLARK NEXSEN SUSTAINABILITY REPORT


SUSTAINABLE INTERIORS Our interiors team sees their role as critical not only to creating an environmentally respectful design, but also to supporting human health and wellness in the built environment. Responsible for specifying the materials and products people interact with every day, the interior design team carefully selects materials that are environmentally friendly, regional, and made of high recycled content. In addition to ongoing education and research regarding non-toxic and sustainable materials options, this group is conducting research on the impact of sustainable interior spaces on workplace productivity.


2020 CLARK NEXSEN SUSTAINABILITY REPORT


SUSTAINABLE INFRASTRUCTURE Our Sustainable Infrastructure Envision Team guides Clark Nexsen's Infrastructure and Transportation departments to design more sustainable site/civil and landscape infrastructure. This group utilizes the Envision system to engage stakeholders, evaluate projects from multiple perspectives, and develop solutions that address life cycle costs and long-term environmental challenges.


RESILIENT DESIGN With 50 percent of the U.S. population living along the coast, our waterfront engineering team plays a high profile role in researching and developing strategies to adapt to rising sea levels. Recent research efforts include a community-driven resilient master plan developed for the Virginia Beach area, which examined current flooding and projected sea level rise as well as neighborhood layouts to reimagine the area for decades to come. Designing for resiliency in coastal settings is just one aspect of delivering sustainable solutions for our clients.

2020 CLARK NEXSEN SUSTAINABILITY REPORT


PROJECT GOALS Essential to the success of every integrated design process is setting clear, meaningful goals for the project and communicating these goals clearly and efficiently throughout the design team. To that end, Clark Nexsen has developed a system for facilitating the establishment of goals early in the project, and documenting those goals in a way that is trackable and easy to share. Our accounting and project management software, Deltek Vision, has been customized to allow design teams to enter their project's goals into a database, incorporating the aspirational goals of the client and designers with clear, measurable sustainability goals within the categories of Habitat, Energy, Water, and Materials. This data is then linked directly with Clark Nexsen's intranet, called "the Cube," making the information easily accessible to the entire design team, ensuring everyone is working together toward the same goals.


SUSTAINABILITY TOOLS A major initiative in growing Clark Nexsen's proficiency in Integrated Design has been the establishment of a set of sustainability tools and resources available to design teams. Through our intranet site, called "the Cube," we have consolidated a number of useful documents and tools including AIA COTE documents, LEED resources, and tools for specifying green materials. In addition, Clark Nexsen has developed a number of in-house sustainability tools, including our "Appendix G." This tool serves as a summary of the AIA COTE Top Ten Toolkit, giving design teams a concise checklist of issues to consider throughout the life of a design project. Appendix G is linked into our Revit template, ensuring that each project addresses these issues and that everyone working on the design documentation has easily access to the established sustainability goals for the project.

01 Integration

02 Community

03 Ecology

04 Water

05 Economy

Owner

WHAT IS THE BIG IDEA BEHIND THIS PROJECT— AND HOW DID THE APPROACH TOWARD SUSTAINABILITY INFORM THE DESIGN CONCEPT?

HOW DOES THIS PROJECT CONTRIBUTE TO CREATING A WALKABLE, HUMAN-SCALED COMMUNITY INSIDE AND OUTSIDE THE PROPERTY?

IN WHAT WAYS DOES THE DESIGN RESPOND TO THE ECOLOGY OF THIS PLACE?

SUSTAINABLE DESIGN CONSERVES AND IMPROVES THE QUALITY OF WATER AS A PRECIOUS RESOURCE.

PROVIDING ABUNDANCE WHILE LIVING WITHIN OUR MEANS IS A FUNDAMENTAL CHALLENGE OF SUSTAINABILITY.

Enter address here

HIGH IMPACT DESIGN STRATEGIES

HIGH IMPACT DESIGN STRATEGIES

HIGH IMPACT DESIGN STRATEGIES

HIGH IMPACT DESIGN STRATEGIES

HIGH IMPACT DESIGN STRATEGIES

Design a building to lift the spirits and delight the senses. If not, why?

Decrease the dependence on single occupancy vehicles. If not, why?

Design landscaping that's comprised of 100% native plantings, especially species that attract pollinators. Avoid all decorative turf grass. If not, why?

Identify your community and ask them what they want. If not, why?

PROJECT GOALS

Create a nighttime habitat by eliminating artificial light and sounds while no humans are present. If not, why?

Make project accessible to someone who might not have otherwise benefited from it. If not, why?

The Big Ideas

0%

METRICS

Community Engagement (1 Manipulation - 5 Citizen Control) 0

Transportation Carbon - Percent Reduction (0% baseline - 100% very high) 0%

USEFUL LINKS AND TOOLS:

Bike Infrastructure - Bike Racks percent provided for occupants (0% baseline - 50% very high)

Review AIA Framework for Design Excellence (in-depth description of all design categories) https://www.aia.org/resources/6077668-framework-for-design-excellence Review AIA Framework for Design Excellence Super Spreadsheet http://clarknexsen/libraries/Sustainability%20Document%20Library/COTE%20Top%20Ten%20Toolkit.xlsx Review past AIA COTE® Top Ten Award Recipients https://www.aia.org/resources/6126355-2019-cote-top-ten-awards Architecture 2030 Palette http://2030palette.org/palette/

Consider providing multi-function, outdoor, or semi-conditioned spaces. If not, why?

METRICS

Potable Water Reduction (0% baseline - 100% very high)

Building Square Feet (refer to program) 0 sq ft

Potable Water Used for Irrigation (0% baseline - 100% very high)

Project Budget (refer to contract)

0%

0%

$0

Rainwater Managed Onsite (0% baseline - 100% very high)

Project Budget Estimate (refer to latest estimate)

0%

USEFUL LINKS AND TOOLS:

Edit your palette: Keep the total number of materials to a minimum. If not, why?

METRICS

0%

0%

Native plantings - Percent of vegetation (0% baseline - 100% very high)

0%

CN: The Cube | Sustainability Initiative and Resources http://clarknexsen/libraries/Sustainability%20Wiki/Home.aspx CN: Integrated Design Agenda Templates I:\Depts\Orgs\Integrated Design\03 Sustainability Tools\Integrated Design Agenda Templates

Vegetated site area - Post Development (0% baseline - 100% very high)

Rightsize the program early and keep the square footage as efficient as possible while managing design for change. If not, why?

Capture and reuse rainwater onsite. (stretch goal) If not, why?

Limit disturbance to the project's natural environment as much as possible. If not, why?

Walk Score (0% baseline - 100% very high) [use https://walkscore.com/ or similar]

What is the story to tell?

Reuse an existing building if possible. If not, why?

Reduce or eliminate outdoor water use. (Irrigation Reduction / Elimination) If not, why? Manage stormwater runoff with the goals of increasing on-site infiltration and improving water quality downstream. If not, why?

Integrate bird collision deterrent design strategies. If not, why?

METRICS

Benchmark indoor water use and compare this number to anticipated use. If not, why?

PROJECT NAME

$0

Estimated Runoff Quantity (0% baseline - 100% very high)

USEFUL LINKS AND TOOLS:

Native Plantings https://www.wildflower.org/plants/

Bike racks and showers https://www.bikeleague.org/content/5-es

Xeriscaping Principals https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Xeriscaping#Principles

Design Ethnography https://www.userfocus.co.uk/articles/what-is-design-ethnography.html

Dark Sky Guidelines https://www.darksky.org/our-work/lighting/lighting-for-industry/fsa/fsa-products/

Mother's Room (1 per 200 FTE) https://www.aia.org/best-practices/17116-recommendations-for-designing-lactationwelln

Bird Friendly Design https://abcbirds.org/wp-content/uploads/2019/04/Bird-Friendly-Building-Design_Updated-April-2019.pdf

0

USEFUL LINKS AND TOOLS: Financing Incentives https://www.dsireusa.org

USEFUL LINKS AND TOOLS:

Walk Score https://www.walkscore.com/

Indoor Water Efficiency https://www.epa.gov/watersense/watersense-products https://www.usgbc.org/RESOURCES/INDOOR-WATER-USE-CALCULATOR https://www.energystar.gov/products

CN: Contact Duke Energy Design Assistance Group (or similar) Wildan Renee Hutcheson, FAIA, LEED AP rhutcheson@willdan.com (919) 634-0749

BENCHMARK EUI

100 kBtu/sf/yr

Net Zero Water Building (NZWB) https://www.buildinggreen.com/feature/net-zero-water-and-more-moving-beyond-low-flow Irrigation Demand Estimation https://bseacd.org/uploads/BSEACD_Irr_Demand_Meth_Rprt_2014_Final_140424.pdf

ENERGY SAVINGS

06 Energy

07 Wellness

08 Resources

09 Change

10 Discovery

SUSTAINABLE DESIGN CONSERVES ENERGY WHILE IMPROVING BUILDING PERFORMANCE, FUNCTION, COMFORT, AND ENJOYMENT.

SUSTAINABLE DESIGN SUPPORTS COMFORT, HEALTH, AND WELLNESS FOR THE PEOPLE WHO INHABIT OR VISIT BUILDINGS.

INFORMED SELECTION OF MATERIALS AND PRODUCTS REDUCES PRODUCT-CYCLE IMPACTS WHILE ENHANCING BUILDING PERFORMANCE.

REUSE, ADAPTABILITY, AND RESILIENCE ARE ESSENTIAL TO SUSTAINABLE DESIGN, WHICH SEEKS TO MAINTAIN AND ENHANCE USABILITY.

HAS THE BUILDING PERFORMED IN WAYS THAT MATCHED EXPECTATIONS DURING DESIGN?

HIGH IMPACT DESIGN STRATEGIES

HIGH IMPACT DESIGN STRATEGIES

HIGH IMPACT DESIGN STRATEGIES

HIGH IMPACT DESIGN STRATEGIES

HIGH IMPACT DESIGN STRATEGIES

80% BELOW BASELINE

PROJECTED EUI

20 kBtu/sf/yr

Select climate and program-appropriate passive strategies. [use Climate Consultant] If not, why?

Ensure that all occupied spaces have access to an operable window. If not, why?

Choose chemicals of concern, such as vinyl, to avoid in the project. If not, why?

Consider embodied value and history of existing building before demo. If not, why?

Ask for utility bills and calculate actual measured EUI. If not, why?

Benchmark and set an Energy Use Intensity (EUI) goal. [use ZeroTool or similar] If not, why?

Give all occupants individual control over their immediate environment. If not, why?

Specify mixes with high percentages of supplementary cementitious materials (SCM) to minimize high-embodied carbon Portland Cement. If not, why?

Assess the probability and type of hazards over the service life of the building and evaluate the consequences of building at a specific site. If not, why?

Call the Owner and ask how it's going every couple of months. If not, why?

Establish design benchmarks and targets for Lighting Power Density (LPD), Window-to-Wall Ratio (WWR), and plug loads. If not, why?

Allow occupants to experience biophilic elements through many senses. If not, why?

Use only FSC-certified lumber. If not, why?

Ask community how project can provide support in times of crisis. If not, why?

Calculate carbon emissions of building construction. (lbs CO2/sf) [use EC3 or similar] If not, why?

Determine how can project support immediate recovery in first days of crisis and in long-term return to normalcy. If not, why?

Develop acoustical goals and a plan for achieving them. If not, why?

Model for energy performance. [Sefaira or other when project includes 80 hrs of MEP] If not, why? Understand and work with occupant behavioral patterns. If not, why? Design solar-ready buildings. If not, why? Conduct a post-occupancy evaluation and commission. If not, why?

Minimize the construction and demolition waste stream from the project. If not, why?

METRICS Quality views (0% baseline - 100% very high) 0%

Operable windows (0% baseline - 100% very high) 0%

METRICS

Benchmark EUI [ZeroTool or similar] 100

0

Daylight sensors installed? (Yes/No) Yes

Projected EUI [Sefaira or similar] 20

CO2 Reduction from Benchmark [EC3 or similar] 0

X No

Occupants per Thermostat (0% baseline - 100% very high) 0%

0

USEFUL LINKS AND TOOLS:

USEFUL LINKS AND TOOLS:

Biophilic Design Reference https://www.terrapinbrightgreen.com/reports/14-patterns/

Climate Consultant Download from CN Software Center

LEED Acoustic Performance Calculator https://living-future.org/declare/declare-about/red-list/

Zero Tool - Baseline and Target Calculator https://zerotool.org/zerotool/

Living Future Institute Red List https://v2.wellcertified.com/

Sefaira Web App https://apps.sefaira.com/page/projects

WELL Building Standard™ http://patternguide.advancedbuildings.net/home

AIA 2030 Design Data Exchange https://2030ddx.aia.org/

Daylighting Pattern Guide https://www.usgbc.org/resources/acoustic-performance-calculator

Watttime - Regional Clean Energy Calculator https://www.watttime.org/

METRICS

TRACKED MATERIALS

Embodied energy - Total CO2 https://buildingtransparency.org/

1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15.

Life cycle analysis conducted - Y/N Yes

X No

Number of EPDs Collected 0

% of construction waste diverted

2020: 80% below baseline EUI 2025: 90% below baseline EUI 2030: Carbon Neutral

PROJECT TAKEAWAYS What were the successes/challenges?

0%

Percent of Reused Floor Area (0% baseline - 100% very high) 0%

Functionality Without Power (0-4 days) $0

Building Design Lifespan (30 yrs. baseline - 200 yrs. very high) 0 yrs.

What is the story to tell?

USEFUL LINKS AND TOOLS:

% of recycled content of building materials 0%

RELi Resilience Action List http://online.anyflip.com/zyqc/ojoi/mobile/index.html#p=15

% of regional materials

Lighting Power Density (LPD) Percent Reduction

AIA 2030 Challenge Targets

METRICS

0

Daylight autonomy [use Sefaira or similar] (0% baseline - 100% very high)

Share mistakes and the strategies for fixing them with... everyone. If not, why?

CN: Predictive Weather Modeling - Design for Rising Temperatures Collaborate with Brian Turner or other CN Building Science professional

0%

USEFUL LINKS AND TOOLS: The Red List The Carbon Smart Materials Palette https://living-future.org/declare/declare-about/red-list/ https://materialspalette.org/palette/ ChemSec SIN List https://sinsearch.chemsec.org/

Climate Positive Design Toolkit https://climatepositivedesign.com/resources/design-toolkit/

EC3 https://buildingtransparency.org/

ZGF Concrete LCA Tool Send request to lca-tool@zgf.com

Tally https://choosetally.com/tutorials/

Measure Product Source Distance https://www.distancefromto.net/

APP G

V 0.6

2020 CLARK NEXSEN SUSTAINABILITY REPORT


UPDATE


2030 C O M M I T M E N T

PAT H T O N E T Z E R O

By signing on to the AIA 2030 Commitment in 2015, Clark Nexsen has joined a growing number of firms that are measuring the energy performance of their buildings and working toward designing all new buildings and major renovations to be carbon neutral by the year 2030. The 2030 Commitment requires design teams to track the predicted Energy Use Intensity, “pEUI,” measured in kBtu/sf/yr. The 2030 Challenge has established a current goal to achieve energy performance of 80 percent better than the national average per building type, which requires design teams and building owners to work closely together and share performance priorities. Clark Nexsen is currently monitoring more than 70 projects over a cross section of building types. While the pEUI reduction is not reaching the 80 percent goal, the pEUI reductions are significantly less than the baseline across all building types. Average of Percent reduction and Count of ProjectID_DDX by UseTypeGrouped

80

Clark Nexsen Average pEUI reduction by Building Types

60

40

20

0 Education K-12

Other

Office

Laboratory

Lodging / Residence Hall

Education Higher Ed

Storage

Health Care

Public Assembly

ProjectID_DDX 1639

278-1614271765

2020 CLARK NEXSEN SUSTAINABILITY REPORT

278-1617041568 3006


2030 C O M M I T M E N T

PAT H T O N E T Z E R O

By analyzing the data we collect for the 2030 Commitment, Clark Nexsen has generated a number of useful insights about our progress towards carbon neutraility. By tracking our data by office, project type, project size, and even by project manager and partner-in-charge, we have better identified our strengths and weaknesses, and developed targeted strategies for improving our performance. In particular, the two graphs below show how we are doing in terms of pEUI reduction and energy modelling. The graph on the left shows our average pEUI reduction by year, which is on par with our peers. We are not yet meeting the target of 80% reduction, although our performance had been steadily increasing over until 2020.. The graph on the right shows the ratio of our Energy projects that have or will be modeled vsbaseline thes…projects that will not. By modeling 64% of our projects, Clark Nexsen yes National Avera… has outpaced the AIA national average for 2019 of 43%. In 2021, Clark Nexsen will strive to improve on that Has energy … National/Regio… number with the goal of significantly reducing our average pEUI. no Count of Energy baseline source by Has energy modeling

Count of Energy baseline source by Energy baseline source

User Defined: …

Average of Percent reduction, Total area and Count of Project name by Max Portfolio Year

Average of Percent reduction

National/Regio…

50

  

ASHRAE 90.1 2… Count of Has energy modeling by Max Portfolio Year and Has energy modeling

Average of Percent Energyreduction baseline 20

30 Energy code b…

8M

40

Has energy modeling 0% 100%

no yes 2016

2017

2018

2019

0

2016

2017

2018

2M Zero tool

Max Portfolio Year

2019 Code baseline

National/Regio… _using_tool_ User Defined: … National/Regio…

   

Education  R FoodServR

Health  CaR Laborator  S Lodging  S/

Mixed-Us Office Other

Public Sa

Religious

2015 Residenti Retail

Service

Storage 2021

Current Year

2015

2021

Repo

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 (Blank)  O Education  P Education  P

Current Ye Public As

ASHRAE Baseli… Clark Nexsen Average pEUI reduction by Year ASHRAE 90.1 2…

 

Utility bills 0

 

have been modeled

4M

31

Energy code b… 10 20 30 Energyreduction baseline Average of Percent

2020

Total area

Count gniledo ofmHas ygrenergy ene saHmodeling fo tnuoC

42 42

ts b yY ear

Average of Percent reduction by Has energy modeling

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Average of Percent reduction

Has energy modeling gniledom ygrene saH

10

6M

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no no

Max Portfolio Year

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Average of Percent reduction by Has energy modeling

20

yes

Zero tool

yes

 

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30

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10

 L  L

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Code baseline

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_using_tool_

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Use

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2016 no yes

2017

2018Max Portfolio Y… 2019 

2016

2018

Max Portfolio Year  2017

2020

% of Projects with Energy Model by Year

Count of Has energy modeling by Max Portfolio Year and Has energy modeling

 

2019 2020

Complete

Current Ye

 S  S

 R  R

 R  P

no

yes no

 P  O

 O  M

 L  L

 H


pEUI

OFFICE ENERGY TRACKING

Average of Energy baseline, Average of pEUICalc and Percent reduction by Project name

Average of Energy baseline

U

Average of pEUICalc

100

80

Current Year

60

2015

2021

40 Project name     

20

       

0

FEI HQ3

SOF RR405 NH-12 and 13 BASF Vannoy Office Battalion Add Replace HVAC SouthfieldTo… Building

Max Portfolio Year   

2018 2019 2020

ARC Jlab

CEBAF Addition

CEBAF Renovation

Durham City Johns Hopkins Building 33 Hall and Biosciences Annex HVAC

McAllister Towing HQ

Mecklenburg Library Support Service

     

Project…   

Active

Complete On hold

Reporting phase    

Concept

Construction Administration Construction Documents

Percent reduction

44.80

79.85

Design Development

2020 CLARK NEXSEN SUSTAINABILITY REPORT

    

ARC Jlab

BASF SouthfieldToWestinghouse CEBAF Addition

CEBAF Renovation

Durham City Hall and Annex HVA FEI HQ3

Johns Hopkins Building 33 Biosci McAllister Towing HQ

Mecklenburg Library Support Ser MTC Shaw

NH-12 and 13 Replace HVAC NNSY Repair Training Fac

P256 Bldg 510 DBB Ships Maint F

P36610 Mission Support Compou P-495 Chambers Field Magazine

Portsmouth Naval Medical Cente Q1068 SOF Building 355

Renovations to Andrews Hall

Renovations to Brickell Library

RM17-1337 Convert X132 for MS SOF RR405 Battalion Add

Tech Center One - VT Corp Resea Tech Center Tenant Buildout

Union County Firearms Training R Vannoy Office Building

Vannoy Ridgefield Office


pEUI

HIGHER EDUCATION ENERGY TRACKING

Average of Energy baseline, Average of pEUICalc and Percent reduction by Project name

Average of Energy baseline

1

Average of pEUICalc

300

Count of

250

200

Curre

201

150

100

Proje    

50

     

0 BRCC Interior Renovations and New Construction

Wake Tech M

Wake Technical Community College Building F - Northern Isothermal Comm. Wake Campus

Greorgetown University Carn Barn

Duke Hall

ECU Building 43 Renovations

Georgetown

Max Portfolio Year    

2016 2018 2019 2020

ECU Innovation

Owen Hall

Wake Tech Bldg. E

Equine Facility at Isothermal Community College

NC State EB Oval Project…  

Active

Complete

Owen Hall and Carmichael Hall Renovation

Wake Tech Bldg. M

Duke Hall

WTCC Bldg E Reporting phase   

Concept

Construction Administration Construction Documents

Percent reduction

0.65

79.85

BR

Du

EC

EC

Eq

Gr

Ow

Wa

Wa

Wa


pEUI

RESIDENTIAL HOUSING ENERGY TRACKING

Average of Energy baseline, Average of pEUICalc and Percent reduction by Project name

Average of Energy baseline

10

Average of pEUICalc

Count of Max Portfolio Year

150

100 Current Year

2015

Project name

50

        

0 Wallace Creek P2

Fayettleville CLC 13 Bed

Fayetteville 10 Bed Home

Max Portfolio Year  

2019 2020

UVA McCormick Road Houses Renovation Building B

UVA McCormick Road Houses Renovation Building C

Project…  

UVA McCormick Road Houses Renovation Building E

UVA McCormick Road Houses Renovation Building D

Complete On hold

Reporting phase  

Construction Administration Schematic Design

Clemson Wes Zone Building D

VA Tech Criteria for Slusher Hall

Percent reduction

47.87

79.85

2020 CLARK NEXSEN SUSTAINABILITY REPORT

Clemson Wes Zone Build

Fayetteville 10 Bed Home Fayettleville CLC 13 Bed

UVA McCormick Road Ho

UVA McCormick Road Ho

UVA McCormick Road Ho

UVA McCormick Road Ho

VA Tech Criteria for Slush Wallace Creek P2


pEUI

SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY ENERGY TRACKING

Average of Energy baseline, Average of pEUICalc and Percent reduction by Project name

Average of Energy baseline

12

Average of pEUICalc

400

Count of Max Po

300

Current Y

2015

200

Project na  

100

         

0 ARE 9 Laboratory Drive Building

Medicago Fit-up

RTF Onco Trap Fitup

Small Appliance Performance Testing Lab Max Portfolio Year     

2016 2017 2018 2019 2020

Syngenta T&E Experience Center

Tethis fit-up

FDBU Technical Services Building Project…  

Active

Complete

Reno Bldg 390 Energetics Lab

Germanna Phase III

Bluebird Bio Manufacturi… Fitup

Reporting phase 

  

Construction Administration Construction Documents Schematic Design

Five Laboratory Drive

RTI Herbert Building AMSI Lab Renovation

Percent reduction

30.87

79.85

ARE 9 Lab

Bluebird B

FDBU Tec

Five Labo

Germanna

Medicago

Reno Bldg

RTF Onco

RTI Herbe

Small App Syngenta

Tethis fit-u


pEUI

K12 ENERGY TRACKING

Average of Energy baseline, Average of pEUICalc and Percent reduction by Project name

Average of Energy baseline

12

Average of pEUICalc

80

Count of Max Portfolio Ye

60

Current Year

2015 40

Project name   

20

         

0 Innovative High School

American Renaissance School

FQVMA Replacement (M15)

E-35 Elementary School

Max Portfolio Year    

2017 2018 2019 2020

Brevard HS

Conn Elementary School

Davidson Day School

Project…  

Active

Complete

Rosman MS/HS

Sharon Road Elementary

Asheville Hendersonvi… Jonesborough Middle School High School School

Reporting phase     

Concept

Construction Administration Construction Documents

Percent reduction

41.02

79.85

Design Development Schematic Design

2020 CLARK NEXSEN SUSTAINABILITY REPORT

American Renaissa

Asheville Middle Sc Brevard HS

Conn Elementary S

Davidson Day Scho

E-35 Elementary Sc

FQVMA Replaceme

Hendersonville Hig

Innovative High Sc

Jonesborough Sch

Lake Norman Char Rosman MS/HS

Sharon Road Eleme


CARBON COMMITMENTS

PAT H T O N E T Z E R O

STRUCTURAL ENGINEERING 2050 CHALLENGE In 2021, Clark Nexsen signed on to the SE 2050 Commitment Program, becoming an early supporter of a growing list of firms that are measuring the embodied carbon of structures and taking steps to minimize and eventually eliminate embodied carbon in all structural engineering projects by the year 2050. SE 2050 aligns with other climate change initiatives, including the AIA 2030 Commitment, LEED, Green Globes, Envision, and the 2030 Challenge for Embodied Carbon, which our firm participates in and supports. As part of this commitment, we will complete an annual Embodied Carbon Action Plan to document our actions to reduce embodied carbon in our projects. We will also submit data to the SE 2050 project database, supporting the ability of all structural engineers to understand embodied carbon and to set attainable targets for future projects. A key to making this shift is taking specific measures that can lead to significant reductions of embodied carbon in projects. We've identified the following initial ways to collaborate with clients and promote a shared goal of reducing embodied carbon: • Evaluate whether upgrading an existing building is a viable solution, as opposed to demolition and new build. Existing building renovations/upgrades are more carbon-efficient. • Perform a Whole Building Life Cycle Assessment to consider the full impacts of a project's carbon footprint, including identifying areas of high environmental impact. We can use the information obtained from a Life Cycle Assessment to select and optimize the structural system and specifications. • Compare the embodied carbon of a project against benchmark projects. • Specify only FSC-certified lumber. • Require that certain structural materials come with Environmental Product Declarations. • Require that certain structural materials are recycled or regional. • Specify low-carbon concrete mixes by replacing a percentage of portland cement with supplementary cementitious materials. • Minimize demolition and construction waste. In 2021, we will identify 4 or more projects to serve as case studies for how we can reduce embodied carbon through design. One of the value-adds of an integrated design approach is that all disciplines work together to achieve sustainability goals. For example, the analyses completed for structural sustainability contribute to the overall environmental goals of the project and can inform choices by other design disciplines. A Whole Building Life Cycle Assessment is a univerally useful source of data. As we look to achieve this challenge, we will collaborate with our colleagues and clients to exceed project goals and reduce our impact to the environment.


2030 CHALLENGE FOR EMBODIED CARBON In 2020, Clark Nexsen committed to the 2030 Challenge for Embodied Carbon, which aims to reduce the embodied carbon emissions from all new buildings, infrastructure, and associated materials by 65% by 2030, and zero by 2040. This commitment reflects the firm's focus on embodied carbon in our design solutions and was a key driver behind 2020 efforts to rapidly expand our knowledge of materials and tools for reducing embodied carbon. These efforts included: •

Developing our knowledge of embodied carbon REVIT plug-ins, including Tally and EC3 for architecture and Beacon for structural.

Establishing an official Embodied Carbon Group with Integrated Design leaders in each office, including both architects and structural engineers.

Began to develop a company system for specifying healthy low carbon materials and structural systems.

Our commitments to reducing embodied carbon reflect the importance of this issue. While operational carbon rises over time, embodied carbon impacts are immediate and much greater. Only 28% of the total carbon emissions from buildings in the next 10 years will be operational - but 72% will be embodied, and every step we take to select more sustainable, low carbon materials is meaningful.

2020 CLARK NEXSEN SUSTAINABILITY REPORT



PROJECTS AND RESEARCH

B U I L D I N G O N S U S TA I N A B L E E X P E R T I S E A N D P R O J E C T E X P E R I E N C E

2020 CLARK NEXSEN SUSTAINABILITY REPORT


GEORGETOWN CAR BARN ADAPTIVE REUSE Georgetown University, Washington, DC An ever-growing institution, Georgetown University saw an opportunity to repurpose an 1800s mechanical car building by transforming the first floor spaces to house the University Press and Master of Arts in Government program. Known as the Car Barn, this historic building is situated along M Street at the end of the Key Bridge and was originally used to house and maintain the city’s streetcars. The adaptive reuse was completed with sustainability in mind. Care was taken to maintain the historic integrity of the building’s character, with the existing structure being reused and repurposed. This effort minimized embodied carbon by giving new life to the existing facility with no new construction. The large arched doorways, previously used for the streetcars, were re-opened and infilled with a glass-fin curtainwall system to promote transparency and create a dramatic lobby and student lounge area. The bright, modern interior benefits from

70% target 70%

73% 0% 100% pEUI Reduction

added daylight as windows were restored and the barn doors opened up. Occupancy and daylight sensors control the interior lighting, ensuring adequate light while minimizing the use of electricity. Occupant comfort in the new classrooms, offices, and conference rooms is assured with an energy efficient HVAC system that employs demand control ventilation with an air-side economizer and water-source heat pumps. The system utilizes variable speed technology on hydronic pumps and airhandling unit motors to properly match the building energy use to the building load. The thermal envelope was improved to maximize energy efficiency, adding an air barrier and thermal insulation to the existing, uninsulated exterior walls. New wood windows, matching the originals but with increased efficiency, were incorporated into the facade, bringing natural light into the space and offering views to the famous “Exorcist Steps,” which were preserved along the building’s exterior.




2020 CLARK NEXSEN SUSTAINABILITY REPORT


FERGUSON HEADQUARTERS Newport News, Virginia Facing a need to expand their headquarters in Newport News, Ferguson partnered with Clark Nexsen to create an amenity-rich, energy efficient, collaborative space for their associates. At the core of its design is a shift towards transparency, openness, and connectivity, and sustainability both within the company and the community at large. The design solution kept a fairly narrow footprint in the optimum building orientation to maximize both daylighting and views, benefitting occupant well-being and reducing the need for artificial lighting. The open office concept reduces material use, and interior rooms such as flexible offices and meeting spaces feature glass wall systems to allow daylight through to the building core. The low solar heat gain coefficient of the glass has a significant impact on the building’s energy efficiency, and shading devices on the east, south, and west facades further control glare and heat gain without interrupting views. Both inside and outside, the design prioritizes creating opportunities to promote interaction and community. A

multilevel glass atrium, open lobby space, and monumental staircase connect multiple levels and encourage people to use the stairs rather than elevators. Ferguson associates have access to a variety of outdoor training and dining spaces and a rooftop terrace. Additionally, prior to the construction of HQ3, the site served as a ‘city center’ for residents to gather, and the design preserves community access. Rather than walling this site off from the city, a pathway leads under the building and into the plaza allowing the public to enjoy this outdoor plaza. The HVAC system has a number of features that contribute to the significant reduction in pEUI. An energy recovery ventilator transfers heat between the exhaust and outdoor air streams using a total enthalpy recovery wheel. A thermal storage system is used to shift electrical demand for cooling from peak daytime hours to off-peak nighttime hours by enabling the chillers to produce ice at night, which is then melted during the day while the chillers remain off. Both the cooling and heating systems also feature a high degree of controllability, allowing them to meet demand with very little waste.

70% target 70%

70% 0% 100% pEUI Reduction

3 Green Globes 2020 Green Globes Project of the Year Runner Up




2020 CLARK NEXSEN SUSTAINABILITY REPORT


JOYNER PARK COMMUNITY CENTER Wake Forest, North Carolina Carroll Joyner Park is a beloved community asset and popular location for recreation and events in Wake Forest, featuring walking trails, historic structures, and an outdoor amphitheater. As part of phase two of the park master plan, the Wake Forest Parks, Recreation, & Cultural Resources Department partnered with Clark Nexsen to design the new Joyner Park Community Center. Offering indoor recreation and gathering space for the community, the new facility includes a gymnasium, indoor track, lobby and reception space, a large multipurpose room, a dance studio, teaching kitchen, locker rooms, and new office space for the PRCR Department. A new, natural play area and public plazas offer engaging outdoor space for both children and adults. In a preservation effort to remove as few trees as possible, the design team optimized

70% target 70%

31% 0% 100% pEUI Reduction

the site location to balance cut and fill as well as overall land disturbance. The facility is also outfitted with a cistern that captures rainwater from the roof through rain chains to form a unique feature that enhances the natural play focus of the design. Using a simple palette of materials that align with the park’s rural context, the building’s exterior features cementitious siding, aluminum storefront, thin set stone veneer, and a standing seam metal roof. A “front porch” area links the facility with the park’s greenway system and overlooks the meadow, reinforcing connectivity with the outdoors. The porch and vertical fins also provide shading on the east side for optimal energy efficiency. In lieu of piping down to the existing pond, a new, onsite stormwater capture system was created.




2020 CLARK NEXSEN SUSTAINABILITY REPORT


EDNEYVILLE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL Henderson County, North Carolina To better serve its more than 550 students, the new Edneyville Elementary School reflects established goals for a collaborative, 21st-century learning environment, outdoor instruction, and integration as a community center. The new school maintains a strong connection to its site and rural community, with all classrooms positioned with views to the west, capturing the surrounding pastoral farmland, lake, and mountains. The school uses 36% less energy than the baseline, and its R-23 walls exceed the NC energy code by 53%. Using exposed wood as a primary material in the roof structure reduces the project’s embodied carbon and serves as a biophilic element for minimizing student stress. The facility receives generous natural light, with approximately 95% of spaces having direct exterior views. Clerestory windows in the atrium space let light deep into the

70% target 70%

40% 0% 100% pEUI Reduction

building, while translucent windows in the gymnasium largely minimize the need for artificial lighting during the day. By creating a sheltered connection between classroom and playscape, the building elevates its site from a picturesque backdrop to an immersive experience. A central circulation corridor “spine” divides classroom space on the west side from administrative and support areas on the east. Working with the site’s existing topography to limit site disturbance, the south half of the building is two stories, with kindergarten and first grade on the ground floor and second and third grades on the main floor. This structure establishes a direct access to the exterior terraces for outdoor learning opportunities.




2020 CLARK NEXSEN SUSTAINABILITY REPORT


2020 ASHRAE LOWDOWN SHOWDOWN New York City, New York Integrated Design Process Clark Nexsen’s design team composed of architects, MEP engineers, structural and civil engineers participated in ASHRAE’s annual energy modeling competition and utilized the ANSI Integrated Design Process to increase building performance. The design team focused on limiting the initial embodied carbon for the building using a heavy timber/CLT structure and a low-carbon exterior envelope composed of aluminum and local stone. The project utilizes standard passive solar strategies as well as cost effective technologies such as radiant slabs to significantly reduce operational carbon. The design team also integrated innovative solutions such as PV panels and solar hot water, green envelope roofs and screens, and Phase-Change Materials for the exterior envelope. Triple E Site Selection While having the opportunity to select any site in Manhattan, the design team chose to locate the building in a low-income area to provide a healthy, sustainable, and resilient facility for the neighborhood throughout

the year and in times of crisis and storm events. Located above the 100-year flood plain, the site is effective for providing services for the surrounding low-income projects which are largely in the flood zone and have been hurt in recent storms. Maximizing Passive Solar Strategies The team examined passive solar strategies best suited for the both present day climate conditions and climate conditions in 2050 using Climate Consultant. Using Sketchup/Rhino and Climate Studio, many massing options were explored and analyzed for daylighting and EUI with and without ventilation. Covetool was used to determine the most cost-effective envelope strategies. Minimizing Embodied Carbon The CLT/heavy timber structure saved approximately 1800 metric tons over a steel system and approximately 3600 metric tons over a concrete system. The predominantly aluminum exterior skin saved 958 metric tons of embodied carbon compared to the GFRC option. The green roofs and screen walls help reduce the embodied carbon of the building by an additional 50 metric tons.



massing option 1 climate studio analysis with ventilation

massing option 1 climate studio daylight analysis

massing option 2 climate studio analysis with ventilation

massing option 2 climate studio daylight analysis

massing option 3 climate studio analysis with ventilation

massing option 3 climate studio daylight analysis


pv panel/solar hot water roof rainwater collection at roof 6’-0” horizontal sunshading south facing pv panel railings phase change walls green roof for insulation, habitat creation + reducing carbon impact skylight single-sided ventilation atrium stack effect ventilation living green screen wall

north facing triple glazed operable windows with clerestory light lightweight recycled aluminum exterior envelope concrete topping slab with radiant floor system over insulation exposed 10” CLT slab with heavy timber wood structure

2020 CLARK NEXSEN SUSTAINABILITY REPORT


FITTS-WOOLARD HALL NC State University, Raleigh, North Carolina Fitts-Woolard Hall marks the culmination of the College of Engineering’s move to the oval on Centennial Campus. The facility joins Engineering Buildings I, II, and III on this unique campus that blends education, research, industry, government, and community spaces. Clark Nexsen partnered with NC State to develop a dynamic, sustainable facility centered on goals to promote interaction and collaboration between students, faculty, and individual engineering departments. Driven by a commitment to “engineering on display,” the four-story facility features high degrees of transparency that create a light-filled, vibrant educational environment. Each teaching and research space supports initiatives critical to the global high-tech economy, including advanced manufacturing, bioengineering, ergonomics, robotics and sensor technology, transportation and logistics, and environmental. From a large scale driving simulator to testing labs for military

70% target

17% 0% 100% pEUI Reduction

equipment, students have access to spaces where they can apply classroom knowledge and explore the results. High performance glazing reduces the building’s heating and cooling envelope loads while natural daylighting and LED light fixtures reduce demand for electricity. Temperature sensors, humidity sensors, VOC sensors, occupancy sensors, and carbon dioxide sensors are utilized in selected lab spaces as the basis for monitoring space usage, occupancy, and controlling the space heating, cooling, dehumidification, and ventilation air systems. Reinforcing overall pEUI reduction, the HVAC VAV terminal unit controls are integrated with space level lighting control utilizing a common space occupancy sensor. This feature controls both space lighting levels and indexing spaces from “Unoccupied Mode” to “Occupied Mode” through the building BAS system. FittsWoolard is tracking LEED Silver certification.




2020 CLARK NEXSEN SUSTAINABILITY REPORT


INNOVATIVE HIGH SCHOOL Flat Rock, North Carolina As public school systems across the nation strive to improve retention, graduation rates, and student success long term, Henderson County’s Innovative High School represents a shared vision to provide greater opportunities to their students. This groundbreaking new facility is located on the Blue Ridge Community College campus and houses two innovative schools, Early College High School and the Career Academy. Recognizing that the built environment plays an important role in the student experience, the facility’s design and finishes were selected to support academic success and well-being. More than 95% of interior spaces have views to the outdoors, and 90% of spaces receive abundant natural light – both of which have a positive impact on occupants.

70% target 70%

51% 0% 100% pEUI Reduction

With two programmatic bars that meet to form an “L” shape, the building is aligned on an east/west axis with good solar orientation. Throughout the building, energy efficiency is supported with exterior sun shading and different glazing types. For example, a two-story, south-facing glass curtainwall in the commons space was optimized toward prominent views. An external sun shade and ceramic fritted glazing minimizes solar heat gain and reduces glare into this space while allowing for balanced daylighting. An on-site bio-retention pond handles 100% of the stormwater. In addition to sustainable design features of the building itself, its location on the community college campus reduces individual driving trips and vehicle emissions as students can readily access all needed courses by walking.




2020 CLARK NEXSEN SUSTAINABILITY REPORT


CAROLINA DAY LOWER SCHOOL Asheville, North Carolina The Lower School at Carolina Day serves first through fifth graders in an inquirybased learning environment, focused on supporting student growth and providing problem solving opportunities. Our designers worked with school representatives to create a solution that responded to their needs, enhanced indooroutdoor connectivity, and positioned the school to meet changing trends in K-12 education. The resulting renovation and addition has formed a facility that instructs by design and provides light-filled, engaging spaces for students, teachers, and staff. More than 80% of the project is adaptive reuse, with 100% of the existing structure and roof decking reused. Additionally, the use of wood as the primary building material for the addition reduces the project’s embodied carbon. The building serves as a teacher, with windows into interior walls to reveal the MEP systems and a butterfly roof that directs rainwater into a bio-retention pond. Outside, the courtyard is more than a

70% target 70%

42% 0% 100% pEUI Reduction

place to gather, learn, and play; it handles 100% of stormwater (roof and site) via the retention pond and features native, educational landscaping as well as earthen berms for free play. The school is surrounded by Asheville’s outdoor beauty and care was taken in the renovation design to reinforce this indooroutdoor connection. Generous natural light abounds, with 95% of occupied spaces having direct exterior views and receiving natural daylight. In particular, all classrooms have direct views to the outside while clerestory windows serve to balance daylighting. In the gymnasium, the conversion of existing ventilation panels to clerestory windows allows the gym to be used with no artificial lighting at most times. A new HVAC system improved both climate control and energy efficiency. The renovated school now uses 42% less energy than the baseline. Additionally, the R-23 walls exceed the North Carolina energy code by 53%. By integrating sustainable design elements along with K-12 design best practices, the school reflects its region’s commitment to protecting the environment while enabling children to learn and explore.




2020 CLARK NEXSEN SUSTAINABILITY REPORT


BUILDING F - LEARNING COMMONS Wake Technical Community College, Raleigh, North Carolina The Learning Commons & Classroom Building (Building F) serves as the heart of Wake Tech’s rapidly expanding Northern Wake campus. Geographically, the centrallylocated building links together the various parts of campus with pathways, bridges, and outdoor gathering spaces, while programmatically the high-tech facility provides much-needed spaces for study, student support, and social interaction. The focal point of Building F is the new learning commons, replacing the library currently located in Building B. The variety of spaces created within the learning commons help each student maximize their learning experience by catering to their individual needs: from lively group discussions in a social atmosphere to quiet, focused individual study. The main reading room on the lowest level of the learning commons is considered the living room for the campus. Comfortable lounge seating with integrated technology, extensive views out to the natural landscape of the Neuse Rive buffer, and ample daylight provided by three “light cannons” in the roof above

70% target 70%

48% 0% 100% pEUI Reduction

all promote lively student interaction and collaboration. At 89,000 square feet, this academic building houses classrooms and faculty offices in addition to the learning commons. The ‘L’ shaped plan configured enables the two wings to operate independently and provides controlled access and egress to the learning commons from a single location. A coffee shop with outdoor terrace seating provides another opportunity for study and interaction. A separate, three story wing houses classrooms and academic offices, connected to the learning commons by a glass enclosed lobby/lounge space. The second and third levels of this wing are interconnected at the lobby/lounge space, creating a double-height entrance area. The facility is LEED Silver certified, reflecting Wake Tech’s commitment to sustainability. WTCC’s Northern Wake Campus is the first all-LEED multi-building community college campus in the nation.

39% reduction of potable water use 31% recycled content materials 39% regional materials 95% occupied spaces with views LEED Silver




2020 CLARK NEXSEN SUSTAINABILITY REPORT


M�CORMICK ROAD HOUSES RENOVATIONS University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Virginia As the primary freshmen housing complex at UVA, the McCormick Road Houses play a pivotal role in the student life experience. This substantial complex includes 10 individually branded “houses” accommodating nearly 1,400 students. Prior to their renovation, the buildings lacked many of the amenities found in newer residence halls on UVA’s campus. The university partnered with Clark Nexsen to create a reimagined housing environment that helps to attract great students and promotes an engaging freshman experience. Throughout the houses, new interior finishes create a contemporary aesthetic. The introduction of a new HVAC system, fire protection, elevators, and upgraded electrical and telecom systems ensure a safe, comfortable, and functional environment. The design team also seized opportunities to go above and beyond a basic systems renovation and transform key social experiences for first year students. Openness and transparency are driving themes in shared spaces. The commons spaces now feature floor-to-ceiling glass

70% target 70%

46% 0% 100% pEUI Reduction

storefront and modern furnishings, offering students variety of areas for socialization or study. The stairs have been reimagined to support students’ sense of community, with large landings and open sight lines from one side of each house to the other. The transformation of “The Castle,” a dining and social space, represents a small but very significant component of this project. By opening the exterior walls and introducing a lantern-like addition on the corner, The Castle and its surrounding outdoor plaza have become a vibrant hub of activity. Key sustainability features include the incorporation of total energy recovery wheels into the Dedicated Outdoor Air Systems (DOAS) to recover energy from the tempered exhaust air and transfer it to the untempered incoming outdoor air. This, coupled with the addition of new insulation at the roof and new energy efficient windows, has help to significantly drive down the energy consumption of the project. In addition, by reusing 97% of the existing structure and envelope, UVA has ensured that these facilities will last for many decades to come.

44% reduction of potable water use 97% reuse of existing structure and envelope 94% occupied spaces with views LEED Gold




2020 CLARK NEXSEN SUSTAINABILITY REPORT


ABBOTTS CREEK COMMUNITY CENTER Raleigh, North Carolina Located on a former landfill site and beside an elementary school, Abbotts Creek Recreation Center transforms an abandoned piece of land into a thriving community park for healthy living and learning. The center’s composition interlocks with the school and creates a series of indoor and outdoor gathering spaces that transform the forgotten site. The center’s upper volume slides past the base providing a welcoming public entry as it connects visitors to the school and landscape. A delicate screen encompasses the upper volume and creates a veil that illuminates the public spaces and defines the entrance to the new community campus. When the landfill was set to close, local citizens formed a committee to determine the best use for the site. Through a thoughtful approach to land utilization and a collaborative effort between citizens and public employees, the Abbotts Creek Park design process focused on creating a healthy environment for living and learning. Now, situated in the middle of a

70% target 70%

34% 0% 100% pEUI Reduction

growing community with many residential neighborhoods and schools, Abbotts Creek Park provides an epicenter for the community to promote healthy living and learning in close proximity to citizens of all ages. The community center provides a variety of facilities open to public use including a gymnasium, fitness center, numerous classroom and multipurpose spaces both inside and outside. To maximize the value of the facility for its long-term operation, the design incorporates cost effective passive solar design strategies in its orientation, daylighting strategies, operable windows, and sun shading devices. In addition, it uses high-performance building materials for glazing and rainscreen cladding systems, active solar systems for hot water heating, as well as recycled content and regional materials.

35% reduction of potable water use 20% regional materials 20% recycled content materials LEED Silver (anticipated)




2020 CLARK NEXSEN SUSTAINABILITY REPORT


HEALTH & HUMAN SCIENCES BUILDING Western Carolina University, Cullowhee, North Carolina The Health and Human Sciences Building was the first facility constructed for Western Carolina University’s Millennial Campus, establishing an approach to development that emphasizes sustainability in conjunction with cutting-edge research facilities. The 160,000 square foot building provides state-of-the-art learning environments for the five departments and nine disciplines within the health sciences college. Nested into the mountainside, the design is a direct response to the site topography and solar orientation. Mapping slopes less than 30 percent defined buildable area limits, informed the project location, and delineated its northernmost extents. To optimize the solar orientation and minimize the impact of the building, the southern boundary was defined by a natural basin in the site. Stepping the design with topography, the facility rests between the defining elements, conforming to the site. This design strategy minimized the scale, promoted interior/exterior relationships, and was the genesis for a large roof garden. As an extension of the site, the roof garden

70% target 70%

38% 0% 100% pEUI Reduction

replicates the form of the basin to restore the natural environment. The garden is home to native medicinal plants indigenous to the Appalachian and Cherokee people and provides a tranquil setting rich in colors, textures, aromas, and sounds to promote renewal and inner well-being. Such siteinfluenced responses generated smaller floor plates, enhancing opportunities for natural daylighting and resulted in a contextually appropriate solution with a human scale. Natural light is shared throughout the building, introduced through an expansive, south-facing atrium curtain wall and distributed to inner offices, corridors, and small gathering areas through interior glazing. Sunscreens provide thermal comfort by limiting direct solar exposure to 3 percent annually, while providing ambient natural daylighting sufficient for 75 percent of lighting needs each year. Teaching spaces, including specialized labs and simulation environments, are organized along the northern edge with diffused daylight and clerestory views to the ascending elevations and natural setting.

41% reduction of potable water use 39% recycled content materials 40% regional materials 90% stormwater treated on site LEED Gold




2020 CLARK NEXSEN SUSTAINABILITY REPORT


UNC COASTAL STUDIES INSTITUTE Wanchese, North Carolina Located on the banks of Roanoke Island, the Coastal Studies Institute (CSI) is surrounded by vast expanses of wetlands and sweeping views of the Croatan Sound. Its simple bent form aligns with an existing canal, capturing views of the water and sky. The building is elevated on piloti touching the ground lightly and interacts with the landscape through its site walls, natural lawns, and covered outdoor spaces. The mission of CSI is to be a model of sustainability through its architecture, building systems, and the research it conducts. It provides a venue for interinstitutional collaboration and offers a new national resource for coastal education. The building was designed to minimize its impact on the land while anchoring itself to the place – an existing landscape of fragile wetlands and waterways. The building’s form is a simple bent bar elevated above the land, and derived from the site by orienting the long face of the bar to the south and bending it to align with and

70% target 70%

38% 0% 100% pEUI Reduction

capture a view down the canal. It hovers over a concrete plinth which raises the ground floor above the 100-year flood plain. The bent bar form acts as a medium for viewing and experiencing the expansive landscape through its use of indoor-outdoor spaces. Gathering spaces for collaboration reside at the ends of the bar where there are expansive views across the wetlands. The building systems and landscape design showcase innovative features in regard to water management, on-site waste treatment systems, stormwater treatment, rainwater collection, and renewable energy. All of the roof rainwater is captured and used for non-potable water uses and as a possible source of future drinking water. The building’s HVAC system is a unique geothermal heat pump system that utilizes an existing public raw well water line as the source of renewable energy. By not drilling wells, the system reduced construction costs by 50 percent and protected the local aquifers and wetlands.

45% reduction of potable water use 90% occupied spaces with daylight 95% occupied spaces with views 100% stormwater managed on site 100% wastewater managed on site LEED Gold




2020 CLARK NEXSEN SUSTAINABILITY REPORT


GORGES STATE PARK VISITOR CENTER Sapphire, North Carolina To create a visitor center that introduces patrons to the beauty of Gorges State Park and offers sustainability insights, the North Carolina Division of Parks and Recreation partnered with Clark Nexsen to design a new facility featuring museumquality exhibit and gallery spaces, a teaching auditorium, classroom for films and presentations, retail space, and administrative offices. Gorges State Park is located on the Blue Ridge escarpment, rising 2,000 feet in four miles and forming the divide between the Tennessee Valley and Atlantic drainages. Warm, moist air from the south flows over the escarpment and dumps approximately 90 inches of rain annually on the park, making it one of the wettest places in North America. The park showcases numerous waterfalls, flora, fauna, and spectacular views, which are highlighted in the Visitor Center to encourage further exploration.

70% target 70%

52% 0% 100% pEUI Reduction

In keeping with the stunning natural landscape, the Visitor Center is LEED Gold certified and the building is used as a sustainability teaching tool for visitors. LEED information is identified for visitors throughout the Visitor Center and adjacent grounds. The Visitor Center uses water very efficiently, and rainwater is collected from the building roofs in an underground storage tank to provide water suitable for flushing toilets and to supply the building waterfall feature. The Visitor Center harvests site energy including the use of free resources like daylighting, solar waterheating, and geothermal energy systems. Under the parking lot, 27 wells use the earth as a heat source in the winter and as a heat sink in the summer.

44% reduction of potable water use 97% occupied spaces with daylight 95% occupied spaces with views 100% stormwater managed on site 100% wastewater managed on site LEED Gold




2020 CLARK NEXSEN SUSTAINABILITY REPORT


PERPETUUM - METLIFE COMPETITION New York City, New York The international MetLife competition provided a platform to research sustainable and energy efficient strategies for both new and renovated high-rise buildings. Clark Nexsen’s submittal, PERPETUUM, takes a holistic approach to the design challenge of renovating an existing high-rise building and implements strategies beyond merely the introduction of a new exterior skin. The design examines opportunities to not only enhance the aesthetic of an architectural icon, but also to address social, economic, and environmental issues in the design solution. Modern workplaces rely on collaboration and informal gathering, often fostered by daylighting for a bright, open environment. PERPETUUM proposes to programmatically add atrium amenity spaces for both the public and building users to enjoy, located at the street level and the upper floors. On the upper floors, these public spaces are shared between four floors and stacked on top of each other to activate the southern side, providing increased opportunities to harvest daylight and views. The cladding system is a double glass wall envelope used to enhance the passive solar capability of the tall structure. The double skin is designed to be a unitized system, which will reduce on site construction and limit interruptions at street level caused by construction operations. On cold days,

the double skin is enclosed and provides additional insulation through the deeper air cavity, while on warm days, the double skin is opened to the outside to provide fresh air intake and improved indoor air quality. The design team also considered solutions for the demolition and disposal of the existing cladding materials. PERPETUUM proposes to donate the precast concrete panels to local municipalities for reuse in flood protection measures along Manhattan’s river fronts, a solution that aligns with ongoing efforts by the city to mitigate future damage caused by catastrophic flooding as seen in Hurricane Sandy. Demolition of the existing skin would also entail harvesting the glass and curtainwall framing to be recycled, thus bypassing the waste stream. PERPETUUM proposes a mechanical system involving the installation of a new mechanical shaft to create additional natural ventilation opportunities through the height of the building. The shaft creates a stack effect, which has air intakes and pressure reliefs strategically located throughout the building. PERPETUUM endeavors to improve the vitality of the MetLife building by honoring its history and iconography through sustainable strategies and improved spatial quality and variety indicative of a contemporary work place.



South facing heat sink to increase stack effect in re-purposed elevator shafts Greenroof to reduce heat island effect Amenity space Deep mechanized double glass wall envelope Shallow ventilated double glass wall envelope Elevators modernized to reduce lift requirements freeing shaft space for ventilation. 60 existing elevators. 6-8 removed for shaft space Air pressure relief outlets from re-purposed technology floor Amenity floor slabs act as thermal masses and shade and mitigate glare on floors below

Tower

Deciduous vegetation to protect thermal mass in summer and improve indoor air quality Fresh air intake at curtainwall, typical at each floor Rainwater irrigation collected from roof terraces on the tower and the podium

Air pressure relief outlets from re-purposed technology floor

Pod iu m

Prime air intake for stack effect Green walkable roof terrace for amenity space and reduction of heat island Rain water storage reflecting pool for irrigation

St reet

Faceted glass and stainless steel boxes Adjacent existing Grand Central Terminal Butt glazed glass system


C o ld D ay • Exterior and interior windows closed • Double skin heats up like a warm blanket • Sun warms slabs acting as solar mass reducing corrective cooling requirements • Thermal chimney is used to passively exhaust air from the building

H o t D ay • Exterior mechanized panels open and interior windows closed • Excess heat from inside double skin is exhausted to exterior • Thermal chimney is used to passively exhaust air from building

Pa s s ive D ay • Exterior mechanized panels open and interior windows closed • Excess heat from inside double skin is exhausted to exterior • Thermal chimney is used to passively exhaust air from the building

2016 CLARK NEXSEN SUSTAINABILITY REPORT



2020 CLARK NEXSEN SUSTAINABILITY REPORT



M A R K E T A N A LY S I S

D E M A N D F O R S U S TA I N A B L E A N D R E S I L I E N T D E S I G N

Demand for energy efficiency well established The vast majority of projects today incorporate some degree of energy efficient design. Owners and operators, looking through a purely financial lens, want to reduce the cost of utilities such as water, gas or oil, and electricity. Equally significant, the upfront cost of many of the more efficient systems and materials is now aligned with traditional options, making the more efficient choice the obvious one. At the beginning of any significant project, building and infrastructure owners are balancing multiple variables and priorities ranging from initial design and construction costs, to long-term operational costs, to local, state, and federal regulations or potential tax breaks. Increasingly, the pEUI of a facility comes into play in these conversations as it correlates to both reduced operational costs and lowered CO2 emissions. While reduced operational costs have arguably become the most significant driver of business investment in green construction, the reduction of CO2 emissions can also be tied to business reputation objectives and regulatory mandates. There is substantial market opportunity for design firms focusing on high performing, sustainable design, as the perception of sustainability has shifted from purely reputational to meaningful in terms of economy and practicality.

2020 CLARK NEXSEN SUSTAINABILITY REPORT


Increasing demand for a holistic approach to design Approached holistically, sustainable design positively impacts every aspect of our built and natural environment. More recent certifications such as WELL Building are clear validation that occupant well-being and the overall health of people is as significant in design today as traditional “sustainability.” Green schools present new opportunities for hands-on learning; sustainable office environments promote healthy, productive occupants; and environmentally-friendly infrastructure protects our valuable water, energy, and material resources. The business case for green building encompasses human capital as well as operational costs. The USGBC cites research indicating that employers with more rigorous environmental standards are finding as much as 16 percent increases in labor productivity, and those with better daylighting note a 27 percent reduction in the incidence of headaches. As a transdisciplinary design firm of architects, engineers, planners, and interior designers, we are uniquely positioned to meet market demand for a holistic approach to sustainable design. Our design process crosses disciplines to gain unique insights that maximize sustainable opportunities, with more than 40 percent of our design professionals LEED and/or Green Globes accredited. Our method leads to the development of buildings and infrastructure that protect our clients’ bottom line, brand reputation, and the environment.


Increasing demand for resilient design Aligned with sustainability, resilient design incorporates principles that better prepare our buildings and infrastructure to withstand current and future climate change. With 50 percent of the U.S. population living on or near the coast, we must develop solutions that are resilient to coastal issues such as sea level rise. The implementation of resilient design principles protects owner and insurer investments, both coastal and interior, by reducing disaster-related costs, strengthening insurability, and mitigating the risk of credit downgrades. The business case for resilient design as a component of sustainability is easily evident, and we strive to integrate these principles into every project. Additionally, as a design firm that frequently works with various departments of the DoD, Homeland Security, and other government installations, we understand resilient design principles as they correspond to manmade events as well as natural disasters. To develop critical communication centers, hospitals, and various federal facilities that can remain operational in any event, the integration of resilient design is a necessity. Just as we view good design as inherently sustainable, we view good design as inherently resilient.

2020 CLARK NEXSEN SUSTAINABILITY REPORT



ACTION PLAN

I M P R O V I N G O U R S U S TA I N A B L E D E S I G N P R O C E S S

Goals Achieved in 2020 Elevating Embodied Carbon • Clark Nexsen committed to the 2030 Challenge for Embodied Carbon • Clark Nexsen committed to the Structural Engineering 2050 Challenge • Developed knowledge of embodied carbon REVIT plug-ins, including Tally and EC3 for architecture and Beacon for Structural. • Developed an official Embodied Carbon Group with ID leaders in each office including both architects and structural engineers. • Began to develop a company system for specifying healthy LOW CARBON materials and structural systems. Researched different resources and companies to assist in the effort.

Elevating EUI and Project Performance • Design teams began to track performance goals using the newly developed Vision system which includes the integrated design performance metrics (energy, water, materials and habitat) • The Building Science Group continued to develop the policies regarding energy modeling and carbon tracking on projects in conjunction with the mechanical department and Integrated Design Group. • The Building Science group continued to take a more comprehensive approach to tracking Post-Occupancy energy data from past projects to better understand pEUI vs actual EUI.

Improving Knowledge • The Integrated Design Leaders provided in-house training sessions for the new sustainable tools and resources including the newly developed “Appendix G” and establishing project goals and tracking in Vision. Educational sessions were held for project managers, architects, and engineers and the tools and resources were shared on one of the state of the firm all employee meetings. 2020 CLARK NEXSEN SUSTAINABILITY REPORT



ACTION PLAN

I M P R O V I N G O U R S U S TA I N A B L E D E S I G N P R O C E S S

• In-house videos were developed and shared on the company intranet to give an update on the latest Integrated Design Tools and Resources that have been developed over the past year. • Clark Nexsen had representatives attend the Carbon Positive Conference in Los Angeles hosted by Architecture 2030. Clark Nexsen had representatives attend and speak at numerous conferences including the I2SL Conference, the NC SCO conference, ARCH Ex, and the AIA Triangle COTE Sustainable Design Symposium.

Project Delivery • The Revit-based project performance template, called “Appendix G,” was developed further and design teams began to use it on case-study projects. It is based on the complete system of COTE Top 10 metrics. • The Project Delivery group worked with the Standards group to make the Appendix G Revit template included in all projects. • Developed a Project Road Map which includes a general schedule of the key steps in high-performance design. It includes the key steps from Integrated Design, Building Science analysis and energy modeling, Resilient Design, and 3rd party certification to show when each element should be taking place over the course of the design and construction process.

Sustainable Operations • Company offices formed internal sustainability committees dedicated to improving workplace practices for materials and waste management, health and wellness, mobility, energy and water. • Developed a Sustainable Workplace Checklist based on the MIT sustainable operations program. Created a “baseline” for each office to create a benchmark to show how each office can improve moving forward relative to their current workplace situation.

2020 CLARK NEXSEN SUSTAINABILITY REPORT



ACTION PLAN

I M P R O V I N G O U R S U S TA I N A B L E D E S I G N P R O C E S S

2021 Action Plan Elevating Embodied Carbon • Select 4-5 2021 projects to serve as case studies for an embodied carbon practice – from performance modeling to systems design and specifications. • Continue to develop a company system for specifying healthy LOW CARBON materials and structural systems. Organize resources in a central location and share information to colleagues through videos and training sessions. • Using current AIA resources, MasterSpec, and working with consultants, develop clear specifications language in high-priority areas for embodied carbon. • Continue to develop knowledge of embodied carbon software and begin to track embodied carbon in Vision “Project Goals.”

Elevating EUI and Project Performance • Increase the number of projects that are tracking performance goals using the newly developed Vision system which includes the integrated design performance metrics (energy, water, materials and habitat) • The Building Science group will begin to take a more comprehensive approach to tracking Post-Occupancy energy data from past projects to better understand pEUI vs actual EUI.

Improving Knowledge • Continue to develop in-house videos on the latest Integrated Design tools and resources on a quarterly basis to be shared on the company intranet. • As project performance is tracked on Vision throughout the year, the list of pEUI’s for all projects will be shared with PIC’s and PM’s on several

2020 CLARK NEXSEN SUSTAINABILITY REPORT



ACTION PLAN

I M P R O V I N G O U R S U S TA I N A B L E D E S I G N P R O C E S S

occasions throughout the year to better understand why certain projects are performing well and to discuss the opportunities for improvement on low-performing projects. • Develop a company survey on Integrated Design to get a sense of the employees’ knowledge on Integrated Design, the latest tools and resources, and determine opportunities for improvement. • We will continue to encourage and pay for all members of the Sustainability Network to get registered in additional sustainable and resilient building and infrastructure design rating systems including LEED, Green Globes, Living Building Challenge and the Well standard.

Project Delivery • Increase the number of projects that are using the new “Appendix G,” the revit-based project performance template. • The Project Road Map will continue to be developed to add more content describing each item in more detail and make it user friendly. •

Project teams will begin to plan projects using the Project Road Map tool and will tailor their project road map based on the client goals and sustainability goals to maximize performance.

Sustainable Operations • Each office will develop a sustainable operations action plan. • Develop a company policy across all offices for catering practices to reduce waste and use recycled products. • Analyze the current carbon footprint for company travel by completing a company-wide commuting survey. The goal will be to determine the optimum “Work from Home” policy that reduces that Company carbon footprint for travel. • We will continue to develop the policies to reduce waste by encouraging the use of electronic documents and forms, setting copy machines to double sided, and encouraging recycling

2020 CLARK NEXSEN SUSTAINABILITY REPORT


T H I R D PA R T Y R E C O G N I T I O N Sustainability Firm Awards Top 10 ENR Southeast Top Green Firm Top 10 ENR MidAtlantic Top Green Design Firm Top 50 ENR National Top Green Design Firm Top 50 BD+C Top Green Building Architecture Firm 106 Total LEED certified projects 5 Platinum 26 Gold 52 Silver 23 Certified Design Awards 111 AIA Awards including 2 AIA NC COTE Awards 2021 Green Globes Project of the Year Runner-Up 2016 and 2020 AIA North Carolina COTE Awards 2015 Rethinking the Future International Sustainability Award


ABOUT US

Founded in 1920, Clark Nexsen is a fully integrated architecture and engineering firm providing innovative design solutions to U.S. and global clients. With 11 offices, we serve more than a dozen markets including science + technology, higher education and K-12, commercial, and infrastructure and transportation. Leveraging the strength of multiple disciplines, we collaborate across intersecting areas of expertise to gain new perspectives, inspire innovation, and deliver high-performing, sustainable projects.

2020 CLARK NEXSEN SUSTAINABILITY REPORT


www.clarknexsen.com