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Gallery of Grads2020


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GALLERY OF GRADS

A senior year to remember COVID-19 pandemic alters plans for high school, college graduates

STEPHEN LANGEL | SPECIAL TO THE CJN

M

ay and June are the months seniors in high school and college look forward to. There are proms, parties, senior class activities and of course, graduation. But due to the COVID-19 pandemic, those memorylasting events were either done virtually, put on hold, rescheduled or canceled. Nevertheless, the conclusion of senior year 2020 created new, one-of-a-kind memories that will be etched in students’ minds forever. Four high school students and four college students shared their senior reflections with the CJN.

Leah Ryzenman / New Albany High School Original graduation date: May 23 New graduation date: Same date, but done virtually College: Northwestern University in Evanston, Ill. Residence: New Albany Synagogue : Congregation Tifereth Israel in Columbus Jewish activities: Attended Sunday school, chairwoman of the Columbus Jewish teen council and attended Camp Livingston in Bennington, Ind. Parents: John and Laura Ryzenman Leah, like many students, is disappointed by what the pandemic has done to her senior year experience. However, she sees positives in how the community has come together, and lessons learned about what matters in life. The statewide shutdown has prevented Leah from enjoying the traditions and recognition associated with her many extracurricular activities. For instance, graduating seniors on the synchronized swimming team have a senior meet, where a banner with their name is displayed, and teammates draw on them with lipstick. “Those senior moments have been taken away from me,” she said. This frustration comes despite the community and the school’s best efforts to maintain traditions. For instance, the high school has changed the traditional “senior staff select,” where seniors choose a teacher that influenced them to hand the student their diploma, to fit this new reality. The school allowed students to either make the request virtually, or to go to the teacher’s house with a sign to make the request. Then, the teacher’s photo appeared alongside the student’s when the

student was recognized during the virtual graduation. The community also became involved, putting up signs throughout the city, honoring the graduates. And mothers in town have started a Facebook page where they adopt a senior, providing the student with snacks and gifts. Leah said the gesture was touching. “It’s good to see the community come together like that,” she said. This experience has provided a new perspective on what matters, Leah said. “The lessons that we learn and the relationships we make, and the memories we make are way more important than the finish line at the end.” She plans to take this new awareness with her as she heads to Northwestern University, where she will major in human development in context. Her studies will focus on how people throughout their lifespan develop in, are influenced by, and shape the social settings they encounter.

Liza Harris / Beachwood High School Original graduation date: May 24 New graduation date: Aug. 9 College: University of Mount Union in Alliance Residence: Beachwood Synagogue: Park Synagogue in Cleveland Heights and Pepper Pike Jewish activities: Camper and staff-intraining at Camp Wise in Claridon Township Parents: Allison and Jon Harris As a senior at Beachwood High School, Liza expected a traditional graduation ceremony and a senior year filled with goodbyes and special memories. Instead, her senior year ended suddenly on a random Friday in March with no expectation that this would effectively be the end of her senior year. She even left things in her locker because she was sure she would return in a few weeks. The school, parents and the community have rallied to provide the best experience possible, including Beachwood holding a

parade on May 7 for seniors, which lifted Liza’s spirits. The parade “was really fun,”she said. “The whole community came out to support us.” The school will also hold a virtual seniors award ceremony on May 31 But, even with these efforts, this has been a difficult time for students. “I lacked a sense of closure,” said Liza, adding she never got the chance to be in class with her friends for the last time and say goodbye in person. This experience taught her a powerful lesson. “Don’t take things for granted,” she said. Liza has found a creative outlet for her feelings by making a video documenting her experience with the pandemic. Health care will also continue to be a focus for her in college as she plans to major in medical laboratory science at the University of Mount Union.

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Ben Ziegler / Bexley High School Original graduation date: May 24, recorded walk-through shown New graduation date: May 16, walkthrough was recorded College: Hamilton College in Clifton, N.Y. Residence: Bexley Synagogue: Temple Israel in Columbus Jewish activities: Served as a madrichim in the religious school, worked as a lifeguard at the Jewish Community Center of Greater Columbus and participated in the JCC Maccabi Games. Parents: Marc and Lisa Ziegler Ben’s school has taken a different approach to graduation than many others by foregoing an entirely virtual graduation for a scaled-down in-person ceremony. On May 16, Ben and his classmates walked the stage to get their diplomas, however, with a twist.

Each student walked across an almost-empty stage in an auditorium that was empty except for their parents. The only people on stage beside the student were the principal, who was there to hand out the diploma, and the school librarian, who took the pictures. Ben picked up his diploma as his name was called out, stopped momentarily for photos and left to make way for the next student. The school recorded all of this and broadcast it on the original graduation date, May 24, along with speeches by the principal and student council president. There was also a parade, where students drove down the street and were cheered on by the community. Regardless, Ben said it still feels like his senior year lacks closure. Not knowing

that Friday in March when the students left school would be their last day just left things feeling unfinished, Ben said. Having the fields where he spent most of his time playing soccer suddenly locked up and empty was unsettling. And, while the graduation was held at the high school, the lack of any crowds, peers, teachers and families just made things different for Ben. This experience has given Ben a new perspective, he said. While challenging and disappointing, he understands that other people have it so much worse. “At least I’m not fighting for my life, and at least the people I care about are still healthy,” Ben said. Plus, there are better things on the horizon as Ben prepares to move to Clifton, New York to attend Hamilton College, where he will major in either government or history and play collegiate soccer.

Matthew Blum / Hawken School Original graduation date: June 7. However, the school considered the students to have graduated as of May 15. New graduation date: Tentatively scheduled for the last week in July. Additional details are forthcoming. College: DePaul University in Chicago Residence: Gates Mills Synagogue: Park Synagogue in Cleveland Heights and Pepper Pike Jewish activities – Bar mitzvah and confirmation at Park Synagogue. Matthew also served as a madrichim in the religious school. Parents: Leslie and Kevin Blum

Brooke Insler / Case Western Reserve University Original graduation date: May 17, and was held virtually that day New graduation date: October for an inperson ceremony Residence: Orange Village Synagogue: Anshe Chesed Fairmount Temple in Beachwood Jewish activities: Attended Hebrew school; involved with Playmakers, the Jewish youth theater program; attended Camp Wise in Claridon Township; and involved with BBYO Parents: Elyse and Steve Insler Insler wants to advocate for vulnerable populations. This goal led her to pursue a master’s degree in bioethics and medical humanities at Case Western Reserve University in Cleveland.

The pandemic has only reinforced her goals, as it served as a case study for her master’s program. She and her classmates did clinical rotations in the pandemic units of hospitals like Cleveland Clinic and MetroHealth. There, she learned about the ethical implications of, for example, medical treatment when there are not enough resources to care for everyone in need. These studies soon turned virtual when the quarantines were put in place, cutting off the rotations at MetroHealth. But, Brooke said, CWRU continued to study the pandemic by having calls each week on bioethical issues relating to treating it. Her graduation also became a virtual affair, including an online convocation and

Matthew is disappointed. The pandemic and resulting school shutdowns have both delayed his graduation and taken away some of the senior experiences he was most looking forward to, such as skip day, prank day and senior week. Matthew regrets missing out on the senior prank the most. It’s something he and his classmates have been looking forward to since they started at Hawken School in Chester Township, routinely hearing from upperclassmen that they will “get their turn one day.” At the same time, he said Hawken and the school’s parent association have

done everything to provide seniors with positive memories of their graduation. There have been social media posts with seniors’ favorite memories of their time at Hawken. Signs have been placed in every senior’s yard, congratulating them on their graduation. Gifts have been delivered to their doors, and students have been given a senior drive-thru lunch at Shake Shack in Orange. Matthew is already looking ahead to college, where he will be seeking a Bachelor of Fine Arts degree in film and television. “I’m obsessed with movies,” Matthew said. He has been writing screenplays for about two years, which he said is “a good way to get lost in a world you create.”

diploma ceremony. Her bioethics department at the CWRU School of Medicine also held a live Zoom ceremony. Her family did its part, however, to make the graduation experience as normal as possible. Her father wrote and delivered a commencement speech, as did her sister. Insler walked down the stairs of her home to the graduation held on their lawn as traditional commencement music played in the background. The family took pictures and videos, which they watched together later, and her grandparents drove by for photos with her from a safe distance. The pandemic has influenced Insler’s career plans. She has now decided to use her career to advocate for the health care needs of children and other at-risk populations. She will take the next steps toward doing so when she enrolls in law school in the fall.

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Ben Blotner / The College of Wooster

Carly Waxman / The Ohio State University Original graduation date: May 3 New graduation date: May 3 virtually, with a live ceremony planned for the future Residence: Solon Synagogue: Park Synagogue in Cleveland Heights and Pepper Pike Jewish activities: Participated in Hillel in college. Her involvement included student leadership work with a focus on getting other Jewish students active in Hillel. She also participated in several fellowships, including the Israel Women’s Network, where, among other responsibilities, she promoted women’s rights. Parents: Lisa and David Waxman Waxman was out of the country when she heard about the change in graduation plans brought on by the pandemic. This news filled her with sadness at the lost opportunity to graduate and celebrate with her friends. The online ceremony just wasn’t the same, she said. Watching online in her living room was “definitely not the same as being in the stadium (at Ohio State).” She didn’t have her name called as there were just too many students graduating, including all graduate and undergraduate majors. She also had to have her diploma mailed to her. But Waxman is holding out

GALLERY OF GRADS

hope that Ohio State will have another graduation soon, this time in person. While she feels disappointment and a lack of closure, she said she gained perspective from this experience. “Yes, I don’t have a graduation, but people are dealing with so much more now,” Waxman said. Also, the fact that her senior year was cut short doesn’t take away from her college experiences. Most importantly, she said she and her family are healthy, and that is not something everyone can say during this health crisis, Waxman said. Now, she is looking ahead to the next stage of her life, attending Brooklyn Law School in New York later this summer.

Original graduation date: May 11 New graduation date: To be determined in October Residence: Columbus Parents: Joel and Sarah Blotner For Blotner, the toughest part about the sudden end of his time atThe College of Wooster in Wooster was missing out on time with his friends and celebrating their graduation together. While he continued to pursue his English degree, it was “kind of all of the work of college with none of the fun.” The graduation itself also left him feeling hollow. “It really didn’t feel like the full ceremony that we should be having,” Blotner said. Instead of a graduation ceremony with a full crowd of family, friends, peers, and teachers, there was an hour-long YouTube broadcast of speeches, with graduates’ names scrolling across the bottom of the screen. Blotner said he is looking forward to the in-person ceremony in October because that will provide a fitting end to his time in college. “It’ll be cool definitely to at least get some closure and see everyone in person again,” he said. But, the issues at the end of his senior year

did not detract from how much he enjoyed college. In fact, he said this experience has taught him that you can still enjoy something, even if things do not turn out as you had expected. This conclusion is especially true if those changes are out of your control like the pandemic is. “You live and learn, and you move on from these things, and you have to realize that there’s nothing you can do about it,” Blotner said. “So, honestly, with that knowledge, it makes things better.” Looking ahead, he is focusing on starting his career as a journalist. His goal is to become a baseball writer.

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Mazel Tov

Mazel Tov

Congratulations

TARYN LACKRITZ

ZOEY YELSKY

MAYA HOLLANDER

Beachwood High School

Orange High School

We are so proud of you and we are your biggest fans! Good luck at The Ohio State University! Love, Mom, Dad, Margo and the dogs (Kylee and Dexter)

We are so proud of all you have accomplished Zoey! Follow your dreams and shine bright in all the things that interest you!

The Ohio State University

Northeastern University

All our love, Mom, Dad and Jacob

Shaker Heights High School

Congratulations Maya! We are so proud of you and all that you have accomplished! We wish you all the best at OSU next year! Mom, Dad, Adam, Noa and Raider

The Ohio State University Health Sciences


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For boys, Junior K - 12

NEEL AGARWAL · DAN ANSELMI · JOSH ANTHONY · FRANK APPLEBAUM · ERIC AREKLETT · JOEY AVERILL THAROON BALAJI · KYLE BASHEIN · NOLAN BINGAMAN · GARRETT BLUM · JACK BORROW · CHARLIE BRENNAN NOAH BROCK · THOMAS BUTLER · TRISTAN CAVOTTA · WILL CHA · NEHAL CHIGURUPATI · GRAHAM CLARK BEN CLEGG · BROOKS CROWLEY · PARKER CROWLEY · NIKITA DAVIDENKO · PETER DAWSON · JOHN DESANTIS RYAN DEVINE · JIMMY DONOHUE · NATE ELLIOTT · BRAD ELLIS · PARKER ERNST · CARTER FAULKNER TATE FLACK

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COLE FLUKER

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DOM FRACASSA

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MITCH FRAGASSI

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CAMERON

GABLE

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ALI GARDEZI

ANDREW GOODMAN · MIKE GRASSI · CHARLIE GROOFF · PRAJWAL GURUPRASAD · ADAM HOLTHAUS · MICHAEL HOLTZ JARED HUSNI

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JUSTIN ILER

SUKHM KANG

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SAI KARNATI

DAVID

MACGREGOR

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JOHN

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JAMES

MARTIN

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KEHERLY HENRY

JOSEPH JONES ·

BRIAN LI

MASSEY

·

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MILES

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CHARLIE JORANKO DYLAN LOCONTI

MCILVAINE

·

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AKHIL

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WILL LVOVICH MEDARAMETLA

SETH MELAMED · HENRY MICHAELSON · JACK MIRANDA · CAM MONESMITH · TY MOSES · RAY MUZILLA TYLER NETTIS

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ALEX NIEDERER

SIMON OLSON

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BEAU O’SICKEY

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CHAS NORMAN KURT OZUNER

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DREW

NOVAK

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JACK O’BRIEN

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SAM OLSON

CHARLIE

PAINE

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SAAVAN PATEL

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TONY PENG

ALEX PIETRICK · NIC PUJOLAS · RYAN RACKLEY · STEFAN RADJENOVIC · SAAM RASHIDI · OWEN REHAK CADE RETINO · ALEX RICHTER · JACK ROGEN · RYAN ROSENCRANS · ANDREW ROZENSHTRAUKH · JACK SACKS COLIN SAVAGE · RILEY STEINER · JACK SWEENEY · GAVIN TALLAL · NICOLAS TEKIELI · NICK THOMAS WILLIAM THOMAS · SIMON TROPPER · ADRIAN VOVK · ISAIAH WAITERS · KENNON WALTON · NATHAN WARREN ETHAN WEBER · TURNER WHITMOYER · WILLIAM WILLOUGHBY · BEN WYANT · MAX YOUNG · www.us.edu


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Micah Goldson / Washington University Original graduation date: May 15 (graduation ceremony was held virtually on the same date) New graduation date: May 31, 2021 Residence: Columbus Synagogue affiliation: Congregation Tifereth Israel Jewish activities: Hillel chapter at Washington University and the local American Israel Public Affairs Committee Parents: Jennifer and James Goldson For Goldson, the most significant problem presented by the pandemic was not the delay in his graduation ceremony or interference with his senior year in college. Instead, it’s that his application to medical school has been pushed back by a year. Washington University in St. Louis did an excellent job handling the crisis, he said, providing online graduation speakers May 15 that were similar to what students would have heard had the ceremony taken place in-person. Each major also had a program to

recognize students. “They ended up honoring us pretty well, considering the circumstances,” Goldson said. However, the Association of American Medical Colleges stopped giving Medical College Admission Tests for some time, only restarting over the past week or so. That does not provide Goldson enough time to take the MCAT before medical school applications are due. So, now he has to push back his applications until next June and the start of medical school until the fall 2022. Goldson remains optimistic and will be looking for relevant experience over the next two years until he can start medical school. In the meantime, he said he has learned a valuable lesson. “Take enjoyment in what you have in the time that you have it because sometimes things will change rapidly, and you can’t always predict what’s going to happen,” Goldson said.

Congratulations

Mazel Tov

Congratulations

SARAH COHEN

REBECCA POWERS

MAXWELL GLICK

Bachelors Degree in Electrical Engineering Technology

Shaker Heights High School International Baccalaureate Diploma

Mazel Tov on your college graduation! We are so proud of you and what you have accomplished and know great things lie ahead of you as you start your career at Procter & Gamble! Lots of love! Mom, Dad, Brendan, and Jacob

Rebecca Powers, my very special granddaughter. My prayer is that the world treats you well and discovers how much you have to offer. All my love, Grandma Gerry

We are so proud of you and look forward to seeing all of the great things you will accomplish in the future. Love, Grandma and Grandpa

Purdue University

The Ohio State University

Miami University

Bachelor of Arts in History


Grad_Ad_2020_CJN.qxp_Layout 1 5/20/20 11:52 AM Page 1

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Forever green and white. No matter what colors come next.

est . 1896

Congratulations to the Laurel School Class of 2020.

The 65 members of the Class of 2020 have been accepted to 134 colleges and universities to date and have been granted over $6.5 million in merit scholarships. American University • Boston University (3) • Case Western Reserve University • College of Charleston • Cornell University • Dartmouth College • Davidson College • DePaul University • Elon University (2) • Fordham University • George Washington University • Harvard University (2) • High Point University • John Carroll University • Kent State University (2) • Kenyon College (4) • Lehigh University • Loyola University Chicago • Miami University, Oxford (4) • Michigan State University • North Carolina State University • Rochester Institute of Technology • SUNY at Binghamton • The College of Wooster • The Ohio State University, Main Campus (10) • Tufts University • Tulane University • University of California, Los Angeles • University of Chicago • University of Cincinnati • University of Kentucky • University of Miami • University of Michigan (3) • University of Notre Dame • Wake Forest University • Washington University in St Louis (2) • West Virginia University • Xavier University • Xavier University of Louisiana • Yeshiva University •

LYMAN CAMPUS One Lyman Circle, Shaker Heights • BUTLER CAMPUS 7420 Fairmount Road, Russell Twp.

Girls Kindergarten-Grade 12 and Coed Pre-Primary 216.464.0946 LaurelSchool.org College choices as of May 20, 2020.

/LaurelSchool

@LaurelSchool

Dream. Dare. Do.


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Morals, life lessons integral part of school’s curriculum BECKY RASPE | SPECIAL SECTIONS STAFF REPORTER @BeckyRaspeCJN braspe@cjn.org |

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myNYCB.com • (877) 786-6560

©2020 New York Community Bank – Member FDIC

Mazal Tov class of

2 0 20 (L-R) Vicktoria Sharapov, Joshua Fishman, Jaden Tsirlin, Lea Keren, Rachel Golden, Samuel Uria ATTENDING THE FOLLOWING HIGH SCHOOLS: Beachwood, Orange, Mayfield, Solon

CONGRATULATIONS TO THE GROSS SCHECHTER CLASS OF 2016 ENTERING THESE COLLEGES AND UNIVERSITIES: Carleton College, Columbia College, Kent State University Honors College, Miami University, Northeastern University, The Ohio State University, University of Southern California

www.grossschechter.org #schechterpride #schechterresults

t school, students learn an array of subjects that will impact their future. In addition to learning math and grammar, many educators teach lessons about right and wrong, as well as other important morals. According to Rabbi Avrohom Drandoff, head of school at Columbus Torah Academy in Columbus, and Patrick Gallagher, head of school at University School in Hunting Valley, adding life lessons and morals into the school day helps foster responsibility and contribute to a well-rounded child. For University School, which has an all-boy student body, teaching life lessons is the school’s motto. Focusing on responsibility, loyalty and consideration, Gallagher said those ideals are infused into each day. “We emphasize empathy with our youngest learners and ultimately want to model service with our oldest learners as well,” he explained. “This is a school that in its mission says it’s going to be a place where each boy is known, loved and cultivate men of character. So, it is very much part of everything we do.” Gallagher said this is also infused into sports, where students are taught about respect, sportsmanship and being kind to opponents as they represent the school. “We want them to know and want them to personify the fact that they’re playing for more than just sports,” he said. “They’re certainly aiming for more than just a victory. They’re hoping to model those values that we espouse as a community.” At CTA, students are not only taught the general right from wrong, but also how that relates to being Jewish. “The basis of a CTA education is our Jewish heritage and Torah, where life lessons on relationships, community, livelihood and personal growth fill the entire school,” Drandoff said. “Our classroom curriculum throughout all disciplines incorporates Jewish and moral concepts and helps our students apply them to the modern world. Our small class sizes provide students the opportunity to share and reflect. Children learn best by practice and general inquiry.” Both educators said these lessons differ for each age group. “Every grade receives customized instructions and concepts built upon each other each year,” Drandoff said. “For the younger grades when children are first learning and exploring self-awareness, we focus on the impact of self. How do you feel? How do you react and respond?

Drandoff

Gallagher

As students get older, they can accept greater responsibility and move outside of themselves.” As students age and approach high school, Drandoff added older students begin to further think outside of themselves and engage in community activities. “That comes from what they learn at CTA, supported by their families,” he said. “We have a lot of pride that many former CTA students are involved in Jewish communal leadership, philanthropy, Israel advocacy and other critical areas.” Gallagher said at University School, this begins with modeling trusting and positive relationships. “This is a place where we’re fortunate to have small class sizes and intimate learning environments,” he said. “The adults in our community know that the charge they have goes beyond mathematics or literature or biology, that they are helping young boys grow up as well. So, we have a sponsorship system for example. The adults in the community are guides and mentors to young people. These are usually not adults that the boys have another relationship. There are then conversations that are holistic and emphasize the choices the boys are making.” Drandoff said teaching morals alongside more traditional education makes a difference. “The educational philosophy of CTA is built on the belief that a school is a microcosm for life,” he explained. “The hours spent engaged in learning should not be all content-driven. Social and emotional intelligence is as much a part of who a person becomes as their academic intellect. Our goal is to prepare our students for the rest of their lives.” Gallagher added parents also have an important role. “It’s about creating responsibilities at school around service and chores, and having similar responsibilities at home,” he said. “

Staff Reporter McKenna Corson contributed to this story.


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Northeast Ohio teens elected to NFTY-NEL regional board

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zzy Lashley was elected regional president and Tovah Elia was elected religious and cultural vice president of the National Federation of Temple Youth Northeastern Lakes region, which covers Cleveland, Erie, northern New York state and Ontario, Canada. Izzy’s goals are to strengthen membership in all of the region’s cities and modernize the region by revamping the group’s constitution, according to a news release. She has been involved in NFTY-related activities since sixth grade, including creating Lashley the junior youth group at Temple Emanu El in Orange. She has been a madrichah, or teaching assistant in the temple’s religious school for five years. She is also active in National Honor Society and the Academic Challenge team. Izzy, 16, is a resident of Lyndhurst and a junior at Charles F. Brush High School in Lyndhurst. Tovah, 17, has been involved in Elia NFTY activities since seventh grade. Her focus includes teaching new music, introducing new service themes and creating a new program with other board members about environmental sustainability around the world, according to the release. She has served as Temple Emanu El’s religious and cultural vice president for two years, as well as being a temple youth group song leader for the past four years. As a junior at Solon High School, Tovah plays guitar for the school’s top jazz band, “Jazz Ensemble 1,” enjoys basketball and is a member of Girl Up, which focuses on empowering young women.

Beachwood High School’s Metz wins Princeton Prize in Race Relations

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unior Elizabeth Metz of Beachwood High School in Beachwood won The Princeton Prize in Race Relations award. The Princeton Prize is a national service program recognizing outstanding high school students who show leadership by improving race relations in their communities. Due to COVID-19, there will not be a local ceremony, however, Elizabeth won a $1,000 prize and attendance to a virtual Princeton University symposium on race relations with 27 other winners for work on the Breaking Barriers Project, which included open forums at Beachwood High School and her web series “What I Wish You Knew,” which addressed cultural and racial differences and included biweekly discussions on topics including white privilege, colorism, unjust stereotypes and intersectionality. Seniors Aaliyah Williams of Shaker Heights High School in Shaker Heights and Mayukha Dyta of Olentangy Liberty High School in Powell received certificates of accomplishment.

to the Senior Class of 2020 from the Columbus Jewish Community


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Virtual learning lets students bring school home with them BECKY RASPE | SPECIAL SECTIONS STAFF REPORTER @BeckyRaspeCJN braspe@cjn.org |

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person lab work so his students would have real data for their future lab reports. “A big part of what I do is incorporate research into my courses,” he said. “I spent my entire break in the lab doing what students would’ve done, so they had data to use to run lab remotely. They do the important work about drawing the proper conclusion. It was about giving them a real lab experience without being physically there.” Students also have access to iPads at Hiram through a 1:1 program, so the transition was seamless for Goodner. “They can collaborate and send screenshots of their work and I can comment on that and review it,” he added. When it came to implementing the new learning format, each educator said they had their worries. But when it came down to it, students were receptive and teachers make a point to keep things interesting. “Students have responded overall very positively,” Arcus-Goldberg noted. “We have had 100% of our students participate in classes since this began. There are obviously ups and downs, and we’ve all been getting a little tired of being cooped up, but the teachers have become more and more creative in engaging the students.” Segal noted the resilience of the students at Laurel. “Girls are eager to connect with each other and their teachers virtually,” she said. “They participate in advisory and class meetings during the week and several are hungry to lead initiatives that keep the outside-of-class time community alive, like trivia or game nights once homework is finished, virtual recess time and a coffeehouse.”

any schools and institutions have developed best practices to continue remote learning during the COVID-19 pandemic. Rachel Arcus-Goldberg, head of school at Columbus Jewish Day School in New Albany; Brad Goodner, professor of biology and biomedical humanities at Hiram College in Hiram; and Leslie Segal, middle school director at Laurel School in Shaker Heights, described how virtual learning has worked for their students. At Laurel School, Segal explained the stay-at-home order came just before the school’s spring break, so leadership had time to develop plans. Students began the program, School@ Home, on April 1. “Powerful learning remains top-of-mind at Laurel, just as it does any day on campus,” she noted. “Perhaps even more important, though, are the relationships teachers build with our girls. Research done by Laurel’s Center for Research on Girls reminds us that girls learn best under the guidance of caring mentors, so our School@Home plan emphasized the connection girls feel with their teachers, their advisers and the connections their families feel to the school community.” The day is structured with half the classes scheduled to meet in real-time online, with a slightly shortened school day. “We determined from the outset that we would run a schedule which is a version of what girls would have done this spring on campus,” Segal explained. “This allowed us to keep many of our routines of learning with the girls.” For students at CJDS, Arcus-Goldberg said learning

starts at 8:30 a.m. with an all-school tefillah. From 9 a.m. to 2 p.m., kindergarten through fourth graders have five 30-minute live classes with their teachers, and fifth and sixth graders have six classes. “They have all of their core classes – language arts, math, science, social studies, Hebrew and Judaic studies, plus one ‘special’ class each day, like physical education, music or art,” she said. “On Fridays, we end the week together with Kabbalat Shabbat at 1 p.m.” She added leadership made sure each student could work remotely. “We made sure in the early weeks of the program that every student had a device on which they could participate in virtual learning, so (we) handed out Chromebooks and iPads to assist families who needed additional computers,” Arcus-Goldberg said. Colleges are also ramping up their virtual learning, Goodner said. At Hiram College, online courses differ between each program. For his biology students, Goodner said he spent his spring break on campus completing in-

Mazel Tov

Mazel Tov

Mazel Tov

NOAH SCOTT BAERSON

AARON FRIEDMAN

MARA FRIEDMAN Bachelor of Arts in Journalism and Mass Communication with Honors

Walter Cronkite School of Journalism

Congratulations to our daughter and sister, Beachwood’s Mara Friedman on your 2020 Graduation from the Arizona State University, Walter Cronkite School of Journalism. We are all so very proud of you. Love your family, Michael, Marci, Morgan, Matthew and Macy Friedman

Arizona State University

Arcus-Goldberg

Goodner

Segal

Bachelor of Sport Management

Congratulations Noah. We are so proud of how much you have already accomplished in your life. You are amazing and we love you so much. We know you will be successful in this next stage of your life!

Bachelors Degree in Quantitative Biology

We are very proud of you and look forward to the next stage of your life.

Love, Mom, Dad and Melissa

Love, Mom, Dad, Ryan and Andrew

Ohio University

University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill


GALLERY OF GRADS

CJN.ORG | COLUMBUSJEWISHNEWS.COM | 53

MAY 29, 2020

This fall, college experience to become new world BECKY RASPE | SPECIAL SECTIONS STAFF REPORTER @BeckyRaspeCJN braspe@cjn.org |

F

or those entering college or returning in the fall, the COVID-19 pandemic will bring about many changes, including online or hybrid semesters. Melanie Corn, president of Columbus College of Art & Design in Columbus, and Angela Johnson, vice president of access and completion at Cuyahoga County Community College in Cleveland, said their colleges are likely going to use a hybrid schedule, where some classes are held in person with smaller class sizes, and others online. Corn At CCAD, Corn said welcoming new students to campus came down to making important changes in the onboarding process. “We’ve made a few decisions already when it comes to fall semester, like how we would traditionally do an orientation in June to come to campus, which keeps us motivated and invested,” she said. “We decided to change that to an August orientation. Johnson We are currently moving some of those functions to a virtual format. Even if we can welcome them back to campus in August, being able to complement that with online engagement during the summer is key.” Additionally, Corn said the freshman-style dorm will have only one student per bedroom to reassure families the school is “taking the extra step.” Plans are also in place to stagger studio classes. Tri-C leadership has yet to solidify concrete plans for the fall, but in case classes continue to be online, Johnson said students should be ready. “We’re looking at what courses we could offer from a social distancing perspective and what is probably more likely to stay online,” she said. “We’re working through the decisions as we’re preparing to onboard students to make sure they have the information about what we want to do.” When classes switched online in March, Johnson said Tri-C made sure all students had the right materials and know-how to succeed, and prepared students with devices and wi-fi. Another way new students can get introduced to life at CCAD is by viewing the work of classes that came before them. Traditionally, these shows would be produced in person, but CCAD has placed every graduating senior’s portfolio project online. Corn said this in itself is a great resource for incoming freshmen. “It is a great asset for prospective students, they have a great online resource for what is being produced and get excited about the different majors we have,” she said. “We are finding different ways to engage students. We’re able to

reach more people because there are only so many people that can attend an event. Especially with this generation, this is where they live.” Johnson said Tri-C is exploring ways for small groups to meet to make sure incoming students have access to the same services as previous classes. “Going away to college is already a scary experience, especially if you’re doing it by yourself,” she explained. “Creating these engagement opportunities to help students connect is something that we’re trying to work through especially since freshmen haven’t built those friendships yet.” Making sure students feel connected to their campus, no matter how that looks in the coming semester, is an

important part of college life. “It comes down to a sense of belonging,” Johnson noted. “Students within their first three weeks of their educational experience are deciding if they belong or not. In those three weeks, students are trying to decide if they should stay or go. Connecting early makes a huge difference in a student’s ability to persist.” Corn added, “That is the point. The earlier you can create that connection, you’re increasing the stickiness of a student and then they’re less likely to drop out and more likely to retain and be satisfied with the experience. Getting them across the finish line depends on what happens in those first few weeks.”

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54 | CJN.ORG | COLUMBUSJEWISHNEWS.COM

MAY 29, 2020

GALLERY OF GRADS

Gap year an option for incoming college students BECKY RASPE | SPECIAL SECTIONS STAFF REPORTER @BeckyRaspeCJN braspe@cjn.org |

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s many students prepare for the transition from high school to college, some opt to experience a gap year, where students can defer a year to pursue other goals. According to the Gap Year Association, about 40,000 students took a gap year last year. Elad Granot, dean at Ashland University’s Dauch College of Business and Economics in Ashland, and Jonathan Wehner, vice president and dean of admissions, enrollment management and student success at Cleveland State University in Cleveland, said though gap years can be common, the reasons for taking them vary. For Granot, who grew up in Israel, going to college out of high school is not an option due to compulsory military service requirements with the Israel Defense Forces. His experience in the military before college made him a big proponent of gap years. “For me, I was a freshman at 25 and that isn’t out of the ordinary there,” he recalled. “For countries that don’t have that, there is something to be said about

Granot

Wehner

taking at least a year to mature. I don’t see many disadvantages in taking a year before going to school, but it does have to have value. I hope the motivation to take a gap year would be to make the experience fulfilling.” Wehner said those taking gap years should have a clear reason. But with the COVID-19 pandemic causing uncertainty around educational structures, he said gap year conversations could be more common. “There are many students who are uncertain about how they may adapt and they aren’t sure if their school will be online and how well they’d do

online,” he explained. “A lot of parents are concerned about their student’s safety, too. But as an educator, I think about the summer setback or summer slide – the learning students lose over the summer and come back to school in the fall at a lower academic level than when they left. For students taking a gap year, if it doesn’t include some form of study, you’re potentially taking 15 months off from school.” To keep the brain elastic and ready to learn, students should approach a gap year as an opportunity to participate in alternative learning experiences. “Most young people about to graduate high school who are considering an academic pursuit are already in the mode of preparing their portfolio, doing things they care about and are passionate about,” Granot said. “A gap year should be that but at the next level – trying to capture as much as you can from the experience and prepare you for what is next. It’s an opportunity to explore, testing things out without major repercussions.” Wehner added, “To be successful, a gap year needs structure. The students that don’t have a plan, often their gap

year doesn’t pay off. They may have a good time, but it doesn’t add up. If a student comes to me and requests deferral, I ask them what their plan is before I approve it. Students with plans tend to have given it more thought.” Due to the varying reasons, both colleges closely counsel students considering the gap year option. That advisory period is key, Wehner said. “It’s about at least prompting students to put a little thought into it,” he noted. “The success of a gap year is all in the planning part. Our goal is for students to be successful. If we can provide advice for success, that’s key.” Granot said, “It’s about putting an accent on the individual. That jives very well with allowing students to explore who they are. Putting that emphasis on the student allows us to be on a one-on-one level with incoming students and grads. It is that connection that allows us to give advice.” Publisher’s note: Elad Granot is a member of the Cleveland Jewish Publication Company Board of Directors


GALLERY OF GRADS

MAY 29, 2020

Congratulations CHAD ADELMAN

Bachelor of Science in Industrial Systems Engineering

CONGRATULATIONS CHAD! We are so proud of you and all of your accomplishments! We know you will do great things going forward! Best of Luck in Washington DC! We Love You So Much! Love, Mom, Dad, Reid & Amber

CJN.ORG | COLUMBUSJEWISHNEWS.COM | 55

Mazel Tov JASON DIDOMENICO

Bachelor of Arts – Strategic Communications

After years of hard work, dedication and determination you have done it! We are very proud of you and all you have accomplished. While this may be your walk off moment, we know there are many more great things to come. Cap’s off to you Jason, congratulations and on to the next adventure! Love, Mom, Dani, Mimi, Papa, Rob, Samantha and Zack

The Ohio State University

The Ohio State University

Congratulations

Mazel Tov

ABIGAIL FEY WURMBRAND

DANIELLE DIDOMENICO

Early Childhood Education and Intervention Specialist

Congratulations Abby! We are so very proud of you, and look forward to your becoming the teacher you were born to become!

Solon High School

After years of hard work, dedication and determination you have done it! We are very proud of you and all you accomplish. Looking forward to everything that comes your way next. Here’s to Dani, congratulations and always remember adventure is out there!

All our Love, Moms Carol Fey and Joan Wurmbrand

Love, Mom, Jason, Mimi, Papa, Rob, Samantha and Zack

Capital University

The Ohio State University


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GALLERY OF GRADS

Help available if you’re ‘undecided’ about college major BECKY RASPE | SPECIAL SECTIONS STAFF REPORTER @BeckyRaspeCJN braspe@cjn.org |

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igh school seniors face many choices when preparing for graduation and enrolling in college. One of the more difficult choices for some students involves selecting a major. According to studybreaks.com, 20% to 50% of students enroll in college as “undecided” majors. Thomas Hawks, dean of academic advising and support at Kenyon College in Gambier, and John Naughton, vice president of enrollment and student success at Ohio Dominican University in Columbus, said an unsure or undecided student has a few options to make the decision easier. “It really begins with the college search,” Naughton said. “Part of that is when students go through the college search, they have trouble deciding what they want to do for the rest of their lives. That is hard for a 17-year-old to determine. The best way to look at it is to use the undergraduate experience as building the individual, and graduate school is preparing for a career.” With that in mind, Naughton

Hawks

Naughton

encouraged students who may be unsure to approach college as an opportunity to meet new people, experience different things and learn topics they’ve never had the chance to before. “Talk to faculty and ask questions – and don’t just ask what they like about their job, ask what they don’t like too,” he noted. “Don’t just sit on a path, too. If you do come in as a certain major, keep your mind open and don’t be afraid to change your plans.” Hawks said at Kenyon College, students are encouraged to take classes in all of the major divisions – fine arts, humanities, social sciences and natural sciences.

“Our advisers encourage students to do that early because the best way for students to figure out their major is to try out some classes and find what interests them,” he said. “A lot of things we offer here are classes students may not have had the chance to take in high school. That to me is really critical.” Another way to find where a student fits in the academic journey lies within internships, Naughton said. “It doesn’t have to be an opportunity for you to get your foot in the door somewhere,” he said. “It’s a great opportunity to determine if you want to go through that door at all. If you have people in your life in a career that interests you, ask them if you can shadow them. Take advantage of the summer to explore those career fields and think about life down the road. Can you see yourself doing this for the next 10 to 20 years? What does it mean for the long term?” If students are still unsure about their major, advising offices can help. “Advising is one of the things we emphasize here,” Hawks noted. “We make sure the moment students arrive on campus that they have a faculty adviser. And they aren’t chosen

randomly – we have students fill out a data form after I read each application, and connect them with a faculty member with whom they can form a strong, nurturing relationship.” In the event a student is still struggling to commit, Naughton encouraged them to embrace the uncertainty. “That is really the essence of what the undergraduate experience is,” he explained. “Just be open to the new experiences, conversations and ways of looking at things. That is going to help you on the journey of figuring out what you want to do. Don’t be afraid to grow and change who you are or sit with the decisions you made. Understand that at the end of the day, choosing a major is not a prison sentence.” Hawk added, “It may also help the students to think that they are not taking on a job that they need to be committed to forever. It’s just the way they are choosing to begin – and they aren’t locking themselves into a particular job or career.”

Mazel Tov

Congratulations

Mazel Tov

JAKE ADELSTEIN

MAYA COHEN

BENJAMIN GROSSMAN

Orange High School

Solon High School

Each day, you remind us that great results come from hard work. We couldn’t be any more proud of you. Love, Dad, Mom, Melanie and Grady

Maya we are so proud of all you have accomplished during high school. From volleyball to cheer to lacrosse and the play Chicago. Here comes college. We are excited to see what you do. Love ya. Love, Mom, Dad, Jenna, Andy, and Chad

Benji, We are so incredibly proud of you and your many accomplishments. We can’t wait to see what the future holds for you at UGA. We love you very much. Go Dawgs! From Mom, Dad & Owen

The Ohio State University

The Ohio State University

University of Georgia

Bachelor of Science in Computer Science and Engineering with Honors in Engineering Summa Cum Laude


GALLERY OF GRADS

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MAY 29, 2020

Preparation key to smooth transition to high school

S

eparated by a few months, the transition from eighth grade to high school can be jarring. To make the move smoother, educators suggest proper preparation for preteens approaching secondary school. According to Sharon Baker, director of middle schools at Hathaway Brown School in Shaker Heights, and Mike Griffith, head of school at The Lillian and Betty Ratner School in Pepper Pike, making sure students are prepared to enter high school is a big part of eighthgrade advising. “We need to help students remember Baker that change is a process so we need to help them remain calm through this opportunity for growth,” Griffith said. “At Ratner School, students are introduced to change as they prepare for graduation. We support the students holistically in academics, social and emotional strength, executive functioning, coping skills and resiliency. All of these tools will help them be prepared, regardless of the Griffith setting they enter to navigate the early stages and get a solid footing.” At Hathaway Brown, Baker said eighth-grade advising is comprised of many conversations surrounding a student’s interests and making plans to pursue them. Developing independence is another piece of the puzzle, she added. “(Students) will hone their systems of organization, plan long-term projects and papers for themselves, set deadlines and determine how to overcome setbacks,” she said of HB’s all-girl student body. “We move them toward defining their voices, whether they email a teacher or set an in-person meeting. Developing self-advocacy skills are critical to the eighth-grade experience so students can maturely identify their academic needs and who is the best resource to help.” Preparing students through their eighth-grade year allows better chances for success when entering high school. “Eighth graders are on the brink of independence,” Baker explained. “They seek it at every corner, so preparing them to manage the responsibility of that, as well as developing some consequential thinking serves them well as they are naturally nervous about the next transition in their lives. They have lots of questions and are finally seeing the adults in their spaces as allies, considering their opinions at least equal to their peers. That is a short, sweet-spot in adolescence, so it’s important to capitalize on it.” Griffith added the preparation period also allows students to develop as mature learners. “This is an important time for the young adolescent student, and so this process, while difficult, really is part of their exploration into better understanding their likes, challenges and what supports they need to be successful,” he said. “It is a very good learning opportunity for students if done well.” But students shouldn’t feel bad about feeling scared or anxious about making the transition. They are many support options available, Griffith said. “The transition from middle school to high school is often filled with both excitement and apprehension,” he noted. “No matter what, change can be hard. Students who

have been in a school setting for many years have learned to trust those around them. Suddenly, they are about to move away from that trusted base. As a team, parents, teachers and staff can help the student to focus on understanding themselves and building confidence in terms of their readiness for the next step.” Speaking of parents, Baker said there a few ways for them to be supportive. “Giving their child opportunities to build independence, showing them that they believe in them and trust their decision making is essential,” she said. “Partnering with their child and really listening will build the relationship of trust so the parent is the go-to when the child is worried or scared.”

Though the transition is different for each child, both Baker and Griffith shared advice for making the most out of the experience. “Find a mentor,” Baker suggested. “Develop a relationship with a junior or senior who you have something in common with. Asking those questions and getting advice from someone who went through it recently and did it well is a huge advantage.” Griffith added, “Enjoy the moment. Everyone else is also going through this process. You are not alone, so reach out to others around you.”

HB is always home. ★ Class of 2020 College Destinations: Belmont University Boston College Boston University (2) Bucknell University Carnegie Mellon University Case Western Reserve University (2) Clemson University Colby College Columbia University Cornell University Dartmouth College Davidson College Denison University (2) Dickinson College Duke University Elon University (2) Emory University (2)

Goucher College Harvard University (2) Hope College Ithaca College Kent State University (2) Kenyon College Lehigh University Loyola Marymount University Massachusetts Institute of Technology (2) McMaster University Miami University New York University (3) Northeastern University (2) Oberlin College The Ohio State University (6)

Ohio Wesleyan University Rice University Rochester Institute of Technology Saint Louis University Skidmore College Spelman College Stanford University Swarthmore College Syracuse University (2) Tufts University Tulane University University of Akron University of California, Los Angeles University of Cincinnati University of Dayton University of Denver

Learn more athb.edu/BestGirlsSchool

52005

BECKY RASPE | SPECIAL SECTIONS STAFF REPORTER @BeckyRaspeCJN braspe@cjn.org |

University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign University of Miami (2) University of Michigan (4) University of Pennsylvania (2) University of Pittsburgh University of South Carolina (2) University of Southern California (2) University of the South, Sewanee University of Virginia University of Washington Vanderbilt University Yale University (2) As of 5/26/20


58 | CJN.ORG | COLUMBUSJEWISHNEWS.COM

Congratulations DOUGLAS RICH

Indiana University Bachelors Degree in Sports Marketing & Management

MAY 29, 2020

GALLERY OF GRADS

Saltzman Youth Panel awards $43,000 in grants to 13 organizations JANE KAUFMAN | STAFF REPORTER @jkaufmanCJN jkaufman@cjn.org |

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hirty-nine high school juniors and seniors recommended grants totaling $43,000 to 13 organizations for programs in the Jewish and general community through the Jewish

Federation of Cleveland’s 2019-20 Maurice Saltzman Youth Panel, according to a news release. Among the grants were: $6,000 to Jewish Family Service Association to cover reliable transportation for individuals

SALTZMAN | 59

SALTZMAN YOUTH PANEL

Douglas, You make us so proud every day! Congratulations on your graduation from Indiana University. You will do great things in New York! Good Luck at Brooklyn Law! Can’t wait to see what your future holds for you! Love you! Mom, Dad, Whitney, Samantha and Harrison

Brooklyn Law School

Congratulations HARRISON RICH

Photo credit - Hilliary Photography

Solon High School

Harrison, You make us so proud of you every day! Congratulations on your graduation from Solon High School! We can’t wait to see you thrive at Ohio State! We hope you love it as much as we did! Love you! Mom, Dad, Whitney, Douglas and Samantha

The Ohio State University Business

Joseph Abrams

Hawken School

Senior

Jewish Family Experience

Noah Barratt

Olmsted Falls High School

Junior

Beth Israel - The West Temple

Cameron Briskin

Orange High School

Junior

Park Synagogue

Mallory Chylla

Beachwood High School

Junior

Anshe Chesed Fairmount Temple

Lauren Clar

Beachwood High School

Junior

The Temple-Tifereth Israel

Adina Firestone

Chaviva High School

Junior

Young Israel of Greater Cleveland

Ezra Galili

Hawken School

Junior

Park Synagogue

Shai Galili

Orange High School

Junior

USY

Jeremy Galin

Shaker Heights High School

Junior

Park Synagogue

Nicole Gillinov

Hathaway Brown School

Senior

Anshe Chesed Fairmount Temple

Eliana Goodman

Solon High School

Junior

Park Synagogue

Jordan Green

Shaker Heights High School

Senior

Jewish Family Experience

Aidan Gross

Solon High School

Senior

Chabad of Solon

Samuel Heller

University School

Junior

Park Synagogue

Isaiah Jacobs

Solon High School

Junior

B’nai Jeshurun Congregation

Elisa Katz

Shaker Heights High School

Senior

Anshe Chesed Fairmount Temple

Zoe Kimmelman

Hathaway Brown School

Junior

Dana Kleinman

Hathaway Brown School

Senior

Chabad of Solon

Danielle Krantz

Shaker Heights High School

Junior

Anshe Chesed Fairmount Temple

Carly Lehman

Shaker Heights High School

Junior

Suburban Temple – Kol Ami

Alexa Plotkin

Orange High School

Junior

Park Synagogue

Rylan Polster

Shaker Heights High School

Junior

B’nai Jeshurun Congregation

Tamar Poreh

Solon High School

Junior

The Shul

Amelia Port

Beachwood High School

Junior

Park Synagogue

Rebecca Powers

Shaker Heights High School

Senior

Park Synagogue

Emma Robbins

Laurel School

Junior

B’nai Jeshurun Congregation

Rachel Rosenthal

Beachwood High School

Junior

Jewish Family Experience

Tal Rothberg

Beachwood High School

Junior

Oheb Zedek Cedar Sinai Synagogue

Elana Rubanenko

Orange High School

Junior

B’nai Jeshurun Congregation

Jacob Rudin-Luria

Hawken School

Junior

B’nai Jeshurun Congregation

Ari Smith

Fuchs Mizrachi School

Junior

Green Road Synagogue

Andy Solganik

Hawken School

Junior

Park Synagogue

Mollie Stadlin

Home schooled

Senior

Congregation Shaarey Tikvah

Gavriel Steiger

Fuchs Mizrachi School

Junior

Green Road Synagogue

Parker Strauss

Gilmour Academy

Junior

B’nai Jeshurun Congregation

Noah Turoff

Brush High School

Senior

Jewish Family Experience

Nathan Wieder

Fuchs Mizrachi School

Junior

Green Road Synagogue

Aidan Wild

Fuchs Mizrachi School

Junior

Green Road Synagogue


GALLERY OF GRADS

CJN.ORG | COLUMBUSJEWISHNEWS.COM | 59

MAY 29, 2020

SALTZMAN | 58 who are unable to drive due to mental health and/or physical disabilities, effects of aging, and/or insufficient income; $4,000 to The Jewish Agency for Israel – North American Council to provide scholarships for educational opportunities for mentors of the Youth Futures program for at-risk youth; and $2,000 to Rainey Institute to engage and lead children of homeless families in activities, provide support and learning opportunities. Panelists Nathan Wieder, a junior at Fuchs Mizrachi School in Beachwood, and Eliana Goodman, a junior at Solon High School in Solon, presented the panel’s recommendations to the Federation’s board of trustees during a virtual meeting on May 18. The board unanimously approved the recommendations. “The Saltzman Youth Panel is more than a simple selection of worthy programs to help fund,” Eliana stated in the release. “It is about the Jewish community, the importance of the work we do, and the importance of community involvement and process.” Prior to the board of trustees meeting, panel members and their families gathered for a virtual reception to celebrate their accomplishments. Federation President Erika B. Rudin-Luria congratulated the group on its successful collaboration and philanthropic spirit. Panelists spoke about how much they learned about community needs, evaluation of grant proposals and the struggle to prioritize needs when resources are limited. Panel members, selected through a competitive application process, met seven times throughout the school year. They created a request for proposals, reviewed grant applications, learned about consensus decision making and, in the end, had a tremendous impact on programs and organizations which improve the lives of others, according to the release.

Students in the Saltzman Youth Panel met seven times during the school year to determine priorities for allocating $43,000. | Photo / Jewish Federation of Cleveland

Saltzman Youth Panel was established in 1998 through a gift from Shirley Saltzman and her family in memory of the late Maurice Saltzman. The program perpetuates the goals of Saltzman, a past board chair of the Federation, who cared about educating the next generation of Jewish community leadership. Each year, a new Saltzman Youth Panel allocates up to $50,000 to worthy organizations – 85% of which is awarded to programs serving the Jewish

community. The other 15% is awarded to nonprofit programs serving the general community. Through this experience, the participants learn about the philanthropic process and responding to community needs. To nominate a rising high school junior or senior for the 2020-21 Saltzman Youth Panel, contact Anna Novik at anovik@jcfcleve.org or 216-593-2844. Application deadline is Sept. 4.

Mazal Tov to our Class of 2020

Top Row: (from left to right) Drew Abrams, Caydan Berry, Samantha Boardman, Jacob Burkons, Edith Chaiten, Leila Claypool, Solomon Cover, David Dettelbach, Mia Effron, Aden Epstein Middle Row: (from left to right) Ian Goldfeder, Mikayla Goldman, Caitlin Hillman, Gabi Kalir, Hannah Kall, Jacob Kirstein, Nina Mayers, Leah Mikhelson, Joshua Nikiforov, Dylan Ornstein Bottom Row: (from left to right) Liav Ost, Orli Peleg, Eli Posa, Charlotte Ratner, Ella Rosenberg, Zoe Rosner, Gabriel Rubanenko, Allison Saks, Ryan Solganik, Max Taddeo

Our graduates will be attending Beachwood High School Brush High School Cleveland Heights High School Hathaway Brown School

Hawken School Lawrence School Mayfield High School Orange High School

Shaker Heights High School Solon High School K-12 Ohio Online


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MAY 29, 2020

GALLERY OF GRADS

The CJN goes one-on-one with: Hailey Nudelman / W&J College Hillel president BECKY RASPE | SPECIAL SECTIONS STAFF REPORTER @BeckyRaspeCJN braspe@cjn.org | fter serving as the Washington & Jefferson College Hillel co-president this year, sophomore Hailey Nudelman was elected to serve as the organization’s sole president for 2020-21. A 2018 graduate of Twinsburg High School in Twinsburg, Nudelman said when searching for colleges, she only considered institutions with Hillel chapters. When arriving at her school in Washington, Pa., she found a small Jewish community and an even less active Hillel. Nudelman, 19, said this inspired her as a freshman to run for co-president and for president her junior year. “I found my freshman year to be pretty inactive,” she said. “The then-president was always saying how busy she was and how it kept her from being able to do things. I thought that I needed to run the group then. I just felt that I needed to get my Jewish identity back and I wasn’t going to lose it. When I was first elected, it was a little overwhelming but I was ready to make that change. It was a lot, but it needed to be done.” With her first time leading the organization alone on the horizon, the member of Temple Emanu El in Orange said she’s ready for the challenge. CJN: What do you plan to accomplish in your role?

Nudelman: I’ve talked about it with a few other people and thought about it a lot. Since we’re at a smaller school and the Jewish population is so small, Hillel as a whole is also on the smaller side. So, all our members talked it over and we decided as a group that we want to do things for ourselves. We also really want to show the rest of the student body our Jewish voice and make it obvious that we are there. There are all these other groups on campus that everyone knows about, but no one really knows about Hillel. So, next year we’re hoping to do more things that are campus oriented and not just for Jewish students. CJN: Why did you think this was the next step in your college and Hillel journey? Nudelman: I’ve had it in my head that I wanted to get stuff done this year and I wasn’t able to get as much done last year as I had hoped just because communication and a lot of things happened. So, I felt I wasn’t finished as I couldn’t get exactly what I wanted to be accomplished. I did get some things done, but it’s not at the point where I felt I could pass it onto someone else. There is still so much more that we can do and we just have to keep working at it. CJN: What does Hillel mean to you and what role has it played in your college life? Nudelman: Hillel has not been that big of an organization at my school, which is part of the reason why I’m trying to push it to be more active. I want it to be more

and I want it to be more for the other students and myself. I was very involved in my youth groups and synagogue at home, and knowing I wanted that to continue when I went to college and it was difficult for it to continue, I just want it to be more. As Nudelman continues to build and shape Washington & Jefferson’s Hillel into the organization she believes it can be, she finds herself learning new things to apply to future endeavors. “It has already affected me since I get to talk to so many different groups, students and adults on campus. I’m even on a first-name basis with the president of our college,” she said. “So, my communication skills have already developed and that is going to continue. I’ve also learned I’m not alone. I am the president, but I wouldn’t be able to do anything if the members of Hillel weren’t helping me every step of the way.”

Mazel Tov

Congratulations

Congratulations

PETER ABRAMS

BENJAMIN WYANT

A

Twinsburg High School

We are so proud of you and wish you all the best, always and forever! Love, Mom and Dad

University of Cincinnati

University School

Mazel tov and congratulations! We are so proud of all you have accomplished and cannot wait to see what you will achieve. We love you very much! Dad, Mom and Samara

Northeastern University

Computer science, data science and business

Washington & Jefferson College’s Hillel members Gabrielle Feldman, Megan Perry, Stephanie Shugerman, Lucy Hutchinson, incoming president Hailey Nudelman and Michale Toland at their challah bake in February. The group produced over 60 loaves and donated them to the Washington, Pa., community. | Submitted photo

MAX FEINLEIB

Shaker Heights High School

We wish you so much fun, adventure and success in college and beyond! We are forever proud of you! Love, Mom, Dad and Jacob

Northwestern University


GALLERY OF GRADS

MAY 29, 2020

Mazel Tov LEAH SCHNEIDER Laurel School

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Mazel Tov SARAH GOODMAN

Bachelor of Science in Political Science with Honors in Political Science Summa Cum Laude

Take pride in how far you have come and have faith in how far you will go! We are so proud of you! Love always, Mom, Dad, & Josh

Mazel Tov Sarah on this great accomplishment! We love you and are excited for you as you embark on your next journey at Penn Law! Love, Mom, Dad, Jordan, Eliana, and Marley

Elon University

Northeastern University

Mazel Tov

Mazel Tov

KALEIGH SHUPP

Bachelor of Arts in History and Political Science

Graduation is not the end of something, It is the beginning of living the life you dream of. Congratulations!! We love you!! Love, Mom, Dad, Corey and Alex

University of Delaware

GILLIAN HERSZAGE Columbus Torah Academy

We are so proud of the strong, focused and dynamic person you have become. Your future is bright! We love you! From Mom, Dad, Max and Shayna

Brandeis University


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GALLERY OF GRADS

No debate about it – Hawken’s Dettelbach tops in Cleveland

Mazel Tov LEAH MEISEL

Bachelors Degree in Neuroscience, Biology, Psychology

SKYLAR DUBELKO | STAFF REPORTER @sdubelkocjn sdubelko@cjn.org |

A

Congratulations Leah. We are so proud of all your great accomplishments—always. Love, Mom and Dad

Macalester College

llie Dettelbach likens debate to a varsity sport. “I would say it has the commitment level of a varsity high school sport,” said Allie, a junior at Hawken School in Chester Township, who joined the debate team her freshman year. “We practice after school almost every day for probably two to two-and-ahalf hours each time. Then we have tournaments every Saturday that last almost all day.” At The City Club of Cleveland’s 2020 High School Debate Championship on March 13, before the COVID-19 pandemic shut down much of Northeast Ohio, Dettelbach went head-to-head with Dev Peyrat, a student at University School in Hunting Valley, and won. “We have our topic about a month in advance, so you have quite a bit of research going into the tournament, but you have to be prepared to defend both sides and you don’t get to choose which side you defend in any given round,” Allie said. “Our topic was: predictive policing is unjust.” Dev won the coin toss, allowing him to choose which side to argue. “He picked to defend that predictive policing is, indeed, unjust,” Allie said. “So I had to defend that predictive policing is not unjust.” Allie said during the debate, “what it means to say

HAWKEN READY

Coed Toddler – Grade 12

Lyndhurst

Cleveland–West

Gates Mills

University Circle

hawken.edu

Hawken School junior Allie Dettelbach competing at The City Club of Cleveland’s 2020 High School Debate Championship. | Submitted photo

that something is not unjust,” was hotly contended. “But because it’s a very complex topic, I would say it would definitely be much more difficult to defend the idea that predictive policing is just because it’s such an absolute claim about predictive policing, which has a lot of unjust aspects,” said Allie, who lives in Solon and attends Park Synagogue in Cleveland Heights and Pepper Pike. To reign supreme in the world of high school debate, Allie explained each side must present some sort of framework or ethical philosophy for the round. “Essentially, it’s kind of like the measuring stick to measure like whose arguments matter more and whose arguments came out on top,” she said. This was not her first win – she is one of four high school debaters in Northeast Ohio to qualify for the 2020 National Tournament for Lincoln-Douglas style debate in June – but Allie said having her family and close friends there made it special. “When people picture debate, they probably picture it on a stage in front of an audience, but really, what debate rounds are like is it’s just you, your opponent and the judge, normally,” said Allie, adding debate events such as public forum and policy debate are partnered, but her event, Lincoln-Douglas debate, is one-on-one. She noted the sold-out event was forced to decrease its capacity due to COVID-19, allowing only those closest to the debaters to attend. The event was broadcast on WCPN ideastream and livestreamed on ideastream’s website. “It’s just incredible to be able to be so involved in an activity that involves youth who really want to be able to master the skills of speaking and really just want to talk about things like geopolitics all week and all weekend, which is just a really cool experience,” Allie said. “So I definitely want to thank the debate community for that opportunity.” Allie is also vice president of the City Club’s youth forum council. Allie’s parents are Karil Bialostosky and Steven Dettelbach, who is a former U.S. Attorney for the Northern District of Ohio.


GALLERY OF GRADS

MAY 29, 2020

Congratulations ZACH GOLDWASSER

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Mazel Tov BRIANNA WEISMAN

Solon High School

Bachelor of Science in Human Development and Family Science

So proud of you and your accomplishments. We love you and look forward to your bright future. Love, Nana and Papa

We are so proud of you Brianna for your graduation from OSU, graduating Magna Cum Laude! We love you and look forward to your future successes! Love, Mom, Dad and Brandon

Lynn University

The Ohio State University

Mazel Tov

Mazel Tov

HARLEIGH MARKOWITZ

CARLY PETTI

Hathaway Brown

Beachwood High School

To our beautiful, caring granddaughter, who has a great future. No matter what road you travel, we know you will be a shining star. We are so proud of you- enjoy your collegiate years at Emory. Carpe diem!

We are so proud of you Carly. Congratulations on your graduation and best wishes with your next chapter at Miami. With love and pride today and always! From Mom, Dad, and Jack

Love, Grandpa Stuart and Beth Markowitz

Emory University

Miami of Ohio


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Mazel Tov MAX STEIGER Beachwood High School

Mazel tov Max! We are so proud of you and your high school career. You have made a difference by being a kind and thoughtful leader, and we can’t wait to watch you thrive at Michigan. Go Blue! From Mom, Dad, Lily, Bubbie, Grampa, and Grammy

University of Michigan

MAY 29, 2020

GALLERY OF GRADS

42nd annual Bianchi Kids’ Playwriting Festival winners announced

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he winners of the Dobama Theatre 42nd annual Marilyn Bianchi Kids’ Playwriting Festival, the longest-running celebration of young playwrights in the United States, were recently announced. They are: • “The Fairy and the Mermaid” by Cordelia Davis of Gates Mills, first grade, Hawken School • “Origami Master” by Daiyanna Collins of Bedford Heights, third grade, Central Primary School • “Coco Love” by Gabrielle D. Siggers of Bedford Heights, third grade, Central Primary School • “The Pet Hotel” by Henry Stricker of Cleveland Heights, fourth grade, Fairfax Elementary • “The Grim Suitcase” by Bryan Barnett of Cleveland Heights, fourth grade, Fairfax Elementary • “Blaze’s Bizarre Breath” by Trishaa Kiran of North Royalton, fourth grade, Royal View Elementary • “A Wild Raccoon Chase” by Sofie Autero of Cleveland Heights, fifth grade, Communion of Saints • “The Healer’s Curse” by Eleanor Egbert of Cleveland Heights, fifth grade, Gearity Elementary • “Dino Day” by Caden Blockson, fifth grade of Cleveland Heights, Fairfax Elementary • “Battle for the Golden Bone” by Braylon Rashad of Cleveland Heights, fifth grade, Oxford Elementary • “Promises” by Elizabeth Chen of Berea, sixth grade, Berea-Midpark Middle School • “Forget Me Love” by London Elersich of South

Discover the school that empowers students to find joy in learning and to become their best selves. 18 MONTHS THROUGH 8TH GRADE Extended Day options (early and after care) available.

Call Ginny Wagh, Director of Enrollment Management at 216-464-0033 x1120 to schedule a tour.

The Lillian and Betty Ratner Montessori School 27575 Shaker Blvd | Pepper Pike, Ohio 44124 | 216 464 0033 | www.theratnerschool.org

Euclid, seventh grade, Gesu Catholic School • “The Itch of the Woods” by Maeve Evans of South Euclid, eighth grade, Gesu Catholic School • “A Hare-Driven World” by Allison Saks of Pepper Pike, eighth grade, Joseph and Florence Mandel Jewish Day School • “Three Square Meals a Day” by Malia Weatherbie of Broadview Heights, eighth grade, North Royalton Middle School • “First Dates” by Percy Okoben of Shaker Heights, 10th grade, Hathaway Brown School • “Corner Store” by Tahlia Stephens of Shaker Heights, 10th grade, Shaker Heights High School • “The Tragic Comedy” by Alister Lowe of Shaker Heights, 10th grade, Shaker Heights High School • “You Hate to See It” by Kendell Berry of Shaker Heights, 11th grade, Shaker Heights High School • “Secret Ingredient” by Noah Frato-Sweeney of Hiram, 12th grade, Western Reserve Academy Plays were judged on the basis of imagination, human values and the uniqueness of the playwright’s voice. “As always, we want to thank all of the young artists who submitted plays to us this year,” said Carrie Williams, Dobama Theatre’s education manager and festival producer, in a news release. “As well as the 60 writers, educators, and theatre professionals who served as judges. Even though the COVID-19 situation makes it impossible to gather to rehearse and perform these plays right now, I’m glad we can still celebrate their achievements.”

Rothberg captures Better2Write contest

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riendship Circle Kulanu student Tal Rothberg won first place locally and third place nationally in the Better Together program’s annual Better2Write competition. Other Friendship Circle Kulanu students who placed include: Ron Chajmovic, who won second place locally; Noah Lurie and Sarah Friedman, who tied for third place locally; and Kayla Goodman, who received special recognition for her poem entry. The annual competition invites teens to submit an essay, article or short story reflecting upon their experiences during the Better Together program, which is designed to encourage meaningful interaction between young and old. Rothberg’s essay reflected upon a special friendship she made with a 92-year old woman and she received a scholarship toward a future Israel experience. The other students received a monetary prize. The program is coordinated locally by Friendship Circle Kulanu Principal Amy Pincus, Montefiore manager of volunteer services Diane Weiner and Rabbi Akiva Feinstein of Montefiore.


GALLERY OF GRADS

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Mazel Tov

Mazel Tov

LIZA HARRIS

Beachwood High School

ETHAN ABRAHAM Solon High School

Congratulations Liza! We are so proud of all that you have accomplished. Your future is bright!

We are so very proud of you, Ethan! Although this is not the graduation you imagined, you have made the best of it! Dream big and follow your own path! Michigan, here you come! Go Blue! Love, Mom, Dad, and Brooke

University of Michigan--Ross School of Business

We love you, Mom, Dad, Sloane, Stella, Waldo and Benny the Bison

University of Mount Union Medical Technology

Mazel Tov TYLER STOVSKY

Mazel Tov

Mazel Tov

JONA BROOKE KOZYR-VERNI

CHANNAH CREVE

Solon High School

Beachwood High School

We’re so proud of you Tyler! On to great things at UCLA! Mom, Dad, Lexi, and Matthew

UCLA

Business Economics and Applied Mathematics

We are so proud of all your incredible achievements and your hard work – Academic Scholar Award, National Honor Society, President’s Education Awards Program Recipient, a good friend and a mentor to many. The sky’s the limit! Your loving fam

The Ohio State University

Beachwood High School

Channah, we are all proud of you. Mazal tov on this step in your journey. Only on to bigger and better things. Love from Abba, Eema, Leeorah, Zayde, Bubbe, and Savta

Cuyahoga Community College


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GALLERY OF GRADS

Volunteering helps college students learn outside classroom BECKY RASPE | SPECIAL SECTIONS STAFF REPORTER @BeckyRaspeCJN braspe@cjn.org | here’s more to college than classes, grades and friends. Billy Bernard, assistant director of student life at the University of Akron in Akron, and Julie Jones, career development and placement specialist at Ursuline College in Pepper Pike, said students should also look to get involved off-campus through volunteer opportunities. “Volunteering broadens your insight into how other people work and live and the plight of other people,” Jones said. “Sometimes, it makes you realize how blessed you are and allows you to live a more grateful life. And what I’ve always found when students go out and do work in the community, they leave with more joy from giving than they ever imagined. So, I think it becomes part of their DNA if they are in the right place to start as a volunteer.” Bernard mirrored the sentiment, adding volunteering also allows students to get acclimated with the community in which they live, work and learn. “People say volunteering makes them feel good and that’s why they do it, and that is partly true,” he said. “But we should also be volunteering to learn about the community and provide support because it’s the right thing to do. Most students live on campus (during college) and this helps them go out into the community and take time to learn about the city they are living in, and how they can contribute not just generally in their four years of college but outside of that as well.” When motivating students to volunteer, Jones said her office at Ursuline starts with career fit. Volunteering in itself is important, but there is a bonus if the experience

also ties into their degree study. “Students come in and are assessed, and then we have all this information to direct them towards nonprofits and other organizations that would allow them to explore their interest while also giving back to the community in a way that fires them up,” she explained. “A lot of it also has to do with the student organizations they are involved with. When students can fit the time in to do it, it really impacts their lives. This can tie them into organizations that hopefully make a tie into their lives.” At the University of Akron, Bernard said students are given many opportunities to first casually get involved with the community and later explore specific organizations. “We have a really great relationship with a lot of our community partners and we’ve reached out to almost 80 nonprofit agencies every year,” he said. “So, we have students who know about the regular programs we have like Super Service Sunday, where they spend about two hours doing volunteer work. Every other week during the semester, we also organize projects in the student union called Drop In-Service. We make blankets, T-shirt pillows, ‘thank you’ cards for service members. We provide students with regular opportunities to do that.” Both professionals said engaging students in volunteer opportunities can lead to academic and personal development. “When they are engaging in the community, they are learning about themselves and taking the time to be introspective and think about what it is they are learning from the experience,” Bernard said. “They’re learning how to interact with other people, which will set them up for success in their career because businesses are always

looking for people who can do that. It also can help a student discern their purpose in life and what exactly they want to be doing. It can spur ideas if they are on the right path in terms of their career.” Jones said, “There is no question that the more you know about the world, the more you understand how your degree ties to it. Lots of learning in college is done outside of the classroom and some of those instances end up being the most impactful experiences. In a small school like Ursuline, there is a lot of talk about how your voice, vision and values make the world a better place and volunteering is the exact gateway for that.”

Mazel Tov

Congratulations

Mazel Tov

EDIN GERMAN

JUSTIN PILLOFF

Laurel School

MADDY BRAUN

Bachelor of Arts, College of Business Marketing Degree

Orange High School

We are so proud of you Edin! We are excited for you to experience an incredible year in Israel and then off to OSU. We love you! Love, Mom, Dad, Julia, Doug, Laura, Zack, Ethan, Aaron, Meira, Ezra, Gwen & Oscar

Congratulations on graduating with honors Maddy! We are so proud of you and can’t wait to see what the future holds! We love you! Love, Mom, Dad, Emily, Ethan and Finn!!!

Congratulations Justin! We love you and are proud of you.

The Ohio State University

Ohio University

University of Cincinnati

T

Julie Jones, career development and placement specialist at Ursuline College in Pepper Pike, helps a student find the right volunteer opportunity for her. | Submitted photo / Ursuline College

Love, Mom, Dad, Jacob, Maddy & Buddy


GALLERY OF GRADS

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MAY 29, 2020

Mazel Tov

Congratulations

EDEN BURG

CHASE MANDELL

We’re so excited for this next chapter of your amazing life journey! No doubt that with your beautiful heart, you will change the world! With so much love & kvelling, congratulations! From, Mom & Dad, Sydni, Isaiah & Rubie

Solon High School

Photo credit - Hilliary Photography

Laurel School

IT IS YOUR GRADUATION FACT: YOU DID IT! Love, Mom, Dad, and Jared

Tulane University

Vanderbilt University

Mazel Tov

Congratulations

MATTHEW KAHN

MEREDITH BARAN

Twinsburg High School

Matt, Congratulations for all of your accomplishments and we look forward to the next chapter in your life. We are very proud of you and wish you nothing but the best.

Bachelor of Science In Marketing

We are so proud of you Meredith and

Love, Mom and Dad

can’t wait to see what the future holds! Love, Mom, Dad, Maddie, Papa & Mama Elk

Marietta College

Ohio University


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GALLERY OF GRADS

Art education opens world beyond classrooms BECKY RASPE | SPECIAL SECTIONS STAFF REPORTER @BeckyRaspeCJN braspe@cjn.org |

students to experience,” Mena said. “By offering a myriad of options to help guide and develop, the whole child opens their world beyond the classroom.” Students at Ruffing Montessori School receive one session per week of studio art in kindergarten through 8th grade, Bennett said. Guided by art specialists, students explore a variety of mediums, artists and artistic periods throughout history and cultures. “Hands-on studio art experiences along with the gentle guidance of the art teacher allow students to explore their own unique ideas and put to use their acquired art skills,” she noted. As Cleveland – as well as Columbus – are known for their artistic institutions, Bennett suggested parents take kids on outings to “spark creative thought.” “When children are asked to stop and look, to ask questions and explore, then they will learn naturally,” she said. Overall, parents have a role in supporting a child’s artistic interests. “Parents sometimes have to say to their kids, ‘You have a creative mind and your academics are important, but it’s also important to take some time for you and explore the things you’re interested in and explore the creative side of your brain as well,’” Zimmerman said. “As a parent, just listening to your child and hearing what they have to say and acknowledging that makes a difference.” Mena said, “Parents can go back and remember when they were children – drawing, singing and dancing their way through the school day while learning. Parents can encourage exploration in the arts by partnering with their children and learning from them and with them.”

chool subjects that may come to mind as shaping young learners may include math, science, history and English, while art may be thought of as secondary. But according to Kate Bennett, fourth- to eighth-grade art teacher for Ruffing Montessori School in Cleveland Heights; Pedro Mena, fine arts department chair at Columbus Academy in Gahanna; and Nancy Zimmerman, director of Jewish life and culture at the Mandel Jewish Community Center in Beachwood, art classes play a big role in a student’s educational development. “Arts education gives you so much of a well-rounded education,” Zimmerman said. “It pairs nicely with so many other things kids are doing in school, so whether you’re left- or right-brained, it helps you think and work more creatively and out of the box.” Mena said, “(In art), students may find an outlet to express thoughts and feelings they experience in new and different ways.” Though artistic opportunities may take a back seat at some schools, the educators said providing these experiences play a key part in academic success. “Students learn how to work together successfully and productively towards a common goal or outcome,” Bennett noted. “The skills learned through the discipline required in producing artwork are transferable to general study skills, communication skills and cognitive skills useful in every part of their curriculum. For example, when students learn to recognize patterns through observation drawings of natural objects, they can also appreciate the geometry of

what they see and apply concepts of ratio as they see things repeated in different scales.” Mena mirrored the sentiment, adding that artistic experiences allow students to work every part of their brain. “It is an equal opportunity to stretch both creative and analytical muscles, the right and left brain,” he explained. “To think differently, approach problems in new ways and see mistakes as avenues for growth.” Bennett added, “Students express uniqueness and individuality through fine arts experiences. The fine arts are not only a way for young people to connect to their own feelings, but can be a way to connect as a community and explore other cultures and world experiences.” Each educational program offers artistic opportunities in different ways. For example, the Mandel JCC offered a program called Jewish Arts and Culture Lab. There, participants could explore Judaism through the arts in disciplines from dance and visual art to videography and writing. Now, the JCC offers a smaller program for teens grades seven to 11 to explore the arts further. “We’re contracted alumni from the lab to do artist and residence workshops throughout the spring and fall for these students to explore all sorts of artistic mediums,” Zimmerman said. “They experience three things – how Judaism informed their teacher’s art, their own Jewish identities and an opportunity to work with an artist in that given medium.” At Columbus Academy, students from preschool to 12th grade take part in visual and performing arts programs, to design and technology activities. “Columbus Academy offers a dynamic array of classes, courses, electives, activities, grants and events for our

Congratulations

Congratulations

Mazel Tov

CODI HOLSTEIN

ALEXA NOVACK

AIDAN GROSS

Solon High School

Solon High School

Congratulations Ali!

We are so excited for you to start this new chapter! You make us proud every day. We love you! Love, Mom, Dad, Alexis and Ava

S

We are so very proud of you and all that you have accomplished. Wishing you continued success! Love, Grandma, Grandpa, Ray, and The Glick Family

Grand Canyon University

Photo credit - Hilliary Photography

Masters Degree in Special Education

We are so proud of you! Love, Mom, Dad and Jake

Penn State University

Miami University


GALLERY OF GRADS

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MAY 29, 2020

Solon graduate elected Miami Hillel president

Happy birthday

Yael Pocola, a first grader at Hebrew Academy of Cleveland in Cleveland Heights, celebrates her birthday, together with other students celebrating their birthday in May on a Zoom video conference, hosted by Judaic principal Shira Goldbaum. | Submitted photo

BECKY RASPE | SPECIAL SECTIONS STAFF REPORTER @BeckyRaspeCJN braspe@cjn.org |

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rowing up in Solon, Emily Olbinsky Garforth didn’t give a second thought to being Jewish. She went to services, was confirmed and knew Judaism was part of her identity. But like any child, Garforth asked a lot of questions about her culture and frequently wasn’t satisfied with the answers. After graduating Garforth from Solon High School in 2017, Garforth was on her way to Miami University in Oxford, a school that has a smaller Jewish population than her hometown. She found Hillel – as many freshmen do – and attended some events, but didn’t really feel like she had found her place yet. That summer, Garforth went on Birthright and was inspired. Two years later and after completing an internship with Hillel at Miami, Garforth was elected by her peers to serve as the chapter president for the 2020-21 school year, her senior year.

If we could imagine a world where everything is OK, and I wouldn’t have problems scheduling programming (because of the pandemic), I just want Miami’s Hillel to feel good. Emily Olbinsky Garforth “We don’t have a lot of the class of 2021 involved in the group, so I had no idea how they were going to choose (a president) or if they wanted to do a co-presidency,” Garforth said. “I wasn’t sure, but this has been on my mind for a while. I was super nervous to apply because it’s a big responsibility and I wasn’t sure if I had the chutzpah to do it. Our previous president was amazing and I wasn’t sure if I was going to be able to fill those shoes. But, I keep telling myself that everyone leads differently.” Throughout her junior year as a communications and marketing intern with the group, she attended more activities and

About Emily

Age: 21 Residence: Solon Synagogue: Temple Emanu El High school: Solon High School class of 2017 Studies: Incoming senior in the American studies program at Miami University went out of her way to meet more of her peers. “I then started wondering who would be the next president, so I applied and sat through the interview,” she recalled. “I felt more comfortable and at home. I wasn’t expecting it or anything. We have a really good group of kids that we’re all working with and I’m just so excited to be there.” Garforth said what she felt in Israel during Birthright was a big part of her decision to run for president. “I felt that overwhelming sense of belonging and coming back from that, I felt that (Hillel) was my place, regardless of how ‘Jewish’ you are,” she said. “It is for me. I’m finding new ways to grow into my Judaism. If you would’ve told me my senior year of high school that I was going to be the president of Hillel at my college, I would’ve been shocked. I’m happy that it happened and I’ve gained a lot of value from it. I’ve grown into it and had to work for it, my appreciation for being a Jew and Judaism.” Even with the pandemic looming over the fall semester, Garforth said she has goals for the group she’d like to get started on. “If we could imagine a world where everything is OK, and I wouldn’t have problems scheduling programming (because of the pandemic), I just want Miami’s Hillel to feel good,” she said. “I just want people to feel so welcomed when they come. I want it to be a comforting place to come to. For me specifically, I want to be that person who knows everyone’s name.” Garforth said she expects to learn meaningful workplace skills, but that isn’t the most important thing to her. “It’s more important to me to help our community grow than it is for me to grow individually,” she said. “And, if I grow along the way, which I have to in order to lead a growing community, that’s great. I have things that I would personally like to learn and be better at when this is done. But this is more about creating a platform for others to share their experiences and stories. This is more about taking a step back to give others a voice.”

Mazel Tov MAXWELL PERLICK

Bachelors Degree in Business Administration

Congratulations on this momentous occasion. All your hard work in the past four years, including an amazing semester abroad in France and a travel/hospitality internship in downtown Chicago, has given you the skills and a path to succeed in life. Love, Mom, Dad, Hannah, Cat, Dusko and Rocco

Lake Forest College


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OSU grad, start-up founder embarks on company’s NXT phase NOELL WOLFGRAM EVANS | CONTRIBUTOR columbuseditorial@cjn.org

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randon Gotlieb sees dollar signs in the open corners of your house. Two years ago as a student at The Ohio State University in Columbus, he and two partners created NXTSTOR, an app that can be described as “Airbnb for your stuff.” Now, after an “anti-climactic graduation,” Gotlieb, as CEO and co-founder, is working to take NXTSTOR to the next level. And while many industries face uncertainty, there is a constant that Gotlieb the team is focused on – people have

stuff. NXTSTOR teams up homeowners with extra space with people who need to store stuff. Hosts place their spare bedroom, basement, attic or other space in their home on the app at a price per square foot. People who have things to store, such as holiday decorations, summer clothes, school supplies and so on, can make a connection and find their stuff a temporary home.

While it may seem like a non-ideal time to take a relatively new business upward, Gotlieb, a member of The Temple-Tifereth Israel in Beachwood, said the timing provides a certain advantage for NXTSTOR 2.0. “I think this is so timely right now,” said Gotlieb, a graduate of Orange High School in Pepper Pike. “Homeownership is so important and in this time of uncertainty in the world, it’s a way that people can earn a little extra money.” When the app initially launched, Gotlieb said they realized early how much they had gotten wrong. “None of us had built an app or done anything like this before,” he said. “We went back and essentially rebuilt everything,” Gotlieb said with a laugh. “We refocused, got bigger, and more importantly got smarter.” They also made additions. Gotlieb said NXTSTOR secured a partnership with Frayt, an on-demand shipping company, allowing users to find a storage location and a way to get their stuff there all through the app. “If using the app can help people earn some extra money and stay in their homes, that would be amazing,” he added. NXTSTOR is focused on space in Columbus, but is

also undertaking a soft-launch in Denver, Gotlieb said. “We’re hoping as it grows, there’s a space in every neighborhood.” While the pandemic has slowed much of the world down, Gotlieb said his team spent the time well. “Honestly – and this feels weird to say – getting ready for the relaunch has been a little easier with everyone hunkered down,” he said. “We’ve taken it as an opportunity to be heads down.” Gotlieb credits his time at OSU with giving him access to resources and support, particularly from his professors. He also equates success with a form of perseverance. “A lot of times,” he said, “people hesitate to take a leap and try something else. I’ve sent so many emails where I was 99.999% sure that the response I would get would be negative, if I even got a response, only to be surprised.” Much like in real estate, the success of NXTSTOR may be in its location, he said. “A byproduct of living in Ohio is that people are really nice to us,” he said. “The support and encouragement has been great.”

Noell Wolfgram Evans is a freelance writer from Columbus.

Preschool parade

Preschoolers at Anshe Chesed Fairmount Temple’s early childhood center and their families participate in a 45-vehicle parade April 29 around the Beachwood temple’s parking lot. They were greeted by the honking of horns, shouting of hellos, and clapping and waving at their teachers and clergy. “The entire staff had as much fun as the families did,” said Jane Mayers, early childhood center director, in a news release.

Mazel Tov

AVERY ADELSTEIN Bachelor of Science in Nursing Summa Cum Laude

So proud of all your amazing accomplishments! There is no greater reward in life than making a difference in the people’s lives you touch! The world is a better place with all the amazing things you’re going to do! Love, Dad, Mom, Sydney and Jeremy

The Ohio State University

Rabbi Joshua Caruso greets families during the vehicle parade. | Submitted photos

The Blevins family, which has three children in the preschool, takes part in the parade.

Tri-C Foundation commits resources to students

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ollowing the transition to online learning for educational institutions across the country, Cuyahoga Community College and its foundation is doing what it can to make sure students stay on track to graduate. The Tri-C Foundation expanded its student emergency fund. Established in 2017, the fund helps students with short-term financial problems. Approved students in need are provided with a $450 gift to help alleviate

hardships. Since the move to remote instruction, 560 fund applications have been approved, totaling $249,934 in gifts. Through May 31, college President Alex Johnson is also matching gifts to the fund up to $15,000. The college has been operating with a fully online learning format since March 23 and will continue to do so through the end of the summer session in August. Those interested in donating to the fund or learning more about it can visit tri-c.edu/give.


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MAY 29, 2020

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David and Irene Cole Essay Contest winner

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he winner and runners-up of the David and Irene Cole Essay contest, an annual Central Ohio competition aimed at challenging high school seniors to consider their future college experiences, were announced by the Jewish Community Center of Greater Columbus May 21. The essay prompt asked applicants how they will perpetuate their own Jewish knowledge and practice as a college freshman and why, with a $1,000 scholarship for the winning essay, which is printed with permission below.

FIRST PLACE ESSAY Benzion Gisser Senior, Columbus Torah Academy One of the fundamental tenets of Judaism teaches that “Kol Yisrael areivim zeh lazeh,” all Jews are guarantors of one another (Rabbi Yom Tov Ibn Asevilli, commentary on the Talmud, tractate Rosh Hashanah, 29a). The concept of areivut, of being responsible for others, has been inculcated in me for as long as I can remember. The Jewish imperative to be active on behalf of others is evident everywhere around me, because I am privileged to be surrounded by people who have a deep sense of areivut. Put simply, when the community or those in need have called, my role models have always replied with a resounding “yes,” regardless of the circumstances. My father – a physician – is an active member of the synagogue board and is quick to help community members in need, from giving charity to providing medical advice. My mother is a social worker who is always the first to discuss life with people struggling in the community and frequently volunteers in my school. My stepmother is also active in the community as a board member of the mikvah, and co-chair of our school’s scholarship dinner committee. My parents and other role models in the community have left an indelible impression that has ultimately influenced me to practice my own brand of areivut. From a young age, I have been actively involved in the Central East National Conference of Synagogue Youth, culminating in my position of education director for the Central East Regional Board. Designing the curriculum and creating learning initiatives has afforded me the opportunity to help others who may not have the ability to learn about Judaism on their own. Similarly, on a more local level, I assumed the directorship of the Columbus Community Chevra, a teen-led learning organization with a mission to inspire teens to be passionate about their Jewish learning. Throughout my life, I have been an active member of my synagogue’s congregation. My involvement has included submitting yearly entries to our annual cholent cook-off, leading prayer services in the main congregation and organizing a weekly teen service. As a natural extension of the areivut I have performed until now, it goes without saying I will be bringing my sense of areivut to the university campus. At Yeshiva University, which I plan to attend, one of my main goals is to join Torah Tours. This program sends students to different synagogues across America

and Canada for the High Holidays to enliven the services and bring joy and Torah to the community throughout the holidays. I am also looking forward to extending my work with NCSY by working as an NCSY adviser. College-age advisors are relatable role models who teach Torah to the younger NCSYers. Just as I have made strong connections with my advisers over the years, I would like to give back to the younger members of the organization that has given me so much. On a personal level, I also believe the coping skills I have acquired to deal with life changes, such as my parents’ divorce, could be used to help my peers on campus with their life transitions and challenges. Where areivut benefits one’s own community, being an “Or Lagoyim,” or light unto the nations (Isaiah 42:6), means going outside one’s community to distinguish oneself for the benefit of others. Like areivut, it is an imperative which I hold very dear that I learned early on from the role models in my family and community. One thing that has distinguished me from others is my podcast, “World of Baseball.” I have a tremendous passion for baseball, and as my love of the game has grown so has my need to talk about it. I started my podcast last year to disseminate my baseball knowledge and connect with others so they can benefit from it as well. My podcast has succeeded beyond my imagination, and I now have hundreds of dedicated listeners. Nevertheless, even if only 10 people listened to each episode, I would still continue to produce content, because I want to share my love of the sport with others. I believe my passion for baseball is infectious and something I will use to distinguish myself on campus by becoming an active member of my college’s baseball organization. I want to transfer the skills I learned as a four-year captain of my high school baseball team to bring a positive attitude, moral support, baseball skills and most importantly, heart, to my college team. However, like turning a double play, my desire to distinguish myself extends beyond baseball to podcasting in general. I recognize baseball will always have a limited audience, but podcasting is an ever-growing discipline. I hope to bring my podcasting and communication skills to campus by joining or creating a podcasting club in order to teach those interested in expressing themselves through this medium. The combination of areivut and being an Or Lagoyim are best exemplified by my support for Israel and by my promoting awareness of issues affecting the Jewish state. In my sophomore year of high school, I joined Columbus’ delegation to the American Israel Public Affairs Committee in Washington, D.C. Together with thousands of pro-Israel activists, I met with my Congress members to advocate the importance of supporting the Jewish homeland. I would like to be a voice for Israel on campus and elsewhere whenever the opportunity arises. This may take the form of participation in the Yeshiva

Columbus JCC announces more teen awards In addition to the David and Irene Cole Essay Contest, winners were recognized for two other annual teen scholarships by the Jewish Community Center of Greater Columbus. The David and Janet W. Goldsmith Teen Kavod Gadol Award is awarded to high school seniors who have a desire to use their talents to work toward improving and strengthening communities, and who through their actions will help others improve, according to the JCC, each carrying a $400 scholarship. This year, the recipients are seniors Jordan Herman of Bexley High School and Leah Ryzenman of New Albany High School. The Don Erkis & Lou Berliner High School Jewish Scholar/Athlete Award went to Emma Segerman of Bexley High School and Matthew Cammeyer of Columbus Academy, both seniors. The competition, named after two late community leaders and friends who worked to inspire youth athletes, carries $1,000 scholarships. Throughout 34 years, the award aims to highlight young athletes, and will also provide them with a one-year JCC membership, a $100 gift certificate and a fitness evaluation by a JCC personal trainer. For the David and Irene Cole Essay Contest, the first runner-up was Jane Shevkin and second runner-up was Gillian Herszage, both seniors at Columbus Torah Academy. University AIPAC delegation, participation in proIsrael rallies and joining Zionist organizations on campus. Most importantly, I will set an example for others by spending a year in Israel for my gap year before college. It is extremely important to me to be an ambassador for Israel in the Diaspora and a strong supporter of the Jewish homeland. The values of areivut and being an Or Lagoyim are central to my Jewish identity. Through vehicles like NCSY, Torah Tours, Israel Advocacy and podcasting, I hope to grow as a Jew, contribute to campus life and the greater society, thereby distinguishing myself as a light unto the nations as I embark on my university career.

Benzion Gisser, 18, plans to attend Yeshivat Hakotel in Jerusalem for a gap year, and then will attend Yeshiva University in New York City.


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A responsibility, a gift to embrace Jewish culture around the world ELANA RUBANENKO Special to the CJN

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he 11 days I spent in Natz, Italy, on a BBYO cultural exchange titled ZWST Winter Machane, included some of the most incredible, humbling and eye-opening experiences of my life. ZWST is BBYO’s partner movement in Germany. Before embarking on the journey, I had no idea what to expect. Rubanenko The trip was described as a “winter retreat in the Italian Alps.” From the immediate culture shock of eating cereal that wasn’t coated in sugar, to hearing German and Ukrainian everywhere, I found myself experiencing things that were both exciting and pushed me out of my comfort zone. Being an American in BBYO, I often forget to think about the language gap that exists between myself and teens from other countries who join our international programs. When I departed for Italy, I was naive to expect everything would be translated into English. Coming from someone who loves to talk and connect with

others, it was difficult to get used to not understanding what was happening at any given moment. The stress of being a foreigner in a new country disappeared when we reached the top of the Italian mountain our first day there. With my new friends from my kvutzah (the groups we were split into), I engaged in the most stimulating conversations about politics, Judaism and cultural differences. Through programs similar to those we do in BBYO, where we learn about holidays and celebrate our culture, to programs where we step out of our comfort zones and just have fun with new friends, it was incredible to be a part of the close-knit community that was built at “Machane Joter.” Similar to how the conventions I attend in the United States often have themes, this winter camp was called “Joter,” which means “more.” Through programs and unique experiences, we learned how we can do more to stand up against anti-Semitism, learn more about our Jewish roots and have a greater impact on each other and the communities around us. My favorite evening program was near the end of our trip when we were split into groups and were able to talk to different staff members and hear their experiences in dealing with anti-Semitism. After we

Circleof

LIFE

SHARE YOUR STORY From time to time, the Cleveland Jewish News will feature local agencies, organizations and synagogues, and the programs and activities taking place within their Circle of Life. To be considered for this feature, submit no more than 750 words and a color .jpg headshot of the writer to editorial@cjn.org. Include “Circle of Life” in the subject line.

heard shocking stories of anti-Semitic co-workers and childhood friends changing perspectives, we gathered in a large circle to talk about our history. After the Holocaust, Jews in Germany have primarily been recognized as victims. The point of the program and discussion was to talk about how to stop accepting the role of the victim and reclaim our Jewish history and pride. One of the ways they actively go about reclaiming Judaism in Germany is by practicing very traditional services every morning, on Shabbat and reciting the Birkat Hamazon, or Grace, after meals. Jewish teens across Germany look forward to their summer and winter machanot to fully embrace being Jewish and feel their loving and supportive community. During the experience, I was shocked at how little it resembled the picture I painted in my mind. However, I could not

possibly have imagined a more meaningful, enjoyable or impactful way to spend my winter break. I learned to value the vibrant Jewish community I have at home and remember we have both a responsibility to embrace our culture and a wonderful gift that we can do so freely. I couldn’t wait to reconnect with my new best friends across Germany at BBYO’s international convention in Dallas in February and in the future.

Elana Rubanenko of Pepper Pike is a junior at Orange High School in Pepper Pike.

Publisher’s Note: Elana Rubanenko wrote and submitted her story prior to the COVID-19 pandemic.

Congratulations HARRISON PYNER Orange High School

Cleveland Hillel Foundation Cleveland Hillel Foundation wishes a bright wishes a brightfuture future to all graduates! to of all our of our graduates! Cleveland HillelTov Foundation Mazel wishes a bright future Class of 2020 to all of our graduates! Mazel Tov Class of 2020

Mazel Tov Class of 2020

Dear Harrison, Congratulations on a great four years at Orange High School! You have made us all proud with all of your accomplishments in the classroom and with basketball! We know you will do great things at Ohio State University and in the future! Love, Mom, Dad, Grandparents and Family

Ohio State University


LOCAL

MAY 29, 2020

Internship reporting on, advocating for Israel led me to my current job NAOMI GRANT Special to the CJN

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Mazel Tov AMANDA WEISKIND Solon High School

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participated in Onward Cleveland the summer of 2018, in between my junior and senior years of college. I lived in Tel Aviv, with the rest of the Cleveland participants, and interned in Jerusalem at The Jerusalem Post. There is no way to get to know a city better than by reporting on it, and my experience at the Post gave me an insider’s view of Israel that allows me to even more effectively combat the boycott, divestment and sanctions movement targeting Israel that is very present on college campuses. During Pesach of my senior year, the University of Maryland’s Student Government Association held a hearing for a BDS resolution. SGA is structured so some legislators represent students by residence and other legislators represent colleges. My representative for my on-campus apartment as well as one of my college representatives were both sponsors of the bill. I emailed them both explaining my disgust with their sponsorship, why BDS is anti-Semitic and how it singles out Israel. In the days leading up to the vote, there were events to help people write speeches and the students spearheading our cause were available outside of those events to help edit speeches. The night before, a friend and I met at the library and emailed almost every SGA legislator who we weren’t positive would vote no. One of my co-interns from the Post wrote an article, “Palestinian employees hurt by BDS speak up about its negative effects.” I thought it was perfect for this situation and shared it on Facebook a couple days before the SGA meeting. A couple friends of mine ended up using it in their speeches.

I was so proud of the way the Jewish community united against the BDS bill. Naomi Grant When it was my turn to speak at the SGA meeting, I argued boycotting Israel hurts Palestinians and SGA exists to focus on campus issues, not geopolitics, and this bill only divides the campus. Many people on our side made excellent points against the bill itself and against BDS in general that had never occurred to me. I was so proud of the way the Jewish community united against the BDS bill. Everyone on our side exhibited such class and spoke eloquently. After five hours of more than 120 students speaking for and against – the majority against – as well as the legislators discussing it, SGA voted the bill down, 23-9. My experiences in college as well as in Onward Israel led me to apply for my current job at Academic Engagement Network, which mobilizes faculty all over the country against BDS and the demonization of the pro-Israel community. I look forward to more Onward participants becoming vocal advocates for Israel.

Naomi Grant is a former Beachwood resident and was a Violet Spevack Editorial Intern at the Cleveland Jewish News in 2017.

Amanda, We are so proud of your amazing high school career and can’t wait to see all that you will accomplish at Ohio State and beyond! Love, Mom, Dad and Samantha Naomi Grant worked as an intern for The Jerusalem Post. | Submitted photo

The Ohio State University Honors Mechanical Engineering


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Nurenberg Paris creates Senior Spotlight to honor class of 2020

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urenberg Paris Injury Lawyers launched Senior Spotlight, an online giveaway to celebrate Ohio’s class of 2020, in the wake of the COVID-19 pandemic which has forced or delayed graduations, proms and other end-of-year celebrations. Families may visit NP4CLE.com to nominate graduating seniors in Ohio. On June 5, the law firm will give $5,600 in gift card prizes to 20 nominees. Four winners will receive $600 each in gift cards and 16 winners will receive $200 gift cards. “Graduations have to be different this year,” David Paris, managing partner of Nurenberg Paris, said in a news release. “That doesn’t mean they can’t be special.

We all have kids who are having to skip important milestones and we feel their disappointment. Senior Spotlight tells our high school seniors that, even though they can’t walk across a stage, their accomplishments still matter.” The winners will be announced live via Facebook on June 5, but the firm intends for the program to celebrate all the nominees and 2020 classes. In addition to being eligible for one of the 20 prizes, all nominees will have their own nomination page which will include their pictures, high schools and personal messages from their families. The public can view the nomination pages at NP4CLE.com in a gallery that will

David A. Hancock

Biology Health Nature Study Teacher CH/UH Public Schools 1968-2003 ALL Royalties are donated to CH-UH Science Education Grants K-12 Loganberry Books-Lettra Press-Amazon

Fuchs Mizrachi graduating students celebrated with parade Graduating eighth graders and graduating Stark High School seniors from Fuchs Mizrachi School in Beachwood received a surprise car parade from their teachers. Each graduate was presented with a lawn sign to display. | Submitted photos

Eighth grader Aytan Hochheiser

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remain published this summer. “The live winner announcement will be a lot of fun,” Paris said. “But this is more than a contest. When you can see all of the nominees and can read about what makes them special, it’s really a salute to all the 2020 graduates.” Parents and families may upload their favorite pictures of their children and a brief explanation of why they think their child will make a difference in the world or their community. Nurenberg Paris is located in downtown Cleveland.

Senior Elijah Soclof


GALLERY OF GRADS

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MAY 29, 2020

Gross Schechter Day School Run/Walk raises $25,000

About 100 children and adults participated in the Gross Schechter Day School fourth annual Run/Walk on May 25, raising about $25,000 with more donations expected. Participants walked in parks, some families ran and biked through their neighborhoods, and some swam as the event changed due to the COVID-19 pandemic. Proceeds will help sustain the Pepper Pike day school’s education programs. | Submitted photos

Sophie Davis

The Catino Family

Congratulations ETHAN ABRAHAM Robby Boroff and Gross Schechter Head of School Randy Boroff with Brayden

Solon High School

Mazel Tov for a great four years and we know the next four will be even better as you continue to fulfill the promise you’ve shown in all your past success. We are very proud of you and know the future will bring even more well-earned rewards. Love from Grandpa Harry & Grandma Roz, Papa Steve & Grandma Bonnie

University of Michigan--Ross School of Business Yoni and Laura Berger with Beni and Rami


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Gallery Of Grads Listings 2020 ETHAN ABRAHAM Solon High School Class of 2020 University of Michigan Ross School of Business PETER ABRAMS Twinsburg High School Class of 2020 University of Cincinnati Area of Study: Sport Administration and Statistics CHAD ADELMAN The Ohio State University Bachelor of Science, Industrial Systems Engineering Solon High School Class of 2016 AVERY ADELSTEIN The Ohio State University Bachelor of Science in Nursing Summa Cum Laude Solon High School Class of 2016 JAKE ADELSTEIN The Ohio State University Bachelor of Science in Computer Science and Engineering with Honors in Engineering Summa Cum Laude Solon High School Class of 2016 NOAH SCOTT BAERSON Ohio University Bachelor of Sport Management MEREDITH BARAN Ohio University Bachelor of Science in Marketing ETHAN BERKOVITZ Solon High School Class of 2020 Ohio Wesleyan University Area of Study: Quantitative Economics LILY BORODKIN Kent State University Master in Education Solon High School Class of 2016

MADDIE BRAUN Ohio University Bachelor’s Degree in Marketing, College of Business Solon High School Class of 2016 SOPHIE BRAVO Laurel School Class of 2020 Rochester Institute of Technology Area of Study: Packaging Science RACHEL CLAIRE BUCHINSKY Laurel School Class of 2020 Lehigh University Area of Study: Business EDEN BURG Laurel School Class of 2020 Tulane University Area of Study: Public Health MAYA COHEN Orange High School Class of 2020 The Ohio State University Area of Study: Fisher School of Business SARAH COHEN Purdue University Bachelor of Science in Electrical Engineering Technology New Albany High School Class of 2017 CHANNAH CREVE Beachwood High School Class of 2020 Cuyahoga Community College SANDRA MOLECKE DAVIS Cleveland State University Bachelor of Arts in Urban Studies Organizational Leadership Cleveland Heights High School Class of 1959 DANIELLE DiDOMENICO Solon High School Class of 2020 The Ohio State University Area of Study – Honors Mechanical Engineering

JASON DiDOMENICO The Ohio State University Bachelor of Arts in Strategic Communications Solon High School Class of 2016 BRANDON DIM Baldwin Wallace University Bachelor of Arts in Sports Management Solon High School Class of 2016 AARON DOBRES The Ohio State University Bachelor of Science in Accounting President of OSU Hillel Solon High School Class of 2016 MAX FEINLEIB Shaker Heights High School Class of 2020 Northwestern University Area of Study: Political Science and Statistics AARON FRIEDMAN University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Bachelor’s Degree in Quantitative Biology Solon High School Class of 2016 MARA FRIEDMAN Arizona State University Walter Cronkite School of Journalism Bachelor of Arts in Journalism and Mass Communication with Honors Beachwood High School Class of 2015 ANDREW GARSON John Carroll University Boler College of Business Bachelor of Science in Business Administration EDIN GERMAN Laurel School Class of 2020 The Ohio State University

NATHANIEL J. GILBERT University of Toledo College of Medicine and Life Sciences Doctor of Medicine MAXWELL GLICK Miami University Bachelor of Arts in History West Geauga High School Class of 2016 RACHEL GOLDEN Solon High School Class of 2020 Comets Vocational School Area of Study: Senior Living & Hospitality ZACH GOLDWASSER Solon High School Class of 2020 Lynn University Area of Study: Business SARAH GOODMAN Northeastern University Summa Cum Laude, Bachelor of Science in Political Science with Honors Minor in Law and Public Policy Minor in International Affairs AIDEN GROSS Solon High School Class of 2020 Miami University Area of Study: Sports Management BENJAMIN GROSSMAN Solon High School Class of 2020 University of Georgia Area of Study: Finance LIZA HARRIS Beachwood High School Class of 2020 University of Mount Union Area of Study: Medical Technology GILLIAN HERSZAGE Columbus Torah Academy Class of 2020 Brandeis University

Gallery of Grads Listings are paid for and submitted by families of graduates


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Let the real you shine.

TM TM

Southpark Center


78 | CJN.ORG | COLUMBUSJEWISHNEWS.COM MAYA HOLLANDER Shaker Heights High School Class of 2020 The Ohio State University Area of Study: Health Sciences CODI HOLSTEIN Grand Canyon University, 2020 Masters in Early Childhood and Special Education Indiana University of Pennsylvania, 2013 Bachelor’s Degree in Early Childhood and Special Education Solon High School Class of 2009 MATTHEW KAHN Twinsburg High School Class of 2020 Marietta College Area of Study: Athletic Training DANIEL KENNON The Ohio State University Bachelor of Science in Hospitality Management TARYN LACKRITZ Beachwood High School Class of 2020 The Ohio State University Area of Study: Health, Rehabilitation & Sciences; Minor in Biomedical Engineering JOSEPH LEWIS Beachwood High School Class of 2020 College of Wooster SAM LICHTEN Columbus Academy Class of 2020 University of Maryland Area of Study: Business/Global Communities Program CHASE MANDELL Solon High School Class of 2020 Vanderbilt University Area of Study: Political Science HARLEIGH MARKOWITZ Hathaway Brown School Class of 2020 Emory University Area of Study: Pre-Med

LEAH MEISEL Macalester College Bachelor of Arts in Neuroscience, Biology & Psychology Hawken School Class of 2016 LANE MURRAY Shaker Heights High School Class of 2020 Concordia University of Montreal JACOB NATOWICZ Case Western Reserve University Bachelor of Arts Double Major in Political Science and Environmental Studies Minors in Public Policy and Economics Shaker Heights High School Class of 2016 ALEXA NOVACK Solon High School Class of 2020 Penn State Area of Study: Nursing

MAY 29, 2020

HARRISON PYNER Orange High School Class of 2020 The Ohio State University Area of Study: Business DOUGLAS RICH Indiana University Bachelor of Science in Sports Managing & Marketing Brooklyn Law School HARRISON RICH Solon High School Class of 2020 The Ohio State University Area of Study: Business LEAH SCHNEIDER Laurel School Class of 2020 Elon University Area of Study: Strategic Communications

GALLERY OF GRADS TYLER STOVSKY Beachwood High School Class of 2020 University of Southern California Area of Study: Business Economics & Applied Mathematics DYLAN SUSSMAN Solon High School Class of 2020 The Ohio State University Area of Study: Computer Science Engineering JONA BROOKE KOZYE-VERNI Solon High School Class of 2020 The Ohio State University Area of Study: Chemistry CANDACE WAHBA Cleveland Marshall College of Law Juris Doctorate in Law

JESSICA SCHWARTZ University of Cincinnati Bachelor of Arts in Organizational Leadership/Judaic Studies Twinsburg High School Class of 2017

AMANDA WEISKIND Solon High School Class of 2020 The Ohio State University Area of Study: Honors Mechanical Engineering

SPENCER SHARP Beachwood High School Class of 2020 Ohio University Area of Study: Business/Sports Management

BRIANNA WEISMAN The Ohio State University Bachelor of Science in Human Development and Family Science Beachwood High School Class of 2016

JUSTIN PILLOFF Orange High School Class of 2020 University of Cincinnati Lindner College of Business Area of Study: Marketing

KALEIGH SHUPP University of Delaware Bachelor of Arts in History and Political Science Attending New York Law School Fall 2020

ABIGAIL FEY WUMBRAND Capital University Degree in Early Childhood Education and Intervention Specialist Bexley High School Class of 2013

CASEY POSNER Orange High School Class of 2020 University of Toledo Area of Study: Cosmetics Chemistry

MAX STEIGER Beachwood High School Class of 2020 University of Michigan Area of Study: Business

REBECCA POWERS Shaker Heights High School Class of 2020 International Baccalaureate Diploma The Ohio State University Area of Study: Fisher School of Business

ADAM STOVSKY Northwestern University Bachelor of Arts in Communication, Radio, TV & Film Hawken School Class of 2016 Areas of Interest: Sigma Phi Epsilon Fraternity & Lambda Chi Eta Communications Honor Society

MAXWELL PERLICK Lake Forest College Bachelor of Arts in Business Administration CARLY PETTI Beachwood High School Class of 2020 Miami of Ohio Area if Study: Business

BENJAMIN WYANT University School Class of 2020 Northeastern University ZOEY YELSKY Orange High School Class of 2020 Northeastern University Area of Study: Computer Science & Mathematics Gallery of Grads Listings are paid for and submitted by families of graduates

Profile for Cleveland Jewish Publication Company

Gallery of Grads 2020  

The Cleveland Jewish News and Columbus Jewish News special section honoring the Class of 2020.

Gallery of Grads 2020  

The Cleveland Jewish News and Columbus Jewish News special section honoring the Class of 2020.

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