Page 1

A VIRTUAL EDUCATION Enrollment in online high schools is increasing — but are they as effective as traditional schools? PAGE 4

SASSAFRAS IS WORTH THE TRIP.

This wildflower hotspot is a great place for recreational hikers. PAGE 7

SPARTANBURGJOURNAL SPARTANBURG Spartanburg, S.C. • Friday, June 8, 2012 • Vol.8, No.23

The Mane Event 'THE LION KING' STAMPEDES TO THE PEACE CENTER

Federal housing assistance cutbacks hit Spartanburg hard. PAGE 8

SEWEurodrive gears up for expansion

PAGE 16

PAGE 13

Park closer. Check-in faster. IT’S NEW! IT’S QUICK! IT’S EASY!

Jelani Remy as Simba and the ensemble in “He Lives in You” from “The Lion King” national tour. ©Disney. Photo Credit: Joan Marcus.

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Visit the Chapman Cultural Center? See fine art… local art… children’s art… folk art… historical art… learn about Spartanburg’s history… inspect a cool map collection… what is it about Spartanburg and peaches?… and textiles?… and the Revolutionary War?… hold a live snake… or not… be a kid again and play with the science exhibits… or take a real kid… appreciate photography by local young people… be inspired… steal a good idea… find the artist within yourself… just chill this summer at…

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Pink Lady by Peggy Demarest now on display in the Guild Gallery

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Roger Allers, co-director and co-writer of the movie version of “The Lion King,” on explaining to then-Disney head Michael Eisner why the 1994 movie would never work for a Broadway adaptation.

Celebrating 10 Year Savings for the Comm and Still Going Stro

“I quickly realized high school was getting in the way.” Boiling Springs resident William Theriac, on why he switched to virtual school after his freshman year at Spartanburg Day School.

“We hear you. We take this seriously. We will help you get safe.” Safe Harbor director Becky Callaham, on the positive message Congress sends by reauthorizing the Violence Against Women Act.

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FDA database offers information on pediatric clinical trials By APRIL A. MORRIS | staff

An online database recently launched by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration allows parents to determine if the medication prescribed for their child has been part of pediatric clinical studies. Parents and clinicians can search the nearly 500 entries in the Pediatric Labeling Information Database by the product’s commercial name or chemical name or by the condition it is used to treat. Many medications are approved for use in adults, but have not been studied in children. To address the problem and increase the number of studies on medication for children, Congress passed initial legislation in 1997, followed by the Best Pharmaceuticals for Children

Act (BPCA) in 2002 and the Pediatric Research Equity Act (PREA) in 2003. These laws also created incentives for drug makers to conduct clinical trials with children. According to the FDA, increased pediatric studies resulted in 84 drugs with new or revised pediatric safety data, 36 drugs with new dosing or dosing changes and 80 drugs listed as not effective in children. Dr. April Buchanan, a pediatrician with the Greenville Children’s Hospital, explored the new database and questioned whether parents will find it particularly useful. The information compiled there is already available to clinicians, she said, while it is presented in a way that may not be understandable to parents. The database most often links directly to the clinical trial information, making it difficult reading for a lay person or parent who

is unfamiliar with the clinical language, she said. “It would be useful if the users want to dig deeper for clinical trials on newer and experimental drugs,” she said. Easley pharmacist Ashish Pa-

the FDA’s Office of Pediatric Therapy, admits that a database designed for multiple stakeholders that include physicians and scientists may be challenging for the general public. The easiest way for parents and the public to use the database

“It would be useful if the users want to dig deeper for clinical trials on newer and experimental drugs.” Dr. April Buchanan, a pediatrician with the Greenville Children’s Hospital, on the usefulness of an online database recently launched by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration that allows parents to determine if the medication prescribed for their child has been part of pediatric clinical studies.

tel recommends another online source, WebMD, for lay people and patients to learn information about drugs. Debbie Avant, pharmacist with

is to search by medical condition, she said. All the recently approved drugs for children with that condition will be displayed, she said, as well as any new dosing guidelines

that have resulted for many medications as a result of the new trials. Sometimes doctors prescribe medications that have not been tested in children, Avant said. Parents may want to use the database to check if a new prescription has been through pediatric clinical trials. If a drug has not undergone a pediatric trial, parents can use that fact as a starting point for questions for the doctor. “We hope this information is empowering,” she said. The database was not mandated by the federal legislation, but is the vehicle for the required public posting of the clinical trial information, Avant said. To access the Pediatric Labeling Information Database, visit www. fda.gov.

Contact April A. Morris at amorris@thespartanburgjournal.com.

Local students graduate from state virtual charter school Officials dispute new report that says full-time virtual schools least effective school type By CINDY LANDRUM | staff

Meredith King doesn’t believe she’ll have any trouble adjusting to the increased responsibility, schedule flexibility and schoolwork completed outside of the classroom when she attends Duke University next fall. That’s because the Landrum teenager attended South Carolina Connections Academy, one of the virtual schools in the state. King was already accustomed to not having classmates in the same room and doing classwork outside of normal school hours because she was homeschooled through eighth grade. In high school, however, King decided she wanted to have more than one teacher, receive grades and take classes such as Chinese and Advanced Placement psychology, physics and economics. So she went to high school online. “It’s almost like you’re already on a college schedule,” said King, who plans to major

4 SPARTANBURG JOURNAL | JUNE 8, 2012

in psychology at Duke. A new report by the National School Boards Association shows King – a fulltime virtual school student who graduated from high school on time – is a rarity. The report said research shows full-time, K-12 virtual schools tended to have lower graduation rates, course completion rates and test scores. While full-time virtual schools enroll less than 2 percent of the nation’s public school population, the number is increasing. Most of the growth comes from for-profit providers. In South Carolina, nearly 7,000 students attended full-time virtual public charter schools in 2011. Thousands of others took at least one class through an online program because they were trying to catch up or missed classwork or their school did not offer a particular class they wanted to take. “A full-time expe-

rience is much different than one class, and the overall data for full-time virtual schools tends to be where the wheels fall off,” said Patte Barth, director of the NSBA’s Center for Public Education. But Connections Academy Executive Director Allison Reaves said many fulltime virtual school students have circumstances that make attending a bricks and mortar school impractical. So they turn to a virtual school as on option. “With a lot of students, there’s a snapshot of time where we fill a need, where a traditional bricks and mortar school is not meeting their needs in some way,” she said. “It’s not necessarily that our system is failing them. It’s that the student found himself in circumstances where he put his education on the back burner and now he is trying to catch up. Students who are behind often won’t graduate on time.” Reaves said her school’s graduating class of about 144 students is the largest in its history, but still represents only about 30 percent of the number of students who started as freshmen. Reaves said students turn to virtual schools for a variety of rea-

sons: They or a family member may be ill, or they are being bullied, or they need to work during traditional school hours to help support their families. Some eventually return to traditional schools; others stay with the virtual experience. “We have a lot of stellar students who do fantastic jobs and perform well above grade level, but we also have a lot of students who have major needs,” she said. William Theriac, a South Carolina Connections Academy student from Boiling Springs, said he’s known he’s wanted to go to college since he was 7 years old. “I quickly realized high school was getting in the way,” he said. He said he learned everything socially he was going to learn in high school during his freshman year at Spartanburg Day School. He decided to attend the virtual school to concentrate on academics, he said. Theriac plans to attend Macalester College in St. Paul, Minn., to major in history and international studies. He wants to eventually go to law school. Contact Cindy Landrum at clandrum@thespartanburgjournal.com.


JOURNAL COMMUNITY

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JOURNAL COMMUNITY

OPINION

VOICES FROM YOUR COMMUNITY, HEARD HERE

FROM THE EDITORIAL DESK

Gowdy calls out VAWA deserters

Of the typically mixed messages left behind at the end of a legislative session, state lawmakers were remarkably clear this year about one: South Carolina’s experiment with public school choice has turned serious. The reforms visited upon the state’s charter school law this spring are plainly intended to accelerate the growth of public charter schools in South Carolina, and force their traditional counterparts to give up scattering speed bumps. Traditional schools have resisted the charter school movement for understandable reasons: Charters operate with fewer rules and more autonomy, yet they still get the public school label – and the public funds. But that doesn’t mean they will reap all the benefits of the changes ahead. With a little imagination, the potential to create “new, innovative and more flexible ways of educating children” is available to every public school in South Carolina, traditional or charter. In fact, traditional schools – and school districts – might be surprised at the help the new law offers. The changes that have drawn the most attention flow in the charter school direction – most notably the directive that charter students may now participate in extracurricular activities at their assigned traditional school if the activity is unavailable at their charter school. The new law also clears the way for single-gender charter schools, allows colleges and universities to create charters and requires local school districts to release charter school funds in a timely way or face fines (a problem that has cropped up on occasion in Greenville County). Of those, the sports eligibility has drawn the most angst from traditional schools fearful that charter walk-ons could displace enrolled students and drain their budgets. Obviously, both are unknowns at this point. If funding should prove a problem, the affected schools have every right to ask the Legislature for a fix next year. But it’s also worth remembering that any charter walk-on must compete alongside his traditional school peers for play time – and should he prove superior and help win championships, will any school honestly object to that? Traditional school coaches might also remember that any charter athletes willing to brave that gauntlet are likely to have parents as fiercely committed to the sport as they are. Such parents usually prove to be avid boosters and fundraisers. Does any athletic department have an excess of those? The challenge, to continue the sports analogy, has always been for the two – traditional and charter – to see themselves as teammates rather than competitors: public schools seeking to educate Palmetto State students effectively and well. What traditionals have most resented is the freedom to innovate that charters enjoy – and it’s true neither legislators nor state educrats have been willing to loosen the bureaucratic strings on a broad basis. However, the new law does offer traditionals a slim pair of scissors: Local school boards may now create their own “school(s) of choice,” freed of state statutes and regulations “promulgated by the state Board of Education.” Which ones are up to the local trustees to select by two-thirds vote, and subject to state approval and review every three years. Legislators are giving their biggest skeptics – traditional school districts – the chance to try the charter method, with the state education board serving as sponsor. To test the waters and see what they can do freed of the restraints they so despise. It’s a challenge the traditionals should not hesitate to take on. Who knows, enough success stories across the state may persuade lawmakers to take shears to those strings.

The statistics are grim and the numbers are way too high. About one in four women have experienced severe physical violence by an intimate partner at some point in her lifetime. Close to 10 million children are exposed to domestic violence a year. South Carolina ranks seventh in the nation for women murdered by men. These numbers come to life every day at Safe Harbor, where we provide shelter, counseling, advocacy and support to victims of domestic violence and their children in Greenville, Anderson, Oconee and Pickens counties. We know all too well the fear, frustration and damage that domestic violence creates for families. “Catherine,” a Safe Harbor client and survivor of domestic violence, says her experiences could be shared by your neighbor, sister, mother, daughter or best friend. “I have had bruises that I show no one. I have run as fast as I could get away only to come back out of fear, guilt, shame or hunger. My children have learned to disrespect me. I have learned to disrespect myself.” In 2011, Safe Harbor sheltered almost 450 families, a 14.6 percent increase from 2010 and a 25.7 percent increase over 2009. Our community counselors and advocates helped 183 women and children. We answered 1,266 crisis calls. Although these numbers are staggering, they are just the tip of the iceberg. Our shelters had to turn away 197 families due to lack of space. In these difficult economic times, the need increases while the resources decrease. Nobody is “for” domestic violence. Of course we are all against it. However, with the reauthorization of the Violence Against Women Act (VAWA), we face an unprecedented split amongst our national legislators. The Violence Against Women Act, enacted for the first time in 1994, was a landmark comprehensive strategy that combined tough new provisions to hold offenders accountable with programs to provide services for victims. VAWA has been a critical funding and training resource for Safe Harbor and other local agencies that work with victims of domestic violence and sexual assault. The enactment of VAWA assured that states finally began taking the issue of violence

A challenge to innovate

IN MY OWN WORDS by BECKY CALLAHAM

against women seriously, enacting and reforming laws specifically addressing domestic violence and sexual assault. VAWA not only provided stronger laws and resources, it sent a message to victims: “We hear you. We take this seriously. We will help you get safe.” It is because of legislation like VAWA, “Catherine” says, that she had the strength to leave. “I carried my broken self and my broken babies to a place of hope. I was given love and shelter. I began to trust. I began to trust myself. I began to stand up straight. I came alive.” I applaud and thank U.S. Rep. Trey Gowdy for his impassioned plea to the House of Representatives to reauthorize VAWA. In this moving speech, he recounts his experience prosecuting domestic violence crimes and displays his understanding of the need for VAWA. I commend Rep. Gowdy for fulfilling his promise to advocate for victims as he publicly calls out his colleagues for playing “election year politics”. Watch the video. A former prosecutor, he knows firsthand what it is like to work with victims. He gets it. And he is willing to speak out, crossing that elusive party line. Giving voice to and standing up for those who have no power is difficult. It’s not always popular. Rep. Gowdy got it right. It’s not about politics. It’s about creating a community that is safe for all of us – in our workplaces, in our schools, and yes, in our own homes. Becky Callaham, M.Ed., LPC, is the executive director of Safe Harbor Inc., which provides safe shelter, counseling and advocacy for victims of domestic violence and their children, and leadership for education and prevention efforts in Greenville, Anderson, Pickens and Oconee counties. For more information about Safe Harbor, call 864467-1177 or visit www. safeharborsc.org.

IN MY OWN WORDS FEATURES ESSAYS BY RESIDENTS WITH PARTICULAR EXPERTISE WHO WANT TO TELL READERS ABOUT ISSUES IMPORTANT TO THEM. THE JOURNAL ALSO WELCOMES LETTERS TO THE EDITOR (MAXIMUM LENGTH OF 200 WORDS). PLEASE INCLUDE ADDRESS AND DAYTIME PHONE NUMBER. ALL LETTERS WILL BE CONFIRMED BEFORE PUBLICATION. WE RESERVE THE RIGHT TO EDIT ALL LETTERS FOR LENGTH. PLEASE CONTACT SUSAN SIMMONS AT SSIMMONS@THESPARTANBURGJOURNAL.COM.

6 SPARTANBURG JOURNAL | JUNE 8, 2012


JOURNAL COMMUNITY

PERFORMANCE ADDED! THURS, JUNE 21 AT 2 P.M. TO BENEFIT THE ACTORS FUND*

PHOTOS BY CHARLES SOWELL / STAFF

BEGINS TUESDAY!

The view from Sassafras Mountain

Worth the trip: Sassafras Mountain The dark woods of Sassafras Mountain are a place where the flowers seem to glow with an angelic light if the sun is in the right spot. The highest mountain in South Carolina scrapes the sky and nodding rhododendron blossoms wave as clouds whisk past. It’s a 45-mile hop from Greenville: taking Poinsett Highway to Travelers Rest, bear left on U.S. 276 and follow it to Highway 11. Stay on 11 into Pickens County to the U.S. 178 intersection at Holly Springs; turn right on 178. Go about eight miles to Rocky Bottom and turn right on F. Van Clayton Highway. Follow Van Clayton up and bear right at the “Y” intersection with Glady Fork Road. Van Clayton becomes Sassafras Road at this point and goes on for a mile to the top. Pick a trail and explore. The best flower trail at this time of year goes over the summit of Sassafras; follow the Van Clayton past the gate and over the summit. Follow Foothills Trail down to the intersection with the highway and head back for the top. It is about 1.5 miles round trip by foot. —Charles Sowell / Staff

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journal community

‘This has hit us hard’ Federal cutbacks in low-income housing assistance have forced cities to seek partners in building affordable housing Free Museums Through generous donations, both the Spartanburg Art Museum and the Spartanburg Regional History Museum have free admission during the first weekend of the month, Thursday thru Saturday, June 7-9, 10 a.m.-5 p.m.

Campfire at Walnut Grove Plantation Gather around the campfire for a taste of local history and a few s’mores. This familyfriendly event includes a short, informative, and entertaining lecture on local history. Arrive early and tour the historical site. Bring a blanket or chairs (and bug spray). Friday, June 8. Gates open at 7:30; campfire fun at 8:30. Presented by the Spartanburg County Historical Association. $3 & $5.

Fine Furniture Exhibit Master woodcraftsman Michael McDunn presents Function & Awe, a large sampling of his handmade fine furniture in the Spartanburg Art Museum. It is both heirloom and contemporary. TuesdaySaturday, May 22-Aug. 4, 10 a.m.-5 p.m.

Youth Photography Exhibit Young people see the world differently. See it through their camera lens in this annual exhibit by the Boys & Girls Clubs of the Upstate. MondaySaturday, 10 a.m.-5 p.m., through July 1. Free.

Children’s Art Exhibit Children from the COLORS program present their colorful and innocent works of art, MondaySaturday, 10 a.m.-5 p.m., June 12-Aug. 1. Free.

Two Guild Exhibits in One Local artists Peggy Demarest and Lynne Tanner present their respective exhibits, Fragments and Marsh Visitations, in the Artists’ Guild of Spartanburg gallery June 1-27, Monday-Saturday, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Fragments is one woman’s view of life through abstract sculptures made of stuff she found. Marsh Visitations is a canvas collection abstracting the artist’s visit to Dewees Island.

Marvin Hamlisch Don’t miss this living musical legend of stage and screen. This one-show-only is selling out fast. For An Evening with Marvin Hamlisch—Tuesday, June 26, at 8 p.m.—order online now.

Summer Camps The Chapman Cultural Center has summer camps aplenty for kids of all ages, all skill levels in art, history, dance, theatre and science. There’s something for everyone.

542-ARTS ChapmanCulturalCenter.org 200 E. Saint John St. Spartanburg

8 SPARTANBURG Journal | JUNE 8, 2012

By CHarles Sowell | staff

Federal cutbacks in funding for low-income housing assistance this year are forcing city officials in Spartanburg and Greenville to leverage the remaining funds so hard that their crowbars are bending, officials with both cities say. Spartanburg has seen a 50 percent cut in HOME funding for the upcoming 2013 fiscal year and an 8 to 9 percent cutback in Community Development Block Grant (CBDG) funding from Washington, said Wes Corrothers, neighborhood services director. The most recent cutbacks are part of a three-year trend, Corrothers said. This year’s cuts have been the most severe yet, with block grant money cut from $692,000 to $624,000 and HOME funding slashed from $304,000 to $155,000. “This has hit us hard,” Corrothers said. “We’ve had to cut back across the board, particularly in the HOME program.” HOME is the largest federal block grant to state and local governments, designed exclusively to create affordable housing for lowincome households. Each year it allocates approximately $2 billion among the states and hundreds of localities nationwide, according to the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development. In Greenville the cuts have been less severe: The 2012-13 allocation pares 18 percent in block grant funding and 34 percent cut in HOME funding from 2011, said Community Development Administrator Ginny Stroud. “We’ve been able to spread the cuts around so no one program is hit harder than another,” she said. “Still, it’s been tough to deal with and we’ve had to slow down on many projects, or put them on hold.” Historically, Greenville has been able to get considerable mileage out of leveraging its federal and grant mon-

ies by working with nonprofit organizations that specialize in low-income housing, Stroud said. Spartanburg, too, has been dependent on local nonprofits to get the most bang for the buck in providing housing, Corrothers said. “But with the start of the recession, we lost two of our most productive organizations to the economic downturn and have been forced to partner with some of the Greenville organizations like Homes of Hope.” One of the most effective of the remaining in-town nonprofits dealing with housing issues is the Spartanburg Housing Development Corp., or SHD, Corrothers said. State Rep. Harold Mitchell, board

Hundreds of units were built in lowincome areas of the city, said Liberty Canzater, CEO and president of Spartanburg Housing. Unfortunately, the pace has slowed down considerably since the federal cutbacks started, Canzater said. “We’re not working on any rehabilitation projects right now,” she said. “But we do have several new homes going up around the city.” In Greenville, HOME funding is to be used for the following housing and relocation projects: Construct one affordable rental on Baxter Street and three affordable rentals in the Greenline-Spartanburg neighborhood; Complete the third year of reloca-

Spartanburg has seen a 50 percent cut in HOME funding for the upcoming 2013 fiscal year and an 8 to 9 percent cutback in Community Development Block Grant (CBDG) funding from Washington chairman of the development corporation, said he sees a growing role for nonprofits as federal cutbacks take their toll. He said organizations such as SHD bring much-needed expertise to the mix. “We’re the only one of two NeighborWorks-chartered housing nonprofits in the state,” he said. “As such, we bring a host of technical and financial tools to the table.” NeighborWorks is a federally-chartered housing organization that is considered a major force in affordable housing and community development on the national scene. “Shortly after we formed Spartanburg Housing, we got a $20 million HOPE VI grant, which we used to jump-start work on affordable housing across the city,” Mitchell said.

tion commitment to families who were moved from the former Queens Court complex to new homes; Finish rehabilitation of home ownership units in the community development-served neighborhoods (23 units through local faith-based organizations and nonprofits). No one is sure how long the federal cuts will go on, Stroud and Corrothers said. “The best we can hope for in the coming year is to get about the same amount of money we did this year,” Stroud said. “That’s a best-case scenario. The truth is, no one will know until Congress acts.” Contact Charles Sowell at csowell@ thespartanburgjournal.com.


OUR COMMUNITY

COMMUNITY NEWS, EVENTS AND HAPPENINGS

Criosanna Allred of Spartanburg, a senior at Spartanburg Day School, was recently honored as a Distinguished Finalist in the 2012 Prudential Spirit of Community Awards program. Allred was honored for being an avid environmentalist who has raised $4,500 in grants to create and expand recycling programs at her school and at several community pools. In addition, she earned a grant to implement an outdoor classroom at her school and she will be the project coordinator and mentor for the classroom. Wofford College recently awarded two scholarships to local students. Mace Gabrielle Wilklow, a senior at Wade Hampton High School and daughter of Todd and Deborah Wilklow of Greenville, was awarded an Anna Todd Wofford Scholarship. The Anna Todd Wofford Scholarships were established in 1973 to honor the memory of the first wife of Benjamin Wofford, founder of the college. In addition, Erika Leigh Houmann, a senior at Greenville Tech Charter High School and daughter of Paul and Fran Houmann of Greenville, was awarded an Old Main Scholarship. A team of AFL associates gathered at New Day Clubhouse in Spartanburg for an ACT (AFL Community Team) volunteer community service event. Part of AFL’s community outreach program, volunteers enhanced the landscape by trimming bushes and trees, planting flowers, spreading mulch and painting the perimeter fence. At the end of the daylong project, AFL volunteers presented New Day Clubhouse with a grant for $2,000. New Day Clubhouse provides a safe and educational environment for those in the community living with mental illness. Bi-Lo, Republic Services, Ingles, Sodexo, IDG, Snyder’s Tree Service, Brickman Landscaping, Country Boys, Sherwin-Williams and Sellers & Son’s Services contributed to the event.

JOURNAL COMMUNITY

Wofford students to intern in India By CHARLES SOWELL | staff

A pair of Wofford students is headed to India this month for a summer of internships with the Manipal Group, a conglomerate of financial and industrial companies in Manipal, India. Christopher Novak and Erin Morgan will spend June and July working in the company’s strategy, accounting and finance divisions, according to a Wofford press release. They are the fourth set of Wofford students to hold the internships. Morgan is a junior French and economics major from Jonesboro, Tenn. Novak hails from Weatherby, Texas. He’s a sophomore finance major. The unpaid internships are offered every year through a partnership between Wofford and the Manipal Group. Travel and living expenses will be covered by the college’s Mungo Center for Professional Excellence – established in 2010 to train students in leadership, entrepreneurship, consulting and project management – and the John M. Rampey Scholarship Fund. The students hope to come home with a summer’s worth of experience that will give them a leg up after they graduate

and face a tough domestic job market. “This is a fantastic opportunity,” the press release quoted Morgan as saying. “India is so important in the business world. I hope to one day work as a consultant for a large company with international clients, and having this first-hand experience in India will set me apart from other applicants.” Part of their first-hand experience includes India’s monsoon season, which typically runs from June to August and can see accumulated rainfall amounts of up to 31 inches. The pair will also experience a six-day workweek and Spartan living conditions. “We prep them for the experience by explaining some of the differences in expectations and living conditions,” said Scott Cochran, dean of the Mungo Center for Professional Excellence, in the press release. “I like to tell them the first two weeks will be the worst in their lives, but after that, it gets easier. I’ve had a student or two call me in near tears because it can be really tough to acclimate, but by the time they leave, India is in their blood and they love it.” Contact Charles Sowell at csowell@thespartanburgjournal.com.

Walnut Grove Plantation and Historic Price House are offering two separate morning day camps this summer. Camp Colonial: A Living History Camp at Walnut Grove Plantation will be held June 26-28. During this camp, children will learn about the Upstate as it was right at the moment settlers like Walnut Grove’s Moore Family arrived in the region. Land, Water, People: A Natural History Camp at Historic Price House will be held July 17-19. Children will learn how settlers built roads, started stores, grew cotton, and, through these actions, impacted nearby land and waters. Camp Colonial takes place from June 26-28 at Walnut Grove Plantation located at 1200 Otts Shoals Road in Roebuck while the Land, Water, and People camp takes places from July 17-19 at Historic Price House at 1200 Oak View Farms Road near Woodruff. Both camps occur from 9 a.m. to noon each day and are open to children 8-12 years old. The cost for each camp is $60 per child and registration for each camp is required by contacting Zac Cunningham at 864-576-6546 or walnutgrove@spartanburghistory.org. American Mensa will be holding admissions testing in the Upstate on June 16, 10:30 a.m., at the Capt. Kimberly Hampton Memorial Library in Easley. Cost is $40. Those who score in the top two percent will qualify for Mensa membership. Mensa has over 50,000 members in the U.S., and over 100,000 worldwide. Members enjoy a variety of benefits including the opportunity to attend social and intellectual events, a monthly magazine, a local newsletter, online forums and the chance to join more than 150 special interest groups. For more information, call 864-605-1494, email testing@piedmontareamensa.org or visit www.us.mensa.org. If you are sponsoring a community event, we want to share your news. Submit entries to: Spartanburg Journal, Community Briefs, 148 River St., Suite 120, Greenville, SC 29601 or e-mail: spartanburgcommunity@thespartanburgjournal.com

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JUNE 8, 2012 | SPARTANBURG JOURNAL 9


journal community

Hatcher Garden naturalist camp begins June 18 By CHarles Sowell | staff

The paths at Hatcher Garden and Woodland Preserve will ring with the sound of children when the Spartanburg Science Center’s Young Naturalist day camp begins on June 18. The camp lasts until June 22 and will run from 9:30 a.m. until noon each day. The campers, ages 6 to 11, will spend their time sharpening skills like listening and observing what the natural world has to offer. Camp officials say this will help them develop a deep appreciation and

understanding of nature. The kids will spend the week investigating Hatcher’s diversity of plants and animals. The camp is limited to 25 students. The students will be led by John Green, Spartanburg Science Center director, while they observe and study the reptiles, insects and invertebrates that populate the garden. The week should be a learning experience in how these different creatures interact and relate to one another, Green said. “Campers will learn how the plants and animals survive and thrive in an urban

woodland garden, an environment that is natural as well as man-made,� Green said. This is the second year the camp has been offered and is very popular among the kids, Hatcher officials said. Hatcher Garden is a 10-acre woodland preserve located just off Reidville Road in Spartanburg. The five-day camp costs $80 for members of the Spartanburg Science Center or Hatcher Garden and $90 for non-members. To register for the Young Naturalist camp or for additional information, con-

Hatcher Garden is a 10-acre woodland preserve.

tact Megan Rudolph at 864-278-9681 or mRudolph@SpartanArts.org. Contact Charles Sowell at csowell@thespartanburgjournal.com.

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JOURNAL BUSINESS

Gaining traction South Carolina’s economic growth shows stable progress By DICK HUGHES | contributor

SEW-EURODRIVE continued on PAGE 14

ECONOMY continued on PAGE 14

GREG BECKNER / STAFF

goal of having the new plant fully operational by “this time next year.” The company received job credits and a $150,000 “set-aside grant” from the state as incentives to expand in Spartanburg, but the family spokesman said the incentives “were not important” in the decision to build the new facility in Lyman. Assistance “for training purposes was the only thing we were interested in because it takes about six months to a year to get a

The economy is stabilizing in South Carolina, but weak points remain, according to recent independent economic reports and evidence on the ground of activity in the critical job-creating construction industry. In a “special commentary” published May 22, Wells Fargo economists said South Carolina’s real gross domestic product (GDP) “has likely neared its prerecession peak” and conditions are in place for growth going forward. They cited a “timely assessment” by the Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia that “showed economic activity climbing at its fastest pace during March than any other time since the end of 2006.” Looking ahead, the Wells Fargo economic group expects “the pace of economic activity to accelerate and population in-flows to increase.” That the manufacturing sector, which is heavily concentrated in the Upstate, is growing rapidly is one reason “why the Philadelphia Fed’s leading economic indicator index points to stronger growth over the next six months,” the group’s economists said.

SEW-Eurodrive vice president of operations Christopher Blickle, left, and plant manager Carl Hinze. Behind the two are gear blanks, which will be cut into gears at the Spartanburg County plant. The company is investing $20 million in plant expansion to assembly large gearboxes for heavy equipment such as cranes.

SEW-Eurodrive plans $20 million expansion By DICK HUGHES | contributor

SEW-Eurodrive, the family-owned global gear manufacturer and pioneer in drive-based automation, is expanding its Spartanburg County operation to customize and assemble gear boxes for the most muscular industrial purposes. The company said it will invest $20 million in the coming expansion, which will add 40 to 50 jobs over the next three to five years to a workforce in Lyman that is

now around 300. The company bought land adjacent to its existing plant and U.S. corporate headquarters off Old Spartanburg Highway to erect a high-arched building of 150,000 square feet to accommodate cranes and storage space required for the 25-ton industrial gearboxes. The company is also building 40,000 square feet of corporate office space on the site. A company spokesman said construction should begin this month, with the

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journal business SEW-EURODRIVE continued from page 13

necessary for customer use and transported to domestic and international customers. The end product is a gearbox built for use where heavy equipment is needed, such as in mining, cement aggregation, pulp and paper, rock crushing, and container loading and unloading. “The new gearbox is up to a 25-ton package … and while there is modularity, these are special gearboxes that have to be designed from the ground up. You can’t just pull parts off the shelf. There will be some parts made here,” the spokesman said. SEW-Eurodrive has been in the Upstate for nearly 30 years. Founded in Germany in 1931 as Sueddeutsche Elektromotoren Werke (Southern Germany Electric Motor Works, or SEW), it opened its first plant and sales

Economy continued from page 13

The state had a difficult climb having lost “nearly 5 percent during 2008 and 2009 as the state’s heavy reliance on cyclically sensitive consumer products manufacturing, tourism and in-migration all slowed markedly,” the economists said. Growth did not return until 2010, and then tepidly. Industrial and commercial construction are picking up, however, reports Brian Gallagher, director of marketing for O’Neil Inc. of Greenville, a full-service engineering, design and construction company. He said “several large industrial projects currently are under construction or in the design phase in the Upstate,” while commercial construction has been stable with two large anchor projects underway in downtown Greenville. “We are seeing owners investing in plant expansions and renovations,” Gallagher said. “There are also greenfield opportunities.” However, he noted Upstate business owners may still be holding back, sharing the national caution “due to the uncertainty related to the economy, taxes and the election.” Wells Fargo pointed out that while Greenville has the largest amount of industrial space at 49 million square feet,

14 SPARTANBURG Journal | JUNE 8, 2012

Charleston and Columbia have outpaced Greenville in absorption of more than one million square feet in the past year. The Greenville market “has moved sideways” as Charleston, benefiting from the port, reduced its vacancy rate to 9.6 percent from 14 percent at the end of the recession. Columbia and Spartanburg have improved modestly, the bank’s economists said.

Greg Beckner / Staff

person up to speed,” he said. Secretary of Commerce Bobby Hitt said SEW-Eurodrive’s decision to expand in Spartanburg “serves as another indication of the company’s commitment to the state.” David Britt, who heads the County Council economic development committee, said it is further verification that “Spartanburg County is an excellent location to do business.” Using existing workers and space, SEW already is doing limited production of the industrial gears, but cannot become fully operational until the building is completed and equipped. The company spokesman said the gear parts are manufactured in a plant built in Germany in 2009 for heavy industrial purposes. From there, the parts are shipped to Lyman, modified as

office in the United States in Ohio in 1975. The company opened the Lyman facility as a manufacturing plant and North American corporate office in 1983. As the business grew, the Lyman plant was expanded several times and, excluding the upcoming addition, comprises more than 500,000 square feet in two buildings, one for manufacturing and one for assembly. This year, the Lyman plant will manufacture more than 400,000 gears and motors from sizes small enough to hold in your hand to industrial gearboxes weighing many tons. “You wouldn’t know it, but our stuff affects you in multiple ways every day – from your clothing made on a machine to your automobile made on a machine to whatever you drink out of a bottle,” the family spokesman said.

Gear blanks that will be cut into gears at the SEW-Eurodrive plant in Spartanburg County.

SEW has four other assembly plants in the United States, as well as sales and technical offices in 60 locations. Sales are worldwide, and up 80 percent of its manufactured products are shipped overseas.

to underperform relative to the nation.” Even with a 3.7 percent increase in the state’s per capita income in 2011, the state “remains nearly 20 percent below the national figure and the per capita income gap between the state and nation has widened since the end of the past recession,” the report said. Partial responsibility for this lies

According to TD Bank economists, South Carolina’s employment rate of 8.8 percent is the continuation of a recent trend of showing faster improvement than North Carolina and Georgia. New industrial projects, including new and expanded plants by BMW, Michelin/BF Goodrich, Continental, Bridgestone and Boeing, have helped “drive manufacturing employment up 8.4 percent,” the economists said. Industry accounts for 27.5 percent of all jobs added in the state since employment bottomed out 27 months ago, they said. With the unemployment rate having dropped below 9 percent, the state is heading in the right direction but “still has a long road ahead to a full recovery,” the Wells Fargo report said. Improved job growth has helped bolster income growth, but South Carolina “continues

with the fact “that a large proportion of South Carolina’s economy and population are still centered in rural areas, where earnings and living expenses tend to be significantly lower,” the bank said. Another factor is the first decline since the 1950s in payments for Social Security, unemployment insurance “and other income support from other government programs on which South Carolina residents are heavily reliant.” According to TD Bank economists, South Carolina’s unemployment rate of 8.8 percent is the continuation of a recent trend of showing faster improvement than North Carolina and Georgia.

The company is owned by brothers Juergen Blickle, who is based in Lyman, and Rainer Blickle, who is based in Germany. Between them, they direct manufacturing, assembly and/ or sales in 48 countries, including Germany, the United States, France, China, Finland, Brazil, Australia, New Zealand, Japan and Singapore. From a handful of workers in Germany at its start, SEWEurodrive has more than 14,000 employees worldwide. It is credited with several technological advances in motor drive systems and, according to the company, ranks No. 1 or No. 2 in markets where it competes. According to Wikipedia, it has annual sales in excess of 2 billion Euros ($2.4 billion). Contact Dick Hughes at dhughes@ thespartanburgjournal.com.

The Palmetto State is now on par with Florida, TD Bank says. The Wells Fargo economists note that just the three regions of Greenville, Charleston and Columbia account for 60 percent of the state’s employment – and the same share of office employment growth over the past decade. In residential housing, the Wells Fargo and TD Bank economic reports see slight improvements in single-family construction and price, but both said the apartment market is where real growth is taking place. Wells Fargo said the vacancy rate for apartments in Greenville, Charleston and Columbia is the lowest in a decade. TD’s economists project an average annual 20 percent increase statewide in multifamily housing starts through 2016. TD expects homeownership will decline from a 2001-08 average of 75.3 percent to 74.7 percent by 2016. Wells Fargo said an increase in apartment construction, although still low by historic standards, is “being fueled by improving job growth, steady population gains and a growing preference for rental housing. These trends will likely remain in place for the next few years, creating more opportunities for new development.” Contact Dick Hughes at dhughes@ thespartanburgjournal.com.


The fine print by dick hughes

There’s More at Play Than Soccer

When thousands of players, parents, friends, coaches and tournament officials are in Greer for a major youth soccer tournament starting next week, they will bring more than excitement on the field. They will bring “more than $10 million” to the regional economy. That’s the estimated economic impact of the 2012 US Youth Soccer Region III Championships that will be held at the MeSA Soccer Complex starting June 14 with an opening ceremony followed by six days of tournament play on MeSA’s 16 soccer fields. The tournament concludes with finals June 21. More than 200 teams of players ranging in age from 13 to 19 years old will compete to advance to the national championship tournament to be held July 24-29 at Manchester Meadows in Rock Hill. Boys and girls teams from South Carolina and 11 other Southern states will participate. “Local restaurants, hotels, retail stores and others will benefit from the more than 4,200 players, coaches, team and tournament officials, who also bring along families to the six-day tournament,” said the United States Youth Soccer Association. The association estimates that visitors will book 12,000 hotel room nights. Pearse Tormey, chairman of the local organizing committee, said it is an honor to host the regional tournament. “Soccer means a great deal to this community. We are delighted to host the best players and teams from across the region in this elite competition and utilize our top-tier facilities and volunteers.” The South Carolina Youth Soccer Association is host, and the National Guard is sponsor. Other regional tournaments are being held in Lancaster, Penn.; Saginaw, Mich.; and Phoenix, Ariz. The 60-acre MeSA Soccer Complex is located at 1020 Anderson Ridge Road, Greer.

Small Bank, Big Contribution

journal business

HAVE YOU SCANNED YET?

120306

Carolina Alliance Bank of Spartanburg has been honored with two awards from the March of Dimes. The bank received the Small Business Award for the fourth consecutive year and also received the Top Financial Institution Award. The charity recognized Carolina Alliance for the bank’s 39 employees contributing 150 man-hours and raising $13,292 for the charity, more than any other financial institution in Spartanburg. Every employee contributed, the bank said.

Housing Fund Gets Boost

With recent investments of $500,000, the nonprofit Greenville Housing Fund (GHF) has exceeded $1.1 million in a fund to provide below-market loans to help low-income individuals purchase homes and start businesses. Program Related Investments, as the loans are called, were made by two banks, South Carolina Bank and Trust and BB&T, and by Lowcountry Housing Trust Fund, which, like GHF, is a certified Community Development Financial Institution. The funds will be used in Greenville, Spartanburg and Anderson counties. Mike Coggin, regional president of SCBT, the first bank to make such an investment in GHF, said its gift of $150,000 “will be loaned to those who need it most in our community. “Not only is this a great opportunity to invest in Upstate South Carolina, but it also has helped us as a bank receive significant Community Reinvestment Act credits, which are required by the federal government.” In March, BB&T contributed $75,000 to help GHF start a pilot program to help low-income individuals start and sustain small businesses with low-interest loans, business preparation and ongoing mentoring. As the loans are paid back, GHI said, the money is “recycled back into other community development activities.” In addition to the latest contributions, the housing fund said it receives “generous support from the City of Greenville, Greenville Redevelopment Authority, Hollingsworth Fund and United Way of Greenville County.”

JUNE 8, 2012 | SPARTANBURG Journal 15


journal sketchbook

Journal Sketchbook

‘The Lion King’ roars into Upstate Four-week run at the Peace Center begins Tuesday By Cindy Landrum | staff

Despite the success of the 1994 animated Disney film “The Lion King,” its director Roger Allers never thought it would be turned into a Broadway production. “‘Beauty and the Beast’ was made into a theater production while we were working on the movie. We used to kid each other while we were working on ‘The Lion King’ that this one would never make it to Broadway,’” Allers, who co-directed the movie, said. “We pictured people running around the stage in fuzzy animal costumes.” They even told then-Disney head Michael Eisner it was a bad idea at a luncheon shortly after the movie’s release. Fortunately, he didn’t listen. “The Lion King” is the highest-grossing Broadway show in history and the sixth longest-running musical in Broadway history. Since it made its Broadway premiere on Nov. 13, 1997, 19 productions around the globe have been seen by more than 64 mil-

Syndee Winters as Nala and The Lionesses in “Shadowland.” Photo: Joan Marcus; ©Disney

lion people, grossed over $4.8 billion and, cumulatively, run a staggering 91 years. The show begins its four-week run at the Peace Center in Greenville on Tuesday. It is expected to be the facility’s biggest Broadway show ever. “Words fail me in describing what it is like being a part of something like this,” said Allers, who also co-wrote the Broadway adaptation of “The Lion King.”

“There was no way of knowing what it would become.” Julie Taymor, a theater and opera director known for creating eccentric, visually stunning productions of hard-to-stage material, was pegged as director. She knew “The Lion King” would have to be expanded – probably doubled – from the 75-minute cartoon to make it as a Broadway production. She knew she

wanted to expand the second act and even thought about where new songs could be placed. But when she pitched her ideas to Disney, there were concerns, Allers said. Allers and co-writer Irene Mecchi were called in to try to flesh out the story. The pair began making up scenes “on the hoof,” Allers said. Seeing that the writers still had the characters in their heads, Taymor

Author brings her latest ‘grit lit’ to the area ‘Sea Change’ combines Karen White’s love of history, South By Cindy Landrum | staff

16 SPARTANBURG Journal | JUNE 8, 2012

But her mother and father were born and raised in Mississippi and she used to spend her summers in a little town in the Mississippi Delta with her grandmother, mother, four aunts and cousins. “I really missed having a hometown, something to call home,” White said. “Sea Change” is set in St. Simons Island off the coast of Georgia, a place she first

visited in 1994 after reading Eugenia Price’s “Beauty from Ashes.” “I’m a huge history buff. I love books set in historic places,” she said. White said the setting is important for her work, something she describes as “grit lit,” or Southern women’s fiction. “To me, the place where a book is set is as much of white continued on page 17

Photo by VII TANNER

It seems like the main characters in Karen White’s novels are always looking for a home, and those homes always end up in the South. That’s not by chance, says the author of the just-released novel “Sea Change.”“It would be naïve to think there’s nothing autobiographical in my books,” she said. “I envied my

cousins because they had that Southern home and community I grew up wanting and longing for.” White’s father worked for Exxon and the family lived all over the world – from Texas to the Netherlands to London – while White was growing up. She didn’t actually live in the South until she moved to the Atlanta area with her husband about 20 years ago.


SO YOU KNOW What: “The Lion King” When: June 12 through July 8 Where: Peace Center

JOURNAL SKETCHBOOK WHITE continued from PAGE 16

The Tree of Life from “The Lion King” National Tour. ©Disney. Photo Credit: Joan Marcus.

to use more than half of the film’s dialogue and all of its messages in the musical. “The themes are universal,” he said. “Dealing with life and death and with guilt, what happens when you lose the guiding light in your world, the estrangement of someone from society – they are heavy topics, but we relieved them with comedy.” The musical gave the writers one last chance to revisit the story, he said. “The movie represented a three-year process of refinement,” he said. “We were working on it until the very last scene. It was worth not tossing out.” Contact Cindy Landrum at clandrum@thespartanburgjournal.com.

a character as any of the characters are,” she said. “The coastal South is so different than anywhere else. I think the people who are born and bred there are different because of that.” In “Sea Change,” White tells the story of midwife Ava Whalen. When Ava meets psychologist Matthew Frazier at a conference, she thinks her days of loneliness are behind her. Shortly after their whirlwind romance, they elope and Ava leaves her family to move to St. Simons Island, despite her deepseated fear of the water. Ava throws herself into uncovering Matthew’s family history and that of the island, not realizing she has a connection of her own to this place – or that her obsession with the past could very well destroy her future. “Sea Change” is the first time White has written a romance between a married couple. She said the book shows there are no perfect people. “I like writing flawed characters,” she said. “Perfect people would be so boring.” Contact Cindy Landrum at clandrum@thespartanburgjournal.com.

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asked them to write the adaptation. “In the moment of saying ‘yes,’ neither one of us thought about what it meant,” Allers said. Allers, a big theater fan, had never written anything for theater. Allers and Mecchi, who preserved more than half of the film’s dialogue, expanded the musical’s female presence. “We recognized that ‘The Lion King’ was male-centric. The male characters really dominated the story,” Allers said. “Julie really wanted to change that.” Rafiki, the shaman baboon-narrator, is played by a woman. And the stage version has a new plotline involving Nala, Simba’s childhood playmate, who as a young woman is unwillingly wooed by Scar. “Scenes we had written for the movie got cut out and one of them was the seduction of Nala by Scar,” Allers said. “We decided to put that back in.” Allers said the expanded Nala storyline shows her leadership qualities and makes stronger the relationship between the musical’s two main characters. “Getting to know Nala more makes the love story stronger,” he said. “All Disney films have a love story. But all we had in the movie were scenes from their childhood friendship to ‘Can You Feel the Love Tonight’ and nothing in between.” Part of the challenge of adapting the animation into a Broadway play was trying to capture the vastness of the African wilderness, Allers said. He points to the movie’s wildebeest stampede. “People envision a vast canyon with hundreds of thousands of wildebeests running about,” he said. “But obviously, you’ve got a limited depth of a stage.” Taymor uses dancers, drummers and masks to express the depth, drama and emotion of that scene in a limited space, Allers said. “That’s one of the things she did of which we stand in awe,” he said. “The exciting thing about theater is that with limited space or materials you can express something so much greater. It takes you out of the element.” In the end, Allers and Mecchi were able

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Students from the Lawson Academy of the Arts at Converse College will perform music from their recitals, Wednesday, June 20, 12:15-1 p.m. in the Barrett Room at Spartanburg’s Library Headquarters as part of the Music Sandwiched In series. Attendees may bring their own lunch or arrive early to purchase a box lunch from Panera. This free, live concert is presented by the Music Foundation of Spartanburg. For more information, call 864-542-ARTS or visit www.chapmanculturalcenter.org.

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Ballet Spartanburg is offering a free dance class for 2-year-olds on Tuesday, June 26, 10-10:45 a.m. at the Chapman Cultural Center. This class is appropriate for boys and girls, and it will focus on creative movement, tumbling, coordination and rhythm. Teaching this class in a fun environment will be Haley Hayes Botton. In the fall, this class will be offered on an on-going basis. For more information or to register, call 864-591-5594 or email lgomez@spartanarts.org.

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GREENVILLE 1990 Augusta Street Greenville, SC 29605 864.233.4272

Photo by Greg Beckner / Staff

“Shifting Plates: An Exhibit of 15 Upstate South Carolina Printmakers” will be on display in the Spartanburg Art Museum at the Chapman Cultural Center June 12-August 25, Tuesday-Saturday, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. A public reception will be held during Artwalk on Thursday, June 21, 6-8 p.m. with an informal gallery talk at 7 p.m. by some of the artists. Participating artists are Wells Alewine, Kent Ambler, Andrew Blanchard, Jim Campbell, Marty Epp-Carter, Kevin Clinton, Steven Chapp, Katya Cohen, Jim Creal, Syd Cross, Daniel Cvammen, Phil Garrett, Luis Jaramillo, Catherine Labbé and Mark Mulfinger. For more information, call 864542-ARTS or visit www.chapmanculturalcenter.org.

We know it isn’t easy inviting others into your home to provide care. So we give you the opportunity to interview and select the best caregiver for you. When you meet our caregivers, you’ll see that at Heavenly Care Services, integrity always comes first.

• Personal Care • Laundry • Light Housekeeping • Errands/Transportation • Companion Care • Medication Reminders • Pastoral Care • Meal Preparation • Respite • Restorative Care ve • Pet Care nl y • Facility Placements • Geriatric, Neurological Referrals

Spartanburg’s oldest home, the Seay House, will be open to the public on Saturday, June 16, 10 a.m.-4 p.m. This house was part of a local farmstead managed and maintained by three maiden Seay sisters in the late 1800s. Admission is free but donations are welcome. For more information, call 864542-ARTS or visit www. chapmanculturalcenter.org.


JOURNAL HOMES F E AT U R E D H O M E S & N E I G H B O R H O O D S | O P E N H O U S E S | P R O P E R T Y T R A N S F E R S

THIS WEEK’S FEATURED HOME

12 Clifton Grove Way, Five Forks Plantation Introducing Ryan Homes’ newest Model Home - The Brookmere at Five Forks Plantation. The Brookmere model has 5 BR, 4.5 BA and a 3 car garage. It features a dramatic 2-story foyer anchored by a waterfall staircase, formal living room, elegant dining room and a study. Grand kitchen features 14 ft island, walk in pantry and light filled morning room. Kitchen opens to dramatic 2-story family room with fireplace and coffered ceilings. First floor In-Law suite great for long term guests. Second floor features a large owner’s suite with separate

sitting room and dual walk in closets. Luxurious bath features tray ceiling, dual head shower and large soaking tub. Five Forks Plantation is an established community with Country Club style amenities. Spacious clubhouse with wrap around porch, Jr. Olympic Pool, lighted tennis courts, athletic field, paved walking trail and 1.3 ac. pond. Ryan Homes offers new homes from the low $300s to $500s built to your specifications. Every new Ryan Home is ENERGY STAR Certified saving you over $100 per month in utility bills compared to standard new construction. Join us for our Grand Opening Celebration!

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HOME INFO Prices: low $300s to $500s 5 Bedrooms, 4.5 Baths, 4369 SF Contact: 864.234.1497 tlambrec@nvrinc.com Ryan Homes www.ryanhomes.com Send us your Featured Home for consideration: homes@greenvillejournal.com

BEFORE YOU BUY OR SELL, DO YOUR

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SPECIAL TO THE JOURNAL

JUNE 8, 2012 | S P A R T A N B U R G J O U R N A L 19


O P E N OPEN

T H I S

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SUN 2-4PM (6/10)

219 SLATE ROCK DRIVE - $384,900 5BR/3.5BA. A breathtaking, full brick, custom built home that sits on a spacious lot that includes an inground pool with plenty of outdoor entertaining space! The interior includes all bells and whistles! Hilary Hurst, (864) 313-6077 Coldwell Banker Caine MLS#1239294

R EA L E STAT E T R A N SAC T I O N S 2012

BUYER

ROURKE, PATRICK J VOGEL III, HERMAN J TIPTON, SCOTT N S C PILLON HOMES INC D R HORTON INC S C PILLON HOMES INC MCCAUL, SCOTT L WADE, JERRY A MARK III PROPERTIES INC CARTER III, HILL A BULLARD, ROBERT M GRAY, REBEKAH P CLASSIC COUNTRY HOMES INC LAWTER, JORDAN ROLAND PLEASANT, TERRY E JONES, CANDACE S BRIGHTON WOODS ROYER, JAMES LEE GREGORY, BRIAN ROBERT SOUTH POINT REAL ESTATE LLC OBRIEN, KERRY M THOMAS, DOUGLAS J MOROZOV, JAMES PATTON HOLDINGS WOODRUFF LLC VANEGAS, ISABEL ZULUAGA HOUSING & URBAN DEVELOP HENSON CAPITAL LLC LONETTI, THOMAS J FEDERAL NATIONAL MORTGAGE FANNIE MAE LAWSON, ERNEST E MEZA, MARTHA SOUTH CAROLINA STATE NELSON, STACY BUSTILLO, GUILLERMO FANNIE MAE SNYDER, DAVID A DAWSON, MICHAEL T REECE, ROBERT MARK III PROPERTIES INC RATLIFF, DWAYNE MARK III PROPERTIES INC MARK III PROPERTIES INC MARK III PROPERTIES INC MARK III PROPERTIES INC MARK III PROPERTIES INC MARK III PROPERTIES INC HOLT, WALTER G COOPER, ROSALEE R GREEN TREE SERVICING LLC ARTHUR STATE BANK GRACE UNLIMITED INTERNATIONAL INC CASEY, ANGELA L ARCHIPRETE, GERARD ROPER, LINDA D GRIER, ROBERT B GOOD, AMY L ROVEY, ERIKA ANN STEELE, WILLIAM L

NGUYEN, KIM 160 LAKE PARK DR BARNES, SHANNA L 151 ANTRIM AVE RAY JR, GRADY LEE 455 HARBOR VIEW LANGE, MICHELLE A 549 HORTON GROVE RD BAINE, MARK R 503 HUNTING BOW LN HUTCHERSON SR, TIMOTHY C 529 HORTON GROVE RD VOGEL III, HERMAN J SECTION: B WALKER JR, WILLIAM H 233 HEATHER GLEN DR DEAN, HARNETHA R 214 N RADCLIFF WAY LAWTER, JORDAN ROWLAND 223 AMBER SKY DR LANDERS, MACKENZIE 549 DRAYTON HALL BLVD HEALY, DANIEL CLIFFORD 714 HERNDON TER RICE, VERNETTE L 509 NAPLES CT CARTER III, HILL A 216 SUGAR HILL CT MIDFIRST BANK 668 SHADOW DANCE LN HARRIS, VALERIE M 245 TIMBERLAND CIR WHITAKER, HAROLD 402 BRIGHTON WOODS DR GUYTON JR, H B 505 QUINN TRL WHEATLEY, PATTY ANN 204 KENTFIELD LN BECK, JESSE L 454 SEA BREEZE WAY SIMPSON, DONNIE E 100 LURAY ST SNELLING, ROBERT 209 COOPER RD WILLIAMS, LASHUNDIA C 161 EDGEFIELD ST ALSTON, NANCY JEAN 240 BROOKFIELD RD COLLINS, JONATHAN ALAN 423 FARNSWORTHRD WEASE, DAVID S 51 DORCHESTER DR WARREN III, HENRY G 290 CEDARWOOD AVE SNYDER, BRIAN E 443 GENTRY ST WATSON, MATTHEW C 110 BEDFORD RD PEARSON, DANIEL E 203 HILLBROOK DR WILLIAMS, CANDICE LEE HELTON 142 LAKEVIEW DR FEDERAL HOME LOAN MORTGAGE 576 MEADOWBROOK AVE SEDA, PEDRO 408 SHAW AVE BRANCH BANKING & TRUST COMPANY 155 MCCONNELL RD FANNIE MAE 10 PIEDMONT ST VEPRUK, NIKOLAY 141 WALDEN CIR SNYDER, ELIZABETH A 151 LAKE LYMAN HTS ANGEL, STEVEN K 146 EMILY DR GOMEZ, AGUSTIN 28 SPRINGBROOK CT NVR INC 516 INNER BANKS RD MOSKOS, DOROTHY 400 N TRADE AVE ENCHANTED CONSTRUCTION LLC 866 VANDENBURG DR ENCHANTED CONSTRUCTION LLC 149 TURNSTONE LN ENCHANTED CONSTRUCTION LLC 504 TILGATE CT ENCHANTED CONSTRUCTION LLC 123 WYNBROOK WAY ENCHANTED CONSTRUCTION LLC 628 CLARION CT ENCHANTED CONSTRUCTION LLC 619 CLARION CT GARLAND, ROBERT S 7119 BROCK ST TAYLOR, JEFFREY W 2 HALL ST OWENS, PRESTON 413 EVINS RD PETTIT, DOUGLAS N 205 S CARLEILA LAKE WAY BEVERLY BUILDERS LLC 8 JULIAN BONDS LN WESTFIELD, WANDA 520 HARRISON ST GRACE UNLIMITED INTERNATIONAL 8 JULIAN BONDS LN FEDERAL HOME LOAN MORTGAGE 116 BRIDGE CREEK DR FIRST CITIZENS BANK & TRUST 121 DOGWOOD AVE SOUTH CAROLINA STATE 408 SHAW AVE U S BANK NATIONAL ASSOCIATION 641 FLINTROCK DR U S BANK NATIONAL ASSOCIATION 353 AMHERST DR

STILLPOINTE

TWIN BROOK ESTATE RIDGECREST HEIGHTS VANDERBILT HILLS CAROLINA OAKS ROSEWOOD BEAUMONT MILL VILLAGE HILLBROOK FOREST BRIARCLIFF ACRES DELANO HILLS PACIFIC MILLS WALDEN ESTATES LAKE LYMAN HEIGHTS SHALLOW BROOK BROOKSIDE VILLAGE GLENLAKE EARLE GLENLAKE OAKS AT ROCK SPRINGS WYNBROOK WYNBROOK WYNBROOK WYNBROOK RIVERDALE MILLS POPLAR RIDGE BROOKFIELD LAKEVIEW MANOR LAKEVIEW MANOR BRIDGEWATER ROSEWOOD DELANO HILLS HANGING ROCK OVERBROOK

20 S P A R T A N B U R G J O U R N A L | JUNE 8, 2012

ADDRESS

L a k e E m o r y, I n m a n , S C : Enjoy the best of lake living at Lake Emory! This lovely community features beautiful homes on wooded lots, many of which enjoy a lakefront location. Lake Emory is minutes away from Boiling Springs, Landrum, and Spartanburg. With

public areas for you to enjoy, Lake Emory is the perfect place for young couples, growing families, and retirees alike. Existing homes are available along with lots on which you can build your dream home!

NEIGHBORHOOD INFO 12 Month Average Home Price:

HISTORIC HOME SALES

$270,000 Amenities: Lake Community Hendrix Elementary Boiling Springs Junior High Boiling Springs High School

$2

80

1 $2 $1

0,0

40

$7

,00

00

,00

0,0

0

0

00 0 20

07

20

08

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09

20

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$75,000

SELLER

$446,500 $400,000 $327,000 $291,570 $276,393 $262,655 $250,000 $250,000 $214,900 $202,000 $177,500 $150,000 $144,900 $144,000 $138,181 $136,000 $132,500 $131,500 $121,000 $119,900 $110,000 $107,500 $103,000 $88,300 $86,800 $80,000 $68,500 $66,000 $65,000 $65,000 $62,500 $60,000 $58,000 $52,000 $51,912 $48,000 $43,478 $39,400 $33,000 $32,500 $30,000 $29,000 $29,000 $29,000 $29,000 $26,000 $26,000 $23,000 $15,000 $15,000 $9,487 $8,500 $7,000 $6,100 $2,500 $2,500 $500 $500 $500

$247,498

PRICE

CATES POND LONDONDERRY THE NORTH HARBOUR DILLARD CREEK CARLTON CREEK DILLARD CREEK ROCK SPRINGS CARLISLE PLACE THE POINTE AT ROCK SPRINGS SUNSET RIDGE RIVER FALLS BRADFORD CROSSING LYMAN FARMS AT SHILOH MASONS CROSSING EVANWOOD

$212,142

SUBD.

$103,454

15-21,

$114,811

JANUARY

20

11

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THE WEEK IN PHOTOS

LOOK WHO’S IN THE JOURNAL THIS WEEK Danielle Cobb of Boiling Springs hits one from the fairway on 12 at Thornblade Club during the The First Tee Invitational, which is the kick-off event for weekendlong events leading up to the BI-LO Charity Classic tournament.

PHOTOS BY GREG BECKNER / STAFF

Barb Hockina of Greenville reads the green while Spartanburg golfer Anna Morgan looks on during The First Tee Invitational. The event pairs two participants from The First Tee of Greenville and The First Tee of Spartanburg with two adult players.

Back row, from left to right, Carolyn Gosnell of Greenville, Nancy Vonmeyer of Pendleton and Danielle Cobb of Boiling Springs react to a putt by Ellie Cecil of Sprtanburg. Ellie’s putt missed by less than an inch during the 6th Annual First Tee Invitational presented by the BI-LO Charity Classic at Thornblade Club in Greer.

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Sudoku puzzle: page 22

Crossword puzzle: page 22

r e b m e Rem ay! Sterling Draper, a volunteer with the Spartanburg Young Professionals, prepares herself to give blood while Laurinda Watson with the Blood Connection, left, gets the tubes and other equipment ready to receive the donation. Spartanburg Young Professionals, an affiliate of the Spartanburg Area Chamber of Commerce, and the Young Leaders Society, an affiliate of the United Way of the Piedmont, hosted the recent blood drive in downtown Spartanburg.

Tom Priddy and Lee Healy fill out paperwork necessary to give blood in the Blood Conection bus parked in downtown Spartanburg. The pair took some time out of their lunch break to make their donations.

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PHOTOS BY GREG BECKNER / STAFF

Tamra Sandoval with the Blood Connection starts blood flowing from a donor during the blood drive.

D s ’ r e h t Fa

2422 Laurens Road Greenville SC 864-234-4960 www.PalmettoHG.com JUNE 8, 2012 | SPARTANBURG JOURNAL 21


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By John Lampkin

S - Charles , GOS President

gos everything

everything for your office... 864-233-5346 www.gos1.com 310 E. Frontage Road, Greer, SC

Journal Watchdog. The news you want. The answers you need

journalwatchdog.com 22 SPARTANBURG Journal | JUNE 8, 2012

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Across 1 A bundle, maybe 7 Money box 11 Fully fills 16 Spot order? 19 Tile with ordered spots 20 Anderson who sang with Ellington 21 The 31-Across’s Quakers 22 Stout relative 23 Kissing game? 25 Recessed photo frame 27 With 98-Across, “The most beautiful face in the world? It’s yours” speaker 28 Turner of records 29 “__ a Lady” 30 Lousy-sounding sausage 31 College hoops org. 33 Movie promo 36 Wine holders 37 Compassionate 41 Some are tributarios 42 Tchaikovsky’s middle name 44 Thing sliding down an aisle? 48 Old ad challenge to wannabe artists 52 Leer at 53 Rest atop 54 Filmmaker Lee 56 Cause of kitchen tears

57 Brooks of comedy 58 Waterfall sounds 59 Wordplay user 61 Iditarod front-runner 63 Half a 45 65 Zeno, e.g. 67 Like sack dresses 68 Popular party appetizers? 72 Fran Drescher sitcom 74 Miller’s Willy 75 Lab protection org.? 78 Andy with recordsetting serves in excess of 150 mph 79 Barnyard beast 80 Cheney’s successor 83 Dorm VIPs 84 Words often heard before a large number 85 Big Papi’s team 87 One of the Minor Prophets 88 Bloke 89 Animation pioneer 91 Dire circumstance, idiomatically? 95 Critical times 97 Pos. and neg. 98 See 27-Across 99 Large land mass 102 Court activity 104 Noah’s eldest 106 Keebler cracker 108 15th-century English ruling house 109 Going nowhere 111 Doctor Bartolo, in “The Barber of Seville”

116 Observatory tool 118 “Ego Trippin’” rapper? 120 Spot 121 Cut off during pursuit 122 Aural cleaner 123 “The Hairy Ape” playwright 124 Coral isle 125 Bring joy to 126 Steinway’s partners? 127 Scary spots in suspense movies Down 1 Catalog stuff: Abbr. 2 “Forgetful me!” 3 Forget to include 4 It may be broken on the road 5 Beetle’s appendage 6 Water, to chemists 7 Talus neighbor 8 Terrible tsar 9 Booze, facetiously 10 Low area? 11 Japanese restaurant staple 12 Orbital point farthest from the sun 13 Thistlelike plant 14 Stop 15 Winter blanket 16 Native Israeli 17 Runner-up’s lament 18 Campus armful 24 JFK posting 26 Waistline concern?

29 Merit badge site 32 String quartet member 34 Sinbad’s giant egglayer 35 Relieve (of) 37 “Ivy Mike” test weapon

Medium

38 Eggs on 39 Multi-legged critters 40 Juice drink suffix 41 Sits in a cage, say 43 Zagreb resident 45 Covert govt. group 46 “A Bell for Adano” author

47 Feedbag morsel 49 Common 50 Lows 51 Many MIT grads 55 Watkins __: N.Y. road-racing town 58 Won back 59 Skid row figures 60 Long-range nuke 62 Grazer with a rack 64 Romantic night out? 66 Paints for Pissarro 67 Exile 69 Health supplements co. 70 Colonial well fillers 71 Dwells on to excess 72 Plodded 73 Hägar’s daughter 76 “Please, Daddy?” 77 “__ Is Born” 79 Drop from the staff 81 Agnus __ 82 Aerie builder 86 “Come on, that’s enough!” 87 Enters, as a cab 88 D.C. school named for a president 90 Verb for Popeye 92 Try to spot, with “for” 93 TLC provider 94 Fido’s Easter treat 96 Musician with a 1712 Stradivarius 99 Montezuma, e.g. 100 “Later!” 101 R&B’s __ Brothers 103 Sherlock’s adversary Adler 104 Feeds, as pigs 105 Cool, old-style 107 Tennis legend 110 Rub out 112 Quite impressed 113 Moonshine mouthful 114 Like some providers 115 Feathered headturners 117 Animation collectible 118 Quilting units: Abbr. 119 Arg. neighbor

Crossword answers: page 21

Sudoku answers: page 21


JOURNAL SKETCHBOOK

WHERE I’VE BEEN BY BILL KOON

Me, Tom Sawyer and a few hostile boxwoods I have been painting our front porch banisters. They are a nuisance at best, but we have thick shrubs everywhere, and I have to paint with my backside in the bushes. The other day, I was pushing back the shrubbery and painting away while my youngest daughter – known here as the “Privileged Child” though she is no longer a child – was reading in a rocker there on the porch. I played my best card: “This sure is fun,” I said, taking a long, smooth stroke and smiling mightily. She replied, “Glad you are enjoying it, Tom Sawyer.” She’d seen right through my gambit, and I was sorry I had ever mentioned Mark Twain or put that novel, with its great fence painting scene, under her nose. She ducked back into “The Girl With the Dragon Tattoo” while I fought another boxwood and wiped up another splatter. The occasion brought me a couple of good memories, about painting and about books. I have known some remarkable painters. My grandfather was a builder, and his three sons, my dad and uncles, all worked with him at one time or another. All of them could paint beautifully – and they painted not just siding and walls but molding and window sashes and the wooden strips within the windows between the panes. They didn’t need any razor blades or masking tape; I’m sure they would sneer at a roller. Plus, they were neat – no spills, no paint in their hair, no gobbed up bristles. They knew how to keep an eye on the tip of the brush and how to avoid dipping up too much paint in a hurry. “Amazing” is the only word I have for them. I wish that some of their genes had made it into my DNA. Books made it into my bloodstream, though. They were just about everything in our household. My father was not literary, but he was a printer, an old-fashioned hot-type man who was an expert on the cumbersome linotypes where typesetters wrote every line on a separate lead slug. Sounds like cave painting to us today. I was fascinated by the clatter of those machines and by the fact that the lines were set upside down and backwards so as to come up properly when inked and

run through a press. I thought my father was magical because he could read a galley tray of those slugs as easily as I could read a right-side-up page. He could go on and on about the big high school and college annuals that his company specialized in – about the hot type and the engraved pictures and the heavy slick paper and the sewn bindings, about what an artifact those books were, about how they would endure at least as long as the students. And he kept a few favorite volumes; handsome books that he had read only backwards. My mother was literary. She read like a demon, four or five books a week. Our regular Friday afternoon route took us by the public library, where she would grab an armload fast; she’d sort through them later, setting aside the ones she had read already. Her reading habit was a godsend to her in her old age, and she read right up to her last days. In fact, I think that the strongest signal that she was finally winding down was that she stopped reading. Thanks to my parents, I like my books inside and out, backwards and forwards. I don’t think I’ll ever be able to go electronic or cyber. I like having a book in my hand, and I want to see my reading on a shelf to remind me of what I have read and of who, even where, I was when I read it. I like thumbing through them, looking at random notes or maybe finding a memento bookmark – a boarding pass or a restaurant receipt or a postcard from an old trip – memories of the real and imagined together. I like lending some of my books to my pals, a gesture of real friendship and trust, if you ask me. I want a few special volumes, just a few, cremated with me when I have read my last novel. The Privileged Child seems to like books the way I do. I just wish she had skipped Tom Sawyer so that I could trick her into a little painting here amongst these hostile boxwoods. Bill Koon can be contacted at badk@ clemson.edu.

U P S T A T E

DINING

See what you’ve been missing

HEADING OUT TO EAT THIS WEEKEND? NEED SOME suggestions?

Adams Bistro American Grocery Arizona’s Blockhouse Blue Ridge Brewing Company The Bohemian Brick Street Café The Brown Street Club Cafe at Williams Hardware Chophouse ‘47 CityRange Davani’s Devereaux’s Fonda Rosalinda’s Ford’s Oyster House The Galley Restaurant The Green Room Handi Indian Cuisine

Hans & Franz Biergarten Harry & Jean’s John Paul Armadillo Oil Company The Lazy Goat Liberty Tap Room & Grill Mary Beth’s The Mellow Mushroom Midtown Deli Nami Asian Bistro Nantucket Seafood Grill Northampton Wine Café Nose Dive On The Border Open Hearth Steak House P. Simpson’s The Plaid Pelican Portofino’s Italian Restaurant Rick Erwin’s West End Grille

Ristorante Bergamo Roman’s Macaroni Grill Runway Café Ruth’s Chris Steak House Saffron’s West End Café Sassafras Southern Bistro Smoke on the Water Soby’s New South Cuisine Stax Billy D’s Stax Omega Diner Stella’s Southern Bistro Stellar Restaurant & Wine Bar Thaicoon Ricefire &Sushi Bar The Trappe Door Travinia Italian Kitchen Trio A Brick Oven Café Yia Yia’s

Upstate UpstateFoodie .com Feed Your Inner Food Enthusiast

JUNE 8, 2012 | SPARTANBURG JOURNAL 23


Saturday, July 21, 2012 Best Hand $2000 Worst Hand $250 Door Prize Drawings Registration 8 A.M. First Bike out 9 A.M. Last Bike out 10 A.M. Registration fee $25 (includes a FREE t-shirt) Dual Starting Locations: Laurens Electric Cooperative 2254 Hwy. 14, Laurens, SC or Harley-Davidson of Greenville 30 Chrome Drive, Greenville, SC Ride Will End At: Harley-Davidson of Greenville

FOOD WILL BE AVAILABLE from Quaker Steak & Lube Contact: David Hammond at 864-683-1667 PO Box 700, Laurens, SC 29360

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June 8, 2012 Spartanburg Journal  

Spartanburg Journal published by Community Journals. Weekly newspaper with, for and about Spartanburg, SC.

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