Page 1

SC UNEMPLOYMENT INCHES UPWARD. Page 13

CLEMSON EXPANDS TO CHARLESTON.

New education center will be modeled after CU-ICAR. Page 4

SPARTANBURGJOURNAL Spartanburg, S.C. • Friday, June 22, 2012 • Vol.8, No.25

The TIPPING POINT

NEW CO-OP

Big plans are afoot that may change the face of the Hub City.

City’s first food cooperative to open in 2013.

Page 8

Page 15

CAST-OFF ART Matthew Harrison displays his demons.

Page 16

GREG BECKNER / STAFF

The Montgomery Building in downtown Spartanburg. Officials may be close to a deal to revitalize the historic building, a key to downtown development.


JoURNAl commUNiTy

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Cindy Landrum clandrum@thespartanburgjournal.com April A. Morris amorris@thespartanburgjournal.com Charles Sowell csowell@thespartanburgjournal.com contributing writer

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Racing Legends of Spartanburg They started out running moonshine. They ended up making history. And it all started right here in Spartanburg. Car racing is one of America’s favorite sports. Discover its roots in this extensive historical exhibit… Spartanburg Regional History Museum Chapman Cultural Center 200 East Saint John Street Spartanburg Tues.-Sat., 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Ends Aug. 31 Free public reception: Fri., July 13, 6-8 p.m. Real race car drivers will be telling their stories. Community Event: “A Drive Through History” Sat., July 14, 10-5, free, featuring cars, drivers, food, and fun stuff for the whole family. 542-ARTS

© Spartanburg Journal published by Community Journals LLC. All rights reserved. All property rights for the entire contents of this publication shall be the property of Spartanburg Journal, no part therefore may be reproduced without prior written consent.

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Will Rothschild, city chief of communications, pointing out the development potential for brownstone town houses on Mill Street, where city-owned houses butt against the Edward Via College of Osteopathic Medicine property.

“I expected blood, and all I got was cream puff.” New Jersey news reporter, commenting in January 1963, on the day Harvey Gantt entered classes at Clemson University as the school’s first black student.

“VCOM is our golf course.” Curt McPhail, program officer with the Mary Black Foundation, on the potential the new Edward Via College of Osteopathic Medicine has to interest developers in building more housing within walking distance of downtown.

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JOURNAL COMMUNITY

Charleston to get its own version of ICAR Advanced materials, the environment and energy will be center’s focus By CINDY LANDRUM | staff

The Charleston area will have its own version of CU-ICAR. Clemson University has announced it

will build the Zucker Family Graduate Education Center at its Restoration Institute on the former Navy base in North Charleston. The education center will be a place where academics and industry meet, collaborate and bring innovation to the marketplace in industries such as advanced materials, the environment and sectors related to energy, power systems, logistics and transportation, said Clemson University President Jim Barker.

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It will be patterned after the International Center for Automotive Research, known by its initials ICAR, in Greenville. ICAR is a 250-acre campus where Clemson University automotive engineering graduate students, established automotive companies such as BMW and Michelin and new high-tech companies work sideby-side on automotive-related research. There are more than 1,000 automotive assemblers and suppliers within a

500-mile radius of the Upstate. In North Charleston, the focus is expected to be composite materials, advanced computing and energy systems. It will also be used as a workforce development hub and a place where students of all ages – from middle school on – and scientists from all over the world can visit. “What CU-ICAR has done to strengthen the automotive cluster in the Upstate, the Restoration Institute is doing in the Lowcountry for advanced materials, the environment and sectors related to energy, power systems, logistics and transportation,” Barker said.

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Prostate cancer study connects generations Graduates learned about risk and screening for second leading killer of African-American men By april a. morris | staff

Nearly 30 African-American men learned more about prostate cancer and screening for this second-deadliest cancer in American men as part of a study sponsored by the Gibbs Cancer Center, the University of South Carolina, and the UsTOO prostate cancer education and support network. The educational study was designed to target black men ages 21 to 40 and deter“The Zucker Family Graduate Education Center will be the hub where all these initiatives meet.” The Zucker Family Graduate Education Center is being financed in part by a $5 million gift from the family that owns The InterTech Group, a global manufacturing holding company based in North Charleston. It is one of the largest privately held companies in the country. The $20 million Zucker Center is expected to open in 2014. By then, Clemson is expected to have finished construction on its wind-turbine drivetrain testing facility. Clemson and its partners received a $45 million grant from the U.S. Department of Energy in November 2009 to build and operate a large-scale testing facility for next-generations windturbine drivetrains. The university and its partners are providing another $53 million for the project. The testing facility will be the centerpiece

mine ways to overcome barriers for them to access prostate cancer education and screening. Like a similar program creating an intergenerational link between AfricanAmerican women, the study, in its second year, connects older and younger men to encourage them to communicate and share knowledge about this deadly disease. Under revised guidelines, AfricanAmerican men and those with a family history of prostate cancer should begin talking about screening at age 45, while other men should begin discussions at 50, said project leader Dr. Daniela Friedman of the University of South Carolina. According to the American Cancer Society, prostate cancer is the second leading cause of cancer death in American men, and one in six men will be diagnosed with of the Clemson University Restorative Institute complex and is expected be the largest of its kind in the world. Plans also call for a 15-megawatt grid stimulator. Anita Zucker, CEO of The InterTech Group, said it is important for the state’s vitality to create a workforce with the right skills. “Centers like this will help place South Carolina at the forefront of innovation,” she said. North Charleston is where Boeing located its Dreamliner assembly plant. Officials said The Citadel provided undergraduate engineering education in the Lowcountry, but the Zucker Center will provide opportunity for students to earn advanced engineering degrees and conduct real-world research shoulder-to-shoulder with engineers from leading companies already located in South Carolina.

journal community

Graduates of a prostate cancer study at Gibbs Cancer Center. The study connected younger and older African-American men, encouraging them to communicate and share knowledge about the second most deadly cancer for American men.

prostate cancer during his lifetime. Between 2003 and 2007, the average annual prostate cancer incidence rate among black men was 229.4 cases per 100,000 men, 60 percent higher than the rate in white men, according to the National Cancer Institute. “This ongoing program is helping a community at higher risk for prostate cancer to make informed decisions about prostate cancer screening and about their overall health,” said Friedman.

In 2011, the Gibbs Cancer Center and USC hosted a series of three National Cancer Institute studies and reached more than 200 participants. Friedman said organizers hope to expand the research and education on prostate screening and treatment decisions to the entire state if additional funding becomes available. Contact April A. Morris at amorris@thespartanburgjournal.com.

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JOURNAL COMMUNITY

OPINION

VOICES FROM YOUR COMMUNITY, HEARD HERE

FROM THE EDITORIAL DESK

Texting ban fails again Take a ride on any interstate, city street or country road and you will see them: drivers typing into cellphones while piloting 4,000 pounds of aluminum, glass and steel at speeds that can kill if attention isn’t paid. Of course, any speed can kill if attention isn’t paid, which is why distracted driving – and most especially texting while driving – is such a growing national concern. While any distraction can endanger safety, texting is the most serious because it involves all three types of distraction: visual (taking your eyes off the road), manual (taking your hands off the wheel) and cognitive (taking your mind off what you are doing). Thirty-nine states now ban texting while driving for all ages, and an additional five outlaw texting by teen drivers. South Carolina – despite years of legislative debate – is not among them. And in typical Palmetto State fashion, that debate so far has focused more on limiting the reach of the laws proposed than on protecting the motoring public from texters. House bill 4451, which had been the most promising of this year’s lot, made it illegal for “a person under the age of 18 to use a hand-held wireless electronic communication device while operating a motor vehicle on the public streets and highways of this state.” The bill also made it illegal for drivers of any age to use a cell phone in a school or highway work zone. Yet drivers could still type in a GPS address, “activate any internal feature or function of the device” (such as an app for a smart phone) and text “while lawfully parked or stopped,” for example, at red lights. Refer back to the three types of distraction listed above. How do those exceptions line up? Fines were also puny compared to other states. North Carolina and Georgia’s laws charge texters $100 and $150 on first offense, respectively. House bill 4451 proposed $50 on first offense, added two points off the driver’s license on second offense and didn’t reach $100 until the third. It demanded that police have a “clear, unobstructed view” of the cell phone activity and only check the phone for messages, not confiscate it. So is a dollop of deterrence better than none? It’s hard to say. Legislators will consider their duty done when a texting bill finally passes, meaning it will be years before we see anything stronger. Mild though House bill 4451 had become by the time it died in the Senate Judiciary Committee, it was tougher than the bills lawmakers debated to death in 2010 and 2011. They may stiffen their spines and toughen one of them to the point of actual deterrence come 2013. Sometimes it’s worth the wait. And sometimes not. At least House bill 4451 targeted the worst offenders. Last year, 58 percent of 15,000 high school seniors surveyed by the Centers of Disease Control admitted to texting while driving. Researchers found that even those who admitted that the behavior is dangerous thought it was safer if they held the phone up so they could see the road while they text. This is beyond foolish. Experts say focusing on a cellphone instead of the road leads to delayed reaction times, lane swerves and other potentially fatal lapses. Numerous studies concur that texting while driving is equal to driving drunk. The primary value of a law is to change behavior. State legislators owe South Carolina one tough enough to compel drivers to put their cell phones down.

Innovating the Upstate Did you know that the Upstate is home to a company with more than 2,000 textile patents? Or that 20,000 Upstate residents work in the plastics industry? How about the fact that our region of the globe has one of the leading centers for advanced materials? Yes to all? No to all? Maybe some? One of the goals of the Upstate SC Alliance is to tell the good economic stories of our region to the rest of the world. And one of the stories we love telling the most is about advanced materials, which is the future of the manufacturing industry. Our region is increasingly supplying advanced materials such as plastics, optics, photonics, textiles and metals to the rest of the world. We are becoming a hub for advanced materials for several key reasons. The first is the people. The Upstate S.C. Alliance represents a 10-county region that includes highly trained graduates, world-renowned professors, a developing dynamic workforce, cutting-edge technology and state-ofthe-art facilities. The move to a more innovative Upstate is a region-wide effort that has its fingers in every pocket of our communities. That company with more than 2,000 patents? It’s Milliken, which is headquartered in Spartanburg. The plastics industry is buzzing with companies such as Greer’s Mitsubishi Polyester Film, which last year launched the first recycled liner film line in the industry. Companies such as Optek Systems in Greenville, Woven Electronics in Simpsonville and Fibersource in Greenville lead the way in the optics/photonics industry. We can count Fisher Barton in Fountain Inn, Hoke in Spartanburg and Renfrow Brothers in Spartanburg amongst the leaders in metal working and fabrication. Advanced materials are fueling the economy in all corners of the Upstate. And if there is a hub to this growing sector, it has to be the Clemson University Advanced Materials Center in Anderson

IN MY OWN WORDS by HAL JOHNSON

County on Highway 187. The center is anchored by a world-class research facility that includes a 111,000 square-foot LEED Silver Certified building, the nation’s best electron microscopy laboratories, the most advanced official fiber drawing capabilities of any U.S. university, laser and chemical laboratories and Class 100 clean rooms. The Advanced Materials Center also includes a composites manufacturing center, a laboratory for advanced plastic material and technology and the center of optical material science and engineering technologies. The success of the businesses in our region, along with the Advanced Materials Center, is a story that the Upstate SC Alliance is proud to share with people and companies worldwide. We can show that the Upstate has the ability to create, innovate and prosper in this very important business cluster. A strong advanced materials sector means jobs and financial security for the region. It helps keep our economy diverse and prosperous. It allows for growth. We expect to see many of the patents and products coming out of small start-ups to become major innovations – innovations that will lead to more jobs that can originate and stay here. And that makes a stronger Upstate for everyone. Hal Johnson is the president and chief executive officer of the Upstate SC Alliance, a nonprofit organization made up of public and private investors aimed at promoting economic growth. Additional information is available through the Alliance’s website, www.upstateSCalliance.com.

IN MY OWN WORDS FEATURES ESSAYS BY RESIDENTS WITH PARTICULAR EXPERTISE WHO WANT TO TELL READERS ABOUT ISSUES IMPORTANT TO THEM. THE JOURNAL ALSO WELCOMES LETTERS TO THE EDITOR (MAXIMUM LENGTH OF 200 WORDS). PLEASE INCLUDE ADDRESS AND DAYTIME PHONE NUMBER. ALL LETTERS WILL BE CONFIRMED BEFORE PUBLICATION. WE RESERVE THE RIGHT TO EDIT ALL LETTERS FOR LENGTH. PLEASE CONTACT SUSAN SIMMONS AT SSIMMONS@THESPARTANBURGJOURNAL.COM.

6 SPARTANBURG JOURNAL | JUNE 22, 2012


journal community

county council from the june 18 meeting

Spartanburg County Council made room for a little extra state money in its 2013 budget Monday night in the hope that state lawmakers will approve $1.5 million in additional funds for the county in the South Carolina budget. As things stand now, the county might get an extra $500,000 to $2 million; county officials had been projecting a $271,000 decrease in state funding. Council passed an amendment to the fiscal 2013 budget that would make room for extra state funding. If the money comes through, most if not all of the county’s wish list of items for the coming fiscal year could come to fruition, including a two percent pay increase for county workers who have not seen a raise in four years. The general fund budget, as passed, is $80 million and includes no raises for county workers, no layoffs and no new taxes. Property taxes will tick up a bit to pay off debt incurred in previous years. The $680,000 in additional property taxes will come from a $2.80 hike (on average for a $100,000 home). After months of meetings and much wrangling, council passed the budget with little comment except for Councilman Roger Nutt’s dissenting vote. Nutt said he opposed the budget as a matter of principle since it calls for using Accommodations Tax money to operate Tyger River Park. Ultimately, he said, that action isn’t what having the tax is all about and is not sustainable. He was also against giving $266,150 in county money to outside agencies, including the Arts Partnership of Greater Spartanburg and Spartanburg County Regional History Museum. About half of the $80 million general fund pays for public safety; the rest pays for roads, parks, health services, economic development, county administration and other county functions. The county’s overall spending plan is about $151 million, of which $71 million is committed to projects including road maintenance, solid waste management, the 911 system and other county functions. After the General Assembly finishes work on the budget later this month, the council plans to prioritize and allocate any money it gets from the state at its July meeting. Spartanburg County Council next meets on July 16 at 5:30 p.m. in council chambers at 366 N. Church St. Contact Charles Sowell at csowell@ thespartanburgjournal.com.

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Rich for development Spartanburg’s downtown is closer to revitalization than ever before By CHarles Sowell | staff

Auto Racing Spartanburg was once at the center of auto racing. The Spartanburg Regional History Museum presents an exhibit featuring artifacts, trophies, and the development of the auto racing industry, June 19-Sept. 1, Tues.-Sat., 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Fine Furniture Exhibit Master woodcraftsman Michael McDunn presents Function & Awe, a large sampling of his handmade fine furniture in the Spartanburg Art Museum. It is both heirloom and contemporary. Tues.-Sat., May 22-Aug. 4, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Youth Photography Exhibit Young people see the world differently. See it through their camera lens in this annual exhibit by the Boys & Girls Clubs of the Upstate. Mon.-Sat., 10 a.m.-5 p.m., through July 1. Free. Children’s Art Exhibit Children from the COLORS program present their colorful and innocent works of art, Mon.-Sat., 10 a.m.-5 p.m., June 12-Aug. 1. Free. Two Guild Exhibits in One Local artists Peggy Demarest and Lynne Tanner present their respective exhibits, Fragments and Marsh Visitations, in the Artists’ Guild of Spartanburg gallery June 1-27, Mon.-Sat., 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Fragments is one woman’s view of life through abstract sculptures made of stuff she found. Marsh Visitations is a canvas collection abstracting the artist’s visit to Dewees Island. Printmakers Exhibit 15 printmakers from the Upstate have come together to create a unique and vastly diverse exhibit of handmade prints in Shifting Plates. The exhibit is in support of a project that collected the works for the true “art collector.” Presented by the Spartanburg Art Museum, Tues.-Sat., 10 a.m.-5 p.m. An Evening with Marvin Hamlisch This maestro of stage and screen will be in Spartanburg for one night and one show only, Tues., June 26, 8 p.m. To accommodate demand, we opened the orchestra pit seating, but they are going fast. When it comes to music “Nobody Does It Better.”

Spartanburg’s brain trust of nonprofits, private philanthropists, and entrepreneurs are busily whipping up plans for projects that Spartanburg city officials say will change the face of the city. Already the city’s moribund downtown is nearing a tipping point on the business side, even as the Southside project is bearing fruit with a new grocery due to open soon on the edge of what was once a food desert. A deal may be close with a private company on revitalizing the old Montgomery Building, officials told the Journal. That would be a key part in tying together the kind of development that would draw visitors from the Marriott to dining and entertainment venues along Main Street, said Will Rothschild, the city’s chief of communications. Spartanburg is a land-rich city in development terms, Rothschild said. “The city owns a lot of property downtown,” he said. “The nine acres left open behind the Chapman Center and Marriott are a prime spot for mixed-use development that could draw more business to downtown and help make the city center the place where people want to live instead of

photos by Charles Sowell / Staff

ArtWalk On the third Thursday of each month, Spartanburg’s art galleries stay open late. At the Chapman Cultural Center, stop in to see the Spartanburg Art Museum, the Guild Gallery, and the Student Exhibits. Free. 5-9 p.m. Public and free receptions in SAM and the Guild Gallery.

Collins Park on the south side of Spartanburg replaced a crime-ridden apartment complex.

fleeing to the suburbs.” On a smaller scale, that is just what the city did on the Southside when it used a combination of city, public and private funds to create a new neighborhood around the C.C. Woodson Center on Bomar Avenue. Just a short block from Woodson, where neat, new starter homes have replaced run-down mill houses, sits Collins Park – the kind of housing development where any middle-class family would love to live, Rothschild said. Collins Park replaced a crime-ridden zone of apartments that the city tore down to make room for new housing. Mayor Junie White said the city hopes to replicate Southside’s success on the Northside, where planning is well underway.

Lunch and Learn You don’t have to travel far and wide to discover great and historically interesting things to see and do. Chumley Cope of “Explore Up Close” will share insider’s tips on getting the most out of the history in your own backyard. Bring your lunch. Presented by the Spartanburg County Historical Association, Fri., June 22, 12:30 p.m. at the Chapman Cultural Center. $5.

542-ARTS ChapmanCulturalCenter.org 200 E. Saint John St. Spartanburg

8 SPARTANBURG Journal | JUNE 22, 2012

A view of the Edward Via College of Osteopathic Medicine from cityowned property on Mill St.

“We don’t have the money right now,” White said. “We hope that will come with time. The potential over there is great with the new VCOM campus.” The city is already using part of its winning Southside playbook around the Edward Via College of Osteopathic Medicine. Rothschild said about 120 parcels have been purchased in the Northside target area by either the city or the Northside Development Corp., the land bank that has been bankrolled by several organizations and private philanthropists. “About $1.7 million has been spent to acquire those parcels,” he said. Curt McPhail, program officer with the Mary Black Foundation, one of the partners in the Northside Development Corp., said the corporation is using a redevelopment strategy borrowed from Atlanta that has spread across the nation in municipal projects. “In Atlanta, a developer and philanthropist named Tom Cousins heard that one ZIP code in the city was producing 95 percent of the city’s incarcerated persons,” McPhail said. “He also found out that the neighborhood was built around an abandoned golf course and decided to do something about it

by partnering with the city’s housing authority.” Cousins founded the East Lake Foundation in 1995. With the housing authority’s help, the new foundation built a mixed-income apartment block in the low-income, highcrime area. It also plowed additional resources into education options and job provision for the tenants. McPhail said those simple changes helped drive crime down 95 percent in that Atlanta ZIP code, and saw the percentage of children passing the state’s math exam soar from 8 percent to 78 percent. Based on the results of the East Lake project, Cousins partnered with Warren Buffett to create the Purpose Built Communities organization that is currently working with cities around the country. “VCOM is our golf course,” McPhail said. The medical school is also behind a drive to create more housing within walking distance of downtown, Rothschild said. “Downtown, we have virtually 100 percent occupancy in rental units,” he said. While there are still lots of empty storefronts downtown, any apartment space in the upstairs of those buildings is completely rented out, he said. The race is on to provide housing for students attending VCOM, which will continue to grow for several more years as the school expands by 150 medical students per year to a total of 600. One spot that practically begs to see brownstone town homes built is on Mill Street, where city-owned houses butt against the VCOM property, Rothschild said. “They have the best view of the city’s skyline anywhere.” Contact Charles Sowell at csowell@ thespartanburgjournal.com.


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The Upstate Homeless Coalition (UHC) recently received, on behalf of Spartanburg-based Butterfly Foundation, a grant for approximately $327,000 from the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD). The grant will provide homeless families and individuals that have special needs with permanent housing in Spartanburg, Greenville and Anderson counties. Along with housing, program participants will receive intensive case management to address their individual needs. The Upstate Homeless Coalition is accepting the grant award as HUD’s regionally designated coordinator of planning and services for Upstate South Carolina homeless service providers. Sherman College of Chiropractic is now seeking candidates for president. Nominations and applications of qualified candidates should be addressed to the college, to the attention of the Presidential Search Committee, and should be submitted by July 31, 2012. For more information, visit www.sherman.edu/ presidentsearch. Spartanburg Community College’s Cherokee County Campus is preparing students to meet local industry demands for a highly skilled, technology-based workforce in Cherokee County. In addition to a new LEGO Robotics program, geared towards fostering young students’ interest of science, technology, engineering and math, the Cherokee County Campus is also expanding its curriculum offerings to include SCC’s popular Mechatronics Technology I Certificate. Both programs ultimately prepare Cherokee County students for well-paying and high-growth careers in the Upstate’s expanding manufacturing industry. Mechatronics refers to an interdisciplinary field involving control systems, electronic systems, computers and mechanical systems. For more information on SCC’s Mechatronics program, visit SCC’s website, www.sccsc.edu, or contact Program Director Paul Turner at 864-592-4738. Cameron Taylor of Fountain Inn, Leah VanSyckel of Taylors, Lina Davda and Max Franks, both of Greenville, and Randy Fang and Karl Schober, both of Greer, recently graduated from the SC Governor’s School for Science & Mathematics with the class of 2012. Taylor is the son of David Taylor and Tracy LaMarca. VanSyckel is the daughter of Mary VanSyckel. Davda is the daughter of Mark and Louvena Davda. Franks is the son of Wade and Mary Jo Franks. Fang is the son of Mr. and Mrs. Frank Fang. Schober is the son of Brad and Faye Schober. On Saturday, June 23, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m., Park Seed will hold its annual Flower Day featuring guided tours of the nine-acre Trial Gardens by professional horticulturists, a seed sale, workshop, photography opportunities and plant sale. Several special-focus trial gardens are presented, including roses, container displays, and the prestigious All-America Selections trials. Park Seed is located at 3507 Cokesbury Road, Hodges, S.C. For more information, visit www.parkseed.com/flowerday. The TD Charitable Foundation, the charitable giving arm of TD Bank, donated $42,500 to nonprofit organizations in South Carolina from February through April 2012. As part of TD Bank’s commitment to giving back to the community, the TD Charitable Foundation awarded grants to nonprofit organizations that provide affordable housing, financial literacy and education and environmental programs in South Carolina. The South Carolina Council on Economic Education, specifically targeting school districts in the Upstate, was one of the organizations receiving funding. The South Carolina Council on Economic Education aims to improve students’ ability to manage money by conducting professional development programs for teachers. If you are sponsoring a community event, we want to share your news. Submit entries to: Spartanburg Journal, Community Briefs, 148 River St., Suite 120, Greenville, SC 29601 or e-mail: spartanburgcommunity@thespartanburgjournal.com


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JOURNAL COMMUNITY

LOVE LIFE! Go the d ista nce.

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12 SPARTANBURG JOURNAL | JUNE 22, 2012

In partnership with

Community Journals

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JOURNAL BUSINESS %

UNION 14.3%

ANDERSON 9.3%

D O O W % EN .4 RE 10

ABBEVILLE 10.6%

LAURENS 9.5%

G

The numbers on this map are based on the May 2012 report from the S.C. Department of Employment and Workforce.

NATIONAL JOBLESS RATE FOR MAY 2012: 8.2%

SPARTANBURG 9.5%

- 7.6

OCONEE 9.3%

LE NVIL GREE

PICKENS 8.5%

STATEWIDE JOBLESS RATE FOR MAY 2012: 9.1%

CHEROKEE 11.7%

By DICK HUGHES | contributor

State jobless rate creeps upward S.C. still doing better at job creation than neighboring states

Unemployment rose in May throughout the Upstate and in all but one county across the state, according to the S.C. Department of Employment and Workforce. Employment in the manufacturing sector, which had been a bright spot in growing jobs in South Carolina, appears to be slowing because of the problems dragging the economy in Europe, according to TD Economics. Statewide, the jobless rate rose from 8.8 percent in April to 9.1 percent in May, the first increase in the rate after 10 months of steady but modest decreases. South Carolina has the 45th highest jobless rate in the nation, but is holding its own or doing somewhat better in job creation than neighboring states.

TD Economics noted that “while the underlying pace of growth remains disappointing, South Carolina and Georgia registered solid gains in job creation in May. North Carolina, which had an unemployment rate of 9.4 percent, lost jobs.” According to the state Department of Employment and Workforce, South Carolina added 16,800 jobs to its workforce. In the main, the increase in unemployment was driven by an increase in the number of people actively looking for work. Unemployment jumped in Greenville County from 6.7 percent to 7.6 percent in May, but Greenville’s rate was the second JOBS continued on PAGE 14

S.C. gets development award By DICK HUGHES | contributor

Area Development, a leading magazine in economic development, has awarded South Carolina with it its 2012 Gold Shovel and Project of the Year awards. The Gold Shovel award recognizes the state’s overall economic development accomplishments. The project award is for enticing Continental Tire to invest $500 million in a tire plant in Sumter County, as well as expand its North American headquarters in Lexington County. The awards are made in four population categories. South Carolina was judged in the 3 to 5 million division. It was the second consecutive year the state has received a Gold Shovel. Contact Dick Hughes at dhughes@ thespartanburgjournal.com.

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JUNE 22, 2012 | SPARTANBURG 2/23/2012 JOURNAL 2:18:27 PM 13


JOURNAL BUSINESS

Wines of Spain By: Richard deBondt

Spain leads the world in acres of grapes, with over 2 million. Even though 97% of its grapes go into wine, it has never led in volume of wine production (France and Italy do). Ancient Spanish vines survive but give notoriously low yields. Since low production costs offset low yields, Spain gives good value for money. There are 88 Spanish “Protected Designations of Origen” usually indicated by the initials “DO” after the label’s place name. Most of Spain’s unique, exciting wines bear a “DO” denoting their home region. The green (relatively rainy) regions of the Northwest offer Spain’s most interesting white wines. From Galicia the names to search out are Rías Baixas, Ribeiro, and Valdeorras, whose crisp dry whites are commonly made from Albariño or Godello grapes. Basque country is famous for several variants of fresh spritzy Txakolina (Chacoli) made with Hondarrabi grapes. Rueda in Castilla y Leon also specializes in crisp dry white made from Verdejo grapes. Most Spanish regions excel with red wine, but none make it exclusively. Rioja, Spain’s most famous export, uses predominately Tempranillo grapes, blended with Graciano, Garnacha, and Mazuela. In Catalonia Penedes, Priorat, and Monsat make distinguished wines from various grapes traditional and modern (Cabernet and Merlot for example). Spread around the country, Jumilla, Ribera del Duero, Bierzo, Ribeira Sacra, and Navarra also offer distinctive reds. Cava, principally from Catalonia, is second only to French Champagne in world distribution of bottle-fermented sparkling wine. Grape types vary with regions and producers. Rosé Cava is a grand hot weather refresher. Every region here named has remarkable diversity. Regretably, many others have been omitted. The website www. winesfromspain.com maintained by the Spanish Institute for Foreign Trade is an excellent place to learn more. Richard deBondt founded Northampton Wines in Greenville in 1975. With his business partner David Williams, he oversees retail wine and restaurant operations, along with wine travel.

Northampton Wines www.northamptonwines.com 211-A East Broad Street • 271-3919 14 SPARTANBURG JOURNAL | JUNE 22, 2012

JOBS continued from PAGE 13

lowest in the state behind Lexington County’s 7.3. The rate in Spartanburg and Anderson counties rose a full percentage point to 9.5 and 9.2, respectively. Spartanburg unemployment increased by more than 1,300 people, the DEW reported, while the labor force added another 1,000 people. Employment decreased by 400 people. Pickens County, which consistently has the second lowest unemployment rate in the Upstate, experienced an increase of 1.1 percentage points to 8.5. Unemployment in Greenwood, Abbeville, Cherokee and Union was in double digits. Union’s jobless rate, which is the worst in the Upstate, was 14.3. State officials were encouraged that online job ads in South Carolina showed a small increase of about 600 ads from April to May, ac-

Jobless Rates in Upstate Counties May

April

May

County

2012

2012

2011

Greenville

7.6

6.7

8.2

Pickens

8.5

7.4

8.6

Anderson

9.3

8.2

9.7

Oconee

9.3

8.2

10.1

Spartanburg

9.5

8.5

10.4

Laurens

9.5

8.4

10.2

Greenwood

10.4

9.6

11.1

Abbeville

10.6

9.4

11.2

Cherokee

11.7

11.1

13.1

Union

14.3

13.4

15.5

South Carolina

9.3

8.8

10.4

cording to the Conference Board Help Wanted OnLine data series. Online ads in South Carolina were about 2,100 higher in May 2012 compared to a year ago. Abraham J. Turner, executive director of the Department of Employment and Workforce,

noted that South Carolina historically mirrors trends in the national rate, “and this month is no exception.” “Despite our unemployment rate edging up this month, more than 24,000 of our fellow citizens have found jobs in the past year,”

Turner said in a statement. “We are encouraged that people are entering the labor force searching for employment, and DEW continues to remain focused on putting South Carolinians back to work.” Nationally, unemployment

THE FINE PRINT BY DICK HUGHES

South Carolina Goes Out of State

The S.C. Department of Insurance has awarded a contract for licensing exam systems to a California firm, PSI. Under the five-year contract, PSI will develop testing for adjusters, appraisers, surplus line brokers and bail bondsmen. It will administer computer-based testing at centers in Greenville, Rock Hill, Aiken, Charleston, Columbia, Florence and Myrtle Beach. PSI has been doing similar work for real estate licensing for the S.C. Department of Labor, Licensing and Regulation since 2002.

Malaysian Company Expands

Genetec Global Technologies, a division of a Malaysian firm, will expand its Fountain Inn operations with a new automation center in Simpsonville. The company said it would invest $1.2 million and add 160 jobs. Dan Gehrman, vice president, said the “expansion will help augment our other businesses – Systems South in Fountain Inn and IP Systems in Denver.” The company said it would add sales, engineering and

assembly capabilities for providing custom automation equipment. It said it would use local companies for much of its machining and fabrication. Persons interested in applying for positions should email humanresources@gentecautomation.com. Genetec Global Technologies is a wholly owned subsidiary of Genetec Technology Berhad of Kuala Lumpur.

‘Cloud’ Provider Adds Data Center

Green Cloud, the Greenville startup providing cloud computing to small and medium businesses, is building its second data center and expanding marketing. The new data center will be in Nashville, Tenn. The company completed $2.7 million in financing to fund the expansion. The bulk of the financing came from an investment by Millry Corp., a family-owned telephone carrier serving southwestern Alabama. “This is another vote of confidence for Green Cloud’s strategy from a very savvy and experienced investor group,” said Shaler Houser, chief executive officer of Green Cloud. Green Cloud earlier raised $1.2 million in financing and expanded into coastal South Carolina and Georgia and into Tennessee.


ticked up to 8.2 percent in May from 8.1 in April. The number of people officially identified as unemployed rose statewide by 5,861 to 195,905 out of a workforce of 2.1 million. Greenville added 2,260 to its unemployment, and Spartanburg added 1,371. Only York County, which is benefiting from a spurt of economic growth as a suburb of Charlotte, N.C., saw a decrease in the jobless rate, from 10.8 to 9.8. Seventy-five percent of the job increases in the state were in trade, transportation and utilities; professional and business services; and leisure and hospitality. Manufacturing, which still leads the state year-to-date in job creation, lost 200 jobs in May. In its June review of economic activity, TD Economics, a division of TD Bank, said reports of manufacturing activity in the South Atlantic, including South Carolina, are mixed, but that signs reflect a slowing of exports to Europe as a result of the growing uncertainty there of stability. “After growing steadily throughout 2011, employment in durable-goods producing sectors has stagnated across the Carolinas in recent months,” the report said.

JOURNAL BUSINESS

“Despite our unemployment rate edging up this month, more than 24,000 of our fellow citizens have found jobs in the past year.” Abraham J. Turner, executive director of the Department of Employment and Workforce

The bank’s economists said another drag on manufacturing in the South Atlantic is the threat of cutbacks in defense spending by the Pentagon. The economists added, however, that Maryland and Virginia are more vulnerable to this because “federal defense procurements make up a sizeable portion of state output.” Contact Dick Hughes at dhughes@ thespartanburgjournal.com.

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Co-op site location announced By CHARLES SOWELL | staff

The Hub City Co-op has closed on a site for the city’s first food cooperative at the old Frank Hall Tire Store at 176 N. Liberty St., in downtown Spartanburg, co-op officials announced this week. The co-op signed a lease with Champion Investment Corp. and will be allowed six months to raise the money needed to start up the food store. The fundraising campaign is set to start in the fall and the store is planned to open in 2013. “The look and feel of the store will truly reflect our community’s interests and provide the local, wholesome food items we travel out of town to purchase,” Hub City Co-op Board Chair Erin Ouzts told reporters. “This is an important milestone in our quest for Spartanburg to be the first community in South Carolina to organize and open a cooperatively owned retail food store.” The Hub City Co-op has leased the top floor, which comprises 7,800 square feet of the 12,000-square-foot

building. The location is walkable from many downtown landmarks and residences. “Over the past year, the Hub City Co-op Site Development work group and Startup Board took the necessary steps to ensure the site selected offered the highest potential for success,” said Tim Meade, Hub City Co-op board member and site development work group member. “We evaluated potential sites, coordinated preliminary design plans with McMillan Pazdan Smith, collected up-fit estimates from Clayton Construction Co., commissioned a market analysis from G2G Research Group, received legal advice from Nodine Law, prepared numerous pro forma financial statements and negotiated the lease with the site owner.” An architect will soon be selected for exterior design work. The Hub City Co-op currently has 480 owners who shelled out $150 each. Contact Charles Sowell at csowell@ thespartanburgjournal.com.

JUNE 22, 2012 | SPARTANBURG JOURNAL 15


JOURNAL SKETCHBOOK

JOURNAL SKETCHBOOK Spartanburg native explores relationship between man-made and natural worlds By CINDY LANDRUM | staff

AVAILABLE JUNE 23RD

AVAILABLE JUNE 26TH

By the time he had spent two hours at Bald Rock near Caesar’s Head State Park, Matthew Harrison had collected five or six trash bags full of beer cans, soda bottles and other garbage. “It amazes me. People go out to nature to get away from the urban settings but once they get there, they trash nature so it looks like an urban setting,” said the Spartanburg native. Harrison uses his art – paintings and assemblage sculptures – to explore the relationship between man-made items and the natural world. He combines cast-off items such as wood screws, drill parts and other things he finds discarded on trash day with items found in nature – bamboo roots, acorns and cicada shells – in his work that features representations of the human spirit. Harrison’s art can be seen in an exhibi-

“Apocalypse Demon” by Matt Harrison

tion at the Sandor Teszler Library Gallery at Wofford College through Aug. 17. “Matt Harrison’s works dance with vibrant primary colors and with a hefty dose of darker emotional tones,” said Oakley Coburn, director of cultural affairs and dean of the library at Wofford. “His assem-

blage sculptures often seem aggressive in their need to speak to the viewer.” For instance, Coburn said Harrison’s “Apocalypse Demon” bares a mouth filled with red-painted wood screw teeth. A tongue of cast-off cicada shells drifts out of the side of the mouth. There’s

Local grads receive scholarship from Chapman Local high school graduates Chelsea Chao and Micayla Ross recently received $1,000 Mary Wheeler Davis Scholarships awarded by the Chapman Cultural Center. Annually, the Cultural Center awards these scholarships to local graduating seniors who will pursue college degrees in the visual or performing arts. The scholarship’s namesake, Mary Wheeler Davis, was a Charleston native and the wife of Dr. William Davis. The memorial scholarship program was established in 1989 by Davis’s family. Chao is a 2012 graduate of Oakbrook Preparatory School with a career interest in the visual arts. She hopes to attend

16 SPARTANBURG JOURNAL | JUNE 22, 2012

either Converse College or Winthrop University to study either art therapy or graphic design. Ross is a 2012 graduate of Dorman High School with a career interest in music and business. She has received numerous awards for her work as a cellist. She hopes to attend Furman University and double major in music and business administration. This scholarship will be continued for the 2012-13 school year and students are encouraged to investigate the application process. The exact deadline has not been set at this time, but will be early spring 2013. For more information, call 864278-9693 or email ahughes@spartanarts.org.


a head of a garden hoe embedded in the side of the demon’s head. “While initially unsettling, such works suggest a wide range of human emotions and invite exploration of the disparate elements recombined in fresh ways,” Coburn said. Harrison said the demons in his work have nothing to do with Satan or evil. “I wanted to exude the large human emotions everyone is capable of having,” he said. “Sometimes when people face their fear, it’s not a fear any more.” Harrison also said the pieces are meant to encourage viewers to think deeper than first appearances. “Because something is unattractive on the outside doesn’t mean it should be automatically discounted,” he said. Harrison graduated from the University of South Carolina Spartanburg in 2002 with a degree in English. He’s worked in sales and delivery and has traveled widely, including a month backpacking alone in Spain and Portugal. Harrison, who lives in Seneca, is now doing coursework at Greenville Technical College to get certified in teaching English as a Second Language. He hopes to pursue a teaching career overseas so he can continue to travel and explore the world and seek out new forms of inspiration for his art.

JOURNAL SKETCHBOOK

SO YOU KNOW

U P S T A T E

DINING

Who: Matthew Harrison What: An exhibition of his paintings and assemblage sculptures

See what you’ve been missing

Where: Wofford College’s Sandor Teszler Library Gallery

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Harrison has no formal art training. He credits Kris Neely, a Spartanburg artist who holds Pop-Up Art Gallery events at his WetPaintSyndrome studio, and David McPherson, an artist and English teacher at Spartanburg Day School, for getting him started in art. “I’ve always had an interest in art and the different genres,” Harrison said. Using found man-made objects and natural items in his art is, well, natural, he said. “I’m a recycle freak, for one thing, and a nature enthusiast, so it all fits.” This is Harrison’s first exhibition. Contact Cindy Landrum at clandrum@thespartanburgjournal.com.

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journal sketchbook

scene. here.

the week in the local arts world

Young campers can learn what life was like for the Upstate’s first settlers during Walnut Grove Plantation’s Camp Colonial: A Living History Camp on June 26-28. Campers will tour the plantation while learning about the region’s Native Americans, early farming methods, fur trading, and shelter building. Planned activities include building a model wattle-and-daub house, assisting with garden chores, writing with quill feathers, and more. Each day focuses on different phases of settlement and aspects of daily life. Camp Colonial will be at Walnut Grove Plantation, 1200 Otts Shoals Road in Roebuck. Camp is open to children ages 8-12 and will be held 9 a.m. to noon each day. The cost is $60 per child and registration is required. Contact Zac Cunningham at 864-576-6546 or walnutgrove@spartanburghistory.org.

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That Awkward Stage, a teenage theatre troupe from Greenville, will present an original musical, “Composed in Memories,� at the Chapman Cultural Center on Friday, July 6, at 7 p.m. and Saturday, July 7, at 2 and 7 p.m. Written and directed by 17-year-old Cara Lisa Franz, the story is about two teenagers’ unspoken love for each other and how they cope with acknowledging their love after the young man loses his memory in a car accident. All music and songs in the play were composed and written by Vincent Lovetro. Both the writer/director and the musical director are seniors in high school. All actors and stagehands are also teenagers. This is That Awkward Stage’s third production, utilizing only teenage talent in all phases of producing a play. The leading roles will be played by 19-year-old Michael Joseph “Mike J� McCall as Evan and 15-year-old Mea Abrahams, a rising sophomore at James F. Byrnes High School, as Allison. Tickets are $15 for adults and $10 for students. For more information or to buy tickets, please call 864-542-ARTS or visit www. chapmanculturalcenter.org.

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Marvin Hamlisch, one of the world’s greatest living composers, will perform at Spartanburg’s Chapman Cultural Center on Tuesday, June 26, at 8 p.m. as a benefit for The Spartanburg Little Theatre. As a composer, Hamlisch has won three Oscars, four Grammys, four Emmys, a Tony and three Golden Globe awards. He has written music for Broadway shows like “A Chorus Line,� “They’re Playing Our Song,� and “The Goodbye Girl� in addition to motion picture scores. Tickets are $40 ($30 for Little Theatre season members), and a complete sellout of the 500 seats is expected. Call 864-542-ARTS or visit www.chapmanculturalcenter.org for information or tickets. Spartanburg was at the center of auto racing in its infancy and is still home to many of the legends of the sport. From now until September 1, the Spartanburg Regional History Museum at the Chapman Cultural Center will present an exhibit featuring numerous artifacts and trophies, and showcase the development of the many branches of the auto racing industry. The museum is open Tuesday-Saturday, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. and cost is $4 for adults, $3 for seniors and veterans, and $2 for kids. For more information, call 864-542-ARTS or visit www.chapmanculturalcenter.org. Send us your arts announcement. E-mail: spartanburgarts@thespartanburgjournal.com

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986 E. Lakeshore Drive • Landrum, SC MOUNTAIN LAKE HOME with DEEP WATER DOCK in place with 224 feet on the water. BEAUTIFUL LAKE HOME! Completed in 2004 with separate living areas for friends, family, or rental income. Upstairs has 3 bedrooms, 2 full baths, kitchen, large living area with hardwoods, 1778 sq ft, and private deck overlooking lake. Downstairs has 2 bedrooms, 1 bath, private kitchen, large living area with hardwoods, 1778 sq ft, and private deck overlooking the lake.

JUST REDUCED TO $429,900 For more information, contact: Thomco Properties 864.505.6361

C62R

Stillwaters of Lake Robinson, Taylors As a private, gated community, Stillwaters of Lake Robinson has a wide variety of unique natural and planned amenities. There are many things to do here; from walking trails and botanical gardens to canoeing on the lake or swimming in our Clubhouse Pool. At Stillwaters, we have created a resort-style life for you on beautiful Lake Robinson, in the shadow of the Blue Ridge Mountains. Within the gates of Stillwaters, you will experience a wonderful balance between architectural consistency and individual taste. At Stillwaters, you have

R EA L E STAT E T R A N SAC T I O N S JANUARY

26-31,

2012

SUBD.

PRICE

SELLER

BUYER

ADDRESS

SPRINGLAKE HIGH POINT FARMS THORN COVE GLENLAKE DILLARD CREEK CROSSING SADDLEBROOK TWIN LAKES COVE BRADFORD CROSSING DILLARD CREEK CROSSING DEYOUNG MEADOWS MOTLOW CREEK EQUESTRIAN FARMS HILLBROOK FOREST SWEETWATER HILLS SHADY GROVE HILLS STONEWOOD CROSSING MANDYS MEADOW LIGHTWOOD FARM QUAIL RIDGE STONELEDGE JAMES CREEK VANDERBILT HILLS E Z HEIGHTS

$420,000 $420,000 $315,000 $231,902 $225,835 $207,000 $187,500 $181,900 $180,000 $179,500 $167,000 $160,000 $135,000 $120,000 $119,900 $115,000 $112,000 $110,000 $101,500 $88,500 $88,000 $87,000

SPROUSE, CLARY CAMP, ROYCE D KOZLOWSKI, DEREK S NVR INC S C PILLON HOMES INC JULAZADEH, HAMMOOD BASSANO, LENA A GREEN, MICHAEL J BRAASCH BUILDING GROUP LLC SUNCREST HOMES LLC HALLMAN, DAVID M PATTERSON, JOHN CHRISTOPHER HORNE, CHRISTOPHER T CLOSTER, SETH E COLEMAN, DELORIS CAROL SUNCREST HOMES LLC BARONE, JOSHUA S MARTIN, JOHN J DEYOUNG, JEFFERY D HSBC MORTGAGE SERVICES INC HICKLIN, MARVIN SODEN, RALPH E

US BANK NATIONAL ASSOCIATION CHOLAK, PAVEL MASON, RICHARD A FULLER, LUCOSI I KEITH, DAVID A COLLINS JR, GLENN D ALLEN, MATTHEW G DEUTSCHE BANK S C PILLON HOMES INC HOLOWACH, JACOB MCCARTY, LON C MOYER, ROBERT B WILKINS, BOBBY S PETROLITE, GINA M CARINI, DIANE ECHEVERRI, JOSE OMAR GALLINA, GREGORY T GOODE, RANDY G CARDIN, JEREMY T KRIZ, SUSANNE H FOREMAN, ALAN BRANNON, ELIZABETH V

180 LONGLEAF DR 135 PASTORALE DR 590 THORN COVE DR 520 INNER BANKS RD 342 HARKINS BLUFF DR 220 SADDLEBROOK DR 108 HYMARKE DR 121 BRADFORD CROSSING DR 372 HARKINS BLUFF DR 124 DEYOUNG MEADOWS DR 297 STABLE GATE DR 455 RANSDELL DR 420 N SWEETWATER HILLS DR 176 ALBUS DR 667 BRANCH VIEW DR 423 MANDYS MEADOW DR 233 LIGHTWOOD FARM RD 430 QUAIL RIDGE CIR 131 STONELEDGE DR 147 STOCKBRIDGE DR 312 FARNSWORTH RD 22 LEE ST

SPECIAL TO THE JOURNAL


journal sketchbook

the week in photos

look who’s in the journal this week

Photos by Greg Beckner / Staff

Spartanburg Parks’ summer campers got a chance to get close to giraffes while on a visit to the Lazy 5 Ranch in Mooresville, N.C., as part of Crazy Critter Week.

Bob Meeske, right, reaches out with his hand and foot from the rail during the Ballet Spartanburg’s Parkinson’s dance class.

Ballet Spartanburg Artistic Director Carlos Agudelo leads the Parkinson’s dance class in one of the dance studios at the Chapman Cultural Center. The class is designed to help Parkinson’s patients with movement by gradually increasing the dance movements from a seated position to a standing position.

Ballet Spartanburg Artistic Director Carlos Agudelo begins the class with arm movements from a seated position. The final dance class of the season met recently. The twice-monthly classes are held the second and fourth Thursdays of the month; a new class starts again in September.

Patricia Crisan provides music for the Parkinson’s dance class.

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Crossword puzzle: page 22

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The finale of the dance class is a group dance that comes together in the center of the studio.

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Sudoku puzzle: page 22

JUNE 22, 2012 | SPARTANBURG Journal 21


journal sketchbook

figure. this. out.

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Across 1 Pay to see cards 5 He played Senator Vinick on “The West Wing” 9 “Ma! (He’s Making Eyes __)”: 1921 song 13 Urge forward 18 B&O part 19 Mistake 21 Marina feature 22 Mazda two-seater 23 Not a waste of time carving? 26 Anti-apartheid author Alan 27 Art in a park 28 Noticed 29 Union chapter 31 “Star Trek” spinoff, briefly 32 Alway 33 Jupiter, to Saturn 34 Tendency toward disorder 36 Tinker Bell’s blabbing? 42 Screenplays 45 “Not __ eye in ...” 46 Busy IRS mo. 47 __ Team 50 Frome of fiction 51 Farm spread 52 Type of daisy 54 Be of use 57 Name whose Japanese symbols mean “ocean child” 58 Foul-smelling 60 Municipal mascot? 64 Revival prefix

65 Political theorist Hannah 67 First skipper? 68 Run-down urban dwelling 70 Not quite closed 72 Blade 75 Sushi bar soup 76 Amount so far 80 Whom Cordelia called “As mad as the vex’d sea” 82 “Maybe later” 86 It has a Bklyn. campus 87 Pane in an infested attic? 91 27-day pope of 1605 92 __’acte 94 Range rover 95 Blue shoe material of song 97 Limo passenger, often 98 Place and Kett 100 Flight units 103 Moo goo __ pan 104 “Smooth Operator” singer 105 Eponymous microbiologist Louis 108 Lollipop for a dog? 111 Most cherished 114 “Norma __” 115 Previously 116 “Color me surprised” 118 Airbus A380, vis-àvis most other planes 119 Bond foe 121 Clumsy mistakes

125 Breakfast cereal prefix 127 Butterfly? 130 Franny’s title brother, in a Salinger novella 131 Support girder 132 Yes-Bob link 133 Italian peak 134 Pre-deal round 135 Silent yeses 136 Comes out with 137 Retinal cells

Down 1 Intimidates 2 “There’ll be __ time ...” 3 Old Sicilian coin 4 Hard-to-win game 5 Like net income 6 __-di-dah 7 Club charges 8 Angels’ div. 9 On-target 10 Best-seller list datum 11 Juicy gourd 12 Raises 13 Plead with 14 “O patria __”: “Aida” aria 15 Duke’s Droid? 16 Thames school 17 Kent’s Smallville sweetie 20 It’s periodically rung out 24 “The Kingfish” Long of early 20th-century politics

25 __ tube 30 Circle piece 35 Sympathetic sorrow 36 Farmer Al __: Paul Terry toon 37 Like __ in the headlights 38 Boiling

Hard

39 In __: miffed 40 Check for fit 41 Burn the surface of 43 Hoodwinked 44 Schnozzola 48 Prefix with fauna 49 Quarterback Hasselbeck

52 Pin money source 53 Furry sci-fi creature 55 Gossip page pair 56 Colleague of Trotsky 59 __ the finish 61 Turkic flatbread 62 Hot dog topping 63 Do some cobbling on 66 Cheerios 69 Dust speck 71 Band with the 2010 album “Infestation” 73 Wetland 74 St. Louis’s __ Bridge 76 Catch some z’s 77 Utah’s __ Mountains 78 Where smoking remnants are stored? 79 P.O. deliveries 81 Coloring cosmetic 83 Evans’s news partner 84 Nitrous __ 85 Drop remover 88 China’s Sun __-sen 89 Forks in the road 90 Have on 93 Assess 96 Neutralizes, as a bomb 99 Shipping routes 101 Hidden 102 Rude looks 104 Moped’s cousin 106 Rhody the Ram’s sch. 107 Brightly colored perch 109 Court activity 110 Fruit with a wrinkly rind 112 __-Croatian 113 Traction aid 116 Mideast strip 117 Tar Heel State university 120 Another, in Ávila 122 Bart and Lisa’s bus driver 123 Await judgment 124 Ladies in Mex. 126 Half a bray 128 PT separators 129 Enchanted

Crossword answers: page 21

Sudoku answers: page 21


JOURNAL SKETCHBOOK

IN MY OWN WORDS WITH COURTNEY TOLLISON, PH.D.

Harvey Gantt’s groundbreaking courage Fifty years ago, a young man from Charleston named Harvey Gantt boldly arrived on the campus of Clemson College. Gantt had applied for enrollment into the college for the fall of 1961, and after his application was returned, Gantt reiterated his desire to enroll in either the spring or fall 1962 semesters. When that request did not progress, Gantt travelled to the campus to meet with Clemson registrar Kenneth Vickery, because no one with his skin color had ever been admitted. Like many pathbreakers, such as Rosa Parks of Montgomery, Ala., Gantt was a trained activist who had organized a sit-in at a segregated lunch counter in Charleston as a member of the NAACP Youth. He and many of his classmates worked under the direction of the “grandmother of the American civil rights movement,” Septima Clarke, who also helped train Rosa Parks and for whom the Crosstown in Charleston is named. Gantt was familiar with the leaders of the civil rights movement, and knew what it would take to challenge the institution’s racial barriers. In 1963, every state in the country except South Carolina had desegregated at least one of its institutions of higher education. Gantt’s actions represent an important milestone in our state’s history of race relations and evolution towards equal accessibility to higher education. After that conversation on campus in June 1962, Gantt and his supporters

took legal action in early July. Gantt’s attorney was Matthew Perry, for whom a federal courthouse in Columbia is named. Perry received support from NAACP attorneys in Greenville and New York, including Constance Baker Motley, who was simultaneously serving as James Meredith’s attorney in his lawsuit to gain court-ordered admittance into Ole Miss. The case travelled through the judicial process. In the meantime, civic and political leaders throughout the state began to prepare the public for changes in the state’s racial climate. That fall, James Meredith matriculated by court order into the University of Mississippi. Knowing the time when we would desegregate was likely nearing, South Carolinians watched in horror as National Guardsmen, students and protestors collided in what historian C. Vann Woodward later referred to as “an insurrectionary assault on officers and soldiers of the United States government and the most serious challenge to the Union since the Civil War.” South Carolinians – white and black – hoped to avoid that type of drama and violence. Gov. Hollings was adamant that he would not obstruct any court order, and encouraged the state to behave as a “government of laws, and not a government of men.” That fall, the head of South Carolina’s Law Enforcement Division (SLED) traveled to Ole Miss to research the security measures that failed when Meredith enrolled. Upon his return, he crafted what

was considered the most extensive security plan our state had ever organized. In January 1963, Gantt won a court order admitting him into Clemson. He matriculated later that month and began classes. The national news media flocked to the campus for the day of his arrival, fully expecting another Ole Miss. Nothing of the sort happened. It was, in the end, described as a “nonevent.” One news reporter from New Jersey said, “I expected blood, and all I got was cream puff.” As anticipated as it was, however, and contrary to popular belief, the desegregation of Clemson College was not the first time the color line had been broken in the state’s institutions of higher education. During the Reconstruction era that began after the Civil War, the University of South Carolina was fully integrated, with African-American professors and students. That came to an end in 1877, when the experiment of Reconstruction ended and white South Carolinians threw themselves wholeheartedly into a period known in history as Redemption. Throughout World War II, the Methodist-affiliated Columbia College allowed African-American servicemen from Fort Jackson to take classes in the evening alongside the white women enrolled. In the summer of 1962, the now-defunct Our Lady of Mercy Junior College in Charleston, which had a relationship with the Catholic University of America in Washington, D.C., accepted

10 African-American students into its summer program. After desegregation at Clemson, three African American students similarly engaged in a lawsuit to gain admittance into the University of South Carolina. They also won their case, and USC was court-ordered to desegregate in the fall of 1963. Wofford College (1964) and Furman University (1965) followed without court order, but not without controversy within their affiliated denominational institutions. And what happened to Harvey Gantt? During his second year, he developed a romantic interest in Clemson’s second African American student, Lucinda Brawley, whom he married in 1964. He graduated with honors, earned a master’s degree from MIT, and established a successful architectural firm in Charlotte. Gantt was elected and served as mayor of Charlotte in the 1980s, and in the 1990s, was appointed by President Clinton to serve as chair of the national Capital Planning Commission. He has remained loyal to Clemson, teaching classes and visiting the university for milestones related to his groundbreaking efforts. The university’s intercultural center is named for Harvey and Lucinda Gantt, and the legacy of his actions extends far beyond. Dr. Courtney Tollison is Assistant Professor of History at Furman and Museum Historian at the Upcountry History Museum.

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FOOD WILL BE AVAILABLE from Quaker Steak & Lube Contact: David Hammond at 864-683-1667 PO Box 700, Laurens, SC 29360

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June 22, 2012 Spartanburg Journal  

Weekly newspaper with, for, and about Spartanburg, South Carolina. Published by Community Journals.

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