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PLACEMAKING

Challenges + Opportunities in Metro Nashville


PLACEMAKING

Challenges + Opportunities in Metro Nashville

This book was prepared by the Nashville Civic Design Center and designed and written by T.K. Davis, Professor at the University of Tennesseee, Knoxville, College of Architecture + Design; Nashville Civic Design Center; Callie Rushton and Josh Murray, Nashville Civic Design Center interns. This book was edited by Gary Gaston, Executive Director, Nashville Civic Design Center; as well as Michael Skipper, Executive Director, and Michelle Lacewell, Deputy Director of the Nashville Area Metropolitan Planning Organization. The Nashville Civic Design Center would like to give special thanks to TK Davis and the UTK CoAD students for their contributions to the content of this publication. The mission of the Nashville Civic Design Center is to

elevate the quality of Nashville’s built environment and to promote public participation in the creation of a more beautiful and functional city for all. Towards this end, the Nashville Civic Design Center: Promotes the Ten Principles of The Plan of Nashville, a vision for growth and development, created and endorsed by the citizens of Nashville; Educates the public about civic design through lectures by prominent speakers and workshops; Provides professional staff and highly-qualified design interns to consult on civic and other community development projects; Facilitates public dialogue about civic design and its impact through the Urban Design Forum. The Forum meets monthly at the Civic Design Center, provides events, lectures and an open forum for the debate of ideas and issues of interest to its members; Researches and publishes reports on various civic design issues.

www.civicdesigncenter.org January 2016


Introduction

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Precedents

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Directors Park, Portland, Oregon Alley Network Project, Seattle, Washington Pedregulho Housing, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil De Moines Regional Skate Park, De Moines, Iowa

UTK CoAD Partnership

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Student Proposals

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Conclusions + Implementation

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Acknowledgements

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Historic Music Row by Michael Frush + Brad Herr Nashville’s Alleyway System by Brandon Litton + Michael Stone Nolensville Pike - Community Center by Anthony Dienst + Royal Starr Davidson Street Corridor by Catherine Dozier + Mathew Smith

Local Happenings Tool Box

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INTRODUCTION


INTRODUCTION

The Project for Public Spaces, on their organization’s web site, asks “what if we built our communities around places?” They then go on to define Placemaking as “both an overarching idea and a hands-on approach for improving a neighborhood, city, or region, Placemaking inspires people to collectively reimagine and reinvent public spaces as the heart of every community. Strengthening the connection between people and the places they share, Placemaking refers to a collaborative process by which we can shape our public realm in order to maximize shared value. More than just promoting better urban design, Placemaking facilitates creative patterns of use, paying particular attention to the physical, cultural, and social identities that define a place and support its ongoing evolution.”

A final charge to the studio was to ask the following question: how do proposed spaces relate to the existing urban environment? Proposals were to consider existing streets and open space, blocks, lots, and buildings. Spaces were to be appropriately designed and to relate well to existing neighborhoods, with a sensitivity given to existing scale, height requirements, frontage, existing setbacks, etc. While preservation of all historic properties was assumed, recommendations for adaptive re-use were encouraged. In essence, each team was to articulate a rationale for how to develop the site. T.K. davis Professor University of Tennessee, Knoxville College of Architecture and Design

Each team asked the questions “could the spaces proposed improve pedestrian, bicycle, and street connectivity? Could they maintain and/or strengthen street and/or bike and pedestrian connections depending on the site?” The intent was to promote walkable, bike-friendly environments and access to transit, with particular attention to providing connections between the proposed spaces and surrounding neighborhoods. With this in mind, the theme of culturally influenced “Placemaking” in Greater Nashville was suggested as a topic of study for our design studio by the Metro Planning Department. The studio worked in teams of two students per site, with four sites selected by Metro Planning.

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Image source: City of Portland

Image source: Alley Network Project

Image source: ArchDaily Brazil

Image source: California Skateparks

PRECEDENTS


PRECEDENTS

Director Park Austin, TX

Laurie Olin + ZGF Architects

Alley Network Project Seattle, Washington

City of Seattle + local designers

Pedregulho Housing Affonso Eduardo Reidy

Des Moines Regional Skate Park Des Moines, Iowa California Skateparks

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Director Park Times Square Tower Concept, NYC, NY, Machado Silvetti

Portland, Oregon Laurie Olin + ZGF Architects City Gate, Romania, Westfourth Architecture

Portland’s Park Blocks are some of the oldest parks in the city; they were platted for public use in the late 1840s by Daniel H. Lownsdale and William Williams Chapman. While their original concept to create 25 contiguous public blocks for parks, schools or public markets extending north to south was not fully realized, the existing 18 blocks remain a defining element of our city. As the city developed around them, each block took on its own unique character.

Image source: City of Portland

The 19th block, Director Park, has been a decade in the making. It was made possible through generous donations from the Thomas P. Moyer family and Jordan Director Schnitzer in partnership with the Portland Parks Foundation, as well as funding from the City of Portland and the Portland Development Commission’s South Park Blocks Urban Renewal Area.

Directors Park, Portland, OR, Laurie Olin + ZGF Architects

PRECEDENT ANALYSIS

“My grandparents, Simon and Helen Director, were part of a generation of immigrants whose hard work helped build this city. Simon Director (1891-1981) was born in Wildlife Crossing, Netherlands, Highway A50 of Chartoriysk. He arrived in the small Russian village Portland in 1910 and began work as a butcher. Helen Holtzman (1900-1976) was born in Warsaw, Poland. She arrived in Portland in 1915 and that same year met and married my grandfather. They had three daughters, June, Ruth, and Arlene. Simon and Helen Director served their community with distinction, paving the way for their children and grandchildren and for generations to come. This park honors their memory and that of their generation in the hope that those who follow will continue their efforts to make Portland the wonderful city that we call home.”

PRECEDENTS


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Images source: City of Portland


Alley Network Project Seattle, Washington

The Alley Network Project draws on the energy and ideas of neighbors, businesses, colleagues and community groups to transform Pioneer Square’s alleys into one of its unrivaled assets. Alleys offer the opportunity for Pioneer Square to boost healthy activity on its streets, feed its vibrant arts culture, and draw people to local businesses.

Image source: Alley Network Project

Why Alleys? The Neighborhood’s Advantage. The scale of the buildings, narrow alley passageways and architecture make Pioneer Square alleys visually alluring. A study conducted by Copenhagen-based Gehl Architects, considered world-leaders at placemaking, identified Seattle alleys as having the potential to be great pedestrian spaces. Neighborhood Enthusiasm. Neighborhood residents and businesses also recognize the potential. Numerous alley activation efforts have sprouted up in Pioneer Square. Since 2008, more than 5,000 people attended alley events, University of Washington students devoted hundreds of hours to design work, and the City of Seattle Neighborhood Matching Funds program and Historic South Downtown awarded funding for installations and events.

Text source: Alley Network Project, 2010 http://alleynetworkproject.com/sample-page/

PRECEDENTS

A Unified Effort. The Project unites people and efforts to capitalize on Pioneer Square’s pedestrian-friendly streetscape. By leveraging funds from government, private foundations, and local businesses and tying together a wide variety of people-public space experts, community organizers, marketing professionals and students-Pioneer Square is jointly problem solving and creating great public spaces.


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Images source: Alley Network Project


Pedregulho Housing Development Rio de Janeiro, Brazil Affonso Eduardo Reidy

Image source: ArchDaily Brazil

The Pedregulho Housing Development in Rio de Janeiro was designed by Affonso Reidy and inaugurated in 1952 to serve low-income worker housing for people arriving from rural regions of Brazil. The development includes three housing blocks (one curvilinear and two modern rectilinear forms), a school with a gymnasium and pool, a health center and an open green space. Pedregulho was premised on the idea that transitioning from rural to urban life required services and facilities beyond just housing. Pedregulho was one of several early projects that translated and subsequently modified European modernism according to the technical capacities of Brazil as it transitioned into an industrial society. The image illustrates the relationship between the intermediary entry level of the curvilinear block and the adjacent São Cristovão neighborhood. Coupled with the free façade of glass and pilotis, the intermediary level serves as a visual, social and circulatory mediator between the diverse spaces that comprise life in Pedregulho.

Text source: Kristine Stiphany School of Architecture, University of Texas, Austin

PRECEDENTS

Still a pioneering project, Pedregulho challenges the singular focus on housing that remains characteristic of conventional social housing development. By integrating broader programs such as education, health and leisure, Pedregulho established the notion that life advancement requires access to a range of social resources in close proximity.


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Images source: ArchDaily Brazil


Des Moines Regional Skate Park

The Des Moines Regional Skatepark Committee and California Skateparks collaborated to create a worldclass skatepark in Des Moines, Iowa that is set to be the largest open park in the nation totaling more than 65,000 Sq. Ft. The city of Des Moines donated a beautiful parcel of land located along the Des Moines River adjacent to School St. and 2nd Ave. The park will be built over the existing West River Drive and incorporate an extension of the Principal Riverwalk, giving pedestrians an option to travel through the passive part of the skatepark. The nearby pedestrian bridge spanning the river adds an additional element to the setting, enhancing the interest of the skatepark’s location. The bridge will also serve as another route to the skatepark from downtown. Centrally located to downtown and the freeway, the Des Moines Regional skatepark will be a welcome addition to the network of parks in the city. Design inspiration was gathered from plazas and architecture found around the world. The clover bowl and kidney pool are reminiscent of all the influence from backyard pools and 70’s style snake runs. At a base level, the skate plaza is intended to provide safe, fun and challenging opportunities for skate­boarders and spectators alike. The plaza terrain maintains a focus on modern street/plaza and elements with an orientation towards beginner through advanced level users of all ages. Design con­siderations also address the opportunity for users to grow and progress in their skills. The park has the ability to host a variety of events including demos, competitions and concerts. Attention has been given to incorporating a safe pedestrian walkway and inviting viewing/socializing areas.

PRECEDENTS

Image source: California Skateparks

Des Moines, Iowa California Skateparks

The entire skatepark was heavily influenced by the existing topography of the land and the water tables. The design also responds to the powerful currents of the river. Text source: Des Moines Regional Skatepark Committee, 2015 http://desmoinesregionalskatepark.com/the-plan/


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Images source: California Skateparks


UTK CoAD Partnership

Because this investigation was tied closely to the NashvilleNext initiative, the “blue sky” timeline was correspondingly assumed to be 2040. These design proposals were also assumed to be multi-block, and assumed incremental development over time or whole development, in either case encouraged by form-based codes. The four sites chosen for study were Music Row, Nashville’s Alleyways, Nolensville Pike (around the Mariachi Plaza Community Center), and the Davidson Street Corridor (with an emphasis on artisan housing and riverfront development). After an initial visit to all four sites, the studio engaged in an exercise to answer the following question: “What are the strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats related to developing each site in the coming 25 years, consistent with the NashvilleNext Final Recommendations, that call for diverse housing affordability, accessibility for all, quality open space, comprehensive connectivity, sensitivity to context, and incorporation of “Missing Middle Housing?”

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B

D

A

C

STUDENT PROPOSALS


STUDENT PROPOSALS A

Michael Frush + Brad Herr

B

Brandon Litton + Michael Stone

C

Anthony Dienst + Royal Starr

D

Catherine Dozier + Mathew Smith

Historic Music Row The Music Industry Coalition and National Trust for Historic Preservation currently are conducting a study to identify the historic value of Nashville’s Music Row. Planning staff is following up with an urban design plan in the Fall of 2016 to determine how Music Row will grow in the future. This could open up a possibility to investigate public space and appropriate builing typologies that could be used in conjunction with the urban design plan.

Nashville’s Alleyway System The downtown alleyways serve multiple purposes: Metro alleyway is currently being converted into a pedestrian-only alley; Printer’s Alley and the alley way adjacent to the Ryman Auditorium have obvious historic value. But how do the downtown alleyways exist as a larger system for pedestrian passageways and connnections to significant public spaces and buildings? Is this an opportunity for “tactical urbanism?”

Plaza Mariachi - Community Center This is a suburban area that lacks a sense of place. This area is in need of an urban design and development scenario that reflects the context of the area and the needs of the community.

Shelby Landing - Artist Housing This is also an area that could benefit from artisan/ maker housing. The site is the Davidson Street Corridor between Cumberland Park and Shelby Bottoms Park. Fronting is on the Cumberland River, but the site therefore contains inherent floodplain challenges.

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Music Row

Michael Frush + Brad Herr

VIEW TOWARDS MUSIC ROW + QUARTER CIR

The Music Row site is bounded by the I-40/65 Interstate to the east, Wedgewood Avenue to the west, the 16th and 17th Avenue corridors of Music Row, and the general area known as Midtown south of Broadway. Concurrently with the studio’s work, the Music Industry Coalition and National Trust for Historic Preservation was conducting a study to identify this areas historic building inventory and value, with the Metro Planning Department to follow up with an urban design plan to determine how Music Row will grow in the future. This study was initiated in response to the threat confronting Music Row, demolition to make room for new, out-of-scale development of buildings.

TUNING MUSIC ROW

The studio referenced the music industry’s strong identity, and the skyline views of downtown, as assets for Music Row and Midtown. The existing tree canopy of 16th and 17th Avenues, complemented by the absence of street utilities (which are confined to the alleyways) is also a strength. Proximity to the Vanderbilt and Belmont campuses, as well as the interstate, are also positive circumstances. Unfortunately, the extensive parking lots of automotive dealerships significantly diminish the pedestrian experience of Midtown.

NASHVILLE’S HISTORIC MUSIC ROW NEIGHBORHOOD THE MUSIC ROW NEIGHBORHOOD OF NASHVILLE IS KNOWN FOR ITS MUSICAL IDENTITY AND CONTRIBUTION TO MUSIC CITY. THE ROW CONSISTS OF 16TH AND 17TH STREETS SOUTH, NAMED MUSIC SQUARE EAST AND MUSIC SQUARE WEST RESPECTIVELY. HISTORICALLY, THE ROW BEGAN WHEN MUSICAL ARTISTS AND BROTHERS OWEN AND HAROLD BRADLEY MOVED THEIR MUSIC STUDIO TO AN ADAPTIVELY REUSED FAMILY HOME. THE SUCCESS OF THE “NASHVILLE SOUND” ASSOCIATED WITH THE BRADLEY BROTHERS INFLUENCED RECORDING STUDIOS TO BEGIN THEIR TRANSITION TO THE NEIGHBORHOOD. STUDIOS BEGAN REUSING FAMILY HOMES AS BUSINESSES CREATING A UNIQUE CHARACTER AND SCALE TO THE NEIGHBORHOOD. AS TOURISM IN NASHVILLE BEGAN TO EXPAND AND THE MUSIC INDUSTRY BEGAN TO CHANGE, MUSIC ROW BEGAN TO SEE A CHANGE IN THE URBAN DEVELOPMENT OF ITS NEIGHBORHOOD. MUSIC ROW IS CURRENTLY UNDER POLITICAL AND HISTORICAL CONSIDERATION DUE TO THE DEVELOPMENT OF THE NEIGHBORHOOD IN ADDITION TO MIDTOWN TO THE NORTH. THE OVERSCALE OF REAL ESTATE DEVELOPMENT INFRINGES UPON THE HISTORIC NATURE OF MUSIC ROW, BRINGING A CASE TO RE-ESTABLISH THE HISTORIC AND CULTURAL IDENTITY OF THE ROW AS UNIQUE TO NASHVILLE. THE URBAN PLANNING OF MUSIC ROW ATTEMPTS TO CREATE THE IDENTITY INHERENT TO THE HISTORY AS WELL AS CREATE A UNIQUE URBAN NEIGHBORHOOD FOR LIVING, WORKING AND PLAYING REALIZING THE CONCEPT OF CONTEXTUAL AND REAL URBANISM. AN ATTEMPT TO RELATE AND CONNECT THE HISTORIC AND BUSINESS CULTURE OF MUSIC ROW WITH ITS TOURISTIC NATURE IS ALSO REALIZED TO CREATE A COMPREHENSIVE URBAN DESIGN PLAN.

Aerial view of proposal for Nashville’s Music Row

AERIAL VIEW OF MUSIC ROW + QUARTER CI St. Thomas Hospital

Music Row

The most fundamental intent of this study on Music Row is to reinforce 16th and 17th Streets as forming an elegant treelined ‘Complete Streets’ loop to house the music industry in Nashville. In addition, a zoning overlay is suggested to stop demolition and out-of-scale infill development on Music Row. Instead discreet infill and pocket parks are introduced where there are now empty lots. The alleys, or ‘laneways’, are encouraged to have backyard, affordable rental housing or workspaces on the lanes for music industry workers. A ‘streetcar’ loop to enhance both visitors’ and workers experience of the neighborhood is proposed. Macroaerial + AMP Bus Rapid Transit MACRO AERIAL + AMP BUS RAPID TRANSIT

STUDENT PROPOSALS

Five Points


LOOP

BELMONT FOUNTAIN PLAN

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RDS MUSIC SQUARE WEST + 17TH STREET SOUTH

Street perspective

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OW IDENTITY

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QUARTER CIRCLE SECTION FACING SOUTH

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PROPOSED MASTER PLAN

Jackson Triangle street plan

JACKSON TRIANGLE STREET PLAN

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Gateway Plaza section elevation QUARTER CIRCLE SECTION FACING WEST

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Existing street VIEW TOWARDS MUSIC ROW + QUARTER CIRCLE

MUSIC ROW BEACON

Music Row Beacon

MUSIC ROW BEACON

AERIAL VIEW OF MUSIC ROW + QUARTER CIRCLE

Rooftop perspective towards downtown VIEWS TOWARDS DOWNTOWN

VIEWS TOWARDS DOWNTOWN

Amenities map

Commons perspective

STUDENT PROPOSALS HAROLD BRADLEY PARK


5’ - 2”

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Proposed street with bike lane

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SECLUDED ALLEY Nashville’s Alley System Brandon Litton + Michael Stone

The alley around the tallest building in Nashville is a narrow, foreboding place that is used only for trash can placement. This is an alley to avoid in the evening, and though it is thin it could be made more inviting. By moving the trash cans back and allowing the adjacent store to spill into the alley would activate this space that is just off of Broadway.

BUTLER’S RUN

This Nashville Alley system study confined itself to that on water’, a continuous floating off shore linear dock parallel portion of downtown east of Fifth Avenue, south of to1st theand west bank of theButler Cumberland which could Connecting 2nd Avenue, Run is River, a well-lit short cut be Union Street, west of the Cumberland River and north of made luminous at night. Division Street. between 1st and 2nd Avenue and home to the entrance to the Civic A linear alley pedestrian network connection from the 5th Design Center. Avenue of the Arts through The Arcade (a glass covered The Nashville Alley system is currently being converted but outdoor pedestrian alley-scaled street) to Printers’ into a pedestrian-only alley. Printer’s Alley and the Alley, then onto Bankers’ Alley, ultimately to the riverfront alleyway adjacent to the Ryman Auditorium have historic is proposed. The width of Bankers’ Alley allows for its value. Planning posed the following question for the interpretation as a spatial hybrid of both an alley and a studio: “How do downtown alleyways exist as a larger pocket park. The block bounded by First Avenue, Second system for pedestrian passageways and connections to Avenue, Church Street, and Bank Street is identified as a significant public spaces and buildings? parking lot that could be a prime location for a hotel with in a courtyard configuration overlooking the river. The site The eastern half of downtown was perceived as having could exploit the elevation changes down to the river to the virtue of riverfront access, considerable pedestrian allow access to below grade parking off First Avenue. activity (much of it tourists), as well as a dual identity as both the historic and tourist district of downtown, with The pedestrianized and luminous Shelby Street Bridge, and zoning protection. Tourism in this district is booming, its underside between Second Avenue and the river, an propelled by the new Music City Center convention excellent potential to tie the district to regional transit, the facility, riverfront development, the international riverfront, the new amphitheater, the East Bank and Nissan popularity of the weekly television drama ‘Nashville’, and Stadium together. the general media celebration of Nashville, both here in the United States and abroad, as a destination cultural tourism city. The Nashville Alleys serve multiple purposes. The potential of some alleyways is inevitably limited by service requirements for adjacent business that can compromise their Placemaking potential. In addition, a number of downtown sites adjacent to alleys remain undeveloped and are unattractive surface parking lots. Thinking more positively, the studio was captivated by the Hargreaves and Associates proposal made almost a decade ago in their Nashville Riverfront Plan for a ‘walk

STUDENT PROPOSALS

Butler’s Run connecting 1st and 2nd Avenues


Existing site conditions

SITE KEY PLAN | EXISTING CONDITIONS

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Axonometric view of Lower Broadway and the Cumberland River AXON | PROPOSED WORK

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PARCELS

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Sectional views ofSTUDY existing and proposed spaces EXISTING SECTIONAL ALLEY TRANSITIONAL SECTIONS 20'

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GE

Proposed Riverfront Hotel

217 S.F.

488 S.F.

RIVERFRONT HOTEL LOWER FLOOR PLAN

276 SQUARE FEET

705 SQUARE FEET TOTAL

FLEX-UNIT PLAN

MICRO-UNIT PLAN

GUEST ROOMS 5 LEVELS

RESTAURANT AND RETAIL AXON | PROPOSED WORK

Pedestrian bridge sectional view

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PARKING 3 LEVELS


Plaza Mariachi

Anthony Dienst + Royal Starr

The Nolensville Pike site is located on both sides of the Pike, south of the CSX Railroad Bridge and north of Harding Place, with considerable east-west latitude. The Plaza Mariachi is located only ten minutes from downtown Nashville, with easy access to three major interstates. It is the largest shopping venue focused on the Hispanic culture in the city. Plaza Mariachi is a welcome addition to this suburban area that generally lacks a sense of place. This area is in need of an urban design and development scenario that reflects the context of the area and the needs of the community.

The Plaza Mariachi area of Nolensville Pike already has much momentum as an international marketplace, its cultural identity, and the Plaza Mariachi itself as a vision. Having the Nashville Zoo nearby, a regional creek and proposed greenway traversing the neighborhood, and public transit, including the potential of bus rapid transit, all are circumstances on which to capitalize. Conversely, this area has extremely low walkability and bikeability. High tension power lines and vast parking deserts in front off aging big box retail venues present aesthetic challenges. Nolensville Pike has safety issues associated with its design and dimensioning, serving transit, bikes, and pedestrians as well as the automobile. The Zoo entrance is also conspicuously under-stated. New police and fire stations and other civic institutions were considered an opportunity in this area. An annual festival schedule for the area began to allow the studio to plan for those cultural rituals, religious and otherwise, that long for Placemaking. There are numerous locations for site infill multi-family housings. The redesign of Nolensville Pike into a Complete Street could be replicated elsewhere along the Pike leading to Downtown Nashville. As a corollary to this, the strategy of ‘Retrofitting Suburbia’ seemed to be an appropriate paradigm for the area.

Nashville’s Historic Pikes converge in Downtown

Aerial view showing street connectivity

STUDENT PROPOSALS FOREWORD

The greenway potential along the creek was labeled an opportunity, as might be a drive-in movie venue, and/ or an amphitheater. There was also the opportunity to enhance connectivity between a number of local subdivision streets, and to expand the midrise Windrush Apartments housing slab at the top of the hill, to take advantage of views of downtown and to engage the slab with additional midrise context so it would be part of an ensemble of multi-generational housing, and not stand alone in isolation. The railroad bridge at the north end of the site was also observed to be a monumental portal into the Plaza Mariachi area, perhaps with the further incorporation of public art.


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N Amenities within Plaza Mariachi

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Plaza Housing Inner Court

View towards apartments

Mariachi Plaza Extension

Container village street view

Views Through Courtyardcross Housing section Apartments

Sam Boney Street Extension

Site section

STUDENT PROPOSALS


Existing Strip Section Interior court perspective

Plaza Housing Inner Court

Parking and community interaction

Proposed Boulevard Section Mariachi Plaza Extension

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Shelby Landing

Catherine Dozier + Mathew Smith

The Shelby Landing site is located on the north bank of the Cumberland River between Interstate 24 and Shelby Bottoms Park. To the north was the location of a master plan by the Smith Gee Studio for Cayce Place, a redevelopment of the Cayce Homes public housing project. Redevelopment of the steel scrap yard west of the Interstate 24 was assumed to be a separate future initiative, in the spirit of a prior international competition for the site. The scrap yard’s future is indeed very uncertain. The site has the obvious advantages of riverfront access, proximity to I-24 connections, its culmination along the Corridor in Shelby Park, and the planned and pending reurbanization of the Cayce Homes. A significant site challenge is the presence of the river’s 100year flood plain, covering most of the site, and its potential discouragement of investment. The flood plain issue is addressed by developing urban blocks which have their bottom 1-2 stories occupied primarily by structured parking. The parking level(s) are lined by a thin zone of rental vendor retail and work space for the artisans, lined by glass garage doors which can be opened when weather permits. The artisan residences are therefore on top of this ground level, sidewalk activated podium, placing the housing safely above the flood plain. The uses lining the sidewalk are transient in nature, and in the event of a potential 100year flood, the contents of these spaces could be readily relocated 1-2 stories above. The north to south streets extended to the river from the plan for Cayce Homes culminate in either existing repurposed buildings along the riverfront or with programmed urban spaces between the repurposed buildings. From west to east, these destinations include a large skate park under the interstate, with a boat

STUDENT PROPOSALS

Site history

landing ramp as well. A boathouse for crew activities, amphitheater, artisan incubator, swimming cove, outdoor marketplace attracting food trucks, a bicycle factory, sales and service center, and a dog park are imagined. A path along the river’s bluff, as well as linear boat docking are also incorporated. The site called for a design incorporating affordable housing into a new artisan community, including adaptive reuse of many of the existing warehouses. The Davidson Street corridor is currently zoned for light manufacturing and industrial uses, and the buildings on the site are significantly out of scale with the adjacent single family housing in Boscobel Heights, which became a sensitive design consideration. Walkability for Shelby Landing was a high priority to promote community engagement and allow for a stronger sense of place to develop because the site is activated by both residents and visitors. Traffic along Davidson Street is slowed with the addition of a generous center bio-swale and on-street parking in both directions.


Site section

Bioswale sectional view

Existing site

Hotel sectional view

The focus on the river necessitated a careful approach to the design of the area between its northern bank and Davidson Street. Select buildings are removed, but adaptive reuse of a good portion of the existing buildings in this zone allows for Shelby Landing to retain some of its industrial character. This industrial aesthetic binds the project together. It gives Shelby Landing a distinct identity that not only calls to mind the heritage of the area, but also lends itself to the atmosphere of a maker culture. The Shelby Landing proposal is explicitly focused on place. It addresses the site on the macro scale by proposing a water taxi that connects distant parts of the metro area to the site and it gathers recreational activities that are spread out over Nashville into a single public corridor. It addresses the middle scale of the immediate surrounding area with a plan to reconnect and extend parts of the city’s greenway system. Finally, it addresses the micro-scale by carefully considering site aesthetics and materials in order to create a unique district adjacent to the heart of Nashville. Proposed site plan

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1. Community Garden 2. Skatepark

1. Community garden 2. Skatepark3. Boathouse and Launch 4. Swimming Cove 3. Boathouse and launch Dock for Water Taxi and 4. Swimming5. cove Science Learning Barge 5. Dock for water taxi and 6. Raised Viewing Platform science learning barge 7. Private Boat Docking 6. Raised viewing platform 8. Outdoor Market 7. Private boat docking 8. Outdoor market

9. Mixed Use Indoor Mall with Artist Workspaces Micro-housing and Mixed-use indoor Commercial Spaces

9. mall with10.workspaces, microLookout Pier housing, and commercial 11. Walk on Water 10. Lookout pier 12. Food Truck Court 11. Walk on water Sunken Ampitheater 12. 13. Food truck court Bicycle Factory 13. 14. Sunken ampitheater Open Parkfactory with Pergola 14. 15. Bicycle 15. Open park with pergola

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Riverfront Axonometric Riverfront axon

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Street perspective with lunchtime food trucks

STUDENT PROPOSALS

Shelby Landing Riverfront Park Shelby Landing Riverfront Park

100’ 50’

200’

400’


Cumberland River from the Atrium

6th Avenue live-work shops

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Music Row Tower’s planned M Residences will offer both a retail and a restaurant space, each of about 4,000 square feet. The retail space will face 19th, with the restaurant space to address both 19th and Chet Atkins. M Residences would include 300 apartment units.

Text source: https://www.nashvillepost.com/blogs/postbusiness/2015/1/8/ september_groundbreaking_slated_for_music_row_tower

Bankers Alley Bankers Alley is currently an underutilized, widely unknown space in The District. However, it could potentially become a valuable asset in connecting the Core and enhancing commercial and recreational activity. The goal of revitalizing Banker’s Alley is to highlight underutilized urban spaces and routes using interventions that emphasize social interconnectedness, cultural identity, and efficient transportation, while connecting locals and tourists. Text source: http://issuu.com/civicdesigncenter/docs/bankers_project_final

LOCAL HAPPENINGS

Image source: Nashville Civic Design Center

Music Row Tower

Image source: The Preston Partnership

LOCAL HAPPENINGS


Image source: Smith Gee Studio

Ascend Ampitheater

The design of the amphitheater draws from its location by the river and was constructed to give guests views of the city as well as green space surrounding the entertainment complex. The amphitheater provides seating for about 6,800 — made up of 2,200 removable chairs in the reserved seating sections near the stage, a lawn capacity of 4,500 and about 100 premium box seats between the reserved seating and lawn. Text source: http://www.ascendamphitheater.com/news?n_id=189

Image source: Davis Architects

The Dallas on Elliston Place

The Dallas on Elliston is certainly submersed in rich history but designed with cutting edge materials and amenities, and modern conveniences. With a 21st and Elliston location, The Dallas is at the epicenter of the West End – one-half block from Baptist Hospital, two blocks from Vanderbilt University, two blocks from a BRT stop, four blocks from Music City Bikeway, five blocks from Centennial Park. It’s no wonder The Dallas has a remarkable

Image source: 21C Museum Hotels

Text source: http://thedallas.com/neighborhood/

21C Hotel 21c Museum Hotels has turned its sights on Music City with plans to develop downtown’s historic 222 Building, located at 222 North Third Avenue. The 1890s era building is listed on the National Register of Historic Places, adding to the 21c portfolio of projects that bring revitalization through contemporary art to the downtown core. Text source: http://www.21cmuseumhotels.com/company/future/

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Image source: City Retail/Twining Properties

Tool Box The components that create a successful urban environment can be likened to a “kit of parts� that, when used correctly, produce a tightly knit community. Careful attention when applying these various tools ensures quality of design and functionality. These components can be molded together to form a cohesive plan, creating a beneficial environment that will better all of

Image source: City of Fort Worth

Image source: Park Slope Neighbors

Public interaction - Kendall Square (Cambridge, Massachusetts)

Pedestrian accomodations - Prospect Park (Brooklyn, New

Diversity + affordability - Mariposa District (Denver, Colorado)

Visual unity - Imagine Alley (Sacramento, California)

Image source: HUD User

Image source: Urban Design Alliance of Sacramento

Urban walkability - West Seventh Urban Village (Fort Worth, Texas)


Image source: BLDGS Architects

Image source: One Development Group

Adaptive reuse - Villa de Murph (Atlanta, Georgia)

Image source: World for Travel

Image source: McGregor Coxall Landscape Architects

Public greenspace - Arboleda (San Pedro Garza Garcia, Mexico)

River as centrality - Parramatta city riverfront (Sydney, Australia)

Accessibility - Accessibility map system (Sydney, Australia)

Clear sense of place - Downtown streetscape (Columbus, Indiana

Image source: City of Columbus

Image source: City of Sydney Council

Public art - Agueda Art Festival installation (Agueda, Portugal)

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ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS Placemaking: Challenges and Opportunities in Metro Nashville is a project of the Nashville Civic Design Center, in

partnership with the Nashville Area Metropolitan Planning Organization (MPO) and the University of Tennessee’s College of Architecture and Design.

Nashville Civic Design Center The mission of the Nashville Civic Design Center is to elevate the quality of Nashville’s built environment and to promote public participation in the creation of a more beautiful and functional city for all. Nashville Civic Design Center Staff: Gary Gaston, Executive Director Ron Yearwood, Assistant Director Melody Gibson, Education Coordinator Fuller Hanan, Community Development Coordinator Eric Hoke, Design Fellow Joe Mayes, Program Coordinator Jolie Ayn Yockey, Special Projects Jules Shainberg, Accounting Services Coordinator

CivicDesignCenter.org

The University of Tennessee, Knoxville, College of Architecture and Design For nearly twenty years, the College of Architecture and Design has been helping to envision the future of Nashville. Architecture students annually participate in pertinent real-world concerns through an academic rigor that results in visionary design solutions for Nashville’s neighborhoods. Some of the student’s most recent works include a boat house along the Cumberland River and micro-apartment housing for Downtown. Thomas K. Davis, Associate Professor ArchDesign.UTK.edu


Nashville MPO The Nashville Area Metropolitan Planning Organization (MPO) facilitates strategic planning for the region’s multi-modal transportation system by serving as a forum for collaboration among local communities and state leaders. The vision of the MPO is to develop policies and programs that direct public funds to transportation projects that increase access to opportunity and prosperity, while promoting the health and wellness of Middle Tennesseans and the environment. Nashville Area MPO Staff: Michael Skipper, AICP, Executive Director Michelle Lacewell, APR, Deputy Director Lou Edwards, Administrative Assistant Jeffrey Leach, Finance Officer Leslie A. Meehan, AICP, Director of Healthy Communities Peter Bang, PhD, Director of Technical Programs Anna Emerson, Senior Planner Nicholas Lindeman, Economic & Systems Data Analyst Rochelle Carpenter, Senior Policy Analyst Mary Connelly, Senior Planner Wesley Rhodes, Policy Analyst Hary(ono) Prawiranata, Senior Modeler Mary Beth Ikard, APR, Social Media Coordinator Sam Williams, GIS Analyst

Funding for this publication was provided in part by funds from the Federal Highway Administration, the Tennessee Department of Transportation, and local government members of the Nashville Area Metropolitan Planning Organization (MPO). The Nashville Area MPO does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, national origin, gender, gender identity, sexual orientation, age, religion, creed or disability in admission to, access to, or operations of its programs, services, or activities. Discrimination against any person in recruitment, examination, appointment, training, promotion, retention, discipline or any other employment practices because of non-merit factors shall be prohibited. For ADA inquires, contact Michelle Lacewell, ADA Compliance Coordinator at 615.880.2452 or email her at Lacewell@nashvillempo.org. For Title VI inquires or all employment related inquires contact Human Relations at 615.862.6640.


LIVABILITY • PROSPERITY • SUSTAINABILITY • DIVERSITY

Profile for Nashville Civic Design Center

Placemaking: Challenges + Opportunities in Metro Nashville  

The Project for Public Spaces, on their organization’s web site, asks “what if we built our communities around places?” They then go on to d...

Placemaking: Challenges + Opportunities in Metro Nashville  

The Project for Public Spaces, on their organization’s web site, asks “what if we built our communities around places?” They then go on to d...

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