Dublin Life December 2022/January 2023

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Medicinal Music

Holiday Gift Guide
Dublin doctor and accomplished musician Mark King
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4 • December 2022/January 2023
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6 City of Dublin 8 Community Calendar 10 faces Medical Musician Meet the man behind the piano and his journey of healing through music 14 city of dublin Cemetery Restoration A story of preserving and making history 16 Holiday Gift Guide Find the best presents Dublin has to offer 22 Racing to the Finish Dublin resident completes his final marathon and looks back at 15 years of running 26 Love-All Tennis fundraiser works for the benefit of families with sick children 28 A Different Twist on Christmas Shopping Heroes & Helpers brings in public safety officials to help children in need 30 good ideas New Year, Old Traditions Celebrating New Year’s traditions across cultures 32 ARTifacts Three Local Artists You Should Know Talent and creativity abound in Dublin 34 student spotlight Dublin City Startups Coffman students start their own businesses while learning at the Entrepreneur Academy 36 dublin dishes

Chili Champion The history of the Dublin Chili Cookoff — plus a recipe to warm you up 38 living Right on Cue Pool table-anchored basement remodel follows multiple overhauls in Amberleigh house 42 luxury living real estate guide 43 top homes sold in dublin 44 write next door

Christine’s Christmas Finale Holiday fundraiser concert approaches its final year

December 2022/January 2023 • 5 www.dublinlifemagazine.com
p26 On the Cover Mark King
p36
Photo by Ray LaVoie
inside December
46 bookmarks p14
2022/January 2023

NEW BEGINNINGS

NEW BEGINNINGS

I feel truly fortunate for this opportunity to serve as your city manager!

I feel truly fortunate for this opportunity to serve as your city manager!

Following in the footsteps of Dana McDaniel, I became Dublin’s sixth city manager on October 1. I’m no stranger to the City of Dublin; I have lived in the Dublin area for more than 20 years and have proudly served this City since 2014, when I was hired as the public service director. I have also overseen nearly all of the City departments during my time serving as deputy city manager/chief nance and development o cer and deputy city manager/chief operating o cer.

Following in the footsteps of Dana McDaniel, I became Dublin’s sixth city manager on October 1. I’m no stranger to the City of Dublin; I have lived in the Dublin area for more than 20 years and have proudly served this City since 2014, when I was hired as the public service director. I have also overseen nearly all of the City departments during my time serving as deputy city manager/chief nance and development o cer and deputy city manager/chief operating o cer.

I sincerely appreciate the con dence Dublin City Council has placed in me to continue serving this City I have grown to love as an employee and a resident. Earlier this year, Council adopted a strategic framework that declares a vision of being the most sustainable, most connected and most resilient global city of choice. The framework outlines goals related to the City’s economic, scal and environmental stewardship; world-class services and amenities; and physical, mental, social and emotional well-being. It also includes goals related to our state-of-the-art infrastructure, including expansive broadband capability that ensures a minimum of 10-gigabit access to all residents, businesses and visitors. I look forward to engaging with all of you and working together toward that vision.

I sincerely appreciate the con dence Dublin City Council has placed in me to continue serving this City I have grown to love as an employee and a resident. Earlier this year, Council adopted a strategic framework that declares a vision of being the most sustainable, most connected and most resilient global city of choice. The framework outlines goals related to the City’s economic, scal and environmental stewardship; world-class services and amenities; and physical, mental, social and emotional well-being. It also includes goals related to our state-of-the-art infrastructure, including expansive broadband capability that ensures a minimum of 10-gigabit access to all residents, businesses and visitors. I look forward to engaging with all of you and working together toward that vision.

The City is committed to transparency and community participation in government. Public involvement and input are the cornerstones of everything we do, and we know that we make better decisions and build a better future when we have conversations and gather feedback from invested residents like you. There are many ways you can become engaged and stay informed.

The City is committed to transparency and community participation in government. Public involvement and input are the cornerstones of everything we do, and we know that we make better decisions and build a better future when we have conversations and gather feedback from invested residents like you. There are many ways you can become engaged and stay informed.

Over the next year, the City will be working to update the Community Plan. The plan is our key policy guide for decision-making about Dublin’s built and natural environments. It was last updated in 2013 and is due for a refresh. This is a tremendous opportunity for public involvement in shaping our community and identifying future opportunities. There will be ample opportunities to provide input, including public meetings and online engagement throughout the update process. The Community Plan update will also be informed by the City’s other numerous planning e orts, including the Parks & Recreation Master Plan, Curbside Management Study, Speed Management Program, Dublin Area Housing Study and Economic Development Strategic Plan, all of which are being developed or updated right now. Visit DublinOhioUSA.gov for more information and updates.

Over the next year, the City will be working to update the Community Plan. The plan is our key policy guide for decision-making about Dublin’s built and natural environments. It was last updated in 2013 and is due for a refresh. This is a tremendous opportunity for public involvement in shaping our community and identifying future opportunities. There will be ample opportunities to provide input, including public meetings and online engagement throughout the update process. The Community Plan update will also be informed by the City’s other numerous planning e orts, including the Parks & Recreation Master Plan, Curbside Management Study, Speed Management Program, Dublin Area Housing Study and Economic Development Strategic Plan, all of which are being developed or updated right now. Visit DublinOhioUSA.gov for more information and updates.

I share all of this with you in the spirit of openness and civic engagement. Dublin is known for being a well-planned city that puts residents rst. With that at our core, I invite you to engage with your City and stay involved in your community. I hope to see you at our public meetings, at our award-winning community events and out and about enjoying the beautiful community we all love to call home.

I share all of this with you in the spirit of openness and civic engagement. Dublin is known for being a well-planned city that puts residents rst. With that at our core, I invite you to engage with your City and stay involved in your community. I hope to see you at our public meetings, at our award-winning community events and out and about enjoying the beautiful community we all love to call home.

Want to report an issue on the go? Download the GoDublin app. Submit your service request.

Want to report an issue on the go?

Download the GoDublin app. Submit your service request.

5555 Perimeter Drive Dublin, Ohio 43017 614.410.4400 | DublinOhioUSA.gov
5555 Perimeter Drive Dublin, Ohio 43017 614.410.4400 | DublinOhioUSA.gov

Happy holidays, neighbors.

CommunityCalendar December/January

All events are subject to change. Visit websites for more information.

DEC. 1

Dublin’s Tree Lighting 5-7 p.m. Riverside Crossing Park, 6635 Riverside Dr. www.dublinohiousa.gov

DEC. 1-18

Chad D. Harris, Agent

6151 Avery Rd., Ste. A Dublin, OH 43016 Bus: 614-889-2778

12 Days of Bridge Park Bridge Park www.bridgepark.com

DEC. 7

12 Elves of Dublin Scavenger Hunt Historic Dublin www.visitdublinohio.com

DEC. 2

Sales Connection Breakfast Series: Kimmi Wernli 8-9 a.m. Dublin Chamber of Commerce, 129 S. High St. www.dublinchamber.org

Columbus Zoo and Aquarium 4850 W. Powell Rd. www.columbuszoo.org

THROUGH JAN. 1 Wildlights 5-9 p.m.

DEC. 11

Sensory-Friendly Santa Experience Noon-4 p.m.

Dublin Arts Council 7125 Riverside Dr. www.dublinarts.org

THROUGH DEC. 15

Pattern-Form-Function/New Variations

JAN. 10-FEB. 24

Emerging: Student Art Exhibition

Christine’s Christmas

DEC. 3

The Holiday Tour of Homes Noon-5 p.m. Tartan Fields www.jlcolumbus.org

DEC. 9

Recognition Luncheon Featuring the Spotlight Dublin Award 11:30 a.m.-1 p.m. Muirfield Village Golf Club Pavilion, 5750 Memorial Dr. www.dublinchamber.org

DEC. 10

Christine’s Christmas: The Finale 7:30 p.m. Davidson Theatre, Riffe Center, 77 S. High St., Columbus www.christineschristmas.org

DEC. 10

Ugly Sweater Bar Crawl

Downtown Dublin www.visitdublinohio.com

DEC. 15-18

A Seussified Christmas Carol 7-8:30 p.m. Thursday-Friday 1-2:30 p.m. Saturday Abbey Theater of Dublin, 5600 Post Rd. www.dublinohiousa.gov

DEC. 17

Wreaths Across America Dublin Cemetery, 83 W. Bridge St. www.dublinveterans.com

8 • December 2022/January 2023
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Medical Musician

Meet the man behind the piano and his journey of healing through music

10 • December 2022/January 2023 www.dublinlifemagazine.com
Photos

Mark King works for The Ohio State University College of Medi cine as an associate professor, associate program director and the residency program director, to name a few of his titles.

What many people may not know is that behind the lab coat is an unbeliev ably talented musician who has been play ing for more than 60 years.

For 18 of those years, King has played the piano as part of the Christine’s Christmas concert to help raise money in memory of Dublin native Christine Wilson, who died in a fire in the University District in 2003.

Born and raised in Florida, King first discovered his musical talents at age 4 after his parents bought an organ and began taking lessons. As he listened to them practice, he made sure to correct them whenever they made a mistake.

“They would practice and I would say ‘No, no, this note,’” King says. “And they were like, ‘Maybe we should get lessons for him.’”

Those lessons led to the discovery of King’s natural talent and passion for mu sic, and became the starting point of his musical career.

When King was 13, he began playing the piano and organ professionally, taking gigs wherever he could. One of his early performances was with a band of college students, though King says they didn’t always see eye to eye on things.

“They hated the fact that I was with them. I was really cramping their style,” King says. “I enjoyed playing and they were all good musicians, but it mostly wasn’t very fun.”

King continued to play well into his college years, but found that the more he put himself into his studies, the less time he had for music. Though he enjoyed his music, he also enjoyed helping people, so he poured his attention into his education and pursuing a career in medicine.

In 1986, King graduated from The Ohio State University with his doctorate and went on to complete his residency at what is now the OSU Wexner Medical Center. After his residency and an additional fellowship at a medical center in San Diego, King says, he just had to return to Ohio.

December 2022/January 2023 • 11 www.dublinlifemagazine.com
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While finishing up school, King married his wife, Heidi, in 1990. The couple now have three children: daughters, Laura and Allison, and son, Michael.

With a growing family and developing career, music became more of a hobby that King unfortunately didn’t have much time for anymore.

That all changed in 2003, when Wil son and her friends died in a tragic fire, just off Ohio State’s campus. King says he and his family were grief-stricken, as they were very close with her.

“She was like a daughter to us, honestly,” King says. “It was incomprehensible, unthinkable what happened to her. And for the next couple of months, we did whatever we could to deal with our grief.”

For King, that grieving took the form of playing music.

He returned to the piano bench and decided to record a Christmas album – since it was Wilson’s favorite holiday – with the plan of donating all of the proceeds to the Christine Wilson Foundation.

Though he originally only made 500 copies to sell in small music shops around the Dublin area, King says, he ended up selling over 2,500 in total.

Soon after, King began receiving cards and letters from people who listened to his CD and wanted to share how the music impacted them.

“I knew at that point that I had really struck a chord with the audience, and there were people who wanted to hear this,” he says.

People began asking King if he would play the music live in a concert, so, in 2004, he brought the CD to life with

the very first performance of Christine’s Christmas.

The event has grown, adding more performers and songs over the years, but the one thing that stayed the same is that all the proceeds go to charity.

King says the changes in the show re flected not only the change in time, but also the change in how the people putting on the show feel.

“Some of the sorrow does turn to joy,” King says. “And so, as such, the music has changed. I’ve changed and we all have grown.”

With this being the 19th and final year of the show, King says it is a bittersweet feeling, but he has definitely enjoyed the opportunity. Though he is not sure if he will ever perform for something like this again, he is excited to see what the future holds.

“I, of course, definitely want to continue playing and creating. How, where (and) when I’m going to do that, I don’t know,” King says. “But for a while, I’m just going to sit back and contemplate where we’ve been. (And) maybe through that, we’ll see if there is a next chapter.”

Rachel Karas is an editor at CityScene Media Group. Feedback welcome at rkaras@cityscenemediagroup.com.

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Fun Fact

Mark King isn’t the only member of his family with musical talents. King says he gets his perfect pitch from his grandfather, who was a professional musician. King’s father also played, mainly the saxophone, and his daughter, Laura, sings.

city of dublin

Cemetery Restoration

A story of preserving and making history

Sitting on W. Bridge Street on the edge of Historic Dublin is the Dublin Cemetery. There lies nearly 5,000 headstones, with veterans from the Revolutionary, Civil, Viet nam and Korean wars, as well as both World Wars, among those remembered. The grave markers vary in size, resting among the trees of one of Dublin’s many beau tiful green spaces.

Mary Elizabeth Graham was the first burial in the cemetery on Nov. 4, 1858, after it opened just a few months prior. With so many veterans and past Dublin residents buried at the cemetery, a large piece of history is resting in the heart of Dublin – though it has had little recognition from its community, and headstones have been in need of serious but gentle care.

That is, until City of Dublin Director of Outreach & Engagement Christine Nardecchia embarked on a project with a team of dedicated volunteers to preserve not only the headstones, but also this crucial piece of Dublin history.

“When the stones are gone, they’re gone,” Nardecchia says. “So we’re taking great care.”

The headstone restoration project be gan in mid-May. Deputy City Manager/ Chief Operating Officer Robert Ranc says that the annual Memorial Day ceremony helped put the project in motion.

“For us, the immediate impetus was wanting to make sure, coming into Memorial Day, that the cemetery would look as good as it could,” Ranc says. “How can we get out there and really make sure it looks great when we honor those who have gone before us, particularly those who have

served and sacrificed for their country? And then it grew from there. How do we continue to honor and preserve this history?”

As the project began to take shape, City staff realized that this was something the Dublin community could also get involved with. Nardecchia reached out to some Dublin residents, who she now fondly re fers to as the “custodians of history,” asking if they would be interested in volunteering to help preserve the cemetery.

“We got an email,” says resident Rich ard Kennedy, who took on the volunteer work with his wife, Carolyn. “They were looking for volunteers … to do restoration and preservation work, essentially cleaning headstones. We go through the cemetery on a regular basis – why not do something to help the cemetery out?”

Richard and Carolyn set out to work in the cemetery every other Saturday be-

tween 8 and 11 a.m. throughout this past year. Each volunteer came when they could, so the group of approximately eight Dubliners varied in numbers each weekend. As for the work? It was certainly a labor of love, Richard says.

“What we thought was going to be just cleaning some headstones turned into, ‘Here are your plastic scrapers. Here’s a toothbrush for the nooks and crannies,’” Richard says. “And everything had to be delicate. We couldn’t use anything harsh or hard; the brushes had to be soft. The scrap ers had to be plastic; we couldn’t use metal.”

“It’s hard work, but it’s very rewarding,” Carolyn says. “The very first day we did it, we were there for, I think, an hour and a half to two hours. So, that night when we walked through (the cemetery), we were saying, ‘Oh my gosh, look at the difference you can see just from this morning.’”

14 • December 2022/January 2023 www.dublinlifemagazine.com
Carolyn and Richard Kennedy volunteered every other Saturday from May through October cleaning headstones in the Dublin Cemetery to preserve the historic lot.

The first couple of weeks were trial and error regarding the best way to clean the headstones. For example, Richard and Carolyn found there was only one working hose in the cemetery.

“The first week we did it, we underestimated the amount of water we needed to rinse off the stones,” says City Crew Su pervisor Tyson Vollrath.

So the City regrouped and decided to bring in a water truck, along with a rotat ing crew member who showed up to assist volunteers each week, making the process exceedingly more efficient.

“(The water truck) really was a huge help. It sped things along to have somebody there every time,” Carolyn says.

The process has been a team effort, with volunteers on the front line cleaning and the City assisting with staffing and listening to suggestions from the volunteers. For older headstones on the verge of collapse, the City employs contractors, which Director of Public Service Jay Anderson notes is to ensure the safety of the volunteers. He says the volunteers have really taken charge of the project.

“It’s not just about the cleaning process,” Anderson says. “It’s (the volunteers) learn ing about the history of the cemetery.”

When the Dublin Cemetery was built in 1858, many people who had already passed on were moved into it due to its popularity and beautiful scenery. The decision, from the families of residents and veterans, to

move them into the Dublin Cemetery may explain why it is home to veterans from wars such as the Revolutionary War.

Not only is the cemetery a place where many war veterans and past Dubliners are buried, it’s an all-inclusive cemetery. This means those who rest there came from all different backgrounds and religions. There are no requirements to be eligible for buri al at the Dublin Cemetery.

“It’s a municipal cemetery, so all are wel come,” Ranc says. “Our City is very open, and we put a big emphasis on our diversity, equity and inclusion efforts. So as a City cemetery open to all, it’s emblematic of Dublin’s values.”

Nardecchia describes the participation and dedication of the volunteers as nothing short of impressive and inspiring. The City plans on making volunteer-led cemetery preservation a returning program due to its success.

“It really is just an incredible way of respecting those who have gone before us and respecting our history,” Ranc says. “I think it’s just a really rewarding thing to be even a little bit a part of. Really, the volunteers are making it happen.”

“Volunteers understand their ownership of the community,” Nardecchia says. “What they’re doing is going to have an impact for future volunteers to pick up the baton.”

The Kennedys say they cannot express enough how positive the experience has been for both of them: how actually seeing

the progress of the headstones on a weekly basis encourages them.

“I was under the assumption there was a caretaker for the cemetery. There is, but they’re only doing the landscaping. It’s on the family of the owner of the stone to kind of maintain it,” Richard says. “So, the Revolutionary War guy (whose headstone I cleaned), his family is probably nowhere around here anymore. So that stone is just going to sit there until it gets fixed because it’s completely broken. I had no idea that that was the family’s responsibility.”

While many people are concerned with taking care of the living, it is also important to take care of those who have passed on before us, to keep them and their history in mind. Richard, Carolyn and the rest of the cemetery preservation team have put that sentiment into practice.

“Both of our fathers have died: Carolyn’s just recently, mine a little longer ago,” Richard says. “Our fathers are both buried in Pittsburgh, so we don’t get over there as often. There are probably stones here that people may never come (visit). Hopefully, someone is doing it where our parents are, and we’re doing it over here for someone else’s parents.”

“My dad is buried in (a) national cem etery for veterans,” Carolyn adds. “Some one is always going to keep those stones clean. It’s kind of neat that we’re able to do that here.”

The Kennedys say they encourage Dublin residents to come and visit the Dublin Cemetery to see its beauty and how much history it encompasses. The Dublin Cemetery is open to the public from dawn until dusk.

Get Involved

Want to be a future custodian of Dublin’s history? If you’re interested in the cemetery restoration project or would like to volunteer with the City of Dublin, please email volunteer@dublin.oh.us.

Curious about Dublin’s past residents and veterans? Check out the Dublin Cemetery Database to explore the cemetery’s burials and headstones. You may spot some famil iar names: bit.ly/DublinCemeteryDatabase.

Visit The Remembrance Project to learn more about Dublin’s veterans and their personal stories at www.Dublin Veterans.com.

Cadyn Healy is an intern for the City of Dublin. Feedback welcome at cpi@dublin.oh.us.

December 2022/January 2023 • 15 www.dublinlifemagazine.com

Select Jewelry

Dublin Village Jewelers is locally owned and operated by three generations of the Verbitsky family. Shop through the beautiful and exquisite selection of necklaces, rings, watches and more.

www.dublinvillagejewelers.com

Local Artwork

Located in Historic Dublin, Extravagifts features a collection of local artwork by Arlene Mueller. Mueller specializes in pet portraits and local landscape scenes from Dublin’s loveliest areas. Alongside the art, Extravagifts carries an array of home decor and unique gifts. www.extravagifts.com

16 • December 2022/January 2023 www.dublinlifemagazine.com
$50-$150 – Extravagifts
Prices vary – Dublin Village Jewelers
Gift
Find the best presents Dublin has to offer
Holiday
Guide

Clothing Set

$100 – Baker’s Village Garden Center and Gift Shoppe

Baker’s Village Garden Center has much more than plants – think clothing, art, jewelry and more. In addition, Baker’s is offering a limited-time selection of personalized ornaments through Jan. 1. www.bakersvillagegardencenter.com

Leather Handbags

$250 – Le Flair Boutique

Find the perfect handbag this holiday season with the fashion expertise at Le Flair Boutique. Owner Jill Richey curates a unique collection of high-quality clothing that pairs perfectly with the as sortment of bags, jewelry and accessories available. www.leflairboutique.com

Dublin Apparel

$15 – Dublin Community Recreation Center

Show off your Dublin roots with the Tshirt and blanket collection found at the Dublin Rec Center. This collection features Abbey Theater and Dublin T-shirts, along with a sweatshirt fleece blanket, each only costing $15. www.dublinohiousa.gov

December 2022/January 2023 • 17 www.dublinlifemagazine.com

Painting Class

$40 – Terra Gallery &

Creative Studio

Give the artist in your life the oppor tunity to shine through an art class with Terra Gallery & Creative Studio. Various mediums and class styles are available for those who hope to grow their creativity or just have fun.

www.terra-gallery.com

Strength Training Lessons

$185-$495 – Starting Strength Columbus

Get strong in the New Year with the acclaimed Starting Strength method. Learn the fundamentals to lifting a barbell correctly from experienced coaches. This gift includes one private lesson and one or up to four weeks of coached small group training. www.columbus.startingstrengthgyms.com

Ladder Blanket Rack

$70 – The Barnstead

Shop through quality leather and hairon tote and handbags at The Barnstead. Along with this, an assortment of decor, furniture and other seasonal gifts are available. www.thebarnstead.shop

18 • December 2022/January 2023 www.dublinlifemagazine.com

Room Holiday Set $50 – The Morgan House

Visit the historic Morgan House to find the perfect piece of home decor. From candles and pillows to furniture and accent artwork, the Morgan House highlights unique pieces to bring style to any home. www.morganhse.com

Yoga Mat and Block

$50-$120 – YogaSix

YogaSix provides classes, training and products to support body health needs. Give the gift that benefits the physical and mental health of your loved ones through a yoga mat and stretching block. www.yogasix.com

December 2022/January 2023 • 19 www.dublinlifemagazine.com Family Owned & Operated Fine Jewelry & Watches Bridal Custom Design Jewelry Repair Appraisals 251 West Bridge Street 614 726 9944 www dublinvillagejewelers com Your Trusted Local Jeweler
Dining

Handcrafted Wood Table

$519 – Experienced Possessions

Experienced Possessions carries a variety of new and pre-owned furniture and home decor. Among these are wood carved tables that are handcrafted by Sparrow Wood Works, available in different sizes, shapes and wood tones. www.experiencedpossessions.net

North Market Gift Card

$5-$50 – North Market Bridge Park

Give a gift card to spark exploration of new food and drink at the Bridge Park North Market. Filled with restaurants, shops and places to grab a drink, there is something for everyone in this all-in-one stop. www.northmarket.org

20 • December 2022/January 2023
www.dublinlifemagazine.com
Small Group Barbell Training with a Coach For All Ages and Abilities Measureable Results Call or Text 380.235.4279 columbus.ssgyms.com Make The Morgan House a Holiday Tradition 5300 Glick Road, Dublin Ohio 43017 Store phone: 614-889-0037 Restaurant phone: 614-889-5703 www.morganhse.com Follow us on &

Racing to the Finish

Dublin resident completes his final marathon and looks back at 15 years of running

Normally, overcast weather is not something people look forward to, but Jared Ellerbrock was overjoyed when he saw clouds overhead as he lined up for the Nationwide Children’s Hospital Columbus Mar athon this fall. That wasn’t the only reason he was excited, though.

22 • December 2022/January 2023 www.dublinlifemagazine.com
Ellerbrock finishes one of his first mara thons, crossing the finish line within three hours and 29 minutes. Jared Ellerbrock holds his daughter, Elsie, after finishing the Boston Marathon. Ellerbrock stands with his wife, Gayle, and their two kids, Elsie and Ethan, after finishing his 50th marathon. Ellerbrock, accompanied by Elsie, nears the finish line at a marathon in Delaware.

The 41-year-old Dublin resident has been running marathons since 2007, mak ing it his goal to one day run a marathon in each of the 50 states.

This past October, he met that goal –even completing the race within his goal time – when he crossed the finish line in Columbus in 3 hours and 50 minutes.

Looking back to when he first started running, Ellerbrock says, he never planned on being a part of so many races.

He originally got into running because his brother, Matt, wanted to help him get fit. He created exercise routines for Ellerbrock and then convinced him to sign up for a race with him.

When Ellerbrock couldn’t beat his brother, he made it his goal to get better, which meant he had to run more races. He started out only doing two or three marathons a year, but eventually stepped things up and began running as many as five or six.

“Knowing logistically how difficult it is to travel to all these, I was like, ‘OK, I’m going to start doing as many as I can,’” Ellerbrock says.

After his daughter, Elsie, and son, Ethan, were born in 2011 and 2013 respectively, Ellerbrock’s trips became fewer and had longer breaks in between them.

Determined not to let his goal slip away, Ellerbrock changed how he looked for races, working to include his family more by coordinating with family trips.

Despite these efforts, his wife, Gayle, and their kids have only been able to see him race a few times, but those races hold a special place in his heart.

One of Ellerbrock’s favorite memories was when Elsie joined him near the end of a marathon in Delaware.

December 2022/January 2023 • 23 www.dublinlifemagazine.com
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“She was maybe 3 or 4 at the time,” Ellerbrock says. “They were there, about a few yards from the finish line, and she jumped in with me and ran across the finish line with me.”

Not all of the races recall fond memories – for example, he once had to run all 26.2 miles in the rain – but Ellerbrock says the people he has been able to meet over the years bring him joy.

Over the past few years, as Ellerbrock marked more races off his list, people began asking him when he was going to do one in Ohio. His answer was that he didn’t know.

Ellerbrock never had a set plan for his Ohio marathon until his sister recommended he save it for last. Her idea was that if it was his final race, his friends and family could throw him a party afterward.

On the day of his final race, Ellerbrock was surprised when he saw his family along the course. They had all gotten Tshirts made to show their support as they cheered him on.

“That’s not something that normally happens, because normally I’m traveling, (and) a lot of times, I’m by myself,” Eller brock says. “You can see a lot of people, but there’s nobody that you know. So that was cool (they were there.)”

Ellerbrock is grateful for all the support his family has given him over the years, and hopes to return that love by supporting his kids as they start to get more involved with their own interests.

Although he still plans to do more races – with the hope of racing in Germany and Japan someday – Ellerbrock says his main focus for now is on his children and being there for them as much as he can.

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Rachel Karas is an editor at CityScene Media Group. Feedback welcome at rkaras@cityscenemediagroup.com.
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Ellerbrock stands in front of Bixby Creek Bridge in the middle of running the Big Sur International Marathon in California.
December 2022/January 2023 • 25 www.dublinlifemagazine.com
Jared and his family stand together at his celebration party after he completed his 50th marathon. They wore the matching T-shirts they had made for the event.
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Ellerbrock stands next to a table full of all the medals he has earned for running marathons.

Love-All

Tennis fundraiser works for the benefit of families with sick children

A group of Dublinites have been having a ball while raising money for charity.

Racquets for Ronald, a fundraiser for Ronald McDonald House Charities of Central Ohio, has been organized by a committee of Dublin residents for six years, and many of the organizers have personal connections with the charity. Last year, the August event at the Country Club at Muirfield Village raised $50,000 for the local Ronald McDonald House, which offers a place to stay for families of children being treated at Nationwide Children’s Hospital.

“It ended up being much bigger than what I originally intended,” committee chair Lori Russell says. “People really enjoyed it, and it has grown. It’s grown significantly every year.”

Racquets for Ronald began as a competitive tennis tournament, but has evolved over the years to include additional styles of play. These days, it in volves some pro-led drills, play at your own pace and pickleball. The event also features food and a silent auction.

More than 200 peo ple attended the most recent event, setting records for turnout and funds raised.

Russell has personal connections to the Ronald McDonald House. Her husband, Mark, has been on the charity’s board for 15 years and is a past president.

“We love the organization,” Russell says. “We’ve had the privilege of listening to some of the families that have had to use the home, and how much it means to them to not have to worry about housing, to not have to worry about food, to not have to worry about parking. It’s just a wonderful, wonderful thing.”

Other committee members have had to utilize the house’s services when fam ily members have fallen ill. Others just enjoy tennis and enjoy helping out their community. Committee members include Pam Austin, Jodi Rhodes, Diane Holland, Gigi Melton, Stephanie Johnson, Christy Birkholz, Laurie Adolph,

“It’s a different kind of fundraiser for the most part because you’re playing, you’re active, you’re not dressed up, you’re outdoors. It’s casual and it’s fun,” Russell says. “We’re very proud of the fact that all the money goes directly to the House.”

Racquets for Ronald isn’t the only Dublin-affiliated fundraising event for RMHC. Each spring, Handbag Hullabaloo takes place at Crown Cars Dublin. There’s also the annual Joe Mortellaro Golf Classic at the Club at Tartan Fields.

26 • December 2022/January 2023 www.dublinlifemagazine.com
Miriam King, Peg Davis, Trish Mazurick and Toni Burkholder.

Local businesses – including Cardinal Health, Safelite AutoGlass and IGS Energy – regularly donate funds and send employees to the House to volunteer, says Ryan Wilkins, marketing manager for RMHC.

Individuals from Dublin also make a difference by serving in volunteer roles, from house warmers to craftsmen maintaining the building.

RMHC has recently completed a $45 million capital campaign to build a new build ing with 80 more guest rooms, a new kitchen and dining space, new offices for staff, and an event center for community events. With the additions, the House will be able to serve 2,000 more families each year.

“Lori has … taken her passion and she’s turned it into something truly dynamic that supports the Ronald McDonald House in a number of ways,” Wilkins says. “First and foremost, it is obviously raising

funds for the House. But in addition to that, she is basically using her network of friends and colleagues to expand the au dience of supporters for our charity. (It’s) invaluable … that she is willing to work so hard and take her own time and effort to put together this awesome event.”

Interested in volunteering for Racquets for Ronald? Email Lori Russell at racquets forrmhc@gmail.com

Claire Miller is an editor at CityScene Media Group. Feedback welcome at cmiller@cityscenemediagroup.com.

December 2022/January 2023 • 27 www.dublinlifemagazine.com

A Different Twist on Christmas Shopping

Heroes & Helpers brings in public safety officials to help children in need

The efforts of local teachers, police and firefighters help make the holidays a little brighter for underprivi leged children every December.

The annual Heroes & Helpers event, now in its fourth year, takes place this year from 10 a.m.-2 p.m. on Dec. 10 at the Target store in Powell.

Heroes & Helpers gives children the opportunity to do holiday shopping with a police officer or firefighter. The Dublin Police Department, Powell Police Department, Liberty Township Fire Department and Dublin City Schools all help give children in the area a positive experience during the holiday season.

A police officer shops around Target with a student at the Heroes & Helpers event in 2020.

28 • December 2022/January 2023 www.dublinlifemagazine.com
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“The entire team from concept to creation was absolutely fantastic to work with!”

Dublin Deputy Chief Nick Tabernik, who has served as a coordinator and participant in the past, looks forward to continuing the tradition this year.

“One of our focuses is outreach and engagement, connecting police officers to the community we serve,” Tabernik says. “This is highly fulfilling for our officers, I think it is fulfilling for our community and, obviously, in the end, it helps someone during the holiday season have a much better and brighter holiday.”

The event reflects well on Dublin and its community, Tabernik says, and shows how officers partner with the community, while also protecting and serving.

“We love serving the community, and I think this is just a fantastic way of be ing able to give back,” he says. “We really appreciate the community support on the back end allowing us to do it.”

Dublin City Schools and Olentangy Local Schools students 14 and under who need a little help in the winter season are chosen by the districts and guidance counselors to take part in the event. Kids get to pick out necessities such as winter hats and gloves, along with wants such as action figures and games.

“Just getting to know (the participants) on a more personal level is very rewarding and really is, for me, the best part of this whole event,” says Tabernik.

Along with the shopping experience, there is a complimentary gift wrapping station, a Christmas-themed photo backdrop for everyone to use and a donation station for those wanting to help give during

the holiday season. Community members often walk into Target on the day of the event and are unaware it is taking place, Tabernik says, but are supportive and usually offer to help, curious to learn more.

Carson Hutton is an editorial assistant at CityScene Media Group. Feedback welcome at feedback@cityscenemediagroup.com.

December 2022/January 2023 • 29 www.dublinlifemagazine.com
Dublin Police Chief Justin Páez (left) and Powell Police Chief Stephen Hrytzik (right) pose with two children outside Target at the Heroes & Helpers event in 2020.

good ideas

New Year, Old Traditions

Celebrating New Year’s traditions across cultures

A glass of champagne, close friends and family, the ball drop in Times Square and a kiss at mid night: New Year’s is a time for cel ebrating and resetting. In the U.S., ringing in the New Year looks dif ferent from culture to culture. Here are some of the New Year’s cele brations happening across cultures in Dublin.

Lunar

New Year

Where: China

When: Jan. 22, the Year of the Water Rabbit

Beginning with the first new moon of the year, this 15-day festival in China –also called the spring festival – celebrates new beginnings and lasts until the next full moon. Those who celebrate enjoy traditional dishes such as glazed duck for happiness, uncut noodles for longevity, and dumplings and spring rolls for wealth. This time is used to clean house and get fresh haircuts and new outfits in order to invite good luck. Money is gifted in red envelopes to symbolize the trans fer of wealth across generations, and time is dedicated to honoring the dead. The celebrations close with the Lantern Fes tival, which symbolizes letting go of the previous year and beginning of the next. The Lunar New Year is also celebrated in Korea, Indonesia, Malaysia, Singapore, Taiwan and Vietnam.

Mahaˉyaˉna

New Year

Where: Northeast Asia

When: Jan. 7

Mahaˉyaˉna, which means “great vehicle” in English, is largely celebrated in China, Japan, Tibet, Taiwan, Mongolia and Ko-

rea. While specific celebration dates differ from country to country based on customs and traditions, Mahaˉyaˉna is celebrated by visiting temples, singing to the deities, lighting candles for luck and happiness, and spending time in prayer to honor the gods. Feasting also plays a key role, with fireworks at midnight to announce the arrival of a new year.

Ugadi

Where: India and Mauritius

When: March 22

Translating to “beginning of a new age,” Ugadi celebrates the creation of the universe and humankind. Because it takes place in March, Ugadi is sometimes viewed as a spring festival that celebrates the new life that comes with the changing of the seasons. A key element for this celebration is cleansing rituals; coconut oil is used to cleanse the head, and houses are cleaned for the start of the new season. Ugadi begins Chaitra Navratri, a nine-day festival celebrating the goddess Durga.

This is a time for self-reflection, connect ing to a global perspective and reconnecting with loved ones.

Nowruz

Where: Central Asia

When: March 20

Rooted in the ancient Persian religion of Zoroastrianism, Nowruz celebrates rebirth and renewal and takes place on the spring equinox. The celebration, which lasts 13 days, includes visiting with older adults to pay respect, spreading “Haft Seen” (a symbolic collection of items meant to bring prosperity), dancing, singing, sport competitions and the preparation of sumalak, a pudding that takes 24 hours to prepare. These celebrations culminate with a pic nic on the last day of the festival. Nowruz is celebrated in countries such as Iran, Af ghanistan, Iraq, Turkey and Syria.

Katie Giffin is an editorial assistant at CityScene Media Group. Feedback welcome at feedback@cityscenemediagroup.com.

30 • December 2022/January 2023 www.dublinlifemagazine.com
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ifacts Three Local Artists You Should Know

Talent and creativity abound in Dublin

By supporting nonprofit arts orga nizations with a primary focus in Dublin, the Dublin Arts Council provides for a healthy community in which a variety of art forms, arts organizations and artistic projects can flourish. DAC is honored to support artists, including three Dub lin visual artists profiled here.

expressionism and surrealism. She primarily paints in acrylic, using pure, bright color tones to infuse simplicity and accuracy in her paintings – effectively communicating the sentiments, feelings and behavior of the characters.

“My art is a poetic message of the importance of universal love. The inspiration for my art is Immortal Relationships; we humans are deeply connected to humans, animals and nature,” says Dadhich. “These interconnected relationships are shaping our society. My art is an effort to preserve and understand these relationships, which are essential to us.”

She is currently working on the series Regrowing Life, a statement about humans’ need to nurture and nourish Mother Nature.

She and her family moved to Dublin from California nearly four years ago. She loves Dublin’s natural surroundings and abundant artwork. Dadhich is inspired by Dublin’s celebration of diverse cultures, which energizes her creatively.

Meet Dawn Petrill

Dawn Petrill is a 1995 graduate of the Cleveland Institute of Art and received a master’s degree in liberal arts (MALS) from Wesleyan University in 2001. She began her artistic career as a freelance illustrator. She has been a resident of Dublin for 16 years.

Petrill paints and exhibits her artwork locally and nation ally, teaching children and adults from her home studio. She also hosts a drawing class for adults with early onset dementia through Central Ohio Alzheimer’s Association, helping improve quality of life through creativity and an outlet for talking about memories.

Meet Neha Dadhich

Neha Dadhich was born and raised in Rajasthan, India. She earned a master’s degree in visual art and doctoral degree in folk arts from MLS University in India. She has worked as an artist for 18 years, including numerous exhibitions and residency programs, teaching and writing. She and her family moved to the U.S. seven years ago.

The vibrant colors and simplicity of the folk-art styles of Rajasthan impact Dadhich’s artwork, with a style between

“People motivate local artists,” she says.

Learn more about Dadhich at www. nehadadhich.com and on Instagram @artistneha23.

Dublin Area Art League

Petrill is a member of Worthington Area Art League, Ohio Art League and National League of American Pen Women. She is also a member and past president of the Dublin Area Art League.

“I have developed a new body of work, which I have dubbed my Earthwork Series,” says Petrill. “My vision was to create

The Dublin Area Art League, founded in 1985, is supported in part by a Com munity Arts Grant from Dublin Arts Council. The nonprofit organization supports and encourages its members through interaction with fellow artists; education through workshops, demonstrations and lectures; and opportunities to exhibit local artwork in Dublin and the surrounding community. Info: www.dublinartleague.org

32 • December 2022/January 2023 www.dublinlifemagazine.com
ART

a series of panels that are juxtaposed on top of each other to show the layers of the landscape. I wished to get away from the typical square or rectangular format – to break up the space and draw the viewer in by extending the planes of field outward.”

Petrill’s new artwork, supported by a grant from the Greater Columbus Arts Council, will be on view in the Dublin Community Recreation Center, 5600 Post Rd., in December. More information can be found at www.artat dawn.com and @artatdawn on Instagram.

can work together to create exciting and meaningful pieces of art. His artwork was featured in a solo exhibition, Ceramic Infu sion, at Dublin Arts Council in 2020, and he was commissioned to create two new public art RiverboxesTM for Dublin Arts Council in 2022.

Networking Key to Success

Meet Don Staufenberg

Originally from Long Island, New York, Staufenberg earned a bachelor’s degree in industrial design from Kent State University. He has served as product designer with many prestigious companies, including Rubbermaid and Herman Miller, and as head of design at Fitch Inc. He and his wife, Jill, have been Dublin residents for 31 years.

Staufenberg continues to explore the boundaries of his work, discovering how ceramic, wood, metal, polymer and color

Staufenberg says he learned a lot about Dublin during the process of creating Equal East and Equal West. He used artifacts such as cable from the Dublin Link pedestrian bridge and wood from the Coffman Park barn in the geocachinginspired artworks. He continues to experiment and learn, hoping to incorporate stained, and perhaps even blown, glass into his artwork in the future.

“No one had really called me an artist before. I’d always been thought of as a product designer,” he says. “But now, when they call me an artist, I say, ‘Yes, I am!’”

View more of Staufenberg’s artwork at www. djsdesignstudio.org.

All three artists recommend networking for continuing education and to discover exhibition opportunities. There are a number of artist organizations throughout central Ohio. The Dublin Area Art League provides excellent local opportunities for visual artists to connect and grow their practice.

Janet Cooper is director of engagement for the Dublin Arts Council. Feedback welcome at feedback@cityscenemediagroup.com.

December 2022/January 2023 • 33 www.dublinlifemagazine.com
Regrowing Life – 1, watercolor and ink on acid free paper, 22x15” by Neha Dadhich Momentum, acrylic and mixed media on Masonite panels, 7x30x2.5” by Dawn Petrill Deco 2, ceramic and wood, 6”Dx5.5”H by Don Staufenberg

student spotlight

Dublin City Startups

Coffman students start their own businesses while learning at the Entrepreneur Academy

Armed only with an idea, a social media account and background knowledge from the Entrepreneur Academy at Dublin City Schools, Emma Cheng and McKenna Reynolds are both running growing busi nesses after school.

Cheng resells clothing that she buys at second-hand clothing stores around cen tral Ohio. She posts a picture of each item on Instagram on Saturday, then takes bids through Sunday night.

“Our mission is to reduce the amount of clothes in the landfills by reusing pre-worn clothing,” she says.

Cheng and her older sister, Emily, started RewearEm – a play on their first names – in 2020.

“My sister was like, ‘Hey, what if we started a business?’” Cheng says, “I’m like, ‘No way.’ I shut it down so fast.”

Emily was adamant that her idea was a good business opportunity, though, and Cheng was eventually convinced.

“We were bored, it was COVID, and we were like, ‘Hey, sure, why not?’” Cheng says. “It grew beyond what we could’ve ever thought of. Not to mention that an Instagram business has (very little) risk. … It’s not like a real in-store business where you pour thousands of dollars into rent.”

Though the sisters have experienced setbacks – Instagram has twice shut down their accounts, mistaking the two for scammers posing as them, which cost them 15,000 followers the first time –they have since rebuilt and are above 5,000 followers.

The low cost of entry for an Instagram business has made this type of endeavor popular among students who want to earn a little spending money.

“Places like Etsy have very high fees, so I didn’t want to deal with that,” says Reynolds, operator of DazzleByKenna. “I know a lot of people spend a lot more time on social media, where they can find me.”

Reynolds sells jewelry that she makes by looping together necklaces, earrings and more with charms and crystals she buys in bulk online. She started DazzleByKen na after she realized she’d bought more

34 • December 2022/January 2023 www.dublinlifemagazine.com
Emily (left) and Emma Cheng (right) celebrate 10,000 followers on Instagram. Photo courtesy of Emma Cheng

charms for her own jewelry than she knew what to do with.

Her favorite part, she says, is seeing people in public or on social media wearing her jewelry. She often reposts pictures of customers’ outfits to show other potential buyers how people are styling them.

Posting consistently to maintain engagement is a major part of both businesses’ success, Reynolds and Cheng agree. Both girls take classes through the school district’s Entrepreneur Academy, through which they have learned guiding principles for furthering their success and building their businesses.

“Every time I tell one of my teachers or classes, I feel like it’s super encouraging that they get excited,” Cheng says. “Entre preneur Academy is a good motivation for me with my business and learning all these new things.”

The academy has also helped them learn how to keep track of their money, promote themselves and build connections. Through the academy, they meet local entrepreneurs and get tips on how to grow their businesses and run them smoothly.

Both Dublin Coffman High School students are planning to use their experience to inform their future careers, as they have been enjoying the entrepreneurial landscape thus far.

“If you have a dream, or just any idea, just go ahead and put it out there and advertise yourself,” Cheng says. “TikTok and Insta gram reels are both a great way to advertise.”

Tyler Kirkendall is an editor at CityScene Media Group. Feedback welcome at tkirkendall@cityscenemediagroup.com.

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dublin dishes

Chili Champion

The history of the Dublin Chili Cookoff — plus a recipe to warm you up

The smell and taste of beans, meat and spices could warm up any cold Dublin resident as they walk around Historic Dublin in late Oc tober, while area restaurants show off their skills during the annual Chili Cookoff.

Put on by the Historical Dublin Business Association, the event started in

the mid-2000s as a friendly competition among residents who wanted to pit their recipes against one another.

Brenda Kocak, past president of HDBA, says the event was gaining momentum at the same time as the association, so it part nered up with restaurants in 2010 to help the event grow.

To help draw more people in, Kocak says, they made sure to host the event on the autumn weekend without a Buckeye game and include a panel of judges consisting of locals.

At one point, the event got so popular that HDBA had to limit the number of tickets since it was becoming hard for the restaurants to plan out how much chili to make.

The most recent cookoff was held back in 2019. It’s been paused since due to the COVID-19 pandemic.

While the original plan was to bring back the event this past fall, Kocak says, linger ing issues from the pandemic prompted the association to set its eyes on 2023.

Until the event returns, you can bring back the memories of the chili cookoff by recreating Tucci’s chili recipe, which won it title of Judge’s Choice in 2019.

Rachel Karas is an editor at CityScene Media Group. Feedback welcome at rkaras@cityscenemediagroup.com.

Chili

Recipe courtesy of Tucci’s General Manager Michael Sharp

• 1 cup diced onion

• 1 cup chopped garlic

• 2 cups diced bell peppers (red and green recommended)

• 4 cups red wine

• 2 gallons barbecue sauce

• 1 #10 can (equal to about 1 gallon) plum tomatoes

• 1 #10 can (equal to about 1 gallon) kidney beans

• 5 pounds your choice of meat (2 ½ pounds of ground beef and 2 ½ pounds of ground pork recom mended)

• 1 Tbsp. garlic powder

• 1 Tbsp. onion powder

• 1 Tbsp. paprika

• 1 tsp. cayenne pepper

*Amounts can be adjusted to make smaller or larger batches

Cook garlic, onions and peppers in a pan.

In a separate pan, brown the meat and drain the grease.

Combine vegetables, meat and beans in a pot and bring up to a medium heat.

Slowly add tomatoes and barbecue sauce.

Add seasoning (adjusting to personal taste) and simmer until hot.

Tucci’s chili recipe won the ‘Judges Choice’ title back in 2019.

Garnish with sour cream, shredded cheddar and/or scallions.

36 • December 2022/January 2023 www.dublinlifemagazine.com
Police Chief Justin Páez tastes one of the chili recipes as a judge for the 2019 chili cookoff.
December 2022/January 2023 • 37 www.dublinlifemagazine.com

Right on Cue

Pool table-anchored basement remodel follows multiple overhauls in Amberleigh house

calls one of the most beautiful she’s seen. It’s surrounded by porcelain tile with a distressed wood look – a good choice for a basement, Lewis says.

“It is so tough and so waterproof,” she says.

Adding character to the entertaining area is a small nook under the stairs, where people can sit and talk outside of the flow of traffic. A small floating bar with stools pulled up to it is positioned near the end of the pool table.

“It’s just a cozy little spot to sit and have a beer while you’re playing pool or whatever,” says Lewis.

A top-to-bottom basement remodel is just the latest in a series of major improvements for a 20-plus-year-old Amberleigh house.

The home was built in 1998, and the current homeowners have been there for the vast majority of the 24 years since. Over the past decade, they’ve worked with J.S. Brown & Co. to overhaul the mudroom, add a second-floor laundry, renovate the kitchen, spruce up the front entryway and, finally, transform the basement – almost always with their children and dogs in mind.

The Basement

The basement project entailed a new bedroom with full bath, as well as a game area anchored by a pool table and an entertainment area with comfortable furniture and a big TV. Like many of the homeown

ers’ remodel choices, it was driven by their children’s needs. In this case, with the kids getting older, they wanted a separate area to hang out with friends – though, of course, the parents could use it themselves when they were the ones who had company.

“We went through all the ages of toys in that basement,” says homeowner Becky Keyser.

The basement was partially finished before, but the finished section is much larger than it once was. J.S. Brown took over a wall space and moved a doorway to accommodate the TV and large sectional couch.

“The wall that had the TV and bar area on it used to be interrupted by a doorway to the unfinished part of the basement,” says Monica Lewis, vice president of sales for J.S. Brown.

The shift in space opened up more room for the pool table, which Lewis

The homeowners also wanted to add a bedroom in the basement – previously, the house was four-bedroom, and with three children, they didn’t have a guest room – but didn’t want it completely cut off from everything. Thus, the sliding barn doors with frosted glass, which not only ensure that open doors don’t cut down on the amount of space, but make it possible to extend the living area down the road if desired.

The bedroom is equipped with a full bathroom and a sizable closet. It also has plenty of natural light. Though the windows had to be replaced because they were dated, they didn’t need to be enlarged, as they were of impressive size already.

38 • December 2022/January 2023 www.dublinlifemagazine.com

“There wasn’t much we had to do to make that bedroom feel like a bedroom,” Lewis says.

The stairs down to the basement have undergone changes, too. Given Keyser’s preference for clean lines, J.S. Brown gave the railings a new style, with a painted look rather than a stained look.

“This basement had a very Colonial, old turn spindle look with the oak coming down the stairs,” Lewis says. “We went with a more Shaker style railing and post.

The Mudroom & Laundry Room

The Keyser home renovations started with the mudroom overhaul in 2013. As the main entrance for both the children and dogs, it wasn’t up for handling all that traffic.

Making things more complicated was the placement of the washer and dryer. Their positioning was off, blocking the door from the garage from opening all the

way. In fact, the homeowners didn’t like having them in the mudroom at all.

J.S. Brown repurposed a second-floor sitting room to serve as the new laundry room, eliminating the need to haul laundry up and down the stairs. It’s equipped with shelves for laundry baskets, a counter for folding laundry and a long hanging rod, and it now has a door to separate it from

December 2022/January 2023 • 39 www.dublinlifemagazine.com
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the master bedroom, which the sitting room did not.

Down in the suddenly spacious mudroom, J.S. Brown installed assigned cubby spaces – with hooks for backpacks, coats, shoes and more – for each of the kids, as well as a pet area with a sink and a space for water dishes.

The Kitchen & Beyond

The kitchen remodel followed the mudroom and laundry room in 2014. The new kitchen, designed in a Shaker style, is open to the dinette, which is itself open to the family room.

The biggest obstacle to modernizing the kitchen was the ceilings. The house has high vaulted ceilings in the back, and the transition comes smack in the middle of the kitchen. That means it can be hard for light to get all the way down to the floor, though a new orb pendant light over the table helps.

“It’s a beautiful feature, and you want to take advantage of it, but you don’t want to draw attention to the fact that this room doesn’t have a consistent ceiling,” Lewis says.

The kitchen island, which was previ ously two-level, now is down to one, mak ing it easier to manage. J.S. Brown moved the cook top from the island to the main

counter, which was a high priority for Keyser. The island also features a beverage center, oversized glass fixtures and glass cabinet doors.

“It’s really stood the test of time,” Key ser says. “People think I just redid (the kitchen).”

A smaller component of the renovated kitchen plays an important role in the household. J.S. Brown installed a nook on

a high-up ledge, used to hold food – particularly pizza – out of the reach of the dogs.

The front door replacement, which immediately predated the basement remodel, turned a typical late 1990s front entry with side lights into a striking grand entrance with solid wood doors.

Garth Bishop is a contributing editor. Feedback welcome at feedback@cityscenemediagroup.com.

40 • December 2022/January 2023 www.dublinlifemagazine.com
Room Additions • Whole House • Gourmet Kitchens • Luxurious Baths • Master Suites • Basements • Wine Cellars 614.908.4879 • JSBrownC ompany.com

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42 • December 2022/January 2023 www.dublinlifemagazine.com Luxury Living Contact Laura Pappas today for more information: 614-572-1250 lpappas@cityscenemediagroup.com Don’t miss your opportunity to showcase your home listings to every homeowner in Dublin. Your listings will also appear in the digital edition of the magazine, hosted on the Dublin Life Magazine home page: dublinlifemagazine.com 7667 Quetzal Dr. – Move-in Ready, Custom Built Home in Hawk's Nest. This home features 4 large bedrooms; 3.5 newly updated baths; formal dining room; executive office; a three-car tandem garage; screened/windowed lanai and a large mechanics workshop. The mechanicals, including roof, windows, kitchen appliances, hot-water tank, and HVAC are all recently replaced. KELLER WILLIAMS CONSULTANTS REALTY www.StrangeHomeTeam.com Mike &
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361-8853 LIKE NEW RANCH – Sunlit open floor plan w/ soaring 9' ceilings, fresh shades of gray, great room/ open center 7' island kitchen-white upgraded cabinetry/stainless steel appliances. French doors-1st floor den/office+utility rm, deluxe prime bedrm/3 bedrm-walk-in closets, 2 full baths, upgraded lighting+polished floors, carpet. Inviting manicured landscape, cement driveway+sidewalks+2 car garage, screen porch. Near by park. $330,000. INFINITY LIVING • Real Estate, Property Mgt. & Feng Shui CRB, CRS, GRI, ABR, PSA, CSD, SRES, SRS, AHWD, MRP, FSIM • www.InfinityLiving.org Carolyn Redinger
679-1274 what’s your style? 0 Beech Dr., Powell – 1st time for sale in nearly 50 years! 1.2+ ACRES over 2 large parcels (6 lots each; 12 total) in a beautiful, quiet neighborhood surrounded by custom homes in Shawnee Hills. DUBLIN SCHOOLS without all the restrictions & HOA rules! Mature trees surround property to provide ultimate seclusion and privacy. One, two, or perhaps even three homes may be built. $300,000. KELLER WILLIAMS CONSULTANTS REALTY www.SteveSmithAssociates.com Steve Smith (614) 205-3394 Steve Smith (614) 205-3394 13200 Hickory Ridge Rd., Plain City – Just outside of Plain City you will find this little slice of real estate heaven. 10
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Top Homes Sold in Dublin

The price of Dublin homes went up 5.1% in September 2022, with the me dian price being $434K, in comparison to last year. On average, homes in Dublin sold within 38 days of being on the market, one day less than last year. A total of 72 homes were sold in September this year, down from 116 last year.

43016

4634 Stockport Cr. 3 beds 3.5 baths $905,000 Sold 10/13/22

8276 Millhouse Ln. 4 beds 3.5 baths $852,001 Sold 10/10/22

7656 Tamarisk Ct. 5 beds 3.5 baths $815,000 Sold 9/13/22

8164 Grafton End 4 beds 3.5 baths $790,000 Sold 9/23/22

5761 Bonaly Ct. 4 beds 3.5 baths $777,611 Sold 9/21/22

4197 Brinsworth Dr. 4 beds 3.5 baths $750,000 Sold 10/27/22

43017

95 N. Riverview St. 3 beds 4 baths $2,125,000 Sold 10/17/22

9144 Tartan Fields Dr. 7 beds 6 baths $1,900,000 Sold 9/21/22

5480 Dublin Rd. 4 beds 4 baths $1,780,000 Sold 10/17/22

105 N. Riverview St. 3 beds 4 baths $1,500,000 Sold 9/20/22

9496 Tartan Ridge Ct. 4 beds 4.5 baths $1,295,000 Sold 9/21/22

7227 Wilton Chase 4 beds 3.5 baths $1,200,000 Sold 9/15/22

Information gathered from Franklin, Delaware and Union County Auditors

December 2022/January 2023 • 43 www.dublinlifemagazine.com

write next door

Christine’s Christmas Finale

Holiday fundraiser concert approaches its final year

A very dark door closed on April 13, 2003, when Dublin resident Christine Wilson and four other students died in an arson house fire near The Ohio State Univer sity campus.

This senseless tragedy and loss of life affected an entire community. I remember this fatal day in detail, as we lived next door to the Wilsons and Christine had been one of our babysitters. The shock was followed by sorrow, which was eventually followed by action as friends and neighbors rallied around the grief-stricken families. The goal was to create something positive from devastation, and a 5K road race was set up along with the Christine Wilson Foundation. The event ran for

nine years and enabled the foundation to start awarding two annual $3,500 scholarships to eighth-graders entering Bishop Watterson High School.

Another neighbor, Dr. Mark King, a radiologist and an exceptional pianist, felt called to go a different direction. He remembered Christine’s love of Christmas and holiday music, and he sat down to record a raw, heart-filled rendition of melo dies in her honor. “I felt that since music helped me during this intensely dark time, maybe it would help others as well,” King says. 1,500 CDs sold quickly, and another 2,500 sold by Christmas. That marked the beginning of healing for many and a beautiful door opening to an unforeseen future.

An idea was born: to hold a Christmas concert with Mark playing piano and monies raised being donated to children’s charities. Christine was majoring in childhood

education at Ohio University with plans of being an elementary school teacher.

“Christine’s life was going to be all about teaching and helping children,” says her father, Tim Wilson. “Through this philanthropic effort, we feel that we are providing for those children, for Christine.”

The first official Christine’s Christmas Concert took place in 2004 at OSU’s Weigel Auditorium and benefited the Childhood League Center. The event captured the distinct sadness that we all felt, but also celebrated the joy of Chris tine’s beautiful life.

Over $1.5 million has been raised through the generosity of sponsors and concertgoers since 2003. Dozens of children’s charities have benefited, including the Center for Child and Family Advocacy and Make-a-Wish. $500,000 was donated to the burn unit at Nationwide Children’s

44 • December 2022/January 2023 www.dublinlifemagazine.com

Hospital and it was renamed the Christine Wilson Burn Center. For this final year, all funds raised will go toward Special Olympics Ohio.

Jim Rieser is one of the original board members and has become close friends with the Kings and the Wilsons through this experience.

“We are unique because we are a work ing volunteer board for a charity event that donates to other charities,” says Jim. He volunteered with the track and field events for Special Olympics Ohio last year and said it was so rewarding that he will continue for many years.

The Dec. 10 concert will be “The Finale,” marking a spectacular 19-year event in memory of an amazing 19-year-old woman. The audience and artists on stage will have a difficult time saying goodbye to this favorite annual tradition.

“I never want to forget the emotional impact that Christine’s Christmas has had on me,” says Mark. For the last concert, there are sure to be a few surprises and not a dry eye in the house.

Mark has many favorite pieces, includ ing his arrangement of “Angels We Have Heard on High”’ and a unique take on “Jingle Bells” that flows from a jazz bal lad to full-out swing, and back to a new age jazz ballad. The solo piece of “O Little Town of Bethlehem” has an improvisational section that uses dissonant notes to create tension while “Christmas Eve Sarajevo” brings the crowd to its feet.

Tim and Pam Wilson want the community to know how grateful they are for the continued love and support. “We deeply appreciate everyone’s time, energy and commitment to make Christine’s Christ-

mas a success. It has been a true gift that allows Christine’s legacy to live on and to help children in central Ohio.” Their favorite song in the concert is “For Good,” sung by Mark’s daughter, Laura, and her cousin, Carolyn King.

“The lyrics from the musical Wicked are perfect and carry the pure message of the concert,” says Tim. Christine’s Christmas is a wonderful way to usher in the warmth of the holiday season. And although this sensational door is about to close, heaven knows that another door may soon open.

“I’ve heard it said that people come into our lives for a reason

Bringing something we must learn and we are led to those

Who help us most to grow if we let them and we help them in return

Well, I don’t know if I believe that’s true But I know I’m who I am today because I knew you”

Colleen D’Angelo is a Dublin Life columnist and freelance writer. She and her husband, Tony, raised three children in Dublin over the last 25 years. Colleen enjoys playing and teaching pickleball; walking her pup, Mason; and traveling internationally. You can reach her at colleendangelo1@gmail.com.

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CALL FOR A TOUR. Primrose School of Dublin 6415 Post Rd | Dublin, OH 43016 614.408.3732 | PrimroseDublin.com

December 2022/January 2023 • 45 www.dublinlifemagazine.com
concert featuring director/pianist Mark King, Capriccio Columbus Choir, CMC Conservatory Chamber Orchestra, and many other talented musicians and vocalists 9:30-10:00 p.m.: Dessert, coffee, cocktail reception
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Each Primrose school is a privately owned and operated franchise. Primrose Schools® and The Leader in Early Education and CareSM are registered trademarks and service marks of Primrose School Franchising Company. ©2015 Primrose School Franchising Company. All rights reserved. See primroseschools.com for additional information about our schools, curriculum, and programs.
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bookmarks

From the Dublin Branch of the Columbus Metropolitan Library

Joan Is Okay: A Novel by Weike Wang

Meet Joan, a devoted ICU doctor in New York City who loves staying in her comfort zone as much as helping her patients. But not even solitary Joan can avoid a nosey neighbor, her grieving family and a global health crisis. As Joan reckons with an outside world in turmoil, she begins to deal with the questions that have been gnawing away inside. While Joan is definitely not OK, maybe, one day, she will be.

Any Other Family by Eleanor Brown

Phoebe, Tate, Taylor and Violet are left without a guardian after the death of their grandmother. Luckily, the four siblings are swiftly adopted – but by three separate fami lies. Tabitha, Ginger and Elizabeth are com mitted to keeping the siblings connected, but none of them is prepared for what that means for their new families or themselves. When the group rents a home in Colorado, they look like any other family on vacation, but the bonds they’ve built are tested like never before. As the adults attempt to make their situation work, they find out there’s a fifth child on the way.

Forever Boy: A Mother’s Memoir of Autism and Finding Joy by Kate Swenson

Kate Swenson, author of the blog Finding Cooper’s Voice, shares her personal story of motherhood in her new memoir. Swenson was ready to become a parent and was over the moon when she gave birth to a son, but immediately knew he was different when he could not be comforted by touch. Cooper was later diagnosed with severe, language-impeding autism, which did not stop Swenson from giving Cooper the best life possible despite how the world treated him. In Forever Boy, Swenson lets readers in on her journey to acceptance and joy, show ing us what can be accomplished with hope and unconditional love.

Sisters of Mokama: The Pioneering Women Who Brought Hope and Healing to India by Jyoti Thottam

In Sisters of Mokama, Jyoti Thottam tells the story of ordinary women who went to extraor dinary lengths to provide hope and healing to an Indian state ravaged by war. When Thottam’s mother decided at 15 to travel to become a nurse in Bihar, one of the areas most affected by the violence of Partition, she was met with nuns from Kentucky. But those determined women were there for a reason: to provide care and share their knowledge. The American and Indian women worked together to persevere, and succeeded in transforming not only the Nazareth Hospital, but also the lives of those around them.

Dublin Life Book Club Selection

Editor’s note: To be added to the Dublin Life Book mailing list or for more information, email kgill@cityscenemediagroup.com. The club will meet Tuesday, Jan. 10 at 7 p.m. location TBD.

The One Hundred Years of Lenni and Margot: A Novel by

Marianne Cronin

17-year-old Lenni Pettersson and 83-year-old Margot Macrae form a unique friendship as they each are dying of different illnesses. When the two begin their quest to make 100 paintings together, untold stories from both of their lives surface as they strive to leave their mark on the world.

46 • December 2022/January 2023 www.dublinlifemagazine.com
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Laura Pappas 614.572.1250 lpappas@cityscenemediagroup.com
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