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CI TY O F CEDA R RA PIDS City Manager's Office 101 1st Street SE Cedar Rapids, Iowa 52401

The Environmental, Social and Economic Benefits of Sustainable Choices

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POSTAL CUSTOMER ECRWSS

Beyond the Green

Our CR Living 5 Seasons | May 2017


Our CR

FROM THE CITY MANAGER

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Sustainability is a fundamental component of building a strong community, and is embedded

FROM THE CITY MANAGER • SPECIAL SECTION •

in the core of the work we do at the City of

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Cedar Rapids.

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In 2012, the Cedar Rapids City Council adopted Guiding Principles of Sustainability for the City

NEWS YOU NEED TO KNOW • WATER QUALITY REPORT •

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of Cedar Rapids: Community – Building a community that embraces its diversity and history

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Growth – Advancing opportunities for businesses, individuals and the community as a whole to thrive

ON THE COVER:

Environmental Stewardship – Promoting economic and social growth while restoring the relationship between the city and its natural environment

The priority of creating pollinator habitat is just one of the City’s initiatives that focuses on the long term sustainability of our community. Learn more on page 9.

Affordability – Creating a city that is affordable and accessible to all members of the community

Photo taken by Seraiah Gibbins, age 14.

Innovation – Serving as a leader in creative, successful strategies to lead the progression towards a sustainable future To help promote and encourage these sustainability principles in

CONNECT WITH CEDAR RAPIDS

our daily operations and throughout the city, the iGreenCR program

www.cedar-rapids.org/subscribe

was created. Through our ongoing iGreenCR initiatives, goals, measurements, and partnerships, the City of Cedar Rapids is working

City of Cedar Rapids Iowa Government

to become a national model for environmental excellence. Creating a green, sustainable city requires a commitment from City

@CityofCRIowa

government, as well as every business, organization and individual. Not only can sustainable practices create a healthier, happier environment for residents, but when public and private organizations

CityofCR

become better stewards of the environment, they create positive economic benefits for themselves and the entire community.

City info on your smartphone

This Our CR issue highlights just a few of the many projects the City has developed that contribute to a healthier, more sustainable Cedar

Text / Email alerts

Rapids. Learn more about City programs and how you can contribute by visiting www.cedar-rapids.org/igreencr.

City Source email newsletter

Interested in Advertising With Us?

Jeffrey Pomeranz Cedar Rapids City Manager

Contact the Our CR Communications Coordinator at 319-286-5742.

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Beyond the Green SUSTAI NABI L ITY ' S T R IPL E B O TT O M L IN E

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or many, sustainability means taking actions that benefit the environment— recycling, reducing air and water pollution, or protecting natural spaces like forests and prairie. All of these are great steps toward becoming more sustainable and

have obvious environmental impacts. However, the value of any sustainable action increases when evaluated through a broader lens. The City of Cedar Rapids measures sustainability in terms of the triple bottom line—an approach that considers how decisions and policies impact the economic, social, and environmental health of the community. When City leaders consider the triple bottom line, they find solutions that are better, longer-lasting, and serve the current needs of the community without limiting the ability of future generations to meet their needs. The stories to come illustrate how this holistic approach to sustainability provides Cedar Rapids residents with new opportunities and builds the framework for a healthy, enduring community. We hope you'll join us on this sustainability pursuit.

ECONOMIC BENEFITS

ENVIRONMENTAL BENEFITS

Flood protection, tourism and entertainment

Prairie plantings, reduced erosion, improved storm water run-off and water quality, provides wildlife travel corridors

SOCIAL BENEFITS

Community gathering space, trails, public art

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McGrath Amphitheatre

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BEYOND THE GREEN

An Upward Trajectory The City of Cedar Rapids is in pursuit of sustainability and a Sustainable City Government Plan as a major milestone. Throughout this process, we are collecting data and your feedback. What priorities are most important to you? Contact sustainability@cedar-rapids.org or call 319-286-5927

iGreenCR Initiative Launched The purpose of iGreenCR is to demonstrate the City’s commitment to creating a more sustainable community for Cedar Rapids’ next generation. iGreenCR’s focus is on both the “i”nvestment the City is making in projects to improve Cedar Rapids for generations to come as well as the actions each “i”ndividual can take to incorporate sustainability into their daily lives. MARCH 2012

JANUARY 2012 Council Adopts Five Guiding Principles of Sustainability

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“State of Affairs" Report This report defined our municipal organization’s starting point—identifying sustainability challenges, what leading cities have done, and what we’ve accomplished. It led to the creation of the City’s director-level Sustainability Integration Committee.

Sustainable City Talks Phase 1 of our sustainability planning process, this threepart series engaged 600 staff, business partners, and community members on the science of sustainability, community leadership, and City leadership and vision.

NOVEMBER 2016 – APRIL 2017

MAY 2016

SEPTEMBER 2016 Sustainability Integration Committee Tasked with creating our city’s first municipal sustainability plan, the Sustainability Integration Committee identified a three-part approach: Educate, Assess, and Prioritize.

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Prioritize—Our Sustainable City Government Plan STAR will allow us to identify our strengths, challenges, and opportunities, which will form our Sustainable City Government Plan and enhance EnvisionCR, our community’s comprehensive plan. FEBRUARY - JUNE

JULY -FEBRUARY Assessment Phase 2 of our process is Assessment, and STAR Communities is our tool. Sustainability Tools for Assessing and Rating (STAR) Communities is a robust assessment tool that grows our understanding and definition of sustainability. Completing STAR will provide a common, transparent set of data the city and community can use.


STAR COMMUNITIES STAR Communities is the national standard for sustainability benchmarking, rating, and planning. Cedar Rapids is preparing to participate in the STAR Community assessment, which measures performance in the areas listed below. Achieving a STAR rating will help Cedar Rapids assess our current strengths and identify areas for improvement. By working towards becoming a STAR community, Cedar Rapids is demonstrating a commitment to local sustainability. BUI LT ENVIRON ME N T • Ambient Noise & Light • Community Water Systems • Compact & Complete Communities

• Housing Affordability • Infill & Redevelopment • Public Spaces • Transportation Choices

CL I MATE & EN E R G Y • Climate Adaptation • Greenhouse Gas Mitigation • Greening the Energy Supply • Industrial Sector Resource Efficiency • Resource Efficient Buildings • Resource Efficient Public Infrastructure

PARTNERSHIP

WITH THE SUN

ECO NO M Y & JO BS • Business Retention & Development • Green Market Development • Local Economy

• Quality Jobs & Living Wages • Targeted Industry Development • Workforce Readiness

S

olar prices have dropped 92 percent since 2000, making solar energy an affordable option for those seeking a clean and renewable energy source.

Since installing a 90 kilowatt (kW) solar array on the Northwest

EDUCATIO N, AR TS & CO MMU N I TY

Transit Garage, the City of Cedar Rapids has saved $3,000 to-date.

• Arts & Culture • Community Cohesion • Educational Opportunity & Attainment

The array produces enough energy to power approximately 12 homes.

• Historic Preservation • Social & Cultural Diversity

maximum cost benefits. The PPA means the solar panels are owned and maintained by the solar installer, they get the tax credits, and the City pays the solar installer for the electricity (at a lower rate than regular electricity). The only upfront cost was paying a consultant to evaluate the complex proposals.

What’s next? Some of the City’s facilities pay a very low rate for

HEA LTH & SA F E TY

NATURA L SYSTE MS • Green Infrastructure • Invasive Species • Natural Resource Protection

However, as a non-taxable entity, the City needed to use a financing mechanism called a Power Purchase Agreement (PPA) to receive the

EQ UITY & EMP O W E R ME N T • Civic Engagement • Human Services • Civil & Human Rights • Poverty Prevention & Alleviation • Environmental Justice • Equitable Services & Access

• Active Living • Community Health & Health System • Emergency Prevention & Response

Federal and state tax credits are available for solar installations.

• Food Access & Nutrition • Indoor Air Quality • Natural & Human Hazards • Safe Communities

electricity because of their size. In these instances, financing solar panels through a PPA would not be a wise economic investment because the solar installer would not be able to charge us a competitive rate for electricity. However, electricity supplied to the City’s drinking water booster stations, responsible for moving drinking water throughout the city, is billed at a higher rate and

• Outdoor Air Quality • Water in the Environment • Working Lands

I NNO VATIO N AN D P R O CE S S • Best Practices and • Local Innovation Processes • Good Governance • Exemplary Performance

provide an opportunity for additional solar power. The City is in the process of equipping four booster stations with solar panels that will generate roughly 200kW of solar (enough to power 25 homes). Going forward, the City of Cedar Rapids will continue to look for more opportunities to reduce energy consumption and implement clean, renewable energy sources.

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BEYOND THE GREEN

Humans and Nature

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esearch proves that humans need nature. Being in

trees increases property values. Trees provide shade and

nature lowers blood pressure, reduces stress and

lower electricity bills in the summer; trees block wind and

anxiety, improves attention span, and generally

lower energy bills in the winter; and trees absorb rain

increases wellness. Even views of nature through a

when it falls—not only in the trees' roots but also the

window produce these results. Most understand the air

trees' canopies. Think of tree canopies as “slow release

quality and oxygen benefits of trees, but trees also provide

capsules.” They can hold on to hundreds or thousands of

economic and social benefits.

gallons of water at a time, and water slowly drips off or

For your home and neighborhood, the presence of mature

evaporates into the air, reducing flash flooding.

GREY TO GREEN

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Using nature in place of pipes to manage stormwater he City of Cedar Rapids has begun using nature to solve unique challenges. “Green Infrastructure” is a term that generally refers to land uses that absorb water. Green infrastructure can be parks, green roofs, permeable pavement, prairie, and even streets and yards. Streets can be built strategically with bioswales that direct

stormwater to rain-absorbing plants, and yards can incorporate these same plants to retain and filter water. These urban conservation practices are designed to improve water quality by reducing the amount of pollutants that enter our streams and waterways. They also help with flash flood mitigation, allowing more stormwater to soak into the ground rather than runoff and overwhelm storm sewers. In contrast, stormwater that enters storm sewer pipes, travels directly to rivers and streams and receives no additional treatment or purification. When green infrastructure is combined with the creation of pollinator habitat, native prairie plantings and a robust urban canopy of trees, sustainable solutions are becoming a critical component of stormwater management in Cedar Rapids.

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INCENTIVES FOR CEDAR RAPIDS PROPERTY OWNERS & BUSINESSES The City’s push to increase green infrastructure has also prompted the creation of the Stormwater Best Management Practices (BMPs) Cost-Share Program, which provides financial and technical assistance to any individual or business subject to a stormwater utility fee. Residential property

Staff from Horizons, A Family Service Alliance participated in the #1BagBlitz in April and challenged Bankers Trust and the Cedar Rapids Police Department to also take part in the challenge to clean-up Cedar Rapids. Photo from Horizon’s Facebook Page.

owners are eligible for 50 percent reimbursement of project costs up to $2,000 for stormwater best management practices—rain gardens, bioswales, soil quality restoration, permeable pavement— implemented on their property. Commercial properties can apply to receive up to 50 percent of the project cost with no maximum reimbursement limit. More information about the cost-share program can be found at www.cityofcr.com/stormwater.

The #1BagBlitz is Now! The #1BagBlitz, a special partnership with Blue Zones Project® Cedar Rapids, encourages businesses, groups and individual citizens to take the City Manager's 1 Bag Challenge (while “Moving Naturally”) and then call on another business, group, or citizen to also take the challenge. The #1BagBlitz runs through June 30, 2017, and it is EASY to participate:

1.

Complete the online "sign-up" form to let the City’s Solid Waste & Recycling Division know where and when you’ll be cleaning up. A list of locations that have free litter clean-up kits is available at www.cleanupcr.com. Groups that need supplies—bags and gloves—should make their request using the online sign up form or by calling 319-286-5897. We ask for one week of advance notice of the group’s desired clean-up date if possible.

2. 3.

Perform a clean-up

GREEN INFRASTRUCTURE PILOT PROJECTS The Iowa Department of Agriculture and Land Stewardship (IDALS) awarded the City of Cedar Rapids $99,237 in funding to develop four Stormwater Best Management Practice (BMP) pilot projects. THE PROJECTS WILL BE BUILT IN THE CITY RIGHT-OF-WAY AND WILL INCLUDE: Permeable pavement near Coe College—

4.

Pavement installations are porous and absorb water, decreasing the amount of runoff.

Bioswales at public schools (Bowman Woods Elementary School, Kennedy High School, and St. Pius Elementary School)— Bioswales are areas of vegetation that channel and absorb water rather than having it runoff. Plants remove stormwater pollutants and reduce flash flooding risks.

Post a photo or video to your social media account(s) and use the hashtag #1BagBlitz to challenge a local organization or individual to take part (optional, but we hope you do!) Complete the online "log participation" form so we can recognize participants and leaders and measure community-wide progress.

A map will be posted online showing progress, recognizing high performers, and showing how many miles have been walked. Those who log their participation using the online forms will also have a chance to win a variety of prizes when the #1BagBlitz campaign concludes on June 30. #1BagBlitz is a great way to help beautify your community, keep litter from entering our storm sewers and traveling to local streams and rivers, and keep moving naturally! Visit www.cleanupcr.com for more information on the City Manager’s 1 Bag Challenge and the #1BagBlitz.

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BEYOND THE GREEN

TREE DATA From the view above Cedar Rapids you see more than the houses and businesses that line the streets. The city is covered by a layer of leaves and branches that create a canopy providing environmental benefits. This urban forest serves as valuable green infrastructure, the only infrastructure asset that gets more valuable over time.

M

anaging the canopy is difficult without knowing

access the software to look at trees by location to see their

details about the species, size and condition of the

species and condition. The inventory allows the City to be

trees. Last summer, the City partnered with Arbor

proactive in preparing for Emerald Ash Borer by indicating

Systems to conduct an assessment of the right of way trees

the best trees for treatment and helping to create plans to

and provide an inventory to help plan for their future care.

manage ash trees when they begin to fail.

Four crews of certified arborists familiar with Midwest tree species walked each street in Cedar Rapids. Section after

A VALUABLE ASSET

section, they measured the trunk diameter of each tree

It is estimated that the street trees in Cedar Rapids

and documented its size and class. They counted more

provide benefits to the community that are valued at

than 43,000 trees with 17,000 open spaces for additional

over $5 million each year. These benefits include energy

planting and noted the canopy is in very good health.

savings, removing carbon dioxide from the atmosphere,

The IT division of the City created a system to manage the tree inventory data. The exact GPS location is available

and increasing attention span. Non-profit Trees Forever

and schedule work more efficiently. The system also

determined for every $1 spent on trees, taxpayers receive

quantifies the financial impact that the forest provides in environmental benefits. Eventually, residents will be able to

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improved air quality, increased property values, and health benefits to people by reducing blood pressure and anxiety

so staff can easily identify trees that need attention

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stormwater retention, reduced water treatment costs,

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$4 back in public benefits.

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WORKOUT OUTSIDE

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itness zones have become increasingly popular in parks, and

Leading the Way with

POLLINATORS B y way of Fox News, Huffington Post, Reddit, Popular Science, and other

national media outlets, more than 71 million people have been introduced to Cedar Rapids’ 1,000 Acre Pollinator Initiative, and the reaction has been

overwhelmingly positive.

Habitat decline and pollution have led to drastic population declines for bees and butterflies, which provide billions of dollars of pollinator benefits for the food crops and flowers we grow, need, and love. In fact, the honey bee and monarch butterfly are both officially endangered species.

municipalities have been eager to

add them because of the health benefits they provide residents. Getting outside in nature adds further benefits—stress reduction, lower blood pressure, and increased attention span. Several studies across the nation have proven that outdoor exercise equipment not only entices more people to use parks, but it increases the activity level of those in the park. In Cedar Rapids, due to a partnership with the Cedar Rapids Area Association of Realtors, the City has been able to add fitness zones at Cherokee and Noelridge Parks. Workout stations include balancing,

Through a collaborative effort with the Monarch Research Project, Cedar Rapids, Hiawatha and Linn County, 1,000 acres of public land were identified that could be

stretching, plyometric, push-up, pull-up, and Tai-Chi exercises. Further donations

put to more productive, beneficial use—pollinator habitat.

from the association of realtors will

The good news is the benefits of this initiative don’t stop with the bees and

this summer, and two more fitness areas

butterflies. The wildflower-rich prairie will trap stormwater, reducing flash flooding and improving water quality. Prairie also cools the air and provides oxygen—all

expand fitness zones to Cherry Hill Park are expected in the future.

while providing a beautiful space for outdoor recreation opportunities. While it will take five years to achieve the goal, the City of Cedar Rapids is proud to champion this issue and serve as a model for others to follow.

For more information, visit www.cityofcr.com/pollinator.

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Enjoy free outdoor fitness classes this summer. Yoga meets on Saturdays, June 3 through August 26, from 8:00-9:00 a.m. at Greene Square. Outdoor workouts at the amphitheatre meet Tuesdays and Fridays through August from 6:30-7:15 a.m.

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BEYOND THE GREEN

Roads for Everyone

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ities that prioritize all modes of transportation—walking, biking, busing, driving—make the lives of residents (and visitors) easier. Increasingly, citizens are seeking communities where they have the option to walk or bike comfortably to a park or grocery store near their home. Prioritizing a people-first model of transportation—a philosophy that considers all the possible uses of a roadway—has benefits well beyond accommodating preference. Cities that consider all modes of travel create settings where vehicular accidents

decrease in number and severity; where restaurants create patios because their patrons enjoy sitting next to a sidewalk and street with bike and people traffic; and where air quality is better. These environments where retirees, young children, those who bike for exercise, and those that want to or need to bike to work all find a transportation network designed with everyone’s needs and safety in mind. Read on to learn how the City of Cedar Rapids is making our city a place where motorists, bicyclists, and pedestrians benefit from transit systems with a focus on supporting sustainable living.

BICYCLE SAFETY REMINDERS The Cedar Rapids Police Department would like to remind both motorists and bicyclists of important safety information to ensure that motorists, bicyclists and pedestrians are able to work together for safe usage of area roadways.

Need a refresher on the bike lane symbols and rules of the road? Visit cityofcr.com/bikecr

• Bicyclists have the same rights and • Motorists are required to pass a bicycle at • Bicycles shall be equipped with red rear obligations as operators of motor vehicles a safe distance. It may be necessary for a reflectors that can be visible from 300 feet including the responsibility to obey traffic motorist to slow down and wait to pass a away. If riding a bicycle between sunset signs and signals (including stop signs and bicyclist. and sunrise, the bicycle must display a red lights) and must use appropriate hand lamp that emits white light visible from • Bicyclists are allowed to use sidewalks signals when turning. a distance of at least 300 feet from the within Cedar Rapids. Bicyclists are front of the bicycle. A red light capable of • Bicyclists should ride as far to the right not allowed to use the sidewalk in the flashing is recommended on the back of a as safely possible. However, a bicyclist business district of Cedar Rapids or bicycle for increased visibility. is allowed to use the travel lane of a anywhere that a “no sidewalk riding” sign roadway and may use the full lane if they is posted. When riding on the sidewalk is • When in doubt, a motorist should yield to feel that the right edge of the road way is prohibited, bicyclists must dismount and pedestrians and bicyclists. unsafe in any way. Bicyclists may need to walk on the sidewalk or ride in the street. use the full lane to avoid road debris on • Bicyclists should be cautious for parked For more information about bicycle the roadway, parked cars, or to ensure vehicles maneuvering into traffic that may safety and laws, visit our website at safe passing of motorists. not see you as they pull out. Bicyclists www.cedar-rapids.org/police. • Cyclists riding two abreast shall not should also be alert for vehicle doors impede the normal and reasonable opening into their path. Special caution movement of traffic and, on a laned is required around parked vehicles as The information provided was accurate at the roadway, shall ride within a single lane. vehicle doors may open unexpectedly; it time of publication. Please visit our website for is recommended that bicyclists not ride the most current information available. within 3 feet of parked vehicles.

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BIKE PATROL CONNECTS

POLICE

WITH THE

COMMUNITY

W

hen police officers ride bicycles, they are being

15-20 miles during their shift. During

energy efficient and using a non-polluting means

special events with large crowds like the

of transportation. There are zero emissions from

Freedom Festival or Downtown Farmers’

bicycles, which can reduce carbon emissions and improve

Market, bike officers can move much

the air quality of our city. Noise pollution is also minimized

more efficiently and faster than officers

with the use of bicycles.

on foot.

When the 40 certified police cyclists utilize their fully-

The Police Department started bike

equipped Trek and Cannondale Police Mountain bikes, they

patrols in spring 1995. The patrol was

are not only being good stewards of our environment, they

developed as another tool for getting

are utilizing an effective community policing technique.

police officers into neighborhoods as

Officers on bike patrol can effectively interact with the

part of the general policing philosophy

public and go to locations where vehicles cannot. Bike

known as community-orientated policing.

patrol officers are often deployed to the trails, the

While the officers were still out in the

downtown district, and neighborhoods with higher amounts

open and easily accessible to the public,

of foot traffic.

they had the advantage of being even

The Police Department has 17 bicycles and most platoons have certified bike officers assigned. Officers usually ride in two person teams and patrol areas throughout the city during their tour. An officer on bike patrol typically travels

more mobile. As police departments have learned throughout the country, bike patrols are very effective in dealing with crimes that take place where police cars cannot go, or where they cannot go without being noticed.

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BEYOND THE GREEN

Photo credit: Kyle Moscrip

BIKING FOR INCLUSIVENESS

A

city’s infrastructure plays a huge role in supporting transportation to work, school or the grocery store while adding leisure and recreation options. Diverse ages, income levels, traditions, and interests mean one mode of

transportation does not fit all. Building infrastructure for people driving, walking, pedaling a bike, or riding a bus is foundational to an inclusive, vibrant, healthy, and mobile population. As road improvements take place throughout Cedar Rapids, city officials continue to look for ways to improve not just the pavement, but residents’ quality of life.

BIKE LANES

TRAILS

Vibrant communities provide for safe, healthy recreation options. Bike trail connections continue to grow throughout Cedar Rapids, making it easier than ever to explore the community on a paved or gravel bike path.

Cedar Rapids has over 55 miles of bike lanes (on-street and off) and was the first in Iowa to install green bike lanes and protected bike lanes.

CEMAR TRAIL NE

The CEMAR Trail, when complete, will provide a connection from Cedar Lake to Marion, following H Avenue/16th Street NE and then along the abandoned rail bed to the east city limits by Mt. Calvary Cemetery. Bike lanes currently connect Cedar Lake to Daniels Park, and a 10’ wide trail segment between 20th Street NE and 29th Street NE has already been completed. This year, work will continue on the trail connection alongside the Mount Mercy University Athletic Complex and Daniel’s Park. This includes the areas of H Avenue NE, 16th Street, F Avenue, and north of E Avenue. Trailheads where trail users can park and access the trail are available off K Ave NE near 20th St, and at Cedar Lake on Shaver Rd NE near H Ave NE.

GRANT WOOD TRAIL (Formerly LINDALE TRAIL)

Design work has begun on the extension of the Grant Wood Trail from C Ave NE to the intersection of 51st St NE and Center Point Rd NE where it would intersect the Cedar River Trail segment of the Cedar Valley Nature Trail. The trail will follow an old railroad alignment running diagonally east to west between Blairs Ferry Road and 51st St NE. Currently the trail is completed from C Ave to Boyson Park in Marion where it connects to the northern end of the CEMAR Trail. Construction may be in several phases and is expected to begin in 2018 or 2019.

CHEROKEE TRAIL

EDGEWOOD RD TRAIL NW

The Cherokee Trail will connect the Ellis Trail and Downtown to neighborhoods and destinations on the far west side including, Jacolyn Park, Cherry Hill Park and Morgan Creek Park near Highway 100. The construction will be staged over several years, with the first phase likely between Morgan Creek Park and Jacolyn Park. Design work is underway and trail users and residents of the neighborhoods near the trail can expect to get a chance to preview and comment on the design later this year. Construction is expected to begin in 2018 or 2019.

Construction of a new multi-use pathway will be underway this summer on the east side of Edgewood Road NW. When complete, a trail connection will exist between O Avenue NW and Ellis Rd, tying into the existing Ellis Trail. 2017 will include much of the prep work for the project, including grading and storm sewer. In 2018, work will begin on the paving as well as new traffic signals at the Edgewood Rd and Ellis Rd intersection. The 10’ wide trail will also incorporate sidewalk and ADA improvements for trail access.

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NEWS YOU NEED TO KNOW

ZONING CODE UPDATE TAKES SHAPE Zoning codes are the unseen forces that help shape how our buildings, neighborhoods, and communities look. The City is currently working on a comprehensive update to its zoning code, known as ReZone Cedar Rapids.

Simply put, zoning: • Provides the rules for what structures can be built and where • Outlines how buildings will be used (e.g. residential, commercial)

TWO-WAY CONVERSIONS CONTINUE THIS SUMMER

• Influences how structures will look (e.g. landscaping, aesthetics)

This summer and next, work will continue to create a

• Specifies how much can be built (e.g. height, bulk)

downtown. Many of these conversion projects also

consistent network of two-way streets throughout the

With help from the public and private developers, the updated code will: • Align with the City’s comprehensive plan, EnvisionCR • Be easier to use and apply to new development • Improve predictability in terms of what gets built for both developers and the community • Encourage mixed-use development and a variety of housing types

include pavement rehabilitation, sidewalk ramp and ADA enhancements, traffic signal removals, and storm sewer improvements. Continued collaboration with Union Pacific Railroad means that safety improvements will also take place this year at the railroad crossings, including the construction of new arms and gates. Segments of oneway streets that will be converted to two-way streets this construction season include 2nd, 4th, and 5th Avenues SE in the downtown core. Visit cityofcr.com/conversions to learn more.

• Preserve neighborhood character Find out more about the project, review documents, and learn about future public meetings at www.cityofcr.com/rezone.

Stay connected with us as we ReZone Cedar Rapids!

to

WORK

WEEK

BIKE TO WORK WEEK IS MAY 15-19, 2017 Join us for special events and activities all week long that celebrate Cedar Rapids bikeability and encourage healthy living. Events include the official proclamation, bike rides, social gatherings, giveaway items, and more. Visit cityofcr.com/bikecr for a schedule of events. W W W. C E D A R - R A P I D S . O R G

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NEWS YOU NEED TO KNOW

FOURTH YEAR OF PAVING FOR PROGRESS The fourth construction season of the Paving for Progress campaign is officially underway, with 30 projects planned for the 2017 year. To date, 79 projects have been completed thanks to the local option sales tax funds. This year, improvements are planned on C Avenue NE, Northwood Drive NE, 14th Avenue SE, West Post Road NW, 3rd Avenue SW, Memorial Drive SE, and more. The full list of 2017 projects is available online at www.cityofcr.com/pavingforprogress.

Learn more about the projects that have been completed to date and what’s coming up next for Paving for Progress.

PRICE APPLIANCE

1/

2

SOLID WASTE & RECYCLING

HOLIDAY COLLECTION

00.00

AND

REMINDERS

FREE TIRE DROP-OFF JUNE 1, 2017 AUGUST 31, 2017

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MEMORIAL DAY

Use the coupon (sent with your utility bill) to drop off your items at either Linn County Solid Waste Agency location during normal business hours. Full details, including a list of accepted items, is available at www.CleanUpCR.com.

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4TH OF JULY

No Collection

Normal Collection

One-day delay in collection for the remainder of the week.

No delay in collection schedule. Place carts out on your normal collection day.

www.CityofCR.com/Garbage |

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J AVENUE WATER TREATMENT PLANT

NORTHWEST WATER TREATMENT PLANT

WATERQUALITY R E P O R T | 2016

We work around the clock to ensure your drinking water is of the highest quality. This report illustrates the scrutiny water undergoes before and after it leaves our facilities. Serving the City of Cedar Rapids, the City of Robins, the Glenbrook Cove Subdivision of Marion and the Poweshiek Water Association.

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BUILDING A RESILIENT

Drinking Water System The City of Cedar Rapids Utilities Department Water Division’s chief responsibility is protecting public health by providing safe, reliable drinking water to all customers. In support of this mission, the Division is engaged in a variety of projects to enhance and protect the City’s water supply. The projects detailed below will keep your water safe from source to tap and allow for continued growth and development in Cedar Rapids.

Middle Cedar Partnership Project The Middle Cedar Partnership Project (MCPP) is a $4.3 million program designed to encourage upstream producers and landowners to implement conservation practices to help nutrients like nitrogen and phosphorus stay on the land and out of waterways. The program is focused on improving soil health, bettering water quality and reducing water quantity. Since the program began in 2015, those in the project area have implemented the following: • 16,539 acres of cover crops • 134 percent increase in cover crop acres from 2015 to 2016 • Approximately 15 percent of the total crop acres in the MCPP target area is now part of a cover crop program

• 6,522 acres of nutrient management plans or practices • 9,173 acres of no-till, strip-till or reduced tillage practices • 2 saturated buffers • 1 bioreactor

From the data being collected within the watershed, the conservation practices are making a difference in the amount of nutrients that are reaching our waterways. In the Middle Cedar: • Bioreactors reduce nitrate concentration by 42 percent.

• Saturated buffers reduce nitrate load by 39 percent.*

• Fields with cover crops have 32 percent lower nitrate concentrations than fields without.

• Water flowing through wetlands show nitrate concentration 84 percent lower than stream observations over the same period.

*Data provided by the USDA Agricultural Research Service and Iowa State University

Airborne Geophysical Groundwater Survey

New Kirkwood Water Tank

The City of Cedar Rapids and the United States Geological Survey (USGS) conducted an innovative groundwater survey in May 2017. CGG Canada Services, who is under contract with the City, collected and recorded geophysical measurements over the Cedar River Aquifer, which is the source of the City’s water supply. These measurements will determine groundwater and soil/sand characteristics in the aquifer. To collect the data, a helicopter traveled approximately 200 feet above the ground at speeds of almost 70 MPH with a remote sensing device called a “bird” tethered 100 feet below the helicopter. The bird transmitted electromagnetic waves approximately 150 feet into the ground to measure the physical properties and determine where the soil and sand is most porous. The data will be turned into models by the USGS that the City can use to better predict how our aquifer will respond to extreme weather conditions, like a drought, and periods when demand for water is high. The models can also be used to predict where future wells might be most productive.

16

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In November 2016, demolition of the Kirkwood standpipe located on Kirkwood Boulevard SW between Rolling Ridge Drive SW and 66th Avenue SW was completed. The new 1.5 million gallon tank will be constructed in 2017-2018 and provide the following benefits: • Allows the Water Division to reconfigure the water distribution system for increased resiliency • Enhances fire protection • Improves the system’s storage capacity • Supports future development • Increases water pressure for those served by the tank


Educational Information Nitrate

lead in your water, you may wish to have your water tested. Information on lead in drinking water, testing methods, and steps you can take to minimize exposure is available from the Safe Drinking Water Hotline (1-800-426-4791) or at www.epa.gov/safewater/lead.

A dissolved form of nitrogen found in fertilizers and sewage by-products that may leach into ground water and other water sources. Nitrates occur naturally in some waters. Over time, nitrates can accumulate in aquifers and contaminate ground water.

The following state-approved laboratories can test your water for lead:

Nitrate in drinking water at levels above 10 ppm is a potential health risk for infants less than six months of age. High nitrate levels in drinking water can cause blue baby syndrome. Nitrate levels may rise quickly for short periods of time because of rainfall or agricultural activity. If you are caring for an infant, ask for advice from your health care provider.

State Hygienic Laboratory Oakdale, IA 800-421-4692

Lead Our drinking water contains little or no lead when it leaves our treatment plants. However, lead can leach into the water during overnight contact with the lead solder and brass faucets in some homes. Because of that, the CRWD collects and analyzes special samples quarterly from area homes to more frequently monitor the distribution system. Our tests show that most homes are at or well below the 15 parts per billion (ppb) — or 15 micrograms per liter of water — treatment technique standard set by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) for annual compliance monitoring. If present, elevated levels of lead can cause serious health problems, especially for pregnant women and young children. Lead in drinking water is primarily from materials and components associated with service lines and home plumbing. The CRWD is responsible for providing high quality drinking water, but cannot control the variety of materials used in plumbing components. When your water has been sitting for several hours, you can minimize the potential for lead exposure by flushing your tap for 30 seconds to 2 minutes before using water for drinking and cooking. If you are concerned about

Water Value

WATER SOURCE (WELLS)

It's important to be aware that some people may be more vulnerable than the general population to contaminants in drinking water. Immuno-compromised persons — those undergoing cancer chemo-therapy or organ transplants, some elderly or infants and people with HIV/AIDS or other immune system disorders — can be particularly at risk from infections. We ask anyone that may be at risk to seek advice about drinking water from their health care providers. Guidelines from the EPA and Centers for Disease Control on appropriate steps to lessen the risk of infection by microbial contaminants and/or Cryptosporidium are available from the National Safe Drinking Water Hotline at 1-800-426-4791.

Questions? If you have questions or concerns about our water quality or this report, we invite you to attend one of two upcoming public meetings: Saturday, June 3 8 a.m. - Noon, Downtown Farmers' Market

$0.46

DISTRIBUTION AND STORAGE WATER TREATMENT

$1.63

Thursday, June 15 5 - 6 p.m., NewBo City Market, 1100 3rd St. SE

Cedar Rapids residents enjoy water rates that are among the lowest in the state.

$0.36

METER AND CUSTOMER SERVICE

Keystone Labs Newton, IA 641-792-8451

At-Risk Populations

$3.98 Buys You 1,000 Gallons of Clean Water: ENGINEERING AND ADMINISTRATIVE SUPPORT

TestAmerica Cedar Falls, IA 319-277-2401

$3.98

Engineering and Administrative

$0.35 perSupport 1,000 Gallons Water Source (Wells) $0.46

from CRWD

$0.59

$0.94

$840.00 per 1,000 Gallons purchased at the store at $.84/gallon

Meter and Customer Service $0.53

vs.

Distribution and Storage $0.90 Water Treatment $1.62

W W W. C E D A R - R A P I D S . O R G

17


Where Our Water Comes From The City of Cedar Rapids obtains its drinking water supplies from shallow vertical and collector wells constructed in the sand and gravel deposits along the Cedar River. Those deposits form an underground water-bearing layer called an alluvial aquifer. Because of continuous pumping of the City’s wells, most of the water in the aquifer is pulled from the river. The rest of the water is supplied as water percolates up from a deeper bedrock aquifer or down from the top of the ground. Our drinking water from those wells benefits from natural filtration through the riverbank. This natural sand filtration has proven to be a beneficial pretreatment to water before it reaches the City’s two conventional lime-softening facilities.

How We Protect the Quality of Our Drinking Water The Cedar Rapids Water Division continues to work with state and federal agencies to monitor and assess our watershed. The Cedar River watershed covers more than 6,500 square miles upstream of Cedar Rapids and extends into southern Minnesota. Source water assessment identifies potential sources of contamination to the water we use to treat for drinking water purposes. Although efforts are made on many fronts, farm-field runoff continues to be a primary concern and risk for contamination of our source water. We continue to actively monitor the Horizontal watershed and have initiated a watershed Collector Well protection program. Vertical Well

How We Treat Our Water

Clay

Our treatment process involves a multibarrier approach to protect our drinking water from the source to your tap. This includes source water monitoring; well-head protection; treatment processes of softening, filtration and disinfection; as well as distributionsystem monitoring and maintenance.

18

Cedar River

Groundwater Dispersion Through Alluvial Sand

Limestone Bedrock

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Bedrock Aquifer


Treatment Process Highlights Lime

Out to Homes, Businesses & Storage

In from Wells

Carbon Dioxide Chloramines (compound of chlorine and ammonia)

Fluoride Phosphate

UV Disinfection

1

2

Aeration Once water has been drawn from the wells into the City’s treatment plants, it undergoes aeration. Raw or untreated water is allowed to cascade down a series of trays, increasing the surface area of the water and promoting the exchange of gases. Aeration also removes undesirable gases such as radon. Aeration is similar to the natural process that occurs when a stream flows through rapids or over falls.

Recarbonation and Chlorination

The CRWD lowers water pH by adding carbon dioxide and adds chlorine to disinfect the water. The chlorine helps ensure our water’s microbiological safety by killing disease-causing organisms. The CRWD also adds a trace amount of ammonia to form chloramine to help the disinfection process.

Filtration

6

Fluoridation and

Phosphate Addition After UV disinfection, the CRWD adds fluoride to promote children’s dental health. Phosphate is also added to chemically stabilize the water and lessen the possibility that lead will leach out of pipes and into tap water.

7

Water is then passed through a sand and gravel filter bed, removing any remaining suspended matter.

Softening

The CRWD adds lime chemical to the water. This softens or reduces the minerals that typically make water “hard.” Excessive hardness increases soap use, deposits scale in water heaters and boilers, interferes with some industrial processes, and sometimes gives water an unappealing taste and odor. Resulting lime residual materials are removed and applied to farmland as soil conditioner or used as fill in approved land reclamation projects.

3

4

5

UV Disinfection

Distribution

From here, finished water is pumped directly into the distribution system. The distribution system includes water storage tanks and more than 600 miles of water main pipes that deliver water to homes and businesses. Water not immediately consumed flows into storage tanks for use when demand exceeds plant pumpage. Water stored in elevated tanks helps stabilize pressure in the distribution system and serves as an emergency reserve for fire protection.

Next, the water enters the ultraviolet (UV) light disinfection system where special lamps emit ultraviolet light into the water. The UV energy instantly damages the genetic material of any microorganisms in the water, eliminating their ability to reproduce and cause infection. Following UV disinfection, water passes through a contact tank where time is provided for the chlorine compound created in Step 3 to complete the disinfection process. W W W. C E D A R - R A P I D S . O R G

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Water Quality Findings

This table summarizes required water quality monitoring results for regulated parameters that were detected in the 2016 calendar year. A comprehensive report of all water quality testing is available from the Water Division.

WATER TREATMENT PLANTS - FINISHED WATER INORGANIC CHEMICALS

J AVE. PLANT

UNITS

MCL

MCLG

RANGE

NW PLANT

AVG

RANGE

AVG

POSSIBLE SOURCES OF CONTAMINANT

Nitrate

mg/L

10

10

3.0 - 6.98

5.25

2.94 - 8.23

5.84

Run-off from fertilizer, leaching from septic tanks, sewage; erosion of natural deposits

Nitrite

mg/L

1

1

0.0 - 0.06

0.04

0.0 - 0.03

0.01

Run-off from fertilizer, leaching from septic tanks, sewage; erosion of natural deposits

Fluoride

mg/L

4

4

0.46 - 1.24

0.69

0.15 - 0.91

0.61

Water additive which promotes strong teeth; erosion of natural deposits; discharge from fertilizer and aluminum factories.

Sodium

mg/L

NA

NA

NA

8.8

NA

7.2

Erosion of natural deposits; added to water during treatment process

Sulfate

mg/L

NA

NA

22.0 - 32.3

27

20.5 - 32.3

26.4

Erosion of natural deposits

Chloride

mg/L

NA

NA

21.5 - 30.8

26.6

19.5 - 29.0

24.8

Erosion of natural deposits, run-off

Arsenic

μg/L

10

10

0.0 - 0.84

0.4269

0.0 - 0.56

0.2646

Erosion of natural deposits

Copper

mg/L

NA

1.0

0.0 - 0.02

0.004

0.004 - 0.009

0.006

Corrosion of household plumbing, erosion of natural deposits

Zinc

mg/L

NA

5

0.15 - 0.30

0.2

0.18 - 0.25

0.22

Corrosion of household plumbing, erosion of natural deposits

Manganese

mg/L

NA

0.05

0.0 - 0.05

0.02

0.0 - 0.0007

0.0001

Corrosion of household plumbing, erosion of natural deposits

Toluene

mg/L

1

1

0.0 - 0.0005

0.0005

NA

ND

COMMON HERBICIDES

J AVE. PLANT

Discharge from petroleum factories

NW PLANT

UNITS

MCL

MCLG

RANGE

AVG

RANGE

AVG

Atrazine

μg/L

3

3

0.1 - 0.3

0.06

0.1 - 0.5

0.07

Runoff from fertilizer used on row crops

POSSIBLE SOURCES OF CONTAMINANT

Metalachlor

μg/L

Unregulated

Unregulated

0.1 - 0.3

0.03

0.1 - 0.3

0.03

Runoff from fertilizer used on row crops

Analysis for the following Herbicides revealed No Detects (ND) at either plant distribution system entry point: Cyanazine, Alachlor, Metribuzin, Butylate, Trifluralin, Acetochlor, Desethyl Atrazine, Desisopropyl Atrazine, Siamazine, Ametryn, EPTC, Prometon, Propachlor, Propazine, Dimethenamid, Butachlor RADIOLOGICAL

J AVE. PLANT

NW PLANT

UNITS

MCL

MCLG

RANGE

AVG

RANGE

AVG

Radon

pCi/L

300 pCi/L

0 pCi/L

34 - 70

49.5

21 - 26

23.5

Erosion of natural deposits

COMBINED RADIUM

pCi/L

5 pCi/L

0 pCi/L

NA

<1

NA

<1

Erosion of natural deposits

Radium -228

pCi/L

5 pCi/L

0 pCi/L

NA

<0.6

NA

<0.6

Erosion of natural deposits

Gross Alpha

pCi/L

5 pCi/L

0 pCi/L

NA

<0.7

NA

0.7

Erosion of natural deposits. Detect from 2015, 2016 result = <0.7

TOTAL ORGANIC CARBON (TOC)

J AVE. PLANT

NW PLANT

RANGE

AVERAGE

VIOLATION

RANGE

AVERAGE

VIOLATION

2.05 3.64

2.73

NO

0.5 3.09

2.04

NO

Credits Received for TOC Removal

Treatment technique requires the Running Annual Average (RAA) of credits given for TOC removal be at least 1

POSSIBLE SOURCES OF CONTAMINANT

POSSIBLE SOURCES OF CONTAMINANT Naturally present in the environment

DISTRIBUTION SYSTEM MONITORING Lead and Copper Rule

UNITS

ACTION LEVEL (AL)

MCLG

RANGE

90%

95%

SAMPLES EXCEEDING AL

VIOLATION

Lead

μg/L

15

0

0.0 - 48.0

11.0

12.0

2

NO

Corrosion of household plumbing systems; erosion of natural deposits

Copper

mg/L

1.3

1.3

0.0 - 0.11

0.07

0.08

0

NO

Corrosion of household plumbing systems; erosion of natural deposits

Revised Total Coliform Rule

JAN

FEB

MARCH

APRIL

MAY

JUNE

JULY

AUG

SEP

OCT

NOV

DEC

Total # Samples/Month

105

104

104

104

104

104

105

104

104

104

106

104

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Level 1 Assessment Required

NO

NO

NO

NO

NO

NO

NO

NO

NO

NO

NO

NO

Meets Monthly MCL of <5% Positive Coliform/Month

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

# Positive Coliform Samples/Mo.

20

POSSIBLE SOURCES OF CONTAMINANT

Disinfectant

Units

MRDL

MRDLG

Range

Average

Violation

Total Chlorine Residual

mg/L

4

4

1.2 - 3.9

3.54

NO

POSSIBLE SOURCES OF CONTAMINANT

Naturally present in the environment

POSSIBLE SOURCE Water additive used to control microbial growth

DISINFECTION BY-PRODUCTS Due to consistently low

J AVE. PLANT

NW PLANT

detections — reduced monitoring became effective in 2016

Data Reflects Source Entry Point Only

Data Reflects Distribution sampling sites

Units

MCL

MCLG

RANGE

AVG

VIOLATION

RANGE

AVG

VIOLATION

Total Trihalomethanes (TTHM)

μg/L

80

NA

0-0

0

NO

0.0 - 3.4

1.6

NO

By-product of chlorinating drinking water

Total Haloacetic Acids (HAA5)

μg/L

60

NA

0-0

O U R0 C R

NO

0

NO

By-product of chlorinating drinking water

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POSSIBLE SOURCE


UCMR2 (UNREGULATED CONTAMINANT MONITORING RULE) NITROSAMINE COMPOUNDS

J AVE. DISTRIBUTION AREA

J AVE. PLANT

EPA Method 521 N-nitroso-dimethyl amine (NDMA) μg/L

NW DISTRIBUTION AREA

NW PLANT

RANGE

AVG

RANGE

AVG

RANGE

AVG

RANGE

AVG

0.0032 - 0.0056

0.004

0.0038 - 0.0059

0.005

0.0000 - 0.0027

0.001

0.0000 - 0.0097

0.005

NO CURRENT REGULATORY MCL - EPA mandatory sampling and analysis to determine contaminant occurrence nationally and establish regulatory MCLs

UCMR3 (UNREGULATED CONTAMINANT MONITORING RULE)

J Ave. Treatment Plant J Ave. Distribution Area NW Treatment Plant NW Plant Distribution Area

1,4 Dioxane μg/L

Chlorate μg/L

Chromium 6+ μg/L

Total Chromium μg/L

Total Molybdenum μg/L

Total Strontium μg/L

Total Vanadium μg/L

Total Cobalt μg/L

Specific Hormones μg/L

Six Specific Perfluorinated Compounds μg/L

Method

EPA 522

EPA 300.1

EPA 218.7

EPA 200.8

EPA 200.8

EPA 200.8

EPA 200.8

EPA 200.8

EPA 539

EPA 537

Range

0.0 - 0.12

ND

1.3 - 2.0

1.5 - 1.9

1.0 - 1.7

58 - 69

0.95 - 1.5

ND

ND

ND

Average

0.030

ND

1.7

1.7

1.4

64

1.2

ND

ND

ND

Range

NA

ND

1.3 - 1.9

1.5 - 1.8

1.1 - 1.7

55 - 69

0.94 - 1.5

ND

ND

ND

Average

NA

ND

1.7

1.7

1.5

63.5

1.2

ND

ND

ND

Range

0.0 - 0.078

ND

1.4 - 1.9

1.6 - 2.1

0.0 - 1.3

69 - 75

1.1 - 1.2

ND

ND

ND

Average

0.038

ND

1.6

1.8

0.88

73.3

1.2

ND

ND

ND

Range

NA

ND

1.3 - 1.8

1.5 - 2.0

1.1 - 1.6

63 - 70

1.1 - 1.3

ND

ND

ND

Average

NA

ND

1.6

1.7

1.5

66

1.2

ND

ND

ND

MCL

NA

NA

NA

100

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NA

NO CURRENT REGULATORY MCL - EPA mandatory sampling and analysis to determine contaminant occurrence nationally and establish regulatory MCLs

TREATMENT TECHNIQUE INDICATORS Treatment technique requires that turbidity of Combined Filter Effluent (CFE) not exceed 1.0 NTU at any time

J AVE. PLANT

NW PLANT

SOURCE OF CONTAMINANT

UNITS

MCL

RANGE

AVERAGE

VIOLATION

RANGE

AVERAGE

VIOLATION

NTU

1.0

0.04 - 0.22

0.05

NO

0.03 - 0.42

0.06

NO

J AVE. PLANT

Treatment technique also requires that no more than 5% of Combined Filter Effluent (CFE) samples exceed 0.3 NTU monthly

Soil runoff

SOURCE OF CONTAMINANT

NW PLANT

MCL

% > 0.3 NTU

VIOLATION

MCL

% > 0.3 NTU

VIOLATION

5%

0%

NO

5%

0%

NO

Soil runoff

Source Water Assessment Information: This water supply obtains its water from the sand and gravel of the Alluvial aquifer of the Cedar River. The Alluvial aquifer was determined to be highly susceptible to contamination because the aquifer characteristics and the overlying materials provide little protection from contamination at the land surface. The Alluvial wells will be highly susceptible to surface contaminants such as leaking underground storage tanks, contaminant spills, and excess fertilizer application. A detailed evaluation of the source water supply was completed by the IDNR, and is available by contacting the public water supply at 319-286-5283. Information about work being done to help minimize contamination of the source water supply can be found at www.CityofCR.com/MCPP. Arsenic µg/L (ppb)

Total Coliform cfu/100ml

E.coli cfu/100ml

Copper µg/L

Zinc µg/L

Manganese µg/L

Iron µg/L

Sodium mg/L

Nitrate mg/L

TOC mg/L

2012 Annual Average

1.26

9

<1

0.1

0.2

270.0

80.0

14.7

1.5

1.79

2013 Annual Average

1.16

108

<1

2.4

0.9

348.0

87.0

13.9

2.6

2.05

2014 Annual Average

0.88

181

<1

2.5

1.0

228.1

46.1

13.0

3.6

2.02

2015 Annual Average

1.15

720

<1

2.8

1.0

214.9

65.1

11.9

4.0

2.10

2016 Annual Average

3.05

33

<1

6.8

2.1

166.0

63.4

9.2

5.5

2.56

Analysis for the following parameters revealed No Detects (ND): Cryptosporidia, Giardia, Lead

Acronyms: ND: Not Detected MRDL: Maximum Residual Disinfectant Level NR: Not Regulated mg/L: Milligrams per liter or parts per million μg/L: Micrograms per liter or parts per billion pCi/L: Picocuries per liter MCL: Maximum Contaminant Level MCLG: Maximum Contaminant Level Goal NA: Not Applicable NTU: Nephelometric Turbidity Unit MRDLG: Maximum Residual Disinfection Level Goal The following is an important message from the Environmental Protection Agency: Drinking water, including bottled water, may be reasonably expected to contain at least small amounts of some contaminants. That’s because as the water we draw from — lakes, rivers, streams, ponds, reservoirs, springs and wells — travels over the surface of the land or through the ground, it picks up naturally occurring minerals and, in some cases, radioactive material. It can also pick up substances resulting from the presence of animals or from human activity. The presence of contaminants does not necessarily indicate that water poses a health risk. More information about contaminants and potential health effects can be obtained by calling the EPA’s Safe Drinking Water Hotline at 800-426-4791 or visiting the website at www.epa.gov/ogwdw. Inadequately treated water may contain disease-causing organisms. These organisms include bacteria, viruses and parasites, which can cause symptoms such WWW . C EasDnausea, A R - R cramps, A P I D Sdiarrhea . O R G and associated headaches.

21


Frequently Asked Questions What is the hardness of Cedar Rapids water? Cedar Rapids water is considered moderately hard, with values of 6-8 grains per gallon or 100-140 mg/L total hardness as calcium carbonate. What is the fluoride concentration and why is it added? Fluoride is added during the treatment process to help prevent dental cavities. The optimal concentration is maintained at 0.7 parts per million (ppm) with a range of 0.6-0.9 ppm as recommended by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. My water smells terrible at the kitchen tap. What could be wrong? Many times gases in the drain trap are displaced upward when running water goes down the drain. It is easy to mistake the odor as coming from the running water when it is coming from the drain. Try pouring a mild bleach solution down the drain and letting the

tap run full force for two to three minutes. This should flush the system clean. My toilet tank and inside of my dishwasher are stained dark brown to black. Is my water safe to drink? The dark staining is likely due to the corrosion-control chemical added during treatment. Its purpose is to lay a protective coating on the insides of pipes so water never comes in contact with the pipe, thereby reducing the risk of dissolving lead or copper into the drinking water. It has been tested extensively and no health or safety concerns have been identified.

This morning I began seeing black particles and debris in my water and it looks yellowish. Do you think I have a broken pipe somewhere? Most times when water discoloration or particles show up all of a sudden, it is because a hydrant or valve has been opened in the area. This happens often in the spring and fall, when street department crews are cleaning the streets or the fire department is testing hydrants before winter weather hits. This generally settles back down and clears on its own within 24-48 hours and is more of an aesthetic issue than a health concern.

My water throughout the entire house tastes and smells musty or stale. Is it OK to drink? Sometimes in low-use areas or dead-end main areas, the water does not get circulated as it should. Where this is the case, the distribution crew can be notified to flush hydrants in the area to help bring in fresh water.

Glossary Action Level (AL) The concentration of a contaminant that, if exceeded, triggers treatment or other requirements that a water system must follow. Arsenic The EPA recently lowered the arsenic Maximum Contaminant Level (MCL) to 10 ppb. Trace amounts of arsenic are occasionally detected in your drinking water at levels well below this more stringent standard. Arsenic is a mineral known to cause cancer in humans at high concentrations and is linked to other health effects such as skin damage and circulatory problems. Coliform A bacteria originating in the digestive system of mammals. Its presence in water alerts lab technicians that disease-causing agents may be present. Compliance Following all rules and regulations defined in the Safe Drinking Water Act and maintaining water quality below MCLs. Contaminant One of a variety of natural or man-made physical, chemical, biological or radiological substances whose presence in public water systems may cause adverse health effects to consumers. Detection The positive identification of the presence of a particular contaminant. Detection of a contaminant does not necessarily represent a serious health risk to consumers if the concentration is below the MCL. Disinfection Killing the larger portion of microorganisms in water, with the probability that the disinfecting agent kills all disease-causing bacteria. Drought A period of unusually persistent dry weather that persists long enough to cause serious problems such as crop damage and/or water supply shortages. Filtration A treatment process that physically removes particles from water as the water passes through a medium. Groundwater The supply of fresh water found beneath the earth’s surface, usually in aquifers. Groundwater is often used to supply wells and springs.

22

Herbicide A chemical agent used to kill plants, especially weeds. Used widely in agriculture. Immunocompromised A physical condition in which the human immune system becomes less capable of warding off illness or infection. Inorganic Composed of or involving organisms (or their remains or products) that are not living. Examples of inorganic substances include minerals, rocks and salt. Maximum Contaminant Level (MCL) The highest level of a contaminant that is allowed in drinking water. MCLs are set as close to the Maximum Contaminant Level Goals (MCLGs) as feasible, using the best available treatment technology. Maximum Contaminant Level Goal (MCLG) The level of a contaminant in drinking water below which there is no known or expected risk to health. MCLGs allow for a margin of safety. Maximum Residual Disinfection Level (MRDL) The highest level of a disinfectant allowed in drinking water. There is convincing evidence that addition of a disinfectant is necessary for control of microbial contaminants. Maximum Residual Disinfection Level Goal (MRDLG) The level of drinking water disinfectant below which there is no known or expected risk to health. MRDLGs do not reflect the benefits of the use of disinfectants to control microbial contaminants. Microbial A group of microorganisms such as bacteria, protozoa and viruses. Nephelometric Turbidity Unit (NTU) A unit of measure used to determine the clarity of drinking water. Organic Of, pertaining to or derived from living organisms. Organic matter contains carbon, hydrogen and oxygen. Examples include humans, plants and animals. Particulates Of or relating to minute separate particles. Pesticides Any substance or chemical applied to kill or control pests, including weeds, insects, algae, rodents and other undesirable O U R C agents. R | M AY 2 0 1 7

Radioactivity The spontaneous decay or disintegration of an unstable atomic nucleus, accompanied by the emission of radiation. Radon Radon is a radioactive gas that you can’t see, taste or smell. It is found throughout the U.S. Radon can move up through the ground and into a home through cracks and holes in the foundation. Radon can build up to high levels in all types of homes. Radon can also get into indoor air when released from tap water from showering, washing dishes and other household activities. Compared to radon entering the home through soil, radon entering the home through tap water will, in most cases, be a small source of radon in indoor air. Radon is a known human carcinogen. Breathing air containing radon can lead to lung cancer. Drinking water containing radon may also cause increased risk of stomach cancer. If you are concerned about radon in your home, test the air in your home. Testing is inexpensive and easy. Fix your home if the level of radon in your air is 4 picocuries per liter of air (pCi/L) or higher. There are simple ways to fix a radon problem that aren’t too costly. For additional information, call your state radon program (800-838-5992) or call the EPA’s Radon Hotline (800-767-7236). Surface water All water naturally open to the atmosphere and all springs, wells or other collectors that are directly influenced by surface water. Water located close to the earth’s surface. Treatment Technique (TT) A required process intended to reduce the level of a contaminant in drinking water. Turbidity Turbidity is a measure of the cloudiness of water. Turbidity is a good indicator of treatment filter performance and is regulated as a Treatment Technique. Violation Exceeding the MCL of a contaminant regulated by the federal government; failure to properly monitor regulated contaminants would also be considered a violation.


CITY SERVICES DIRECTORY

! Emergency line

CITY SERVICE

LOCATION

PHONE

EMAIL ADDRESS

Animals

900 76th Avenue Drive SW

319-286-5993

AnimalControlMgmt@Cedar-Rapids.org

Assessor

City Services Center, 500 15th Avenue SW

319-286-5888

CRAssessor@Cedar-Rapids.org

Bid Opportunities

City Hall, 101 1st Street SE

319-286-5021

Bid-Purchasing@Cedar-Rapids.org

Building and Housing Codes

City Services Center, 500 15th Avenue SW

319-286-5831

D.Kolosik@Cedar-Rapids.org

Buses

Ground Transportation Center, 450 1st Street SE

319-286-5573

CRTransit@Cedar-Rapids.org

Fire Safety Inspections

713 1st Avenue SE

319-286-5166

CRFire@Cedar-Rapids.org

Garbage, Recycling and Yard Waste Collection

City Services Center, 500 15th Avenue SW

319-286-5897

SolidWaste&Recycling@Cedar-Rapids.org

Housing Assistance Programs

City Hall, 101 1st Street SE

319-286-5872

HSG-Admin@Cedar-Rapids.org

Land Development

City Hall, 101 1st Street SE

319-286-5822

DevelopmentServices@Cedar-Rapids.org

Park Rentals

Northwest Recreation Center, 1340 11th Street NW

319-286-5566

Recreation@Cedar-Rapids.org

Potholes and Street City Services Center, 500 15th Avenue SW Maintenance

319-286-5802 286-5826 !

Street@Cedar-Rapids.org

Recreation Programs

319-286-5566

Recreation@Cedar-Rapids.org

Sewer Backup or Problems City Services Center, 500 15th Avenue SW

319-286-5802 286-5826 !

Sewer@Cedar-Rapids.org

Traffic Signals, Signs and Markings

City Services Center, 500 15th Avenue SW

319-286-5802

Traffic@Cedar-Rapids.org

Utility Billing

City Hall, 101 1st Street SE

319-286-5900

WaterMail@Cedar-Rapids.org

Northwest Recreation Center, 1340 11th Street NW

For more information about the City of Cedar Rapids and its services, call 319-286-5080 or visit www.cedar-rapids.org.

CITY COUNCIL

To leave a message for a City Council member, call 319-286-5051. To find your district, go to www.cedar-rapids.org and navigate to Local Government > City Council, then click on Elections and locate the Find Your District link.

Ron Corbett

Pat Shey

Ralph Russell

MAYOR

DISTRICT 3

AT LARGE

Kris Gulick

Scott Olson

Ann Poe

DISTRICT 1

DISTRICT 4

AT LARGE

Scott Overland

Justin Shields

Susie Weinacht

DISTRICT 2

DISTRICT 5

AT LARGE

Ron.Corbett@Cedar-Rapids.org

Kris.Gulick@Cedar-Rapids.org

Scott.Overland@Cedar-Rapids.org

Pat.Shey@Cedar-Rapids.org

Scott.Olson@Cedar-Rapids.org

Justin.Shields@Cedar-Rapids.org W W W. C E D A R - R A P I D S . O R G

Ralph.Russell@Cedar-Rapids.org

Ann.Poe@Cedar-Rapids.org

Susie.Weinacht@Cedar-Rapids.org

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Caring for You and Your Family

UnityPoint Clinic – Westdale Opens Monday, May 22 Grand Opening Celebration Saturday, June 10 | 9:30 a.m. - Noon Join us for our grand opening celebration! We’ll have kids activites, health information, demonstrations and more.

Our new UnityPoint Clinic is opening at 4325 Williams Blvd on Monday, May 22. This new clinic will bring 20 providers to one new location. This new clinic is located right next to Menards on Williams Blvd, SW. We hope you are as excited as we are to bring pediatrics and family medicine to the Southwest side! Our current UnityPoint Clinic located at 2375 Edgewood Road will then become a dedicated urgent care clinic — caring for those that need walk-in care to treat minor medical problems and injuries that are not life-threatening, but need the attention of a health care provider. Patients are able to check wait times online.

What’s new? UnityPoint Clinic Pediatrics will open its third clinic location. We know keeping your kids healthy and happy is important to you. As the largest and most experienced provider of pediatric care in the area, it’s our priority every day. Our pediatricians are experts in children’s health, providing care for infants to young adults, including well-child exams, immunizations, physicals, treatment of illnesses and injuries and more.

unitypoint.org/westdale

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OUR CR

|

M AY 2 0 1 7

UnityPoint Clinic – Westdale campus will include: • Family Medicine • Pediatrics • Therapy Plus • MedLabs • Imaging Services UnityPoint Clinic Family Medicine – Westdale 4325 Williams Blvd. SW Cedar Rapids, IA 52402 (319) 368-8400 Hours: M – F: 8 a.m. – 5 p.m.

Our CR - May 2017  

Learn how Cedar Rapids is going "Beyond the Green" by including Economic, Social, and Environmental factors in planning for a sustainable fu...

Our CR - May 2017  

Learn how Cedar Rapids is going "Beyond the Green" by including Economic, Social, and Environmental factors in planning for a sustainable fu...

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