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homestead j a c k s o n h o l e a rc h i t ec t u re + int e rio rs + a rt

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T A B L E

O F

CONTENTS Dream Homes

Art in the Valley

78 METAMORPHIC MANOR

A grand display of stone emerging from the forest

112 FALL ARTS FESTIVAL +

84

MODERN MASTERPIECE

Features

33

DESIGN INSPIRATION, PEOPLE & PROFILES

34 ELEMENTS OF STYLE

8 local designers’ favorite trends

46 THE YIN AND YANG

56

OF MODERNIZING LOG HOMES 2 renovation case studies

HEALTHY SPACES

The interconnectivity of design and wellbeing

60 CHILLAXING,

JACKSON STYLE

3 variations on the rec room

68 STYLISH WINE STORAGE

3 innovative, artistic examples

90 DESIGNING FROM THE

INSIDE OUT

Rustic-turned-contemporary home designed around the views

94 THE ART AND SOUL

OF A HOME

Establishing a sanctuary in harmony with both architecture and nature

102 WHERE THE HEART IS

A highly functional, yet tasteful home for a family with three active kids

106 EVERY ROOM

14 | homestead

Transformation of an early contemporary Jackson home

WITH A VIEW

Simple lines, clean details and walls of windows

WESTERN DESIGN CONFERENCE Jackson Hole’s vibrant arts community celebrates its well- deserved place among the best in the nation

114 JACKSON HOLE

SHOWCASE OF HOMES

Charity event gives a glimpse into valley homes

116 PERSONAL ART COLLECTIONS

Local independent curators changing the contemporary landscape in Jackson

122 REAL ESTATE

MARKETPLACE

128 RESOURCE DIRECTORY


— DESIGN INSPIRATION

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homestead Publisher Latham Jenkins Sales Director Mindy Duquette Creative Director Martha Vorel Co-editor Megan Jenkins

BOLD MOUNTAIN A R C H I T EC T U R E

Co-editor/Copy Editor Liz Prax Features Editor Meg Daly

B O L D

M O U N TA I N

A R C H I T E C T U R E

307.203.2852 • KINSEYARCH.COM

Contributing Writers Zachary Barnett Kirsten Corbett Meg Daly Kelsey Dayton Julie Fustanio Kling David Porter Shannon Sollitt Contributing Photographers David Agnello Jim Fairchild Tuck Fauntleroy Audrey Hall Latham Jenkins Aaron Kraft Corey Lack Sargent Schutt homesteadmag.com

802 W. Broadway | P.O. Box 4980 Jackson Hole, WY 83001 307.733.8319 info@circ.biz circ.biz Homestead is published annually by Circ Design Inc. Homestead is fully protected by copyright and nothing that appears may be reproduced wholly or in part without written permission from the Publisher. While every care has been taken in the compilation and reproduction of information contained herein to ensure correctness and currency, such information is subject to change without notice. The Publisher accepts no responsibility for such changes or for typographical or other errors.


OUR TEAM LATHAM JENKINS, Publisher of

Homestead and Jackson Hole Traveler, spent his first summer in Wyoming in 1990 as a scenic raft guide in Grand Teton National Park. His idea for Homestead began in 2001 in response to the expanding number of exceptional home design projects in our valley. His goal was to provide a platform to showcase these works of art and give others a chance to admire them. Latham now spends his time connecting people with experiences through his pursuits in media and residential real estate.sales.

BEAUTIFUL LANDSCAPES START HERE

Homestead’s sales and marketing director, MELINDA DUQUETTE, has been with the publication since its inception. With a passion for the diverse beauty of architecture and design, Melinda feels fortunate to forge partnerships with so many of the valley’s multi-talented artisans. A bit of a multi-talent herself, she loves photography and spending quality time with her husband and children.

MEGAN JENKINS is the managing editor of Homestead, as well as the coordinator of the Jackson Hole Showcase of Homes, now in its sixth year. She loves creating opportunities for patrons to experience the residential masterpieces of the magazine. A valley resident for more than two decades, she spends most of her time raising her two active children.

Author, journalist and editor LIZ ILIFF PRAX is ever grateful to the conservationists who protected (and continue to protect) the lands of Jackson Hole, her “backyard playground” since she escaped East Coast suburbia 18 years ago. In addition to contributing to Homestead, Jackson Hole Traveler and Practical Horseman magazines, she’s helping to expand the TravelStorys app’s audio tour library.

After working on the magazine many years ago, MARTHA VOREL has reunited with Homestead. An Indiana native, Martha studied television and film before moving west. Jackson’s dearth of TV gigs compelled her conversion to graphic design. After leaving the valley for her husband’s stint in graduate school, Martha and her husband recently returned to raise their girls.

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homestead LETTER FROM

J

ackson’s Western tradition is one of grit and bootstraps, with a dash of bracing mountain air and a dollop of style as finely finessed as a handlebar moustache. Although Jackson Hole might be referred to as the Last of the Old West, its modern homesteads are far from untamed. One might even say there is a revolution afoot. Western style is enjoying a renaissance of sorts, the old being made new again by the creators, drafters and craftspeople of the Tetons. Jackson Hole’s heritage is expanding and evolving as never before. Here at Homestead magazine we aim to reflect the subtle elegance and natural beauty of the Jackson Hole home; to demonstrate how mountain luxury, combined with stunning landscapes, creates the most enviable of living spaces. Jackson has long been the destination of dreamers. As you explore the following pages, we invite you to envision your own dream and prepare a path to achieving it. The Homestead Team

ON THE COVER

106 DESIGN ASSOCIATES

EVERY ROOM WITH A VIEW Krafty Photos

Simple lines, clean details and walls of windows

90 BERLIN ARCHITECTS

DESIGNING FROM THE INSIDE OUT

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Jim Fairchild

Rustic-turnedcontemporary home designed around the views


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DESIGN INSPIRATION —

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DESIGN

INSPIRATION


Elements of Style DESIGNERS’ BEST PICKS STORY BY Meg Daly

Melinda Shirk

Kristin Fay

WRJ DESIGN

TRAUNER FAY DESIGNS

Kate Binger DWELLING

STOCKTON AND SHIRK INTERIOR DESIGNS

Today, when I’m designing I find myself drawn to one specific trend: the juxtaposition of reclaimed material contrasted with lighter-colored palettes. With that as a foundation, I’ll layer in whitewashed walls, natural linens and accents of European influences to create a multi-dimensional synergy of elements and a sense of peace and harmony.

We love the “wet area” in a bathroom. These shower areas are fully tiled with an open concept that typically includes the bathtub and separates the space from the vanity. Defining these areas not only helps control humidity, but also creates two usable spaces that are accessible, comfortable and easy to clean.

I’m super fond of the new wave of finishes in antiqued gold. This metal layers so well with reclaimed wood and all the postrecession neutrals that have been the focus of design for the past nine years. Antiqued or matte gold also pairs beautifully with a plethora of colors, flat black metals, stainless steel and brushed nickel. They make for more design eye candy!

We are loving the trend toward neutral woven fabrics, creating a fresh, modern palette layered with texture. Our firm always works as a team. We infuse the spaces we create with mountain modern elements, incorporating leather, reclaimed timber, iron and soft Western prints as added dimensions to an airier living space.

Rush Jenkins

34 | homestead


|

DESIGN INSPIRATION

|

Interiors are intimate sites for personal expression as well as the places where our families gather and our lives unfold. Good design makes all the difference in how these spaces function. Homeowners in Jackson Hole have a desire to be current as well as authentic to the region, and a bevy of top-notch design studios are here to guide that process. We spoke with eight of the valley’s leading interior designers and asked them what their favorite current design trends are. The answers are as diverse as they are insightful.

WE HOPE THESE TIPS INSPIRE YOU!

Shannon White Burns SHANNON WHITE DESIGN

I’m inspired by the trend of efficient yet elegant. In this bathroom, elements such as integral sinks, floating vanities and wall-mounted accessories and fixtures showcase this style. In a recent project, we also installed floor-to-ceiling frosted-glass panels and doors in the bathroom to replace framed walls. This maximized space and light in the room.

Elisa Chambers SNAKE RIVER INTERIORS

I believe in luxury you can live with, not just for display. Home is not an abstract concept; it’s a living, breathing place, rooted in personality. Your home should feel like you and your experience: worldly, sophisticated, always real. Your home wants to be as functional as it is beautiful.

Jacque Jenkins-Stireman JACQUE JENKINSSTIREMAN DESIGN

Wallpaper has reached new heights of sophistication and design with digitally printed papers by small boutique companies. Design options are endless, with saturated colors and unique motifs and textures not found in traditionally produced papers. Their impact can be great in a small area like a powder room, an accent wall or even a headboard.

Jodi Forsyth & Amy Brown

FORSYTH & BROWN INTERIOR DESIGN People are returning to custom bedding and drapes. There was a trend of white on white, but now people want something more personalized. With all the fabrics and trims available, there are endless options and ways people can express themselves. Custom bedding makes a bedroom a sanctuary. It’s the ultimate finishing touch.

homesteadmag.com | 35


ALL THAT GLITTERS

IS NOT GOLD — ANYMORE

Subtle ways of using texture to bring in the light

INTERIOR DESIGN

DWELLING

dwellingjh.com

A twig chandelier, reflected in a gold-framed mirror, whimsically plays off a new, reclaimed-barnwood wall and lightens the feel of this remodeled dining room.

H

ow do you incorporate your favorite patterns into a sophisticated new look for your home? Ask interior designer Kate Binger, the founder of Dwelling. She brightened up this active family’s Solitude home using modern textures and colors that complement the family’s favorite Pendleton plaids. “The entire house was painted gold, which dumbed down the brilliance of the wood ceilings, making the house feel dark and heavy,” Binger says. The walls are mostly white now, with a few key ones clad in barnwood. “Barnwood is an excellent accent. It gives houses lacking texture an instant interest and depth.”

36 | homestead

BEFORE

STORY BY Julie Fustanio Kling PHOTOS BY David Agnello


|

DESIGN INSPIRATION

|

“WHEN I USE OVERSIZED MIRRORS, I LIKE TO PLAN THE REFLECTION OF AT LEAST ONE LARGE WINDOW.” — KATE BINGER

BEFORE

A balance of neutrals and pops of colors and dog-friendly fibers contextualizes the home in its dense forest setting, allowing the owners to let their rescued Rhodesian Ridgeback dogs happily roam free. Binger seems to attract clients who enjoy living hard in their homes, just as she does. Feet on the table, wine and dogs on the sofa and muddy boots on the entry rug; she enjoys this aspect of entwining form and function in her designs. In the dining room, a large, gold-framed mirror on the barnwood-sided wall lightens up the open floor plan, reflecting the windows that look out onto a creek

ABOVE A pop of color from a red-lacquered coffee table enlivens a dynamic mix of neutral colors and natural fabrics in the living room. Dogfriendly fibers throughout the house allow the pets to reign. homesteadmag.com | 37


|

DESIGN INSPIRATION

|

“FOR ME, CLEAN LINES PAIRED WITH THE WARMTH OF TEXTURE AND COLOR IS PARAMOUNT.” — KATE BINGER

BEFORE

and a grove of trees. “When I use oversized mirrors, I like to plan the reflection of at least one large window.” Binger says. “In this case, the dining wall was an instant win for a mirror since it is able to reflect the transom windows, operable windows and the stone of the fireplace.” She also makes a good case for introducing bright colors, especially because of the long, white winters here. A wood pedestal coffee table is painted with red lacquer and designed to function as a gathering place for drinks and games. The red brings a playful aspect to the colorful mosaic of cowboy paintings by Duke Beardsley from Altamira Gallery. At the bar, Binger chose barnwood 38 | homestead

ABOVE In the master bedroom, a clean-lined leather headboard against another reclaimed-barnwood wall creates a warm and welcoming place to curl up with a Pendleton blanket. Lacquered navy blue nightstands with gold and marble knobs flank the bed and play off the velvet window treatments. A custom watercolor of magpie feathers by artist Eric Patrick Kelly is a perfect place to rest your eye.


| DESIGN DESIGN INSPIRATION — INSPIRATION|

DESIGN INSPIRATION

ABOVE Smoky purple walls and linen window treatments soften the geometric grey patterns in the guest bedroom, where Binger introduced faux shagreen nightstands and a headboard wrapped in a bird’seye stitched linen.

shelving, which complements the matte, etched-limestone backsplash tile. Cowhide and polished-chrome barstools create a great contrast to the existing cherry cabinetry. A funky twig chandelier brings whimsy to the custom, live-edge dining table. In the master bedroom, a classic leather headboard and navy painted nightstands balance the pop of the lounge chairs, which are covered, of course, in Pendleton wool. “For me, clean lines paired with the warmth of textures is paramount,” Binger says.

homesteadmag.com | 39


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DESIGN INSPIRATION

|

CUSTOM TURQUOISE TILE

GEMSTONE TILE LLC

Jewelry STORY BY Kelsey Dayton

40 | homestead

gemstonetile.com

F OR YOU R HOM E


|

DESIGN INSPIRATION

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“When you are investing in a product like this, you are putting something in your home that not many people have.” — CAROLYN VANCLEAVE

Mosaic Turquoise wall

T

ABOVE Ithaca Peak with copper matrix countertop

he turquoise mine near Kingman, Arizona, is the most prolific in the world, producing more than 500 natural blue/green shades of the gemstone. Down the road from the mine, Gemstone Tile does something with the turquoise no other company does: It creates bespoke tiles suitable for any interior application, including counters, backsplashes, showers, fireplaces and flooring. They have also been installed in luxury superyachts and commercial environments around the world. “It’s jewelry for your home,” says Carolyn VanCleave. She and her husband, Danny, a former silversmith, have owned the company with Matt Ruzicka for almost six years. The turquoise is stabilized first: hardened to protect the stone. Once stabilized, it won’t absorb dirt, oil or any liquids, so the vibrant color lasts forever. The final product is durable, elegant and unique, especially when used in the home. One of the oldest gemstones in the world, turquoise is highly sought after because of its color. “It really delivers the ‘wow factor,’ even when used just as an accent,” VanCleave says. “When you are investing in a product like this, you are adding value to your home, but not only that, you are putting something in your home that not many people have. I don’t know anybody who sees turquoise and doesn’t stop to admire the stone.” Gemstone Tile uses authenticated, jewelry-quality turquoise produced from the nearby mine. The company works closely with clients to visualize the possibilities of adding turquoise to a home. Only a select few showrooms carry its products, including Montana Tile and Stone, in Bozeman, Montana, the closest one to Jackson. “Because of the nature of the gemstone, we don’t have a warehouse full of slabs of turquoise tiles,” VanCleave says. “Our work is extremely custom. People often say, ‘Wow, I’ve never seen anything like that in my life.’ There’s a reason for that—we’re the only ones who make it.”

LEFT Gemstone Tile exhibits every year at the Western Design Exhibit + Sale in Jackson Hole, Wyoming, in early September—a great place to view large displays of their product up close. westerndesignconference.com homesteadmag.com | 41


THE ART OF

A

GETTING EVERYTHING

t client-based design studio Jacque Jenkins-Stireman, no two projects are the same. JJS doesn’t have a signature design style, but it does have a signature design approach: “Listen first, design with purpose.” This fundamental philosophy, which makes for comfortable, livable, long-term properties, established the JJS team as one of the “oldest and freshest” design studios in Jackson Hole. From architectural consulting through interior planning, all the details of a custom-designed Jenkins-Stireman home are carefully thought out. “Every single property has a unique ‘tailored’ finish,” says

42 | homestead

STORY BY Shannon Sollitt PHOTOS BY Tuck Fauntleroy

INTERIOR DESIGN

JACQUE JENKINS-STIREMAN jjstiremandesign.com

Director of Operations Ashley Cadwalader. “Most of the firm’s work is completely customized. We decided long ago that the traditional showroom approach didn’t work for our business model. Instead, we spend time with our clients, understanding their lifestyles and helping them realize their Mountain West dream.” If there is one unifying theme in Jenkins-Stireman’s work, it’s juxtaposition. The firm is known for taking two seemingly opposing styles and piecing them together in ways that are at once stylish and innovative. Take Four Pines Cabin #14. This Shooting Star property “exemplifies

ABOVE Exposed barnwood beams and reclaimed timber hold this “Western Bohemian” home together. Vibrant interior design brings it to life.


|

sophisticated, whimsical design while embracing the Mountain West spirit and the homeowners’ lifestyle,” Jenkins-Stireman says. The accents, like reclaimed timber and cowboy paintings, “nod to Jackson’s mountain history,” Cadwalader adds, “but the furnishings celebrate the homeowner’s personality.” Each room pops with color and vibrant patterns. The cowboy painting displayed proudly in the living room is far from traditional Western. Instead, it is a Warhol-esque pop-art piece that at once complements and stands out from the traditional wood-and-stone architecture. Jenkins-Stireman calls the home “Western Bohemian”—fitting for its Bay Area owners, who wanted a home that felt comfortable and livable, but also would have international appeal for prospective renters. “Both can be challenging to accommodate,” Cadwalader says, but the JJS team thrives in such creative environments.

DESIGN INSPIRATION

|

ABOVE Jacque Jenkins-Stireman can “envision rooms coming together without blinking an eye.” RIGHT West meets Warhol: Accents like the pop-art style cowboy painting blend traditional Western themes with contemporary flare.

homesteadmag.com | 43


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THE YIN + YANG of

MODERNIZING LOG HOMES

STORY BY Julie Fustanio Kling PHOTOS BY Sargent Schutt + David Agnello

s the sun moves across the sky, the Chinese believe the symbols of yin and yang gradually trade places with each other, revealing what was obscured and obscuring what was revealed. So too goes the modernization of log homes. These two renovation projects showcase the possibilities in black (yin) and white (yang). In both cases, large windows opened up the traditional Western cabin feel, and steel was introduced to create a more industrial, black-and-white look. Floating staircases draw the eye up and out rather than down and in.

1 CONTRASTS IN COLOR The first example is a log cabin in East Jackson. “Before, the home was dark and cavelike,” says designer John Martin, of J. Martin Design. “I wanted to give the honey-colored logs a fresh, new look and lighten the room.” After grinding the stain and clear coat off the logs, he bleached out the pink and yellow tones. He then used a guest bedroom as his laboratory to test the color and get the right whitewashed look. “I wanted the logs to be opaque, so I had to thin down the alabaster stain in order to see the grain,” he says. Because the existing frame couldn’t support concrete floors, he chose a porcelain faux wood tile from Italy. Finally, he smoothed out the textured drywall and replaced the track lighting with recessed cans. “I didn’t want to have a lot of different elements competing for attention,” he says. “I just wanted three or four showstoppers, so I chose the windows, the steel, the Italian tile and the white logs.”

LEFT In this East Jackson cabin, whitewashing the logs, expanding the clerestory window from 4 to 6 feet and customizing a 9½-foot sliding glass door beneath it immediately modernized the great room.

BEFORE

46 | homestead


|

BEFORE

ABOVE Working within a budget, Martin painted the existing kitchen cabinets a dark grey to add contrast, replaced the brass backsplash with white subway tile, and bought stainless steel appliances, the largest expense. RIGHT Martin replaced the river rock facade and “holly hobby” railing with steel to create a loftlike feeling inspired by modern industrial homes in Los Angeles. “It was a cool dichotomy with whitewashed logs and steel,” he says.

FEATURE

|


|

FEATURE

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BEFORE

2 MATERIAL CHANGES The honest expression of the log structure in this Indian Paintbrush project was an interesting challenge to architect Peggy Gilday. “Experimentation with stains and finishes brings out the richness of the wood grain while omitting the orange color inherent in aged, clear finishes,” she says. “Historically, the chinking (the caulk substance between the logs) may be a contrasting color, which can be distracting.” 48 | homestead

By blacking out the log stack, she was able to obscure the chinking and modernize the old building with the addition of tongue-andgroove Western red cedar. Other elements, including a sleek, modern staircase and a plastered fireplace replacing the heavy stone, simplified the interior. “I think Peg had a great eye to go black with the logs,” says Teton Heritage Builders partner


|

DESIGN INSPIRATION

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BEFORE

ABOVE In this Indian Paintbrush house, Gilday saw an opportunity to turn a 1980s cabin into an architect’s dream: a white cube and a black box. By painting the cabin and garage with an ebony stain, she “pared the space down to its essence.”

BEFORE

homesteadmag.com | 49


|

FEATURE

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A modern addition, made of tongue-and-groove red cedar and a flat roof, links the two log structures and creates a more linear look. BEFORE

50 | homestead

Mark Dalby. He had to shore up the log to put in the steel and connect the cabins to the addition. The front entrance was designed as an art gallery for the owner’s collection. The space is punctuated on either end by Italian steel-framed doors and windows. “This was a cool way to show some functional steel,” Dalby says. The rift white oak cabinetry in the kitchen was hand selected so that the wood grain carries through the doors and drawers sequentially. For Russ Weaver, another partner at Teton Heritage Builders, log isn’t as limiting as it appears. “Just think, there’s a square timber in every round log,” he says. .


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|

DESIGN INSPIRATION

|

WITH

FUTURE GENERATIONS IN MIND

STORY BY Kelsey Dayton PHOTOS BY Corey Lack Photography

E

ABOVE A linear theme runs throughout this home, from the floors to the walls. “It’s clean and simple aesthetically, but it still has all the features that make a home warm and comfortable, like fireplaces, natural light and beautiful views,” says Matt Somers, owner of Seven Generations Construction. 52 | homestead

very custom home has its own style and requires its own custom mix of quality, budget and schedule. Whether it’s a rustic timber-and-stone home or a clean-lined contemporary design, an enviably robust budget or one that requires painstaking care to preserve, Seven Generations Construction energetically pursues its clients’ goals. Founded in 2007 by Matt Somers, Seven Generations Construction is committed to providing high quality homes that are built to stand the test of time. The company is also committed to sustainable building practices. Its name is a nod to a Native American practice of making decisions with future generations in mind. 7GC works to minimize waste, maximize efficiency and build resource-responsible homes. Somers moved to Jackson in 1998 after working in construction for four years in New England. He worked for a Jackson building company for nine years before starting Seven Generations Construction. “With 20 years of high-

CONSTRUCTION

SEVEN GENERATIONS 7gconstruction.com

end building experience in Jackson,” he says, “I haven’t seen it all, but I’ve seen a lot of it.” Somers has kept his company small enough that he is involved on some level with every project. “On some projects we work with an architect to hone in on all the details, and on others I spend more time with the homeowner picking out tile, paint colors, etc. We customize the process to work for the rest of the team on the project.” He continues, “7GC is fortunate to have a great crew of awesome craftsmen who truly care about the quality of their work. The honesty and integrity of our entire team helps to make this process fun and rewarding.” The client for the home featured here was also the architect. She knew what she wanted, and Somers collaborated with her to make sure her vision came to life. It’s his favorite part of the job: seeing a project evolve from an idea to a finished physical home.


|

DESIGN INSPIRATION

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“Our entire construction team takes so much pride in handing over the highest quality home possible given the goals of that particular project.” — MATT SOMERS

ABOVE Whitewashed tongueand-groove birch was used on the floors and walls, with horizontal lines coursing consistently throughout the house.

LEFT The home exterior resembles a New England farmhouse, while the interior is contemporary. Seven Generations Construction prides itself on its ability to work with clients and bring any style of home to life. homesteadmag.com | 53


DISCOVER THE JACKSON HOLE LIFESTYLE

SHOOTING STAR HOME 6 BEDROOMS | 6 FULL BATHS, 6,673 SQ. FT. | 1.25 ACRES $11,750,000. #17-2099.

AMAZING SKI LODGE 6 BEDROOMS | 6 FULL BATHS, 3 HALF BATHS 7,713 SQ. FT. | 1.25 ACRES $5,800,000. #17-2284. ROB DESLAURIERS | 307.413.3955

This stunning JLF Architects designed home features 6 bedrooms, 6.5 baths, dedicated guest wing and 3 car garage. Water features embrace this stunning home and large picture windows afford natural sunlight into all areas as well as pull the eye up to amazing views of the expansive Jackson Hole Mountain Resort. Reclaimed materials throughout interpreted in a clean sophisticated style, natural stone, hand plastered walls and the highest quality of design and craftsmanship are hallmarks of this amazing home located in the exclusive Shooting Star Jackson Hole community.

ROB DESLAURIERS | 307.413.3955

WESTBANK MOUNTAIN CONTEMPORARY

JACKSON HOLE GOLF & TENNIS CLUB

5 BEDROOMS | 4 FULL BATHS, 1 HALF BATH 6,673 SQ. FT. | 1.25 ACRES $4,995,000. #16-1543.

5 BEDROOMS | 6FULL BATHS, 1 HALF BATH 4,080 SQ. FT. | 1.1 ACRES $3,100,000. #17-2624.

JAKE KILGROW | 307.413.2822

JAKE KILGROW | 307.413.2822

REALIZING JACKSON HOLE DREAMS FOR OUR CLIENTS SINCE 2003 307.739.8070 | RGJH@JHSIR.COM | REALTYGROUPJH.COM

ROB DESLAURIERS

KELLI WARD

JEFF WARD

JAKE KILGROW


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Healthy Spaces

The interconnectivity of design and wellbeing

STORY BY Meg Daly

David Agnello

A

56 | homestead

quiet revolution is underway in interior design and architecture. As more Americans embrace the concept of wellness—which looks at all aspects of wellbeing, from physical health to social and emotional health as well—so too are design professionals expanding ways wellbeing can be incorporated into our lived environments. Jackson Hole is home to one of the world’s experts in this field. Veronica Schreibeis Smith is the founder of Vera Iconica, an architecture firm specializing in wellness architecture. She is also the chair of the Wellness Architecture Initiative at the research and education nonprofit Global Wellness Institute. Schreibeis Smith says in this day and age we need our homes to be healing spaces. “We live frenetically paced lifestyles,” she says. “Our homes ground us and offer dimensions of healing we are not getting from other parts of our lives.” Wellness is a different metric than green building, Schreibeis Smith explains. A building can be LEED certified for using insulation materials that prevent heat loss. But those materials may be toxic, and there is no regulatory body keeping tabs


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DESIGN INSPIRATION

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Wool

Latham Jenkins

A natural, sustainable and renewable resource, wool is an excellent nontoxic, flame-resistant thermal and acoustic insulator.

David Agnello

Plaster

on off-gassing of building materials. A wellness approach to insulation would be to choose another material—Schreibeis Smith suggests blown-in sheep’s wool—that meets the same standards for heat loss and will ensure nontoxic air quality in a building. Materials are one concern when thinking about wellness architecture and interior design. But other factors apply as well. Schreibeis Smith talks extensively with her clients, learning about their family priorities and needs. She designs spaces that encourage social interaction and easy flow, which in turn enhance healthy relationships within a household. While the visual experience is important, Schreibeis Smith counsels that wellness design is not just about creating a pretty environment. “A building

Natural clay plaster regulates humidity, releases negative ions—which are mood boosters—and neutralizes airborne pollutants, such as formaldehyde.

Natural Wood Products Exposure to natural wood lowers blood pressure, heart rate and psychological stress, while increasing your ability to focus and fend off illness.

homesteadmag.com | 57


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FEATURE

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David Agnello

can be beautiful, but if it makes people sick, it failed,” she says. “It’s not just about looks.” Wellness architecture and design should encompass all dimensions of health and wellbeing. Schreibeis Smith notes that having a fountain of water is both soothing aurally and emotionally purifying. Plants purify the air, she says, and also offer the visual experience

that science has proven is soothing to humans. Wood—walls, tables, floors—offers natural smells and richer acoustics than other materials. “Those of us involved in wellness architecture want to make meaningful change in the industry,” Schreibeis Smith says. “And it starts with awareness.”

LEFT A well-designed kitchen sets the stage for a healthy lifestyle, promoting good eating habits and social connection. Thoughtful under-counter storage is ergonomically advantageous and keeps the kitchen light and bright.

Pamela Gibson Fine Art pamelagibsonartist.com 503 780 3256 Quiescence can be seen at TwentyTwo Home 45 E Deloney Avenue, Jackson twentytwohome.com Encaustic and mixed media, 48” x 36”

58 | homestead


Photos by Audrey Hall

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DESIGN INSPIRATION

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WINE CELLAR

CHILLAXING JACKSON STYLE

RECREATION ROOMS DESIGNED FOR SERIOUS PLAY STORY BY Meg Daly PHOTOS BY Sargent Schutt + Krafty Photos

The abundant recreation opportunities in Jackson Hole don’t stop at the front door. Inspired by their outdoor playground, local homeowners are designing their homes to be bastions of play and relaxation, where families and houseguests can unwind after their adventures on the slopes and trails. We visited three homes where fun is the focus. From a vintage billiards table to super-modern ping pong stations, and even indoor shuffleboard, these design elements offer an elevated experience of indoor recreation. 60 | homestead

ABOVE This rec room includes a home theater, a ping pong table, a mini bar area, two large televisions, a fireplace and a hidden wine cellar.


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DESIGN INSPIRATION

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CLOSED

1 FAMILY FUN The rec room in this Shooting Star cabin embodies the overall purpose of the home: ultimate family vacation. “The whole house was designed as a getaway,” says Christopher Lee of Design Associates Architects. “It’s a place where the family can play.” The Silicon Valley-based owners and their two kids love ping pong, so that was a central element of the space, with an overhead TV screen (one of more than 30 TVs in the house) as well as a view of the nearby ski slopes from the table. Opposite the ping pong area, a home theater welcomes a more relaxed viewing experience. All screens in the room can be synced so viewers never miss a moment. The wet bar features wood from a regionally sourced, deconstructed barn. According to Elisa Chambers, of Snake River Interiors, the entire home emphasizes an urban ranch aesthetic. She calls the interior, which features Montana rock, barnwood, walnut, metal and glass, “elegantly understated.” Three glass panels in the floor serve a playful peeka-boo function to the wine cellar below. The glass can be tinted white with an electric charge; when “fogged,” the panels obscure the view of the wine below. “You have to know which rock on the fireplace to push to open the ‘secret door’ to the wine room,” Lee explains.

OPEN

2 PLAY, ELEVATED

At another Shooting Star cabin, recreation is also the main focus. (See page 69 for a description of its wine cellar.) This cabin features a singular modern pool table designed to be a statement piece for the client, an impassioned pool player. “We chose sharp edges and a sleek design, keeping the colors monotone and minimalistic,” says Katie Merritt, principal of KAM Designs. “We added hidden storage in the wall to store a ping pong topper for the table.” In the cabin’s great room, a long, elegant window bench provides dual purpose and function. When not used for seating, the bench can be transformed into a shuffleboard table via a scissor lift. Merritt notes that there is no designated area for fun and games in this cabin. Instead, she says, “The house has some aspect of fun in every room.”

TOP A window seat hides a shuffleboard table. BOTTOM Clean lines define the modern aesthetic of this pool table. homesteadmag.com | 61


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DESIGN INSPIRATION

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3 ECLECTIC SPIRITS

ABOVE A 19th-century pool table contrasts with a 21st-century bar and wine cellar in this hip West Bank guest home. 62 | homestead

At this West Bank guesthouse, recreation is the name of the game. The client’s interest in vintage pool tables led to this amazing find: a completely reconditioned H.W. Collender pool table originally made in 1879. Collender was one of the most respected billiards table makers of his time. “My client searches for something special in everything he does,” notes architect Michael Howells. “The pool table was a very serious piece for its time. To me it reads like something made for someone like J.P. Morgan. Not many people had a pool table in those days.” Situated opposite a futuristic bar and wine cellar (featured on page 68), the pool table provides a dynamic, stylistic contrast. “The contrast works,” says Howells. While the bar is very much of the present, with no historicism or precedent, the pool table is steeped in history, as is the Tiffany lamp hanging above it. According to Howells, the juxtaposition of modern and vintage reflects the homeowner’s sensibility. “This owner knows what he likes and he is putting it together,” he says. “His home exemplifies how there are other ways of dwelling in Jackson Hole and other aesthetic attitudes that can be completely compatible with this place.”


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DESIGN INSPIRATION

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40-ACRE RIVERFRONT PROPERTY Fishermen’s Dream Location

This 40-acre property at the confluence of the Gros Ventre and Snake rivers offers Grand Teton views and great fishing! Rare opportunity to own property on private waters. Arrange to view this exceptional homesite. MLS #17-1928 Price Upon Request

A HOME FOR ALL SEASONS in Teton Village

A home for all seasons, with ski access and wonderful hiking trails. This contemporary residence offers all the Village amenities at your doorstep. Four bedrooms en suite with private baths. Spacious rooms for entertaining. The place to elevate your dreams. MLS #16-2964 Call for Appointment

Claudia Bonnist, Broker, GRI

CMBonnist@gmail.com • 307.690.2525

Terry Winchell, Realtor

TW@FightingBear.com • 307.690.2669

375 South Cache • Jackson, WY 83001 jacksonholeconnection.com

homesteadmag.com | 63


J. MARTIN DESIGN

REDEFINED DESIGN. SIMPLE ELEGANCE.

TEL 310.968.3198

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JOHN@JMARTINDESIGNINC.COM

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JMARTINDESIGNINC.COM

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INSTAGRAM @JMARTINDESIGNINC


37 YEARS OF EXCEPTIONAL CRAFTSMANSHIP

307.733.3688 :: JACKSONHOLEHOMEBUILDERS.COM :: JACKSON, WYOMING


— DESIGN INSPIRATION

Control everything from anywhere.

At Jackson Hole AV, we take ownership of our projects and believe every step of the way is important to the final results. From the very first time we meet with you to the final day of in-house training, we’re here to make the entire process as smooth and as enjoyable as possible. Home & Office Integration | Whole-House Audio & Video | Lighting | Window & Shade Control Home Theater & Media Rooms | Building Automation | Boardrooms | Design Services 307-733-2629 | www.jacksonholeav.com | Jackson, WY


Stylish

Wine Storage STORY BY Meg Daly PHOTOS BY David Agnello + Sargent Schutt

68 | homestead

Wine storage has come a long way from the ill-lit, musty cellars of yore. Today’s wine aficionados display their collections like modern art, a part of the overall look and feel of a home and a statement about the homeowner’s personality. Featured here are three spaces in luxury Jackson Hole homes where wine storage is integral to elegant dining and entertaining area design.


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FEATURE

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2 ABSTRACT GLASS ART The wine storage unit in this Shooting Star home is a main focal point of the living space. Floating between the game room and kitchen, the “cellar” is also visible upon entering the home. Interior designer Katie Merritt, who came up with this ingenious design, says, “The mirror back wall creates depth and dimension, while the floating wire rack system maintains an airy feel.”

Against the light, neutral palette of the walls and floors, the 600-bottle wine collection acts as a gleaming, colorful installation of abstract glass art. The space itself is enclosed in glass and climate-controlled. By framing the unit in 100-year-old reclaimed timbers, Merritt expertly evoked the mountain modern theme consistent with the rest of the home.

1 CURVES AND CYLINDERS The 10-by-10-foot bar in this West Bank guest

home packs a stylish punch in a small footprint. Designed by architect Michael Howells, the halfmoon bar with lighted backsplash is open to a stunning billiards room, welcoming guests to serve themselves. The curved bar was designed to wrap partway around a 12-foot-tall cylindrical wine storage unit dropped into the ground below. The homeowner saw this unique wine cellar in a British magazine and asked Howells if it was possible to do in Jackson Hole. Howells accepted the challenge, teamed up with Dembergh Construction and took things to the next level. “This bar and wine cellar break down conventional assumptions about what you’re supposed to be doing in Jackson Hole,” Howells says. According to Mike Prichard, a partner with Dembergh Construction, the biggest installation challenge was coordinating engineers and subcontractors, including Willow Creek Woodworks, Brander Design, 3form manufacturers, Genuwine Cellars and Rocky Mountain Hardware. “Once Michael figured out how to blend all the functional and design elements together, it was our job to synchronize the experts to make it a reality.” “It was a pleasure to build,” Prichard adds. The end results, he says, are “spectacular!”

LEFT The bar’s lighted back panel is programmable for different shades and moods. A remote control opens the glass ceiling/ door to the wine cellar below.

homesteadmag.com | 69


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FEATURE

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“The clients feel like they are in their home, not a cellar.” — JAMIE FARMER

70 | homestead


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FEATURE

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3 A LIBRARY OF WINE What began as a library turned into a truly elevated wine display in this spec home. The owners came into the picture midway through the building process and told architect Jamie Farmer they are passionate about wine. Nimble on his feet, Farmer suggested that instead of books, why not have a library of wine? The lofted area could still serve as a colorful collage background to the great room below. The modular shelving unit, mounted against a barnwood backdrop, is designed to hold three bottles deep. LED beam lighting washes the wine with light from behind. Glass walls provide an open feel while also ensuring the room’s temperature can be carefully monitored, as it would be in a professional setting. “We chose a slate tile for the floor,” Farmer says, “to make it feel not just like a wine room but also a tasting room.” Guests can sit at a small table to enjoy a tasting before finishing the bottle downstairs. “The clients were pleased with the transparent design,” Farmer says. “They feel like they are in their home, not a cellar.” RIGHT Originally slated to be for books, this second floor space became a library of wine.

BLACK DIAMOND MOVING + STORAGE 615 Elk Avenue, Ste D, Jackson, WY 307-739-8553 BLACKDIAMONDMOVING.COM

SHIPPING • RECEIVING • STORAGE • LOCAL MOVING INTERSTATE MOVING • INSTALLATIONS • DESIGNER SERVICES

G I V I N G Y O U T H E P E A C E O F M I N D T H AT Y O U R A S S E T S A R E S A F E A N D S E C U R E . LOCALLY OWNED AND OPERATED FOR OVER 18 YEARS.

homesteadmag.com | 71


BOUTIQUE

Property Management STORY BY Kelsey Dayton

ABOVE The Abode team: (left to right) Rob Alday, Wes White, Brook Parker and Rachel Alday are hands-on every step of the way.

M

any luxury property management companies grow too big, too fast. Not Abode Jackson Hole. A family-owned business, it is committed to staying small and specialized, offering sophisticated service—simplified. The company’s top priority is property management; it doesn’t sell real estate. Clients know it is focused entirely on managing their properties. “We do one thing and we do a really good job at it,” says Rachel Alday, one of the owners. She and her husband, Rob, started Abode in 2010 in Park City, Utah, after companies they’d hired to manage some of their properties had grown and lost the personal touch that had originally drawn their business. The couple did everything in the early days of the business, including caretaking, maintenance and rescuing guests who accidentally locked themselves out of their vacation rentals. Even then, they were selective in

72 | homestead

their clients and calculated in their growth. “We always knew we wanted to stay boutique,” Alday says. The Jackson arm of the company, which the Aldays started in 2014, is managed by Wes White and Brook Parker, but the Aldays visit once a month from Utah. They want to maintain the family-company feel, where clients can interact directly with the owners. Abode also offers a customizable concierge service, which includes transportation arrangements, pre-arrival grocery shopping and booking of activities, babysitters and dinner reservations. Homeowners trust Abode Jackson Hole to manage their multimilliondollar homes. But guests who stay in the homes also trust them with something valuable: their vacation time.


LUXURY RENTALS

ABODE JACKSON HOLE abodejacksonhole.com

RIGHT Abode at Open Meadows is a private, 11-bedroom ranch in the heart of Wilson. The estate includes a 5-bedroom home along with a 4-bedroom cabin and a 2-bedroom “barn” with a large office space for meetings and retreats. Sitting on 25 acres, there is plenty of room to spread out. The open floor plan creates an easy living flow. Cowboy chic style welcomes you to the Jackson Hole experience. A 5-minute drive to skiing too. It is all here for an amazing experience.

RIGHT For a traveler who likes to feel at one with nature, nothing compares to staying in an authentic Wyoming log home. Sequestered far away from the hustle and bustle of city life yet only a 10-minute drive from Jackson town and the Jackson Hole Mountain Resort ski slopes, at Willow Haven you’ll discover the perfect balance of seclusion and convenience.

RIGHT Nestled among willows and wildflowers, the Heron House is secluded luxury. The house has been furnished to the standards of a world-class, luxurious home with great taste and enormous attention to detail.

OPEN MEADOWS

WILLOW HAVEN

BLUE HERON — A WILDLIFE SANCTUARY

homesteadmag.com | 73


FIND MORE THAN A HOME. FIND A WAY OF LIFE.

There are many reasons to consider a home in Jackson Hole—from the stunning location to the laid-back lifestyle to the financial benefits of living in an income tax-free state. Latham Jenkins offers expertise in all three areas—real estate services, local lifestyle insight and relationships with financial advisors who can offer in-depth guidance as you search for more than just a home. Get started at LivewaterJacksonHole.com


Eagle’s Nest

$3.9M | MLS#17-3131 EaglesNestJacksonHole.com

LATHAM JENKINS

REALTOR 307.690.1642 latham@livewaterjacksonhole.com

LiveWaterJacksonHole.com


P.O. Box 2072, Jackson, WY 83001 | (307) 690-3305 | windriverbuildersinc.com


DREAM HOMES


| DESIGN INSPIRATION DESIGN INSPIRATION —|

METAMORPHIC MANOR STORY BY Julie Fustanio Kling PHOTOS BY Jim Fairchild

CONSTRUCTION

CC BUILDERS

jacksonholehomebuilders.com ARCHITECTURE

MICHAEL REMSIK DESIGNS michaeljremsikdesigns.com CABINETRY

WILLOW CREEK WOODWORKS willowcw.com

LANDSCAPE

MD NURSERY & LANDSCAPING mdlandscapinginc.com

Metamorphic stones define many aspects of the house, creating unique spaces within an open floor plan. 78 | homestead


| DESIGN DESIGN INSPIRATION — INSPIRATION|

A

n enormous amount of site work and collaboration went into transforming this piece of forested land in Wilson into a stately stone manor. The metamorphosis was completed just in time for its unveiling on the day of the total solar eclipse in August 2017. “We scrambled at the end because we had visitors, but we had so much fun working together,” says the wife of a retired couple who owns the house. She designed and built six homes for her family before she got it right. “It took three and a half years to plan this one and we are still really good friends with everyone who helped build it.” The team, including Dallas-based building designer Michael Remsik, local homebuilder CC Builders, Willow Creek Woodworks and MD

Nursery & Landscaping, picked out unique slabs of onyx, limestone, quartzite and granite to achieve the metamorphosis. They even found a piece of snow-white onyx with a natural line on it that creates the illusion of a snow cap on the hand-cut Teton Range backsplash over the backlit powder room vanity. The half-moon-shaped mirror above the vanity hearkens back to the owners’ first day in the house, when the path of the eclipse cast awe-inspiring shadows on the property, then lit up their dream home again. The scale and quality of the stone throughout the house is a source of pride for builder Clint Cook. He even used scraps of the exterior stone to make benches lining the wraparound terrace and the fire pit out back. homesteadmag.com | 79


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DREAM HOME

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ABOVE Vaulted monastery stone arches add a grandeur to the kitchen/living area, harmonizing with heated Oakley stone floors and hand-picked quartzite and granite slabs. RIGHT Hand-textured Douglas fir beams bring scale to the two-story great room, which looks out onto the Grand Teton. The window seat matches the Brazilian cherry floors and doubles as a storage chest for blankets and toys. LEFT The hum of the Frank Lloyd Wrightian waterfall brings the outside into the dining room, where warm tones from knotty alder moldings frame the view. 80 | homestead


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DREAM HOME

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Monstrous blocks of Oakley stone and reclaimed old-growth fir make the edifice as noble as the mountain range it faces. The stone is also used for the terrace and the heated walkway to the front door. Remsik, who has now designed two houses in Jackson, enjoys bringing natural elements into mountain homes. “To me, that inside/outside feel is vital in mountain homes,” he says. “I spent a lot of time tweaking views.” Earthy combinations of hand-textured Douglas fir beams and stone create a majestic yet cozy feel in the home’s entrance. Two giant, vaulted stone thresholds cloister the 23-foot-ceilinged great room, which Remsik elongated to create two seating areas, one facing the Grand Teton and the other facing a stone fireplace. “The space is defined by the stone arches and fireplace rather than walls themselves,” he says. 82 | homestead

Adjoining the great room, the dining room has an air of Fallingwater, Frank Lloyd Wright’s famous home built around a waterfall outside of Pittsburgh. “The best thing about the house to me is when you sit at the dining room table, it feels like the waterfall can get you wet,” Cook says. The 20-foot-wide, man-made waterfall drops 20 vertical feet and is dispersed in seven pools leading to a small pond in the backyard. “We were trying to create a natural, spring-like feature that comes out of the hillside and down into the yard,” says Jared Searle, general manager at MD Nursery & Landscaping. “We wanted to create a soothing ambiance with the sounds of the water.” For the husband, the dream is spending hours looking out at and listening to the waterfall, then turning his head to the opposing office windows, which paint a picture of the Snake River and the Tetons. “I wanted him to have

ABOVE The kitchen offers a view of the waterfall. The natural materials inside reflect the palette of colors in the forest behind the house.


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DREAM HOME

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“TO ME, THAT INSIDE/OUTSIDE FEEL IS VITAL IN MOUNTAIN HOMES. I SPENT A LOT OF TIME TWEAKING VIEWS.”

the best views back and front, so we lined the windows up with the center of the Grand,” says his wife. A custom handrail with glass inlays allows an unobstructed view from the office. “We created an open balcony with glass so it still feels like you are part of the great room,” says Jaxon Ching, founder of Willow Creek Woodworks. He suggested rustic walnut for the office’s built-in desk, bookshelves and cabinetry to add diversity to the palette of woodwork throughout the house. A Murphy bed is hidden in the junior master bedroom, opening up the space so this guest suite can double as a sanctuary for the wife. Her private view of the Grand is framed by two aspen trees in the front yard.

— MICHAEL REMSIK

A library nook off the junior master holds the biggest secret in the house: a bookshelf that opens into a storage space with easy access to the elevator, so the owners can carry things up from the mudroom or down to the media room and woodworking workshop on the first floor, depending on who’s doing the shopping. The workshop, an unfinished space off the guest bedroom built for the owners’ grandchildren, will be the next metamorphosis for Remsik, who has his own woodworking shop in Dallas. Next, the owners plan to dream up some furniture.

ABOVE In the evening, the mist from the waterfall and the crackle of the outdoor fire pit create a dreamlike atmosphere in the backyard. The benches were custom made by CC Builders.

homesteadmag.com | 83


Comfortable

MODERN MASTERPIECE STORY BY Kirsten Corbett PHOTOS BY David Agnello

T

ucked in a grove of trees on Snow King Mountain, the newly updated Regan residence rests at the end of a short drive amid wildflowers, pines and aspen. With the help of JH Builders, Trauner Fay Designs and GYDE Architects, the family transformed an iconic, early contemporary Jackson Hole home into a comfortable modern masterpiece. The Regans envisioned opening up the home to allow “the outside to come inside”—especially the mountain and town views—and updating the interior with modern finishes. At the end of the outdoor walkway lies the first transformation. What was once a small, unused alcove is now an elegant entry where a full-glass pivot door and glass wall blur the barrier between indoors and out. Small touches like an outdoor, metal panel cut to mimic the shape of the trees are repeated indoors on an entry bench from the same powder-treated metal.

84 | homestead

INTERIOR DESIGN

TRAUNER FAY DESIGNS traunerfaydesigns.com CONSTRUCTION

JH BUILDERS jhbuilder.com


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DREAM HOME

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ABOVE This plush, open-sectional couch, chosen by Trauner Fay Designs, invites the family to gather, without closing off the living area from the adjoining kitchen and library. It’s also the perfect place to catch a movie on a TV that retracts into the custom cabinetry. homesteadmag.com | 85


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DREAM HOME

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Renovation of the main entry opened space for the addition of a spectacular dining room. Surrounded on three sides by 9-foot-tall windows, diners feel as if they are sitting outdoors, even in mid-winter. Custom white-leather chairs ensure the guests’ comfort, while Trauner Fay Designs’ choice of an antler centerpiece and other touches echo the natural patterns of nearby branches and icicles, according to the season. Knowing that natural light was a priority for the Regans, JH Builders made several key improvements to the nearby kitchen and main room. New, full-length windows open the north wall and transform what was once a shadowed corner into an inviting, bright space leading to the outside deck and library. On the upper level looking down on the main room, the builders replaced dark wood railings with sophisticated glass panels that are nearly invisible, directing the eye toward high,

RIGHT Family and friends can sit back in comfortable, woven-synthetic-fiber deck chairs while enjoying a fire and unlimited view of the valley leading up to the Tetons. JH Builders weatherproofed the outdoor gas fireplace to keep snow out and automatically drain any water that collects, making it very low maintenance.

86 | homestead


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DREAM HOME

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THE REGANS ENVISIONED OPENING UP THE HOME TO ALLOW “THE OUTSIDE TO COME INSIDE.”

ABOVE The floating, live-edge wood bar’s walnut stools appear suspended, accenting the silver backsplash with their metal stays.

square windows. They also added textured-wood slatting to the 20-foot-high ceiling to make the large space feel warmer and more visually interesting. One more key update replaced the original concrete floors with European oiled oak. Made to show the gentle wear of walking pathways over time, the wood floors soften the entire home and record the subtle history of family life. In the kitchen, a sleek, painted-glass backsplash and concealed outlets keep the focus on the central island, where family can gather to cook and enjoy everyday meals. Trauner Fay Designs chose limestone for the island, complemented by grey-felted stools and textured fabric-and-wood chairs. Two barstools fit perfectly at the island’s burnished-metal end. Downstairs, a full bar embodies the comfortable, modern aesthetic of the home. A floating, live-edge walnut bar invites people to pull up a stool, while the mirrored backsplash with a central silver-painted skull builds a sense of

occasion in this entertainment area. Several other downstairs spaces cater to the family’s interests, such as a dedicated music room with guitars hung in easy reach, a craft area for creative projects, and a multistory outdoor climbing wall with an auto-belay device, which is popular with both family and friends. The home’s topping highlight is a new roof deck perfectly situated for Teton and valley views. JH Builders reconstructed the once conventional roof to create about 650 square feet of additional outdoor living. Glass panel railings make the deck feel as if it’s floating above the treetops. When the sun dips low, a 60-inch-long gas fireplace warms the space with light and ambiance. From top to bottom, this house with “good bones” has truly been transformed into a masterpiece where the Regan family can gather, share hobbies and create memories together. homesteadmag.com | 87


| DESIGN INSPIRATION DESIGN INSPIRATION —|

C R E AT I N G C U STOM

LIBRARIES STORY BY David Porter PHOTOS BY Krafty Photos

LIBRARY DESIGN BY

FOXTAIL BOOKS & LIBRARY SERVICES foxtailbooks.com

C

hristy Shannon Smirl wants to put a book in your hands. And on your shelves. And on your coffee tables. Founder and owner of Foxtail Books & Library Services in Jackson Hole, she is a private library curator, ready to work with homeowners within any space or budget to build and maintain custom libraries. “Your home library should be brimming with books you love and that look great,” says Smirl, who has a master’s degree in library and information science. “Your home is filled with important objects like your favorite artwork, precious antiques and fine furniture. Shouldn’t your library be chosen and arranged with the same intention and care?” Passionate about books and how they are displayed, Smirl helps homeowners select texts relevant to their personal interests, such as those in the library shown here. “The couple LEFT Foxtail Books built this unique collection to suit the clients’ interests and the feel of their home. Art, bookends and beautiful books were arranged in the space to complement interiors by Trauner Fay Designs.

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| DESIGN DESIGN INSPIRATION — INSPIRATION|

DESIGN INSPIRATION

Artwork courtesy of Altamira Fine Art, featuring David Michael Slonim’s “Woodlands No. 49.”

who owns the home are both scientists, so we selected books that tell the history of science.” Every volume in that section, from an 1860 encyclopedia to a 1939 chemistry and physics handbook, tells the story of scientific knowledge. The library includes field guides and natural histories of the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem, as well as classic literature, mysteries for casual reading and titles for the couple’s teenage children. “This is a foundational library,” Smirl says. “It’s intended that the family will build on it for years, until every inch of shelf space holds a book. I’ll be here to help them keep it polished, cozy and loved.” Whether you’re organizing 1,000 cookbooks or creating space to showcase your favorite titles, Foxtail Books & Library Services fills a niche for Jackson Hole readers and bibliophiles who seek aesthetic function. RIGHT This collection was assembled title by title with books that reflect the clients’ reading tastes and their love for Jackson Hole.

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DESIGNING FROM the INSIDE OUT STORY BY Julie Fustanio Kling PHOTOS BY Jim Fairchild

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ARCHITECTURE

BERLIN ARCHITECTS berlinarchitects.com

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f every house speaks a different language, the latest design by Berlin Architects is fluent in the echoes of the Teton Mountain Range. The rustic cedar-and-stone exterior is modest. But once you cross the threshold, rustic turns contemporary. The interior space resounds with natural light and views from enormous windows, establishing a secret vocabulary with nature. Perched on a butte on the north side of Spring Gulch, the private residence is like a minimalist treehouse, a reflection of the restrictive footprint on the hilly 18-acre lot and the owners’ love of clean lines. “The lot wasn’t so much of a challenge as it was a collaboration, because the owner has an architectural background,” says Gabriel Vazquez, Berlin’s project manager. The outcome is an architect’s—as well as the owner’s—dream house. This project was three years in the making. The firm and the owners went back and forth with drawings and site plans that now fill a built-in bookshelf in the home’s office, the room with the most intimate vista of the Grand Teton. “We created a rhythm with the windows,” Vazquez says. “And we were not shy about exposing all the structural steel holding the house up.” Desert-red hues from the vertical-grain fir ceilings and white oak floors create warmth in winter and a contrast to the structural steel and the wall of windows, which feature white peaks and sage foothills.

LEFT Looking in is like looking out; from the window placements to the paintings that hang on the walls, everything about this house reflects its mountain views. homesteadmag.com | 91


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ABOVE The open floor plan exposes steel and celebrates the simplicity of the structure. The windows are oriented to capture views of the Tetons and sunsets—and to protect the interior from baking in the sun.

“Having the hills in the foreground gives perspective to the mountains and the valley floor,” says the firm’s founder, Larry Berlin. “It’s almost like a painting.” The downstairs workout room and a cozy TV nook off the open kitchen/ dining/living room are two of the only places to sit without facing a window. Clerestory windows recessed above a lower roof were chosen for the south side of the house to create a more inward-feeling space. Artwork is also minimal with paintings of Mount Moran and the Grand Cathedral on the only walls in the living area, speaking to the play of light on the mountains. Sunsets filter in from the windows above, providing gentle evening light onto the extensive north-facing patio. “The house was definitely designed around the views,” Berlin says. 92 | homestead

“The windows in each bedroom meet at 90-degree angles, joining two very different mountain scenes.” A view of the southernmost peak, Mount Glory, from the master bathroom’s west window inspires a more singular perspective than the broader views of the Teton Range from the other windows. Below, the junior master suite is a mirror image of the master. All of the downstairs bedrooms have private patios, with the exception of the kids’ room. The walls above the headboards and all of the furniture in the bedrooms are made of vertical-grain fir that matches up with an architect’s precision. “We try not to design from the outside in, but from the inside out, to make our clients’ houses very personal to them,” Berlin says.


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“We try not to design from the outside in, but from the inside out, to make our clients’ houses very personal to them.” — LARRY BERLIN

ABOVE In the twin master and junior master bedrooms, seamless, vertical-grain fir walls show the architect’s precision and draw the eye to the 90-degree windows, which offer two very different mountain views. LEFT The steel-and-fir stairwell is lit by a clerestory window, which filters natural light from the south side of the house down from above the roofline.

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THE ART AND SOUL

OF A HOME STORY BY Zachary Barnett PHOTOS BY Audrey Hall

INTERIOR DESIGN

WRJ DESIGN wrjdesign.com

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LEFT While the clean lines of the midcentury modern furniture fall in step with the home’s geometry, the whites in the bench, chandelier and lampshade align with the afternoon sunlight on the textured rug.

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“NATURE USES ONLY THE LONGEST THREADS TO WEAVE HER PATTERNS, SO EACH SMALL PIECE OF HER FABRIC REVEALS THE ORGANIZATION OF THE ENTIRE TAPESTRY.” - RICHARD FEYNMAN, NOBEL PRIZE-WINNING PHYSICIST

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his quote resonated with me as I stood with Rush Jenkins, CEO and principal designer for WRJ Design, in the entranceway of this award-winning Jackson Hole home he designed recently. He pointed out the half-seen, half-hidden elements of the architect’s lines and angles,

and noted how the earth tones in the Elizabeth Eakins floor covering subtly called out the textures and pitch of the reclaimed timber. For lines, there was the simple geometry of Mountain Hardware’s chandelier echoing the trim in the glass doors homesteadmag.com | 95


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LEFT A Bradford Stewart painting and custom wool-and-silk rug, along with Edward Wormley sofas, accentuate the power of light, balancing the imposing steel, stone and timber. BELOW A WRJ-designed breakfast table, Holly Hunt glass pendants and Lindsey Adelman chandelier play off the glassfronted white cabinets.

beyond, and the crisp contours of the midcentury furniture balanced by the streamlined, upholstered bench. And there hung one of the owner’s paintings capturing all of these elements combined. “One of the lessons I learned at Sotheby’s,” Jenkins recounted, “is that paintings always have a way of finding their place.” We had not yet moved beyond the entranceway, and already there was enough to appreciate about the art of Rush Jenkins. He was, indeed, thoughtful, with a sound eye for the narrative of the home as the owners and architects had meant it, which is when the word “intrigue” first entered our conversation. JLF Architects/JLF Design Build had used steel, stone and timber to layer this house high up on a vista-rich butte between Jackson and Wilson. They had done so in a way that the rooms appear to have been built sequentially, as if they were the chapters of a fantastic novel about the life of a family, unfolding gradually and surprising at every turn. It occurred to me that not only is the designing of a home very much like the telling of a story, but that in every design—every creation—is revealed the thread of the designer.

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AN ARTIST FINDING HIS PLACE

Raised on an Idaho farm with views of the Tetons, Jenkins studied landscape architecture in California and then moved abroad for studies in the Fine and Decorative Works of Art graduate courses at Sotheby’s London. Eventually, he became the first-ever director of design at Sotheby’s New York, before “returning home” to Jackson Hole with his partner, Klaus Baer, to found WRJ Design. Jenkins tells stories, good ones about how his styling of a collection for Cher led to his designing the exhibition for Nancy Reagan at the Reagan Library; of interviewing with the former first lady’s board members, including Merv Griffin and the advisor to Prince Charles. These stories become one story of an artist with many talents and interests, woven from a deeply curious, creative mind and drawn from the well of experiences and terrain. Nature is a major source of inspiration to Jenkins. “The natural surroundings and authenticity of where I grew up had a great impact on my desire to return to the West,” he says. “Open spaces, rugged terrain, majestic mountains feed my soul.”

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ABOVE The master bedroom takes on a cabin-in-thewoods feel, thanks to the custom, textured Elizabeth Eakins rug, linen drapes and rising butte beyond, which becomes, in the mind’s eye, another painting. LEFT WRJ chose unadorned Ochre light pendants to complement the owner’s option of a windows-onthe-world view in place of traditional mirrors.

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“OPEN SPACES, RUGGED TERRAIN, MAJESTIC MOUNTAINS FEED MY SOUL.”

- RUSH JENKINS

In fact, WRJ created its own word for this relationship with nature—a very telling, brilliant word—and used it as the title of its statement publication: INTERROIR 1. The combination of environmental elements—soil, land, sky, climate, light, terrain, texture, fibers, altitude, palette—that imbues a specific object, material or space with distinctive character 2. The imprint of nature upon interior design 3. The signature approach of WRJ Design

DRAWING THE OUTSIDE IN

That afternoon, interroir is what I saw: line and form and color in harmony with nature. Paul Bertelli, design principal at JLF, had conspired with the owners to follow the lines of the landscape and defer to nature. It made sense that Jenkins would identify with this philosophy. “The philosophy and work of JLF is something that resonates deeply with me,” he says. “We have a similar approach to understanding context and place and using natural materials in the design of our clients’ homes. Their homes have a deep authenticity and soul that feel like they’ve enveloped the lives of many generations.” homesteadmag.com | 99


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And here was the brilliance of Jenkins. As we walked the rooms, I saw again and again the wisdom of his choices. Instead of out-muscling the heaviness of the stone, steel and timber with big shapes and colors, he saw the need for light, cream tones and simplicity of pattern. With a plein air painter’s eye for the distant, muted colors of the far-off mountain ranges and horizon, he sought softness and clean, soothing lines. In the white linen drapes that embraced the sunlight in every room, and in the light blues and grays of the floor coverings that drew from the clouds and sky, his intentions were clear: Allow the mind’s eye to rest. Establish harmony. Create a sanctuary.

WHEN THE JOURNEY BECOMES A HOME

In the end, by Jenkins recognizing the lines and palette of the journey already established, the shared beliefs about what this home could be were interwoven with the memories and moments of what it did become.

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It began with the owner’s love of midcentury furniture and a dream of building a home in the mountains of Wyoming. It continued with Bertelli wandering the butte with fellow architect Ashley Sullivan and landscape architect Jim Verdone one summer day, seeking a site for the home and happening upon a little meadow of wildflowers. Those flowers became the owner’s sanctuary and the anchor for the whole project. And then there was Jenkins’ meeting with the owner in New York City. Though he was not originally slated to join this journey, Bertelli and Sullivan thought the owner should meet him. Says Bertelli, “The thing about Rush is, every time we work with him, the project turns out great. He has an innate ability to see what we’re trying to accomplish. He gets it. I really think of him as a part of the team.”


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WHERE

the HEART IS STORY BY Shannon Sollitt PHOTOS BY Sargent Schutt

ARCHITECTURE

MERRELL DESIGNWORKS mdwjh.com

CONSTRUCTION

COULOIR CONSTRUCTION couloirconstruction.com

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INTRO TEXT INTRO TEXT COULD GO HERE OR HERE...

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ost homes have a “heart”: a fireplace, a living room, a cozy master bedroom. The heart of Jennifer Bruno’s mountain modern home is the laundry room. And the laundry chutes are the veins. “I designed the house around the laundry chutes,” Bruno laughs. It’s kind of a joke, but for a mother of three growing, active kids, laundry is a constant. Bruno’s life and kids demand efficiency, so every inch of her Teton Village home is highly functional—but not at the expense of taste. Wood trim and stone walls give a touch of that traditional Western rustic feel, but metal accents and big, open rooms bring it back to this century. Unlike many of the neighboring houses designed for vacation rentals, Bruno’s feels like a home—her dream home. Builders Jesse Roy and Derek Di Venere of Couloir Construction and Rick Merrell of Merrell DesignWorks turned the heavily wooded lot into a custom home in just 14 months. The design team tried a few iterations of the primary living spaces before deciding on the final layout. They wanted to maximize space, utility and views of Jackson Hole Mountain Resort. The Couloir Construction crew built a temporary mock-up skeletal wall that framed

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ABOVE Wooden accents, like this barn-style bathroom door and wall trim, add rustic flare to this mountain modern home. RIGHT With just one photo for reference, Jesse Roy designed a set of cavelike bunk beds nestled into the wall for young guests.

Tower Three, relocated the chimney to add a corner window, then brought Merrell and Bruno in for feedback. The team then worked together to redesign the picture windows, living room and kitchen to bring Bruno’s ideas to fruition. The home’s two primary functions are family and entertaining. It needed to be comfortable and cozy enough to house Bruno’s family, likely for the rest of their lives, but big enough to welcome visitors and entertain guests. Two rows of bunk beds in the basement sleep four young guests. “Jen showed us an inspiration photo of the bunk beds, and I started to design on the fly,” says Roy. Accounting for bed size, stair width and space for additional wall cladding, he designed each bed like a small cave, recessed into the wall and accessed by a staircase between the two rows. He left room in front of the bed “caves” to add doors to them in the future. “With only a picture, I think we captured the look and feeling that Jen was trying to achieve, keeping in mind functionality,” he says. Upstairs, a wooden, sliding barn door turns the first-floor 104 | homestead


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ABOVE The rock lining the walls is custom-made from a mix of three different types of stone from three different quarries around the West. RIGHT The team calls this window “The Tower.” It spans two floors and offers views of the valley in front of Jackson Hole Mountain Resort.

office into a guest suite. Each floor has different heating accommodations, and the team left room to build an elevator for Bruno’s aging parents. Although Bruno had the vision, the entire process was collaborative. “She made the process enjoyable and fun,” Di Venere says. “We were always trying to understand what she wanted, and I think ultimately we helped give her that.” Merrell admits it was one of the most enjoyable projects he’s ever been a part of. Laughter was never in short supply onsite, he says. The team shared desks, jokes and a healthy supply of peanut M&M’s. And the heart of the house, the laundry room, is painted purple: Bruno’s favorite color. homesteadmag.com | 105


EVERY ROOM with A VIEW STORY BY Kelsey Dayton PHOTOS BY Krafty Photos

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hen Chris Lee of Design Associates Architects begins to create a home, he finds the most stunning view and decides which room needs to have it. But at the home he designed in Bar B Bar, the incredible views of the Tetons were too good to limit to just one room. “It turns out that every room wants that view,” he explains. So he created a T-shaped design to give each room a front row seat to the magnificent landscape. The outside portion of the home also features small patio spaces connected by pathways, each with its own spectacular view.

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ARCHITECTURE

DESIGN ASSOCIATES

designassociatesarchitects.com

The 3,617-square-foot home feels as though it’s made of glass. The windows, provided by Peak Glass and manufactured by Bildau, a German company, ensured that the home met local energy codes, while allowing far more windows than is standard. “Framing didn’t take long; there were hardly any walls,” Lee says. The house was originally designed as a temporary vacation home, modest in size and simple in design. Midway through the process, however, the owners decided


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ABOVE Midway through the design process the owners decided they wanted a bigger home. Architect Chris Lee added 16 feet onto the great room, which allowed him to make the fireplace two-sided and provided seating space behind the chimney.

RIGHT The communal space of the home is all one large area designed to be open and social. Wherever you are in the house you enjoy a spectacular view.

they would live in Jackson Hole full-time and wanted something bigger. “We didn’t miss a beat,” Lee says. “It didn’t even really slow us down.” The home is built with two wings: one with communal space, such as the great room, and the other the private, bedroom areas. A glass-encased hallway connects the two spaces. The great room acts as the social center, with a fireplace, kitchen and living area, including a small loft where kids can play. Plywood paneling on the vaulted ceiling gives a smooth and sleek feel that also generates a sense of warmth. The room, like the rest of the house, was designed to maximize the views. The guest rooms are simple, each with its own bathroom and “bomber view”

DESIGN INSPIRATION

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ABOVE The house was designed with an open floor plan for entertaining. The concept for the great room was simple, Lee says. “It’s basically an open rectangle with a kitchen in the corner.”

of the Grand Teton. The master suite is the crown jewel of the home. Floor-toceiling glass comprises three of the bedroom walls. Glass surrounds three sides of the fireplace to make it look as though it’s floating from the ceiling. Lee worked with Roscoe Company and interior designer Shannon White to create a modern, yet welcoming feel to the home. The owners wanted simple lines and clean details and chose white throughout the entire house. This creates an airy, serene feeling. Nothing is shouting for attention. The heated, stained-concrete floors are a dark gray—almost black—with a light sheen. “The whole house is as laser clean as can be—with a lot of glass,” Lee says. The owner’s affinity for modernism clashed with subdivision requirements for a Western aesthetic. Lee brought the two into alignment in several ways. He used unstained barnwood to give the exterior a rustic feel. Solar panels blend into the black, metal roof. He also created a thin roofline and left the windows unframed, so everything looks clean and crisp, while still appearing weathered and bucolic. 108 | homestead


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ABOVE The master bedroom is the “crown jewel� of the home, says Lee. Three sides of the room are glass. Faraway neighbors and strategically placed landscaping ensure privacy, while surrounding the room with incredible views.

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Fall Arts Festival —

FIND YOUR STORY BY David Porter

one of a kind

RIGHT Western Design Exhibitor: Paul Morelli for Belle Cose

FALL ARTS FESTIVAL JacksonHoleChamber.com

WESTERN DESIGN EXHIBIT + SALE

WesternDesignConference.com

Artist Kathryn Turner showcasing her work during Palates and Palettes

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ackson loves art, from the representative to the culinary and performing. Undoubtedly the best time to take it all in is during the 34th annual Fall Arts Festival this September. Maureen Murphy, director of special events at the Jackson Hole Chamber of Commerce and the festival organizer, says, “Buyers both local and from afar place Jackson in the top five markets of Western art.” For one festival event, Palates and Palettes, more than 30 galleries open their doors to co-host an evening replete with fine art, live music, delicious food and perfect wine pairings catered by local chefs. Spectators can watch artists sculpt and paint in the Town Square during the Quick Draw Art Sale

LEFT Ann Everett Fashion Designs featured at Western Design Fashion Show RIGHT Taste of the Tetons. Valley chefs, restaurants and caterers put their best culinary work on display for sampling. 112 | homestead

and Auction. Be ready to purchase your favorite piece. Proceeds from the sales, which can be as affordable as $900 each, support the festival. The painting “Rise Above,” by the 2017 festival’s featured artist, Mark Keathley, fetched more than $77,000. For four days, the Western Design Exhibit + Sale, now in its 26th year, is the largest gallery in Jackson. The Opening Preview Party kicks off the festival with


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Western Design Exhibit + Sale Floor

Fall Arts Festival Calendar of Events THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 6TH Western Design Exhibit + Sale Opening Preview Party + Fashion Show 6pm — 10pm, tickets $50 & $125

FRIDAY — SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 7TH — 9TH Western Design Exhibit + Sale 10am — 5pm ARTITUDE ADJUSTMENT: Daily sponsored happy hours Tickets $15

FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 7TH Palates & Palettes

FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 7TH Western Design Exhibit + Sale Design Excellence Awards Celebration $19,000 is presented with cocktails + artisan chocolates 2pm

SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 8TH Western Design Exhibit + Sale Benefit Night — 10% of sales to benefit Jackson Hole Art Association 4pm — 7pm

SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 9TH Taste of the Tetons

SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 9TH Western Design Exhibit + Sale

ABOVE Quick Draw Art Sale + Auction, Amy Ringholz painting in plein air. Paintings are auctioned immediately following the 90-minute session.

a gala and couture runway fashion show. Festive cocktails at five open bars, gourmet food and an energetic crowd mingle with 100-plus juried exhibitors. The Exhibit + Sale features unexpectedly sophisticated and uniquely crafted home furnishings, jewelry and fashion, as well as a designer show house. “The fresh perspectives and creativity found at the Exhibit + Sale continue to draw thousands annually,” says Executive Director Allison Merritt. “It’s clear that Western has many meanings and that one-of-a-kind doesn’t have to mean unaffordable. Much like the artists themselves, their unique work features everything from cowboy to contemporary and encourages a fresh and open-minded approach to design.”

RIGHT Designer Show House dining room by Kibler & Kirch

WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 12TH Featured Artist Poster Signing

SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 15TH Quickdraw Art Sale + Auction

RIGHT Western Design Artist J Booth Art

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2017 BENEFICIARIES CHOSEN BY HOMEOWNERS

JAC K S ON HOL E

SHOWC A SE O F HOM E S

1 ARCHITECTURE Enclosure Studio INTERIOR DESIGN Trauner Fay Designs LANDSCAPING Frederick Landscaping CONSTRUCTION New West Building Co.

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u Doug Coombs Foundation u Make-A-Wish® Wyoming u Santa Claus Fund u Teton Free Clinic STORY BY David Porter

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ach autumn, Homestead magazine hosts its signature event highlighting the valley’s best architecture, design and building. Held during the Fall Arts Festival and benefiting local charities, the Jackson Hole Showcase of Homes welcomes people to step inside a diverse array of locally designed and built homes and see up close the valley’s talent and craftsmanship. In 2017 we featured the elaborately detailed West Bank home of famed lawyer Gerry Spence, which was designed by his wife, Imaging, and built by Michael Beauchimen. “It was a wonderful experience,” Imaging Spence says about the Showcase tour. “Many designers and builders attended, and they were curious and receptive. It was gratifying to talk with people who understood structure themselves.” Farmer Payne Architects’ modern, gabled farmstyle home in the historic Gill Addition neighborhood wowed viewers with its big windows and simple yet elegant design. Architect Jamie Farmer says the modern farmhouse style achieves a blend between heritage and culture and functionality. “People thought it was a cool project and appreciated quality and design,” Farmer says. “The simplicity of the gabled form is really functional and allows you to increase the quality of the materials.” A collaboration between Enclosure Studio, Trauner Fay Designs, New West Building Company and Frederick Landscaping, the Hoover residence includes a nod to Western heritage with its rustic, timber-beam structure, as well as expansive views of the Tetons and the National Elk Refuge. “Being given the opportunity to walk people through a home we’d recently completed, highlighting custom features, explaining the design concept and meeting potential new clients was priceless,” interior designer Kristin Fay says. Stay tuned for information about this year’s Showcase of Homes (check our blog at homesteadmag.com) and join us for a relaxed, festive day of design and building expertise.


DESIGN INSPIRATION ARCHITECTURE Farmer Payne Architects

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INTERIOR DESIGN Imaging Spence

LANDSCAPING Lawngevity Landscapes CONSTRUCTION New West Building Co.

FOR 2018 INFO VISIT: JacksonHoleShowcase.com

CONSTRUCTION Michael Beauchimen

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LEFT Imaging Spence (far right) gives meaning to every intricate detail of the home she and her husband have carefully curated with meaningful items from their extensive travels throughout the world. Imaging chose The Santa Claus Fund, a local nonprofit she founded to provide holiday gifts to local Teton County children, as the charity to receive her portion of proceeds generated from the tour. homesteadmag.com | 115


CONCEPTUAL

CURATING STORY BY Meg Daly

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ndependent curators Matthew Day Jackson, Andy Kincaid and Camille Obering have teamed up to produce multi-genre, site-specific installations and performances that are changing the landscape of contemporary art in Jackson Hole, putting it on the map for cutting-edge art. Recent exhibitions, such as “Rural Violence” and “Observatories,” challenged audiences with new ways of looking at the West. For instance, an installation in “Observatories,” by the venerable contemporary artist Paul McCarthy, called into question our fascination with gory stagecoach fights and Old West violence. With their abiding passion for conceptual art, how do these non-traditionalists approach curating their own art collections? How does Western topography intersect with their personal artistic tastes? Kincaid, an artist himself, has transformed his home into an art gallery called Holiday Forever. The name is a play on the notion of Jackson Hole as a perpetual playground. Each month, he and his partner, Amanda Flosbach, turn over the front two rooms of their rented Cache Street home to visiting artists to do with as they see fit. Often, Kincaid does not know in advance what his guests will be exhibiting. “I allow the gallery to be a vessel for artists’ concepts,” he says. Making his home into a rotating door for contemporary thought could be considered an art project in itself. The transience of the art and perpetual transformation of the space mean his home is always infused with new and diverse ideas. All three curators agree that art can give your life context and broaden the way you experience the world. “Art is a way to talk about history,” Obering says. “It can say something about a particular period in your life, as well as the world at large.”

LEFT Work by internationally acclaimed artists Jordan Eagles and Kiki Smith preside in Camille Obering’s living room. 116 | homestead


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ABOVE Andy Kincaid transformed his rented home into a contemporary art gallery. Featured here: work by Dennis Witkin. holidayforever.org homesteadmag.com | 117


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As a fine art dealer, Obering’s doctrine for her personal art collection mirrors that of her other projects. “The crux of what we’re trying to do is collect ideas and people,” she says of her work with Kincaid and Jackson. Her home in Schofield Patent, which she shares with her husband, Ben Musser, and their two young children, boasts work by notable contemporary artists such as Jordan Eagles, Tara Donovan and Kiki Smith. Obering says the artwork in her home converses with nature. “And Western life is always in this conversation,” she says. Large picture windows look north toward the Tetons and invite the outside world inside. A print by Neil Jenney punctuates the living room: “Art is nature adjusted,” it reads. Like his cohorts, Jackson is drawn to art that asks question and conveys concepts. “An artwork is like a battery that carries ideas,” he says. An internationally respected contemporary artist, he makes his home in Wilson with his wife, Laura Seymour, and their two children. Among other achievements, he has exhibited in the Whitney Biennial, and his work is included in 118 | homestead

the Metropolitan Museum of Art’s permanent collection. Jackson sees his relationship with pieces of art like relationships with people. “When you are drawn to a piece of art, there might be an aspect of yourself represented there.” All three curators collect work by the artists they bring to town. It may not always be harmonious with traditional mountaintown aesthetics, but that’s not the point, they say. Instead, the team feels strongly that avantgarde views are a vital part of Jackson Hole. “It’s an energy we are trying to prolong here,” Kincaid says. ABOVE Large works by legendary performance and installation artist Chris Burden (left) and Larry Bamburg (right) at Matthew Day Jackson’s Fall Creek home. RIGHT Tara Donovan’s button sculpture at Obering’s home.


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LRWB’s attorneys have a nuanced understanding of every stage of your real estate transaction. We’ll walk you through, step by step, and provide clarity, expertise, and efficiency. Our firm can advise you on financing, construction, development, corporate involvement, tax implications, and investment potential for your real estate transaction.

Establishing Residence in Wyoming?

Our firm can advise you on establishing domicile here in Wyoming and making the most of our state’s tax and business benefits. We take a team-based and personalized approach to each client and like to say, “We’re here to help, not to take over.” We know you have valued advisors in your home state, and we offer an integrative strategy to create the best outcome for you.

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The LRWB attorneys know Wyoming and Jackson Hole. More importantly, we have roots in the community and the state. Our partners and staff attorneys have served in leadership positions or on boards at organizations including the Wyoming State Bar Foundation, the College of Law Advisory Board, Equal Justice Wyoming, the Teton County Library Foundation Board, and many others. There is no better partner for your introduction to the valley.

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TETON PINES

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MARKETPLACE

ELK REFUGE

Serenity on the Elk Refuge PRESENTED BY: JACKSON HOLE REAL ESTATE ASSOCIATES

A

stunning, hand-crafted log residence situated in the heart of the 24,700-acre National Elk Refuge, with the panorama of the entire Teton Range as a backdrop. Offered fully furnished for turn-key convenience, its unrivaled location is just minutes from downtown Jackson yet feels worlds away. The one-level home’s 6,735 sq. ft. features five en-suite bedrooms, a great room with stone fireplace and floor-to-ceiling windows to capture the amazing views, adjacent dining room with access to a covered patio, a separate family room w/projection TV, gourmet kitchen with walkin pantry and a private office.

PRICE $8,450,000

INQUIRIES

JACKSON HOLE REAL ESTATE ASSOCIATES CHRISTIE’S INTERNATIONAL REAL ESTATE Carol Linton, Associate Broker CarolLinton@jhrea.com +1 307 732 7518 LintonProperties.com


JACKSON, WYOMING

MARKETPLACE

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Gracious In-Town Living

PRESENTED BY: GRAHAM-FAUPEL-MENDENHALL & ASSOCIATES

L

ocated in the highly sought-after Gill Addition, designed by J. Visser Design, this irresistible 4 bed, 4.5 bath home features gorgeous wide plank oak floors, quartz counter-tops, and marble work throughout. Enjoy an open floor plan with expansive great room views over the Elk Refuge. The entire home boasts elegant craftsmanship & exudes unparalleled warmth. The well-appointed kitchen offers top of the line appliances. Desirably located, this timeless home has it all.

WILSON, WYOMING

PRICE UPON REQUEST

Immaculately Constructed New Home in Wilson PRESENTED BY: GRAHAM-FAUPEL-MENDENHALL & ASSOCIATES

:: MLS# 17-2002

O

ne of the few NEW construction Teton Pines Cluster offerings! This exceptional 4 bed, 4.5 bath home was built to exacting standards. The great room & high-end kitchen may be accessed by an elevator leading to 2nd floor living. Highlighted with stunning wide-plank white oak floors and marble counter tops—natural light floods the space. This beautifully built home is unique with an attached 2-car garage. Conveniently located, just minutes from Jackson Hole Mountain Resort. PRICE $3,400,000

INQUIRIES

JACKSON HOLE REAL ESTATE ASSOCIATES | CHRISTIE’S INTERNATIONAL REAL ESTATE Graham-Faupel-Mendenhall gfm@jhrea.com | +1 307 690 0812

| GrahamFaupelMendenhall.com


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MARKETPLACE

NORTH OF JACKSON

Discover Woodside

PRESENTED BY: JACKSON HOLE REAL ESTATE ASSOCIATES

560 Woodside Drive Jackson, WY

D

iscover serenity in this timeless, rustic, mountain modern masterpiece. Situated on 5 private acres, enjoy unobstructed Grand Teton views from every room. Take in every breathtaking sunset, cast upon the reflection ponds, which are fed by a recirculating waterfall. Completed in 2018, this estate features 6 bedrooms, 8 bathrooms, two great rooms, a stunning kitchen with a catering pantry, a wine closet, a media/theatre room, and a fitness room. Located just 10 minutes north of the town, living in Jackson Hole offers abundant wildlife viewing, endless recreational opportunities, a lively arts scene, and unmatched tax advantages. PRICE UPON REQUEST

INQUIRIES

JACKSON HOLE REAL ESTATE ASSOCIATES CHRISTIE’S INTERNATIONAL REAL ESTATE Jaime Mehnert, Sales Associate Jaime@JacksonsFinestHomes.com +1 307 200 9689 560Woodside.com


www.shannonwhitedesign.com | Shannon White Burns, Allied ASID | 307.690.1594


|

DESIGN INSPIRATION

YOU TRUSTED US TO BUILD YOUR HOME, NOW YOU CAN TRUST US TO MANAGE IT.

www.NewWestBC.com | 307.203.2460

www.NewWestPM.com | 307.733.8604

Landscape Design • Installation • Maintenance • Lawn Care • Irrigation • Gardening • Snow Removal

www.LawngevityLandscapes.com | 307.202.4624

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2018 RESOURCE DIRECTORY ARCHITECTURE 22

ATELIER ONE LTD. 125 S King St | PO Box 3859 Jackson, WY 83001 307-733-4307 DannyWilliamsArchitect.com

275 Veronica Lane, Ste 200 PO Box 4119 Jackson, WY 83001 307-733-5697 BerlinArchitects.com

DESIGN ASSOCIATES 106 ARCHITECTS 50 S King St, Ste 201 PO Box 4615 Jackson, WY 83001 307-733-3600 DesignAssociatesArchitects.com

26

1085 W Hwy 22 | PO Box 4356 Jackson, WY 83001 307-733-3766 Dynia.com

260 W Broadway, Ste A PO Box 381 Jackson, WY 83001 307-413-3276 FarmerPayneArchitects.com

1070 Elkrun Lane, #60 PO Box 12258 Jackson, WY 83002 307-203-2852 KinseyArch.com

32, 102

4

Dallas, TX, & Jackson, WY 214-533-9380 MichaelJRemsikDesigns.com

6, 84

23, 56

115 E Pearl Ave, Ste 100 PO Box 4793 Jackson, WY 83001 307-201-1642 VeraIconicaArchitecture.com

WIND RIVER BUILDERS 76

PAMELA GIBSON FINE ART

58

503-780-3256 PamelaGibsonArtist.com

CABINETRY & CUSTOM MILLWORK 4510 Landmark Circle Idaho Falls, ID 83401 208-522-2486 WillowCW.com

16

24

JACKSON HOLE 112 CHAMBER OF COMMERCE

JACKSON HOLE 114 SHOWCASE OF HOMES

3955 Antelope Lane PO Box 10970 Jackson, WY 83002 307-733-0529 MillIronTimberworks.com

265 W Broadway Jackson, WY 83001 307-203-2460 NewWestBC.com

SEVEN GENERATIONS 52 CONSTRUCTION

215 N Millward Ave Jackson, WY 83001 307-690-8256 JacksonHoleShowcase.com

WESTERN DESIGN CONFERENCE

1155 Gregory Lane Jackson, WY 83001 307-733-6043 AVSWy.com

67

JACKSON HOLE AV

112

HOMEWARES 131

AZADI FINE RUGS 55 N Glenwood St Jackson, WY 83001 307-734-0169 AzadiFineRugs.com

GALLERIES & ANTIQUES 172 Center St PO Box 4859 Jackson, WY 83001 307-739-4700 AltamiraArt.com

110

AUDIO VISUAL SPECIALISTS

1010 South Park Loop Rd, Ste #2 Jackson, WY 83001 307-733-2629 JacksonHoleAV.com

PO Box 7889 Jackson, WY 83002 307-690-9719 WesternDesignConference.com

ALTAMIRA FINE ART

111

TURNER FINE ART

HOME AUTOMATION

307-733-3316 JacksonHoleChamber.com

13

62 S Glenwood St PO Box 1435 Jackson, WY 83001 307-733-0555 TayloePiggottGallery.com

545 N Cache St Jackson, WY 83001 307-690-9632 TurnerFineArt.com

EVENTS/ ORGANIZATIONS

355 11th St, Ste 200 San Francisco, CA 94103 415-285-6930 MatPelBuilders.com

2205 South Park Ranch Rd Jackson, WY 83001 307-413-1909 7GConstruction.com

255 N Glenwood St PO Box 1006 Jackson, WY 83001 307-739-1940 CayuseWA.com

PO Box 2072 Jackson, WY 83001 307-690-3305 WindRiverBuildersInc.com

30

CAYUSE WESTERN AMERICANA

160 W Deloney Ave PO Box 4819 Jackson, WY 83001 307-733-8771 TetonHeritageBuilders.com

WILLOW CREEK 29, 78 WOODWORKS INC.

1230 N Ida Lane #7 PO Box 1636 Wilson, WY 83014 307-733-0133 DemberghJH.com

970 W Broadway, Ste 216 PO Box 642 Jackson, WY 83001 307-734-5245 JHBuilder.com

130

TAYLOE PIGGOTT GALLERY

NEW WEST BUILDING 127

MICHAEL J. REMSIK 28, 78 DESIGNS

128 | homestead

DEMBERGH CONSTRUCTION

MILL IRON TIMBERWORKS

150 E Hansen Ave Jackson, WY 83001 307-734-9444 MDWJH.com

VERA ICONICA ARCHITECTURE

310 E Broadway, Ste 7 PO Box 12822 Jackson, WY 83001 307-699-3949 CouloirConstruction.com

MATAROZZI PELSINGER BUILDERS

20

KINSEY LLC

32, 102

JH BUILDERS

10

FARMER PAYNE ARCHITECTS

MERRELL DESIGNWORKS

1521 Martin Lane Jackson, WY 83001 307-733-3688 JacksonHoleHomeBuilders.com

COULOIR CONSTRUCTION

DYNIA ARCHITECTS

66, 78

CC BUILDERS

BERLIN ARCHITECTS 90

TETON HERITAGE BUILDERS

BUILDERS/ CONTRACTORS

DWELLING 7

3, 36

1921 Moose-Wilson Rd, Ste 102 Wilson, WY 83014 307-733-8582 DwellingJH.com

HOME AGAIN 890 S Hwy 89 Jackson, WY 83001 307-739-2232 HomeAgainJackson.com

119


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44

KISMET FINE RUGS

150 E Broadway | PO Box 6368 Jackson, WY 83002 307-739-8984 KismetRugs.com

485 W Broadway Jackson, WY 83001 307-732-0078 RockyMountainHardware.com

TWENTY TWO HOME

126

8

8

SNAKE RIVER INTERIORS 164 E Deloney Ave PO Box 1552 Jackson, WY 83001 307-733-3005 SnakeRiverInteriors.com

12

WILD WEST DESIGNS 120

TRAUNER FAY DESIGNS 84 3490 Clubhouse Dr, Ste 103 Wilson, WY 83001 307-733-0902 TraunerFaydesigns.com

94

30 S King St | PO Box 910 Jackson, WY 83001 307-200-4881 WRJDesign.com

3, 36

1160 Alpine Lane, 2C PO Box 12285 Jackson, WY 83002 307-200-6608 ForsythAndBrown.com

MOUNTAINSCAPES, INC. 2

64

PO Box 10846 Jackson, WY 83002 310-968-3198 JMartinDesignInc.com

1715 High School Rd, Ste 210 Jackson, WY 83001 307-739-3008 JJStiremanDesign.com

2389 S Hwy 33 Driggs, ID 83422 208-354-8816 MDLandscapingInc.com

PO Box 8948 Jackson, WY 83002 307-734-7512 MountainscapesJH.com

LEGAL SERVICES 42

LONG REIMER WINEGAR 121 BEPPLER LLP 270 W Pearl Ave, Ste 103 PO Box 3070 Jackson, WY 83001 LRW-Law.com

125 E Pearl Ave, Ste 4 PO Box 1890 Jackson, WY 83001 307-264-1616 AbodeJacksonHole.com

15

31

PO Box 7635 Jackson, WY 83002 307-699-3377 ClearwaterRestoration.com

55

DIAMOND SPAS 800-951-SPAS (7727) 720-864-9115 DiamondSpas.com

25

GREAT COUNTRY TIMBER FRAMES

80 W Broadway | PO Box 4897 Jackson, WY 83001 307-733-6060 JHRea.com

74

802 W Broadway Jackson, WY 83001 307-690-1642 LivewaterJacksonHole.com

PRIVATE REALTY 63 GROUP, LLC CLAUDIA BONNIST, BROKER 375 S Cache St PO Box 4636 Jackson, WY 83001 307-690-2525 / 307-734-1083

SOTHEBY’S INT’L 54 REALTY JAKE KILGROW, BROKER ROB DESLAURIERS, BROKER 110 E. Broadway Jackson, Wyoming 83001 307-413-2822 / 307-734-1083 JHSIR.com

SPECIALISTS

CLEARWATER RESTORATION

ABODE JACKSON HOLE 72

LIVE WATER PROPERTIES LATHAM JENKINS

18

SNAKE RIVER SPORTING CLUB

120 West Road Ellington, CT 06029 (860) 896-0636 GreatCountryGarages.com

JACKSON HOLE REAL 122 ESTATE ASSOCIATES 127

RECREATIONAL

BARN YARD & GREAT COUNTRY GARAGES

615 Elk Ave, Ste D Jackson, WY 83001 307-739-8553 BlackDiamondMoving.com

REAL ESTATE

MD NURSERY AND 21, 78 LANDSCAPING

FORSYTH & BROWN 11 INTERIOR DESIGN

JACQUE JENKINS- STIREMAN INTERIOR DESIGN

30 S King St | PO Box 910 Jackson, WY 83001 307-200-4881 WRJDesign.com

307-202-4624 LawngevityLandscapes.com

1921 Moose-Wilson Rd, Ste 102 Wilson, WY 83014 307-733-8582 DesignedInteriorsJH.com

J. MARTIN DESIGN

94

WRJ DESIGN

LAWNGEVITY

71

PROPERTY MANAGEMENT

LANDSCAPING & LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE

INTERIOR DESIGN DESIGNED INTERIORS

745 W Broadway | PO Box 12019 Jackson, WY 83002 StocktonAndShirk.com

|

14885 Sporting Club Rd Jackson, WY 83001 307-200-3138 SRSportingClub.com

BLACK DIAMOND MOVING CO.

STOCKTON & SHIRK

WRJ HOME DESIGN STUDIO + INTERIORS

88

PO Box 2025 Wilson, WY 83014 307-264-0220 FoxtailBooks.com

MOVING & STORAGE

45 E Deloney Ave | PO Box 4778 Jackson, WY 83001 307-733-9922 TwentyTwoHome.com

140 W Broadway PO Box 2726 Jackson, WY 83001 307-734-7600 WildWestDesignsInc.com

LIBRARY SERVICES FOXTAIL BOOKS

PO Box 3154 Jackson, WY 83001 ShannonWhiteDesign.com

5

ROCKY MOUNTAIN HARDWARE

SHANNON WHITE DESIGN

RESOURCE DIRECTORY

9 Village Street Ellington, CT 06029 (860) 454-9103 GCTimberFrames.com

MONTANA RECLAIMED 59 LUMBER COMPANY PO Box 741 Gallatin Gateway, MT 59730 406-763-9102 MTReclaimed.com

RIDGELINE LOG & TIMBER 51 1675 High School Rd Jackson, WY 83001 307-733-8007 RidgelineLogTimber.com

STONE & TILE 27

ARCHITECTURAL STONE & TILE 525 Elk Ave, #4 | PO Box 6710 Jackson, WY 83002 307-732-1819 ASTJH.com

GEMSTONE TILE

40, 65

502 Topeka St Kingman, AZ 86401 928-753-3147 GemstoneTileWorks.com

homesteadmag.com | 129


JACKSON HOLE, WY

|

BIG SKY, MT

Photo by David Agnello

www.tetonheritagebuilders.com


Profile for Circ Design

Homestead Magazine 2018  

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